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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01767
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: February 2, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01767
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text












000016 120312 ** G-0
LIE OF FLORID.. ..... -DI
20o BOX117007
SUNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


326


y Reporter


Thursday, February 2, 2012


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 312 N 75 cents


Father, son lose everything


in fire


- except each other


By GORDbN JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. corn
A Columbia City man and his son escaped
serious injury after a fire destroyed their
mobile home early Sunday morning.
Louis Weeks, 46, said when he woke
up about 2:40 a.m. the front of his mobile
home at 659 SE Seville Place was engulfed
in flames. He ran to the other side of the
single-wide trailer and broke a window so
he and his 11-year-old son, William, could
escape.
"We jumped out the window and
watched it burn down," he said. "I lost
everything."
Weeks said he burned his feet when he


ran onto the porch in his bare feet to toss
two propane canisters onto the ground.
before they exploded.
It took 16 minutes for firefighters to
arrive, but he said it was too late to save
the contents of the dwelling.
Weeks said he cooked dinner on a char-
coal grill on the wood porch of his trailer
earlier that night. He believes a stray
animal may have knocked over the grill
searching for food after he and his son
went to bed, starting the fire.
Fire officials ruled the blaze accidental
and believe it was caused by hot ashes
from the grill, according to a Columbia
FIRE continued on 3A


Louis Weeks stands
next to what is left of
his mobile home,
which was destroyed
in an early morning
fire Sunday. Weeks
and his son escaped
by. breaking a window
before flames engulfed
the single-wide trailer
near Columbia City.


GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter


Putting

a dent in

pill mills

DEA reports sharp
drop in oxycodone
purchases in state.

By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer
MIAMI A combination
of tough new laws and a high-
profile crackdown is chipping
away at Florida's dubious dis-
tinction as the nation's lead-
ing illicit source of powerful
prescription painkillers for
drug addicts and dealers, fed-
eral and state officials said
Wednesday.
NewU.S.DrugEnforcement
Administration figures show
that the number of oxycodo-
ne pills purchased by Florida
doctors dropped 97 percent
from 2010 to 2011, mainly due
to a state law that took effect
July 1 banning clinics and doc-
tors from dispensing them.
Yet the DEA numbers also
show a 14 percent drop in
Florida pharmacy purchases
of oxycodone over the same
time period, even counting a
small increase in the first three
months of 2011. The decline
at pharmacies coincided with
the takedown in February of
a network of Broward County-
based "pill mills" that used
some 1,600 Internet sites to
attract thousands of addicts
and drug dealers.
About 85 people, including
at least 13 doctors, have been
arrested in South Florida
over the past year on pill mill-
related charges, according
to federal prosecutors. U.S.
Attorney Wifredo Ferrer
said Wednesday at a pre-
scription pill abuse summit
in Lexington, Ky.; that fewer
people are coming from out
of state to Florida to buy pain-
killers.
"I'm hoping to dry up this
pipeline that we have between
South Florida and Kentucky
and Tennessee and Ohio,"
Ferrer said. "We're not going
to let up."
Florida's efforts were fur-
ther bolstered when the state
last year finally launched a
prescription drug monitoring
program aimed at curbing
doctor-shopping and track-
ing physicians who prescribe
unusually large amounts of
oxycodone and other pain-
killers. The program had to
overcome opposition from
Republican Gov. Rick Scott,
who questioned it as an intru-
sion into privacy and possibly
DEA continued on 3A

CALL US:
|I !(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 . . 1 Fax: 752-9400


Black History Month begins


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/LaKe City Reported
Florida Gateway College student Brandy Newkirk performs a praise dance Wednesday during the FGC Black
History Month Proclamation Program held at the old FGC library/future student center. About 150 students, faculty
and staff attended the event where students George Bryant sang 'Lift Every Voice and Sing' and Percephini Sykes
recited poetry.


Fracas

over


taking


prisons


private

State sen. booted
from budget
panel for dissent.

By GARY FINEOUT and
JAMES L. ROSICA
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Senate President
Mike Haridopolos on
Wednesday removed a vet-
eran GOP legislator from
a budget panel after he
fought a plan to privatize
prisons, saying he had lost
confidence in the lawmak-
er's willingness to cut gov-
ernment costs.
Haridopolos said he was
stripping'Sen. Mike Fasano
of his chairmanship of the
Senate budget subcommit-
tee that oversees spending
on prisons and the courts.
He was also removed from
the main budget commit-
tee.
"I had lost confidence in
him to build (on) the mis-
sion" of cutting the cost of
government, Haridopolos
told. reporters. "It was a
very difficult decision, but
I just felt he was not rowing
in the same direction. He
was not ready to make the
tough choices. He couldn't
handle the responsibility."
The move, however,
could upset the perceived
collegial working atmo-
sphere of the Senate at a
PRISONS continued on 3A


11th victim found in deadly crash


FHP details criteria
for determining
when to close a road.


By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
ORLANDO A pickup truck
involved in a deadly Florida inter-
state pileup was so badly burned
and crushed that it took investi-
gators more than two days to find


78
Isolated showers
WEATHER, 2A


a third body inside, authorities
said Wednesday.
The discovery brings the death
toll from the weekend crashes
on Interstate 75 to 11. The con-
dition of the wreckage has also
prompted investigators to enlist
anthropologists to help -identify
victims.
The newly discovered victim
was inside a Dodge pickup truck
that crashed into a tractor trailer
as it traveled south early Sunday
in smoky and foggy conditions,
authorities determined Tuesday.


The pickup's driver and anoth-
er passenger were discovered
before, but none of the three had
been identified Wednesday.
Anthropologists from the
University of Florida were looking
for any bone fragments and teeth
'that may help identify the bodies
from the pickup. The other eight
victims have been identified.
"The vehicle was crushed
between multiple vehicles," said
Larry Bedore, director of inves-
tigations for the medical examin-
er's office in Gainesville. "It was


Opinion .... ..
People.
Obituaries
Advice & Comics
Puzzles . .


in the center of an inferno that
melted most of the metal and a lot
of the glass."
Authorities closed the busy
six-lane highway early Sunday
because a mix of fog and smoke
from a nearby brush fire made
visibility difficult. The road was
reopened about three hours later
after the Highway Patrol deter-
mined conditions had improved.
The first pileup occurred a short
time later.
CRASH continued on 3A


TODAY IN
HEALTH
K.:.mner-,, ill,
3t ,:,,jd:


COMING


COMING
FRIDAY
L.:::3l ne.. :
r,:,un,,jiip


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012


CAM e3. Wednesday:
\. Afternoon: 1-4-4
Night: 5-9-2


ay 4) Wednesday:
- Afternoon: 7-6-5-9
Night: 6-9-6-6


STuesday:
"-- 3-10-15-28-29


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'Soul Train' creator found dead


LOS ANGELES "Soul Train" host
Don Cornelius was the arbiter of cool,
a brilliant TV showman who used
his purring, baritone voice to seduce
mainstream America into embracing
black music and artists.
But the "love, peace, and SOUL!"
he wished viewers as he closed each
show for decades escaped him as his
life descended into marital trouble,
illness and, finally, a fatal self-inflicted.
gunshot wound on Wednesday.
Police went to his Mulholland Drive
home around 4 a.m. after receiving a
call from one of his sons, who became
concerned after being contacted by'
his father. Cornelius,
75, was found shot
and was pronounced '
dead an hour later at a
nearby hospital.
Authorities ruled
out foul play, but have
not found a suicide
note and are talking
to relatives about his Cornelius
mental state.
To music-hungry viewers, he was a
smooth, sharp-dressed man who got
them dancing to the hottest tracks
going. The pop world's biggest stars
recalled him as much more: A cultural
groundbreaker who advanced African-
American music and culture; a black
entrepreneur who overcame racism
by strength of will; a visionary who
understood rap's emergence but criti-
cized its rawness.
Aretha Franklin, an early "Soul
Train" performer, called him "an
American treasure."
"God bless him for the solid, good
and wholesome foundation he provide,
ed for young adults worldwide," she
said, "and the unity and brotherhood
he singlehandedly brought about with
his most memorable creation of 'Soul
Train.'"
Donald Cortez Cornelius was born


Sept. 27, 1936, in Chicago. After
high school, he served as a Marine
in Korea. Cornelius was working
as an insurance salesman when he
spent $400 on a broadcasting course
and landed a part-time job in 1966
as announcer, newsman and DJ on
WVON radio. That's where listeners
first heard the distinctively mea-
sured and rich Cornelius rumble.
Cornelius began moonlighting
at WCIU-TV when Roy Wood, his
mentor at WVON, moved there, and
won a job producing and hosting "A
Black's View of the News." When
the station wanted to expand its
"ethnic" programming, he pitched a
black music show, and "Soul Train"
was born.
"You want to do what you're capa-
ble of doing. If I saw (Dick Clark's)
'American Bandstand' and I saw
dancing and I knew black kids can
dance better; and I saw white artists
'and I knew black artists make better
music; and if I saw a white host and
I knew a black host could project a
hipper line of speech, and. I did know
all these things," then it was reason-
able to try, he said.
"Soul Train," which began in 1970,
followed some of the "Bandstand"
format with its audience and young
dancers. But that's where the com-
parisons stopped. Cornelius, the ,
suave, ultra-cool emcee, mAde "Soul
Train" appointment viewing.
"There was not programming that.
targeted any particular ethnicity," he
said in 2006, then added: "I'm trying
to use euphemisms here, trying to
avoid saying there was no television
for black folks, which they knew was
for them."
Debra Lee, who is chairman
and chief executive of Black
Entertainment Television, was one
of those youngsters who tuned in to
the show. She said she would finish


her chores early so she could check
out the latest music, fashions and
dance moves.

Hoboken to 'Jersey Shore'
girls: 'Fahgettaboutit!'
HOBOKEN, NJ. -The women of
MTV's "Jersey Shore" say they're
not angry that Hoboken officials
won't allow a spinoff of the real-
ity show to be filmed in the city of
Frank Sinatra's birth.
But Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi and
Jenni "JWoww" Farley tell The
Associated Press the city would have
benefited from the proposed show.
They say officials likely based their
decision on "stereotypes" about the
show and its cast.
'"The thing is we don't go to a town
to damage it. ... We go to a town to
help it out," Farley said Wednesday.
"We wanted to help out Hoboken, we
wanted to give them more revenue,
we wanted to give (to) their stores."

Cameron plans move to
New Zealand farm
WELLINGTON, New Zealand -
Hollywood director James Cameron
is planning to move onto a New
Zealand farm.'
Cameron has successfully applied
to buy 1,067 hectares (2,636 acres)
of farmland in New Zealand. In
an application filed with the New
Zealand Overseas Investment Office,
Cameron says he and his family
"intend to reside indefinitely in New
Zealand and are acquiring the prop-
erty to reside on and operate as a
working farm."
Cameron, a Canadian, directed
two of Hollywood's most successful
films, 'Titanic" and "Avatar.".


(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Actress Elaine Stritch
is 87.
Actor Robert Mandan
is 80.
M Comedian Tom
Smothers is 75.
Rock singer-guitarist
Graham Nash is 70.
Television executive
Barry Diller is 70.
Country singer
Howard Bellamy (The
Bellamy Brothers) is 66.
M John Cornyn, R-Texas,


is 60.
Model Christie
Brinkley is 58.
Actor Michael Talbott
is 57.
Actor Michael T.
Weiss is 50.
Actor-comedian Adam
Ferrara is 46.
Actress Kim Zimmer
is 57.
Singer Shakira is 35.
Country singer Blaine
Larsen is 26.


Daily Scripture
"Hear, 0 Israel: The LORD our
God, the LORD is one. Love the
LORD your God with all your
heart and with all your soul and
with all your strength."

Deuteronomy 6:4-5 NIV


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ...............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on.Sunday.
Mpmber Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service. .
All material herein is property of the Lake I. n Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 1030 a.m, next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 10-880. an a redelveyor ser
Vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709' is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
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(twijson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
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CORRECTION'

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


'Inspirational
messages' bill passes
TALLAHASSEE The
Senate has approved a bill
promoting student-initiated
prayer and other "inspira-
tional messages" at public
school assemblies.
The bill (SB 98).was
passed 31-8 on Wednesday
with some Democrats join-
ing Republicans to support
the measure.
Sen. Gary Siplin spon-
sored the bill. The Orlando
Democrat says it keeps
students and not administra-
tors in charge of whether
and how to deliver mes-
sages of inspiration.
Such messages could
include student-initiated and
student-led prayer.
Other Democratic
senators say the bill may
be unconstitutional and
will almost certainly be
challenged in court U.S.
Supreme Court deci-
sions have banned state-
sponsored prayer in public
schools.
A House version of the
bill is stalled in committee.

Charge against Rubio
staffer dropped
BONITA SPRINGS
Southwest Florida pros-
ecutors aren't pursuing a
domestic battery charge
against a former regional
director for U.S. Sen. Marco
Rubio.
A spokeswoman for the
Lee County State Attorney's
Office said Wednesday that
Michael Brennan's wife
claims she was intoxicated
and didn't remember any-
thing. The spokeswoman
says prosecutors can't
pursue charges when the
victim is unwilling to par-
ticipate.
Brennan was arrested
last month after his wife
claimed he rolled her into
a carpet and punched and
kicked her while she was
inside. Brennan resigned
from his position as south-
west regional director with


Rubio's office after his
arrest
Brennan's attorney said
his wife made the false
allegations because she was
drunk and suffering from
postpartum depression.
According to a statement,
Brennan loves his wife and
will seek counseling so they
can be loving parents to
their children.

Man Wearing Obama
mask robs McDonald's
RIVIERA BEACH -
Police say a manr robbed a
South Florida McDonald's
while wearing a President
Barack Obama mask.
Riviera Beach police are
seeking the public's help
in finding the suspect, who
they say held employees
at gunpoint early Saturday.
The masked man ordered
everyone into a back office
and told the manager to put
cash in a cloth bag..
The Palm Beach Post
reports the suspect told
employees he would kill
them if they left the office.
He got away with about
$1,000.
Police say the suspect
was about 6-feet tall and
wore all black clothing and
white gloves.

Polo club founder
adopts girlfriend
WEST PALM BEACH -
A wealthy Florida polo club
founder has adopted his
adult girlfriend as part of a
legal battle stemming from
a fatal 2010 car crash.
Court records show
International Polo Club
Palm Beach founder John
Goodman legally adopted
42-year-old Heather Laruso
Hutchins. Hutchins says
the couple has been dating
since 2009.
Attorneys for the family
of a man killed in the car
crash tell the Palm Beach
Post the adoption is an
attempt by Goodman to
shield assets in a trust from
potential lawsuit damages.


THE WEATHER


Goodman's lawyer says it's ., "- .,
aimed at ensuring the future : ,,A
stability of his assets. ISOLATED ISOLATED ISOLATED q ISOLATED ISOLATED
Police find infant's SHOWERS [ SHOWERS SHOWERS SHOWERS SHOWERS
.o0i c e Tin d in f a n t s in r, ` 1- .
body in freezer i lr?
ui I n r a 9 U1 79I In 40


PUNTA GORDA -
Authorities in southwest
Florida say an autopsy
is pending for an infant
whose body was found in a
freezer.
Punta Gorda police.
tell the Sarasota Herald-.
Tribune that detectives
consider the babys death
to be suspicious.
According to a police
report, paramedics and
police were called to the
Punta Gorda home Sunday
night for a medical emer-
gency involving a 27-year-
old woman, who was trans-
ported to a Port Charlotte
hospital. '

3 die when car pulls
into path of truck
JACKSONVILLE -
Authorities say three
people died when a Toyota
sedan pulled into the path
of a tractor-trailer in north
Florida.
The crash happened
about 10 p.m. Tuesday on
U.S. 301 near Jacksonville.
Florida Highway Patrol
spokesman Bill Leeper says
the truck hit the driver's
side of the vehicle and
dragged it about 75 yards
before it stopped. He says
the car was completely
underneath the truck.
The Florida Times-Union
reports the two victims in
the front seat were wearing
seat belts. The backseat
passenger was not Their
names have not been
released pending notifica-
tion of their families.
The driver of the truck
was taken to the hospital
with injuries that were not
considered life-threatening.
The newspaper reports a
trucker who was sleeping
in his rig parked nearby
called 911.
(AP)


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City
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3.56 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
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75 60 Gainesville
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do Cape Canaveral Lakp City
60 75 65 Lap City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
o80 68 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
81 71 0 Pensacola
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83, 63 Miami Tampa
S 31. 69 Valdosta


Friday
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80, 72


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


77
53
68
43
87 in 1903.
25 in 1977

0.00"
0.00"
0.85"
0.11"
3.42"


SUN
Sunrse today
Sunsettoday
,Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:21 a.m.
6:08 p.m.
7:20 a.m.
6:09 p.m.

1:27 p.m.
2:54 a.m.
2:18 p.m.
3:46 a.m.


Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.
7 14 21 29
Full Last New First


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Thursday Friday







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T-"t-, i' ., .-. ,IL^J^._ yJ--'.L r _i -a'=nr_~ '- -~_. ,-"J *.-y-.. _.


On this date in
1990, thunder-
storms produced
severe weather
in the Lower
Mississippi Valley.
Thunderstorms
northeast of
Brandon, Miss. pro-
duced strong winds
and hail up to three
inches in diameter.


An exclusive
|service
brought to
lit our readers
30nmites ioln b
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

weather.com

Forecasts, data and
SMte ,graphics 0 2012 Weather
i !' I Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weteY www.weatheroublisher.com


FLORIDA'


Wednesday:
N/A


Ls I ;lic-Citl Reporteill


I














LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012 3A


Community Health, Wellness Fair set


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Medical screenings are an important ingredient in today's
healthcare.
Local residents will have an opportunity to get some
insight into their personal health during the Fourth Annual
Community Health and Wellness Fair, which will take place
from 8 am. noon, Saturday at the Richardson Community
Center, 255 NE Coach Anders Lane.
The event is sponsored by the Columbia County Recreation
Department, Lake Shore HospitalAuthority, and the Richardson
Community Center/Annie Mattox Park North Inc. group.
Nicole Smith, Columbia County Recreation Department
secretary, said approximately 15 vendors will be in attendance
at this year's event
This year's event will feature blood pressure checks, choles-
terol checks, body mass index screens and weight checks in
addition to other medical screenings.


"Well have guest speakers, including Dr. Robert Busch
of Busch Urology," Smith said. "He's going to speak on
prostate health."
The featured speaker for the event is Dr. Athena Randolph.
The topic of her address is "Red Alert Tackling the Obesity
Epidemic."
"Well be giving out door prizes every 30 minutes," Smith
said. 'There will be T-shirts for the first 100 participants and
the LifeSouth Bloodmobile will be there and by donating
blood, your name is entered to win one of three, $20 gift cards.
This event is free and opened to anyone and everyone."
Smith said the health and wellness fair serves as a benefit
for community members who want to know more about their
health and wellness.
"This event brings health awareness into the community in
an informal setting and it makes people more comfortable to
come out and get information on their health," she said. 'They
can have one-one, candid conversations with the healthcare
providers and get some answers to important healthcare
questions."


DEA: Sharp drop in oxycodone purchases reported

Continued From Page 1A


ineffective.
Taken together, the actions "sent a
clear message to others that the diver-
sion of (legal) pharmaceutical painkill-
ers would not be tolerated," said Mark
R Trouville, chief of the Miami DEA
office. "These statistics indicate that'
the message has been delivered."
In yet another statistic, in 2010, 90,
of the nation's top 100 physicians who
purchased oxycodone were located in
Florida, In 2011, that number dropped
to just 13 of the top 100.
Florida Attorney General Pam
Bondi, who has made combatting pill
mills a top state priority, said the "the
drastic decline in the sale of oxycodone


in Florida is a sure sign that the tough
laws we enacted are working. Our
work is far from over, we will continue
to fight until every bad doctor and
clinic is out of our state."
The numbers come from a DEA
system that tracks controlled sub-
stances such as oxycodone at every
stage from manufacturer until they are
dispensed. The numbers are still stag-
gering in Florida nearly 500 million
oxycodone doses were purchased by
doctors and pharmacies in 2011 but
it's clear on the street that things are
changing.
Tina Reed, an anti-pill mill activist in
Fort Lauderdale whose son is a recov-


ering addict, said groups still stage
protests and pickets outside pain clin-
ics. But there aren't as many as a few
months ago, she said.
"It isn't over, but it has definitely
improved," Reed said. "There are still
pill mills out there, but they are trying
to fly under the radar."
According to the Justice
Department, prescription drug abuse
contributes to nearly 40,000 deaths
each year and almost $200 billion in
annual health care costs. About 7 mil-
lion people use prescription drugs for
non-medical purposes and about one
in seven teenagers abuse prescription
drugs, the department says.


FIRE: Father, son just thankful to have each other
Continued From Page 1A


County Fire Department
incident report.
Weeks, who is an unem-
ployed construction and
air conditioner sales rep-
resentative, said he let
the insurance lapse on the
mobile home because he
couldn't afford the pay-
ment.
"When you're unem-
ployed you have to drop
some things," he said. "My
boss said he'd hire me
back if things pick up."
Weeks and his son are


staying with friends, but he
knows there is a sense of
urgency in finding another
place to stay.
"My friend said I can
stay as long as I want, but
you know how that goes,"
he said. "It's definitely not
a long-term solution."
Everything inside the
trailer was destroyed, leav-
ing them with very little.
"I don't have anything,"
he said. "I was at the hos-
pital in my underwear."
He said his son wakes


up crying because of the
uncertainty, in his life.
Classmates at Columbia
City Elementary School
donated clothes to his son,
which helps Weeks focus
on more immediate con-
cerns.
He is seeking volunteers
to help demolish and haul
away what's left of the
mobile home.
"I need help to clean up
the site and perhaps find
someone to donate or sell
a cheap trailer to replace


the one I lost," he said.
He wants to live at the
same location because he
believes his son has expe-
rienced enough turmoil in
his life because of the fire.
"This has been traumat-
ic enough my son to lose
his home," Weeks said.
"School gives him stability
when everything else is in
life is unstable."
Call Weeks at (386) 292-
3274 to volunteer with the
cleanup or any other assis-
tance.


PRISONS: Floor fracas
Continued From Page 1A


time that it is dealing with
a billion-dollar budget gap
and the once-a-decade job
of redistricting.
The Florida Education
Association and Florida
AFL-CIO were swift in fir-
ing off press releases criti-
cizing the move as "politi-
cal payback" for privatiza-
tion interests.
But Fasano, of New Port
Richey, said he'd "wear the
loss as a badge of honor"
for speaking up "for the
little guy."
Nearly 4,000 prison
employees' jobs in 26
facilities could be affected.
Lawmakers in support of
privatization say it could
save at least $16.5 million
a year. They're looking
to plug a more than one
billion dollar hole in this
year's state budget
Haridopolos declined


to bring up the privati-
zation bill (SB 2038) for
debate on the Senate floor
on Wednesday after cut-
ting off discussion the day
before. He said he wanted
to give senators the week-
end to continue to think
about their position.
Fasano translated the
move: "They don't have
the votes. That was a
given" when Haridopolos
refused to call up the bill
for debate, he said.
"I've been in the pro-
cess for 17 years," Fasano
said. "If the leadership,
with all great respect, had
the votes to pass privatiza-
tion, or at the minimum,
stop my amendments, they
would have brought the
bill up."
Fasano pushed a raft of
amendments earlier this'
week.


CRASH: llth victim found

Continued From Page 1A
At least a dozen cars, six to review their protocols.
tractor trailers and a moto- in determining when to,
rhome collided. Some cars shut down and reopen.,
were crushed under the a major highway. The,.
bellies of big rigs. Others Highway Patrol was also
burst into flames, making quick to point out that
it difficult to identify vic- motorists mustbe prepared
tims. to quickly make good deci- ,
The crash sent another sions because road condi-,
18 people to the hospital. tions can change quickly.
Members of a Brazilian Officials said the decision
church near Atlanta had to close a road is made by,,
expressed fears that one of a Highway Patrol supervi-
the survivors, 15-year-old sor, who relies on feedback
Lidiane Carmo, could be from troopers who assess
targeted by immigration road conditions. They use.
officials because she's in information and forecasts
the country illegally. But from the National Weather,
a U.S. Immigration and Service. A key piece of.
Customs Enforcement information is an index
spokeswoman said estimating the humidity
Wednesday that the girl is and smoke dispersion on a,
not facing deportation. scale of 1 to 10. If the score
Five other members is 7 or higher, the Highway
of the church called Patrol's protocol is to close
Igreja Internacional the road.
da Restauracao, or The index score for early
International Church of the Sunday had been forecast
Restoration, were killed in to be a 6 in the four-county
Sunday's crash. region that includes the
Meanwhile, Florida offi- crash site, according to the
cials said they are willing National Weather Service.


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Thursday, February 2, 2012


ONE-


ONE
OPINION


Pythons


adapt too


readily


to Glades
he National Park
Service says 1,825
Burmese pythons
have been caught
in and around the
Florida Everglades since 2000.
One of the largest over 16 feet
long and weighing 156 pounds
- was caught just in January.
The Burmese pythons have
been joined in the swamps by
other discarded pets: African
pythons and assorted constric-
tors. They are rapidly vacu-
uming the Everglades clean
of native wildlife: raccoons,
opossums, bobcats, marsh and
cottontail rabbits, deer, foxes,
and endangered wood rats and
wood storks. One python even
tried to eat a-live alligator.
The National Park Service
says that in areas where the
snakes are known to be active,
sightings of medium-size mam-
mals have dropped by as much
as 99 percent
It's not hard to envision
what happens next With their
prey exhausted, the snakes
will begin moving out of the
Everglades in search of food -
pets, for example. Florida Sen.
Bill Nelson says that snakes
don't belong in the Everglades
in the first place, "and they cer-
tainly don't belong in people's
backyards."
In January, the U.S. Fish
'and Wildlife Sefice, under '."
the Obama administration,
finally issued a ban on import-
ing or taking across state lines
Burmese pythons, yellow
anacondas and northern and
southern African pythons.
The administration found itself
up against a surprisingly strong
reptile lobby. According to fig-
ures collected by The Washington
Post, the reptile trade is a $2
billion business in the United
States, with 11 million reptiles
kept as pets and more reptiles
imported into the U.S. than any-
where else in the world.
If the snakes can't be eradicat-
ed, they have -to be controlled.
Soon, wearing shoes, belts,
jackets, suitcases and hatbands
made from Burmese-python
skin may not be a fashion state-
ment It will be a civic duty.
M Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
Strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
'spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters


and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


OPINION


www.lakecityreporter.com


NO T ST 1iM TA L MPW TO 1M



Here's your chance!


"occupy" move-
ment and "de-
worming" have
in common?
The "occupy" movement is-
the expression of discontent; a
desire to make changes in the
world to promote fairness and
prevent abuse of power. The
"De-Worming Project" is a proj-
ect started by 22-year-old Aaron
Jackson, to give de-worming
medication to starving children
in Haiti and Costa Rica. Rainn
Wilson (from "The Office" tele-
vision show) became interested
-n the project, and plunged in
to help. (You can see this story
on.YouTube.) These are two
good examples of "causes." A
"cause" is an effort to correct a
bad situation and to make the
world a better place.
Wouldn't the world be a
little better if we, all could find
a cause? It's not as difficult as
you might think. Sometimes
just a tiny step or a gerintle
nudge can have a huge influ-
ence. Did you see a movie
about a young boy who decided
to "play it forward"? .When
someone does something good
for you, pass it on and do some-
thing good for the next guy you
see needing some help.
How do you choose a cause
that's right for you? As you go
through your day, there must


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


be hundreds of opportunities.
Where do you see a need,
sadness, stress, grief, pain, or
sorrow? What are some or
your own unique skills, talents,
abilities, or knowledge, that
if shared could make a differ-
ence? Do you have a hobby,
sport, or special interest that
could also help another, as a
side benefit? What unique gift
might you have to offer?
See if you can add some
examples to this list: You're
a senior in assisted living,
and can bring a little fun
to other seniors with your
hobby-magic, storytelling,
slide show. You're a college
student who could be a "big
brother" or "big sister" to a
naive new freshman. You
could start a "neighborhood
watch" in your neighborhood
where there has been a recent
burglary. You could visit a
senior center or a shopping
center, and play piano during
lunch hour. You could save


your loose change for the
Salvation Army. You could
just become'more active in a
church. Visit the hospital, or
volunteer at a hospice. Or,
just join someone else's cause:
a walk or run for a charity.
Donate unused clothes to
a charity thrift shop, or the
church rummage sale.
What if you don't take up a'
cause? The world will surely
go on without you. But if you
were able to make even one
person feel a little better, or
a little happier, wouldn't it
be worth it? What's a smile
worth? Can't do much? It
might not take much. If you
were to do what you already
do in your spare time, maybe
sharing it could make some-
. one else a little happier?
What cause would you
choose? Even if you just have
an idea to share, it could help
others get started, and could
make a big difference. If
you Email me your ideas, I'll
be glad to share them with
Florida, and we could make a
difference.

Bob Denny has counseled
troubled youth and families in
Florida for 15 years and teaches
psychology at Florida Gateway
College. Your comments and ideas
are appreciated at Bob.Denny@
gmail.com.


Super Bowl is excess in time of austerity


ust when you think
you've heard it all,
someone reports that
the price of the best
seat at the Super Bowl
- row one on the 50-yard line of
Indianapolis' Lucas Oil Stadium
- is a cool $17,048. That's about
what it would cost you to buy a
50-inch television set for every
room in your house, includ-
ing the bathrooms, where
you could watch this struggle
between the Ciants and Patriots
in great comfort
For a lower-level seat at the
40-yard line, you get a break.
The resale price, according to
news reports, is $16,480, a tri-
fling amount when you consider
the value of telling your grand-
kids or whomever that you
were in this Midwest capital to
see a historic rematch between
two East Coast teams. That, of
course, is if you are from Boston
or New York and really care.
Otherwise, you can talk about
the War Memorial downtown
and certainly basketball.
That, plus other resale
costs for this annual example
of excess, qualifies it for the
profligacy title in the Guinness
World Records. Anyone able to
pay that much unquestionably
is vulnerable for an income
tax hike in Barack Obama's
scheme to make the rich pay
up. Actually, the face value of
a ticket ranges from $800 to
$1,200. But don't show up in


Dan K. Thomasson
Indianapolis thinking you can
buy one for that price, if you
could get one at all.
The average price for the
ticket sold on site is $4,223,
enough to buy only about three
good TV sets with some change
left over for snacks, confetti and
the shirt of your favorite player
for a home-staged celebration.
You could even afford to throw
a beer through one of the sets
when the other team scores.
Another disparaging factor in
the price is that your food and
drinks for all those intermis-
sions and half times and time
outs will cost somewhat less
than it does to reach the moon.
As a native Hoosier, I
don't remember anything in
"Naptown" quite worth that
much. But then I came from
the next county down, at a
time when movie tickets cost
25 cents and you grew your
own popcorn. I would like to
think that few who reside in
the region are crazy enough
to pay those prices, especially
since the Colts aren't there
and despite the fact that one


of the quarterbacks'is named
Manning. And, oh yeah, this
isn't the 500-mile auto race.
This exhibition of indulgence -
the national ticket for Super Bowl
Sunday is $11 billion seems
to disprove statistics showing
that while the country is back
in a growth pattern, Americans
individually still have consider-
able pocketbook aches from the
binge spending we have endured
over the last two presidential
administrations. Those planning
to attend, however, either haven't
been touched by the downturn
or are willing to hock something
just to experience firsthand such
a momentous event where they
can ogle millionaire players in
person and rub up against mil-
lionaire fans.
But I digress. The annual
spectacular rivals anything the
Romans staged and attracts
tens of millions of viewers
worldwide on sets ranging from
70-inch plasma HD to grainy
19-inch analog. I, for one, will
clutch my wallet tightly, prop
up my feet, open a.diet drink
and watch the event on a mid-
sized set, napping in between
the wonderful commercials
and thankful that I am not
"Back Home Again in Indiana"
for this. Oh, I'll probably do
some ogling on my own of
Madonna.

* Dan K. Thomasson writes for
Scripps Howard News Service.


4A


ANO
VI


THEIR
E W


Obama's


deadly


secret

Now that it's in '
full campaign
mode, the Obama
administration
can't stop talking
about things once regarded
as secret. President Obama
has been bragging about the
once-shadowy SEAL Team 6
so much you'd think he was
going to tap it to be his running
Inate. Defense Secretary Leon
E. Panetta caused a flap with
Pakistan on Sunday when he
told "60 Minutes" he "believed"
that "somebody must have
had some sense" that Osama
bin Laden was hiding out in
Abbottabad, though he had no
proof. President Obama piled
on during his "historic" Google
Plus video chat on Monday, in
which he tore the fig leaf from
U.S. covert drone strikes in
Pakistan's tribal areas.
Mr. Panetta delved into the
legality of U.S. drone strikes
against American citizens
abroad in his Sunday interview.
The issue continues to nag the
administration, which claims
it has the right to terminate
American citizens without due
process but also says that the
rationale for doing so is clas-
sified. Mr. Panetta refused to
go into specifics, but he said
the government was, "required
under a process of law to be
able to justify that despite the
fact that [a] person may be a
citizen, he is first and foremost
a terrorist who threatens our
people, and for that reason, we
can establish a legal basis on
which we oughta go after that
individual." The process of law
Mr. Panetta is referring to is an
administrative procedure in the
White House, not something
that would satisfy constitutional
due-process standards.
Asked if Mr. Panetta was say-
ing that the people in question
automatically "lose their citi-
zenship if this administration
decides they're a terrorist," Mr.
Panetta hedged. He said that
if they returned to the United
States they would be afforded
due-process rights. In fact, the
Obama administration has gone
out of its way to extend full con-
stitutional rights to foreigners,
such as Somali terrorist Ahmed
Abdulkadir Warsame, who was
transported secretly to the
United States in the summer
of 2011 for arraignment in a
federal court solely to establish
that precedent.
When it comes to Americans
abroad, there apparently are no
such protections. Mr. Panetta
attempted to use a "threat of
imminent harm" defense: "if
a terrorist is out there on the
battlefield, and the terrorist is
threatening this country, that
person is an enemy combatant,
and when an enemy combatant
holds a gun at your head, you
fire back." But to the White
House, the battlefield means
anywhere in the world, and the
threat could refer to anything.
This expansive, pre-emptive
self-defense logic may be justifi-
able for taking out foreign ter-
rorists, but it fails miserably as
a rationale for executive assas-
sination of American citizens.
The administration's con-
tortions over the issue are
no surprise considering Mr.
Obama's past statements on
his predecessor's handling
of terrorists. Try as it might,
this administration can't have
it both ways. Mr. Obama
should take the medicine he
prescribed for George W.
SBush and release his advisers'
own memos on the legality of
targeting American citizens
with lethal force without due
process allowing the American
public to decide whether this
practice is acceptable.


* Washington Times

















LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012 5A



What Black History means to me


By Befaithful Coker
Special to the Lake City Reporter
The value of black
history is constantly
evolving. Whether
value is placed on
history by looking
backwards or forward is a matter
of personal opinion. My personal
opinion is that the celebration of
black history is an opportunity to
build one leg of the relay team. I
use it to measure myself, against
the team or the whole. Where
do I need to improve? Has my
personal progress added benefit


to the team? Do I need additional
resources? I take my answers
to those questions back to the
team captain. I am the captain of
my ship, therefore I start with an
inward focus on improvements.
I also celebrate black history
because in my self-assessment
I get an opportunity to think
about the role others played
in my life. This year I want to
thank three very special people
for what they did to establish
the foundation of my perception
some twenty five to thirty years
ago. I want to thank Melinda
Moses for instilling a very high


Historically Speaking


Befaithful Coker

level of self-esteem inside of me.
I want to say thank you Terry
Huddleston for teaching me to
be patient, to be flexible and to
be fair. I want to thank Dillon &
Teresa Spradley for teaching me
that love is inspiring and motivat-
ing everyone to be better without
exception to race or any other


bias. If we can accept that black
history is looking into the his-
tory, asking what worked, what
didn't, and what needs to keep
improving, we will all take pride
and ownership in answering the
questions, we have all worked
hard to build America. Keep on
improving.
Assessing Progress
Walter "Polk" Jones Sr.:
Born nearly one century ago,
Mr. Jones made his home in
Lake City in 1927. He and late
wife Stella, had one daughter,
Marie, and two sons, Walter and


Tal. Mr. Jones has seven grand-
children, and quite a few great
grandchildren.
Each of his chil-
dren are college
graduates. A dis-
tinguished honor
not many can
assert.
In 1939, Mr. Jones
Jones purchased
his first home in
Lake City, in King's Quarters
Subdivision. In 1942, the Navy
drafted Mr. Jones.

HISTORY continued on 6A


OBITUARIES


Cynthia Pope Braden
Cynthia Pope Braden, 51, of
Lake City, passed away on
Saturday, January 28, 2012 at
North Florida Regional Medi-
,al Center in Gainesville, fol-
lowing an extended illness.
Born on July 30, 1960 in Albany,
3a., to the late James Everett
Pope and Annie Lou Hamm.
She loved the outdoors, swim-
ning, canoeing, doing word
searches, watching cop shows,
spoiling her grandchildren and
;pending time with her family.
She is preceded in death by one
brother Michael Everett Pope.
Survivors include her mother
Annie Lou Pope of Lake City,
threee sons; Danny Braden
Joshua Bradeh, Jonathan
Braden, all of Lake City, daugh-
:er; Diana Braden of Lake City,
brother ; Gregory Pope (Jew-
-l) of Lake City, sisters; June
Green, Debbie Dukawicz both
)fLake City and two grandsons.
Funeral services will be con-
Jucted Friday, February 3, 2012
at 2:00 P.M. at Gateway Forest
Lawn Funeral Home Chapel
with Rey. James Roberts of-
ficiating. Interment will follow
at Forest Lawn Memorial Gar-
lens. Visitation with the family
will be Thursday, February 2,
2012 at .the funeral home from
5:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 S. US Hwy 441, Lake
City,. Fl. (386) 752-1954.
Please Sign our guest book' at
www.gatewayforestlawn. corn

John M. Houston
MVr. John Marion Houston, 81,
passed quietly in his sleep on
lanuary 30, 2012. Mr. Hous-
;on was born October 13, 1930
in Coffee County, Alabama. He
aad been a resident of Columbia
County for 22 years. He served
-is country as a soldier in the
United States Army, attaining the


John W Bums III, Agent
234 SW Main Boulevard
Lake City, FL 32056
Bus: 386-752-5866
Y l'li'i r l i ., i ;" ,11, | '11" L,)I,


rank of Corpo-
ral. Preceding
him in death:
Parents, John
Guerny Hous-
ton and Myrtis
Lee Bembo
Houston; two
sisters, one
brother and
one grandson.
Mr. Houston is
survived by his


loving wife of 57 1/2 years, An-
nie Pearl Paschal Houston; chil-
dren, Shirlene, Rachel, Milton,
Franklin and Charles; 10 grand-
children; six great-grandchil-
dren; four sisters and one brother.
Family meant the world to him,
and he will be dearly missed. He
has found peace with the Lord.
Funeral services for Mr. Houston
will be 12:30 p.m., Thursday,
February 2, 2012 at the National
Cemetery, Jacksonville, Florida.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"

Robert H. Humphries
Mr. RobertH."Bob" Humphries,
78 of Lake City passed away on
Monday, January 30, 2012 at the
St. Vincent's Medical Center in
Jacksonville. He was a native of
Duncan's Creek, North Carolina
and son to the late Summie and
Carrie Gettys Humphries. Mr.
Humphries was a retired United
States Air Force Veteran with
a career that spanned 20 years
and served during Vietnam. Mr.
Humphries moved to Lake City
in 1995 from Shelby, North
Carolina and was a member of
the Christian Heritage Church in
Lake City. He enjoyed playing
golf and growing dahlias in his
garden, often giving his flowers
away to help brighten someone's
day. Mr. Humphries was a loving
and caring husband to his wife
of over 18 years and a kind'and


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He is survived by his wife,
Helen Jo Humphries, Lake
City, one son, Mark Humphries,
South Carolina, his grandchil-
dren, Jerod, Charlie and Isabella
Humphries, three daughters,
Gina (Robbie) Crews, Lake
City, Denise (Tom) Ott, Jackson-
ville and Dee Dee (Bill Schmidt)
Montpetit, Seattle, WA and
his grandchildren, Genevieve
Schmidt, Kris (Maile) Ott, Chris
(Loria) Crews and Carly Crews.
Two great-grandchildren, four
nephews, Ron Hicks, San Fran-
cisco, CA, Kit Hicks, Marion,
NC, Jim Humphries, Greer, SC
and Scott Hicks, South Carolina
and one niece, Dianne (Buzz)
Willis, Marion, NC also survive.
Funeral services for Mr.
Humphries will be conducted
on Friday, February 3, 2012
at 11:00 AM in the Chapel of
Guerry Funeral Home with Rev.
Chris Jones, Pastor of Christian
Heritage Church officiating. In-
terment will follow on Monday,
February 6, 2012 at 12:30 PM at
the Jacksonville National Cem-
etery in Jacksonville, FL with
full military honors. Visitation
with the !family will be from
10-11:00 AM, one hour prior to
the service. In lieu of flowers,
the family request donations be
made to the Alzheimer's As-
sociation in memory of Mr.
Humphries. Arrangements are
under the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, Lake City.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome. net

Deacon Willie Frank
Mitchell
Deacon Willie Frank Mitch-
ell, 83, of Lake City, De-
parted this life on January


30, 2012 to be with the Lord.
He left us with many loving
and pleasant memories. He
was born on October 15, 1928.
Survivors are a brother John-
nie Mitchell of Valdosta, GA.
Five children, RoAnne Hender-
son (Lorenzo) Valdosta, Ga.;
Frankie Lee Mitchell-Heming-
way (Douglas) Washington, DC;
Willie L. Mitchell Lake City;
William Mitchell Washington,
DC and Tyrone (Ernestine)
Mitchell District Heights, MD.
Three step children, Johnnie
Mae Bell, Elnora Bell-Rawls,
Kissimmee, Fl. and James Hen-
ry Bell III, Jasper, Fl. Eighteen
grandchildren and twenty two
Great. Grand Children. A host
of special friends and neighbors
and a special thanks to the staff
at Lake City Medical Center.
Visitation for family and friends
will be from 4-7pm. Friday Feb-
ruary 3,2012 attheFuneral home.
Funeral services will be held
\


pharmacy


Saturday, February 4, 2012 at
the New Bethel Missionary Bap-
tist Church, 550 N.E., Martin Lu-
ther King Jr. Street, Lake City at
2:00P.M. with the Rev. Alvin J.
Baker, pastor/teacher officiating.
Interment will be on Monday
February 6, 2012 at 1:00 P.M. at
the Sun Set Hill Cemetery, 1100
N. Oak Street, Valdosta, Ga.
MIZELL FUNERAL HOME
365 N.W. Washington Street
is in charge of arrange-
ments. Ph. (386)752-3166
E-mail rudolmize@aol.com.
Please sign the guest book at
www.mizellfuneralhome.com.

lona Lois Warner
lonaLoisWarner, 84,ofLakeCity,
FL, passed away on Feb. 1, 2012
at Shands, U.F. in Gainesille, FL.
She is the daughter of William
Osterloh and Elsie Allen, born
Mar. 16, 1927 in Crookston, MN.


She was preceded in death by.,
her husband, Robert L. War-
ner, Son, Larry R. Warner
and brother, Darwin Osterloh.
She is survived by her son, Ron
"Roberta" Warner of Home-
stead, FL; two daughters, Jacey
"Jerry" Norton of Garland,
TX, and Jean Yonn of Mac-
clenny, FL; 5 grandchildren
and 7 great-grandchildren.
Graveside service will be held
on Feb. 3, 2012 at 11:00 AM at
Fort White Cemetery, with Bro.
Carl Taylor officiating. Interment
will be" in Ft. White Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the
care of EVANS-CARTER
FUNERAL HOME,
High Springs, FL


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, dall the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Feb. 2

Lake City Masons
We are pleased to
inform you that the 1st
Stated Communication
in February will be Lake
City Masonic Lodge #27's
Americanism program on
Thursday, Feb. 2. Our spe-
cial guests that night will
be recording artist group
The Mercy Mountain
Boys, who will be perform-
ing their song Soldier's
Letter. We are also pleased
to welcome the American
Legion Color Guard, who
will present the colors for
the Pledge of Allegiance. If
that were not enough, we
will also have a speaker
for your entertainment
and information. This
meeting will be open, so
please bring your wife.or
significant other and family.
Dinner will be served at 6
p.m. and the program will
begin at 7 p.m.
Blood Drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have
blood drive Feb. 2 at Winn-
Dixie from 11 a.m. to 7
p.m.
Feb. 2.

Robotics fundraiser
Columbia High School
FIRST Robotic Team 3556
is holding a fundraiser on
Thursday from 5-8 pm at
Moe's Southwest Grill on
Hwy 90. A portion of the
proceeds and tips will ben-
efit the team. Come out to
enjoy dinner and support
not only Team 3556 but
Columbia County when
we compete at the FIRST
Competition in Orlando in
March. Learn more about
this team at team3556.com
Feb. 3

Gospel concert
Southern Gospel soloist
Ann Downing, a popular
performer on the Gaither
Gospel Homecoming video
series, will be in concert
at the Wellborn United.
Methodist Church, 12005
County Road 137, at 7 p.m.
on Friday, Feb. 3. For infor-
mation call (386)754-8524.
Blood Drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have
blood drive Feb. 3 at
Health Center of Lake City
from 1 to 6 p.m.
Volunteer training
Hospice of the Nature
Coast will provide orienta-
tion training for individu-
als who are interested in
learning more about,
Hospice volunteer oppor-
tunities. The class will
be held on Friday, Feb.
3, at the Hospice of the
Nature Coast Clinical office
Conference Room, 150
N. Main Street in High


Springs, from 9 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. Lunch will be
provided.
The class provides
an overview of Hospice
philosophy and history.
Participants will become
acquainted with services
provided by Hospice of the
Nature Coast for patients
and their families. They
will also become familiar
with the concept of pal-
liative care and learn the
importance of confidential-
ity. At the end of this train-
ing, those wishing to vol-
unteer in specific areas will
be qualified to do so. Teens
and high school students
are encouraged to attend.
To register for this class,
contact Rebecca McCuller,
Hospice of the Nature
Coast Volunteer Services
Manager at 386-755-7714.
Hyssongs in concert
The Hyssongs will'be
presenting a concert of
gospel music at the Lulu
Advent Christian Church,
254 SE Gillen Terrace in
Lulu, on Feb. 3 at 7 p.m.

Feb. 4

Church yard sale.
The Lake City Church of,
God, 173 SE Ermine Ave.,
Kid's Club will have a yard
sale Saturday, Feb. 4 in the
Family Life Center from 7
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Blood Drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have
blood drive Feb. 4 at
Richardson Community
Center Health Fair from
9 a.m. to noon. All*donors.
can enter to win one of
three $20 Walmart gift
cards. There will also be a
drive at Hungry Howie's
from 1 to 5 p.m. All donors
receive a free small sub or
personal pizza.
Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Haven
Hospice will celebrate 5
years of the Suwannee
Valley Care Center, 6037
W. US Highway 90, and 25
years serving the area with
a birthday party Saturday,
Feb. 4 from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. There will be bounce
houses, snacks and activi-
ties, free of charge.

Health fair
The Columbia County
Recreation Department will
host ifs annual Health and
Wellness Fair Saturday,
Feb. 4 from 8 a.m. to
noon at the Richardson
Community Center. To par-
ticipate with a booth, call
754-7095 or email nicole_
smith@columbiacountyfla.
com.
West Virginia Day.
The West Virginia
Annual Reunion will be
held on Feb. 4 start-


ing at 11:30 a.m. Please
bring a covered dish to
share for the luncheon.
The event will be held at
Epiphany Church, 1905
SW Epiphanty Court. For
questions, information, or
reservations please call
386-755-4937.


at the Clubhouse, 189
Claudia Way. Our guest
speaker will be Mr. James
Montgomery talking about
the History of Alligator
Lake
Lunch is $11.00. Plan
to attend it should be very
interesting.


Olustee Festival Pageant Blue/Grey meeting


. The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, Feb.4. Ages
3-12 mos, 13mo-23 mo,
2-4, 5-6 and 7-9 will be
held at 4 p.m. at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be
held at 7 p.m. Winners in
each division will receive a
$50 savings bond, crown,
banner and ride in the
Olustee parade on Feb.
14. The pageant is open to
the public with admission
at the door: $5.00 adults
and students. Applications
are available at the
Columbia County Library
or Chamber of Commerce.
Deadline for entries is 1-23-
2012. For more information
you may contact pageant
director, Elaine Owens at
386-965-2787.

Black History Movie
Festival
Black History Movie
Festival, 4-8pm Olustee
Park.
Feb. 5

Abundant Life Church
Pastor Cagney Tanner
and his wife Shelby invite
the public to the first ser-
vices of Abundant Life
Church, 671 State Road
100 in Lake City, between
S&S and Ken's Barbecue.
Services include Sunday
school at 10 a.m., Sunday
worship at 11 a.m. and 6
p.m. and Thursday service
at 7:30 p.m. Call (386) 984-
0310 for information.
Blood Drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have
blood drive Feb. 5 at the
Lake City Mall from noon
to 6 p.m.
Church homecoming
The Vineyard Southern
Baptist, 1832 SW Tomaka
Terrace, will have the 5th
annual Homecoming on
Feb. 5. Sunday services
will be at 10:30 a.m. with
a covered dish lunch to
follow. There will not be
Sunday school that day.
Everyone is welcome. Call
365-0764 for information.
Feb. 8
Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon
The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends will be held at
11:00 a.m. on Wednesday
February 8th at Eastside
Village (off of Baya)


The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St across
from Aquatics Center.

Feb. 9

DAR meeting
The Edward Rutledge
Chapter DAR (Daughters
of the American
Revolution) will hold
its-monthly meeting on
Thursday, February
9, 10:30 a. m., at the
Senior Services Center,
28 SE Allison Court (off
Baya Avenue), Lake
City. Annette Lindsey
will be speaking on the
United Daughters of the
Confederacy. All guests
are welcomed. For further
information, please call
752-2903.
Loss workshop
Hospice of the Nature
Coast will host an educa-
tional seminar on "Coping
with the Loss of Your
Spouse" on Thursday, Feb.
9 at 2 p.m. in the Wings
Community Education
Center in the Lake City
Plaza. There is no cost
to attend. Please contact
Vickie Myers at 386-755-
7714 to register or with any
.questions you may have.
Feb. 10

Friends of Music
The Friends of Music
Concert Series will pres-
ent its second concert of
the season on Friday, Feb.


10 at 7:30 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church, 697
SW Baya Dr. Dr. Laura Ellis,
organist/harpsichordist, and
Dr. Steven Thomas, cellist,
will perform. Both musi-
cians are professors at the
University of Florida. The
concert is free, and a recep-
tion will follow. For more
information call Bill Poplin at
3654932.
Feb. 11

FACS Valentine's Day event
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will have a Valentine's
Day Dinner and Dance on
Saturday, Feb. 11 from 6
to 10 p.m. in the Epiphany
Catholic Church Social Hall.
There will be entertain-
ment, music, dancing and a
cultural food buffet Please
bring your best covered dish
to share. The event is free
for members, $10 for non-
members. Call 965-5905 for
information.
Gospel sing
Southwide Baptist
Church, 388 SE Baya
Drive, will have a Gospel
Sing Saturday, Feb 11 at
6 p.m. Pine Grove Choir,
The happy Carter Family,
Jennifer Sherrill, and
Herman Hampton will per-
form. There is no admission.
Bus trip
"What Freedom Looked
Like" a bus trip to Ft Mose,
St Augustine, Florida -
Florida's all free black settle-
ment, 7am 6pm; meet at
Richardson Gym. $25 per
person includes lunch.

Zumba fundraiser for
Habitat for Humanity
All proceeds go to Habitat
for Humanity of Lake City/
Columbia County Inc. for
one hour long Zumba class
facilitated by American
Family Fitness, 4578 Sw
Heritage Oaks Circle, Suite
102 on Feb. 11 at 11 am.
The donation cost is $10


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email lhampson@lakecityreporter.com


per person. A fire truck and
bloodmobile will be on site
too.
Pre-Valentine Banquet
First Central Association
Women's Department
will host the Annual Pre-
Valentine Banquet on
Saturday, Feb. 11 at 6
p.m. The event will be
held at the Springville
Community Center, 3710
NW Suwannee Valley Rd.
Tickets are $25 each and
may be purchased from the
Missionary Department of
any of the local First Central
Churches. The Speaker will
be Carla Herring Blalock of
Suwannee County. Special
music will be provided by
Kyler Burke, a student at
Columbia High School. For
more information you may
contact Gloria McIntosh at
755-1099. Dress is semifor-
mal or church attire.
Founder's Day Program
The Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-Cookman
University Alumni invites
you to our Founder's Day
Program on Feb. 11 at 4
p.m. at the Holiday Inn.
Dr. Trudie Kibbee Reed, .
President of Bethune-
Bookman University will be
our speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church attire...,
Valentine's Day Ball
The 1st annual
Valentine's Day Ball,
presented by the Rotary
Club of Lake City, will
be Saturday, Feb. 11
from 6 tol0 p.m. at The
Country Club of Lake City..
Cocktails, dinner, dancing
and entertainment with
"Harry, Sally and Billy."
Dress is Black-Tie optional.
Tickets are $50 each and -:
are available at the Lake
City Reporter, The Wheeler:'
Agency, Hunter Printing,
First Street Music, Parks-
Johnson Agency on Hwy .
90 West or call 752-0812.
Gentlemen...BE A HERO...
bring her to the Valentine's
Day Ball!


. .


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After V'-ari Of SirtIl.aLtel Use Vh,
MTa tln'[n.l SupporrL 4 L me Biin i
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HISTORY: What it means to me

C mtinued From Page 5A


Strolling down memory
lane, brings laughter to
Mr. Jones as he recalls the
community he raised his
children more than half a
century ago. Mr. Jones
recalled purchasing his tele-
vision when radio was the
norm in homes. Mr. Jones
enjoyed being the gathering
place for television viewers,
in part, because it kept him
involved with his children.
In 2011, Jones spoke at the
Richardson Community
Center, stressing the impor-
tance of parental involve-
ment Mr. Jones shared that
technology brings many
advances; however, none
should be allowed to replace
the involvement of parents.
Mr. Jones has been coined
the "Westside Historian".
He has a memory that is as
sharp as a tack and the intel-
lect to support his very logi-
cal approach and sensible
rationale. We love you Mr.
Jones.


Test Your History
Knowledge.

Local History:
1883- Aggie and Jenkins
Jones outright purchased the
property known to us today
as Richardson Community
Center from Louise Cathey
to start the tourist site Aunt
Aggies Boneyard. Property
ownership changed and
the facility later became
Richardson High School
After integration the facility
was no longer necessary.
Glenn Hunter purchased the
facility to prevent demoli-
tion, and made a donation
resulting in its current usage
as Richardson Community
Center.
National History Trivia:
The 3-way automatic stop
sign was invented by this
African American and sold
to General Electric?


Answer: Inventor Garrett
Augustus Morgan was
born in Paris, Kentucky.
Born into poverty and
with only a fifth-grade
education, he moved
to Cleveland, Ohio and
worked as a sewing-
machine mechanic. By
1907 he had a patent
for an improved sewing
machine and began his
own sewing machine
business. He patented
his automatic traffic
signal (1923) and sold it
to the General Electric
Co. In the 1920s he
collaborated in starting
a newspaper for African-
Americans, the Cleveland
Call (later the Call
and Post). He was also
active in the Cleveland
Association of Colored
Men and the National
Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012 7A


Oral cancer
virus affects
7 percent of
Americans
BY LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO About 16
million Americans have oral
HPV, a sexually transmit-
ted virus more commonly
linked with cervical cancer
that also can cause mouth
cancer, according to the
first nationwide estimate.
HPV- human papilloma
virus is increasingly rec-
ognized as a major cause
of oral. cancers affecting
the back of the tongue and
tonsil area. Smoking and
heavy drinking are also key
causes.
Until now, it was not
known how many people
have oral HPV infections.
Overall, 7 percent of
Americans aged 14 to 69 are
infected, the study found.
But the results are not
cause for alarm. While
mouth cancers are on the
rise probably from oral
sex most people with
oral HPV will never devel-
op cancer. And most don't
have the kind most strongly
linked to cancer. Also, tests
for oral HPV are costly and
mainly used in research.
Still, experts say the study
provides important informa-
tion for future research that
could increase knowledge
about who is most at risk
for oral cancer and ways to
prevent the disease.
The nationally repre-
sentative study is based
on 30-second gargle tests
given to about 5,500 people
in a 2009-10 government
health survey. Their mouth-
wash samples were tested
for HPV.
The results were pub-
lished. online Thursday in
the Journal of the American
Medical Association.'
There are many types of
HPV, but one in particular,
known as HPV-16, is most
strongly linked with oral
cancer and also is a com-
mon cause of cervical can-
cer. That form was found,
in about 1 percent of people
studied, translating to about
2 million Americans.
Dr. Maura Gillison, the
lead author and a research-
er at Ohio State University,
said the study "provides
us some reassurance"
that most people with oral
HPV will not get oral can-
cer. Millions may have oral
HPV, but fewer than 15,000
Americans get HPV-linked
oral cancer each year.
She said the .study
should prompt research
into whether the existing
vaccines for cervical cancer
protect against oral HPV,
too.


Food Network, book take



on weight in chef whites


BY LEANNE ITAUE
Associated Press
NEW YORK- Paula Deen's diabe-
tes revelation pretty much sums it up:
Kitchen pros at all levels struggle with
obesity and its dangerous aftertaste in
the high-pressure, high-calorie world
of food.
The queen of Southern comfort
cooking, now a spokeswoman for a
diabetes drugmaker's health initiative,
announced last week that she hid her
Type 2 diabetes for about three years
while continuing to cook up deep-fried
cheesecake and bacon-and-egg burg-
ers between doughnuts on TV.
Choosing to digest her ill health
privately all those years, Deen's story
is familiar to those in chefs jackets
who already had gone public with the
question few in their world love to talk
about How do you stay healthy while
trying to earn a living making food?
On Thursday, a dozen obese chefs,
restaurant owners, caterers and oth-
ers will search for the answer. Thafs
when the Food Network premieres
"Fat Chef," which follows participants
for 16 weeks as they struggle to lose
weight and learn a healthier way of life
with the help of trainers, nutritionists
and therapists.
'You have this abundance of food all
around you," said pastry chef Michael
Mignano, who's one of the dozen..
"You're doing parties, you have wed-
dings. There's always a lot of food left
over. You're constantly tasting, work-
ing late hours, eating late."
Mignano, 36, owns a bakery in
Port Washington, N.Y. At 6 foot 2, he
weighed about 500 pounds soon after
he was diagnosed with Type 2 diabe-
tes in 2010, before "Fat Chef' went into.
production last October. His resolve
to do something about his weight
grew stronger as the,
result of a different
Food Network show
on which he appeared 'I wasn't nen
in September, "Sweet whether the
Genius." pastry chef,
"I wasn't nervous long ro
about that show, but
I was nervous about
whether the jacket
would fit me," said Mignano, who now
weighs about 400 pounds and has
a long road ahead to reach his goal
weight of 250. "Watching myself on
that show, I was the fat guy. Thafs all
I saw..I felt almost like a drunk seeing
himself on the floor passed out"
Going public with his weight loss
journey hasn't been easy for Mignano
and others in similar unhealthy dire
straits. As chefs, the constant food
stimulation by sight, smell and taste
was compounded by personal strug-
gles and family obligations.
Art Smith, who doesn't appear on

old pal Deen. Like Deen, he was diag-
nosed with Type 2 diabetes about
three years ago.
Also 6 foot 2, Smith ballooned to


ASSbUIATIU KtRSS
This Monday, Oct. 10, 2011 photo courtesy of Food Network shows caterer Ally Vitella, right, as she does modified
sit ups with the assistance of health consultant Christine Avanti, during a workout at the Vitella residence in North
Caldwell, N.J., as seen on Food Network's "Fat Chef." Vitella dropped from a size 28 to a size 16 during the show.


325 pounds while gorging on refined
sugar, caffeine, PB&Js anything
that gave-him an instant energy boost
or filled him up at the end of an
exhausting day as a chef for Oprah
Winfrey.
Exercise? He could barely walk a
block, until he decided to turn it all
around and lost 118 pounds. Now
51, the Jasper, Fla.; native, restaurant
owner, cookbook author and food TV
personality has kept the weight off.


vous about that show, but I was nervoi
e jacket would fit me," said Michael Mi
who now weighs about 400 pounds an
ad ahead to reach his goal weight of 2


Smith has run marathons, eats oat-
meal and egg whites for breakfast,
drinks plenty of water and has expand-
ed Common Threads, his healthy eat-
' ing initiative for low-income kids. He
declares: 'Tve got my sexy back!"
Obviously not all chefs struggle
with obesity and serious health threats
like diabetes, but most do think about
weight and how to hold back the extra
pounds.
Allison Adato, a senior editor and
former food beat writer for People
magazine, is out in April with a book,
"Smart Chefs Stay Slim," offering
insights and tips from three dozen of
the biggest names in the industry.
"Paula Deen's revelation may mark
a turning point for some viewers and
diners," Adato said. "My hope is that
this moment creates a broader aware-


ness that the way a person eats does
have an impact on his or her health.
Fortunately, there are a lot of chefs
who have already thought about how
to balance a healthy lifestyle with
enjoying wonderful food."
Surrounded by rich, decadent food
and their need to earn a living from
it, Adato's chefs stay fit by keeping
hyper-aware of every calorie. Some
balance out their food excesses over
a few days, indulging one day, but
"eating clean" the next
They know the difference
au between tasting the food
us about they prepare without gorg-
gnano, ing on it, and exactly how
id has a much dessert to enjoy.
50. As a pastry, chef,
Mignano said his problem.
wasn't so much the choco-
late he was surrounded by.
It was the junk food he'd slam down
before and after work.
Ally Vitella, 41, a New York City
caterer, discovered she had Type 2
diabetes at the first health check-in
for "Fat Chef" At 5-9, she weighed
345 pounds and was forced to sit guilt-
ily by as her husband and mother-in-
law lugged catering ovens and other
equipment up and down the stairs of
their Manhattan clients.
After a job, "You're kind of a scav-
enger. I was eating hors d'oeuvres for
lunch and dinner. I would scoop up
half a tray of food and eat it. We were
ordering pizza and Chinese food at
home because we were exhausted all
the time," she said. "We cook things
you're supposed to eat once in a while,
but I was eating them every day."
Vitella, who lives in North Caldwell,


NJ.,.dropped from a size 28 to a size
16 during the show, losing nearly 60
pounds. Her goal weight is 190, but
the important thing, she said, is she
can play again with her 7-year-old son
and 9-year-old daughter.
'Tve learn that tasting means tast-
ing, not tasting the same dish five
times," Vitella said.
Escalation .of Type 2 disease in the
U.S. has been closely tied to obe-
sity. Roughly 23 million Americans
are believed to have the most com-
mon Type 2 diabetes; patients' bodies
either do not produce enough insulin
or do not use it efficiently, allowing
excess sugar, or glucose, to accumu-
late in the blood.
Deen, who's made a lucrative living
as aTVchef by going over the top with
butter, cream and sugar, faced a torrent
of criticism when she disclosed her
diabetes diagnosis and her contract to
,lend her face and recipes to "Diabetes
in New Light," a project of the drug-
maker Novo Nordisk. The campaign's
website includes detailed information
about Victoza, the drug Deen has
taken for nearly five months.
Smith calls Deen's endorsement
deal "a mistake, ill advised" but said
her personal health and her style of
cooking "are her own business." He
said he dropped the weight and rede-
fined his lifestyle for himself, but also
to show the public that it CAN be
done.
"At this moment, chefs in America,
particularly those fortunate enough to
be embraced by the public as celebri-
ties, have enormous influence," he
wrote in the foreword to Adato's book.
'Tve tried to use mine responsibly."


Study: Heartburn drugs

don't aid children's asthma


BY LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press
CHICAGO An acid
reflux drug often used for
hard-to-treat asthma doesn't
help children with the breath-
ing disease and may cause side
effects, a study in 300 children
found.
The results echo recent
research showing that a simi-
lar heartburn drug didn't work
in adults with asthma.
Use of these heavily pro-
moted acid-blocking drugs,
called proton pump inhibitors,
has more than doubled in U.S.
children in recent years, but
the study results suggest doc-
tors should put the brakes on
that practice, said University
of Arizona asthma expert Dr.
Fernando Martinez.
The study found children on
prescription Prevacid pills had
more colds, sore throats and
bronchitis infections than those
given dummy pills. There were
also signs that children given
Prevacid were prone to broken
bones. That finding was weak
and could have been due to
chance. But Martinez said it is
worrisome, given a Food and
Drug Administration advisory
about fracture risks in adults
using these drugs long-term.


And he urged "great caution"
in prescribing these drugs to
all children, not just those with
asthma.
The study and an editorial
by Martinez were released
Tuesday in this week's Journal
of the American Medical
Association.
Acid reflux involves stom-
ach acid, backing up into
the throat, causing irritation
and often symptoms includ-
ing heartburn. Asthma is an
unrelated lung disease involv-
ing narrowed airways, with
symptoms including wheez-
ing, breathing difficulties and


coughs. Sometimes acid reflux
can cause similar respiratory
symptoms and in children it
often occurs without heart-
burn.
Some doctors believe that
airway irritation caused by
acid reflux may make asthma
worse, and that undiagnosed
acid reflux might be a reason
why some people on standard
asthma medicines continue to
have symptoms. Prescribing
acid-blocking drugs is thus
common in people with poorly
controlled asthma even if they
have no obvious symptoms of
reflux.


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012



Susan G. Komen cancer charity



halts grants to Planned Parenthood


BY DAVID CRARY
Associated Press
NEW YORK The
nation's leading breast-can-
cer charity, Susan G. Kopnen
for the Cure, is halting its
partnerships with Planned
Parenthood affiliates cre-
ating a bitter rift, linked to the
abortion debate, between two
iconic organizations that have
assisted millions of women.
The change will mean a
cutoff of hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars in grants,
mainly for breast exams.
Planned Parenthood says
the move results from Komen
bowing to pressure from anti-
abortion activists. Komen
says the key reason is that
Planned Parenthood is under
investigation in Congress a
probe launched by a conser-
vative Republican who was
urged to act by anti-abortion
groups.
The rupture, which has
not been publicly announced
as it unfolded, is wrenching
for some of those who've
learned about it and admire
both organizations.
'We're kind of reeling,"
said Patrick Hurd, who is
CEO of Planned Parenthood
of Southeastern Virginia -
recipient of a 2010 grant from
Komen and whose wife,
Betsi, is a veteran of several
Komen fundraising races and
is currently battling
breast cancer.
"It sounds almost Plann
trite, going through Plan
this with Betsi, but from
cancer doesn't care abortion
if you're pro-choice, is that
anti-choice, progres- gation
sive, conservative," conse
Hurd said. "Victims
of cancer could care
less about people's
politics."
Plan ned
Parenthood said the Komen
grants totaled roughly
$680,000 last year and
$580,000 the year before,
going to at least 19 of its affili-
ates for breast-cancer screen-
ing and other breast-health
services. *
Komen spokeswoman
Leslie Aun said the cutoff
results from the charity's
newly adopted criteria bar-
ring grants to organizations
that are under investiga-
tion by local, state or fed-
eral authorities. According
to Komen, this applies to
Planned Parenthood because
ifs the focus of an inquiry
launched by Rep. Cliff
Stearns, R-Fla., seeking to
determine whether public
money was improperly spent
on abortions.
Cecile Richards, president
of the Planned Parenthood
Federation of America, has
depicted Stearns' probe as
politically motivated and said
she was dismayed that it
had contributed to Komen's
decision to halt the grants to
PPFA affiliates.
"It's hard to understand
how an organization with
whom we share a mission of
saving women's lives could
have bowed to this kind of
bullying," Richards told The
Associated Press. "It's really
hurtful."
Reaction to the news was
swift and passionate. On
Twitter, it was one of the most
discussed topics Tuesday
evening, with some tweets
praising Komen's decision
and others angrily vowing
never to give to it again.
Two Democrats in
Congress Sen. Patty
Murray of Washington and
Rep. Michael Honda of
California issued state-


In this March 8, 2011 file photo, Planned Parenthood supporter Peg Paulson of Carmel,
Ind., left, and opponent Heather Pruett of Indianapolis argue during a rally at the Indiana
Statehouse on the South Lawn in Indianapolis in response to an Indiana House bill which
would end funding to Planned Parenthood because it provides abortions. The nation's leading
breast-cancer charity, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, is halting its partnerships with Planned
Parenthood affiliates in 2012 creating a bitter rift, linked to the abortion debate, between two
iconic organizations that have assisted millions of women.


ments denouncing Komen's
action.
"I am stunned and sad-
dened," said Honda, whose
longtime chief of staff,
Jennifer VanderHeide, had
breast cancer last year. "I call
on Komen to reconsider this
decision, stand strong in the
face of political pressure and


ed Parenthood says the move results
Komen bowing to pressure from anti-
n activists. Komen says the key reason
t Planned Parenthood is under investi-
in Congress.- a probe launched by a
ervative Republican who was urged to
act by anti-abortion groups.



do the right thing for the publishing
health of millions of women Southern
everywhere." announce
Anti-abortion groups, in Bibles it
contrast, welcomed the news. some of th
The Alliance Defense Fund for Komei
praised Komen "for seeing 'to Plannec
the contradiction between its Aun, th
lifesaving work and its rela- woman, s
tionship with an abortionist tactics we
that has ended millions of for the fi
lives." cited Stea
A statement issued gation asa
Tuesday evening by Komen That in
made no reference to the
vehement reactions, instead
citing its new grant-making
criteria and pledging to
ensure there were no gaps in
service to women.
"While it is regrettable
when changes in priorities
and policies affect any of
our grantees, such as a long-
standing partner like Planned
Parenthood, we must contin-
ue to evolve to best meet the
needs of the women we serve
and most fully advance our
mission," the statement said.
Planned Parenthood has
been a perennial target of
protests, boycotts and fund-
ing cutoffs because of its F
role as the largest provider F
of abortions in the United
States. Its nearly 800 health C
centers nationwide provide M V
an array of other services,
including birth control, test- *
ing for sexually transmitted 31
diseases, and cancer screen- w
ing.
According to Planned
Parenthood, its centers per-
formed more than 4 million
breast exams over the past
five years, including nearly
170,000 as a result of Komen
grants. 'Mh h hN',, I
Komen, founded in 1982,
has invested more than $1.9
billion since then in breast-
cancer research, health ser-


vices and advocacy. Its. Race has no set timetable, was
for the Cure fundraising launched in September
events have become a global when Stearns asked Planned
phenomenon.
For all its mainstream pop-
ularity, however, Komen has
been a target of anti-abor-
tion groups since it began
its partnerships with Planned
Parenthood in 2005. I


Life Decisions
International
includes Komen
on its "boycott
fist" of compa-
nies and organi-
zations that sup-
port or collabo-
rate with Planned
Parenthood.
In December,
Lifeway Christian
Resources, the
g division of the
Baptist Convention
d a recall of pink
had sold because
.e money generated
n was being routed
d Parenthood.
e Komen spokes-
aid such pressure
re not the reason
funding cutoff and
rns' House investi-
a key factor.
vestigation, which


PRIMARY
CARE
MIEOICINE
Preventative Care -


'hysicals
Geriatric Care
Vomen's Health


Best of
. the Best
5 Years


)iabetes Management
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ww.primarycaremedic.com


t mk l r h t.. v,.I4m I'
s*"Fkvmv \i* M


Parenthood for more than
a decade's worth of docu-
ments.
Stearns, in a statement
emailed to the AP on Monday,
said he is still working with
Planned Parenthood on get-
ting the requested docu-
ments. He said he is look-
ing into possible violations
of state and local reporting
requirements, as well as alle-
gations of financial abuse,
and would consider holding
a hearing depending on what
he learns.
Many of the allegations
were outlined in a report pre-
sented to Stearns last year by
Americans United for Life, a
national anti-abortion group,
which urged him to investi-
gate.
Democrats and Planned
Parenthood supporters have
assailed the probe as an
unwarranted political ploy.
Komen, while not publicly
announcing its decision to
halt the grants, has conveyed
the news to its 100-plus U.S.
affiliates. Richards said she
was informed via a phone
call from Komen's president,
Elizabeth Thompson, in


PHYSOIANS






LAKE CITY


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December.
' "It was incredibly surpris-
ing," Richards said. "It wasn't
even a conversation it was
an announcement"
Richards subsequently
sent a letter to Komen's
top leaders CEO Nancy
Brinker and board chairman
Dr. LaSalle D. Leffall, Jr. -
requesting a meeting with
the board and asserting that
Komen had misrepresented
Planned Parenthood's fund-
ing-eligibility status in some
states.
According to Planned
Parenthood, the Komen
leaders replied to Richards
with a brief. letter ignoring
the request for a meeting,
defending the new grant cri-
teria, and adding, "We under-
stand the disappointment
of any organization that is
affected by these policy and
strategy updates."
Aun, in a telephone inter-
view, said Komen was not
accusing Planned Parenthood
of any wrongdoing.
"We want to maintain a
positive relationship with
them," she said. "We're not
making any judgment."


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakeatyreporter:com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, February 2, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


Fort White
sign-up today
Fort White Babe Ruth
Baseball has spring ball
registration from 4-7 p.m.
today at South Columbia
Sports Park, north of
Fort White High. Four
divisions are offered for
ages 4-12 and fees range
from $45 to $65. A birth
certificate is required for
new players. Coaches are
needed and can register
at the same time.
For details, call
Millissa Blakley at
365-4133 or e-mail
fwbrbaseball@gmail. com.


Alumni game
on Saturday
Former Fort White
High baseball players
are invited to play in an
alumni softball game at
11 a.m. Saturday at the
Fort White baseball field.
There will be a home run
derby fundraiser ($10 for
non-players) following
the game, plus fish fry
and barbecue dinners
will be sold for $6 each.
There will be kid friendly
booths for a small fee.
For details, call coach
Mike Rizzi at 288-8680.
CHS -: . .-:
Q-back Club
meeting Monday,
The Cu.,lumbia County
Quarterback Club will
meet at 6 p.m. Monday in
the Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club,
president Joe Martino at
984-0452.
YOUTH'. ..
Registration set
for Fort White
Fort White Girls
Softball Association's
registration for its spring
season is 5-8 p.m. Friday,
and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday at South
Columbia Sports Park
and Busy Bee in Fort
White. Leagues offered
are T-ball (starting at age
4) through 16-and-under.
T-ball cost is $45; fees for
other leagues are $55.
For details, call Nora
Harvey at (386) 365-5688.
FORT WHITE
Q-back Club
meeting Feb. 13
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Feb. 13 in
the teacher's lounge at
the high school. This is
the nominations meeting
for the 2012-13 season.
Parents and interested
parties are invited to be a
part of the organization.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
U From staff reports


GAMES

Today
Fort White High
softball vs. Union County
High in preseason
classic, 7 p.m.
Friday
Fort White High
softball vs. Bradford High
in preseason classic,
7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Fort White
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling hosts District


2-2A tournament,
11 a.m.


Fort White High
sends Legree to
SEC for football.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
FORT WHITE -- As a'
state high jump champion,
A.J. Legree knows some-
thing about rarefied air.
In college football the
most rarefied air is in the
Southeastern Conference
and Legree made that leap
today by signing a scholar-
ship with the University of
Kentucky.
Legree had verbally
committed to Kentucky in
December, but got heavy
interest recently from
Western Kentucky and
Southern Miss. In the
end, he went with his first
choice.
"It was one of those deci-
sion that came down to my
gut," Legree said. "Coach
(Demetric) Jackson told me
you are going to feel it. It
came down to which team I
felt more at home with and
which position coach I felt
more comfortable with."
Legree primarily dealt
with former Tennessee-
quarterback Tee Martin
and called him "a tremen-
dous coach." Martin is
passing game coordinator
and wide receivers coach
for the Wildcats.
Legree said he was not
swayed by the SEC reputa-
tion.
"I was looking to go to a
good university to get my
degree and possibly make
some big plays," Legree
said.
In his announcement
speech, Legree thanked his
family, teachers, coaches
LEGREE continued on 2B


ecsi
ec,/s/


.- - - "T'

I t' V! L-"' 'I L-J"

-' ; ,,
"'i^.Ss -


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fernanda Legree hugs her son, Fort White High senior A.J. Legree, before he signs a schol-
arship Wednesday on National Signing Day to play on the University of Kentucky football
team. Pictured are.Legree's father, Alphonso Brown (from left); Legree; his mother, Fernanda
Legree; grandmother, Frances Legree; and aunt, Karen Armstrong. Not pictured are his sister,
Lillian Legree and uncle, Darryl Brown. 'I'm a very excited mom,' Fernanda Legree said. 'I'm
so proud of him. It's been an honor and blessing to have 'him.'


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Dequan Ivery signs a letter of intent with sister Jahla watching on during a
presentation in the school's auditorium on Wednesday. Ivery will play football at the University
of Miami after choosing the Hurricanes over Louisville.


t


Saban stocks ... "A
.-.

up, DGB h


stayshome


Alabama, OSU,
Florida have big
signing days.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
Every coach claims. to
have a great national sign-
ing day. Nick Saban actually
does every year.
By lunchtime on
Wednesday, the Alabama
coach had most of his lat-
est highly rated recruiting
class locked up.
"He's the best at (recruit-
ing) in the country," said
Tom Lemming of CBS
Sports Network. "Over the
last five years, nobody has
been better at it than Nick
Saban."
The national signing peri-
od for high school football
players opened with the
usual plethora of pick-a-cap
news conferences and a few
high-profile flip-flops.
New Ohio State coach
I rbai Meyer showed that
a yiar away from coach-
oir (didi'l hurt his abil-
ity to recruit. Meanwhile,
i'. ', old school, Florida,
l1iow;-d a mediocre sea-
onl with ;t pi liin,,iim sign-
ing day Idespite having
,Sotilliheii California pluck


a couple of blue-chippers
from Gator country.
Missouri didn't need to
leave the state to make the
biggest grab of all on sign-
ing day, getting a letter of
intent from the nation's most
celebrated prospect, receiv-
er Dorial Green-Beckham
from Springfield, Mo.
In Tuscaloosa, Ala., there
were no surprises for the
national champion Crimson
Tide. And that was a good
thing because Saban and
his staff had already lined
up a class that most of the
analysts had ranked as
either the best in the nation
or very close to it.
"There was little intrigue
or drama to this class," said
Allen Wallace of SuperPrep
Magazine.
No, just talent.
The Tide swept through
the South to reload with
26 signees. Alabama went
to Baltimore to get wide
receiver Cyrus Jones,
down to Lynchburg, Va.,
for defensive tackle Korren
Kirven one of the few
late additions scooped up
eight players from Georgia,
three from Florida, picked
up a quarterback, Alec
Morris, from Texas, and
even dipped into LSU ter-
ritory to grab highly touted


I - *- : d 1.
'
S - ':. ' ,

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Andre Debose (4) outruns a Furman University defender during a game on Nov. 11
in Gainesville. Debose was one of the nation's top recruits two years ago.


safety Landon Collins from
Geismar, La.
Collins' selection of
Alabama over LSU last
month on national TV was
memorable for his mother's
vocal disapproval ('Tigers
No. 1," she said, eyes roll-
ing at her son's choice). On
Wednesday, with mom by
his side, Collins signed his
letter of intent at Dutchtown
High School.
Here's a look around the
nation at more of the top
stories from signing day.

Return of Urban
The Buckeyes' recruit-


ing coaches as opposed
to their coaching coaches
- did a bang-up job with
Meyer's first Ohio State
class.
You might remember
Michigan wasn't pleased
with the fact that Meyer and
the staff he was assembling
was allowed to recruit while
the old staff was preparing
the Buckeyes for their bowl
game. The NCAA signed off
on the arrangement. This
just after Ohio State was
handed a one-year bowl ban
for transgressions under
former coach Jim Tressel.
Considering Meyer's
track record, simply having


him on Ohio State's side
was probably all the advan-
tage the Buckeyes needed.
Meyer's class was a
consensus top-five, loaded
with defensive linemen,
including Noah Spence
from Harrisburg, Pa., and
Adolphus Washington from
Cincinnati. The Buckeyes
got a late boost when offen-
sive tackle Kyle Dodson
from Cleveland switched
from Wisconsin to Ohio
State on Wednesday.
"We had to have him,"
Meyer said of Dodson.
Dodson was one of at
SIGNINGS continued on 3B


I I


ins

Tigers send
Ivery to Miami
on scholarship.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Ifs become a signing-day
tradition for Columbia High
to send a player to a major
university to play football.
That tradition unveiled a
new chapter on Wednesday
as defensive tackle Dequan
Ivery signed to play at the
University of Miami.
"This was a big moment
for CHS," Columbia coach
Brian Allen said. "I want
everyone to know that you
can't do it without the aca-
demic side of it. This is his
one shot to be a role model
for his family and sisters."
Ivery was thought to
be leaning toward the
University of Louisville
and family members were
. even dressed in the school
colors. When it came time
to sign, however, Ivery went
with his heart.
"It was a tough deci-
sion," he said. "I liked both
schools, but I'm choosing
the University of Miami. I
want to thank all the coach-
es that helped me by stay-
ing by my side and helping
to make this decision."
Allen believes Ivery is
a next-level kind of player
that can make an impact at
Miami.
"He's got tremendous
strength," Allen said. "He
can bench 410 to 415 ponds.
He's got a tremendous
punch. He's light on his feet
and he pursues the foot-
ball. He's got a very good
swim move and that will be
an asset. I guarantee they'll
like what they have."
IVERY continued on 2B





















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Qatar
Masters, first round, at Doha, Qatar
(same-day tape)
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Phoenix Open,
first round, at Scottsdale,Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Duke atVirginia Tech
ESPN2 Nebraska at Northwestern
9 p.m.
ESPN UCLA at Washington
ESPN2 South Carolina at Florida
II p.m.
ESPN2 Gonzaga at BYU
FSN -Arizona atiCalifornia
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT Chicago at NewYork
10:30 p.m.
TNT-- Denver at LA. Clippers
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
FSN Stanford at Arizona St.


FOOTBALL

Super Bowl facts, figures

AT STAKE National Football
League Championship for the Vince
Lombardi Trophy.
PARTICIPANTS New England
Patriots (AFC) and NewYork Giants.This
the seventh appearance for the Patriots
(3-3) and the fifth appearance for the
Giants (3-I1).
SITE Lucas Oil Stadium.Indianapolis.
This is' the first Super Bowl played in
Indianapolis.
SEATING CAPACITY 63,000
DATE Feb. 5, 2012.
KICKOFF 6:30 p.m.
NETWORK COVERAGE By NBC-
TV to more than 200 stations throughout
the United States.
Westwood One Radio to 600
stations within the United States. The
Armed Forces Television will also provide
broadcast to 175 countries throughout
the world.
The game will be distributed interna-
tionally by the NFL and NFL International
to more than 185 countries and broad-
cast in 30 different languages.
PLAYERS SHARE -Winners: $88,000
per man. Losers: $44,000 per man.
PLAYER UNIFORMS New England
will be the homb team and has its choice
of wearing its colored or white jersey.
OVERTIME At the end of
regulationn playing time, the referee will
immediately toss a coin at the center of
the field, according to rules pertaining
to the usual pre-game toss. The captain
of NFC team (the visiting team) will
call the toss. Following a three-minute
intermission after the end of the regular
\game, play will continue by 15-minute
periods with a two-minute intermission
between each such overtime period with
no halftime intermission. The teams will
change goals between each period, there
will be a two-minute warning at the end
of each period.
Both teams must have the opportunity
to possess the ball once during the extra
period, unless the team that receives the
opening kickoff scores a touchdown on
its, initial possession, in which case it is
the winner. If the team that possesses the
ball first scores a field goal on its initial
possession, the other team shall have the
opportunity to possess the ball. If (that
team) scores a touchdown on its posses-
sion, it is the winner. If the score is tied
after (both teams have a) possession, the
team next scoring by any method shall
be the winner.
OFFICIAL TIME Theicoreboard
clock will be official.
OFFICIALS There will be seven
officials and five alternates appointed by
the Commissioner's office.
TROPHY The winning team
receives permanent possession of the
Vince Lombardi Trophy, a sterling silver
trophy created by Tiffany & Company and
presented, annually to the winner of the
Super Bowl.The trophy was named after
the late coach Vince Lombardi of the
two-time Super Bowl champion Green
Bay Packers before the 1971 Super Bowl.
The trophy is a regulation-size silver foot-
ball mounted in a kicking position on a
pyramid-like stand of three concave sides.
The trophy stands 20/' inches tall, weighs
6.7 pounds and is valued more" than
$25,000.
ATTENDANCE -To date, 3,512,727
have attended Super Bowl games.

Super Bowl records

INDIVIDUAL RECORDS
SCORING
Most Points, Career 48, Jerry Rice,
San Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Points. Game 18, Roger Craig,.
San Francisco vs. Miami, 1985; Jerry Rice,
San Francisco vs. Denver, 1990 and vs. San
Diego, 1995; Ricky Waiters, San Francisco
vs. San Diego, 1995;Terrell Davis, Denver
vs. Green Bay, 1998.
Most Touchdowns, Career 8, Jerry
Rice, San Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 3, Roger
Craig, San Francisco vs. Miami, 1985;Jerry
Rice, San Francisco vs. Denver 1990 and
vs. San Diego, 1995; Ricky Watters, San
Francisco vs. San Diego, 1995; Terrell
Davis, Denver vs. Green Bay, 1998.
Most Points After Touchdown, Career
13 Adam Vlnatleri, New England-
Indianapolis, (13 attempts, 5 games).
Most Points After Touchdown, Game


- 7, Mike Cofer, San Francisco vs, Denver,
1990 (8 attempts); Un Elliott, Dallas vs,
Buffalo, 1993 (7 Attempts); Doug Brien,
San Frandmco vs. San Diego, 1995 (7
twempts).
Me rllSeld Gots, Career 7, Adam
Vinaouri, New EnRgland-lndiinapolis, (10
sewrmpds, S gfmes),
Must Fie(d oals, same 4, Don
Chandler, @Grefen Bay v, altand,
196%8, Rsy Wersciing, San Francisco vs.
Conannwd,1982
ILonpsae Field Gol -= 54, Steve
Chrie Vffalo vs ; Ail1e, 199+


Most Safeties I, Dwight White,
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota, 1975; Reggie
Harrison, Pittsburgh vs. Dallas, 1976;
Henry Waechter, Chicago vs. New
England, 1986; George Martin, New York
vs. Denver, 1987; Bruce Smith, Buffalo vs.
New York, 1991.
RUSHING
MostAttempts, Career- 101, Franco
Harris, Pittsburgh.
Most Attempts, Game 38, John'
Riggins,Washington vs. Miami, 1983.
Most Yards Gained, Career 354,
Franco Harris, Pittsburgh, 4 games.
Most Yards Gained, Game 204,Tim
Smith,Washington vs. Denver, 1988.
Longest Gain 75, Willie Parker,
Pittsburgh vs. Seattle, 2006.
Most Touchdowns, 'Career 5,
Emmitt Smith, Dallas, 3 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 3,Terrell
Davis, Denver vs. Green Bay, 1998.
PASSING
Most Attempts. Career 156, Tom
Brady, New England, 4 games.
Most Attempts, Game 58, Jim Kelly,.
Buffalo vs.Washington, 1992.
Most Completions, Career 100,
.Tom Brady, New England, 4 games.
Most Completions, Game 32, Tom
Brady, New Englan'd vs. Carolina, 2004;
Drew Brees, New Orleans vs. Indianapolis,
2010.
Highest Completion Percentage,
Career (minimum 40 attempts) 70.0
(56-of-80),Troy Aikman, Dallas (3 games).
Highest Completion Percentage,
Game 88.0, Phil Simms, New York
Giants vs. Denver, 1987.
Most Yards Gained, Career 1,156,
Kurt Warner, St. Louis-Arizona, 3 games.
MostYards Gained, Game 414, Kurt
Warner, St. Louis vs.Tennessee, 2000.
Most Touchdowns, Career II, Joe
Montana, San Francisco, 4 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 6, Steve
Young, San Francisco vs. San Diego, 1995.
Most Had Intercepted, Career 8,
John Elway, Denver, 5 games.
Most Had Intercepted, Game-- 5, Rich
Gannon, Oakland vs.Tampa Bay, 2003.
Longest Completion 85, Jake
Delhomme (to- Muhsin Muhammad),
Carolina vs. New England, 2004.
RECEIVING
Most Receptions, Career 33, Jerry
Rice, San Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Receptions, Game II, Dan
Ross, Cincinnati vs. Sah Francisco, 1982;
Jerry Rice, San Francisco vs. Cincinnati,
1989;' Deion Branch, New England vs.
Philadelphia, 2005; Wes Welker, New
SEngland vs. N.Y. Giants, 2008.
MostYards, Career 589, Jerry Rice,
San Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Yards, Game 215, Jerry Rice,
San Francisco vs. Cincinnati, 1989.
Most Touchdowns, Career 8, Jerry
Rice, San Francisco-Oakland, 4 games.
Most Touchdowns, Game 3, Jerry
Rice, San Francisco vs. Denver, 1990.
Longest Reception 85, Muhsin
Muhammad (from Jake Delhomme),
Carolina vs. New England,'2004.
FUMBLES
Most By, Career 5, Roger Staubach,
Dallas, 4 games.
Most By, Game 3, Roger Staubach,
Dallas vs. Pittsburgh, 1976; Jim Kelly,
Buffalo vs.Washington, 1992; Frank Reich,
Buffalo vs,Dallas, 1993.
INTERCEPTIONS
Most By, Career 3, Chuck Howley,
Dallas; Rod Martin, Oakland; Larry Brown,
Dallas.
Most By, Game 3, Rod Martin,
Oakland vs. Philadelphia, 1981 .
Longest Return 100, James
Harrison, Pittsburgh vs.Arizona, 2009.
TEAM GAME RECORDS
SCORING
Most Points 55, San Francisco vs.
Denver, 1990.
Fewest Points 3, Miami vs. Dallas,
1972.
Most Points, Both Teams 75, San
Francisco (49), San Diego (26), 1995.
Fewest Points, Both Teams 21,
Miami (14),Washington (7), 1973.
Largest Margin ofVictory 45 San
Francisco vs. Denver (55-10), 1990. ,
YARDS GAINED
Most Net Yards Gained 602,
Washington vs. Denver, 1988.
Fewest Net Yards Gained 119,
Minnesota vs. Pittsburgh, 1975.
Most RushingYards -280,Washington
vs. Denver, 1988.
Fewest Rushing Yards 7, New
England vs. Chicago, 1986.
Most PassingYards 407, St. Louis vs.'
Tennessee, 2000.
Fewest PassingYards 35, Denver vs.
Dallas, 1978.
FUMBLES
Most Fum6les Both Teams 12,
Buffalo (8) vs. Dallas (4), 1993.
Most Fumbles, One Team 8, Buffalo
vs. Dallas, 1993.
Most Fumbles Lost 5, Buffalo vs.
Dallas, 1993.
INTERCEPTIONS
Most Interceptions By 5,Tampa Bay
vs.0 Oakland, 2003.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
Sto form'four ordinary words.
I BOMOLI ,


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Boston 93, Cleveland 90
Indiana 106, New Jersey 99
Atlanta 100,Toronto 77
New York 113, Detroit 86
Memphis 100, Denver 97, OT
Golden State 93, Sacramento 90
L.A. Lakers 106, Charlotte 73
Wednesday's Games
Washington at Orlando (n)
Chicago at Philadelphia (n)
Toronto at Boston (n)
Detroit at New Jersey (n)
Oklahoma City at Dallas (n)
Phoenix at New Orleans (n)
Indiana at Minnesota (n)
Miami at Milwaukee (n)
Houston at San Antonio (n)
Charlotte at Portland (n)
LA. Clippers at Utah (n)
Today's Games
Memphis at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at New York, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Denver at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Washington at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Miami at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New York at Boston, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Denver, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No.7 Duke at Virginia Tech, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Murray State vs. Southeast
Missouri State, 8 p.m.
No. 12 Florida vs. South Carolina,
9 p.m.
No, 18 Saint Mary's (Calif.) vs. San
Diego, 10 p.m.
No. 24 Gonzaga at BYU, 11 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Kentucky at South Carolina,
6 p.m.
No. 2 Syracuse vs. St. John's at Madison
Square Garden, Noon
No. 3 Ohio State at No. 19 Wisconsin,
2 p.m.
No. 4 Missouri vs. No. Q Kansas,
9 p.m.
No. 5 North Carolina at Maryland,
4 p.rp.
No. 6 Baylor at Oklahoma State,
1:30 p.m.
-No. 10 Murray State at UT-Martin,
7 p.m.
No. II UNLV at Wyoming, 4 p.m.
.No. 12 Florida vs. No. 25
Vanderbilt, I p.m.
No. 13 Creighton at Northern (owa,
5 p.m.: .
No. 14 Georgetown vs. South Florida,
11 a.m."
No. 15 Marquette at Notre Dame,
I p.m.
No. 16 Virginia at No. 21 Florida
State, I p.m.
No. 17 San Diego State vs. TCU,
10 p.m.
No. 20 Indiana at Purdue, 7 p.m.
No. 22 Mississippi State vs. Auburn,
4 p.m.
No. 24 Gonzaga at Pepperdine,
10p.m. ,

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
New Jersey 4, N.Y. Rangers 3, SO
Winnipeg 2, Philadelphia I, SO
Pittsburgh 5,Toronto 4, SO.
Boston 4, Ottawa 3
N.Y. Islanders 5, Carolina 2
Buffalo 3, Montreal I
Tampa Bay 4,Washington 3, OT
Nashville 5, Minnesota 4
Detroit 3, Calgary I
Anaheim 4, Phoenix I
Edmonton 3, Colorado 2;
Vancouver 3, Chicago 2, OT
San Jose 6, Columbus 0
Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo (n)
Pittsburgh atToronto (n)
Washington at Florida (n)
Dallas at Anaheim (n)
Columbus at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Carolina at Boston, 7 p.m.
Montreal at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Chicago at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Detroit atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Six more It's official, 1)\
weeks of Punxsutawne Phil
winter for declares winer is
sure. Now, let sticking around.
me go back ,.S ,
to sleep. j r_


FUSYTF


SL THE GROUNDHOG
,^, IMAPE HIS PREDICTION
DMAYID WWrHOUT A --
/ 1 Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
S / suggested by the above cartoon.
7A: OF ^ ^ ^ O

(Answers tomorrow)
r Jumbles; EMPTY GULCH COOKIE PASTRY
I Answer; When the actor broke his leg on-stage, they
had to RECAST HIM,


COURTESY PHOTO

Sepulveda students in Valdosta

Sepulveda's ATA Martial Arts students participated in the Valdosta Regional Taekwondo
Tournament on Jan. 14. Students are (front row, from left) Tommy Suh,
Josephine Bevington, Colby Thompson, Eduardo Florez, Aubrianna Herndon,
Jacob Bevington, Aliyah Tannenbaum and Jesse Braden. Second row (from left) are
Zachary Tannenbaum, Robert Cook, Phillip Dorris, Tiffany Walker, Dena Suh and
Trey Sheldon. Back row (from left) are Brenda Brinkley, Jeff Thompson, Alice Geiger,
Joy Geiger, John Herndon and Tyler Herndon. Finn Tucker and Steve Merriman also
participated in the tournament.


COURTESY PHOTO

Kiwanis Club Texas hold 'em

Kiwanis Club of Lake City had a Texas Hold 'em charity fundraiser at Brookly Boys Pizza
on Friday. Thirty players participated and the club raised $565. The top four players
chopped the prize fund with each winning $285. Winners are Rick Cahill, second (from left);
Doug Peeler, third; Janet Creel, first; Charles Peeler, fourth.



IVERY: Inks deal to join 'The U'


Continued From Page 11

Ivery said he'll be ready
to go from the moment he
steps foot on campus.
"I'm ready to go and grind
it out right away," he said.
"I just know myself and I'm
capable. God has my back-
when it gets tough. I just
have to grind it out."
Ivery's speed has been
raved about for his size. He
said the last time he, was
clocked in the 40-yard dash


ACROSS
1 Picks
' 6 Pueblo
builders
11 Sir Newton
.12 Basketball
venue
13 Tenets
15 Skulks about
16 Not cheap
18 Drain cleaner
19 Bump
21 Blouse, e.g.
22 and hearty
23 Great Lakes
port
25 Take a
crack at
28 Is a good dog
30 Remind too
often
31 Race the
engine
32 London radio
33 Suffix for hero
35 In the bag
(2 wds.)
37 Hard wood
38 Snakes do it


was as a junior. He ran a 4.9
at 310 pounds.
He credits defensive
coach Reinard Wilson with
helping him utilize that
speed.
"I didn't like listening
to the coaches at first," he
admitted. "Wilson was tough
on me. He always made sure
I ran to the ball and stressed
it every day. Coach Allen, he
molded me."


40 Major -
Hoople
41 Funny
Charlotte -
42 FICA number
43 Calif.
neighbor
46 Hen
48 Play
postscript
50 Van Gogh
painting
54 Inert gas
55 Signified \
56 Minuscule
57 -craftsy


1
2

3
4
5

6
7


DOWN
England's FE
Bob Hope
sponsor


For future Tigers that
want to follow in his foot-
steps, Ivery offered a little
advice.
"Work hard and never
)believe the dream is over
no, matter what incident
faces you," he said. "Just
keep working."
Ivery didn't do it on his
own however. He took time
to thank his family and
coaches for their help.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


X AY S P I Q E
rL NERS OR:ELS

S NATA C A RMEN

RINAP S A
DC I E
I0 EN BAA A A E
OA F ED ACOT
8 C LE DE K ON
CO ET IL K UMA
LC EE
TVS E

jllIMBU ES ROTATE
CHERIE YOOHOO
HIOTlEILS FR AM E


Urop UIlIIlU -
Type of eel 8 Shaquille 0'-
Injury 9 Deep black
memento 10 RSVP
Silly enclosure
"Where 14 Building
Eagles Dare" lot
actress


15 Old photo
color
17 Hush puppy
ingredient
19 "Star Wars"
gangster
20 Noted wise
guy
22 Boxcar rider
24 It may be
fragile
25 Neatens a
beard
26 Spy mission
27 Cousteau's
middle name
29 Fam. member
34 Shoulder
gesture
36 More spiteful
39 Lox locale
43 Right after
44 Fencing
weapon
45 Ivy, e.g.
46 Polo need
47 Columnist -
Bombeck
49 Chaney of
"The Wolf
Man"
51 Was on a jury
52 Annapolis
grad
53 Pig's digs


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


2B


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


. I .


:: ~- ,j-i


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012


Florida inks 23 players


By-MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE
- Florida coach Will
Muschamp believes the
best way 'to challenge
for the Southeastern
Conference title is to be
stout on both lines of
scrimmage.
It's been his main goal
since he arrived on cam-
pus.
He moved closer to mak-
ing it happen Wednesday.
Muschamp's second
recruiting class included
eight defensive linemen
and the top-rated offensive
tackle in the country. The
23-player class was ranked
fourth by ESPN and
could improve if receiver
Stefon Diggs ends up in
Gainesville. The 6-foot-1
wideout from Olney., Md.,
will announce his decision
Feb. 10.
Muschamp wanted to
sign more, but he. lost out
on five players on national
signing day. Linebacker
Josh Haryey-Clemons
committed to Georgia,
receiver Nelson Agholor
picked Florida State, cor-
nerback Tracy Howard
selected Miami, defensive
end Leonard Williams
chose Southern Cal and
offensive lineman Avery
Young preferred Auburn.
The Gators did get two
late additions, with defen-
sive end Dante Fowler Jr.


switching from Florida
State and receiver Raphael
Andrades signing with
Florida.
Fowler was part of a
standout group of defen-
sive linemen.
"If you watched in our
league this year, the two
dominant teams were
very good on both lines of
scrimmage," Muschamp
said.
Although the Gators
ranked eighth in the
nation in total defense
in 2011, their line got
pushed around in losses
to Alabama, LSU, Auburn,
Georgia and South
Carolina. Even lower-divi-
sion Furman ran for 233
yards against Florida.
So several defensive
linemen in Florida's sign-
ing class should be able to
help right away.
The eight include:
Jonathan Bullard from
Shelby, N.C., Bryan Cox
Jr. from Fort Lauderdale,
FowlerfromSt. Petersburg,
Damien Jacobs from East
Mississippi Community
College, Alex McCalister
from Clemmons, N.C.,
Dante Phillips from
Venice, Jafar Mann from
Stone Mountain, Ga., and
Quinteze Williams from
Tyrone, Ga. Cox is the
son of former NFL player
.Bryan Cox.
"We saw very easily in
our season this year we
struggled on both lines


of scrimmage, consis-
tently being able to run
the ball and stop the run,"
Muschamp said.
Jacobs is one of six sign-
ees already in enrolled in
school and will take part
in spring practice. The oth-
ers are: cornerback Willie
Bailey from Hallandale,
guard Jessamen Dunker
from Boynton Beach, offen-
sive tackle D.J. Humphries
from Charlotte, N.C., line-
backer Antonio Morrison
from Bolingbrook, Ill., and
receiver Latroy Pittman
from Citra.
Dunker and Humphries,
widely considered the No.
1 offensive tackle com-
ing out of high school,
could step in and compete
immediately since they
will get a head start in the
weight room and on the
field. Florida's line returns
four starters, but all of
them have been benched
at one point in their
careers.
"As far as playing early,
the further your position
moves from away from
the ball, the harder it is,"
Muschamp said. "Them
being able to go through
15 days of practice is going
to huge. They're just two
very good, big athletes.
They move very well,
great feet, change of direc-
tion, very flexible, can
bend, both powerful guys.
-I'm real excited about both
players."


SIGNINGS: Texas picks up late LB


Continued From Page 1L

least a half dozen players
who switched commit-
ments to play for Meyer.
"He's done an amazing,
job flipping kids away from
schools like it was easy
as can be. And ifs not,"
said Mike Farrell, nation-
al recruiting analyst for
Rivals.com.
Michigan did OK for
itself, too. Coach Brady
Hoke's recruits received
high marks from the
experts and stacked up
nicely with Ohio State.
So signing day was just
like the old days in the Big
Ten. There was Ohio State
and Michigan, then every-
body else.

Florida Trojans
With NCAA. sanctions
kicking in at- USC, Lane
Kiffin had 10 fewer schol-
arships to hand out this
year.
While the quantity is
down, the quality of the
Trojans' class was not, and
Kiffin's crew made a cou-
ple of big scores in Florida
on signing day.
Defensive end Leonard
Williams from Daytona
Beach, Fla., and receiver
Nelson Algholor from
Tampa both chose the
Trojans.
After announcing his
decision on ESPNU,
Algholor said he was look-
ing forward to catching
passes from Matt Barkley,
who decided to return for
his senior season.
Looks like Kiffin can
thank his quarterback for
thht victory.

Snubbing the Irish
Did Case Keenum get a
seventh year of eligibility?
Maybe the most sur-
prising signing day flip-
flop came from receiver
Deontay Greenberry from
Fresno, Calif., who backed
off of a long-standing ver-
bal commitment to Notre
Dame and signed with
Houston.
"Out of left field," Farrell
said.
Greenberry made a last.
visit to Houston, but was
still considered a lock to
end up in South Bend, Ind.,
as one of the top prizes of
coach Brian Kelly's class.
His cousin, cornerback
Tee Shepherd, has already
enrolled at Notre Dame.
Instead, Greenberry is
off to Houston to play for
new coach Tony Levine,


whose Cougars will still
use, a pass-heavy offense
even with Keenum out' of
eligibility.

Longhorn's late pitch
Signing day at Texas
tends to be pretty bor-
ing. Coach Mack Brown's
classes are usually locked
up airtight weeks, if not
months, before letters of
intent start setting off the
fax machines.
This year, however, the
Longhorns swooped in
late to pick up linebacker
Torshiro Davis, who is
from Shreveport and had
committed to LSU.
For the second straight
year, Texas signed one of
the most highly regarded
running backs in the coun-
try, landing Johnathan
Gray from Aledo, Texas,
to go with last year's
freshman sensations Joe
Bergeron and the other
Mack Brown.

Still not signed
Quarterback Jameis
Winston from Hueytown,
Ala., said in an interview
on ESPNU: "I'm a Nole."
But he also said he won't
'sign a letter of intent with
Florida State until at least
Friday. Winston seems
intent on sticking with the
Seminoles, but until it's
official Jimbo Fisher will
no doubt have to sweat it
out.
Stanford has at least
caught Winston's atten-
tion.
As for Florida State,
Fisher signed a second
consecutive class rated in
the top 10 by' the analysts
which should only make
Seminoles fans even more
eager for their team's long-
awaited return to national
championship contention.

Staying home
Green-Beckham, born
in St. Louis and adopted by
a family from Springfield,
Mo., made the hometown
fans happy by signing with
the Tigers.
At 6-foot-6 and 220
pounds, the receiver
already looks like an
NFL prototype, com-
parable to stars such as
Calvin Johnson and Andre
Johnson.
He whittled his choices
down to Alabama, Texas,
Oklahoma, Arkansas and
Missouri in January, and


on Wednesday morning at
Hillcrest High, School he
picked the Tigers.
"I felt like they've
(Missouri) been there
since Day One," Green-
Beckham said.
Missouri first offered
him a scholarship, at the
age of 15.

Really Rutgers?
When Greg Schiano
left for the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers last week,
the fear was that Rutgers
would loss much of what
was being touted as its
best recruiting class ever.
In the end, new coach
Kyle Flood and the rest of
the staff kept it together.
Rutgers lost only one
player that had previously
committed and came away
with a class that included
most of the top players
in New Jersey, a typically
solid state for producing
football players, though
often those players don't
go to Rutgers.
The cream of the crop
was Darius Hamilton,
a defensive end from
Ramsey, NJ., and the son
of former NFL player Keith
Hamilton.
'"This shows you how
good a job the assistant
coaches did because in the
end Schiano didn't mat-
ter," Farrell said. "These
kids wanted to play for
Rutgers."

Quick hits
Florida fans might be
worried about some of
the recruits that got away
from the Gators, but coach
Will Muschamp was able
to secure a strong class
that included Lakewood
defensive end Dante
Fowler, who switched his
Florida State commitment
to.Florida on Wednesday.
... Stanford landed two of
the best offensive tackles
in the country, beating
out USC for Kyle Murphy
from San Clemente, Calif.,
and Nebraska for Andrus
Peat from Tempe, Ariz.
Peat's brother, Todd, plays
for the Cornhuskers. ...
California was headed
toward a top-10, maybe
top-five, class before defen-
sive line coach Tosh Lupoi
left the staff to join Steve
Sarkisian at Washington.
It helped the Huskies land
blue-chip defensive back
Shaq Thompson from
Sacramento.


FSU moves to 6-1 in ACC

By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Michael Snaer scored 21
points and Bernard James
added 13 on Wednesday
night as No. 21 Florida
State rallied in the second
half to defeat Georgia Techh
68-54 for its sixth straight
win.
The victory gives Florida .
State (15-6, 6-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference ) its
best start in league play
since joining the ACC for
the 1991-92 season and it
keeps the Seminoles tied
with North Carolina for first
place. Duke is right behind
at 5-1.
Georgia Tech (8-14, 1-7)
led 25-24 at halftime despite
not having scoring and
rebounding leader Glen
Rice Jr., who missed the
game with a foot injury.
Brandon Reed scored a
season-high 18 points and
Daniel Miller added 10 for -
the Yellow Jackets, who lost JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
their sixth straight. Florida State's Jon Kreft (50) pushes Florida's Erik Murphy
Snaer scored 16 points ik (33) as he inches his way to the basket during a game on
the second half. Dec. 22.



Seminoles load up


with defensive talent


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State literally went
heavy for defensive play-
ers Wednesday in another
highly ranked recruiting
class pulled in by coach
Jimbo Fisher and his staff.
The Seminoles landed two
of the nation's top-ranked
defensive linemen in 290-
pound defensive end Mario
Edwards, Jr., from Denton,
Texas and 310-pound defen-
sive tackle Eddie Goldman
from Washington, D.C.
Both gave their version of
the Tomahawk Chop when
announcing their school
choice on' national televi-
sion.
"The hard thing to find is
big, athletic people," Fisher
said. "The bigger and the
more athletic they are the


better off you are as a foot-
ball team."
Edwards, who played
for Ryan High School in
Denton, Texas, hopes to
wear the uniform no. 15
worn at Florida State in the
1990's by his father. The
6-4 Edwards was named
national defensive player of
the year by USA Today.
Edwards and recruit
Chris Casher from Mobile,
Ala., will join a .veteran
group of defensive ends at
Florida State led by Brandon
Jenkins, Cornelius 'Tank"
Carradine and Bjoern
Werner that has helped
Florida State rank among
the national leaders is sacks
over the past two seasons.
"We can keep a great
rotation now," Fisher said.
"It's a good opportunity for
them."
Two other highly recruit-


ed 300-pound high school
stars, Dalvon Stuckey and
Justin Shanks join Goldman
on the interior line.
"It's going to create great
competition within our
team," Fisher said.
The defense designed by
coordinator Mark Stoops
ended up saving the season
as Fisher's offense inexpli-
cably disappeared down the
stretch. Florida State led
the ACC in scoring defense
and total defense while the
offense was eighth in total
yai-dage.
Fisher hopes
Wednesday's class can fill
in some of the gaps.
They signed 10 more
Wednesday in a group that
also includes linebackers
Markuss Eligwe and Reggie
Northrup and defensive
backs Colin Blake, Ronald
Darby and P.J. Williams.


Howard picks Miami,

giving 'Canes class a boost


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIRAMAR Tracy
Howard knows Miami's
future is uncertain.
He also believes it's
bright
The nation's top-rated
cornerback announced
his decision to play for the
Hurricanes on Wednesday,
giving Miami's signing-
day class a huge boost
and spurning offers from
Florida and Florida State in
the process. Howard visited
Miami's campus last week-
end and made up his mind,
saying he was undeterred
by the ongoing NCAA
inquiry into the actions of
a former booster who pro-
vided extra benefits from
athletes and recruits from
2002 through 2010.
Miami self-imposed a


bowl ban this past season,
and eight players were
suspended for at least one
game because of their inter-
actions with the former
booster, convicted Ponzi
scheme architect Nevin
Shapiro.
"Nobody knows what's
going to happen," Howard
said. "Nobody knows what
the sanctions are going to
be, ... They took a bowl'
game away this year and
players got suspended.
They did their punishment
So what more can there be?
There's going to be a sanc-
tion. No doubt about it. I'm
taking a chance."
When he lifted a
Hurricanes cap at Miramar
High, surrounded by family
members, Miami coaches
working on campus about
25 miles away roared.
S"Extremely relieved,"


said Howard's mother,
Shaiy Howard.
Howard immediately
became the gem of the
Miami class, one that
already included other high-
ly rated players like Miami
Columbus High defensive
back Deon Bush, defensive
tackle Jelani Hamilton of
perennial national power
St. Thomas Aquinas of
Fort Lauderdale, Fla., wide
receiver Angelo Jean-Louis
of Palm Beach Central High
and running back Randy
"Duke" Johnson of Miami
Norland High Florida's
"Mr. Football" winner this
past season.
Also Miami-bound:
Howard's Miramar team-
mate, wide receiver
Malcolm Lewis, who said
he left Howard alone in
order to make his own
decision.


LEGREE: Will join Kentucky football


Continued From Page IE

and administrators.
"You have played a tre-
mendous role in my life and'
I love you and appreciate
you so much," Legree said.
"You have been my family
away from my family."
Legree singled out
Jackson and also track
coaches Bill Jones and
March Martinez. He will
get a shot at track & field
with the Wildcats.
"I want to thank my mom
(Fernanda Legree) and
God," Legree said. "All this is
happening because of him.'
Principal Keith Hatcher
read an e-mail he had


received from Union County
Property Appraiser Bruce
Dukes in December. Dukes
and a friend had spoken
with Legree for several min-
utes after a basketball game
between the two schools.
"I was impressed with his
character and decorum,"
Dukes wrote. "I have never
been so impressed by a stu-
dent athlete."
The Fort White family
understands.
"The sky is the limit for
A.J.," Jackson said. "In high
school he has never had a
referral and anytime you get
a comment from a teacher


it is something positive.
He works extremely hard.
He is here every day at 6
o'clock lifting weights and
has lettered in 3-4 sports
every year. All these things
make this so special."
In addition to his athletic
prowess, Legree carries a
3.7 GPA.
"AJ. outworked most of
his opponents and team-
mates," Jackson said. "He
played hard-nosed physical
football and did it the right
.way. He has been rewarded
for it and I am extremely
proud. It is a testament to
him and his family."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420















LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDE


SI THOUGHT ...8UT THIS IS YOUR FOIE GRAS FELL FLAT! YOUR ISNT THROWING ARE YOU KIDDING?!
YOU'D HAD IT WITH AN EXTREME CRUMB CAKE IS CRUMM! VOUR TOMATOES A THIS IS RECORDED!
REALITY SHOWS! COOKING PEPPERONI IS PITIFUL! LITTLE OVER IT'S MY 2ND TIME
REALITYSHOW! YOUR SCHNITZEL THE TOP? WATCHING IT
SI'M SORRY, UT I SA UYOUR PU PU
YOU'VE BEEN PLATTER IS
SCHOPP ED, PREPOSTEROUS!
I -O --P. .
-X, OL I ._+r-' SPL.t~-T:


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


DEAR ABBY


Care providers show respect

by using a patient's name


DEAR ABBY: "She Has
a Name in Georgia" (Dec.
2) complained that the
care staff at the assisted
living community where
her mother lives calls her
"Granny," "Grandma" and
"Mamma." She found it
disrespectful, and I agree
with her.
I am an R.N. with
two advanced-nursing
degrees. Calling a resi-
dent "Granny," "Dear" or
"Honey" is not loving or
caring. It is degrading, ,
humiliating and hurtful! It
does not matter what the
ethnicity of the attendant
is; there are standards
of conduct and patient's
rights. I suggest "She Has
a Name" ask the director
of the facility for copies of
the standards of care and
patient's rights documents.
The family may want to
install a "nanny cam" in
the room if it will provide
peace of mind. There are
many fine communities
where care of the residents
is professionally and car-
ingly provided. I hope they
are able to find one for
their mother. RETIRED
R.N. AND RESIDENT
ADVOCATE
DEAR R.N.: Thank you
for sharing your expertise
on this subject. I didn't
realize patient's rights
were specified by the
documents you mentioned
or that how. a resident is
addressed is covered in
them. Other health care


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
professionals responded
similarly, and I stand cor-
rected. My newspaper
readers comment:
DEAR ABBY: During
school and in clinical rota-
tions, we were repeatedly
instructed to call clients by
their names, especially in
situations where memory
was impaired. Not only
does it help to reorient the
patient as to who they are
and help them to maintain
their identity, but it pro-
vides a clear separation as
to who is family and who is
the caregiver.
The director should
not have diminished the
importance of the family's
feelings on this matter.
I suggest they consider
relocating their mother
to a facility that is more
conscientious about the
care they are being paid to
provide. CAREGIVER IN
FLORIDA
DEAR ABBY: The
assisted living staff should
not be calling her mother
by those names. The legal
term is "elder speak," or
as it is commonly known -
baby talk. This infantilizes
elders. It is detrimental to


their care and contributes
to "ageism," a process in
which elders are perceived
as less valuable than oth-
ers.
The family was right to
speak up and, regardless
of cultural considerations,
the staff and director
should respect their
wishes and refer to their
mother by her appropriate
.name. SHOCKED R.N.
IN CALGARY, CANADA
DEAR ABBY: Failure to
address a patient/resident
by his or her proper name
is a violation of regulations
and could be cited dur-
ing surveys. If the patient
preferred a nickname, the
care plan conference team
(staff department heads,
family and patient) needed
to make a notation in the
care plan to allow the nick-
name to be used.
Most of this is covered
by the Patient's Bill of
Rights and falls under
the "right to be treated
with respect and dignity."
Using terms like "Sweetie"
or "Granny" is a symp-
tom of the staff's failure
to respect the patient's
individuality. Besides, if
an aide approached me
and said, "Granny is com-
plaining of pain," which
"Granny" am I supposed to
attend to? RESPECTFUL
GERIATRIC NURSE

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


wHAT'S A Tvlt-Vf-L/TTEg PHRgAE
S FOR "MOIFY


.'%+> ,,'-"


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Contact someone from
your past. Calling in a
favor will make something
you want to achieve much
easier. Don't give in to any-
one asking for too much or
putting demands on you.
Call the shots and you'll
get things done. ****, .
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Beware of empty
promises and people try-
ing to get something for
nothing. You are best to
take care of personal mat-
ters quietly to avoid med-
dlers. Use your head and
you'll come up with'a way
to get around someone
causing you grief. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Remain calm and
focused. Good fortune
can be yours if you play
to win and set your sights
on realistic goals. Don't let
anyone cause unwarranted
uncertainty. Size up your
situation and make your
move. Don't waffle under
pressure. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Hidden matters
must be kept that way.
Prematurely revealing
what you 'are trying to
accomplish-will lead to
unfortunate circumstances
and added responsibilities.
Challenge anyone trying '
to shake your confidence.
Protect your property and
plans. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Your charm and bravado
will light up any group
you join. Your ability to
network and pull people
together will be rewarded
with offers that allow you.
to make some long over-
due alterations to your life
and your future. ****,
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Open-mindedness
will lead to opportunity..
You will learn quickly and
excel. Mixing business
with pleasure and mingling
with people who share
your concerns will bring
about a new direction that
will help subsidize your
lifestyle. **
LIBRA (Sept.'23-Oct.
22): Strive to gain as much
experience as possible.
Learning more about dif-
ferent cultures or trying
something that will help
you better understand
your relationships will
enrich your life and influ-
ence your future choices.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Your efforts won't be
wasted if you focus on con-
tracts and monies owed.
Address situations that you
have been avoiding and you
will receive the benefits you
deserve. Do what's best for
you, not everyone else. Itfs
your turn to profit ***


I SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Your emo-
tions may get the better of
you. Try not to react too
quickly when it comes to
personal or partnership
problems. Take a wait-and-
see approach and gauge
what's actually at the root
of any conflict you face.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Empty promises
can be expected. Before
you agree to any offer or
suggestion being made,
look at the facts and fig-
ures carefully. You are
likely to discover a flaw
that may not be fixable.
Your scrutiny can be a life-
saver. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Time spent at
home or fixing up your
digs will pay off. Working
on something that can ,
bring in extra cash or
allow you greater personal'
freedom is looking good.
Express your concerns
and plans and you will
get the support you need.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Not everyone will be
honest with you regarding
what he or she can contrib-
ute. Do your due diligence
and find out firsthand
how capable the people
are around you before
you make a commitment.
Put greater effort into an
important partnership. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: R equals M
"GPS JUNYTMPNJ AV DAHS RNVG
NGPSU XUNXPSGV; AG MSDAZSUV
AGV XUSMABGANT OTM GPST
MAVOXXSOUV." KADD ZOYJPOT

Previous Solution: "The use of solar energy has not been opened up because
the oil industry does not own the sun." Ralph Nader
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 2-2


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
H* DIDNt- YoU GO WHr fT- PND LOAlK
wrrTH cT--o-rHr-- RNOUtAHD OtH f SA-IN
CON N-tIo N,EU-y/? ON MYCHESTHThOt-
b ',; k /Sl"m y ,.-
^ ^ NflME '
SCgTOK
'~ S \ A60D "-{
/S \,!-a y] /'"


CLASSIC PEANUTS


IT'S DEGSPitHGC-rl
PN INDNIDUAL ,WNNIE
c= I HFIV MYolWN
j),i tit Nlnl ,', r
T( TP/I
'K^ }


;: .1L~i2


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415






















Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012

Lake City Reporter





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Publisher shall not be liable for any
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 10000186CA
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARTHA R. ESPINOZA A/K/A
MARTHA ROSA ESPINOZA;
CARLOS A. CLAVELL A/K/A
CARLOS CLAVELL; ALEXAND-
ER A. NAPOLES; UNKNOWN
TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated the 23RD day of January,
2012, and entered in Case No.
10000186CA, of the Circuit Court of
the 3RD Judicial Circuit in and for
Columbia County, Florida, wherein
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is
the Plaintiff and
MARTHA R. ESPINOZA A/K/A
MARTHA ROSA ESPINOZA;
CARLOS A. CLAVELL A/K/A
CARLOS CLAVELL; ALEXAND-
ER A. NAPOLES; UNKNOWN
TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are
defendants. The Clerk of this Court
shall sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia County
Courthouse, 173 N.E. HERNANDO
AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055,
11:00 AM on the 29th day of Febru-
ary, 2012, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
LOT 41, UNIT 20, OF THREE RIV-
ER ESTATES SUBDIVISION, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
6, PAGE 14, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated this 24th day of January, 2012
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of The Circuit Court
By: -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL
Submitted by:
Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson,
P.A.
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
-Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438

05530349
February 2, 9, 2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA. .
CASE NO: 12-08-DR
Norman Banks Ducre, Sr.
AND
Carol Ducre
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSO-
LUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Carol Ducre
ADDRESS: 196 Lily Street, Sacra-
mento, California
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
has been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy of
. your written defenses, if any, to it on
Norman Banks Ducre, Sr. whose ad-
dress is 428 NW Columbia Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055 on or be-
fore 02-13-2012, and file the original
with the clerk of this Court at 173
NE Hernando, Lake City, FL. 32055
before service on Petitioner or imme-
diately thereafter. If you fail to do so,
default may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion.
The action is asking the court to de-
cide how the following real or per-
sonal property should be divided:
NONE /
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's of-
fice. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of Court's
office notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on re-
cord at the clerk's office.
WARNING:
Rule 12..285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents
and information. Failure to comply
can result in sanctions, including dis-
missal or striking of pleadings.

Dated January 9, 2012
By:/s/ Sol. S. Rodriguez, Deputy
Clerk

05530002
January 12, 19, 26, 2012
February 2, 2012







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
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Services


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 11-384-CA
NEWEST BANK, FSB,
Plaintiff.
vs.
UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR
BENEFICIARIES OF THE ES-
TATE OF P'NEAL SHIPMAN, et
al,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:'
UNKNOWN CREDITORS OF
THE ESTATE OF P'NEAL SHIP-
MAN
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
UNKNOWN HEIRS AND BENE-
FICIARIES OF THE ESTATE
OF P'NEAL SHIPMAN
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
TRACIE SHIPMAN YOUNG
Last Known Address: Unknown
Attempted Address:. 339 Llewellyn
Avenue, Lake City, FL 32025
Current Address: Unknown
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LEON
SHIPMAN JR
Last Known Address: Unknown
Attempted Address: 339 Llewellyn
Avenue, Lake City, FL 32025
Current Address: Unknown
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
P'NEAL SHIPMAN
Last Known Address: Unknown
Attempted Address: 315 SE Llewel-
lyn Avenue, Lake City, FL 32025,
339 Llewellyn Avenue, Lake City,
FL 32025 and 119 NE Anderson
Terr., Lake City, FL 32055
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
SECTION 34:
COMMENCE AT THE NW COR-
NER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW
1/4, SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AND
RUN THENCE N 08*24" E,
ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF LLEWELLYN
AVENUE, 210 FEET" FOR A
POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
CONTINUE N 08-24' E, ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, 99.0
FEET, THENCE RUN S 87"36' E,
138.00 FEET, THENCE RUN S
09-13'50" W, 89.71 FEET,
THENCE RUN S 88*30' W, 138.0
FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, SAID LAND LYING AND
BEING A PART OF THE NE 1/4
OF THE SW 1/4, SECTION 34,
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST.
SECTION 34;
COMMENCE AT THE NW COR-
NER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4,
SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST,
THENCE RUN N 8-24' E, ALONG
THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
OF LLEWELLYN AVENUE,
309.00 FEET FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE N 8*24' E, 18.00 FEET,
THENCE S 87-02'10" E, 204.75
FEET, THENCE S. 6'30' W, 100.10
FEET, THENCE S 88'30' W, 72.20
FEET, THENCE N 9-13'50" E,
89.71 FEET, THENCE N 87-36' W,
138.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
ALL LYING AND BEING SIT-
UATE IN COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or be-
fore February 24, 2012, a date which
is within thirty (30) days after the
first publication of this Notice in The
Lake City Reporter and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint. '
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT: If you are a person with
a disability who requires accommo-
dations in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, the provision of certain
assistance. Individuals with a disabil-
ity who require special accommoda-
tions in order to participate in a court
proceeding should contact the ADA
Coordinator, 173 NE Hemando Ave-
nue, Room 408, Lake City, FL
32055, (386)719-7428, within two
(2) business days of receipt of notice
to appear. Individuals who are hear-
ing impaired should call (800)955-
8771. Individuals who are voice im-
paired should call (800)955-8770.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 24 day of January,
2012
P. DeWitt Cason
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05530348
February 2, 9, 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000533
DIVISION: MF
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KATIE T. HORNE A/K/A KATIE
TERESA HORNE A/K/A KATIE
CARTER, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated January 19, 2012, and en-
tered in Case No. 2010-CA-000533
of the Circuit Court of the Third Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for Columbia
County, Florida in which Citimort-


gage, Inc., is the Plaintiff and Mi-
chael Carter a/k/a Michael L. Carter,
Katie T. Home a/k/a Katie Teresa
Home a/k/a Katie Carter, Jane Doe
n/k/a Katie Malave, State of Florida
Department of Revenue, are defend-
ants, I will sell to the highest and
I


Legal

best bidder for cash in/on the third
floor of the Columbia County Court-
house at 173 N.E. Hemando Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055, Columbia
County, Florida at 11:00AM on the
14th day of March, 2012., the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment of Fore-
closure:
LOT 8 AND 9, OF GALLOWAY
SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION
OF THE SOUTH HALF, IN
BLOCK G IN THE NORTHWEST-
ERN DIVISION OF THE CITY OF
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,' AC-
CORDING TO MAP OR PLAT OF
SAID SUBDIVISION, RECORDED
IN O.R. BOOK 104, PAGES 393
AND 394, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH
A 2003 MOBILE HOME LOCAT-
ED THEREON AS A PERMA-
NENT FIXTURE AND APPURTE-
NANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED
AS VIN #'S 11439454A AND VIN
# 11439454B
A/K/A 607 NW GIBSON LN,
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming and interest in
the surplus from this sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days.
Dated in Columbia County, Florida
this 20th day of January, 2012.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By: B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of.certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation in order to
participate should call Jacquetta
Bradley, ADA Coordinator, Third
Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, Florida, at (386)719-7428
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
your voice impaired, call, (800)955-
8770. To file response please contact
Columbia County Clerk of Court,
173 NE. Hemando Ave., Lake City,
FL 32056-2069; Fax: (386)758-
1337.

05530346
February 2, 9, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN .AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 12-2011CA-000366
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
acting through the United States De-
partment of Agricultural, Rural De-
velopment, f/k/a Farmers Home Ad-
ministration, a/k/a Rural Housing
Service,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIE L. CARTER, III a/k/a WIL-
LIE LEE CARTER, a/k/a WILLIE
CARTER, a married man; WENDY
CARTER a/k/a WENDY SUE AN-
SON, a married woman, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
TO: WENDY CARTER, A/K/A
WENDY SUE CARTER, F/K/A
WENDY SUE ANSON, a married
woman, whose address is unknown
and who is not known to be dead or
alive.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage regarding the
following property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
A part of Blocks 275 and 276 of the
Eastern Division of the City of Lake
City, Florida, more particularly de-
scribed as follows: Commence at the
Southwest comer of said Block #275
and run S. 88'57'30" E. along the
North right-of-way line of Monroe
Street, 95.18 feet for a POINT OF
BEGINNING; thence N. 040'W.,
103.23 feet; thence S 89"02'30"E.,
97.73 feet to the East line of said
Block. #276; thence S. 0'45'OW.
along the said East line, 103.33 feet
to the North line of said Monroe
Street; thence S. 88'57'30"W. along
said right-of-way, 95.18 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on:
FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., Es-
quire, Attorney for Plaintiff, Boswell
& Dunlap LLP, 245 South Central
Avenue, Post Office Drawer 30, Bar-9
tow, FL 33831, within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this
Notice of Action, and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's At-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 26th day of January,
2012
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTIC-
IPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT FREDERICK
J. MURPHY, JR., ESQUIRE, 245
SOUTH CENTRAL AVENUE,
BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830, TEL-
EPHONE (863) 533-7117, WITHIN
TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NO-
TICE. IF HEARING IMPAIRED,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, OR VOICE
(V) 1-800-955-8770, VIA FLORIDA
RELAY SERVICE.
P. DeWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL
05530374
February 2, 9, 2012


Hom cS 1er
11l- -A,,.w .C.-^ Ul

L AerCay R eorter
Lake City Reporter


Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
REHABILITATION AND DEMO-
LITION/REPLACEMENT
Project No. llDB-L4-03-22-01-H20
Project ID: 2012-C
Columbia County (herein referred to
as the "Owner")
Sealed bids marked "Sealed Bid -
Columbia County Small Cities Com-
munity Development Block Grant
Project for Fiscal Year 2009, Hous-
ing Rehabilitation Grant" to be fi-
nanced by the State of Florida De-
partment of Economic Opportunity
under the provisions, and subject to
the requirements, of Title I of the
Housing and Community Develop-
ment Act of 1974, as amended, will
be received by the County for reha-
bilitation or demolition/replacement
dwelling units on behalf of the fol-
lowing owners for the following
units:
Rehabilitation
Unit 09-6, John Woods, 204 SE Su-
zanne Way, Lake City;
Unit 09-7, Petronia Kay Johnson,
457 SW Tina Glen, Lake City;
Unit 09-10, Lessie McClain, 169 NE
Bristol Place, Lake City; and
Demolition/Replacement
Unit No. 09-9, Thelma Sims, 119 NE
Fryer Street, Lake City. .
The owners listed above invite bids
for the rehabilitation or
demolition/replacement of the above
referenced properties. In order to be
considered, the proposal must be
made upon the Bid Proposal Form
and in accordance with the Instruc-
tions to Bidders. Copies of these
forms can be obtained from the
Building and Zoning Department, lo-
cated at 135 NE Hemando Street,
Suite B-21, Lake City, Florida on
February 3, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. East-
erm Standard Time.
In odler for your firm to submit a bid
on the project located at 119 NE Fry-
er Street, Lake City, you, your em-
ployees and any subcontractors, in-
cluding electrical, plumbing and me-
chanical subcontractors, and their
employees performing work on com-
ponents painted with lead-based
paint must have completed a United
States Department of Housing and
Urban Development approved
"Lead-Safe Work Practices" training
course.
The improvements are to be made
for and under contract to the owners
of the subject properties as described
above. Disbursements for funds for
the improvements will be made by
the County on behalf of the owners.
Bids will be received at the Office of
the County Manager, located at 135
NE Hemando Street, Suite 203, P. 0.
Box 1529, Lake City, Florida,
32055, not later than 10:00 a.m.
Eastern Standard Time on February
13, 2012. Bids must be enclosed in a
sealed envelope marked with the
property owner's name and address.
Bids will not be accepted if they are
turned in later than the deadline
specified above. No electronic or
facsimile bids will be accepted. The
sealed bids will be publicly opened
and read'aloud at 10:00 a.m. Eastern
Standard Time on February 13, 2012
at the Office of the County Manager,
located at 135 NE Hemando Street,
Lake City, FL.
CONTRACTORS, please note that
the County will need to know the
following information: 1) Your state
of licensure, 2) Your license number,
3)Your license class, 4) Certificate of
Completion of Lead-Safe Work
Practices Training and 5) Your in-
surance coverage.
A "walk through" of the above prop-
erties is scheduled for February 3,
2012 at 9:00 a.m. Eastern Standard
Time. Please meet at the Building
and Zoning Department, located at
135 NE Hemando Street, Suite B-21,
Lake City, Florida, 32055, prior to
going to the units. If you plan to
submit a bid, a representative of your
firm must attend the "walk through"
of the units to become familiar with
the properties and the work to be
completed.
No contractor shall visit the subject
property for any reason without first
making arrangements with the Coun-
ty and owner.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her bid
within sixty (60) days after the actual
date of the, opening thereof.
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OP-
PORTUNITY
EMPLOYER/HANDICAP ACCESS
JURISDICTION
Publish in the legal section on Janu-
ary 26, 2012 and February 2, 2012.

05530251
January 26, 2012
February 2, 2012
NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURS-
ING
IN RE: The license to practice nurs-
ing of
Johnathan Ivari Lynn, R.N.
4299 SW Carpenter Road
Lake City, Florida 32024
CASE NO.: 2011-13951
LICENSE NO.: RN 9235701
The Department of Health has filed
an Administrative Complaint against
you, a copy of which may be ob-
tained by contacting, Casey Cowan,
Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cy-
press Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3265, (850) 245-4640
If no contact has been made by you
concerning the above by March 1,
2012, the matter of the Administra-
tive Complaint will be presented at
an ensuing meeting of the Board of
Nursing an informal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency
sending this notice not later than sev-
en days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Tele-
phone: (850) 245-4640, 1-800-955-
8771(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770(V),
via Florida Relay Service.

05530136
January 19, 26, 2012


February 2, 9, 2012

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
File Number: 12-10-CP
WILLIAM W. SIMON,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
William W. Simon, deceased, whose
date of death was January 4, 2012,
File Number 12-10-CP, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is P.O. Box 2069,
Lake City, Florida 32056. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. *
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. '
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS
January 31, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Gary D. Grunder
23349 Northwest CR 236, Suite 10
High Springs, Florida 32643
(386) 454-1298
Florida Bar I.D. 199486
Personal Representative:
Judith Wanczuk
2030 Parade Dr., NW
Grand Rapids, MI 49505

05530362
February 2, 9, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL .CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2010-757-CA
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
IRENE ROSE STACY,
Defendant,
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
Notice is hereby given that the un-
dersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court,
Columbia County, Florida, will on
the 2/29/2012, at 11:00a.m., at the
3rd Floor Courtroom (1) of the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, 173 Her-
nando Street,' Lake City, Florida, of-
fer the sale and sell at public outcry,
one by one, to the highest bidder for
cash, the property located in Colum-
bia County, Florida, as follows:
Commence at the Southwest comer
of Lot 9, McClinton Farm Subdivi-
sion, a subdivision according to plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4,
Page 41A of the Public Records of
Columbia County, Florida; thence
run East approximately 210 feet for
the point of beginning; then run
North 210 feet; East 210 feet; South
210 feet; West 210 feet to the point
of beginning. Together with a 2000
Augustine Doublewide
ID#GMHGA6439900433A and
ID#GMHGA643990433B which is
permanently affixed to the lands
above described and as such is
deemed to be a fixture and a part of
the real estate.
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered on 1/23/2012, in
the above styled cause, pending in
said Court.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
P. DeWitt Cason, Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court
B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05530373
February 2, 9, 2012
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO
SELL
NOTICE IS GIVEN that the Suwan-
nee River Water Management Dis-
trict intends to sell certain lands. A
description of the lands is as follows:
PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4
AND PART OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 30,
TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 17
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: FOR POINT OF REF-
ERENCE COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
SECTION 30, THENCE RUN
NORTH 02 DEGREES 04 MI-
NUTES 16 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
SAID SECTION 30, A DISTANCE
OF 2643.88 FEET TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID
SOUTHWEST 1/4; THENCE RUN
NORTH 87 DEGREES 25 MI-
NUTES 27 SECONDS EAST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SOUTHWEST 1/4, A DIS-
TANCE OF 1002.39 FEET TO THE
CENTER OF A BRANCH AND
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE RUN ALONG SAID
CENTER OF A BRANCH THE
FOLLOWING COURSES: NORTH
43 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 15
SECONDS EAST, 217.65 FEET;
NORTH 59 DEGREES 54 MI-


NUTES 40 SECONDS EAST,
130.47 FEET; NORTH 39 DE-
GREES 48 MINUTES 42 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 103.77 FEET;
NORTH 25 DEGREES 23 MI-
NUTES 40 SECONDS EAST,
114.63 FEET; NORTH 40 DE-


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


BUY IT


^^^^^~glfH~i'r^
hi~il T




















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2012


Classified Department: 755-5440


Legal

GREES 18 MINUTES 25 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 848.21 FEET TO
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO.
47 AND THE TERMINUS OF
SAID COURSES; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 17 DEGREES 09 MI-
NUTES 50 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DIS-
TANCE OF 2123.86 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 32 MINUTES 34 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF
1519.05 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 02 DEGREES 04 MI-
NUTES 16 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 989.54 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
CONTAINING 45.97 ACRES.
The sale of the above lands shall take
place not less than 30 days nor more
than 45 days after the first publica-
tion of this notice.
This notice is given to comply with
the publication requirements of Sec-
tion 373.089, Florida Statutes.
This notice shall be published on the
following dates: February 2, 2012;
February 9, 2012; February 16, 2012.
Terry E. Demott
Senior Land Resource Coordinator
Suwannee River Water Management
District
9225 CR 49
Live Oak, Florida 32060
(386) 362-1001
05530470
February 2, 9, 16, 2012


060 Services
Bookkeeping &
Tax Services
Reasonable prices
Call 386-466-9096

100 Job
Opportunities

05530322
United States Cold Storage
Now excepting applications for:
Experienced Warehouse
Fork-lift Operators
Excellent pay and benefits
Apply in person Feb. 2 & Feb. 3
9am 4pm
211 NE McCloskey Ave.
Lake City 32055

05530375
Credit Administration Asst.
position available with First
Federal Bank of Florida. The
candidate will provide oversight
to ensure credit files meet policy
guidelines.Assist with
committee meetings including
organization of committee
packages, take minutes and
facilitate amendments. Assist
with the credit review process
and loan review/quality control
support. Requires excellent
organizational skills with strong
attention to detail. Minimum of
three years previous administra-
tive experience required.
Must be proficient in Word,
Excel and Outlook. Able to
proofread and make grammati-
cal and spelling corrections on
routine correspondence;type
40+ WPM;ability to take
meeting minutes. Lending
experience/exposure preferred.
Full benefits package. Applica-
tions may be obtained from any
First Federal Branch and
submitted to Human Resources,
PO Box 2029, Lake City, FL
32056 or email resume to
Turbeville.JfSffsb.com.
Bilingual candidates, encouraged
to apply Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05530458
NOW HIRING
Assistant Managers, Cashiers
& Baggers for High Springs
fruit & gift stores.
Apply in Person at Florida
Citrus Center (Chevron)
18603 NW CR 236, High
Springs (exit 404 & 1-75)

Children' Ministry Director:
First Presbyterian Churchl of Lake
City is seeking an organized,
outgoing and creative person to
implement children' ministry
within the church and develop a.
community outreach program.
Part-time. E-mail resume to:
kathy@fpclc.org or mail to:
P.O.Box 469, Lake City, 32056
PERSONAL ASSISTANT/
RECEPTIONIST, Computer skills
required, reply to: P.O. Box 7246,
Lake City, FL 32055
HELP WANTED
Full time Energetic-Retail Exp.
people person. Computer register
& stock exp a plus. Apply in
person. Smitty's Western Store.
3 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: James Scott
DBA Scott Farms Burlington,
KY. Perform all duties of
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, &
Vegetable Production including
seeding, planting, plowing,
weeding, spraying, harvesting,
packaging; and general farm
maintenance. Employment Dates:
03/20/2012 11/10/2012. Wage of
$9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0443042.


MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
Now accepting resumes for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20th Ave. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or email to:
bulldog@laloenterprises.com
P/T Selling Event Specialist
needed to promote products in the
Local Grocery Chains. Must be
outgoing and dependable. Week-
ends/Some Weekdays are a must.
No experience needed, we will
train. Please call (904) 652-8150.


100 Job
100 hOpportunities
Office Manager Position:
Needed Immediately!
2 year degree; 4 years experience
in office management.
Candidate must possess skills in
and knowledge of the following:
business & bookkeeping, Payroll,
Editing, day to day office manage-
ment, ordering supplies, client
scheduling, professional phone and
interpersonal skills, computer
competency to include creation of
Word documents and Excel
spreadsheets. Candidate must be
organized and flexible as this
position is highly involved with all
aspects and programs within this
agency.$25,000 to $28,000 per
year plus benefits. Please email
resume to: employment(5@rhap.net
or fax to 386-754-9017.
P/T Caregiver for partially
paralyzed elderly woman. Two
weekends a month with more
nights possible. Exp a must. Ellis-
ville area. Fax resume to 755-2165
Receptionist needed for Doctor's
office. Part-time with the
possibility of full-time. Send reply
to Box 05084, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056
ROUTE SALES person needed
for local milk route. CDL B Class
and good driving record a must.
Apply in person at 1721 E Duval
Street. Mon.- Fri. 3-6pm.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

120 Medical
120 Employment

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST. ,
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05530402
MEDICAL BILLING
Experience in medical office,
insurance coding, and billing
required. Excellent salary
based on experience.
Apply in confidence.
Email mafaisal05()yahoo.com
or fax 386-758-5987

Busy Family Practice Office
Seeking part-time Nursing Asst.
Exp required, must be organized.
Fax' resume to (386)719-9494.
GIEBEIG FAMILY MEDICINE
DENTAL HYGIENIST
needed. Full Time position
M-F 9:00 5:00pm Lake City
Office. Salary Commensurate with
experience. Please fax resume to:
386-752-3122 or email to
caw70(@aol.com
Desto Home Care is accepting
applications for Medical Billing/
Customer Svc. Prefer someone
who has medical billing exp. No
Calls. Mail resume to: Desoto
Home Care, P.O. Box 1480,
Lake City, FL 32056 Attn: Shaun
Medical Office looking for full
time employee in Optical. Experi-
ence preferred but not required.
Will train. Send resume to 763 SW
Main Blvd. Lake City, Fl. 32025
Resp. Therapist needed for
medical office.
Please fax resume to
(386) 754-1712

240 Schools &
240 Education

05530293
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/06/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/13/12

*LPN 03/12/12
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Dog Kennel chain link. 10 ft long
x 6ft wide x 6ft high, door on wide
end. Like new, used inside only.
snaps together in half hour. Still
assembled. $150. obo. 965-0061
German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
Sfee from intestinal and external


parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


407 Computqrs

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
HP COPIER/SCANNER. Model
PSC1410. All in one. Works great
Can demonstrate. I now use
wireless. $75. obo 386-965-0061
Hughes Internet satellite
system with outside pole.
$150. obo.
386-965-0061


416 Sporting Goods
Men's new Golf Clubs.
Graphite Shafts. Woods 1-3-5.
Irons 3-9. Putter and bag. $100.
386-752-9963

419 TV-Radio &
SRecording
2 small TV's. 1 Panasonic
1 Sylvania. Both work well. Used
as security cameras. $50.00 for
both obo. 386-965-0061
COMPLETE DIRECT TV
Satellite system on outside pole.
$150. obo.
386-965-0061


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts:
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

2 FAMILY Sale 1564 NW
Frontier Dr. Lake City Country
Club. Lots of clothes, and much
more. Saturday, Feb. 4th 7:30-1
Church Yard Sale. Sat. 8-? 256
NW Carol Place. 90 W right on
Turner Rd., left on Carol P Fur-
niture, collectibles, clothes, more
Daycare Closing Yard Sale. Sat.
8-? 441 S by Oleno State Park on
181 Ripley. Inside/outside toys,
teaching supplies, CD's & VHS.
Estate Sale. Sat,& Sun Contents
of home MUST go. Also moto-
rhome, deck boat, farm equipment,
farm tractor & 2 axle trailer
w/ramps. Open 10am both days
Home Depot S on 247 to new Dol-
lar Store at that light, left on Calla-
han, past Rolling Meadows to 1st
Rt. (Sparrow Terr) Rt. 1 mile to
SW Lamboy Rt. follow Rd to 914.
Huge Yard Sale
200 SW Hobby Place
Saturday Feb.4th
Moving, so everything must go.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

Karaoke Equipment for sale
Ready to set up and sing
Check Craigslist for specs
$3000 obo / 386-638-0061
PANASONIC DELUXE wireless
telephone system. One base & 3
extensions. Good for 200 ft from
base even outside. $75. obo
386-965-0061 /
RV TOTE. 36 gallon
Never Used. Cost $239.
Sell for $100.
386-752-9963
Security camera components.
Watch your home from any com-
puter. $900 worth of equipment.
Enough for 5 or 6 systems. Will
sell for $300.obo 386-965-0061
Stationary exercise bike. Sears
Deluxe Model. (Easy on & off)
Cost $799. new. Selling for
$300. obo. 386-965-0061

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420


460 Firewood

FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
S2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3 BR/2 BA, 14 x 80, CH/A, water,
sewage & garbage included. Total
electric. 1st, last + dep., lease
required, $550 mo. 386-752-8978.
3/2 partially furunished MH
fenced 15 ac. in Suwannee Coun-
ty. SOme farm and animal main-
tance exp. desirable. Terms neg.
386-454-7139 or 305-216-9893
3BR/2BA SWMH on 1 acre in
Ellisville. Private lot
$460. mo 1st, last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Newly remodeled 2/2 MH, Lake


City, FL. Quite area, Ig lot. No
Pets. 1st ($400) & Sec. ($300) due
before move in last month rent will
be split over the first 4 months.
Please call Jenn 386-454-7724

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, i '.' 2 l 2-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Prices! New 2012 3/2 start at
$39,900 and New 4/2's start at
$49,900. All new homes inc
delivery and set up, ac-skirt and
steps. North Pointe Gainesville
'1 4- ,"'2-5566


0 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
New And Used! North Pointe
Homes in Gainesville has 4 used
homes in stock! Don't delay as
these will go Fast.
Call North Pointe in Gainesville
(Hwy 441, 6 Blocks north of
Hwy 222) (352)872-5566
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Dealer in NW Florida Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating THEIR Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89.788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come,' 1st Serve.
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start al
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566

50 n Home
650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
3br/2ba 2.75 ac. w/fish pond.
Small down plus $750 month
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








lbr Apt with
all utilities included.
Close to the VA.
(727)415-2207
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also,.larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423' rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
I bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Quail Heights Move in Special.
2br/lba Duplex. Washer/dryer
hook up. Private, safe, secluded,
$725 mo $500 sec. 386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1 Month FREE
with 1 year lease. Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint.
Great area. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

70n Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05530457
Century 21/
The Darby Rogers Group
Totally remodeled in down
town White Springs 3/2
$840./mo.
16884 53rd Road Wellborn
3/2 $800./mo
1306 NW Scenic Lake Drive,
Lake City 3/2 spacious
home/Lake Front $1,650./mo
*453 SW Mayflower Glen
Forth White 2/1 $750./mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, 1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to downtown & shopping.
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170
3/2, newer home,
nice neighborhood
386-623-2848

3br/1.5 ba. Completely renovated.
Centrally located, completely
fenced yard. $825. mo + 1st, last &
security. 386-938-5637
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

4/2. CH/A. New roof & remod-
eled. Nice area. just south of Lake
City. $1250. mo. 1st. last & $1250
sec. dep. 386-755-1865 days only

Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3BR/2BA 1760 SQFT. car-
pet, tile. end porch, all appliances.
Irg gar, big kitchen. 386-269-0123

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals

OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mthl
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor
2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 11 00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft.
Office Space beside the Red Barn
on Hwy 90. $595. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

Live on a Golf Course. 3/2 brick
on 1/2 ac. Formal living, dining &
family room. 2 car garage.
$129,900 Frank 386-984-5217


820 Farms &
SAcreage-

Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
1. \k i 111 R IoII i i t
TIrE'T W&^I(


.n "''''' -
aId -map
S= e cash

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
S Only



4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!

(386) 755-5440


82O Farms &
82 Acreage

0553,0107
PROPERTY FOR SALE
SEALED BID
Suwannee County, FL
United States of America. Farm
Service Agency
WILL SELL, AS IS, the
following described property
located in Suwannee County:
9.39 acres, more or less, located
at 16493 77th Road. Live Oak.
Florida 32060.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION: The
SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of the
SE 1/4 of Section 10. Township
4 South. Range 14 East. Less
and except the East 25 feet and
the North 25 feet thereof for
road and utility purposes.
THIS PROPERTY
CONTAINS a vacant dwelling
unit which FSA has deemed to
be adequate for residential
occupancy. The property may
be examined at 16493 77th
Road, Live Oak, Florida 32060.
Bids must be entered on
official bid forms, FSA-2592,
that may be obtained from the
indicated contact people. For a
bidding package or for further
information contact: Dana
Baucom at 352/379-4540 and
visit the FSA website at:
http://www.resales.usda.gov/
BIDDING FORMAT: THE
PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD
FOR CASH. The sale will be
by sealed bid. Bids will be re-
ceived until the public opening,
which will be at 1:30 pm on
February 22, 2012, at the office
of the State Executive Director,
FSA, 4440 NW 25th Place,
Gainesville, FL 32606. Bids
must be accompanied by a 10%
bid deposit in the form of a
certified check, cashier's check,
postal money order or bank
money order payable to Farm
Service Agency. FSA will
choose the highest bid. The
deposit will be returned to
unsuccessful bidders. Term of
sale will be cash only. The
United States of America
reserves the right to reject any or
all bids. FSA will not offer
financing for this property.
The USDA Farm Service
Agency is an equal opportunity
lender and provider.
Complaints of discrimination
should be sent to USDA,
Director, Office of Civil Rights,
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410


870 Real Estate
7O v Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


940 Trucks
Dodge Dakota 2004,45K mi.
22mpg hwy, 17city. Mediterranean
blue. 4 door cab. 4 wheel dr, good
tires, new spare. Hard pick up
cover. $9,500obo. 386-965-0061
Must sell, Must Leave Country

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2003 Allegro 30DA. Workhorse
Chassis. 18300 miles, garage kept.
Excellent cond. w/many extras
$40,000. 386-754-5660

To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.



fWl

2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-623-9026

If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


U Get Your


V -hcl Sld


2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
Price Reduced $5,000
Only 18,300 miles, garage
kept motorhome. Exc.
cond. w/many extras.
$40,000
Call
386-754-5660