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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01772
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 8, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01772
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text










YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER SINCE 1874


000016 120312 ****3-DIGIT 3
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


LAKECITYREPORTER.COM


Papa John's will


reopen in March


Eight employees were
kept on payroll to help
rebuild after arson.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.comrn
Ever since an Oct 20 arson fire gutted his
Papa John's restaurant, store owner Jacob
Wilkes has worked to reopen his business on
U.S. 90 in Lake City.
To keep himself afloat financially, Wilkes
is working for an Orlando-based subcon-


tractor performing upgrades at Papa John's
restaurants throughout the region. In his
free time, he returns to Lake City to help the
eight employees he kept on the payroll with
ongoing renovations at his restaurant.
The employees, who Wilkes is paying with
insurance money from the fire, have already
removed the charred rubble, scraped up
scorched floor tiles and are preparing to
rebuild the interior from floor to ceiling.
"Now there are four walls and the steel
beams," he said.
b The restaurant is expected to reopen in
mid March, Wilkes said.
PAPA JOHNS continued on 3A


CRASH CLOSES BAYA


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police Sgt. Marshal Sova (left) and Florida Highway Patrol Lt. Mark Boatright
are seen along Baya Drive where a car was hit by a pickup in a two-vehicle accident
Tuesday evening. The driver of the car was taken to an area hospital. The condition of
the driver is not yet known. Baya was closed for at least an hour.


.Sex sting

leads to

arrest of

local man

Solicited meeting with
fictitious 10-year-old,
sheriff's reports say.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

GAINESVILLE A Lake City man
was one of 21 arrested during an
Internet sting targeting individuals
looking to perform sex acts with und-
eraged children.
David Leon Lashley, 48,454 NWNye
Hunter Dr., was arrested Thursday
and booked into the
EAlachua County Jail.
He was charged with
using a computer to
solicit parents' help
in securing children,
for illicit acts.
Lashley and the
Lashley others were arrested
during Operation
Tail Feather, a collab-
oration between several law enforce-
ment:agencies that began Feb. 1.
However, the arrests did not imme-
diately become available.
According to the Gainesville Sun,
the Alachua County Sheriff's Office
STING continued on 6A


Stores collect
$72K for sick,
injured kids

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
With a dollar here and a handful
of change there, local convenience
store customers donated more than
$72,000 for local sick and injured
children.
S&S Food Stores/Scaff's Markets
donated $72,974.30 to Children's
Miracle Network, Thursday during
the company's annual awards lun-
cheon at the County Club at Lake
City. The money was raised by store
employees who organized raffles,
hosted yard sales and encouraged
customers to give.
The money will be used for
research, equipment, renovations and
entertainment supplies for patients at
Shands Hospital for Children at the
University of Florida in Gainesville,
said Heather Mears, associate direc-
tor of Children's Miracle Network in
Gainesville.
Money is raised locally and stays
local, she said. Often the money is
COLLECT continued on 6A


BLACK HISTORY MONTH




'NOT TO BE




IGNORED"


/ TONY BRFIT/Lake City Reporter
Wendy Rouse, the keynote speaker at the 19th annual Lake City VA Medical Center Black History Month prayer luncheon, with a photo collage to
which she referred during her address.



VA prayer luncheon addresses role of

African American women in history.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
A picture frame containing a col-
lage of African-American women
celebrated as heroes didn't tell
the story of their contributions
in shaping the nation.
The honor of explaining their contribu-
tions fell to Wendy Rouse, the guest speaker
during the annual VA Medical Center Black
history program, where the role African-
American women played in modern history
and their spirituality was celebrated.
More than 50 people attended the 19th
Annual Black History Month prayer lun-
cheon Tuesday at the Lake City VA Medical


Center, including VA employees, residents
and public officials.
The 90-minrute program and luncheon
featured several songs, brief biographies of
African-American women who made histori-
cal contributions and a keynote address by
Rouse, who focused on the spirituality of the
women in the program, "Black Women in
the American Culture and History."
Rouse, the interim director of
Gastroenterology Services at Shands at the
University of Florida, spoke about the faith
the women shared as they had to overcome
a variety of obstacles to become successful.
"God would not allow the history of the
black woman to be ignored," Rouse said, as
she recounted the trials and tribulations of


Sojourner Truth and other famous African
American women and their historical con-
tributions.
Rouse said everyone has a picture in their
minds of an African-American woman who
have influenced them.
Rouse said she has not engaged in public
speaking in years, but spoke at the program
because her sister, Fadra McIntosh, asked
her to.
"For most part IF try to inspire young
African American middle school students to
move beyond their situation and their strug-
gles into a different life," she said. "Inspiring
hope in a lot of them that they can overcome
their struggles and I'm doing that through
the word of God."


Vol 138. No 5 Opinio
CALL US: 4s3 .^ People
(386) 752-.1293 I bi ,3'Pep
SUBSCRIBE TO Partly Cloudy Obitua
THE REPORTER: W WEATHER, 2A Avce
Voice: 755-5445 "9" Puzzles
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n
ries . . . .
& Comics..


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Paul, Elton in
t-io. for Queen


.. 5A
S .. 4B
.. .. 2B


COMING
THURSDAY
Local nevws
roundup


Baiagl.~iaiia~n~lirtasauM *ww;:741 WWAR--


li Ij111


I 75


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8,2012


4A .
. 2A


















2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012


FLORIDAA
IO" Saturday:
I"na y9-16-34-39-41-46
x2


A$H 3. Tuesday:
11 .Afternoon: 0-4-5 .


t '..- Tuesday: zak.-
f Afternoon: 2-1-7-2


Monday:
5-8-9-13-18


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


McCartney, John in show for Queen


LONDON Some of the world's
biggest pop stars will perform in
,front of Buckingham Palace on June
4 to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II's
Diamond Jubilee, palace officials
said Tuesday.
The lineup will include former
Beatle Paul McCartney, singers
Elton John and Shirley. Bassey and
popular boy band JLS. Longtime
favorites Cliff Richard and Tom
Jones will also perform.
Concert organizers said that
many more stars, including some
from America and
Australia, will also
be on the bill, with
details to be released
In the coming
months.
"It's going to be
fun," Elton John said
in a video shown Elizabeth
to reporters at ,
Buckingham Palace.
The event is a centerpiece in the
queen's Diamond Jubilee celebra-
tions, which have already kicked off
to mark her 60 years on the throne.
It follows a raucous Golden Jubilee
concert in 2002 that featured a
rendition of "God Save the Queen"
by Queen guitarist Brian May per-
formed in the open air on the palace
roof.
Take That star Gary Barlow,
charged with organizing the gala
event, said he hopes as many as
half a million people are able to see
the concert from the public areas
in front of the palace. It will also be'
broadcast,on television and radio.

Cash's 80th birthday,
legacy to be celebrated
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Johnny
Cash is still cool.
Like Elvis or Hank Williams, Cash .
retains a certain cachet in current


popular culture even in death. More
proof of his enduring legend is on
the way as plans to celebrate what
would have been the American
icon's 80th birthday unfold later this
month and year.
There will be a groundbreaking
on the project to preserve Cash's
childhood home in Dyess, Ark., on
Feb. 26, his birthday. A new Cash
museum will open in Nashville later
this year and several music releases
are expected to commemorate the
anniversary of his birth. There are
three documentaries in the works as
well.,
Interest remains as high as ever
more than eight years after his death
in 2003 at 71 of complications from
diabetes.
"He appealed to people and still
appeals to people who have a small
CD collection and live in middle
America just as much as the punk on
the streets of Germany," Cash's son,
John Carter Cash, said. "And that's
sort of magical the way he's been
able to do that still,.that his image
still draws people from all walks of
life."

Madonna's first tour since
2009 to start in Israel
NEW YORK Madonna's not fin-'
ished with stadiums.
Live Nation Entertainment
announced Tuesday that the
Material Girl's first tour since 2009
will include a Sept. 6 show at Yankee
Stadium.
On Sunday, she was the Super
Bowl halftime performer at Lucas
Oil Stadium in Indianapolis.
Her world tour will start May 29
in Tel Aviv, Israel. It will include
performances in Istanbul, Brussels,
Helsinki and Zurich.
The North American portion of
the tour will include Montreal, San


Jose and Cleveland.
The tour will also visit South
America and Australia.
Tickets for most of the U.S. shows
go on sale Feb. 13. .

'Gabor kept behind closed
doors at birthday gathering
LOS ANGELES After what felt
like an eternity but was actually just
a few minutes, Frederic Prinz von
Anhalt emerged from a white door
into the foyer of the old-fashioned
Bel-Air mansion that he shares with
his wife of 25 years, former glamour
queen Zsa Zsa Gabor.
The self-proclaimed German
prince held a chocolate birthday
cake he said was a gift from celebrity
chef Wolfgang Puck. Smoke from
the expunged candles jabbed into
the small cake was still drifting in
the air.
Surrounded by paintings and pho-
tographs depicting Gabor when she
was an infamously sassy Hungarian
-actress, a few dozen guests quietly
sipped champagne and mingle in
Sthe common areas of the home over-
looking the twinkling lights of Los
Angeles.
But Gabor was nowhere to be
seen apparently celebrating her
95th birthday behind closed doors
on the chilly Monday evening. Von
Anhalt presented the cake to his
bedridden beloved out of sight from
the partygoers who had gathered for
the occasion. He paraded it around
the room as he greets his guests.
Gabor hasn't had much reason to
celebrate for nearly two years as she
dealt with a broken hip, a leg ampu-
tated because of gangrene, blood
clots, infections, pneumonia, a loose
feeding tube. But that didn't stop.
the publicity-loving von Anhalt from
throwing a good party in her honor.
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Composer-conductor
John Williams is 80.
Newscaster Ted
Koppel is 72.
Actor Nick Nolte is
71.
Comedian Robert
Klein is 70.
Actress Brooke
Adams is 63.
Actress Mary
Steenburgen is 59.
Author John Grisham
is 57.


Rock singer Vince
Neil (Motley Crue) is 51.
Environmental
Protection Agency admin-
istrator Lisa P. Jackson is
50.
Actress Mary
McCormack is 43.
Retired NBA player
Alonzo Mourning is 42.
Actor Seth Green is .
38.
Actress Karle Warren
("Judging Amy") is 20.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an, affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein isproperty of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the'publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING .........754-0417
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)

CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440

CORRECTIO


I


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Senate resolution
on. Dodd-Frank OWKd
TALLAHASSEE The
Republican-led Florida
Senate couldn't avoid
an election year political
squabble.
The Senate approved
a resolution on a 27-12
vote strictly along party
lines Tuesday to inform
Congress of its desire .
to see the Dodd-Frank
legislation repealed. The
Senate's badly outnum-
bered Democrats argued,
strenuously without suc-
cess.
The Dodd-Frank legisla-
tion designed to overhaul
the nation's financial
system that was in part
responsible for the 2008
economic collapse is seen
by many Republicans as
stymying an economic
recovery. Democrats
believe the regulations
are necessary to prevent
another banking collapse
that could throw the econ-
omy into chaos.
Democratic Sen.
Larcenia Bullard of Miami
asked her colleagues whey
they wanted to repeal a law
she believes protect con-
sumers.

Teen stabbed during
school confrontation
MIAMI LAKES -
Authorities say a student
was stabbed during a fight
at a Miami Lakes high
school.
School officials say the
fight occurred Tuesda'y
afternoon at Barbara
Goleman High School.
According to the Miami
Herald, two male students
got into a fight with a
third student, who pulled
a pocket knife. The third
students llii cut one of his
two attackers in the back.
MiamiDade Fire Rescue
responded and took the
wounded student to a
Miami hospital, His inju-
rie didn't appear to be life-
l h,,',lrillirg


The identities of the
students weren't being
released. It wasn't imme-
diately clear what criminal
charges would be filed.

Attorney expects
return of painting
TALLAHASSEE U.S.
Attorney Pamela Marsh
says she expects a nearly
500-year old Italian painting
to be returned to a Jewish
family within the next cou-
ple of weeks.
A federal judge on
Monday filed an order to
return a Baroque painting
to the heirs of Federico
Gentili di Giuseppe. He died
in 1940 shortly before the
Nazis occupied France. The
Vichy government later sold
the painting but his family
says the sale was illegal.
U.S. authorities seized
the painting from a Florida
museum last November.
It was part of an exhibit
that came from a Milan-
museum.

Ex-senator to plead
guilty in tax case
MIAMI Former state
Sen. Mandy Dawson is
planning to plead guilty to
tax charges arising out of
a high-profile political cor-
ruption case.
Dawson's intention to
plead guilty was included
in a federal court filing
Monday by her attorney.
A judge set an April 21
deadline for her to enter
the plea.
Federal prosecutors say
the 55-year-old Dawson
evaded thousands of dol-
lars in taxes and failed
to file tax returns. The
charges carry a maximum
13-year prison sentence.
Through an aide,
Dawson was paid about
$82,000 for legislative
support by Dr. Alan
Mendelsohn of Fort
Lauderdale. He pleaded
guilty in 2010 to several
corruption-related charges
and is now in prison.


Scientists find new
hotspots for turtles
GAINESVILLE -
Researchers using satellite
tracking have discovered
new feeding hotspots in the
Gulf of Mexico providing
important habitats for at
'least three separate popula-
tions of loggerhead turtles.
The sites are off the
coast of Southwest Florida
and the northern tip of the:
Yucatan Peninsula.
A team of scientists
intercepted female logger-
heads on land and outfitted
them with satellite tags at
study sites in the Florida
Panhandle, Casey Key and
Dry Tortugas National
Park. They then tracked
the females' migrations and
used a new method to deter-
mine when they had arrived
at the two areas.

School funding suit
decision appealed
TALLAHASSEE -
Attorney General Pam
Bondi is appealing an
appellate court's decision in
a school funding lawsuit to
the Florida Supreme Court.
Bondi noted in papers *
filed Monday that the 1st
District Court of Appeal
has certified the matter to
the justices as a question of
"great public importance."
The appellate court last
year turned down a request
from state officials to pre-
vent the case from going
to trial.
The suit alleges state
public school funding and
policies fail to meet con-
stitutional requirements
to provide children with a
high quality education.
It was a rare and divided
ruling by the full appellate
court rather than just a
three-judge panel.
The judges split 8-7.
The suit was filed on
behalf of two advocacy
groups and parents and stu-
dents in Duval and Pasco
counties.
(AP)


THE WEATHER

, m' = --ir g j i


.,73/4--
Tilahasseeo Lake City,
Tllahassee 74/43
S 74.41 74/43
Pensacola Gainesville *
68/43 Panama City 74/46
72/46 Ocala
75, 5


Key West
Olando Cape Canaveral Lake City
7,,'56 4/59 Miami
7Tapa 9 Naples
77/59 West Palm Beach Ocala
79.68 0 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 80 69 0 Pensacola
82/61 Naples Tallahassee
80.,64 Miami Tampa
Ke West 8068 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
79/70


MOSTLY
^ SUNNY


HI 681L0 41


City Thursday
4 Jachsole Cape Canaveral 71,57'sh


Daytona Beach
74/54
a S


uaytona -Beachn
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesvllle
Jacksonville


A Moon


TEMPERATURES
High Tuepday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


70
57
.68
44
86 in 1957
25 in 1912

0.00"
0.01"
0.86"
0.76"
4.07"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:17 a.m.
6:13 p.m.
7:16 a.m.
6:14 p.m.

7:21 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
8:25 p.m.
8:04 a.m.


I300O


5
MODEiDE
30m niisiolu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
Gm..,=,~


69/52/pc
77/67'sh
79/62,, sh
68.45 pc
65/45/pc
78. 70. sn
66'42;.pc
78.'67,'sn
79. 62.,'sn
71, 48/pc
74, 55. pC
65., 48.- s
62/4 3,'pc
66 '42/s
74, 58 pc
65/43, pc
75, 66, sn


Friday
74 60, sn
73/56/sh
* 79/68'sh
80/62/pc
71.',49'pc
67,'47,/pc
78, i I sn
70/ 16'pc
80,66, sn
80,.64. r,
73, 51/pc
78.61. i.h
63 50i/pc
62 45. pc
66 46., pc
75, 57.'pc
66.45 pc
79, 65/sn


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Feb. Feb. March lV& Forecasts, data and
21 29 8 3 i graphics 2012 Weather
New First Full l oCentral, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpublisher.com


On this date in
1835, a severe
cold wave gripped
the southeastern
U.S. The mercury
dipped to 8 degrees
at Jacksonville,
Fla., and to zero
at Savannah, Ga.
Orange trees were
killed to the roots.
k__.__._11 __F._ro_


Daily Scripture


"Let those who love the Lord
hate evil, for he guards the lives
of his faithful ones and deliv-
ers them from the hand of the
wicked."

Psalm 97:10 NIV


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon .... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com) ,
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.............%...... $26.32
24Weeks ..............$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mall rates ,
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks.................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


At OUND FLORIDA


r"~-CP-YIPU,...~r-.---~~-DI-..-..-.1 11 111


iS~7il~i~l~:~


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-Raw














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 3A


PAPA JOHNS: Store to reopen in March
Continued From Page 1A {! .- '" ; i'.:. ,".:. .


The fire turned his life
upside down, but Wlkes
says things could have been
worse. And he's not being
philosophical.
'The insurance adjusters
were impressed they were
able to contain the fire,"
Wilkes said. 'The Lake
City Fire Department did
an excellent job saving the
building."
Eight days after the early-
morning blaze, Lake City
Police investigators arrest-
ed two managers from a
nearby Domino's restau-
rant and charged them with
arson. Wilkes said he didn't
know either suspect, Bryan
David Sullivan, 21, or Sean
Everett Davidson, 23, both
of Lake City.
'"The could have come in
here the day before and I
wouldn't have known they
were from Domino's," he
said.
When police told him the
managers a competing res-
taurant were charged with


deliberately setting the fire,
Wilkes said he expressed
disbelief.
"It was kind of mind blow-
ing," he said. "These restau-
rants have been competing
for 15 to 30 years and noth-
ing remotely close to this
has ever happened. They
[the suspects] had appar-
ently been talking about
this for a while."
Wilkes said he was able
to salvage stainless steel
counters and sinks from the
charred building. He's still
waiting for a contractor to
let him know if his oven can
be repaired.
"If we have to order a new
one, we'll have to do that
real soon," he said.
Everything else inside
was destroyed in the blaze,
he said.
Wilkes said his experi-
ence working for the corpo-
rate subcontractor perform-
ing construction work will
help him because the same
upgrades are required at


all the pizza chain's restau-
rants. He will be able to do
the required work at his
restaurant, rather than hire
a subcontractor.
When the restaurant
reopens in mid March,
Wilkes said some corporate
officials said they will try
to attend the ribbon cut-
ting. First on the invitation
list, though, will be every
Lake City Fire Department
employee. And, Wilkes said
those employees can also
expect free pizzas from time
to time in the future for risk-
ing their lives to save his
building.
Wilkes is considered one
of the chain's success sto-
ries, according' to a com-
pany spokeswoman. He
started as a delivery boy
and worked his way up the
corporate ladder until he
saved enough money to buy
a franchise in August.
"I was just learning to be
a franchisee," he said.
He chose the Lake City


COURTESY PHOTO
Papa John's owner Jacob Wilkes at work remodeling his store Friday following an Oct. 20
arson allegedly committed by two employees of a competitor.


store when it was available
because he was told an exist-
ing store is a safer invest-'
ment than building a new
one. Despite his recent hard-


ship, Wilkes said he has no
regrets about buying a busi-
ness in Lake City and looks
forward to reopening soon.
"It's amazing the support


we've received from people
we don't even know," he
said. "We plan on doing the
reopening as big as possible.
I'm eager to reopen."


HOME DAMAGED BY FIRE


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City and Columbia County fire departments responded to a house fire at 421 Northeast
Washington Street Tuesday. No one was hurt in the fire. Officials are still investigating the
cause.


VOICES FOR CHILDREN


Friends of Music to


present concert Friday


From staff reports
Two University of Florida professors
will perform Friday as part of the fifteenth
annual Friends of Music Concert Series.
Dr. Laura Ellis, will play organ and
harpsichord and Dr. Steven Thomas will
play cello at First Presbyterian Church in
Lake City, on Friday, Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m.
Admission is free and a reception will fol-
low.
Ellis and Thomas' performance will
include two sonatas for harpsichord and
cello by Antonio Vivaldi; three hymn-based
compositions for organ by Bach, Hailstork,
and Travis; and a cello suite
by J. S. Bach.
. Ellis is an associate pro-
fessor of music in theSchool : *
of Music at UF, wher,.- she
teaches undergraduate and
graduate organ, harpsi-
chord and carillon. In addi- Ellisa
tion to her duties as univer-
sity organist, she serves as
curator for the Andrew Anderson Memorial
Pipe Organ in the University Auditorium,
the carillon in the Century Tower, and the
historic keyboard instruments housed in
the School of Music. In addition to her
regular performances on the carillon in
Century Tower on the University of Florida
campus, Ellis has recently performed solo
carillon recitals throughout North America,
in Australia, and in Canada.
Thomas was appointed to the UF School
of Music in 2007, following a 13-year tenure
at the Hartt School, where he had chaired
both the string and chamber music depart-
ments. He brings to UF an unusually vast
wealth of performing experience, having
appeared as soloist and recitalist, orchestral


Thomas


and chamber musician and conductor on
four continents.
. Keyboard students will benefit from hear-
ing two keyboard instruments that pre-
ceded the piano. String students will greatly
enjoy Thomas's playing of the cello.
The last two concerts of the. Friends
of Music season will be by Bay Street
Brassworks March 17 at 7:30 p.m and The
Jacksonville Masterworks Chorale April 28
at 7:30 p.m.
For more information about the concerts,
call Bill or Linda Poplin at 3654932 or 365 -
4941.


JASOUN MA I HEW WALKER/LaKe city Reporter
Lisa Scanlon'(from left), Ruby Tuesday manager, presents a $1,729.07 check to Jeanne Van
Arsdall and Summer Howell, fundraising committee co-chairs for the Voices for Children of
the Suwannee Valley Inc. The money comes from the proceeds from a fundraiser held in
December. The Voices for Children organization supports the Third Circuit Guardian ad Litem
program, which assists more than 400 abused, abandoned and neglected children. For more
information, to make a donation or to volunteer call (386) 364-7720.


Tax cut

proposal.

falls short

Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE-Aballot
proposal that would have fur-
ther slashed property taxes
for Florida homeowners
failed on a tie vote in a House
subcommittee Tuesday after
opponents said it would shift
the tax burden to non-home-
stead properties and "bully"
local governments.
Supporters argued the
proposed state constitution-
al amendment (HJR 1289)
would have helped cure ineq-
uities among homeowners
created by the existing Save
Our Homes amendment.
Voters, though, still will
have a chance to cut prop-
erty taxes through another
proposal lawmakers last year
placed on the November
2012 ballot.


"ill makin. ai
r* I rer- P_ .:._ll- ,6l h].3 ,,
. L. jd ; ',r.,' [,- ., ,:,.r nm.
* hTi. r. T: -'i-E ,,:,rk


Classes Starting Soon!
Lantia l d *\ a d /.u.'


1@0
-L F ..- ,


I a.le it. Itk p{ca.ri.-r

For Information call Bob Ganzak at (229) 506-1387
or email at bob.ganzak@dalecarnegie.conm


PUBLIC NOTICE
Are you being required to switch to
mail-order prescriptions
Call us. We can help.


pharmacy
1/


Baya East
780 SE Baya Dr.
386.755.6677


Baya West
1465 W. US Hwy. 90
386.755.2233


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Steven Lee
Colley
DOB: 8/26/90
Height: 6'1"
Weight: 160 lbs.
Hair: Blonde
Eyes: Brown
Wanted For: VOP Possession
of Drug Paraphernalia


Brandon Shawn
Pass
DOB: 9/26/92
Height: 57"
Weight: 150 lbs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Blue
Tattoo: Neck-Lillian Lewis 9/5/09,
Left Arm-Mommas, Right Arm-Boy
Wanted For: Dealing in Stolen
Property


WANTED AS OF 2/6/2012
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
,F COLUMBIA COUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


Mei~re- ed~dd Sdt o Ford& Eplye -Exres uitsPdiet


n1*)





















OPINION


Wednesday, February 8, 2012


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Obama's


shovel-


ready


veterans

Last week, the White
House proposed a
new jobs program
for unemployed vet-
erans. The Veterans
Jobs Corps (VJC) seeks to
spend $1 billion to find work
for 20,000 former servicemen.
Interior. Secretary Kenneth
L. Salazar said the program
was modeled on the Civilian
Conservation Corps. Like the
Depression-era program, the
VJC will focus on jobs such as
maintaining parkland and other
unskilled labor.
The plan responds to a cri-
sis that does not exist. The
Labor Department reported in
January that unemployment
among veterans is tracking
just 0.4 percent above the gen-
eral unemployment rate, but
even this slight variation is a
statistical fluke. A March 2011
study by the Bureau of Labor
Statistics showed that veterans
experience higher-than-normal
unemployment rates during
their first year out of service,
when they are getting their
feet on the ground. After 24
months out of uniform, veter-
ans are unemployed at half the
rate of their civilian counter-
parts.
The program's expectations
are highly unrealistic. The
proposed billion-dollar budget
averages out to $50,000 per
job, for one year, excluding
substantial government over-
heard costs. Politics plays
an inordinate role here. In
November, Congress passed
a bipartisan measure provid-
ing tax credits to businesses
that hire veterans. The credit
was "paid for" by delaying a
planned reduction in fees on
home loans for vets guaran-
teed by the Department of
Veterans Affairs. This "Rob
Peter to pay Paul" budget strat-
egy is designed solely to give
politicians bragging rights. Mr.
Obama has not even bothered
to suggest how he hopes to
pay for the VJC, but the urgent
necessity for living within
the nation's means has never
stopped him before.
E Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Transportation system taking


some risky turns


t's always interesting
when three apparently
unrelated news stories
materialize coincidentally
and provoke a serendipi-
tous question such as, in this
case: Aren't we driving (liter-
ally) very rapidly in the wrong
direction?
First, consider the massive
chain-reaction wreck on 1-75
near Gainesville last week. The
word "horrific" is probably
overused these days, but it
seems to fit tils calamity. The
wreck began when fog and
smoke enveloped the interstate'
around 3:45 a.m. A stream of
vehicles began to collide, one
after another. At least six of
them were tractor-trailer rigs.
Some of the vehicles caught
fire. Eleven people were killed
and more than 20 were injured.
Second, during the same
week, the state of Texas raised
the speed limit on 1,500 miles
of highway to 75 mph. The
same law that authorized the
higher limit also eliminated the
nighttime differential, which
was typically five mph lower
than the daytime speed limit.
But the eye-catcher is a pro-
vision in a House transportation
bill that increases the maxi-
mum legal weight for trucks on
interstate highways to 97,000
pounds and, in some cases, as
much as 126,000 pounds.


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmar.edu

Currently in most states
the maximum truck weight is
80,000 pounds, or the weight
of about 20 cars. It would take
32 cars to equal the weight of
Sa 126;000-pounhd'18-wheeled
giant.
As it turns out, this 800-page
proposal doesn't appear to have
much chance of becoming law.
Nevertheless, all of the pro-
posals, are still on this side of
the border with the inconceiv-
able, supporting the distinct
possibility that our future holds
higher truck weights, higher
speed limits (and average
speeds), and a higher rate of
death on the highway.
Unfortunately, the transpor-
tation horse has been out of
the barn for a long time in our
nation, but it's intriguing to con-
template the different choices
that we might have made. The
nature of our country is that
commodities, products and peo-
ple have to be moved from one
place to another. That process


has always involved risk and,
given our reliance on internal
combustion engines for these
purposes, it also involves envi-
ronmental damage and eventual
shortages of a finite resource.
We could, of course, devise
and construct a system that
would be safer, faster, cleaner,
more comfortable and more
efficient. It would sacrifice
some of the freedom and con-
venience of the personal vehi-
cle, but it would also allow us to
redirect to more productive and
enjoyable uses the billions of'
hours that we spend each year
driving.
Such a system could also
eliminate a lot of the factors
that make getting from place to
another more dangerous than
it needs to be: drivers who are
drunk, sleepy,-distracted or just
plain incompetent; vehicles that
are poorly maintained; exces-
sive speed; and the gross mis-
match between private vehicles
and massive trucks many times
their size.
I'm talking, of course, about
high-speed rail,, an infamous
nonstarter in our country and
the object of considerable dis-
approval and scorn.


* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


With age should come at least some wisdom


'm not sure how it hap-
pened. It's not like we
planned it.
Between my husband
and me, our collective five
children and their significant
others, most of the birthdays in
our immediate family fall within
four short weeks, January to
February.
Yes, just after Christmas,
when we've all pretty much
exhausted our credit limits, not
to mention any clever ideas for
cheap gifts.
So we line up birthday cards
on the kitchen table like jets
on a runway, sending them out
in precise sequence, hoping
they'll depart and arrive on
time.
In recent years, as if our
birthday calendar wasn't
already confusing enough, we
added three grandchildren,
who were smart enough to
avoid the January-February
window, but apparently couldn't
resist the family tendency to
"cozy up."
The first was born in August
2010 on what would've been my
mother's 85th birthday, a fact
that would have tickled her to
no end, I am sure, had she lived
to see it. The latter two arrived
just this past September, barely
24 hours apart.
My husband and I have
birthdays 10 days apart, but


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com
we usually celebrate them
together. This year will be a bit
different because for him, it's
a milestone (like 21 or 30 or
six whopping decades or what-
ever), and for me, it's just, well,
another year.
It occurred to me, between
the two of us, that we have
lived more than 100 years, and
ought to have a few words of
wisdom to offer to those who
are younger and still have a bit
more tread to burn off their
tires.
So I asked the Birthday Boy
to help me come up with "Some
things you should know by the
time you're our age, meaning
old enough to know better":
1. Life is short Hold noth-
ing back. Eat, drink and do as
much good stuff while you can.
But life is also long, so pace
yourself.
2. Invest your time in people
who build you up, not tear you
down. And try to do the same
for them. You'll be amazed at


what you can build together.
3. The time is now for love,
for life, for taking risks and
this is the place. If it's not the
place, go somewhere else.
4. Do what you want and ask
for what you need. Be clear.
Don't expect anyone to read
your mind, let alone your heart.
5. Learn to say no, and mean
it, but always say yes to life.
6. When recording a game
to watch,later, be'sure-to add
extra minutes to allow for over-
time, or you could get cranky
and end up sleeping on the'
couch.
7. Give and take kindness.
Forgive to be forgiven. Smile at
children, old people and every-
one else, especially if they don't
smile at you. Offer grace and
get it back a thousandfold.
Finally, I want to say this.
The best thing about a birth-
day is that it means you're still
alive. If you've lived as long as
I have, and lost as many loved
ones, you ought not take for
granted such a gift.
What? No, of course, you
don't need to send me or
Birthday Boy a card (at P.O.
Box 777394, Henderson NV
89077).
Unless you really want to.

* Sharon Randall can be contact-
ed at randallbav@earthlink.net.


4A


AN O
VI


THEIR
EW


Cross


your


fingers


on jobs


f there is such an animal
as an economic report of
unalloyed good news, the
January unemployment
report was as close as it
gets, especially seen in the con-
text of the recession and the
tremendous hurdles in emerg-
ing from it.
The economy added
243,000 new jobs last month.
Excluding the Census bulge
and March and April of last
year, this is the biggest burst
of hiring since March 2006.
The unemployment rate now
has fallen for five straight
months, a reassuring sign of
recovery and one not seen
since the end of 1994.
The politically sensitive
unemployment rate, stuck at
around 9 percent for most off
2011, dropped to 8.9 percent
in October and continued
dropping to 8.3 percent last
month.
That was something of
a surprise, because as the
economy picks up, more
people flock back into the
workforce which, of course,
is a good thing, but until
they find jobs the unemploy-
ment rate can rise again
even though more people are
working.
That 8.3 percent was the
lowest since February 2009,
the month after President
Barack Obama took office.
The nadir for unemployment
in our current cycle was 10
percent in October 2009.
Lest we forget what good
times looked like, in 2006
and almost all of 2007 the job-
less rate never got out of the
mid-4 percent range.
Last month's job growth
was spread across many eco-
nomic sectors: professional
services, retail, construction,
leisure and hospitality. Only
state and local government
employment showed declines.
Hard-hit manufactur-
ing added 50,000 jobs, the
most in a year, and a sepa-
rate survey, from the trade
group Institute of Supply
Management, showed manu-
facturing in January expand- .
ing at its fastest pace in seven
months.
All economic reports come
with "on the other hand" dis-
claimers, but even here the
bad news is not as bad.as it
was. The economy added 1.82,
million jobs last year, twice as
many as in 2010.
That still leaves 12.8 mil-
lion Americans unemployed;
that's the fewest since the
recession ended in June 2009,
for what comfort it's worth.
Even the "underemploy-
ment" rate reflecting part-
timers who want, but can't
get, full-time work and those
who have quit looking alto-
gether fell from 15.2 per-
cent to 15.1 percent.
For Obama to benefit politi-
cally from these numbers,
two things have to happen:
The economy has to continue
improving through the fall,
and voters have to viscer-
ally feel that the economy is
indeed getting better.
Stuart Hoffman, chief
economist for PNC Financial
Services Group Inc., told
Reuters about this newest
report: "I think this is a sign::
that maybe the economy is
reaching the holy grail of
a self-sustaining economic
expansion."
Oh, Mr. Hoffman, we do so
hope you're right.


* Scripps Howard News Service














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Feb. 8
Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon
The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends will be held at
11:00 a.m. on Wednesday
February 8th at Eastside
Village (off of Baya) -
at the Clubhouse, 189
Claudia Way. Our guest
speaker will be Mr. James
Montgomery talking about
the History of Alligator
Lake
Lunch is $11.00. Plan
to attend it should be very
interesting.
Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409.
SW St Johns St across
from Aquatics Center.

Feb. 9

DAR meeting
The Edward Rutledge
Chapter DAR (Daughters
of the American
Revolution) will hold
its pionthly meeting on
Thursday, February
9, 10:30 a. m., at the
Senior Services Center,
28 SE Allison Court (off
Baya Avenue), Lake
City. Annette Lindsey
will be speaking on the
United Daughters of the
Confederacy. All guests
are welcomed. For further
information, please call
7k2-2903.
Garden Club
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its monthly
meeting on Thursday, Feb.
9 at 10 a m. at the Woman's
Club (Club House).
Coffee will be served at
9:30 a.m. and visitors are
welcome to join us. Our
program this month will
be "Wildflowers" by'Betsy
Martin
Loss workshop
Hospice of the Nature
Coast will host an educa-
tional seminar on "Coping
with the Loss of Your
Spouse" on Thursday, Feb.
9 at 2 p.m. in the Wings


Community Education
Center in the Lake City
Plaza. The program facili-
tated by Jerry Tyre is spe-
cially designed for those
who have recently experi-
enced a loss of a spouse.
There is no cost to attend.
Please contact Vickie
Myers at 386-755-7714 to
register or with any ques-
tions you may have.
Relay for Life fundraiser
There will be a Date
Auction Fundraiser on
Thursday at Feb. 9, 9
p.m. at Phish Heads in
Lake City to benefit the
American Cancer Society
and Relay for Life.
Movie night
Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church will have a movie
night at 6 p.m. on Feb. 9.
The movie "Fifth Quarter"
will be shown with popcorn
and all the fixings. All are
welcome. The church is
located one mile past the
underpass on Route 47.

Christian Action Network
at Tea Party Meeting
Join us at 7:00 p.m. on
Thursday, February 9th
for our monthly meeting. *
Our guest speaker will be
Jason Campbell, Program
Director for the Christian
Action Network. Christian.
Action Network (CAN) was
founded in 1990 by Martin'
Mawyer. He based the
organization on Biblical prin-
ciples, values, traditions and
truths. CAN's primary goals,
are to protect America's
religious and moral heri-
tage through educational
efforts. CAN has produced
several documentaries. on
the Radical Islamic threat
to the world. Members of'
CAN have been on the Sean
Hannity show several times
to discuss this topic. We
will have information on the
Florida Legislative Session,'
information on the upcom -..
ing Constitution Class that
will be held by KrisAnne
Hall, information on the
Conservative Countdown
Radio Show and other cur-
rent information. For more
information, call John 386-
935-0126, Sharon 386-935-
0821 or go to: wwwnorth-
centralfloridateaparty.org.
Please try to come to


this meeting; bring a friend
and get involved! We meet
at the Taylor Building, 128
SW Birley Avenue in Lake
City, Florida. The Taylor
Building is located on
the corner of U.S. 90 and
Birley, approx. 3 miles west
of the 1-75 interchange in
Lake City. It is a large gray
building with a Century 21
sign in front The North
Central Florida Tea Party is
a non-partisan group who
is concerned about where
our nation is heading. Our
goals are to educate our-
selves on the issues facing
us today, act on what we
learn, and motivate other
like-minded people to
become involved.
Feb. 10

Friends of Music
The Friends of Music
Concert Series will pres-
ent its second concert of
the season on Friday, Feb.
10 at 7:30 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church,
697 SW Baya Dr. Dr.
Laura Ellis, organist/
harpsichordist, and Dr.
Steven Thomas, cellist,
will perform. Both imusi-
cians are professors at
the University of Florida.
The concert is free, and a
reception will follow. For
more information call Bill
Poplin at 365-4932.
Big Tent Adoption Event
Lake City Humane
Society in partnership with
PetSmart will be holding
a Big Tent Adoption Event
Feb. 10 through 12 at
PetSmart on Highway 90,
in the Publix shopping cen-
ter, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
on Friday and Saturday
and from noon to 4 p.m. on
Sunday.
There will be many dogs
available for adoption of
various breeds and sizes.
All animals have been
spayed or neutered, cur-
-'ent on their vaccinations
and micro chipped. We
invite everyone to come
out this weekend and help
us reach our goal of adopt-
ing 60 homeless animals to
a forever loving home.
Please remember pets
are not gifts that can be
returned or thrown away.
With each adoption you


OBITUARIES


Will "Roger" Gillen
Mr. Will "Roger" Gillen, 76, of
Lulu, Florida, died Sunday, Feb-
ruary 5, 2012 at his residence
following an extended illness.
A lifelong resident of Lulu,
Mr. Gillen was the son of the
late Clarence & Helen Waldron
Gillen. Mr. Gillen worked as a
county road supervisor for Co-
lumbia County for several years
and then went to work as a road
grader operator for Ellirigton
Construction in Lake Butler as a
rock finisher specializing in road
construction until retiring. In his
spare time Mr. Gillen enjoyed
fishing, camping and spending
time with his family. Mr. Gil-
len was a faithful member of the
Lulu Advent Christian Church.


He was preceded in death by a
son, Damon Gillen; a daughter,
Darlene Griffis Gillen; a grand-
son, Kenny Griffis; two sis-
ters, Gwen Morrow and Jackie
Cribbs and a brother, Carl Gillen.
Mr. Gillen is survived by his wife
of forty-six years, Dena Gillen; a
son, Tim Griffis Gillen ofLulu;
two daughters, Linda Avery of
Inglis, Florida; and Angie Green
(Greg) of Lulu; a brother, Roland
Gillen of Lulu and sisters, Cath-
erine Smith of Lake City and
Martha Woishwell of Key Largo,
Florida. His six grandchildren,
Heather, Kristen, Shad, Bran-
don, Lance and Tyler and six
great-grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Gillen
will be conducted at 1:00.P.M. on
Wednesday, February 8, 2012 in


the LuluAdvent Christian Church
with Pastor Miles "Butch" Nel-
son officiating. Interment will
follow in the Bethlehem Baptist
Church Cemetery (located on
Hwy 100) in Lake City. The fam-
* ily will receive friends for one
hour prior to the service at the
church. Arrangements are under
the direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 S. Marion Ave.,
Lake City, FL 32025 please sign
the online family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


will receive a coupon for
one free training lesson.
Shrine Club fish fry
The Lake City Shrine
Club will host an old fash-
ion fish fry on Friday, Feb.
10 at 7 p.m. at the club,
771'N.W. Brown Rd., Cost
of meal is $6 and includes
fish, hush puppies and all
the trimmings. Proceeds
benefit the Lake City
Shrine Club activities.
Payments are not deduct-
ible as charitable contribu-
tions.
Theater season begins
High Springs
Community Theatpr,
130 NE 1st, Street, High
Springs, opens their 19th
season February 10, 2012,
with Neil Simon's "The
Odd Couple," directed by
Terry Beauchamp. Neat
freak Felix Unger, sepa-
rated from his wife and in
despair, moves in with
Oscar Madison, an easygo-
ing, slovenly sportswriter.
Riotous situations result.
Running for 966 perfor-
mances, this comedy won
several Tony awards, lead-'
ing to an Oscar-winning
film and a spin-off TV sit-
com.
A special "Fabulous
First Friday" means free
champagne and hors-
d'oeuvres for patrons with
doors opening at 7 p.m.,
rather than the usual
7:30 p.m. door opening.
Performances run from
February 10 through
March 4 with Fridays and
Saturday at 8 p.m. and
Sunday, 2 p.m. Tickets are
$11 for adults and $8 for
children 5 to 12 years old.
Seniors pay $9 on Sundays
only.
Tickets: the Coffee,
Clutch in High Springs
(386) 454-7593; The
Framery of Lake City (386)
754-2780 and Online at
highspringscommunitythe-
ater.com and at the door.
For more information, call:
(386) 454-3525.


Feb. 11

FACS Valentine's Day event
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will have a Valentine's
Day Dinner and Dance on
Saturday, Feb. 11 from 6
to 10 p.m. in the Epiphany
Catholic Church Social
Hall. There will be enter-
tainment, music, dancing
and a cultural food buffet
Please bring your best
covered dish to share. The
event is free for members,
$10 for nonmembers. Call
965-5905 for information.
Gospel sing
Southside Baptist
Church, 388 SE Baya
Drive, will have a Gospel
Sing Saturday, Feb 11 at
6 p.m. Pine Grove Choir,
The Happy Carter Family,
Jennifer Sherrill, and
Herman Hampton will per-
form. A love offering will
be taken.
Bus trip
"What Freedom Looked
Like" a bus trip to Ft
Mose, St Augustine,
Florida Florida's all free
black settlement, 7am -
6pm; meet at Richardson
Gym. $25 per person
includes lunch.

Zumba fundraiser for
Habitat for Humanity
All proceeds go to
Habitat for Humanity
of Lake City/Columbia
County Inc. for one hour
long Zumba class facili-
tated by American Family
Fitness, 4578 Sw Heritage
Oaks Circle, Suite 102 on
Feb. 11 at 11 a.m. The
donation cost is $10 per
person. A fire truck and
bloodmobile will be on site
too.
Pre-Valentine Banquet
First Central Association
Women's Department
will host the Annual
Pre-Valentine Banquet


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email lhampson@lakecityreporter.com


on Saturday, Feb. 11 at
6 p.m. The event will be
held at the Springville
Community Center, 3710
NW Suwannee Valley Rd.
Tickets are $25 each and
may be purchased from the
Missionary Department of
any of the local First Central
Churches. The Speaker will
be Carla Herring Blalock of
Suwannee County. Special
music will be provided by
Kyler Burke, a student at
Columbia High School. For
more information you may
cohitact Gloria McIntosh at
755-1099. Dress is semifor-
mal or church attire.
Founder's Day Program
The Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-Cookman
University Alumni invites
you to our Founder's Day
Program on Feb. 11 at 4
p.m. at the Holiday Inn.
Dr. Trudie Kibbee Reed,
President of Bethune-
Bookman University will be
our speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church attire.
Valentine's Day Ball
The 1st annual Valentine's
Day Ball, presented by the
Rotary Club of Lake City,
will be Saturday, Feb. 11
from 6 tolO p.m. at The
Country Club of Lake City.
Cocktails; dinner, dancing
and entertainment with
"Harry, Sally and Billy."
Dress is Black-Tie optional.
Tickets are $50 each and
are available at the Lake
City Reporter, The Wheeler
Agency, Hunter Printing,
First Street Music, Parks-
Johnson Agency on Hwy
90 West or call 752-0812.
Gentlemen...BE A HERO...
bring her to the Valentine's
Day Ball!
Sweetheart Dinner/Dance
The American Legion
Auxiliary will have a
Sweetheart Dinner and
Dance Feb. 11 starting
at 6 p.m. Price is $24 per
couple, $12 for singles.
American Legion Post 57 is
located on US41S.


Give a
little peck...
1col x 2in
(1.667 x 2in)
Two to three lines
of text plus photo
and decorative
frame.


or a kiss...

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Four to five lines of


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Have a special
someone you want
to surprise?

This year place a Love
Line and tell them how
you feel and make all
their friends jealous.

Peck $20
SPeck- $ or great
Kiss $30
Ks h s 0 big smooch
. Smooch s40

Deadline for ads 1colx4in
(1.667 x 4in)
February 9 4pm Six to seven lines of
text plus photo and
Publishing on decorative frame.

February 14

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012


COLLECT: Columbia stores collect $72K

Continued From Page 1A


raised $1 at a time, with
customers donating spare
change or purchasing a paper
Miracle Balloon.
"People are giving what
they can, when they can,"
Mears said. "It adds up over
a year and truly makes a dif-
ference."
Children's Miracle
Network is a national orga-
nization dedicated to raising
awareness and money for its


170 member hospitals.
S&S have been fundrais-
ing for Children's Miracle
Network since the mid-1980s,
said Keith Brown, vice presi-
dent of marketing for S&S.
Scott Rivkees, chairman of
pediatrics at UF, said the zeal
of the community is amazing.
He noted that gasoline sales
decreased from last year, but
the money raised for charity
increased. In 2010 employ-


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Keith Brown (left), the vice president of marketing for S&S
Food Stores, presents a check for $72,974.30 Tuesday to
Dr. Scott Rivkees; the professor.and chair of the College of
Medicine/Department of Pediatrics at Shands in Gainesville,
during the S&S Food Stores/Scaffs Markets Employee
Awards.Luncheon. The company raised the money over the
course of a year for the Children's Miracle Network/Shands
Children's Hospital. 'The support that comes in does so
much and makes the lives and care of the children that are
entrusted to us better,' Rivkees said. 'It's an amazing thing
that they've raised this much money one dollar at a time.'


ees raised $70,736 for the
Children's Miracle Network.
'Tve always said they are
the salt of the earth," said
Lester Scaff, of employees.
Scaff and his wife Anne Scaff,
own S&S Food Stores.
Scaff said many employ-
ees know of babies that have
been admitted to Shands,
so the charity is near and
dear to their hearts. Most
employees don't make much
more than minimum wage,
but work hard for the charity
and the company, he said.
"They are doing it because of
who they are and what they
are," he said.
At the hospital, recognition
is given to the employees of
S&S Food Stores, rather than
the company, he said.
Store number 52, on
Branford Highway across
from the Columbia County
Fairgrounds, raised $4,875,
the most money of all S&S
stores.
Store manager Tracy
Duranty said the store's nine
employees were inspired by
a premature baby, her grand-
daughter Izabella Wagner.
While visiting the neo-
natal intensive care unit at
Shands Hospital for Children,
Duranty saw a plaque for S&S
employees' past donations.
"It changed the whole
thing for me. If it wasn't for
them my granddaughter
wouldn't be alive," she said


STING: Local man arrested in sting

Continued From Page 1A


hid them by claiming the
sheriff's website was down
for maintenance last week,
in an apparent attempt to
prevent additional targeted
suspects from becoming
aware of the operation.
The Sun reported Alacuua
County Sheriff Sadie
Darnell gave the ACSO
captain responsible for sup-
pressing the information a
verbal warning.
According to ACSO
reports, Lashley used an
Internet service to contact
someone he believed to be
the parent of an underaged
child, but who was actually
a detective.
A Citrus County Sheriff's
Office detective posted an
online advertisement that
read, "Looking for a man to
help in the family fun area,"
and around 9:06 p.m. Feb.


1., Lashley responded by
e-mail.
In their correspondence,
the detective said she was
looking for someone to edu-
cate her fictitious 10-year-
old daughter in sexual mat-
ters.
Lashley responded that
he was driving to Gainesville
and once he arrived in the
area, he called the detec-
tive to get directions to the
residence.
- Around 12:20 a.m. Feb.
2, Lashley arrived at the
home, came to the doorway
and was taken into custody.
After his Miranda rights
were read, Lashley told
authorities his "main plan"
was to come to the home
to speak to the mother
and talk some sense into
her. He also told authori-
ties he wanted to teach the


child about sexual matters,
reports say.
ACSO public information
officer Art Forgey said the
21 people arrested ranged
in age from 19 65 years
old.
Forgey said it took author-
ities about. two months to
plan Operation Tail Feather
and that the operation was
completed in seven days.
. "We had 40' investiga-
tors at any one time, some
conversing back and forth
with these folks, some were
assigned to surveillance
and some were part of the
arrest teams," he said.
Forgey said the men knew
what they were doing.
"It's a rape," he said. "It's
not consensual and an oper-
ation like this is designed
to get these men off the
streets."


of the hospital.
Duranty said she posted
a picture of Izabella and told
customers her story shortly
after Izabella's birth at 29
weeks. The story then com-
pelled customers to give.
"We didn't ask for money.
They just do it" Duranty
posts new pictures in the
store and customers still
ask about Izabella, who is
now a healthy 15 month


old.
Team Member of the Year
Tammy Fletcher, store
accounting supervisor, was
named 2011 Team Member
of the Year. "It's nice after 29
years to be recognized like
this," she said. A second
generation S&S employee,
Fletcher works in the cor-
porate office balancing store
accounts. She was selected
from the company 2011


team members of the year.
The luncheon also recog-
nized employees with signifi-
cant anniversaries with the
company, froni 3 to 30 years.
"Lester and I get a lot of
credit for the company,"
but it's the managers and
employees who deserve
credit for this company, said
Anne Scaff. "It's been a won-
derful 50 years. Thank you
for all that you do for S&S."


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday, February 8, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Travel basketball
tryouts today
Lake City Recreation
Department and
Richardson Community
Center/Annie Mattox
Park North, Inc.'s have
tryouts set for USSSA
travel basketball teams
for sixth-graders and
ninth-graders. Ninth-
grade tryouts are
5:30-7 p.m. today, Friday,
Feb. 15 and Feb 17 at
Richardson Community
Center. Sixth-grade
tryouts are 9-11 a.m.
Saturday and Feb. 18,
and 6-7:30 p.m. Feb. 15
at Richardson Middle
School. A tryout from
6-7:30 p.m. Feb. 16 is at
Richardson Community
Center. Permission forms
are required. Cost is $60
for players who make the
team.
For details, call Mario
Coppock at 754-7096.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Registration set
for Fort White
Fort White Girls
Softball Association's
registration for its spring
season is 5-8 p.m. Friday
and Feb. 17, "and
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday and Feb. 18 at
South Columbia Sports
Park and the Busy Bee
store in Fort White.
Leagues offered are
T-ball (starting at age 4)
through 16-and-under.
T-ball cost is $45; fees for
other.leagues are $55.
For details, call Nora
Harvey at (386) 365-5688.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Clulb will
meet at 7 p.m. Monday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

From staff reports

GAMES

Thursday
Columbia High
baseball vs. North Marion
High in preseason classic
at Buchholz High, 4 p.m.
Columbia High
softball vs. Santa Fe
High, 6 p.m.
Fort. White High
baseball vs. Union
County High in preseason
classic, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling in Region 1-2A
tournament at Lincoln
High, noon
Columbia High
baseball vs. Williston
High in preseason
classic at Buchholz High,
4 p.m.
Columbia High
softball at Trinity Catholic
High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
softball vs. Eastside
High, 6 p.m. (JV-6 p.m.
at Branford High)
Columbia High
basketball vs. Lee High/
St. Augustine High
winner in District 4-6A
tournament at Wolfson
High, 6 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling in Region 1-2A
tournament at Lincoln
High, 10 a.m.
Columbia High girls
weightlifting in FHSAA
state championships at


Kissimmee Civic Center,
10:30 a.m.


Strong start for



Lady Indians


Fort White beats
Gainesville High,
8-1, on Tuesday.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's softball team
got off to a strong start
with an 8-1 home win
over Gainesville High on
Tuesday.
Pitcher Cecile Gomez
continued her strikeout
spree, adding 17 to the 28
she had in two preseason
games. She gave up five


hits and one run and walked
two.
Fort White scored in the
bottom of the first inning
and built a 6-0 lead before
the Hurricanes got on the
board.
Leadoff hitter Ali Wrench
had a two-run triple and
a single and scored three
runs.D'kota Cassady went
3-for-4 with an RBI double
and a triple. She scored
one run. Gomez helped her
cause with a triple, a single,
a run scored and two RBIs.
Shea Chesney had a hit
and scored a run. Sydney
Walker had a hit. Alexa


Hatcher had a sacrifice-fly
RBI, a walk and scored one
run. Jessica Widlan walked
and scored.
"It was a good opener, a
good confidence. booster,"
Fort White head coach
Cassie Sparks said. 'The
first half of the lineup is
doing their job as far as
hitting the ball and mov-
ing runners around. The
bottom of the lineup came
through tonight. We had
a few mental errors, some
missed signs, but that is to
be expected."
Fort White host Eastside
High at 6 p.m. on Friday.


'.



JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Kenny Boynton (1) bounces off a Vanderbilt
defender while attempting to make a shot on Saturday.


Wildcats too
much for Gators
in Lexington.
By COLIN FLY
Associated Press
LEXINGTON, Ky. -
Freshman Michael Kidd-
Gilchrist had 13 points and
13 rebounds and top-ranked
Kentucky easily passed
its toughest .Southeastern
Conference test to date
with a 78-58 victory over
No. 8 Florida on Tuesday
night
The Wildcats. (24-1, 10-
0) have won 49 straight at
home and matched their
best start in league play
since 2005 thanks to three
freshmen starters who
have jelled into a formida-
ble defense to go along with
their high-powered offense
Doron Lamb scored
18 points and freshman
Anthony Davis added 16
for Kentucky, which won
its 16th straight overall


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Cecile Gomez connects with a hit in a
game played last season.


CHS starts off with revenge


Lady Tigers pull
out 4-3 win
against Keystone.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Taylor Douglass picked
up first win in a Columbia
High uniform by throwing
a complete game to help
the Lady Tigers pick up a
4-3 victory over Keystone
Heights High.
Douglass worked seven
innings, gave up nine hits,
stuck otit seven batters and
allowed three runs in the
win. She worked for ahead
throughout the game.
Columbia picked up two
runs in the first inning as
Kayli Kvistad and Stephanie
Pilkington combined on
back-to-back home runs.
The Lady Tigers contin-
ued to add to their lead
in the second inning with
Brandy Morgan driving
in two more runs off a
two-run homer to score
Holly Boris.
Keystone Heights began
to chip away at the lead in
the third inning with Kayla
Walker hitting a bloop shot
between first and second to
score Chelsea Harvin.
Douglass go out of the
inning, but would face a
little more trouble in the


* ,~* -


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Holly Boris slides safely into third base during Saturday's preseason game in Lake City.


fifth.
Harvin scored a second
time coming off a Kelsey
Waters homer to bring
Keystone Heights within
4-3.
Boris wbuld add a little
insurance for the Tigers
in the bottom of the sixth


inning after a single batted
in Michaela Burton for a
two-run edge.
That's all that Douglass
would need as the Indians
were unable to mount a
final-inning rally.
"This was a good start to
our season," Columbia head


'coach Jimmy Williams said.
"We scheduled a tough
team and beat somebody
good. Two runs is the most
we've beaten them by. The
top of our order did a really
good job and Taylor did a
good job. I tell you, I am
really happy to have her.


That's a tough team she
beat and I'm really proud
of her."
'Columbia will return,
to the diamond at'
6 p.m. on Thursday as the
Lady Tigers host Santa
Fe High in a non-district
contest.


and ended Florida's run of
seven consecutive wins.
Kenny Boynton led the
Gators (19-5, 7-2) with 18
points, but the team with
the nation's most 3-point-
ers this season went 6 of
27 from behind the arc and
shot 34.9 percent overall
from the field.
One of the last remain-
ing questions for a team
that continues to believe
it can play for a national
championship in just under
two months had been the
quality of opponents the
Wildcats had faced after not
meeting a ranked team in
over a month. I
Kentucky answered it
emphatically.
Freshman point guard
Marquis Teague finished
with 12 points and 10 assists
as the Wildcats attacked on
both ends.
Florida scored the first
two baskets of the second
half to cut it to 38-30, but
Kentucky answered with
an 11-0 run sparked when


Teague and Darius Miller
hit consecutive 3-pointers.
Florida freshman Bradley,
Beal then drove to the hoop,
only to have Davis reject
his shot and Davis swatted,
another from Patric Young
on the possession for good'.
measure.
Miller added another-
jumper and Kidd-Gilchrist!
spun, hit a basket and was'
fouled. He completed the
three-point play that made
it 49-30 as' Florida missed.
eight straight shots before'
snapping the skid.
The lead reached 20.
points when Lamb buried a
3 from the left corner with
11:27 left and by as many
as 21 late.
Beal scored 14 points
and Young added 12 for the
Gators.
Florida insisted before
the game all the pressure
was on the Wildcats, but
this group that starts three
freshmen and two sopho-
mores doesn't appear to get
rattled easily.


No. 1 Kentucky tops


No. 8 Florida 78-58


.,. .~

















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
4:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
Desert Classic, first round, at Dubai,
United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Georgetown at Syracuse
ESPN2 Kansas at Baylor
8 p.m.
FSN Rice at Houston
9 p.m.
ESPN Duke at North Carolina
ESPN2 Seton Hall at Rutgers
NHL
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN Boston at Buffalo
10 p.m.
NBCSN Calgary at San Jose

FOOTBALL

NFL Draft order


First Round
x-subject to coin flip


1. Indianapolis
2. St. Louis
3. Minnesota
4. Cleveland
5.Tampa Bay
6.Washington
7.Jacksonville
8. x-Carolina
9. x-Miami
10. Buffalo
I Ix-Kansas City
12. x-Seattle
13.Arizona
14. Dallas
15. Philadelphia
16. N.Y. Jets
17. Oakland
18. San Diego
19. Chicago
20.Tennessee
21. Cincinnati
22.Atlanta
23. Detroit
24. Pittsburgh
25. Denver
26. Houston
27. New Orleans
28. Green Bay ,
29. Baltimore
30. San Francisco
31. New England
32. N.Y. Giants


NFL Draft early entries

Players granted special eligibility for
the 2012 NFL Draft on April 26-28 in
New York:
Alvester Alexander, RB,Wyoming
SDwayneAllen, TE;Clemson' ,: ,
'Edwin Baker, RB, Michigan St.
Mike Ball, RB, Nevada -
Jamison Berryhill, RB,Texas
Justin Blackmon,WR, Oklahoma St.
Michael Brockers, DT, LSU
Bryce Brown, RB, Kansas St.
Vontaze Burfict? LB, Arizona St.
Orson Charles,TE, Georgia
Morris Claiborne, DB, LSU
Fletcher Cox, DT, Mississippi St.
David DeCastro, G, Stanford
Tiree Eure,TE, Minnesota
Marcus Forston, DT, Miami
Stephon Gilmore, DB, South Carolina
Chris Givens,WR,Wake Forest
Dorian Graham,WR, Syracuse
Robert Griffin, QB, Baylor
Jewel Hampton, RB, Southern Illinois
Cliff Harris, DB, Oregon
Dont'a Hightower, LB,Alabama
Stephen Hill,WR, Georgia Tech
Ronnie Hillman, RB, San Diego St.
Max Holloway, DE, Boston College
Jayron Hosley, DB,Virginia Tech
Janzen Jackson, DB, McNeese St.
LaMichael James, RB, Oregon
Alshon Jeffery,WR, South Carolina
Aldarlus Johnson,WR, Miami
Damaris Johnson,WR,Tulsa
Chandler Jones, DE, Syracuse


Matt Kalil, OT, Southern California
Dre Kirkpatrick, DB, Alabama
Peter Konz, C Wisconsin
Luke Kuechly, LB, Boston College
Ronnell Lewis, DE, Oklahoma
Andrew Luck, QB, Stanford
Terrell Manning, LB, N.C. State
Jonathan Martin, OT, Stanford
Bobby Massie, OT, Mississippi
Whitney Mercilus, DE, Illinois
Lamar Miller, RB, Miami
Brock Osweiler, QB, Arizona St.
Eric Page,WR,Toledo
Donte Paige-Moss, DE. North
Carolina
Nick Perry, DE, Southern California
Bernard Pierce, RB,Temple
Ken Plue, G, Purdue
Dontari Poe, DT, Memphis
Rueben Randle,WR, LSU
Riley Reiff, OT, Iowa
Trent Richardson, RB, Alabama
Josh Robinson, DB, UCF
Mohamed Sanu.WR, Rutgers
Darrell Scott, RB, South Florida
Tommy Streeter,WR, Miami
Darron Thomas, QB, Oregon
Johnny Thomas, DB, Oklahoma St.
Phillip Thomas, DB, Syracuse
Barrett Trotter, QB, Auburn
Olivier Vernon, DE, Miami
Brandon Washington, OT, Miami
David Wilson, RB,Virginia Tech
Jerel Worthy, DT, Michigan St.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
LA. Clippers 107, Orlando 102, OT
Washington II I.Toronto 108, OT
Philadelphia 95, L.A. Lakers 90
Phoenix 99,Atlanta 90
Chicago 108, New Jersey 87
New York 99, Utah 88
Sacramento 100, New Orleans 92
San Antonio 89, Memphis 84
Houston 99, Denver 90
Oklahoma City I 1I, Portland 107, OT
Tuesday's Games
Utah at Indiana (n)
Charlotte at Boston (ri)
Cleveland at Miami (n)
Sacramento at Minnesota (n)
Phoenix at Milwaukee (n)
Oklahoma City at Golden'State (n)
Today's Games
LA. Clippers at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Miami at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New York at Washington, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Denver,9 p.m.
Houston at Portland, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
LA. Lakers at Boston, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Sacramento,
10:30 p.m.,

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No.2 Syracuse vs. No. 12 Georgetown,
7 p.m.
No. 5 North Carolina vs. No. 10
Duke, 9 p.m.
No. 6 Baylor vs. No. 7 Kansas, 7 p.m.
No. 11 Michigan State vs. Penn State,
6:30 p.m.
No. 15 Florida State at Boston
College, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Virginia vs. Wake Forest,
7:30 p.m.
No. 22 Michigan at Nebraska,
8:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 9 Murray State vs.Tennessee State,
8 p.m.
No. 16 Saint Mary's (Cal) at Gonzaga,
II p.m.
' No. 20 Mississippi State vs. Mississippi,
7 p.m.
No. 21 Wisconsin at Minnesota,
7 p.m.
No. 23 Indiana vs. Illinois, 8 p.m.
Friday's Game
No. 25 Harvard at Penn, 7 p.m.


GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
PEBBLE BEACH NATIONAL
PRO-AM
Site: Pebble Beach, Calif.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Courses: Pebble Beach Golf Links
(6,816 yards, par 72), Monterey Peninsula
Country Club, Shore Course (6,900 yards,
par 72) and Spyglass Hill Golf Club (6,833
yards, par 72).
Purse: $6.4 million. Winner's share:
$1,152,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
3-7 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Friday, 12:30-
3:30 a.m., 3-7 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.;
Saturday, 12:30-3:30 a.m., 1-2:30 p.m.,
9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Sunday, 1-2:30 p.m.,
9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.) and CBS (Saturday,
3-6 p.m.; Sunday, 3-6:30 p.m.).
LPGA TOURIAUSTRALIAN
LADIES PROFESSIONAL GOLF/
LADIES EUROPEAN TOUR
WOMEN'S AUSTRALIAN OPEN
Site: MelbourneAustralia.
Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Royal Melbourne Golf Club,
Composite Course (6,505 yards, par 73).
Purse: $1.1 million. Winner's share:
$165,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 12:30-2:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday,
10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.lpga.com
Australian Ladies Professional Golf
site: http://llwww.apg.com.u
Ladies European Tour site: http://lwww.
ladieseuropeantour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
ALLIANZ CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Boca Raton
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: The Old Course at Broken
Sound Club (6,807 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.8 million. Winner's share:
$270,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30-2:30 a.m., 6:30-
9:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-3 a.m., 7-9:30 p.m.;
Monday, I-3 a.m.).
EUROPEAN TOUR
DUBAI DESERT CLASSIC
Site: Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Emirates Golf Club, Majlis
Course (7,301 yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.5 million. Winner's share:
$416,670.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 4:30-8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m.; Saturday, 4-8 a.m., 3,5 p.m.;
Sunday, 4-8 a.m., 3-6:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeantour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Anaheim 3, Calgary 2, SO
Toronto 6, Edmonton 3
Phoenix 3, Detroit I
Tuesday's Games
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia (n)
Florida at Washington (n)
Minnesota at Columbus (n)
Pittsburgh at Montreal (n)
St. Louis at Ottawa (n)
Los Angeles at Tampa Bay (n)
Vancouver at Nashville (n)
Toronto at Winnipeg (n)
Phoenix at Dallas (n)
Chicago at Colorado (n)
Today's Games
Boston at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Calgary at San Jose, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
St. Louis at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg atWashington,7 p.m.
Dallas at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Phoenix, 9 p.m.


BRIEFS


RUNNING
Blue Grey 5K Run/

Walk Feb. 18

The Olustee Blue Grey
5K Run/Walk is 7 a.m.
Feb. 18 at Olustee Park in
downtown Lake City. Race
day registration begins at
6 a.m. Early online
registration for the event is
$25 at
www.stepfitnessonline.com.
There also are
registration forms at
Carquest Auto Parts on
Pinemount Road. Day of
race registration is
6-6:45 a.m. for an additional
$10. The race will
benefit the family of
Melanie North, and also
the March of Dimes' Fund
the Mission program.
For details, call Michelle
Richards at (386) 208-2447.


Kuykendall Race

Day 5K Feb. 25

The Catherine
Kuykendall Race Day 5K
run is 8:15 a.m. Feb. 25
from Rountree Moore
Toyota Scion. Online
registration is at active.
com and costs $20 plus a
transaction fee. GulfCoast


Financial Services is
presenting the race for
the benefit of Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network.
'For details, call Melanie
at 755:9018.


Race the Tortoise
5K March 3

The fourth annual Race



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

TRNIP


the Tortoise 5K run/
.walk is 8 a.m. March 3 at
O'Leno State Park. Entry
fee is $20 through Feb.
15 ($10 for ages 14 and
younger) and $25
thereafter.
To register go to
www.friendsofoleno.org.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


TRREEV L WNTT -.
,^ ^ ^^ Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A: I IT, 1 -111 T I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BLAZE HATCH OBJECT SAILOR
Answer: Playing the sun in the play about the solar
system allowed htm to BE A STAR


GOLF REPORTS



Net 122 best in Super Bowl


The team of Donald
Roberts, Donnie Thomas,
Tom Wade and Lance Bass
combined for a net 122 to
take first place in the Super
Bowl Tournament.
Other top finishers in the
field of 52 were the team of
Buddy Slay, Ken Radcliffe,
Larry Ross and George
Bowlin in second, and the
team of Keith Shaw, Bob
Randall, Al Alvarado and
Mike Yacovelli in third, fol-
lowed by the team of Timmy
Rogers,' Jim Carr, Martin
Hatcher and Jerry Smith in
the final money spot
Buddy Slay picked
up a win in A flight of
Wednesday's blitz with a
score of +6. Dennis Crawford
was two shots back in third.
Jonathan Allen took third
place at +3.
David Crawford and
Mickey Wilcox battled to
a first-place tie in B flight at
+9. Mike McCranie, Donald
Roberts and Tony Garcia
finished in a three-way tie
for third.
George Burnham's eagle
on No. 16 picked up a skin
and a pot-hole purse. Keith
Shaw and Chad Hunter split


COUNTRY CLUB
eat LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

the rest of the skins prize
with Slay, who had two, and
Crawford with one.
Steve Patterson (+7)
cruised to a three-shot
win over Trey Jackson in
the Saturday blitz. Terry
Hunter and Jonathan Allen
tied for third place at +3.
Dave Mehl (+11) won
th B flight by four points
over Eddy Brown. Steve
Osborne, David Pope and
David Rhodes tied 'for
third.
No. 16 gave up its second
eagle and skin of the week
to Hunter. Donnie Thomas,
Don Howard and Dennis
Crawford each had a skin.
Chip-ins were the talk in
LGA play this week. Six
players knocked in a total
of seven shots from off
the green. Judy McGrath
led the way with two; Ann
Bormolini, Sally Rivers,
Katrina Counts, Caroline
Stevens and Roberta
Whitaker joined the fun
with one chip-in apiece.


Along with the short
game heroics, Cathy Steen
won the low net match
with 3-under-par 69. Faye
Warren and Stevens were
in second with one-under
71s, and Bormolini was
third at even-par 72.
In Good Old Boys play
Monty Montgomery, Bill
Rogers, Jeff Mayne and
Dan Stephens finished atop
a three-team match, 6-5,
over Stan. Woolbert, Jim
McGriff, Joe Persons and
Bill Wheeler. Tom Elmore,
Howard Whitaker, Paul
Davis and Tony Branch
garnered 2 points.
Match two was a walk-
over for Marc Risk, Carl
Wilson, Dave Cannon,
Merle Hibbard and Bobby
Simmons, 6-2, over Dennis
Hendershot, Eli Witt, Jim
Stevens and Hugh Sherrill.
Montgomery was at
even-par 72 to claim medal-
ist honors. Risk (76) and
Elmore (77) provided the
competition.
Stephens claimed a nine-
hole win with 38 on the
front side.
The mixed team tourna-
ment is 1 p.m. Feb. 19.
/


Queen of hearts day Feb. 18


This month's club tour-
nament on Feb. 18 will cel-
ebrate Valentine's Day by
putting hearts in play on
every hole. Join us to see
how.
The club tournament
is open to all golfers and
is handicapped to make
everyone competitive. For,
details, call 752-3339.
The 'Wednesday blitz
ended in a dead heat with
Mike Kahlich and Randy
Heavrin tied for first. Bob
Wheary was third and Gary
Croxton was fourth.
The Friday Dogfight also
had a tie for first, as Ronnie
Ash and Jack Tuggle had
superb rounds to best the


World Golf ranking


1. Luke Donald ENG
2. Rory Mcllroy NIR
3. Lee Westwood ENG
4. Martin Kaymer GER
5. Steve Stricker USA
6.Webb Simpson USA

ACROSS
1 Hypnotized
6 Swig
11 Go hungry
12 Tornado cloud
13 Dreamed of
14 Cheese often
grated
15 Oscar
nominee
16 Darth's
daughter'
17 Rochester
clinic
18 Brewery tank
19 Mile., in
Barcelona
23 Had down pat
25 Ball of yarn
26 Uncle or
granddad
29 Ike's missus
31 Tolerated
32 Shout of
surprise
33 Bring cheer
34 Mo. multiples
35 Rubber tree
sap


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Pete Sands

large field. Joe Herring fin-
ished third and Paul Storm
took fourth place.
The field in the Friday
Dogfight continues to grow
each week, as the blitz for-
mat with closest to the pins
on par 3s and a skins game
give everyone a shot at win-
ning something. Everyone
is. invited to play so come
out on Fridays and join us.
The Top of The Hill
was won by Gerald Smithy
with Jack Tuggle finishing
second.


7.Jason Day
8.Adam Scott
9. Charl Schwartzel
10. Dustin Johnson
S1. Gr. McDowell
12. Matt Kuchar
13. Nick Watney
14. K.J. Choi


37 Ohio college
town
39 Ski lift (hyph.)
40 Part of mph
41 Thin fog
45 Jet engine
noise
47 Sponge
features
48 Carmaker's
woe
51 Loving
gesture
52 Rock tumbler
stones
53 Not plain
54 Georgetown
gridders
55 Topsy-turvy

DOWN
1 City near
Syracuse
2 Disgustingly
dirty
3 "Only Sixteen"
group (2 wds.)
4 Anon's
companion


Sunday Scramble win-.
ners were Steve Nail, Flip
Russel, and Tony Johnson.
They not only won the
scramble but took the pot,
too.
The Sunday'Scramble is
open to all golfers. Sign up
by 2 p.m.; teams are picked
and a shotgun start follows
at 2:30 p.m.
Girls practice group:
Chipping contest win-
ners: Ashley Mixon, first;
Rachal Blanton, second;
Rebekah Blanton, third;
Putting Contest win-
ners: Rachal Blanton, first;
Ashley Mixon and Rebekah
Blanton, tied for second;
Allison Kranke, fourth.


I S. Brandt Snedeker
16. Sergio Garcia
17. Phil Mickelson
18.Tiger Woods
19. Bubba Watson
20.Justin Rose
21. Hunter Mahan
22. lan Poulter


USA
ESP
USA
USA
USA
ENG
USA
ENG


Answer to Previous Puzzle


TRIAL RUN L T

EYE RAE
TO AS GGE ISE H



T ETDUO


S E E EUNU E D
SLOB NECK A C E
TINY SAK I SHE
SAGE TSE HOP


5 Crayola
choice


2-8 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


9 Swampy
ground
10 Andy Capp's
wife
11 Did the
backstroke
12 Worry
16 Congress
member
18 Calf meat
20 Count on
21 Bleachers
level
22 Aardvark's
diet
24 Santa Fe loc.
25 Caught in the
act
26 Lose feathers
27 Whaler of
fiction
28 bene
30 Centurion's
highway
36 Typesetting
mistakes
38 Stickers
40 Close friends
42 Districts
43 Tangy
44 Latin I verb
46 Bullring yells
47 Fix apples
48 Fan noise
49 Kind of trip
50 Coral islet
51 End of some
URLs


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421
















Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York'Giants head coach Tom Coughlin gestures as he speaks to the crowd during a ceremony for the NFL football Super'
Bowl XLVI champions at City Hall in New York on Tuesday.


Fans roar as Giants' victory'



parade rolls into New York


By VERENA DOBNIK
Associated Press

NEW YORK -
Thousands of fans roared
as New York Giants quar-
terback Eli Manning
hoisted the team's Super
Bowl trophy from a glit-
tering blue-and-white float
Tuesday during a victory
parade along the Canyon of
Heroes, where the city has
honored stars for almost a
century.
The parade set off
from the southern tip of
Manhattan and moved
slowly north to City Hall
as fans dressed head-to-toe
in Giants gear cheered and
confetti wafted slowly down
from the high-rises that line
the street.
Manning, joined by
coach Tom Coughlin,
Mayor Michael Bloomberg,
Gov. Andrew Cuomo
and other teammates,
waved and grinned from
the float as a deep roar
rose from the crowds. The
team will be honored with
symbolic keys to the
city at a City Hall Plaza
ceremony.
Some fans waited since
6 a.m. to catch a glimpse of
their favorite players. About
half of a Long Island high
school class skipped school
to see. "a whole nation
coming together in one
place this parade," said
Mike King, 16, of Wantagh,
N.Y.
King and seven school
friends got up at dawn,
arriving by subway in.
lower Manhattan to join
the crowds packed behind
police barricades lining
Broadway. He attributed
the win to the stellar per-
formance of Manning and
the hold-your-breath catch


By DAVID GINSBURG
Associated Press

OWINGS MILLS, Md.
- Ricky Williams is retir-
ing from the NFL. Again.
This time, however, it
appears to be for good.
The 34-year-old Williams
told the Baltimore Ravens,
on Tuesday he won't be
back to fulfill the sec-
ond year of a contract he
signed in August Playing
as a backup to Ray Rice
this year, Williams ran for
444 yards and scored two
touchdowns.
He also became the 26th
player in NFL history to
reach 10,000 yards rushing,
reaching the plateau in the
season finale at Cincinnati.
"The NFL has been an
amazing page in this chap-
ter of my life," Williams
said. "I pray that all succes-


by Mario Manningham that
led to the game-winning
drive.
"It was one small step for
the Giants, and one giant
leap for the fans and the
nation," King said.
Frank Capogrosso, 11,
from Staten Island, with
his dad and his best friend,
standing at this beginning
of parade route, leaning
against the barricade with
a grin on his face.
"This is better than TV.
I love the cop cars, the toi-
let paper, and the ecstatic
fans." He added: I'm ecstat-
ic. I love the Giants, I love
their style: They play, they
don't talk."
. The parade for the Super
Bowl champions will have
an estimated economic
impact of up to $38 million
for the city, depending on
the number of spectators,
Bloomberg said. As many
as 1 million are expected
- about a third of them
from outside New York.
After the parade, the team
will travel to New Jersey for
a 3 p.m. rally at MetLife
Stadium.
This will be the second
Super Bowl championship
parade for the Giants in
four years. They also beat
the Patriots in the NFL title
game in 2008.
But it's hard to imagine a
victory more exciting than
the Giants' last-minute 21-
17 victory over the Patriots.
The hero of this year's
parade undoubtedly will be
Super Bowl MVP Manning.
Manning and Manningham
connected on the clutch
play, as the receiver made
the over-the-shoulder catch
along the sideline.
From a Broadway high-
rise older than the ticker-
tape tradition, members


sive adventures offer me the
same potential for growth,
success and most impor-
tantly, fun. ... As for what's
next, I am excited about
all the opportunities ahead
- continuing my educa-
tion, running The Ricky
Williams Foundation and
whatever other opportuni-
ties present themselves."
Williams retired previ-
ously before the 2004 sea-
son when facing a four-
game suspension for vio-
lating the league's drug
policy. He returned in 2005,
then left to spend the 2006
season with Toronto of the
Canadian Football League.
After an outstand-
ing college career at
Texas, where he won the
Heisman Trophy, Williams
broke into the NFL in 1999
with the New Orleans
Saints.


of the law firm Kenyon &
Kenyon dumped shredded
paper out their windows to
the spectacular view below
of the lauded athletes.
Jun Kim, 28, a Korean
linguist, reserved his big-
gest batch for Manning.
"You are a star!" he yelled
as the quarterback passed
by. "People thought he
would crumble under pres-
sure, but he didn't. He's the.
best"
New York City Sanitation
Commissioner John
Doherty said he expect-
ed to see about 40 tons
of paper showered down.
That's a lot but not one for
the record books. The city
threw 5,438 tons of ticker
tape on returning veterans
at the end of World War II
in 1945.
Even before the parade
started, city sanitation
crews.with hand-held vacu-
ums were ready to suck
up the piles of confetti that
would rain on Broadway.
The second-high-
est amount of paper was
thrown to honor astronaut
John Glenn in 1962 3,474
tons. The actual ticker tape
from those days has been
replaced by recycled paper
that's shredded into con-
fetti.
Sanitation spokeswom-
an Kathy Dawkins says
the department picked up
34.2 tons of paper after the
Giants' last parade in 2008.
The streets Tuesday
were a mass of metal police
barricades, and security
was tight with helicopters
flying overhead and police
command centers parked
nearby.
Sanitation worker Joey
Lobosco, 38, from Staten
Island, cheered as team
favorites like wide receiver


Victor Cruz passed by.
"I like the whole atmo-
sphere here of winning
in New York there's
nothing like it. Winning
in the greatest city in the
world," Lobosco said.
The parade ends at City
Hall. On Monday, 250 fans
nabbed pairs of tickets to
the festivities at City Hall.
About 50,000 people entered
sweepstakes for a place at
the ceremony. Three large
screens around City Hall
will allow members of. the
public to watch the cere-
mony. Streets will be closed
between Broadway and
Church Street from Canal
to Pearl streets, as will
Brooklyn Bridge access to
and from Park Row.
Mindy Forman, 53, of
Yorktown, N.Y., was one of
the lucky few who scored
a ticket. She said the win
was a much-needed victory
at a time when many could
use some cheering up. She
counted herself among that
group: She was laid off two
weeks ago from her job as a
college administrator.
"It celebrates New York,"
she said. "It celebrates the
city. It celebrates the state.
And it gives people some-
thing to believe in in very
hard times."
New York has feted its
public heroes since 1919,
with the .first parade for
World War I General John
Pershing and his victorious
troops.
They were followed by
more than 200 parades hon-
,oring such people as aviator
Charles Lindbergh, scien-
tist Albert Einstein, Pope
John Paul, South African
leader Nelson Mandela and
pianist Van Cliburn. Their
names are chiseled into the
Broadway sidewalks.


BOWLING


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lorrie
Geiger 221; 2. Mary Lobaugh 195;
3. Lori Davis 193. 1. Frank Miller 235;
2. Dan Cobb 220; 3. (tie) Mark Davis,
Tom Sewejkis 214.
High scratch series: 1. Lorrie
Geiger 536; 2. Mary Lobaugh 528;
3. (tie) Joyce Hooper, Lori Davis 492.
1. Frank Miller 608; 2. Mark Davis
599; 3. Willie Frasier 584.
High handicap game: 1. Carla
Nyssen 248; 2. Cathey Creel 243;
3. Lori Davis 231. 1. Dan Cobb 252;
2. Ken Watson 244; 3. Dess Fennell
243.
High handicap series: 1. Dianne
Madsen 667; 2. Debbie Walters 630;
3. (tie) Lome Niquette, Beth Koppa
623. 1. Frank Miller 686; 2. Willie
Frasier 668; 3. Jesus Camacho 661.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 184,
Mark Davis 193.
(results from Jan. 31)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(63.5-32.5); 2. Farmers (58.5-37.5);
3. Pin Busters (52.5-43.5).
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 230; 2. Pat Klock 223;
3. Roberta Giordano 221. 1. Ronnie
Grey 281; 2. Wayne Johns 249;
3. Chuck Shorter 246. ,
High handicap series: 1. Elle
DeRosa 623; 2. Janet Nash 622;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 615. 1. Ross
Meyers 682; 2. Vernon Black 646;
3. Joe Peterson 636.
(results from Jan. 31)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. 4 S's
(62-34); 2. Upsand Downs(55.5-40.5);
3. Jo's Crew (54.5-41.5, 560 team
average); 4. Three Gals & A Guy
(54.5-41.5, 521 team average).
High handicap game: 1. Debbi
Evert 243; 2. Elle DeRosa 234;
3. June Pat Klock 226. 1. Rodger
Jordan 261; 2. Ray Denton 241;
3. Bill Price 236.
High handicap series: 1. Jane
Sommerfeld 678; 2. Elaine Nemeth
626; 3. De De Young 616. 1. David
Duncan 727; 2. Thomas Young 673;
3. Ronnie Grey 639.
High average: 1. Elaine Nemeth
153.05; 2. Shirley Highsmith 152.27;
3. Louise Atwood 151.26. 1. David
Duncan 191.76; 2. Bill Dolly 184.83;
3. George Mulligan 179.43.
(results from Feb. 2)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Silver Ladles
(11-5); 2. Spare Us (10-6); 3. The
Sandbaggers (9.5-6.5).
High handicap game: 1. Harriett
Woods 258; 2. Joan Carman 255;
3. Elsie Huddleston 237.
High handicap series: 1. Susan
Mears 627; 2. (tie) Jo Anne Carr,
Diane Madsen 617.
(results from Jan. 31)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. Average Joes
(9-3); '2. Pintimidators (8.5-3.5);
3. TAZ (8-4).
High 'scratch game: 1. Norma
Yeingst 180; 2. Di Drehoff 177;
3. Jennifer Freeman 176. 1. David
Wetherington 236; 2. Tim Carberry
233; 3. Bobby Trunnell 232.
High scratch series: 1. Unda
Sutton 493; 2. Norma Yeingst 488;
3. Chrissy Fancy 474. 1. David
Wetherington 630; 2. Bobby Trunnell
609; 3. Dan McNair 608.
High average: 1. Normi Yeingst
.169.27; 2. Cheryl Jacks 159.71;
3. Jennifer Freeman 152.62. 1. Dan
McNair 200.91; 2. A.J. Dariano
194.35; 3. Mark Moore 191.67.
(results from Jan. 29)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Ronsonet
Buick/GMC (88.5-31.5); 2. Team
12 (80.5-39.5); 3. Rountree-Moore
(79.5-40.5).


High scratch game: 1. Wally
Howard 252; 2. Dale Coleman 245;
3. Dave Duncan 244.
High scratch series: 1. Dave
Duncan 680; 2. Dale Coleman 676;
3. Wally Howard 671.
High handicap game: 1. Dave
Duncan 260; 2. (tie) Wally Howard,
Jamie Ritzman 253; 4. (tie) Leonard
Randall, Keith Rouse 252.
High handicap series: 1. Dave
Duncan 728; 2. Bobby Smith 683;
3. Dale Coleman 676.
High average: 1. Dale Coleman
219.97; 2. Zech Strohl 219.86;
3. Robert Stone 215.45.
(results from Jan. 23)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Strike Zone
(11-1); 2. Waterbury Builders (10-2);
3. Pacers (9-3).
High scratch game: 1. Tina
Sherrod 252; 2. Karen Coleman 200;
3. Shannon Howard 192. 1. John
Hilbert 259; 2. Wally Howard 256;
3. George Rye Jr. 244.
High scratch series: 1. Tina
Sherrod 569; 2. Karen Coleman 544;
3. Jeanette Willcox 531. 1. John
Hilbert 682; 2. Wally Howard 681;
3. Joe Ganser 663.
High handicap-game: 1. Tina
Sherrod 303; 2. Desiree Stemp 247;
3. (tie) Dorothee Call, Unda Wells
243. 1. Frank Howell 268; 2. John
Hilbert 266; 3. George Rye Jr. 265.
High handicap series: 1. Tina
Sherrod 722; 2. Dorothee Call 680;
3. Jeanette Willcox 678. 1. Joe
Ganser 720; 2. George Rye Jr. 712;
3. Wally Howard 705.
(results from Jan. 20)

Youth leagues
MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Colin Madden
(26-22, 4,668 pins); 2. Madison
Stephens (26-22, 4,430' pins);
3. I Can't Believe Its Not (25-23,
4,829 pins); 4. Ninja Bowling Co.
(25-23, 4,743 pins); 5. Gary's Got
Back (25-23, 4,554 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 190; 2. Sara Sykes 188;
3. Linden Barney 178. 1. Dalton Coar
270; 2. Cody Howard 267; 3. Cody
Howard 235.
High scratch series: 1. Linden
Barney 525; 2. Courtney ScPmitt
517; 3. Sara Sykes 505. 1. Cody
Howard 701; 2. Dalton Coar 696;
3. Colin Madden 561.
MAJORS
Team standings: 1. Three
Man Wolfpack (43.5-28.5); 2. Pin
KillersIll (41.5-30.5); 3. Bubblegum
(38.5-33.5).
High handicap game: 1. Tiffany
Ritch ; 2. (tie) Chelsea Gore,
Chelsea Williams 216. 1. Jimmy
Milewski 255; 2. Jacob Wheeler 230;
3. (tie) Jamie Moon, Josh Johns
228.
High handicap series: 1. Tiffany
Ritch 624-.2: -Chelsea Williams 615;
3. Amanda Storms 580. 1. Gharles
Collins 647; 2. Jimmy Milewski 636;
3. Josh Johns 603.
JUNIORS
Team standings: 1. Crazy Kids
J(52.5-19.5); 2. ULighting Pins (46.65-
25.5); 3. The Bud Utes (42-26).
High handicap game: 1. Alexis
Menna 229; 2. Callie Pierce 211;
3. Biancah Billlngsley 202.1. Douglas
Christensen 233; 2. Vincent Westphal
229; 3. Jarret Moehl 219.
High handicap series: 1. Alexis
Menna 609; 2. Biancah Billingsley
561; 3. Megan Ball 541. 1. Vincent
Westphal 599; 2. Chase Williams
588; 3. Phillip Whitehead 576.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Heaven
Camacho 161; 2. Mikhiya Hendon
141. 1. Carson Lyons 173.
High handicap series: 1. Heaven
Camacho 450; 2. Mikhiya 409.
1. Carson Lyons 482.
(results from Jan. 21)


Goodell thanks fans


Associated Press

NEW YORK NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell is thanking fans
for their support in a post-
season letter and promis-
es the league will. pursue
ways to enhance the game
on and off the field.
Two days after the New


York Giants beat the New
England Patriots 21-17 in
the Super Bowl, Goodell
said the NFL is proud of
the quality of the sport that
attracted record crowds.
An estimated 111.3 mil-
lion people watched the
Giants' victory, making it
the most-watched televi-
sion show in U.S. history.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 24, 2011, photo, Baltimore Ravens running
back Ricky Williams watches from the sideline against the
Jacksonville Jaguars in Jacksonville. Williams is retiring.


RickyWilliams


says he's retiring


__















WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012 4B


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


'AAAAAAAAAAUUUUUUGGGGGGGGHHHHHHH!


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
.z' cjEcK *rnE Tr,6A 4i ...4rT QUeStN / I A Te jIOOL oPF PRiM & CtI-EAd&...



'1"


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


DEAR ABBY


Man's ex-girlfriend has

warning for his fiancee


DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend, "Brady," broke up with
me in November. Five weeks
later he became engaged to
someone else. I found out
after that I have genital warts.
My yearly exams never
showed any problems before,
so I know I got them from
Brady. I'm getting treatment
now, but I'll be contagious for
the rest of my life.
I have been unable to tell
Brady about this because
he won't respond to my
attempts to contact him.
I'm now trying to decide
if I should tell his fiancee.
I know he wants children,
and this disease can have
some serious repercussions
if she gets pregnant
Do I leave this woman in
the dark, or should I give
her the medical information
she and her doctors should
have? NEEDS TO DO
THE RIGHT THING IN
NEW YORK
DEAR NEEDS TO DO
THE RIGHT THING: Five
weeks into a relationship
is a whirlwind courtship,
unless Brady was cheat-
ing on you with his fiancee
before your breakup. If
that's the case, she may be
the person who infected
Brady.
Since he won't respond
to you, send him a regis-
tered letter informing him
of your diagnosis, and any
other information about
genital warts you feel is rel-
evant If you're worried that
the fiancee is in the dark


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
about this, send her a copy
- also by registered mail.
That way you'll know it was
received.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I am the
product of an interracial rela-
tionship from the late '60s.
My maternal grandmother
wanted nothing to do with
me and made my teenage
mother give me up for adop-
tion. Before my biological
mother passed away a few
years ago, her dying wish
was for my grandmother and
me to form a relationship.
She didn't want her mother
to be alone in her final years.
I made an attempt to
forge a relationship with
my grandmother only to
be told that she didn't like
me because of the color of
my skin. Since then, I have
been having bad dreams
of my mother being disap-
pointed in me because I
didn't fulfill her wish. Please
advise me on what I should
do. UNACCEFIPTED IN
NORTH CAROLINA
DEAR UNACCEPTED:
It takes two people to form a
relationship. By reaching out
to your grandmother, you did
the best you could to fulfill


your mother's wish which,
from your description of your
grandmother, was an unfair
burden to try to place on you.
There's no reason for you to
court another round of rejec-
tion and, for your sake, Im
advising you not to.
It may help to write a let-
ter to your mother, explain-
ing to her what happened
when you reached out to
your grandmother and
how it felt, then read it at
her grave. But please, stop
blaming yourself for your
grandmother's inability to
love.
** ** **DEAR
ABBY: While going through
pictures on my girlfriend's
computer, I discovered
that she had posed nude
for a drawing by her artist
daughter. For some reason,
I am really bothered by
her posing nude and doing
it for her daughter. How
can I bring this.up, which
will let her know that I was
snooping on her computer?
SAW WAY TOO MUCH IN
KENTUCKYI
DEAR SAW WAY TOO
MUCH: Why would you
be "really bothered" by a
mother posing nude for her
daughter who is an artist?
Most mothers and daugh-
ters have seen each other in
states of undress and there
is nothing shocking about it

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Take charge mentally,
physically, emotionally and
financially. Call the shots
and speak your mind.
Eliminate whatever isn't
moving quickly enough for
you and put more effort
into whatever you feel has
the best chance to excel.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Showing your emo-
tions will not help your
situation. You are best to
listen observe and formu-
late a plan to exectute in
the future, when you are
in better control. Learning
new skills or gaining valu-
able information will help
you professionally. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Take on chores that
will help dissipate the angst
you are feeling. Good things
come to those willing to go
after what they want Don't
fear going it alone or striv-
ing to reach goals that oth-
ers disagree with. Do your
own thing. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Refrain from making
any sudden personal or
professional alterations.
You will have regrets that
are difficult to reverse.
Emotional honesty is emi-
nent when dealing with
others as well as for seeing
your own situation clearly.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
A money matter is not


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

likely to be as clear-cut as
you hoped. Don't invest,
loan or borrow money or
possessions without doing
your homework. Loss due
to a lack of information
is evident, and protecting
your assets and reputation
is a must. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Expect to have a prob-
lem with peers if you don't
want to contribute. You will
discover more, about work
and your rights if you inter-
act with others. An oppor-
tunity to explore a unique
alternative must be taken.

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22):
Charity begins at home. You
may want to impress some-
one you think can be of help
to you but you need to give
your undivided attention to
personal responsibilities.
Offer suggestions rather
than your money or time.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Your reluctance to
share your thoughts will
be your saving grace.
Listen attentively and learn
from what you hear. The
information you acquire
will help you make a good
decision, based on fact and
personal experience. Love
is highlighted. **
SAGYITARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Get into the
swing of things. Make
alterations to your liv-
ing arrangements that
will enable you to do the
things you've wanted to
do but couldn't due to
lack of resources. Focus
on romance, comfort and
emotional and physical
well-being. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't let someone
else's uncertainty bring
you down. Opportunity
knocks and you must be
willing to answer the door
and move forward with
your plans, regardless of
what others do. Don't let
love or someone's change
of plans deter you. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Ask pointed
questions and you will
get answers that will give
you the freedom to move
forward with your plans.
It's important to strive
for greater stability and
personal security. What
you do now will determine
your future status. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't spend time
worrying about matters
over which you have no
control. In the end, things
will work out better than
"you may have imagined
Meanwhile, be wary of
business investments
that appear attractive, but
which may pose hidden
dangers. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: W equals F
"KZKHSDECK BTENX ND JEGKIH-XNTEG
MTREN.REY. BPS RX NPKHK ED
TNNKAMN ND JEGKHXNTEG NPK XDEY
DW NPK URHGX?" -- MTUCD MROTXXD

Previous Solution: "Drama assumes an order. If only so that it might have by
disrupting that order a way of surprising." Vaclav Havel
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-8

CLASSIC PEANUTS

WHAT COME ON, NOOPV,.,IT LETS 60, 0B0. LETS 60, THEY'D BETTER BE PRETTq
) DAO FOR A BEAUTIFUL DAq F OR LOl RABBIT.
2 CHAN68CR IN6


2t t! C
Rt- a M T5~!^ ^ ~iM C ^i w ^ ~^( I


FRANK & ERNEST


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


'-- -----


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS



















olumbia, In.

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Bowl-a-thon to benefit Youth Ranches


From staff reports

The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office is holding a
bowl-a-thon as a fundraiser
for children who stay at the
Youth Ranches.
The Columbia County
Sheriff's Office Bowl-
A-Thon for the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches
will take place from 1 3
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25 at
Lake City Bowl, 350 SW
State Road 247. Teams
will bowl three games.
The entrance fee is $7.50
per person, which will pay
for the three games "and
shoe rentals.
The teams will consists
of three members and a
resident of the Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranch.
"The purpose of the
event is to raise aware-
ness and funds for the
Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranches or Boys Ranch
(in Suwannee County),"
said' Sarah Wheeler,
Columbia County Sheriff's
Office records supervi-
sor, noting there are four
Youth Ranch campuses
in Florida. "We choose
to have three people on
the team and the fourth
person be a rancher, that
way the children get to
interact with the public to
see who is actually help-
ing them."
The Florida Sheriffs Youth
Ranches is a donor-funded,


w:r.A l Ad. --


" S*T~-~


Courtesy photo
Columbia County Sheriffs Office employees llen Herringshaw (from left), Cindy Innocenti, Sarah Wheeler and Yvette Bal prepare for the inaugural Columbia
County Sheriff's Office Bowl-A-Thon for Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranch. The fundraiser is set to take place from 1 -3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25 at Lake City Bowl.


child care organization. Its
mission is to prevent juvenile
delinquency and produce
lawful, productive citizens.
This is not a boot-camp or
military setting. They have
fences but only to keep the
horses and cows in. The
Youth Ranches program is


an at-will program in which
boys and girls agree to par-
ticipate. Children from a
variety of backgrounds find
a stable home at the Youth
Ranches where they learn
four pillars of success: Work,
study, play and pray.
Wheeler said 12


teams have already reg-
istered to participate in
the fundraiser. Teams
can be made up of law
enforcement officers,
church groups, school
groups, business rep-
resentatives, private
citizens, governmental


offices or any other area
of the community.
Wheeler said the fund-
raiser is a non-competi-
tive event that will focus
on raising proceeds for the
ranchers.
The event is the inau-
gural bowl-a-thon fund-


raiser by the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
for Florida Sheriffs
Youth Ranches. Each
team will be asked to
raise $100 for Florida
Sheriffs Youth Ranches.
The entry deadline for
teams is Feb. 17.


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2012


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


SADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
I Ths is a non-refundable rateg




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Slinine 6. 10
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peonal merchandise totalling S0 or le.
Each item must include a prce
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4 lines 6 day Each additional
personal merchandise tolling S1,000 or less.




One item per ad 23 |
4 lines 6 a Each additional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
Spersonal mehandise totaling $2,0 or less.
n.ThisanonrefundabMl rate.
iEac I s t Itnl a prie .




One item per ad
S4 lines 6 days Each additional




Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Tah I se is a non-pe0dcle rte.
SOe Item per ad
$1.8 e* ra u Ech additional n
j4 y lines e 6 daysine $ 5. j





Inlderss an Meh di tonalng $2,500 por le 1w
ad if each We dn ede is e rim o.






Limited to service type advertis-

4 lines, one month.5...59.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.


You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter..
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com


Sim


Ad is to Appear:
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday


Call by:
Mon., 10:0 am.
Mon., 10:00 am.
Wed., 10:00 am.
Thurs., 10:00a.m.
FN., 10:010 am.
Fri., 10:00 a.m.


FaxEmall by.
Mon., 9.0am.
Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wed., 9:00a.m.
Ths., 9:00 a.m.
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Frd. 9:00 a.m,


These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in-error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication..Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
, Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must. comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www .lakeeityreporter.com


Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
WILL RECEIVE BIDS FOR THE
FOLLOWING:
Columbia High School
Rooftop HVAC Unit Replacement
Lake City, Florida
Architect's Project No. 1133
CCSD BID FILE no. 3268
Date & Time for Receiving Bids:
2:00 P.M., Wednesday, FEBRUARY
22,2012 -
Contractor's Prequalification: ALL
CONTRACTORS WISHING TO
BID THIS PROJECT MUST BE
PREQUALIFIED. NOTE: All con-
struction- personnel who will be
working on School Board of Colum-
bia County property as part of this
project are. required by Florida law,
F.S. 1012.32, to meet Level 2 crimi-
nal background screening require-
ments.
Date, Time & Place for Mandatory
Pre-Bid Conference: ALL BIDDERS
ARE REQUIRED TO ATTEND
THE MANDATORY PRE-BID
CONFERENCE AT COLUMBIA
HIGH School, Lake City, FLORI-
DA, TO BE HELD AT 10:00 A.M.,
Thursday, February 9, 2012.
Place for Receiving Bids: Columbia
County School District, Administra-
tive Complex, Purchasing Office,
Room 233 2nd Floor, East Wing,
372 West Duval Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055 Telephone (386) 755-
8030
Bid Documents Prepared By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS, 3911 Newberry
Road, Suite D, Gainesville, FL
32607, (352) 372-8424, FAX (352)
377-4945
Bid Documents Available from:
http://www.csa-
architect.com/bid_documents.htm
Project Description: The work in-
cludes, but is not limited to, the re-
placement of roof mounted HVAC
units at ColumbiA High School in
Lake City, Florida. The work in-
cludes removal of the existing roof
mounted units, associated curbs and
electrical wiring and equipment.
New work includes new curbs,
patching and/or infill of roof areas
with metal deck, insulation and roof-
ing materials where required. The
work also includes ductwork connec-
tions, new control work and new
electrical material and connections to
new units.
The project will consist of two
stages. The first stage will be au-
thorization in the latter part of
March, 2012, after contract award, to
submit Shop Drawings and ordering
and shipment of materials to the job
site. The second stage will be au-
thorization to begin construction
work on Mdnday, June 4, 2012.
Dates of Advertisement: Wednes-
day, February 1 and 8, 2012
FOR THE COLUMBIA COUNTY
SCHOOL DISTRICT
Mike Millikin, Superintendent
By: R.M. "Mike" Null, Director of
Purchasing
05530365
February 1, 8, 2012
NOTICE OF ABANDONMENT
Stor-it America Mini Storage
The following units will be auc-
tioned off on Saturday, February 11,
2012 at 9:00 AM Location is 2-1/2
miles north of the post office oh
Hwy. 41, owned by Stor-it America


Irvin Donaldson
Alvaro Quesda
05530385
February 1, 8, 2012


Unit #70
Unit #77


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON ENACTMENT OF ORDI-
NANCE BY THE CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Ordinance No. 2Q12-2021, which ti-
tle hereinafter appears, will be con-
sidered for enactment on second and
final reading by the City Council of
the City of Lake City, Florida, at
public hearing on Tuesday, February
21, 2012, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matters can be heard
in the City Council Meeting Room,
City Hall located at 205 North Mari-
on Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. Copy of said ordinance may
be inspected by any member of the
public at the Office of the City Clerk,
City Hall, located at 205 North-Mari-
on Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055, during regular business
hours. On the date, time and place
first above mentioned, all interested
persons may appear and be heard
with respect to the ordinance.
CITY COUNCIL ORDINANCE
NO. 2012-2021
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING THE CODE OF
LAKE CITY BY ADDING A NEW.
SECTION NUMBER 86-110.4 TO
ARTICLE III, CHAPTER 86,
WHICH PROVIDES FOR THE
PERMANENT CLOSING, VACAT-
ING AND ABANDONING OF
PORTIONS OF NW DYSON TER-
RACE (FORMERLY Dyson Street),
WILLIAMS STREET,AND
THOMPSON STREET SHOWN
AND LOCATED IN ALLINE
THOMPSON SUBDIVISION AD-
DITION NO.1, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 25, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep. ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

COUNTY, FLORIDA (HEREIN
"THOMPSON SUBDIVISION");
MAKING FINDINGS; AUTHORIZ-
ING THE CITY TO CONVEY BY
QUIT-CLAIM DEED TO THE
ABUTTING PROPERTY OWNERS
THOSE CLOSED, VACATED
AND ABANDONED PORTIONS
OF NW DYSON TERRACE (FOR-
MERLY DYSON STREET), WIL-
LIAMS STREET AND THOMP-
SON STREET; RESERVING
EASEMENTS FOR UTILITIES;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILI-
TY; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL
OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT;
PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION IN-
TO THE CITY CODE; AND PRO-
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and place of any con-
tinuation of the public
hearing shall be announced during
the public hearing and that no further
notice concerning the matter will be
published.
All persons are advised that, if they
decide to appeal any decision made
at the public hearing, they will need
a record of the proceedings and, for
such purpose, they may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the
proceeding is made, which record in-
cludes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, if any accom-
modations are needed for persons
with disabilities, please contact
Joyce Bruner, Office of City Manag-
er, 1-386-719-5768.
AUDREY E. SIKES
City Clerk
Notice Published On: February 8,
2012

05530577
February 8, 2012


010 Announcements

If anyone has information concern-
ing the murder of Darrell Davis
(March 1, 1982) in Lake City,
please call 888-755-7336.

020 Lost & Found
FOUND: Small Poodle, Jan 31.
Hwy 47 & the Bingo Station.
Please call to identify.
386-697-5247
MISSING SIAMESE Cat. Close
to Peyton Loop, Verndale Apt.
Last seen Feb. 1. Please call if you
have information. 386-752-1426'

0lo Job
1 Opportunities
05530545
Lease Purchase Positions
CRST Expedited is currently
looking for lease purchase
candidates for OTR positions.
-pay 70% of gross revenue
+100% of the fuel surcharge.
-Lead drivers earn $2,000+
take home per week
-Zero down payment & no
credit check needed
-Maintenance plan
Call 800-767-6918 today
www.joincrst.com

CDL Class A Truck Driver.
Flatbed exp. for F/T SE area.
3 years exp or more. Medical
benefits offered. Contact
Melissa or Mary @ 386-935-2773
CHRISTIAN HERITAGE
Church has a nursery job available.
Contact Chris Jones.
386-344-5961
Electrician/Traffic Signal Installer
with bucket exp. CDL preferred.
Good pay and benefits.
Bobby 813-433-7851 EOE


FLORIDA


i* * *
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
MATHEMATICS'
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
To Commence Fall Term 2012
Teach college-level and
preparatory mathematics; work with
colleagues for the advancement
of departmental goals. Requires:
Master's degree .in mathematics; or
master's degree with minimumof 18
graduate credit hours in course work
centered on mathematics. Ability
to use technology in instruction.
Ability to teach on-line and distance
learning courses. Ability to work
well with others. Ability to learn from
colleagues and to share knowledge.
Ability to utilize various instructional
strategies to reach students. Ability
to present information in a coherent
manner and the ability to fairly
evaluate student retention of.that
information. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience.
Ability to teach college level and
preparatory mathematics.
SALARY: Based on degree and
experience.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 2/17/12
Persons interested should
provide College application, vita,
and photocopies of transcripts.
All foreign transcripts must be
submitted with official translation
and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314


Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(d)foc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges
of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education
and Employment


100 Job
Opportunities'

Exp. PT Bookkeeper
w/QuickBooks & computer skills
for professional office. Flex hrs.
Ref. Req. Send resume to:
Bookkeeper Position.
P.O. Box 1328,
Lake City, FL 32056

MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754

New Business Expanding to North
Florida. Looking for motivated in-
dividuals. Will be having Opportu-
nity Meeting. Call for details
386-754-8811

Now accepting resumes for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20th Ave. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or email to:
bulldog@laloenterprises.com


PEOPLES
------------+- ^M-------
STATE BANK

Fulltime loan processing
position available.
Experience required.
LaserPro experience
preferred. Apply at the
Peoples State Bank West
office located at:
3882 W US Hwy 90 Lake
City, FL 32024


EEO Employer


100 Job
Opportunities

P/T Caregiver for partially
paralyzed elderly woman. Two
weekends a month with more
nights possible. Exp a must. Ellis-
ville area. Fax resume to 755-2165

PLANTERS WANTED
Small 6 inch trees. The more you
plant, the more money you make.
8 hours a day, 5 days a week.
Call 479-462-3100.

ROUTE SALES person needed
fot local milk route. CDL B Class
and good driving record a must.
Apply in person at 1721 E Duval
Street. Mon. Fri. 3-6pm.


ederi
( i,

PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:

Home Health Care Agency

servicing Columbia and

surrounding counties

seeking Full-Time

Experienced Physical

Therapist

Competitive Salary &

Benefits Available.

Please contact Kim

at 386-758-3312

for more information.


100 Job
Opportunities

Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


120 ^Medical
120 Employment


Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta7l4@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

(i553058 I
Medical Billing Manager
Experience in medical insurance
billing required. Full time position
with excellent salary based on
experience. Send resume in
confidence to fax: 386-758-5987
or emfailMafaisal05()yaahoo.com

Busy Family Practice Office
Seeking part-time Nursing Asst.
Exp required, must be organized.
Fax resume to (386)719-9494.
GIEBEIG FAMILY MEDICINE

Medical Office looking for full
time employee in Optical. Experi-
ence preferred but not required.
Will train. Send resume to 763 SW
Main Blvd. Lake City, Fl. 32025
Medical practice needs
Ophthalmic Technician.
FT or PT. Experience preferred.
Fax resume 386-755-7561.


SO N 'I a r-,, ,

Apply in person or online .

- '-- ..... ,'


.GrabY our Sweetheart for our Annual


-~~~~ ~ ~ -',--'-*.. ... ..




If 'I .A
Saturday, Februaryme Ribth


Dinner Includes: Prime Rib,


Shrimp Alfredo, Salad,

Choice of Vegetables & Dessert

(, .


-- '*' "














LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8,2012


240 Schools &
Education
05530293
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
*Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/06/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/13/12
*LPN 03/12/12
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
S$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Craftsman 42"cut DYS 4500
lawn tractor & dump trailer.
Ex cond.Garage kept. $800
386-754-4094
KUBOTA DIESEL MOWER,
ZD326, 600 hours, 26 hp,
$7,000
Call 904-412-6450
Sears Riding Mower, 48" & rear
bagger, 24 hp, exc. cond., warran-
ty, $475 OBO also Sears self pro-
pelled walk behind mower w/elec.
start, $160 OBO. 386-965-0061

417 Store & Office
Equipment
2 Drawer Metal file
,cabinet with base.
$25.00. for both
386-758-6886

420 Wanted to Buy'
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
1 Ticket to see John Edward
February 7 at 7pm in the Florida
Theater in Jacksonville. Section
L300, row C. $99. 386-752-4337
Antique
Cement Swan Planter.
$40.00
386-758-6886
CAR REFRIGERATOR
"Ice Box Plus" 16" X12.5" wide.
2 compartments. Like new.
$40.00 386-758-6886
Tools, Tools, Tools
24 yrs. of accumulation, hand
tools, elect, tools, ladders, welding
equip., air cond., sm. elec. motor-
cycle, new freestanding porch &
umbrella, 8 ft. diam. pool, 48"
deep, brand new liner, electr. lawn
care equip.clothes dryer & lots
more, 914 SW Lamboy Cir, L.C.

450 Good Things
5 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Tayloirville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 min
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.
630 Mobile Homes
for Rent .
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP .
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448


. Mobile Homes for rent in
SWhite Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
For Sale by Owner or Rent to Own
3/2 MH on 1 acre in Providence,
completely remodel, new every-
thing, great neighborhood. $39K
Financing available. 386-249-1640
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Prices! New 2012 3/2 start at
$39,900 and New 4/2's start at
$49,900. All new homes inc
delivery and set up, ac-skirt and
steps. North Pointe Gainesville
(352)872-5566
New And Used! North Pointe
Homes in Gainesville has 4 used
homes in stock! Don't delay as
these will go Fast.
Call North Pointe in Gainesville
(Hwy 441, 6.Blocks north of
Hwy 222) (352)872-5566


A6 0 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go'
Save Up To 35K
800-622-2832 ext 210

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
3br/2ba 2.75 ac. w/fish pond.
Small down plus $750 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

705 Rooms for Rent
Roommates Wanted: Master BR
w/private bath $475. mo. Single
room & share bath, $375. mo.
Cable, internet, washer/dryer.
McFarlane Ave. 15 min to
Walmart., VA & WinnDixie
Call Dave.(904)466-2925
710 Unfurnished Apt.
71 For Rent









all utilities included.
Close to the VA.
(727)415-2207
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771


$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A lg walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208

1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Quail Heights'Move in Special.
2br/lba Duplex. Washer/dryer
hook up. Private, safe, secluded,
''$725 mo $500 sec. 386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1 Month FREE
with 1 year lease. Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint.
Great area. 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
20 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
73 6 Home For Rent
05530457
Century 21/
The Darby Rogers Group
Totally remodeled in down
town White Springs 3/2
$840./mo.
16884 53rd Road Wellborn
3/2 $800./mo
1306 NW Scenic Lake Drive,
Lake City 3/2 spacious
home/Lake Front $1,650./mo
453 SW Mayflower Glen
Forth White 271 $750./mo,
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

lbr/1.5ba Cpuntry Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,l ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to downtown & shopping.
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170
3/2, newer home,
nice neighborhood
386-623-2848

3br/1.5 ba. Completely renovated.
Centrally located, completely
fenced yard. $825. mo + 1st, last &
security. 386-93.8-5637 ,
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
4/2, CH/A, New roof & remod-
eled. Nice area, just south of Lake
City. $1250. mo. 1st, last & $1250
sec. dep. 386-755-1865 days only
Clean, quiet 2br/lba -4.5 mi S of
. Lake City, CH/A. $550 mo. + sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3BR/2BA 1760 SQFT, car-
pet, tile, end porch, all appliances,
Irg gar, big kitchen, 386-269-0123


750 Business &
5 Office Rentals
05530343
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor
2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 11 00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act Which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the, age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3 Bed/1 Bath home on
Poplar St.
Nice yard and carport.
$48,000 call 484-678-6385
Live on a Golf Course. 3/2 brick
on 1/2 ac. Formal living, dining &
family room. 2 car garage.
$129,900 Frank 386-984-5217

820 Farms &
820 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Contact us

at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
Price Reduced $5,000
Only 18,300 miles, garage
kept motorhome. Exc.
cond. w/many extras.
$40,000
Call
386-754-5660


1994 33' Air Bus
Automatic dome satellite
dish, 2 AC's, gas heat,
micro, 2 dr. fridge/freezei,
generator.

$7,500
Call
386-365-2362


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS


386-752-1293 Get Connected
ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO
ads@lakecityreporter.com

Mon.-FN.: 8 a.m.- 5:00 p.m

THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU! '!! y
www.lakecitvrepnorter.comr


180 East Duval SL
Lake City, FLorida 32055


Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

8 0 Real Estate
O70 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
92 & Supplies
F250 STEP BARS,
Like New for crew cab,
$200
Call 904-412-6450

930 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON Electric
Glide Classic. 2006. 12,500 mi
LOADED $12,000.
(734)255-4820

940 Trucks
Dodge Dakota 2004,45K mi.
22mpg hwy, 17city. Mediterranean
blue. 4 door cab. 4 wheel dr, good
tires, new spare. Hard pick up
cover. $9,500obo. 386-965-0061
Must sell, Must Leave Country

91 Recreational
951 Vehicles
1994 33' Air Bus. Automation
dome satellite dish, 2 AC's, gas
heat, micro, fridge/freezer,
generator. $7,500. 386-752-0941
1997 PACE Arrow Motor home.
34ft. Chevy drive line. Generator,
queen bed, Sleeps 6. Very good
condition. Will put new tires all
around. NADA value. $34,000.
Sell for $26,500. 386-965-0061
2003 Allegro 30DA. Workhorse
Chassis. 18300 miles, garage kept.
Excellent cond. w/many extras
$40,000. 386-754-5660
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


High Visibility
All utilities furnished including Internet
Kitchen and bathroom facilities included
Partially furnished
Several size offices available

GREAT LOCATION FOR
PERSONAL SERVICE BUSINESS
Please call Buddy Slay@386-755-1666
or Dale DeRosia@386-623-3004


.i. .mill .

. . . ....* . .


ILaeCtyepo3teI


Classified Department: 755-5440










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8,2012


PROPANE FILLING STATION
Drive it in and we'll fill it up!


Chevron
,1-


1130 US Hwy 90 W
Lake City, Florida
(386) 752-5890
G.W. Hunter, Inc.


Per Carton, plus tax.
Expires 2-15-12



1.438 E p res 2-15-12
M on-1 t. I,- ., ....

i TimEE5ss ITlEmoRIES -
Huge Mattress Sale
Unbelievable Prices

A4-up to 70 /Osavings
It Pays To Compare
., ( e386-466-1888 5
1034 SWMainBlvd., (nexttotheMoneyMa)lakeiyFL32055


Connected


0. mmm


www.lakecityreporter.com


a


-4
i~ -


e, eentert o FidUa
Obstetrics and Gynecology
Chandler Mohan, MD Emad Atta, MD
Annmarie Fenn, CNM, MS
,,Weght Loss' Hair Removal/ Chemical Peels/ 4D Baby Ultrasounds
Se'p allALL $69
Accepting all Insurance. No Ins visit 550

S8(386) 466-1106
Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak


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