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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01769
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 4, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01769
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text











000016 120312 ****3-DIGT 326
LIE OF FLORIDA ISTORy
PO BOX 117007 HISTORY
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Saturday, February 4, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 314 M 75 cents


Arrest


made


in fatal


crash


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
An arrest was made Thursday
in a 2010 crash that took the life
of a Columbia County woman.
Iris Leigh Copeland, 23, 1120
Silas Dr., Live Oak, was taken
into custody
i on charges of
vehicularhomi-
cide and DUI
manslaughter
in the death
of Patricia A.
Walker of Lake
Copeland City. Copeland,
who lived in
Lake City at the time of the
crash, was arrested around 8:03
p.m. by the Florida Highway
.Patrol on a bench warrant. She
was booked into the Suwannee
County Jail on $50,000 bond.
Lt. Pat Riordan, Florida
Highway Troop B public infor-
mation officer, said the report
on blood alcohol content or other
illegal substances in Copeland's
body was not immediately avail-
able.
According to FHP reports,
around 10:40 p.m. on July 5,
2010, Copeland was driving
a 1993 Ford Explorer east on
County Road 252 with Walker,
ARREST continued on 3A


State is

fighting

algae on

its own

By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE- Legislation
that would clear the path for
a pair of state water pollution
rules supported by business,
agriculture and utility interests
won approval Friday from the
Florida House. Some environ-
mental groups, though, say the
rules are too weak and prefer
tougher federal standards.
Technically, the bill (HB 7051)
would waive a legal requirement
for legislative approval of the
rules. The Florida Department
of Environment Protection draft-
ed the rules as an alternative to
the stricter standards proposed
by the federal Environmental
Protection Agency.
The bill now goes to the
Senate, where it's also expected
to pass, and then on to Gov. Rick
Scott, who supports the state
rules.
That, however, won't be the
final word on the matter. The
environmental groups have filed
an administrative law challenge.
They also need final ratification
by EPA, which has given them
preliminary approval.
Both sets of rules would set
numeric nutrient criteria to
replace the imprecise verbal
standards the state now uses.
Environmentalists, though, con-
tend the state's version would
do little or nothing to prevent or
clean up algae blooms choking
many of Florida's lakes, rivers
ALGAE continued on 3A


IlnolIi


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 7S2-9400


'A HAND


UP, NOT


A HANDOUT'


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Habitat for Humanity officials and local dignitaries and toss shovelfuls of dirt during the.groundbreaking ceremony on Friday for a home to be built at
383 Southeast Lomond Ave.

Group breaks ground on home No. 5


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com

Now it's a vacant lot with a dirt
foundation, but soon it will be a
home for a mother and her five
young children.
Work to build the'family
a new, comfortable house starts today.
Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/
Columbia County broke ground on its fifth
house Friday with a ceremony of board
members, volunteers and community lead-
ers.
It will take about six months, hundreds of
volunteers and thousands of hours to build
the house, at 383 SE Lomond Ave.
For future homeowner Annie Mosley,
28, the new four-bedroom home will give
her children more space, stability and allow
them to have a pet, she said.
The apartment the family of six lives in
now is cramped, said Mosley, who works in
housekeeping at the Lake City Hoilday Inn.
'This really motivates me to do better
as a person," said Mosley, who will live
in the house with her daughters, Selesia
Rice, 12; Dezire Rice, 1; Alexandria Mosley,
HOME continued on 3A


EVIDENCE MARKED FOR DESTRUCTION


PP
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Re
Columbia County Sheriff's Office Lt. Joe Lucas (right) and Assistant State Attorney
Jonah Farr look over bags of evidence Thursday marked for destruction. The evide
covers 497 cases mostly from 2008, including 953 items like pills, drugs and drug
paraphernalia. The evidence will be taken to the Gardall-America Steel Mill in Bald\
on March 1, to be destroyed.


78
Mostly cloudy C
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion
People
Fasth & Values
Advice & Comics
Puzzles


Lake City resident Annie Mosley reacts after seeing the beginning of what will be her new 1,200
square foot home, slated for completion in about six months. Pictured are Mosley's daughters,
Selesia Rice (from left), 12; Dezire Rice, 1; County Commissioner Ronald Williams; daugh-
ter, Alexandria Mosley, 8; nephew, Tyler Rice, 2; daughter, Jasmine Mosley, 9; son, Deontrick
Harvey, 7; Mosley; Habitat for Humanity chairman George Burnham Jr.; and Mosley's in-laws
Ernest and Rebecca Mosley.


Fla. House OKs

redrawn maps

By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Republicans hailed passage
of legislative and congressional redistricting maps
Friday in the Florida House as historic because they
are the first to be drawn under new anti-gerryman-
dering standards, but Democrats and other critics
said it's too soon to celebrate.
They contend the plans violate those requirements
in part by favoring incumbents and the Legislature's
GOP majority. It's an issue that's expected to be
decided in the courts.
Both measures passed on identical 80-37 party-
line votes, with Republicans in favor and Democrats
against They now return to the Senate, which ear-
lier passed its own versions, for final action possibly
next week.
porter The two Fair Districts amendments voters adopted
in 2010 prohibit lawmakers from intentionally draw-
nce ing districts to favor or disadvantage incumbents or
political parties. It also protects minority
win
MAPS continued on 3A

TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE SUNDAY
.r ,-:,u ld L,-. 'E .:I ti .,
t-e [-e -h. t :1? n .


4A
2A
. .. 5A
.8A
9A


I


1 ---M w-__,------j


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2012

Celebrity Birthdays


C$H3)* Friday: Friday:
Afternoon: 4-5-8 Afternoon: 1-3-8-8


Thursday:
2-7-19-27-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Gibson could be witness in trial


LOS ANGELES (AP) Attorneys
for a deputy who arrested Mel Gibson
on suspicion of drunken driving want
to call the Oscar-winner as a witness
during an upcoming trial to deter-
mine if the officer suffered discrimi-
nation because of the case.
The trial will focus on what hap-
pened to Deputy James Mee after-he
arrested the actor-director in 2006,
and whether he endured discrimina-
tion because he is Jewish.
Mee's attorneys are hoping to
show the Los Angeles
County Sheriff's
Department moved
to protect Gibson
because the star had a
close'relationship with
the department before
his arrest.
Attorneys for the
county have denied Gibson
Mee faced discrimina-
tion or retaliation.
The case is likely to focus heavily
on Gibson's arrest, when the actor
made anti-Semitic comments that
Mee claims his superiors forced him
to remove from a report
Mee also alleges he was ostracized
and his opportunities for promo-
tion were blocked after he arrested
Gibson.
Gibson's reputation was damaged
for years after details of the arrest and
his anti-Semitic and sexist rant was
leaked to celebrity website TMZ.

Cruise's latest movie
heading to Louisiana
NEW ORLEANS Universal
Pictures has had such a good run
making movies in Louisiana that
the studio is returning to the Bayou
State next month for the making of
its next big project an action thriller
with sci-fi elements and starring Tom


Cruise.
The name of the project and other
details are under wraps, but one thing
Universal executives are willing to
say is that Louisiana has served them
well when it comes to making movies.
Louisiana was the filming site of
such Universal projects as 2005's
'The Skeleton Key" with Kate
Hudson; 2009's "Cirque du Freak:
The Vampire's Assistant" with John
C. Reilly and Salma Hayek; the now-
showing, action film "Contraband"
starring Mark Wahlberg; and the
sci-fi action film "Battleship," which is
due out in theaters on May 18.
"It is a wonderful place to
make films," said Andrew Fenady,
Universal's president of physical
production, who oversees all aspects
of physical production, including bud-
geting, scheduling, hiring crews and
managing day-to-day operations.
Filming on the untitled Tom Cruise
project is set to begin mid-March
in Baton Rouge arid New Orleans,
Fenady said. The film will co-star
actresses Andrea Riseborough and
Olga Kurylenko. Filming will last a
little more than a month in Baton
Rouge and just under two weeks in
New Orleans.

Bee Gee Gibb's health
continues to improve
LONDON Bee Gee star Robin
Gibb says he is making a strong
recovery and putting on weight after
suffering from a serious illness.
He told BBC radio on Friday
that he feels better than he has in a
decade.
The 62-year-old had suffered from
severe weight loss in recent months
and has been hospitalized for stom-
ach and colon problems that forced
him to curtail public appearances.
He has not specified the exact


nature of his illness but told the BBC
he had a growth on his colon that
was removed.
The singer says his doctors have
been amazed by his recovery.

Bogart's son opens film
festival at Smithsonian
WASHINGTON That famous
movie line, "Here's looking at you,
kid," will have time to echo in the
halls of the Smithsonian this week-
end as the son of Humphrey Bogart
and Lauren Bacall opens the first
film festival at the National Mall's
new movie theater.
"Casablanca" will be the first film
shown at the new Warner Bros..
Theater at the National Museum of
American History on Friday night,
followed by free weekend screen-
ings of "The Maltese Falcon," 'The
Treasure of Sierra Madre" and "The
Big Sleep." Bogart's suit worn in
"Casablanca" also is on display, on
loan from Warner Bros.
Stephen Bogart, 63, said he
didn't really know his famous father
because he died when his son was
just 8 years old.
"All I knew him as was on cel-
luloid," said Stephen Bogart, who is
anow a real estate agent in Naples,
Fla. Still, he said his father would
have been shocked to find himself
featured at the Smithsonian.
"He was not full of himself. He
was just an actor and hung around
with writers and producers and
film people," Stephen Bogart said.
"Obviously, he would have been
proud and would have been humbled,
but he would have been shocked."
The American Film Institute
has ranked Humphrey Bogart as
the greatest male legend from the
screen.
(AP)


Actor Conrad Bain is
89.
Former Argentinian
President Isabel Peron is
81.
Comedian David
Brenner is 76.
Singer Florence
LaRue (The Fifth
Dimension) is 68.
Former Vice President
Dan Quayle is 65.
Rock singer Alicd
Cooper is 64.


Actress Lisa Eichhorn
is 60.
Football Hall-of-Famer
Lawrence Taylor is 53.
Country singer Clint
Black is 50.
Actress Gabrielle
Anwar is 42.
Boxer Oscar De La
Hoya is 39.
Singer Natalie
Imbruglia is 37.
Rock singer Gavin
DeGraw is 35.


Daily Scripture
"But I will sing of your strength,
in the morning I will sing of
your love; for you are my for-
tress, my refuge in times of
trouble."

Psalm 59:16 NIV


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community.Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Tddd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS.
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING .........754-0417
(ads@lakecityreporter.com)

CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................ $48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks ................. $82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


Alternative hurricane Tribe says millions
insurance gets OK could be forfeited


TALLAHASSEE -
Legislation designed to
help state-backed Citizens
Property Insurance Co. spin
off customers has cleared
the Florida House.
The chamber voted 6648
for the bill (HB 245) that's
designed to reduce Citizens'
risk on Friday. It now goes
to the Senate where similar
legislation hasn't yet had a
committee hearing.
It would let unregulated
surplus lines companies sell
insurance for hurricane and
other property damage if
they meet certain financial
criteria.
Surplus lines normally
charge more than regu-
lar insurers. Customers,
though, could opt out if
Citizens tries to transfer
their coverage.
Citizens has become
Florida's largest property
insurer with nearly 1.5 nl-
lion policies because some
private insurers have fled
the storm-prone Florida
market

Ex-bank CEO pleads
guilty to fraud
FORT MYERS The
former chief executive
office of a failed southwest
Florida bank has pleaded
guilty to federal fraud
charges involving falsifica-
tion of records and lying to
government officials.
Former Orion Bank chief
Jerry J. Williams pleaded
guilty Friday in Fort Myers
federal court to fraud con-
spiracy and false statement
charges. He faces up to 15
years in prison.
The case was investi-
gated by the inspector
general for the Troubled
Asset Relief Program
used by the government
to bail out companies dur-
ing the financial crisis.
Orion's parent company
had unsuccessfully sought
$64 million from the TARP
program.


TALLAHASSEE -The'
Seminole Tribe of Florida
could stop paying tens of
millions to the state if lg-
islators move ahead with
a bill to regulate sweep-
stakes operations known as
Internet cafes.
There are as many as
1,000 of the operations in
Florida but there have been
questions about whether
they are illegal under the
state's gambling laws. The
Legislature is considering
legislation to either regulate
Internet cafes or ban them
altogether.
A new legal opinion pro-
vided to the Seminoles says
any effort to regulate the
operations would violate
a 2010 compact the tribe
signed with the state. The '
state granted the Seminoles
exclusive rights in exchang-
es for $1 billion over a five-
year period.

Man gets life for
killing store owner
WEST PALM BEACH -
A South Florida man has
been sentenced to life in
prison for killing a West
Palm Beach jewelry store
owner during a robbery.
A Palm Beach County
judge sentenced 30-year-
old Arron Smith on Friday
after he was convicted of
first-degree murder and
other charges.
Prosecutors say Smith
and 53-year-old Kenneth
Laws robbed the West
Palm Coin and Jewelry
Exchange in July 2010.
During the robbery,
44-year-old John Lauseng
was shot in the back and
arm.
Smith and Laws fled
in a van authorities say
was driven by 42-year-old
Hasan Jones.
Laws was sentenced to
life in prison last year after
being convicted of murder.
Jones has pleaded guilty
to second-degree murder


THE WEATHER


as part of a deal to testify I .
against Smith. He awaits I-,.:,
sentencing. MOSTLY i MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY PARTLY
Man survives jump CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY
Man Survives jump -"
off Skyway bridge I
UI I ,un KH. I u-4r!I, i 7U I 0 1 I 1" 1 in 9 I InA


TAMPA Deputies say a
36-year-old man is in good
condition after jumping
off the Sunshine Skyway
bridge, which spans Tampa
Bay.
Hillsborough County
Sheriff's deputies say John
Stewart Murray of Pinellas,
Park attempted suicide
early Friday by jumping off
the bridge.
Authorities say Stewart
was conscious when he
hit the water and a boater
picked him up. He was
taken to Bayfront Medical
Center, where he is receiv-
ing further medical evalu-
ations.
Stewart apparently
jumped from the center
span of the bridge.

Unemployment comp
gets renamed
TALLAHASSEE The
Florida House has voted
to rename unemployment
compensation as "reem-
ployment assistance."
The chamber Friday
unanimously passed a bill
(HB 7027) that includes
the name change. It next
goes to the Senate where
a similar bill (SB 1416) has
been moving through com-
mittee.
Gov. Rick Scott's new
Department of Economic
Opportunity sought the
change to "rebrand" and
refocus Florida's unemploy-
ment compensation system.
Scott wants to add incen-
tives for jobless workers
to seek reemployment in
order to continue receiving
compensation.
To that end, the bill also
would require claimants
who receive low scores on
a skills review to undergo
workforce skills training at
no expense to them.
(AP)


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" .H i .. .: s -.4 .%.. : e -


City
SJacksonlle Cape Canaveral
y 7,' 54 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
vile Daytona Beach Fort Myers
51 ;75j59 Galnesvllle
Ocala Jacksonville
78/57 J s i
78/57 Kney West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Ke et
79 61 75'63 Lake City
Miami
pa Naples
64 West Palm Beach Ocala
78 67 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama Cty
Ft Myers 79 70 0 Pensacola
84, 64 Naples Tallahassee
83t64 Miami Tampa
S 8(/70 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
80/72


Sunday
80 61.'pc
79 60 pc
78/71/'pc
84 64.pc
73 57 pC
78/56,pc
30' 70'c
79 56 pc
80, 70 pc
80/65/pc
79 57 pc
82 62 pc
73/55/sn
73 50 sn
77 53 sn
81 64, pc
79/53/r
7. 63 pc


Monday
76.63 sr
78 60'sn
81/71/sn
81 63 in
77 55. p.:
74, 54, sn
79/69,'sh
77 53 sr,
82 70 sr
82/63/sh
73 55 pc
.'2 62.sr,
69/50/pc
65'45 1Pc
74 47 r
80, 63, sr
75/48/c
81 66 snr


1Vdosta
-~lr

S 77/55
Taiblaha ee Lake City


Pensacola
71,'60






1


77/55 i 53
Gainesv
Panama City 7.'
72/58


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80,


~EUoaks~ra _ _ _ _ __maau raa


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
SRecord low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


80
54
68
44
87 in 1950
17 in 1917

0.00"
0.00"
0.85"
0.34"
3.65"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset.tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:20 a.m.
6:10 p.m.
7:19 a.m.
6:10 p.m.

3:14 p.m.
4:36 a.m.
4:13 p.m.
5:23 a.m.


030@
Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.
7 14 21 29
Full Last New Frst


7a 1p 7p la 6a
Saturday Sunday







S Fohrecastetmpebwte "FeelIe' temperature
,aa"'i"i""""S"wsn e gr"w


On this date in
1988, strong
northerly winds in
the Upper Midwest
produced wind chill
readings as cold as
60 degrees below
zero.


6

30Xind-esiolun
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


3 &Y Forecasts, data and
I -i^ graphics 0 2012 Weather
mo y IV Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


FLORIDA'
AiO1 Wednesday:
15-23-38-48-52-53
x3


-------------- ITE 497 1 Mr., T I MITI.1--.....-I IO W A .


Get Connected




Q2~j

















LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATIONAL SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2012


Hiring surges in

January; jobless

rate at 8.3 percent


By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON In a
long-awaited surge of hiring,
companies added 243,000
jobs in January across the
economy, up and down the
pay scale and far more than
just about anyone expected.
Unemployment fell to 8.3
percent, the .lowest in three
years.
The job growth was the fast-
est since last March and April.'
Before that, the last month
with stronger hiring, exclud-
ing months skewed by tempo-
rary census jobs, was March
2006. The unemployment rate
came down by two notches
from December. It has fallen
five months in a row, the first


time that has happened since
1994, two economic booms
and two recessions ago.
"The economy is growing
stronger," President Barack
Obama said. 'The recovery is
speeding up."
Indeed, the report Friday
from the Labor Department
seemed to reinforce that the
nation is entering a virtuous
cycle, a reinforcing loop in
which stronger hiring leads
to more consumer spending,
which leads to even more hir-
ing and spending.
On Wall Street, where inves-
tors had already driven stocks
to their best start in 15 years
because of optimism about the
economy, the jobs report trig-
gered a spasm of buying.
The Dow Jones industrial
average climbed 156.82 points,


An ironworker works in the
steel framework of a roof in
the remodeling of a down-
town hotel in Pittsburgh.

its second-best showing this
year, and finished the day at
12,862.23, its highest close
since May 2008, four months
.before the financial crisis hit
The Nasdaq composite
index finished at its highest
level since December 2000,
during a steep decline after the
dot-com stock craze. Money
poured out of bonds, which
are considered less risky than
stocks, and bond yields rose.


ALGAE: State fighting it on its own

Continued From Page 1A


and other inland water bod-
ies.
Nutrients from such pol-
lutants as sewage, animal
manure and fertilizer feed
the algae.
Opponents of the federal
rules argue they will be too
costly. A study commissioned
by the state estimates they'd
cost utility customers and
businesses from $298 million
to $4.7 billion a year while
the state proposal would
range from $51 million to


$150 million.
The EPA, though, has esti-
mated its rules would cost
only $135 million to $206 mil-
lion.
The federal rules are the
result of an agreement EPA
made in 2009 to settle a law-
suit by the environmental
groups. They assert EPA
was violating federal law by
failing to require the state to
implement numeric limits for
nitrogen and phosphate.
Sierra Club Florida, the


Florida Wildlife Federation,
Conservancy of Southwest
Florida, Environmental
Confederation of Southwest
Florida and St. Johns
Riverkeeper now are asking
a state- administrative law
judge to reject the state's
rules.
The groups allege they are
arbitrary and contradict exist-
ing law. A hearing is set for
next week, but the environ-
mental groups are seeking a
delay until late February.


Seven to vie for title


of Miss Olustee today


A number of beautiful young ladies
from Columbia and surrounding counties
will be at the Columbia County School
Administrative Complex today hoping to
be selected for one of the titles in the
Annual Olustee Scholarship pageant.
The winner of the Miss Olustee Title in
ages 16-20 will receive a $500 educational
scholarship and will represent the Blue/
Grey Army at the Annual Olustee Festival
which will be held Feb. 17-19. First run-
ner up will receive a $300 scholarship and
2nd runner up a $200 scholarship.
Girls competing for the 2012 title
are Angela Cameron, Lyndsey Horton,
Natalie Hunter, Tayler Rode, Hannah
Shaffer, Rachel Walker and Regina Witt.
These girls will be judged on interview, an
onstage question, casual wear modeling


and evening gown.
Other age divisions include Baby Miss
Olustee, Tiny Miss Olustee, Miniature
Miss/Mr Olustee, Little Miss Olustee,
Petite Miss Olustee, Pre-Teen Miss
Olustee and Junior Miss. The winners in
these divisions will receive a $50 savings
bond and will ride in the olustee parade
on February 18.
Ages 3 months-9 will be held at 4 p.m.
and ages 10-30 at 7 p.m. Tickets may be
purchased at the door for $6. Members
of the Blue/Grey Army and pre-schoolers
are admitted free.
For additional information contact
Elaine Owens, Pageant Coordinator at
386-965-2787.
See full coverage in Sunday's Lake City
Reporter.


MAPS: House OKs redrawn districts

Continued From Page 1A


voting rights and requires
that' districts follow politi-
cal or geographic boundar-
ies whenever feasible.
The maps comply with
those requirements as well
as the federal Voting Rights
Act, said Rep. Peter Nehr,
a Palm Harbor Republican
who co-chaired a redistrict-
ing subcommittee.
"Florida will become a
national model of how redis-
tricting should be accom-
plished," Nehr said. "These
maps were drawn by the
most open, transparent and
bipartisan method in our his-
tory."
Three groups in the Fair
Districts coalition that put the
amendments on the ballot
through a petition drive cri-
tiqued the maps in a letter last
week to House Redistricting
Chairman Will Weatherford,
R-Wesley Chapel.
Leaders of the Florida
League of Women Voters,
National Council of La Raza


and Common Cause Florida
noted the state is almost
equally divided between the
two major political parties,
but based on political perfor-
mance data the maps would
let Republicans maintain
their current dominance.
They wrote that Florida
was a key battleground
state in the past two presi-
dential elections: Republican
George W. Bush won Florida
with just 52.1 percent of the
vote in 2008, while Democrat
Barack Obama carried the
state by an ever smaller mar-
gin with 50.9 percent
The GOP, though, now
has overwhelming majorities
of 81-29 in the House, 28-12
in the Senate 19-6 in the con-
gressional delegation. The
latter will grow by two seats
to 27 because of population
growth.
The new maps would give
the GOP at least a 2-1 advan-
tage in all three bodies, the
letter said.


Democratic Rep. Perry
Thurston of Plantation noted
the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals on Tuesday upheld
the legality of the congres-
sional Fair Districts amend-
ment, writing that its pur-
pose was to "level the playing
field."
'These maps don't level
the playing field," Thurston
said. "Let's have 50-50 if that's
what the state's makeup is."
Nearly a third of state
House members would be
shifted to a new district or
paired with another incum-
bent, but the Senate map pro-
tects, all incumbents except
for those who cannot seek
reelection because of term
limits. The congressional
plan also displaces several
incumbents, but they are not
required to live in the districts
they represent Two South
Florida Republican congress-
men already have announced
plans to change districts
because of the new maps.


ARREST: Woman charged in accident

Continued From Page 1A


52, as a passenger.
Reports said Copeland was traveling at a
high rate of speed and as the SUV traveled
around a left curve in the roadway, she ran
off the eastbound lane and traveled onto
the southern shoulder of the roadway.
The vehicle then began traveling in a
southeasterly direction and struck a fence,
after which it hit several trees before com-


ing to rest facing northeast in a field of
planted pine trees.
Neither of the vehicle's occupants were
wearing seatbelts, reports said.
Walker was pronounced dead at the
scene by a Columbia County EMS para-
medic, while Copeland was taken to Shands
at the University of Florida in Gainesville
with serious injuries.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Mosley kisses her daughter, Dezire Rice, 1, Friday during a groundbreaking ceremony for a
four-bedroom, two-bathroom home that Habitat for Humanity of Lake City/Columbia County
Inc., will be building for her. 'I am extremely happy,'.Mosley said. 'I'm lost for words.' She said-
when she learned her family was selected for the project she 'just went blank.'


HOME: Group breaks ground on No. 5

Continued From Page 1A


Jasmine Mosley, 9; and son,
Deontrick Harvey, 7.
"It's a hand up, not a
handout," said George
Burnham Jr., Habitat chair-
man. Partner families sign
a 20-year, zero-interest
mortgage. They also agree
to spend 350 hours work-
ing on their home or other
Habitat homes. It is a mutu-
al partnership between the
community and the family,
he said.
Board member James
Montgomery said to
improve a community you
don't have to be able to do
everything, you just have to
be willing to do something.
"We are providing a family
with a home and it can't get
any better than that," he
said while addressing the
crowd Friday.
"I know that this fam-
ily that receives this home
realizes that people do
care. I know the other four
families realize Columbia
County cares," said County
Commissioner Ronald
Williams. "Just because you
are poor doesn't mean you
are a bad person."
Mosley said she was sur-
prised in 2010 when she
was approved for a Habitat
house. She hopes to own
the home and pass it down
to her children, she said.
First Federal Bank of
Florida donated the land


for the home. The bank
also donated two nearby
lots. One is already slated
for the sixth Habitat house,
Burnham said.
The key to providing
homes for low income fami-
lies is Habitat's zero-interest
mortgage. Mortgage pay-
ments from the four other
homes, help pay for new
projects, Burnham said.
The last house Habitat
built, at 978 NW Dyson
Terrace, had three bed-
rooms and two bathrooms,
The monthly mortgage is
$336, including insurance
and taxes. With a conven-
tional loan, payments would
be about $750, he said. The
home would rent for about
$800.
Non-profit Habitat for
Humanity was founded in
1976 as a way to eliminate
poverty housing and home-
lessness. Habitat was start-
ed locally in August 2003


and is operated entirely by
volunteers.
Habitat is always look-
ing for volunteers in any
capacity. While those with
construction skills are pre-
ferred, there is plenty of
other work to do, Burnham
said.
Habitat is also looking
for corporate and church
sponsors. It would like to
provide volunteers with
lunch after hours of work
on Saturday and is looking
for groups to sponsor the
lunches.
S"This thing works,"
Burnham said. "It engages
people in the community."
Volunteers are welcome
to show up starting at 8 a.m
today to work on the house.
Those wishing to donate
or volunteer can call (386)
755-0014 or email info@
hfhlakecity.org.
"We just need to take care
of each other," he said.


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OPINION


Saturday, February 4, 2012


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


U.N.'s


big,scary


report

The United Nations
is raising the alarm
that unless the,
world's governments
take drastic action to
Impose strict development con-
trols, humanity is in grave peril.
So what else is new?
On Jan. 30, the U.N.
High-level Panel on Global
Sustainability issued a report
entitled "Resilient People,
Resilient Planet A Future
Worth Choosing." The
99-page report, envisioned as
a "blueprint for sustainable
development and low-carbon
prosperity," contains 56 recom-
mendations to "put sustainable
development into practice and
to mainstream it into economic
policy as quickly as possible."
The report warns of a dire
future if its recommendations
are ignored.
All such U.N. reports paint
a gloomy picture. The lat-
est makes reference to the
1987 Brundtland Commission
report, "Our Common Future,"
which also told of impending
economic collapse, ecological
disaster, overpopulation and
resource depletion. There
have been ups and downs
over the past 25 years, but the
catastrophic future feared by
the world body has not come
to pass despite there being no
international economic and
resource controls.
The major roadblocks to
implementing such utopian
schemes are fast-growing coun-
tries such as China and India.
They rightly view "sustainable"
growth as a brake on their
mounting prosperity. A man-
aged economy sounds good
to liberal policymakers who
think economic growth under
2 percent is a stellar achieve-
ment, but China and India
which alone comprise over a
third of the world's population
S- kick out 10 percent growth in
gross domestic product year
after year. This is the reason
these countries have led the
,resistance against a new global
climate treaty; they want no
impediments to their economic
progress. In this one respect,
the U.S. government could
profit from their example.
Washington Times


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
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get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
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LETTERS
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Romney? Yes, but he


needs to get serious


itt Romney won
the Florida
primary, but
can he get the
Republican pres-
idential' nomination and then
win the White House?
That's the question most
doggedly pursued by most
news stories I've read since
Romney's victory in the Florida
primary, and there's a sure
answer: wait and see. It would
serve readers better to address
his character, competence and
political philosophy, matters
that give readers a basis for
deciding whether he actually
should win.
My own view is yes, but.
Let's start with the positive,
with the issue of character and
with' one of those widespread
Internet yarns that seem too
likely to be propaganda deceiv-
ingly dressed up as Princess
Truth ready to go to the ball.
According to PoltiFact.com,
a hogwash-wary column of,the
Tampa Bay Times, the story
checks out. It tells how, in 1996,
CEO Romney called an emer-
gency halt to moneymaking at
Bain Capital. The daughter of
someone in the company was
missing. She had apparently
taken the drug Ecstasy and,
to help find her, Romney took
all 50 employees to Ntew York
City, hired a private detective,


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojoy@aolcorn


started a search using still
another 200 people and got
publicity for the effort. She was
consequently located. Romney's
unswerving, compassionate
decisiveness quite possibly
*saved her life.
Character means much more
than that, of course, but every-
where you turn, you bump
into Romney's self-control, his
abstention from even the most
meager of vices, his loyalty to
friends, family and faith, his
extraordinary charitable giving,
his focus on others instead of
just self, self, self, the central
cause of so many politicians.
As for competence, he was
about as good a business
manager as a business man-
ager gets, restoring dozens of
companies to health, starting
new ones such as Staples and
Sports Authority and return-
ing unbelievable dividends to
investors. Some say business
experience would mean noth-
ing as president. Yes, it would.


Leadership at his level involves
vision, analysis, strategy, policy-
making and teamwork, which is
exactly what being a president
involves.
On issues, Romney clearly
understands the workings of
free enterprise, not the way
President Barack Obama does,
believing that central planning
is crucial to right outcomes and
that the profit motive is end-
lessly suspect I think Romney
gets it that our debt will kill us
if we don't kill it first, that the
wrong kind of regulation will do
the same and that big govern-
ment equals big trouble.
But and it's a significant but
- he only occasionally sounds
convincing, he is given to awk-
ward slips of the tongue, he
has enunciated no idea of how
to slice the gargantuan debt in
a gargantuan way, he is very
nearly a shrinking violet on the
topic of tax reform, he plays
rhetorical games on several
issues, including free trade, and
he needs to be more serious
about entitlements.
For my money, he needs
to go after the issues like he
went after those French rugby
players, and then, in a couple
of Florida debates, a brawler
named Newt.

* Jay Ambrose is a columnist liv-
ing in Colorado.


Mitt Romney needs a translator


e'ally, you'd think
with all their money,
vaunted organization
skills and control-
feak machinery,
Mitt Romney's people could
get someone to translate for us
when he talks off the cuff.
We have to listen to this guy
every single day for the next
nine months, possibly the next
nine months and four years. It
would be much less exhausting
and unnerving if we knew that
when he talks about the poor,
the middle-class, the rich and
life in general, what he says is
not necessarily what he means.
(Although, apparently, it some-
times is. Ergo, that translator.)
Romney's gaffes are made-for-
cable-TV staples. We know them
by heart Corporations are peo-
ple, my friend; I'm not concerned
about the very poor they have
an ample safety net Care to
make a $10,000 bet?; I like firing
people who provide services to
me; I'm running for office, for
Pete's sake, I can't have illegals;
there were a couple of times I
wondered if 1 was going to t.i. a
pink slip; I'm iiiio iiIIl I)\ 1. too,
It's all very tedious, But the
While Houset is taking div. very
seriously because Piresident
Barack Obama and his people
know well il.II on'cer tIIi .ll
GOP primary season is ,P%,..


5P -4


Ann McFeatters
amcfeotters@notionalpress.org
this will be a deadly fight to the
finish.
The nastiness between
Romney and Newt Gingrich will
only intensify. As Iowa, South
Carolina and Florida proved, neg-
ative advertising works exceed-
ingly well. If you call Mr. X a liar,
Mr. Y an incompetent boob and
Mr. Z an evil traitor twice every
hour, all day, week after week,
voters will hate the ads but still
think Mr. X is a liar, Mr. Y stupid
and Mr. Z dangerous.
Karl Rove, dubbed George
W. Bush's brain, is raising mil-
lions of dollars for anti-Obama
TV ads. And they don't give the
president credit for saving the
domestic auto industry, getting
rid of Osama bin Laden, helping
end the tyranny of Moamnuar
Gadhafi, ending the war in Iraq,
overhauiiing li, .1if1i insurance or
pl I -,iliii' tlIIIiil r depression,
Rove's ts ads pillory Obama as
.1.-1h i- ..l-ir-i. hl<- for the $15
iIilihn II nt il,,u debt, 13 million


unemployed Americans and
underwater houses. Obama:
"The Defending Undisputed
Debt King."
Obama's ads will re-spew
all the anti-Romney digs that
Gingrich dug up or, perish the
thought, just show Romney flip-
flopping off the cuff.
When the general election
starts, we must demand to know
how the candidates would solve
our problems. Exactly how
would Romney create American
jobs? Exactly how would Obama
balance the budget? How would
Romney fix Washington?
Meanwhile, Romney is quiver-
ing in self-proclaimed "delight"
at the egotistical billionaire
Donald Trump's endorsement
(Remember Romney sneak-
ing out the back door to avoid
photographers while currying
favor from Trump earlier in the
game? Recall Trump's trashing
of Romney as a smalltimee" busi-
nessman who fires people.)
If anyone in America is say-
ing, "Whoopee! Trump backing
Romney is good enough for me,"
that person deserves the next
nine months of nuttiness, and fig-
uring out what tone-deaf Romney
means all by himself.
Scripps Howard columnist Ann
McFeatters has covered the White
House and national politics since
1986.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


U.S., NATO

to leave

war zone

early

resident Barack
Obama's military
advisers plan on the
U.S. and its NATO
allies ending com-
bat operations in Afghanistan
perhaps as soon as mid-2013,
a year and a half early. That
lays the groundwork for the
coalition leaving well before the
announced 2014 deadline.
The accelerated withdrawal
still needs the approval of our
NATO partners, which hardly
seems a problem because
most of them are more eager
to leave than we are. French
President Nicolas Sarkdzy,
incensed about two recent
incidents in which Afghan
soldiers turned on and killed
a total of six French trainers,
announced last week that he
would pull out his troops in
2013 a year early.
The decision must still be
agreed on at a NATO summit
this May in Chicago, but that
seems little more than a for-
mality.
U.S. forces in Afghanistan
have already been reduced
from 100,000 to 90,000, and
another 22,000 are due home
this fall. For those who insist
on seeing this announce-
ment in an election-year
political context, that means
we will have a robust force
on the ground through the
November election should
major fighting be required.
The role of most of the
remaining 68,000 U.S. forces
would be to support and train
Afghan soldiers, but leave any
fighting to them. Washington
would be willing to leave
beyond 2014 a residual force
to provide air power, logistics,
supplies and training, but that
would require permission
from the Afghan government.
The Iraqi government said no
to a similar offer, and we were
out by the end of last year
except for a small force to
help guard the U.S. embassy.
The Obama administration's
numerous critics say it erred
in proposing this revised date,
that this only encourages
Taliban forces who, depend-
ing on which intelligence
estimate you read, either are
or are not on the run to hold
out.
But this ignores an obvious
fact: The Taliban live there.
They may hide out in Pakistan
and the drones may have
taken a terrible toll on their
leadership, but they have
always known that sooner or
later we would leave. It was
a simple matter of hiding the
AK-47 and picking up a hoe
until we did.
In the barest terms, we
have accomplished our basic
objectives. Osama bin Laden
and his top aides are dead.
Al-Qaida has been crushed.
The Afghan government that
gave the 9/11 plotters sanctu-
ary has been routed and dis-
. persed, and its leader, Mullah
.Omar, dare not emerge from
hiding in Pakistan, even after
we leave.
There is the question of
what we leave behind. As
in Iraq, the government we
leave behind was better than
the dictatorship we found.
But Iraq and Afghanistan
have shown that our ability
to establish democracies in
ethnically divided countries
with no history of democracy
is limited.
In the end, it is the Afghans'
country. We wish them well; we
will try to help them as best we


can. How they choose to live is
up to them. But they need to be
aware: Don't let your houseg-
uests attack us again.

M Scripps Howard News Service






















FAITH &


VALUES


The commonplace defini-
tion of "pastor" is a male/
female in charge of a
church, who spiritually
feeds a group of people,
providing comfort in time of crisis.
What is the Biblical definition of
the word "pastor"? Because the word
is used only once in the English Bible
(Ephesians 4:11), a definition cannot
be derived based upon usage. In the
Greek, the language of the original
New Testament manuscripts, the
word means "to shepherd" or "to
feed". Why is the word translated
"pastor" only in this one passage?
Why, as in other passages, is it not
translated "shepherd"?
According to some, the 1611
English translators of the Bible trans-
literated the Latin word meaning "to
shepherd". Had they been true to
scholarship, they would have used the
word "shepherd" in Ephesians 4:11.
Where iii the Bible are the quali-
fications for a pastor?'Since there
is only one place where the word is
used, there is not a listing of qualifi-
cations. However, if we translate the
word as "shepherd", then we can find
the qualifications of a "pastor".
Luke records the apostle Paul
requesting "the elders of the
[Ephesus] church" (Acts 20:17) to
come to him in Miletusa Luke tran-
scribes Paul's comments to these men
as, "Be on guard for yourselves and
for all the flock, among which the
Holy Spirit has made you overseers,
to shepherd the church of God which
He purchased with His own blood"
(Acts 20:28). This group is referred
to as: elders, overseers and ones who
shepherd.
Paul left Titus at Crete to "appoint
elders in every city" (Titus 1:5). In
the qualifications, Paul uses an alter-
nate word "overseers". To Timothy,


Paul gave a similar list, using the
word "overseer" (1 Timothy 3:2). It
appears the words "elder" and "over-
seer" are used interchangeably. Paul
used the word shepherd (or pastor)
in talking to the men from Ephesus.
In giving the qualifications of these
men, Paul describes their family life,
personal character and reputation
with the non-church community. One
specific qualification was that the
elder be "the husband of one wife"
(Titus 1:6). In the qualifications of
an overseer, Paul gave Timothy the
same instructions (1 Timothy 3:2). If
an elder is
to be "the BIBLICAL MEDITATION
husband
of one
wife" and
an over-
seer is t6o
be "the
husband
of one
wife," then
a pastor Carlton McPeak
must be carltonmc@msn.com
"the hus-
band of
one wife."
A past6r is a male who is a member
of a group of men spiritually lead-
ing a local congregation of believ-
ers in Christ. The word "pastor" is
a description of what he does. The
word is not his title.

Carlton G. McPeak is an evange-
list working in the Lake City area. All
Scriptural quotations are from the New
American Standard Bible, Holman Bible
Publishers, unless otherwise stated.


The power of the Word


he Bible tells us in Hebrews
4:12-13 (NKJ) "For the Word
of God is living and power-
ful, and sharper than any
two-edged sword, piercing
even to the division of soul and spirit,
and 'of joints and marrow, and is a dis-
cerner of the heart. And there is no
creature hidden from His sight, but all
things are naked and open to the eyes
of him to who we must give account."
Dr. David Jeremiah did a series of
studies some time back on things he
never thought he would see. One
of the studies was "I never thought
I would
BIBLE STUDIES see the
,-- day when
Sthe Bible
would be
so mar-
ginalized".
By mar-
ginalized
he meant
pushed to
Hugh Sherrill Jr. the outer
ems-hugh43@omcastnet edge of
signifi-
cance. He
said "when something is marginalized,
its influence is reduced without being
totally removed".
Many studies have been made over
the past few years that prove this to be
true. The sad part about these studies,
they have proved the message of the
Bible, God's Word, has been diluted
in the church, among those for whom
Jesus died.
Hosea 4:6 tells us "My people are
destroyed for lack of knowledge".
Have we forgotten what Hebrews 4:12
says to us? '"The Word of God is alive
and powerful". God is alive and well,
sitting on His throne today. It is pow-
erful, powerful enough to speak the
world into existence; powerful enough


to take a piece of clay and rnake man;
powerful enough to bring all things
to pass that is spoken of in His Word;
sharp enough to divide the soul and
the spirit; and powerful enough to be
a discerner of our thoughts. In other
words, He is able to see the whole
picture of our heart (whole being) and
determined why we do what we do. He.
knows why we think like we do and our
intent when we do what we do.
Satan has very subtly moved God's
Word.into the background. It has been
taken out of schools, taken off walls
in government buildings, and sadly
taken or made of no effect out of many
churches. We need to remember how
powerful the Word of God is and that
one day it will reign supreme over the
entire universe.
One day.His Word tells us, in
Revelation 19:11-16, that He will 6ome
back to this earth and restore His
authority to mankind. Verse 13 tells
us "He is called the Word of God" and
"out of His mouth goes a sharp sword
(V.15)". This is the same sword spoken
of in Hebrews 4:12.
Hebrews 4:13 tells us that everything
will be open and nothing will be hid
from His sight. And that He is the
one whom, we must give an account.
Should this not get our full attention
to know that someday we will stand
before a just, all powerful God and
give an account of everything we have
done...Christian or not. Our only hope
is that we place everything under His
(Jesus) blood. Believe His Word or
not....IT IS TRUE.

Hugh G. Sherrill
ems-hugh43@comcast.net


;+ t ) - ;
iit5 i'".
"is
......
0
;) i.i.


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
FirstAdvent Christian
1881 SW McFaraneAve.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
RRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E.Duval Street, Lake City
Sunday 10:30AM & Wednesday 7:00PM
www.firstassemblyc.com

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 6:30PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield

RRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E.Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study
Sunday Worship 11AM
Wed. Kids& Youth Ministry 6
Pastor: Ron Thompson


:45AM
& 6PM
i:30PM


lay Electric Coopera'tive, nc.
Competitive rates, non-profil,
right here in your community,
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30AM
Pastor Elder Hmtli Gr fiAn
752-4198


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 SE. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
.independefit B apoil;
144 SE MontroseAve.* 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Sunday Eve.
ed. Prayer Meeting ,
Pastor Mke fNorman


10AM
11AM
6PM
7:30 PM


THE VINEYARD
Sunday School 9:30 AM
SundayWorship 10:30AM
Sunday Night 6:00 PM
1832 SWTomaka Terrace
(off SW Bascom Norris Dr.)
theievardoftakecitv.com .

CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOUC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30AM,
2 30 PM (SpanisnngsiAt!
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00AM-10:15AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Everung Service 7:30 PM

LAKE CITC IHRS1'N ICHN JCHCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436


Sunday School
SiJn Mom WOrship 10
Wed, Prayer Meeting


9:30AM
1:30 AM
7PM


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
DiriFc:bjr,n ii, , 6'6 23-743
Jacl. LEun.'Jr Mlnlser

CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St. 752-5965
Sunday S:hocl 9:45AM
Sun. Worship. 10:30AM & 6:00PM
\'We Family irjnt 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

NEGEL CHiUCH OF GOD
:; i S' Mornfr Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45AM
SunOay Worrip 10:50 & 6:30
'bied Sp iijal Enrlrinillc 7PM
Shil. Youih (ChL.rch
Bc,,; ani GCrl; Club:
31,le Stu1ly
PJaor Ja.fn R Hatiaw.]y

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake C.h, FI 9025- 386-752-2218
Website: www.stameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sunday 8:00 & 10:00AM
Wednesday 5:15PM
'Priest Trhe .v.MihaelArritrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Surdfy rv;;I E;
'Nuiiry Prlilpd
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,' 5. ,.il. ,'e ,io 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 9:30AM
Nursery Avail.
aIe Pil LuO 6PM Worship 7PM
P3 :,r'P~erno .IOhn Da d Eryarj

'. ..



Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SA. D)epLmj Jef' ft is iLn ln wraml:e Pin nien~ RdJ
2-3910 I m .5973i 26


METHODIST
Firs' Ur led Merthlhdt Churrn
:, S. Marine Ave
S :6-752-.448
Sunday School 3i5M
Sunday Momrng NWi'i hip
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traoltional Servi' 11:00AM
rcjram oppoilunitej rj.b'e i!1 area
for all ages:
For a complete schedule
cnliw.l church Atfice at
752-4488

TRINITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday St:htiol '3 4'iM uirip 11 uOAM
Wed. Bible Study 7:00PM Mon. Prayer Noon
Friday Prayer 6:00-7:00PM
Pastor Rev. Fatha M. DeSue

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
12i' SW Mr Farlan' 752-3513
1A9ijJe.i[l O Summers S:noul.
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
aia'e& Woi t p 6:00PM
Sunday School 9:00AM
lursery prionlea
Awana (ages 3-18) 5:30-7:30PM
Pastor: The Rev. J, Louie Mabrey
www.weslevmem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHlOISb CHI.IRCH
US. 90 E. tur on Cortez (next to Quality
!nd i iqht on Ckinawa
Sunday ScnoOl 9:45 AM
Sun.Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed. hJgnr Seriup 7PM
Pastor, Rndy Ogburn

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZAENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PENTECOSTAL
FIRS FULL rISPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
E'vlil.I.iT Serviie 6:00PM


AoMADERSON COIMBIA CO.. INC.
,ASPILAT PAVING
S COMMERCLU *INDIMtHIAL
Site Pretnr.nion Road Buildinig Parking Lo'
Grading & irainaiig
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


Youth Services- Wednesday 7 u.'
Mid-week Service -Wednesday 7:00 PM
kJr e'?l iii :'vi.a2..' E'."ri.r WI : ITTr
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

PRESBYTERIAN
7iRST PRFEB'BERIAHN IHURCI
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sun. School lOAM Sun. Worship 9AM
Contemporary 9AM
Traditional 11AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
-;Ior DIr i v A MtV1;r
oJi'(di 1f MLSi; Bill Prwpln

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
CereCiaron Service 9:30& 11:15AM
Wednesday Servrce 7:00PM
217 DyalAve.. from y 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
A Chrilrn lta Ile Mi:'v

:HRSTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pjsior Chns Jines 752-9119

S:AlllG CREE I HAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 PM.
Pastor Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

1EW BECINNINiG CHURiH
Highway 242 E. of Branti:r Hiohwvay
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morrim.n Woihip 11:0AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wteaneiay 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


D HARRY'S
tA09 wHeating & r Condboing Inc.
SHary Moslce. Prosiden'

P Rn 752-2308 T?'s


MIKELVS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Hea;dquarthers
MOWERS CH AIN SAWS TRIMMERS
(152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY. r .
386-752-8098





E 755-7050


BAYWAYjanitoriat senvies
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpetl are
Rnil enitfl & Cuomimeria
755-6142

North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
I ake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights









Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EURYDAY"
US 90 WEST 55-2427

GW Hunter, Inc.
I ev Chevron Oil
wo Jobber



Holly, Jctric, Ia.
"Quality work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Opnc 7 DIs a \Vcel
I163 L )ial St, lakC Cr( ) I I1..
(386) 752-I067
Fresh4i Mcat. Frvsh PzioiwL'


To Advertise in
this Church Directory
call
755-5440.


Saturday, February 4, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


.Who is a Pastor?


5A


OBS1 ErRICS& GYNECOLOGY

(3861 466-1106
,- ... -,-, ,, ,I ,. -. ,,,


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL IIEAf'll
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054
















6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Feb. 4

Church yard sale
The Lake City Church of
God, 173 SE Ermine Ave.,
Kid's Club will have a yard
sale Saturday, Feb. 4 in the
Family Life Center from 7
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Blood Drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have
blood drive Feb. 4 at
Richardson Community
Center Health Fair from
9 a.m. to noon. All donors
can enter to win one of
three $20 Walmart gift
cards. There will also be a
drive at Hungry Howie's
from 1 to 5 p.m. All donors
receive a-free small sub or
personal pizza.
Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Haven
Hospice will celebrate 5
years of the Suwannee
Valley Care Center, 6037
W. US Highway 90, and 25
years serving the area with
a birthday party Saturday,
Feb. 4 from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. There will be bounce
houses, snacks and activi-
ties, free of charge.
Health fair
The Columbia County
Recreation Department will
host it's annual Health and
Wellness Fair Saturday,
Feb. 4 from 8 a.m. to
noon at the Richardson
Community Center. To par-
ticipate with a booth, call
754-7095 or e-mail nicole
smith@columbiacountyfla.
com.
West Virginia Day
The West Virginia
Annual Reunion will be
held on Feb. 4 start-
ing at 11:30 a.m. Please
bring a covered dish to
share for the luncheon.
The event will be held at
Epiphany Church, 1905
SW Epiphanty Court For
questions, information, or
reservations please call
386-755-4937.


Blood Drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have
blood drive Feb. 5 at the
Lake City Mall from noon
to 6 p.m.
Church homecoming
The Vineyard Southern
Baptist, 1832 SW Tomaka
Terrace, will have the 5th
annual Homecoming on
Feb. 5. Sunday services
will be at 10:30 a.m. with
a covered dish lunch to
follow. There will not be
Sunday school that day.
Everyone is welcome. Call
365-0764 for information.
Feb. 7

4-H Laying Hen Project
2012
There will be a man-
datory 4-H Laying Hen
Project orientation meeting
for any 4-H member, ages
5 to 18, who would like to
raise laying hens to show
at the Columbia County
fair in November. Youth
do not have to be cur-
rently enrolled in 4-H but
will need to join ($1 fee)
prior to receiving chicks.
Participants will learn
how to care for a small
farm animal, prepare them
to show at the fair, earn
premium money at the
fair, and have fresh eggs
in about 6 months. The
cost for the 6 baby chicks
(pullets) will be $12.00.
In order to participate,
youth must attend one of
the following mandatory
meeting dates; Feb. 7 at
6:30 p.m. at the Livestock
4-H Club Meeting held at
the Bethlehem Lutheran
Church located at CR 349
and SR 441, Ellisville, FL; ,
or, Feb. 20 at 6 p.m. at the
UF/IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office. If you
have any questions please
contact Derek Barber or
Dr. Cindy Higgins at the
UF/IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office at 386-
758-1030.


Olustee Festival Pageant Feb. 8


The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, Feb.4. Ages
3-12 mos, 13mo-23 mo,
2-4, 5-6 and 7-9 will be
held at 4 p.m. at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be
held at 7 p.m. Winners in
each division will receive a
$50 savings bond, crown,
banner and ride in the
Olustee parade on Feb.
14. The pageant is open to
the public with admission
at the door: $5.00 adults
and students. Applications
are available at the
Columbia County Library
or Chamber of Commerce.
Deadline for entries is 1-23-
2012. For more information
you may contact pageant
director, Elaine Owens at
386-965-2787.

Black History Movie
Festival
Black History Movie
Festival, 4-8pm Olustee
Park.
Feb. 5

Abundant Life Church
Pastor Cagney Tanner
and his wife Shelby invite
the public to the first ser-
vices of Abundant Life
Church, 671 State Road
100 in Lake City, between
S&S and Ken's Barbecue.
Services include Sunday
school at 10 a.m., Sunday
worship at 11 a.m. and 6
p.m. and Thursday service
at 7:30 p.m. Call (386) 984-
0310 for information.
Church concert
Mercy Mountain Boys in
concert at New Beginning
Church Sunday, Feb. 5 at 6
p.m. Everyone is welcome.
The church is located on
Highway 242 between
Sister's Welcome Road and
Branford Tl;lihwa;y.


Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon

The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends will be held at
11:00 a.m. on Wednesday
February 8th at Eastside
Village (off of Baya)
at the Clubhouse, 189
Claudia Way. Our guest
speaker will be Mr. James
Montgomery talking about
the History of Alligator
Lake
Lunch is $11.00. Plan
to attend it should be very
interesting.
Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St across
from Aquatics Center.

Feb. 9

DAR meeting
The Edward Rutledge
Chapter DAR (Daughters
of the American
Revolution) will hold
its monthly meeting on
Thursday, February
9, 10:30 a. m., at the
Senior Services Center,
28 SE Allison Court (off
Baya Avenue), Lake
City. Annette Lindsey
will be speaking on the
United Daughters of the
Confederacy. All guests
are welcomed. For further
information, please call
752-2903.
Garden Club
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its monthly
meeting on Thursday, Feb.
9 at 10 a.m. at the Woman's
Club (Club House). Coffee
will be served at 9:30 am.
and visitors are welcome to
join us. Our program this
month will be "Wildflowers"
by Betsy Martin


Loss workshop
Hospice of the Nature
Coast will host an educa-
tional seminar on "Coping
with the Loss of Your
Spouse" on Thursday, Feb.
9 at 2 p.m. in the Wings
Community Education
Center in the Lake City
Plaza. The program facili-
tated by Jerry Tyre is spe-
cially designed for those
who have recently experi-
enced a loss of a spouse.
There is no cost to attend.
Please contact Vickie
Myers at 386-755-7714 to
register or with any ques-
tions you may have.
Feb. 10

Friends of Music
The Friends of Music
Concert Series will pres-
ent its second concert of
the season on Friday, Feb.
10 at 7:30 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, 697
SW Baya Dr. Dr. Laura
Ellis, organist/harpsichord-
ist, and Dr. Steven Thomas,
cellist, will perform. Both
musicians are professors at
the University of Florida.
The concert is free, and a
reception will follow. For
more information call Bill
Poplin at 365-4932.
Feb. 11

FACS Valentine's Day event
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will have a Valentine's
Day Dinner and Dance on
Saturday, Feb. 11 from 6
to 10 p.m. in the Epiphany
Catholic Church Social
Hall. There will be enter-
tainment, music, dancing
and a cultural food buffet.
Please bring your best
covered dish to share. The
event is free for members,
$10 for nonmembers. Call
965-5905 for information.
Gospel sing
Southside Baptist Church,
388 SE Baya Drive, will have
a Gospel Sing Saturday,
Feb 11 at 6 p.m. Pine Grove
Choir, The Happy Carter
Family, Jennifer Sherrill,
and Herman Hampton will
perform. A love offering will
be taken.


Bus trip
"What Freedom Looked
Like" a bus trip to Ft.
Mose, St. Augustine,
Florida Florida's all free
black settlement, 7am -
6pm; meet at Richardson
Gym. $25 per person
includes lunch.

Zumba fundraiser for
Habitat for Humanity
All proceeds go to
Habitat for Humanity
of Lake City/Columbia
County Inc. for one hour
long Zumba class facili-
tated by American Family
Fitness, 4578 Sw Heritage
Oaks Circle, Suite 102 on
Feb. 11 at 11 a.m. The
donation cost is $10 per
person. A fire truck and
bloodmobile will be on site
too.
Pre-Valentine Banquet
First Central Association
Women's Department
will host the Annual Pre-
Valentine Banquet on
Saturday, Feb. 11 at 6
p.m. The event will be
held at the Springville
Community Center, 3710
NW Suwannee Valley Rd.
Tickets are $25 each and
may be purchased from the
Missionary Department
of any of the local First
Central Churches. The
Speaker will be Carla
Herring Blalock of
Suwannee County. Special
music will be provided by
Kyler Burke, a student at
Columbia High School. For
more information you may
contact Gloria McIntosh at
755-1099. Dress is semifor-
mal or church attire.
Founder's Day Program
The Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-Cookman
University Alumni invites
you'to our Founder's Day
Program on Feb. 11 at 4
p.m. at the Holiday Inn.
Dr. Trudie Kibbee Reed,
President of Bethune-
Bookman University will be
our speaker. Dress attire
is semi-formal or church
attire.
Valentine's Day Ball
The 1st annual
Valentine's Day Ball,


presented by the Rotary
Club of Lake City, will
be Saturday, Feb. 11 .
from 6 tolO p.m. at The
Country Club of Lake City.
Cocktails, dinner, dancing
and entertainment with
"Harry, Sally and Billy."
Dress is Black-Tie optional.
Tickets are $50 each and
are available at the Lake
City Reporter, The Wheeler
Agency, Hunter Printing,
First Street Music, Parks-
Johnson Agency on Hwy
90 West or call 752-0812.
Gentlemen...BE A HERO...
bring her to the Valentine's
Day Ball!
Feb. 12

Dekle at Friends of the
Library
Local author and former
prosecutor, Bob Dekle,
will present a program
at the Friends of the
Columbia County Public
Library's Annual Meeting
on Sunday, February 12,
2012 at 2pm. The program
will be held at the Main
Library in downtown Lake
City. George R. "Bob"
Dekle, author of The Last
Murder: The Investigation,
Prosecution and Execution
of Ted Bundy, is now a
legal skills professor at ,
the University of Florida
and the author of a legal
textbook (Prosecution
Principles: A Clinical
Handbook). Mr. Dekle will
discuss the book that he
wrote about his experience.
investigating and prosecut-
ing serial killer Ted Bundy
from 1978 to 1980. There
will be a very brief busi-
ness meeting immediately:
followed by Mr. Dekle's
presentation.
The program is free
and open to the public.
Refreshments will be
served. For more informa-
tion, please call 758-2101.
Feb. 13
Women's Cancer Support
Group to meet
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of Lake City
will meet at Baya Pharmacy
East, 780 SE Baya Drive
from 5:30 to 6:30 PM on
Monday, February 13,


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com


2011. Information at 386-
7524198 or 386-755-0522.
Feb. 14

Speed dating
Singles Valentine Day
Speed dating (National HIV
Day),5pm-10pri, El Potro.
American Legion
Boys and girls state
selection, 6:30 p.m. at the
American Legion Post
57 on US 41S. Cookies
and soda will be served.
Members and guests wel-
come.
Feb. 16

Money Matters
Want to manage your .
money better? The UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office is
offering a series of four
classes on finances.
Classes include money
management, credit,
FISCO Score and invest-
ment on Feb. 16th, 23rd
and March 1st and 8th
from 5:30-6:30 at the
Extension office, 164
SW Mary Ethel Lane,
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Cost is $2
per class or $5 for the
series. Spaces are limited
and registration date is
by Feb. 10. Please call
Jenny Jump at (386) 752-
5384 to register or for
more info.
Feb. 17

Sweetheart Dance
The Springville
Community Center, 3710
NW Suwannee Valley Rd,
Annual Sweetheart Dance
is set for Friday, February
17 at 8:30 p.m, The attire
for this event is dressy.
Music will be provided by
DJ Hurricane of Lake City. '
Tickets are $8 per person
and may be purchased in
advanced from any Board
member. Please contact
Gloria McIntosh at 755-
1099 or Coretta Ford at
397-1347. Guests may bring
individual refreshment
trays. Sweetheart pictures
will be taken for a nominal
fee by IKE productions.


NOTICE OF MEETING
UTILITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
CITY OF LAKE CITY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Utility Advisory Committee for the City of Lake City,
Florida will hold a meeting on Monday, February 6, 2012. The meeting is scheduled for 5:30
p.m. at City Hall, 205 North Marion Street, Lake City, Florida.

All interested persons are invited to attend.
AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


NOTICE OF MEETING OF THE LAKE CITY COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY TO BE HELD ON MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 6, 2012 AT 6:45 PM, IN THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS
LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT 205 NORTH
MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.

THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING IS TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEMS:

Street Improvements located in the CRA

All interested persons are invited to attend.
AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


CITY COUNCIL MEETING


THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA WILL
MEET ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 AT 7:00 P.M. IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY
HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA

All interested persons are invited to attend.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk

















Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Saturday, February 4, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
BOXING
10 p.m.
HBO Nonito Donaire (27-1,0) vs.
Wilfredo Vazquez'Jr. (21-1-1), for vacant
WBO junior featherweight title; cham-.
pion Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. (44-0-1) vs.
Marco Antonio Rubio (53-5- I), forWBC
middleweight title, at San Antonio
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, third round, at Doha, Qatar
(same-day tape)
I p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Phoenix Open,
third round, at Scottsdale,Ariz.
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Phoenix Open,
third round, at Scottsdale,Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Syracuse at St.John's
ESPN2 Detroit at Butler
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, Marquette
at Notre Dame orVanderbilt at Florida
FSN Xavier at.Memphis
2 p.m.
ESPN Ohio St. at Wiscorsin
ESPN2 -Temple at Rhode Island
3 p.m.
FSN -Arizona at Stanford
4 p.m.
ESPN North Carolina at
Maryland
ESPN2 Middle Tenn. at Denver
NBCSP New Mexico at Boise St.
6 p.m.
ESPN Kentucky at South Carolina
ESPN2 Iowa St. at Oklahoma
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Mississippi at Alabama
9 p.m.
ESPN Kansas at Missouri
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Indiana St. at Wichita St.
II p.m.
FSN Southern California at
Washington .
NBA
8:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago at Milwaukee
NFL
9 p.m.
NBC Ceremony, NFL Honors, at
Indianapolis
SOCCER
7:55 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League,Arsenal vs.
Blackburn, at London
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
5 p.m.
FSN UCF at Memphis

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Thursday's Games
Memphis 96,Atlanta 77
Chicago 105, NewYork 102
San Antonio 93, New Orleans 81
Sacramento 95, Portland 92
Golden State 119, Utah 101
Friday's Games
Washington atToronto (n)
Miami at Philadelphia (n)
Cleveland at Orlando (n)
Minnesota at New Jersey (n)
Milwaukee at Detroit (n)
Phoenix at Houston (n)
Memphis at Oklahoma City (n)
NewYork at Boston (n)
Indiana at Dallas (n)
L.A. Lakers at Denver (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Indiana, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Washington, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8:30
p.m.
Chicago at Milwaukee, 8:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10 p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. I Kentucky at South Carolina,
6 p.m.
No. 2 Syracuse vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 3 Ohio State at No. 19Wisconsin,
2 p.m.
No. 4 Missouri vs. No. 8 Kansas,
9 p.m.
No. 5 North Carolina at Maryland,
4 p.m.
No. 6 Baylor at Oklahoma State,
1:30 p.m.
No. 10 Murray State at UT-Martin,
7 p.m.
No. I I UNLV at Wyoming, 4 p.m.
No. 12 Florida vs. No. 25
Vanderbilt, I p.m.
No. 13 Creighton at Northern Iowa,
5 p.m.
No. 14 Georgetown vs. South Florida,
II a.m.
No. 15 Marquette at Notre Dame,
I p.m.
No. 16 Virginia at No. 21 Florida
State, I p.m.
No. 17 San Diego State vs. TCU,
10 p.m.


No. 20 Indiana at Purdue, 7 p.m.
No.22 Mississippi State vs.Aubum,4 p.m.


igers


take


two


.JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Jonathan Dupree falls down to the court after fighting teammate Raul Colon (33) and Columbia High's 'Mrcus Amerson {11) for possession of
the ball during a game on Tuesday.


Columbia finishes season


with sweep of Fort White


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Regulation wasn't enough
in the first contest between
Columbia High and Fort
White on Tuesday, but the
Tigers didn't need much
more than a quarter to put
its mark on Friday's 74-59
win against the Indians in
Lake City.
Columbia started all
seniors to begin the game
for Senior Night in a line-
up that included Monte
Tisdale, Marcus Amerson,
David Morse, Taylor Veins
and Nigel Atkinson.
Veins scored the first five
points of the contest in his
first start of the season for
the Tigers.
Columbia used his early
energy to open up the game
with a 21-5 run.
Fort White-battled back
to end the first quarter with
an 8-0 run to make the game


21-13 after Trey Phillips hit
a three-point shot at the
buzzer.
Columbia let loose in the
second quarter. The Tigers
connected early and often
and finished the half with
53 points after scoring 32 in
the quarter.
David Mors6 was the
hottest player on the floor
for Columbia during the
stretch with 11 points in the
first half.
"That's been there all
along," Columbia coach
Horace Jefferson said. "I've
just been waiting for it to
come out. It's something
I've talked about for two
years and if that was his
coming out game, then it
couldn't have come at a bet-
ter time."
Morse finished with 14
points in the contest.
Fort White's Melton
Sanders was the game's
leading scorer after drop-


ping in 31 points in the con-
test.
"Sanders can flat out
shoot the ball and he con-
nected on some deep
shots," Jefferson said.
But Sanders was left
doing most of the work by
himself as Trey Phillips
was the only other Indians
to break into double dig-
its. Phillips finished with 15
points.
Columbia was led in scor-
ing by Amerson, who fin-
ished with 15. Tisdale had
12 points,, Laremy Tunsil
had eight points and Morris
Marshall, Javonta6 Foster,
Veins, Jaylen Wyche and
Atkinson all scored for
Columbia.
The Tigers (18-6) now
turn their attention to the
district tournament where
they will have a bye.
Columbia opens against the
winner of St. Augustine and
Stanton Prep on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tre Simmons (2) and Nigel Atkinson (10)
drives down the court as they enter overtime in a game
against Fort White on Tuesday.


FROM THE SIDELINE *

Friendly rivalry at CHS

did last season. good thing. teams. for the Tigers.
Columbia's baseball The Lady Tigers should There's no reason to Columbia's main power
team isn't too far want to outdo the boys and think either can't reich bat is Kayli Kvistad a
A removed from a district vice versa on the baseball those heights. sophomore commitment
Brandon Finley championship of its own. diamond. Both teams have good to the University of Florida
Slarl was an assistant Donn't et- me wrion.r nitchingr Kepllan RBailpv who hrad 11 home runs


Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom
What is good
for the
goose is
good for
the gander.
Second-year coach J.T.
Clark is hoping the same
can be said for the Tigers
and the Lady Tigers.
After a district
championship on the
softball field last year,
Clark admitted it adds a
little fire to the baseball
squad to have the kind of
success the Lady Tigers


coach two years ago for the
Tigers when they won a
district championship.
This year, the Tigers
are expected to be one of
the teams contending for
a district championship
along with St. Augustine
and Atlantic Coast.
Clark said he doesn't
necessarily like to be
looked at as the favorite
and prefers to sneak up
on other teams as the
underdog.
But that's why the
friendly rivalry between
the two teams could be a


LJU11 L gU HIC W1V11g,
neither team should be
pulling for the other to fail.
In fact, it's the opposite.
The better each team
does should inspire the
opposite sex to strive to
achieve the same level.
Columbia's girls are
already saying words like
state championship.
Clark said that the
season won't be a success
for the boys unless they
win a district championship
and advance to the third
round something the
Tigers have never done.
The talent is on both


leads the Tigers as a four-
year varsity player. He was
5-2 with a 2.19 ERA last
season.
Likewise, the Lady
Tigers have a four-year
varsity player leading from
the mound with Jessica
Keene. She'll be counted
on down the stretch run,
but will also give innings
to senior Taylor Douglass
- a Fort White transfer
- this season.
Both teams have a
plethora of bats. Blaine
Courson leads a group of
bats with home-run power


last year, but there's also
Stephanie Pilkington,
Michaela Burton, Peyton
Sund and a host of other
returning starters.
The pieces are there
for both these teams. A
friendly rivalry has been
known to make both
competitors better. Let's
hope that the best of both
teams is brought out by
competition with each
other.

a Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


7A


I

















LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2012


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Mom uses illness to compete

with girl for son's attention


DEAR ABBY: I'm 18 and
my boyfriend, "Jordan," is
17. We have been together
a year and a half and rarely
fight. There is only one
problem in our relation-
ship his mother.
"Martha" has lupus
and uses it to manipulate
Jordan. When we plan
dates, she'll tell him she
feels sick and make him
stay home to take care of
her. As soon as the date is
canceled, she's miraculous-
ly better. She complains
that he doesn't spend'
enough time with her and
lays guilt on him because
she "could die any day,"
but says these things only
when I'm around.
I don't believe that at 17
my boyfriend deserves the
stress she puts on us, but
I'm not sure what to. Can
you help me? STRESSED
TEENS IN THE SOUTH
DEAR STRESSED
TEENS: There is noth-
ing you can do about it,
so accept that as long
as you're involved with
Jordan, his mother is part
of the package deal.
In another year your
boyfriend will be legally an
adult and able to decide if
he wants to stay at home
taking care of his mother,
or leave to pursue his edu-
cation or go to work. From
your description, the fam-
ily dynamics do not appear
to be healthy. But if you're
smart, you will not involve
yourself in them. A girl


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
who competes with her
boyfriend's mother rarely
wins that battle, so remem-
ber that.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I'm 14 and
a ballet dancer, although I
just started dancing serious-
ly at 12. I have been in some
shows and my teacher has
started me on pointe work.
It has become my dream to
dance professionally.
When I confided it to
my mother, she told me it
would be impossible.
Should I continue with
my dream or pursue some-
thing else? I know it's a
tough profession to work
in, but it is what I love.
- DANCING FOR JOY IN
SAN DIEGO
DEAR DANCING FOR
JOY: A career in dance
requires strength, determi-
nation, discipline and sac-
rifice. These are all traits
that will serve you well
regardless of what profes-
sion you decide to pursue
when you're older. The
person you should ask this
question of is your ballet
teacher, who is better able
to evaluate your talent than
I can at a distance.


But I urge you to stick
with dance as long as it
interests you. Eveh if you
don't eventually become
a performer, you could
become a choreographer, a
teacher or find a rewarding
career in some other capac-
ity with a dance company.
Now is not the time to
give up on this dream.

DEAR ABBY: My fiance
is an amazing man and
I'm lucky to have him,
but because he's in the
military I don't see him
very often. I recently met
a guy in one of my college
classes who has made it
clear that he's attracted to
me. I can't help but feel
the same about him.
He often asks me to study
and hang out with him. Am
I being disloyal if I inno-
cently study or hang out
with this guy without telling
my fiance? FRIENDLY
FIANCEE IN COLORADO
DEAR FIANCEE: You
say the attraction between
you and your classmate is
mutual. If you start hang-
ing out with him without
telling your fiance, then
the relationship ISNT
innocent. If you can't
handle the separations,
then you don't have what it
takes to be a military wife.
So do both of you a favor
and end the engagement
N Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


....WHNM THE' Assi 4 Y(oU
A PARI(.&G SPACe AT
THE WAlI-Ii- CLmIIC-,


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Create a space at
home that is conducive to
exploring and developing
a hobby or a new venture
that interests you. Refuse
to let your emotions take
over when it comes to
making a personal decision
involving your love life.
Think before you react.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): You have more
options than you realize.
Curiosity will lead to a new
venture. Love is highlight-
ed, and getting involved
in a joint project will bring
you closer together. Invite
friends and family to par-
ticipate or cheer you on.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Someoqe who does
something unexpected
'will catch you off guard.
Assess the situation thor-
oughly before you take
action. Uncertainty regard-
ing your future may result
if you retaliate or over-
react Bide your time and
outmaneuver your oppo-
nent. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be emotional
and sensitive. Don't let
what others do or say influ-
ence how you respond.
Stick to whatever task or
responsibilities you've
been given, and you will
show your leadership
ability as well as your well-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

adjusted attitude. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug..
22): Don't let uncertainty
be your demise. Rise
above any conflict you
face, and keep moving in a
positive direction. It's your
ability to move forward
regardless of what you are
up against that will gain
the respect of others and
lead to success. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Your help will be wel-
comed, and will lead to
an interesting encounter.
Business and personal
relationships will bring
positive results if you lay
down ground rules before
you move forward. An
unusual opportunity can
turn into a lucrative affair.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Change things up a
bit Put fun first and let the
chores wait. Don't let an
emotional matter ruin your
day. Expand your interests.
A short trip or attending a
conference or tradeshow
will spark new ideas. **
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Times are chang-
ing. Good fortune in love,
friendship and business
partnerships is apparent.
The connections you make
now, or nurturing the ones
you already have, will pay
off. Developing one of your


talents or ideas will create
a buzz. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Stay on top
of the facts and figures,
or you may be accused
of exaggerating what you
have to offer. A personal
relationship will be reason
for concern if you have
something to hide. Clear
up any misunderstanding
quickly. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Someone who has
taken a liking to you will
pull you in an interesting
direction. Your curiosity
will help you discover hid-
den talents. Romance is
prominent, making this a
good time to find love or
enhance your current rela-
tionship. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): The responsibili-
ties you have taken on in
the past will pay off now.
Ask for whatever com-
pensation you need for
your time and effort You
are worth more than you
think. A commitment must
be honored. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Let your creativity
and imagination take over.
Utilize your skills to the
fullest and show everyone
around you what you are
capable of doing. Alter what-
ever is holding you back
personally, domestically and
physically. It's time to move
forward. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: C equals D
"EO FATX C R E G F GEOY DYYKD VAAX
L Y G G F A T X D Y G O L MR L FAT R X Y
WAL R VAYL YWATHM LA BRGG OAXLM
ELD XEBMYD." XREWYX KRXER
X E GJ Y

Previous Solution: "Life is to be lived, not controlled, and humanity is won by
continuing to play in face of certain defeat." Ralph Ellison
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-4


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


BUT IM NOT ^
(ETTrri4 PAD
FOURTH ONE. I
DO FLR-EDy I)!



. Il '


BuT;, LLuy....
YOU'RE BElD- .\
PUBLISHED -
^*e .' 1
. ,' ,
1 ^2,'


"W.-<'A >&.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


FRANK & ERNEST


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415



















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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3rd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
Case #: 2009-CA-000431
Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-
pany, as Trustee for Long Beach
Mortgage Loan Trust 2003-4
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Timothy M. Clark a/k/a Timothy
Clark; Donna Sue Clark a/k/a Donna
S. Clark; Patti s. Macarages a/k/a
Patti S. Jackson a/k/a Patti S. Maca-
rages; Thomas Drew Jackson; Deas-
Bullard Properties, a Florida General
Partnership; Audrey S. Bullard; Mar-
tha Jo Khachigan, Individually and
as Co-Personal Representative of the
Estate of John H Deas, Deceased
Defendants)
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order rescheduling fore-
closure sale dated January 23, 2012
entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-
000431 of the Circuit Court of the
3rd Judicial Circuit in and for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, wherein
Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-
pany, as Trustee for Long Beach
Mortgage Loan Trust 2003-4, Plain-
tiff and Timothy M. Clark a/k/a
Timothy Clark are defendantss, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash, AT THE WEST
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
LOCATED AT 145 HERNANDO
STREET, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
AT 11:00 A.M., February 29, 2012,
the following described property s
set forth in said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure, to-wit:
LOT 16, CEDAR HILLS, A SUBDI-
VISION ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 134, PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN YEAR: 1997, MAKE:
FLEETCRAFT, VIN#:
FLFLT70A2476SK21 AND VIN#
FLFLT70B24576SK21, MANU-
FACTURED HOME, WHICH IS
PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO
THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
LANDS. AS SUCH IS DEEMED
TO BE A FIXTURE AND A PART
OF THE REAL ESTATE.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN,
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
DATED at Lake City Florida, this
26th day of January, 2012.
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
05530372
February 4, 11, 2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION:
CASE NO.:
122011CA000050CAXXXX
AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES TROMBLEE; EMERALD
COVE OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC., A DISSOLVED CORPORA-
TION; Unknown Tenant(s); UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) N/K/A FAR-
RAH RIVERS; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S) N/K/A MARKEY RIVERS;
AMBER TROMBLEE; IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPIR-
TY,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 17th day of January,
2012, and entered in Case No.
122011CA000050CXXXX, of the
Circuit Court of the 3RD Judicial
Circuit in and for Columbia County,
Florida, wherein. AURORA LOAN
SERVICES, LLC is the Plaintiff and
JAMES TROMBLEE; EMERALD
COVE OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC., A DISSOLVED CORPORA-
TION; UNKNOWN TENANTSS,
UNKNOWN TENANTS) N/K/A
FARRAH RIVERS, UNKNOWN
TENANTS) N/K/A MARKEY
RIVERS and AMBER TROMBLEE
IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY. are defendants.
The Clerk of this Court shall sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at the Columbia County Courthouse,
173 N.E. HERNANDO AVENUE,
LAKE CITY, FL 32055, 11:00 AM
on the 18th day of April, 2012, the
following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOTS 73, EMERALD COVE,
PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT OR
MAP THEREOF, AS RECORDEb
IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 35 AND
36, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
"THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated this 17th day of January, 2012
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By: -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL
Submitted by:
Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson,
P.A.
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
05530276
January 28, 2012
February 4, 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
'tHIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
v.
JOHN PAULSON and LUCY
PAULSON;, any and all unknown
parties claiming by, through, under,
or against the herein named individu-
al Defendants who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said un-
known parties may claim an interest
as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees
or other claimant; John Doe and Jane
Doe as unknown tenants in posses-
sion,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JOHN PAULSON and LUCY
PAULSON, any and all unknown
parties claiming by, through, under
or against the herein named individu-
al Defendants who are not known to
be dead or alive, whether said un-
known parties may claim an interest
as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees
or other claimants; John Doe and
Jane Doe as unknown tenants in pos-
session.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Com-
plaint to Foreclose Mortgage has
been filed by the Plaintiff, FIRST
FEDERAL BANK OF FLORIDA, in
the Circuit Court of Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida, regarding the following
described real property:
SEE EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED
HERETO
Section 14, Township 4 South,
Range 15 East, Columbia County,
Florida; A 30 foot wide strip of land
lying Westerly and contiguous with
the west line of Lot 13 of Pinemount.
Meadows, a subdivision that is re-
corded in Plat Book 7, Page 168 and
169; also the NE 1/4 of the NW 1/4
of the SE 1/4.of said Section 14,
Township 4 South, Range 15 East,
Columbia County, Florida.
You are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, on the
Plaintiffs attorney, PAUL V.
SMITH, ESQ., whose address is P.O.
Box 2029, 4705 West US Hwy 90,
Lake City, Florida 32056, and file
the original with the Clerk of the
above-named Court on or before the
20th day of February, 2012.'
IF YOU FAIL TO DO SO, judgment
by default will be take against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint.
WITNESS my hand and official seal,
this-19th of January, 2012.
P. DEWITT CASON,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By:/s/ Patricia A. Perry
Deputy Clerk
(seal) '
05530275
January 28,2012
February 4, 2012

010 Announcements
If anyone has information concern-'
ing the murder of Darrell Davis
(March 1; 1982) in Lake City,
please call 888-755-7336.

020 Lost & Found
FOUND: Small Poodle, Jan 31.
Hwy 47 & the Bingo Station.
Please call t6 identify.
386-697-5247

MISSING SIAMESE Cat. Close
to Peyton Loop, Verdale Apt.
Last seen Feb. 1. Please call if you
have information. 386-752-1426

060 Services
Bookkeeping &
Tax Services
Reasonable prices
Call 386-466-9096

100 Job
Opportunities
05530317
SALES REPRESENTATIVE
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT
Tampa based Company looking
for experienced sales representa-
tive in the north central Florida
area. Candidate should have a
history in sales and is self-moti-
vated. Must be able to focus on
serving our customers'with su-
perior supplier relationships.
This person will need to effec-
tively interface between custom-
ers, our service department and
co-workers. There must be an
intense attention to detail and
complete commitment to our
customers and company, a
strong team ethic is absolutely
necessary. College degree
preferred but not required. "
Compensation based on


experience and qualifications.
TMontefusco(5eppersonco.com

PERSONAL ASSISTANT/
RECEPTIONIST, Computer skills
required, reply to: P.O. Box 7246,
Lake City, FL 32055


100 Job
Opportunities
05530458
NOW HIRING
Assistant Managers, Cashiers
& Baggers for High Springs
fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

Children' Ministry Director:
First Presbyterian Church of Lake
City is seeking an organized,
outgoing and creative person to
implement children' ministry
within the church and develop a
community outreach program.
Part-time. E-mail resume to:
kathvyfpclc.org or mail to:
P.O.Box 469, Lake City, 32056
Electrician/Traffic Signal Installer
with bucket exp. CDL preferred.
G6od pay and benefits.
Bobby 813-433-7851 EOE
S HELP WANTED
Full time Energetic-Retail Exp.
people person. Computer register
& stock exp a plus. Apply in
person. Smitty's Western Store.
2 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Kirks Farm,
Inc Farmington, KY. Perform all
duties of Tobacco Production,
including seeding, planting,
plowing, weeding, spraying,
harvesting, stripping & packaging;
and general farm maintenance.
Employment Dates: 03/28/2012 -
12/10/2012. Wage of $9.38/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract '
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence.
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0444196.

SMeederi

CA4Eten ef

PHYSICAL


THERAPIST:

Home Health Care Agency

servicing Columbia and
surrounding counties

seeking Full-Time

Experienced Physical

Therapist

Competitive Salary &

Benefits Available.


Please contact Kin

at 386-758-3312

for more information


ACROSS
1 de mer
4 Chat
7 100-meter"
event
11 Chopper
12 Vaccines
13 Bone below
the elbow
14 Space-time
guru,
16 armland
17 "Cosmos"
host
18 Type of ladder
19 Water-power
org.
20 Funny -
DeLuise
21 Extinguish
24 Upholstery
fabric
27 Coffee brewer
28 What red
means
30 Teen event
32 Statistics
34 Dog in
"Beetle
Bailey"
36 Paulo


100 Job
Opportunities

11 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Little River
Leaf, Inc Hopkinsville, KY.
Perform all duties of Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, & Vegeta-
ble Productions including seeding,
planting, plowing, weeding,
spraying, harvesting, stripping &
packaging; and general farm
maintenance. Employment Dates:
03/28/2012 01/31/2013. Wage of
$9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0444198.

Maintenance worker, permanent,
part time. Must be able to handle
tractor & forklift. Apply in person
Columbia County Fairgrounds,

MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754

Now accepting resume's for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20th Ave. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or email to:
bulldog@laloenterprises.com

P/T Selling Event Specialist
needed to promote products in the
Local Grocery Chains. Must be
outgoing and dependable. Week-
ends/Some Weekdays are a must.
No experience needed, we will
train. Please call (904) 652-8150.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I DOEMV I


S Answer:


Yesterday's Jumbles: GUARD
n. Answer: When no or
Sshe could'

37 Site Answer
39 Provide new
weapons
41 Malt brew F I G I
42 Pet shop ES A D
sound
43 Extends E L L I
45 Like an SE A HO
acrobat
48 Slide MM
sideways D R A M
49 Downy fruits
52 Big-ticket R ES U
53 Gopher st. J O/ K E R
54 King, to
monsieur D
55 Synthetic LO T
fabric, for L0
short 'BA CH
56 You bet!
57 Business I SIEE
abbr. T S A R


DOWN
Daisy -
Yokum
Poles'
connector
"Stormy
Weather"
singer


4 Ms. Davis
5 Onassis
nickname
6 Prohibit
7 Floor cleaner
(2 wds.)
8 Lotion
ingredient


Want more puzzles?
Checkout the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


100 Job
Opportunities

Office Manager Position:
Needed Immediately!
2 year degree; 4 years experience
in office management.
SCandidate must possess skills in
and knowledge of the following:
business & bookkeeping, Payroll,
Editing, day to day office manage-
ment, ordering supplies, client
scheduling, professional phone and
interpersonal skills, computer
competency to include creation of
Word documents and Excel
spreadsheets. Candidate must be
organized and flexible as this
position is highly involved with all
aspects and programs within this
agency.$25,000 to $28,000 per
year plus benefits. Please email
resume to: employment(@rhapa.net
or fax to 386-754-9017.

P/T Caregiver for partially
paralyzed elderly woman. Two
weekends a month with more
nights possible. Exp a must. Ellis-
ville area. Fax resume to 755-2165

Receptionist needed for Doctor's
office. Part-time with the
possibility of full-time. Send reply
to Box 05084, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City,.FL, 32056

ROUTE SALES person needed
for local milk route. CDL B Class
and good driving record a must.
Apply in person at 1721 E Duval
Street. Mon..- Fri. 3-6pm.

Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


ONCE YOU'VE LOOKED AT
ONE SHOPPING CENTER,
YOU'VE --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)
LYING SURVEY ATTEND
ne showed up to buy her lemonade,
t STAND IT


to Previous Puzzle


REE P OD
E K |E FUSE
T E R ORCA
R SE YEAR
EE CHIIEER
ALIT ER
TE AS HEN
AI F R ERA
AH|O V ER B
S GTE
TOBO GGAIN
E LANI E
RIEN E ODD
O0K D WES


Beauty parlor
sound
"2001"
computer
Barrel slats
Some NCOs
Our sun
Cabinet div.
Defective
firework
Face-to-face
exam
A law itself
November
word
Bear
constellation
Stadium noise
Painted
tinware
Tattoo word
Place to learn
Source
Capp and
Jolson
Spectacular
Tales
Low voice
Swordfight
Loughlin or
Petty
007's alma
mater
Drink a little
Ms. Tan
Bakery buy
Thus, in
citations


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


BUY IT


SEBLLT


FINDIT
M- -~m


i


M


ME


EIONI I


S

$B Y
u.E


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17













10A

120 Medical
Employment

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

Busy Family Practice Office
Seeking part-time Nursing Asst.'
Exp required, must be organized.
Fax resume to (386)719-9494.
GIEBEIG FAMILY MEDICINE
DENTAL HYGIENIST
needed. Full Time position
M-F 9:00 5:00pm Lake City
Office. Salary Commensurate with
experience. Please fax resume to:
386-752-3122 or email to
caw70(Slaol.com
Desto Home Care is accepting
applications for Medical Billing/
Customer Svc. Prefer someone
who has medical billing exp. No
Calls. Mail resume to: Desoto
Home Care, P.O. Box 1480,
Lake City, FL 32056 Attn: Shaun
Medical Office looking for full
time employee in Optical. Experi-
ence preferred but not required.
Will train. Send resume to 763 SW
Main Blvd. Lake City, Fl. 32025

240 Schools &
240 Education

05530293
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/06/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/13/12
LPN 03/12/12
Fees iuicl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstraininmservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Dog Kennel chain link. 10 ft long
x 6ft wide x 6ft high, door on wide
end. Like new, used inside only.
snaps together in half hour. Still
assembled. $150. obo. 965-0061
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

HP COPIER/SCANNER. Model
PSC1410. All in one. Works great
Can demonstrate. I now use
wireless. $75. obo 386-965-0061
Hughes Internet satellite
system with outside pole.
$150. obo.
.386-965-0061

410 Lawn & Garden
Equipment
Craftsman 42"cut DYS 4500
lawn tractor & dump trailer.
Ex cond.Garage kept. $800
386-754-4094

416 Sporting Goods
Men's new Golf Clubs.
Graphite Shafts. Woods 1-3-5.
Irons 3-9. Putter and bag. $100.
**SOLD**

419 TV-Radio &
Recording
2 small TV's. 1 Panasonic
1 Sylvania. Both work well. Used
as security cameras. $50.00 for
both obo. 386-965-0061

COMPLETE DIRECT TV
Satellite system on outside pole.
$150.obo.
386-965-0061

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2012


430 Garage Sales
2 FAMILY Sale 1564 NW
Frontier Dr. Lake City Country
Club. Lots of clothes, and much
more. Saturday, Feb. 4th 7:30-1
Church Yard Sale. Sat. 8-? 256
NW Carol Place. 90 W right on
Turner Rd., left on Carol P1. Fur-
niture, collectibles, clothes, more
Daycare Closing Yard Sale. Sat.
8-? 441 S by Oleno State Park on
181 Ripley. Inside/outside toys,
teaching supplies, CD's & VHS.
Estate Sale. Sat & Sun Contents
of home MUST go. Also moto-
rhome, deck boat, farm equipment,
farm tractor & 2 axle trailer
w/ramps. Open 10am both days
Home Depot S on 247 to new Dol-
lar Store at that light, left on Calla-
han, past Rolling Meadows to 1st
Rt. (Sparrow Terr) Rt. 1 mile to
SW Lamboy Rt. follow Rd to 914.
Huge Yard Sale
200 SW Hobby Place
Saturday Feb.4th
Moving, so everything must go.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SALE EVERY WEEKEND
COUNTRY CLUB ROAD AND
HANOVER PLACE 9AM-2PM
386-697-1946

440 Miscellaneous
1 Ticket to see John Edward
February 7 at 7pm in the Florida
-Theater in Jacksonville. Section
L300, row C. $99. 386-752-4337
Karaoke Equipment for sale
Ready to set up and sing
Check Craigslist for specs
$3000 obo / 386-638-0061
PANASONIC DELUXE wireless
telephone system. One base & 3
extensions. Good for 200 ft from
base even outside. $75. obo
386-965-0061
RVTOTE. 36 gallon
Never Used. Cost $239.
Sell for $100.
**SOLD**
Security camera components.
Watch your home from any com-
puter. $900 worth of equipment.
Enough for 5 or 6 systems. Will
sell for $300.obo 386-965-0061
Stationary exercise bike. Sears
Deluxe Model. (Easy on & off)
Cost $799. new. Selling for
$300. obo. 386-965-0061

450 Good Things
Sto Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.
630 Mobile Homes
for Rent'
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-'
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
For Sale by Owner or Rent to Own
3/2 MH on 1 acre in Providence,
completely remodel, new every-
thing, great neighborhood. $39K
Financing available. 386-249-1640
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Prices! New 2012 3/2 start at
$39,900 and New 4/2's start at
$49,900. All new homes inc
delivery and set up, ac-skirt and
steps. North Pointe Gainesville
(352)872-5566
New And Used! North Pointe
Homes in Gainesville'has 4 used
homes in stock! Don't delay as
these will go Fast.
Call North Pointe in Gainesville
(Hwy 441, 6 Blocks north of
Hwy 222) (352)872-5566
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Dealer in NW Florida Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating THEIR Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.


640 [Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566

Mobile Home
650 & Land
3br/2ba 2.75 ac. w/fish pond.
Small down plus $750 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

705 Rooms for Rent
Roommates Wanted: Master BR
w/private bath $475. mo. Single
room & share bath, $375. mo.
Cable, internet, washer/dryer.
McFarlane Ave. 15 min to
Walmart., VA & WinnDixie
Call Dave.(904)466-2925
710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent









lbr Apt with
all utilities included.
Close to the VA.
(727)415-2207
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
,386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Inc water.-
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Quail Heights Move in Special.
2br/lba Duplex. Washer/dryer
hook up. Private, safe, secluded,
$725 mo $500 sec. 386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1 Month FREE
with 1 year lease. Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint.
Great area. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


UN WHttiEaS WailtlUATnArII r%

10--Da-s







Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-623-9026
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.





Veil Sod


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05530457
Century 21/
The Darby Rogers Group
Totally remodeled in down
town White Springs 3/2
$840./mo.
16884 53rd Road Wellborn
3/2 $800./mo
1306 NW Scenic Lake Drive,
Lake City 3/2 spacious
home/Lake Front $1,650./mo
S453 SW Mayflower Glen
Forth White 2/1 $750./mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,l ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to downtown &,shopping.
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170
3/2, newer home,
nice neighborhood
386-623-2848

3br/1.5 ba. Completely renovated.
Centrally located, completely
fenced yard. $825. mo + 1st, last &
security. 386-938-5637
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
4/2, CH/A, New roof & remod-
eled. Nice area, just south of Lake
City. $1250. mo. 1st, last & $1250
sec. dep. 386-755-1865 days only
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3BR/2BA 1760 SQFT, car-
pet, tile, end porch, all appliances,
Irg gar, big kitchen, 386-269-0123

750 Business&
55v Office Rentals

05530343
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1100sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/27,07 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

To place your
classified ad call
7155-5440
WIMIMg~~n


Classified Department: 755-5440


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis,
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3 Bed/I Bath home on
Poplar St.
Nice yard and carport.
$48,000 call 484-678-6385
Live on a Golf Course. 3/2 brick
on 1/2 ac. Formal living, dining 8'
family room. 2 car garage.
$129,900 Frank 386-984-5217

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
7 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Corial Homes
by Arthur Rulenberg
I ... .. H ,I . -I .i , d , ,, ,
, 1 I, , ,I _r I t , [ ,I ,, : '


930 Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON Electric
Glide Classic. 2006. 12,500 mi
LOADED $12,000.
(734)255-4820


940 Trucks

Dodge Dakota 2004, 45K mi.
22mpg hwy, 17city. Mediterranean
blue. 4 door cab. 4 wheel dr. good
tires, new spare. Hard pick up
cover. $9,500obo. 386-965-0061
Must sell. Must Leave Country

951 Recreational
Vehicles
1994 33' Air Bus. Automation
dome satellite dish, 2 AC's. gas
heat, micro, fridge/freezer,
generator. $7,500. 386-752-0941

2003 Allegro 30DA. Workhorse
Chassis. 18300 miles, garage kept.
Excellent cond. w/many extras
$40,000. 386-754-5660


Jasmine
Vi. r the model in
The Prcsien at
Laurel Li.e
27' Belfllouer Drise
Model Hours:
Tuesdvb-Fridyv 12-5
Sat. 1-3
Sun. I-4pm
Ca Rob Edwards
(t36) 965-0763


Give" a

litfe peck...

Icolx 2in
S(1.667 x 2in)
Two to three lines
of text plus photo
Sndd decorative
:; ;, frme. m .


or a kiss...

Icol x 3in

you just can't keep to .6 to 67 x 3in)
Four to five lines of
yourself? text plus photo and
decorative frame.

Have a special

someone you want

to surprise?


This year place a Love
Line and tell them how

you feel and make all
their friends jealous.


Peck $20
Peck 20 or a great
Kiss 530
big smooch
Smooch $40

Deadline for ads lcol x4in
'1 667 x 4inl
February 9 4pm Six to seven lines of
P g"blihi on text plus photo and
Pu sngondecorative frame

February 14


- Lake City Reporter

lakecityreporter.com CU RU NTS magarme


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ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.
mmmml=gPIW"xlzirr


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write some...