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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01764
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 29, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01764
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








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City


Health &

Wellness


Reporter


Sunday, January 29, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 309 U $1.00

TEACHER OF THE YEAR NOMINEES




14 of our finest honored


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com

Every day teachers in Columbia County
are working until they see that light bulb
of understanding in the eyes of their stu-
dents. They are staying up late, reading
essays, correcting math problems and


writing lesson plans. Often the reward for
their tireless work comes only years later,
when-a former student returns as a suc-
cessful, productive adult.
Selected by their peers, nominees for
the 2013 Columbia County Teacher of the
Year represent the high quality educators
in the district. They will be honored at the


Teacher of the Year program and recep-
tion 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 2 at the First
Presbyterian Church, 697 SW Baya Drive.
The public is invited...
Alvin Davis, the 2012 Florida Teacher of
the Year, will be the keynote speaker. Davis
is a high school music teacher in Broward
County.


"It is most important to have this recog-
nition program to showcase our nominees
and all teachers," said Dorothy Spradley,
volunteer and education marketing coordi-
nator for the district, "and to let them know
how much we truly appreciate their many
TEACHERS continued on 3A


Safest

day for

local

driving?

Tuesday
According to FHP
report on fatalities
in tN-county area.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com

The safest day to drive on
area roadways is Tuesday,
according to a report from
the-Florida Highway Patrol
this week.
Saturday and Sundays-
were deadliest in 2011, the
report said. Thirteen people
died in Saturday accidents
last year, while 12 died in
Sunday crashes. Just two
fatalities were recorded on
Tuesday. Seven occurred
on Mondays, six on
Thursday, five on Fridays
and four on Wednesdays.
The report covered fatal.
accidents investigated by
FHP in Columbia, Suwannee
REPORT continued on 5A

Critical
injuries
inATV
accident
From staff reports
A 64-year-old Lake City
man was critically injured
in a Lafayette County ATV
accident Saturday morning,
according to the Florida
Highway Patrol.
Billy Joe Payne was rid-
ing on a private road about
10 miles west of Brnford at
10:45 a.m. when he steered
sharply to the left and struck
a drainage ditch, reports
said. The 2005 Arctic Cat
turned end over end, eject-
ing Payne, who came to
rest 15 feet from the point
of impact. The ATV contin-
ued to flip and came to rest
upside down in the unpaved
roadway..
Payne was transported to
Shands at the University of
Florida for treatment, FHP
said.
Payne was not wearing
a helmet, reports indicate.
Alcohol was not a factor,
according to FHP


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


PASSING THE BUCK



AT CHAMBER BALL


Wilson
era begins
at C of C.

By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter.
com
Columbia County's
business and .com-
mnunity leaders came
together Saturday night
to celebrate the Lake
City/Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce's
past accomplishments
and future goals.
About 400 people
attended the Chamber
Ball at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds,
which rounded out a
weekend of chamber
events.
Dennille Decker, cham-
ber executive director,
said tickets sold out two
weeks ago. "It just shows
the Chamber Ball is
becoming the most antici-
pated event in Lake City,"
she said.
On Friday the Chamber
hosted a golf tournament
at The Country Club at
Lake City. ."We had over
100 golfers and had a
great time," she said. "We
appreciate everyone who
BALL continued on 3A


.. . .. . .-_- -'-- [- : '
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Bill Haley (left), the 2011 Lake City-Columbia County Chamber of Comnierce president, passes the buck to 2012 Chamber
president Todd Wilson Saturday during the 2nd Annual Chamber Ball:


. .. . .. ,- -
- T-4 -rr-ITT-L -,r R7- p.--
Columbia High School robotics team members Timmy Jewett (front row, left) and Chris Nettles
work on part of a robot while team captain Hayley Lewis (back row, from right), Alex Roberts, Bryce
McCarthy and Manny Ceroto finish construction on the base of the robot:


66 --
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 6A


Opmn,.r,
Busi:,ne
Lile .
Adce- .
Puzzles ...


IDC


'Get Smart' getting
ready for another
round of robotics

By TONY BRITr
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Working with tools such as shooters, sweep-
ers and controllers isn't rocket science, but it's
pretty sophisticated stuff. The Columbia High
School robotics team, Get Smart, has matters
well in hand, however.
It's the middle of building season as team
members construct a robot to compete in the
FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of
Science and Technology) Robotics Competition.
The contest will take place March 8-10 at the
University of Central Florida in Orlando.
In this year's contest, called "Rebound
Rumble," teams are tasked with constructing
and operating robots that will shoot basket-
ROBOTICS continued on 3A


TODAY IN COMING
BUSINESS WEDNESDAY
SL I n bu : L.: l n e --


I rI r I- *? I[


I-.-- rijul 1.












2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


.3J-,` 'Ez r. IiI, FLORIDA


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
4-30-38-41 2 4-5-14-22-24 Afternoon: 1-5-2 Afternoon: 6-7-6-8 4-9-14-18-35-47 4-19-28-29-47 PB 5


AROUND FLORIDA


Backyard politics: Risks and rewards for Gingrich


COCOA
Newt Gingrich's
promise to colonize
the moon isn't pie-in-
the-sky in Florida. It
illustrates an adage:
All politics is local.
Fred Register is among
Florida's voters Republicans
and Democrats alike who
know firsthand what deficit
reduction can mean. The state's
space industry lost several thou-
sand jobs to NASA budget cuts.
"If we give up on space, we
might as well give up on every-
thing," said Register, a 79-year-old
a Republican who retired from
the space program after five
decades.
No issue better illustrates the
risks and rewards of backyard
politics than Florida's space
industry. Gingrich ignited the dis-
cussion by making a bold decla-
ration at a packed rally last week
in Cocoa, about 20 miles from the
Kennedy Space Center.
"By the end of my second term
we will have the first permanent
base on the moon, and it will be
American," he said before being
interrupted by applause.
Backyard politics some-
times knocked as pandering
- has long been part of presi-
dential campaigns. Candidates
this. month alone have promised
to address gay marriage in Iowa,
hydroelectric power in New
Hampshire and port development
in South Carolina. They've joined
state lawmakers' fight against
labor union influence in New
Hampshire and tiptoed around
Iowa's.controversial ethanol sub-
sidies., ,
Gingrich says his.promise '
reflqta j.ao.ng

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Newt Gingrich, left, and his wife Callista pose for photographs after
Gingrich spoke, at Centro de al Familia in Orlando.


space exploration. But it also
reflects a successful campaign
strategy. His win in South
Carolina was aided, at least in
part, by his vocal support for
a plan to dredge the Port of
Charleston, among other local
issues.
The moon issue, however,
opened him to attacks from his
rivals, led by Mitt Romney, who
ridiculed Gingrich's space ideas
during Thursday's presidential
debate as an incredibly expensive,
initiative .
spent 25 years in bi)uiness,"'
* Romney said. "If I had a busi-


ness executive come to me and
say they wanted to spend a few
hundred billion dollars to put
a colony on the moon, I'd say,
'You're fired."'
The former Massachusetts
governor ticked off projects the
former House speaker had prom-
ised: a new interstate highway
for South Carolina andi dredging
the port of Charleston; burying
a power line coming into New
Hampshire from Canada.
"Look, this idea of going state
to state and promising what
people want to hear, promising
billions, hundreds of billions of


dollars to make people happy, '
that's what got us into the trouble
we're in now," Romney said.
"We've got to say 'no' to this kind
of spending."
Indeed, Romney has in recent
months focused more than his
rivals on national issues, such as
the economy and federal budget
deficits. But he has not avoided
local issues altogether.
Romney visited Florida's Space
Coast days after Gingrich, speak-
ing. to voters on a stage flanked
by a capsule that once traveled
on the space shuttle.
"A strong and vibrant space
program is part of being an
exceptional nation," he declared
Friday, the day after attacking
Gingrich's ideas during the
debate.
And he has engaged in back-
yard politics in other states,
albeit less enthusiastically than
Gingrich.
South Carolina Gov. Nikki
Haley says she privately dis-
cussed local concerns about
nuclear waste disposal with .
Romney, although he avoided
the issue in public. And Romney
joined his competitors in attack-
ing the National Labor Relatiols
Board for filing a lawsuit alleging
that Boeing Co. opened a plant
in South Carolina to punish the
Machinists union for a series
of work slowdowns. The NLRB
dropped the lawsuit in December
'when the Machinists approved a
four-year contract extension with
Boeing.
Gingrich isn't apologizing for
his local focus.
"I thought we were a country
where one of the purposes of
candidates going around was to
actually learn about the states


they campaigned in and actually
be responsive to the needs of the
states they campaign in," he said
in last week's debate.
That's a message that reso-
nates with Register, the retired
Space Coast resident Thanks
to all the attention leading up to
Florida's primary, he thinks a
new president might help revive
the nation's space industry, put-
ting his neighbors back to work.
'"We've been hit pretty hard,"
he said. "In 2013 maybe we'll see
a light"

Two Putnam deputies fired
for reckless driving
PALATKA A north Florida
sheriff's office has fired two
deputies for driving recklessly.
Putnam County Sheriff's
Office Capt. Johnny Greenwood
tells The Gainesville Sun that
the two deputies were speeding
as they responded Dec. 31 to a
complaint about noise from golf
carts.
' Authorities say the deputies
were driving separate cars to
the scene when one lost control
and crossed a concrete median,
finally coming to rest in the
opposite lane.
Greenwood says devices on
the deputies' cars clocked one
going 124 mph and the other
going 119 mph. Greenwood says
those high speeds for a routine
call are a "gross violation" of
agency policy.
One deputy was a six-year vet,
eran of the agency and the other
worked for the sheriff's office
for less than a year.

(AP)


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Busts put tiny Texas county on map


SIERRA BLANCA, Texas
Nestled among the few remaining
businesses that dot a rundown high-
way in this dusty West Texas town
stands what's become a surprise des-
tination for marijuana-toting celebri-
ties: the Hudspeth County Jail.
Willie Nelson, Snoop Dogg and
actor Armie Hammer have been
among the thousands of people bust-
ed for possession at a Border Patrol'
checkpoint outside town in recent
years, bringing a bit of notoriety to
one of Texas' most sparsely popu-
lated counties.
"Once I was in Arizona, and when
I said where I was from, they said,
That's where Willie Nelson was
busted,'" said Louise Barantley, man-
ager at the Coyote Sunset souvenir
shop in Sierra Blanca.
Hudspeth County cameos aren't
only, for outlaws: Action movie
star Steven Seagal, who's already
deputized in Louisiana and Arizona
for his reality show "Steven Seagal
Lawman" on A&E, has signed on to
become a county officer.
Locals already have found ways
to rub shoulders with their celebrity
guests.
Deputies posed for pictures with
Snoop Dogg after authorities said
they found several joints on his bus
earlier this month. When Nelson was
busted here in 2010, the county's
lead prosecutor suggested the singer
settle his marijuana charges by per-
forming "Blue Eyes Crying in the
Rain" for the court. Nelson paid a
fine instead, but not before county
commissioner Wayne West played
one of.his own songs for the country
music legend.
West acknowledged he's a big fan
of Nelson and wanted to capitalize on
a golden chance to perform for such
a noted "captive audience."
"Willie loved the song, he is a real
outgoing individual" he added.
The once-thriving town of Sierra
Blanca began to shrink to its current
1,000-person population after the
construction of nearby Interstate 10
- a main artery linking cities from
California to Florida offered an
easy way to bypass the community.
Now the highway is sending thou-


sands of drug bust
cases Sierra Blanca's
way, courtesy of
a Border Patrol
checkpoint just out- .....
side of town where ,
drug-sniffing dogs
inspect more than l l
17,000 trucks, travel- Ha
- es and tour buses Hammer
-- daily for whiffs of
contraband that may have made its
wait inland from the border.
Hudspeth County Sheriff Arvin
West, younger brother of the musi-
cally inclined commissioner, said his
office handled about 2,000 cases last
year, most of them having to do with
drugs seized at the checkpoint.
Border Patrol agents say people
busted with small amounts of pot
often say they have medical marijua-
na licenses from California, Arizona
or New Mexico three states along
1-10 that, unlike Texas, allow for
medicinal pot prescriptions and
claim to believe the licenses were
valid nationwide.
Nelson's publicists declined to
comment about the specifics of the
singer's case. Representatives for
Snoop Dogg, who will pay a fine and
court costs after being cited for pos-,
session of marijuana paraphernalia,
did not return several messages
seeking comment.
County authorities have not yet
decided whether to prosecute or
issue a citation for Hammer, who
starred in the 2010 film 'The Social
Network" and more recently played
FBI's number two man in "Edgar
J." He was arrested in November
after authorities said they found
marijuana-laced brownies and cook-
ies on his way to his wife's bakery
in San Antonio. His attorney Kent
Schaffer has called the case a "total
non-issue."
Local officials say they're not on a
celebrity witch hunt, but some resi-
dents are enjoying the publicity from
the high-profile arrests. They say the
once forgotten town of Sierra Blanca
should take pride in not pandering to
famous people caught breaking the
law.
"We get attention because some-


thing is being done right," resident
Adolfo Gonzalez said while shopping
at a local convenience store. "Ift'd be
worse if we'd let them go because
they are celebrities."
That's not expected to change
when Segal comes to town. Sheriff
West insists the "Under Siege" star
hasn't indicated any plans to film his
show here but the sheriff isn't rul-
ing it out.
"If he wants to, we can do it but
that's not what he said this was
about," West said.

Family, friends gather
for Etta James' funeral
LOS ANGELES Hundreds of
Etta James' friends, fans and family
gathered Saturday at a Los Angeles-
area church to remember the leg-
endary rhythm and blues singer who
died this month.
Mourners at James' funeral are
expected to include entertainment
luminaries, with both Stevie Wonder
and Christina Aguilera scheduled to
perform. Aguilera will sing the song
that, James made famous, "At Last,"
while Wonder will perform with the
church's choir. The Rev. Al Sharpton
will deliver the eulogy.
James died Jan. 20 at age 73 after
battling leukemia and other ailments.
She was most famous for her rendi-
tion of "At Last," and in her decades-
long career, she became revered for
her passionate, soulful singing voice.
Her version of the song has become
an enduring anthem for weddings
and commercials. *
Perhaps most famously, President
Barack Obama and the first lady
danced to a version of the song at
his inauguration ball.
"Etta James was a pioneer. Her
ever-changing sound has influenced
rock and roll, rhythm and blues, pop,
soul and jazz artists, marking her
place as one of the most important
female artists of our time," Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame President and
CEO Terry Stewart said after her
death.

(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Actor Noel Harrison
is 78.
Author Germaine
Greer is 73.
M Actress Katharine
Ross is 72.
M Actor Tom Selleck is
67.
Actress Ann Jillian is
62.
Rock musi-
cian Tommy Ramone,,
(Ramones) is 60.'
Rock musician Louie
Perez (Los Lobos) is.59.
Rhythm-and-blues/


Sfunk singer Charlie Wilson
is 59.
Talk show host Oprah
Winfrey is 58.
Country singer Irlene
Mandrell is 56.
Actress Judy Norton
Taylor ("The Waltons") is
54.
Olympic gold-medal
diver Greg Louganis is 52.
M Actress Heather
Graham is 42.
Actress Sara Gilbert
is 37.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number............. 752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wllson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
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vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
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vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates .
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks.................. $48.79
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Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Daily Scripture

"God is spirit, and his worship-
ers must worship in the Spirit
and in truth."


- John 4:24











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 3A

-TEACHERS: Nominees cite rewards


JASON MATTHEW WALKERIL3ae City Reponrter
The owners of Pro Motion Physical Therapy pose for a photograph with 'Pat' the Chamber.
Champion traveling trophy after bidding $1,100 during a live auction Saturday. Pictured are
Pro Motion Physical Therapy co-owners Brian and Melinda Sganga and receptionist Salena
Westberry, Chamber Executive Director Dennille Decker and 2012 Chamber Piesident Todd
Wilson.


BALL: Year's activities are reviewed

Continued From Page 1A


who came out and golfed."
The 2ndAnnual Chamber
Ball coupled the annual
meeting with dinner, danc-
ing and a silent auction.
The Ball also served as
a changing of guards as
Bill Haley, 2011 president,
"passed the buck" to Todd
Wilson, 2012 chamber
president and publisher
of the Lake City Reporter.
Wilson said he is the 78th
president in the Chamber's
91 years.
"I'm honored to be the
2012 president of the cham-
ber of commerce. We have
a wonderful team of indi-
viduals dedicated to being
advocates in Lake City and
Colum ia County," Wilson
said. '"We have several
exciting initiatives planned
for the year and we are
very excited to promote
business in Lake City."
"Think Lake City First'
is the theme of my presi-
dency. Spend your money.
locally with your fellow
chamber members. It is
our collective responsi-
bility to remind our com-
munity of this every day,"
Wilson said in a speech.
The chamber has a three-
year strategic plan in place
and several initiatives
planned to help improve
the chamber and business
community, he said.
Retiring directors Steve
Smith, Haley and Jenny
Drawdy were recognized.
"Wow, what a year. It
goes so doggone fast,"
Haley said. Looking back
on 2011, there were 13
chamber mixers, 23 ribbon


cuttings, Leadership Lake
City sessions and a legis-
lative breakfast, he said.
Major events included the
Fourth of July celebration,
Trunk or Treat in October,
Snow Day, the Dashing to
the Snow 5K and last year's
inaugural Chamber Ball
and golf tournament.
Haley said considering
all the chamber has done,
"you'd think we have a
huge staff but we don't."
The chamber staff is made
up of Decker and Sonja
Meads, administrative
assistant.
Haley said the Lake City/
Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce is among the
oldest at national chamber
events. He said the cham-
ber's lasting presence in
the area is because being
involved in the chamber is
a point of pride for many.
"The movers and shak-
ers, the 'big"bus.inesse. in
town, they make the cham-
ber," he said. "Next year if
you plan on going to the
Ball, make sure you get
your tickets early."
"I want to wish Todd the
best of luck," Haley said.
With a winning bid of
$1,100, Brian and Melinda
Sganga of Pro Motion
Physical Therapy won the
"Chamber Champion" trav-
eling trophy.
Melinda. Sganga said
they bid on the gator head
because he is cool and
it was for a good cause.
When the bidding started,
"I said that gator head is
leaving here with mne," she
said. The business will dis-


Laptops for Miami students
Associated Press that the laptop program
MIAMI-- -Children in aims to boost the students'
one of. Miami's toughest interest in learning.
neighborhoods are getting The $200 XO laptops run
rugged, inexpensive laptop open-sourced software and
computers similar to ones are designed specifically for
distributed toschoolchildren children. The John S. and
in developing countries. James L. Knight Foundation
Th e One Laptop Per Child financed the laptops for
Association in Miami gave Holmes ElementaryC
more than 500 green-and- The One Laptop Per Child
white laptops Friday to stu- Association has a sister foun-
dents at Holmes Elementary dation in Massachusetts that
School in Liberty City. has distributed the laptops
Officials with the associa- in Nicaragua, Peru, Rwanda
tion tell The Miami Herald and other countries.


play the gator head in their
lobby where everyone can
see it. "We are proud to
display it."
-"We live here and we are
raising our children here.
We are trying to be part of
this community," she said.
"We appreciate every-
body that attended and
made this' night possible,"
Decker said. "Just judging
by the looks on everyone's
face, they are having a
good time."
GulfCoast Financial
Services was the golf tour-
nament title sponsor and
Rountree-Moore was the
dinner title sponsor.


Continued From Page 1A
many contributions,. hard
work, dedication, creativity Avt
and selflessness and care
they give the students in
our schools."
Nominee Chris Dang
said being a teacher is most
rewarding "when you know Dang
you've inspired a child to
achieve greatness." Dang :
said he is .now teaching
10-year-olds he first taught .'
as 4-year-olds in prekin- .
dergarten. This year stu-
dents he taught as a first- :',_
year teacher will graduate Angstadt
from high school, he said.
"They've been a big part of
my life."
Nominee Deborah Peale
said her most rewarding
experience is when students
return to tell her the impact >
she had on their lives. Once
a former student with a Bailey
learning disability called fifth grace
Peale from college to say Element
she was the only reason the years ofe
student stayed in school, 0 A
Peale said., teaches
Nominee Kevin Doyle Summer
said teaching is a profession has five
that attracts people willing ence.
to get to work early, stay E M
late and pay out of pocket. teaches
Doyle said he finds unex- dents a
pected things students do Element
to be rewarding, such a slip- years ofe
ping him an apology note N Kev
when they are late or dis- specialist
ruptive. Element
Nominees for the 2013 years of,
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of the Year are: ESE stu(
Chris Dang teaches Element
fourth grade at Niblack years of,
Elementary and has 11 0 Mar
years of experience. es fifth
Denise Nordmeyer Element
teaches Algebra 1A and 1B years of
at Columbia High School. Eri
She has 13 years of experi- physical
ence. City Mid
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ROBOTICS: Eager for competition

Continued From Page 1A


, balls into hoops. More than 60
teams from around the coun-
try are slated to compete.
In preparation for the con-
test, the 25 members of Get
Smart were broken into small
groups to handle specific
tasks, including building, pro-
gramming and using comput-
er aided design in the robot's
construction.
The students already have
20 days, roughly 100 hours,
invested in the project.
Haley Lewis, team captain,
'said she is excited about pre-
paring for this year's competi-
tion.
"I'm so excited to see how
our new team will handle the
competition," she said. "Last
year all of us were rookies
and now this year some of us


have that experience and we
get to bring in this whole new
crowd of people so they can
experience how amazing it is.
Itfs a high energy weekend
and its going to be great for,
everybody involved."
During its first trek into
competitive robotics, the CHS
team won the 2011 Florida
FIRST Regional Gracious
Professionalism Award, an
award for great sportsman-
ship,
.Celena Crews, a Columbia
High School math, science
and engineering teacher,, is
Get Smart's coach coach.
"This is build season and
we have six weeks to design,
build and test the robot," she
said. "This is our second year
and we are way ahead of the


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game from where we were
at this point last year. We're
at the end of our third week,
so we're essentially halfway
through, and we've made
amazing progress."
Crews said the team used
principles of physics to devel-
op a way for the robot to score
the basket, as well as a way


ence.
Ashley Brown teaches
language arts at Challenge
Learning Center.
Sherod Keen is the band
instructor at Richardson
Middle School.


to collect balls from missed
shots.
"In the meantime we're
raising funds and preparing
for competition," she said,
noting it takes about $14,000
annually to get part of the
team to the Orlando regional
competition. "Part of competi-
tion, which is three days long,
,they (students) go around and
talk to other teams and learn
from other teams. Our focus
right now is getting ready for
competition."


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OPINION


Sunda january 29 20I2


-yi, .%- ,- -7 a -I


OUR
OPINION



NDAA


casts


a chill

whether through
I legislative
absent-mind-
edness or
an alarming
ignorance of the Constitution,
Congress approved a chill-
ing provision in the National
Defense Authorization Act, the
law that gives the Pentagon the
go-ahead to spend the money
allocated to it President Barack
Obama signed the measure into
law Dec. 31.
The provision is aimed at
clarifying the circumstances
under which the United States
can detain suspected terrorists,
presumably all foreigners. The
bill targets detainees who were
"part of or substantially supported
al-Qaida, the Taliban or associated
forces."
Thafs pretty spongy language,
because it assumes a certain
level of organization that, at least
with the Taliban, may not exist
And who knows what "associated
forces" are?
But the glaring fault in the pro-
vision is that it does not exempt
American citizens from indefinite
imprisonment without charge,
trial or even a hearing an obvi-
ous violation of the Fifth and Sixth
amendments of the Constitution.
A Senate amendment specify-
ing an exemption for Americans
was defeated 45-55, with most
of the no votes coming from
Republicans who can't invoke the
Constitution enough when trying
to justify some sketchy interpreta-
tion of states' rights.
According to Washington's
The Hill newspaper, a bipartisan
coalition of lawmakers spanning
the spectrum from liberal Sen. Al
Franken, D-Minn., to Tea Party
movement supporter Rep. Jeff
Landry, R-La. -is organizing to
change the detainee language.
In a signing statement, Obama
wrote that he had "serious res-
ervations with certain provisions
that regulate the detention, inter-
rogation and prosecution of sus-
pected terrorists."
The president has said his.
administration would never use
this provision against American
citizens. That's not to say the
next president would not.
Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


N ewt Gingrich prom-
ises that by the
end of his second
term as president,
the United States
will have established a perma-
nent "American" colony on the
moon.
As campaign promises go,
this is real pie in the sky.
Supposedly, Floridians will
be so excited by the prospect
of the return of their old NASA
jobs (or the idea of living on
the oxygen-free moon) that
they will forego their common
sense and vote for Gingrich.
He will pay the billions of dol-
lars the moon escapade would
cost by "growing the economy"
through such means as elimi-
nating taxes on capital gains
(even though capital gains
taxes are the lowest they've
been since the 1930s).
If elected, Gingrich also has
promised to move the U.S.
embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem, a hugely contro-
versial and complicated issue.
This prompted a casino-owning
billionaire friend of Israel to
give Gingrich's presidential
quest $10 million to keep up
the attacks on Mitt Romney.
For his part, Romney has
promised that if he is elected,
America will be awash in jobs
(but only for those here legal-
ly). He will do this by being a
former governor and business-
man, thus assuring everyone
he's an executive who means
business. He will also, he says,
get rid of regulations that were
supposed to promote competi-
tion, keep workplaces safe,
make food and drugs safe and
effective and ensure consumer
products work the way manu-
facturers say they will.


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANO
VI


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com
Unregulated, businesses
will start creating jobs as fast
as they can. They will also
get more tax breaks, which
will make them so happy they
will create even more jobs,
although it is not clear how
they will suddenly break free
from the desire to create those
jobs in countries where labor is
cheaper than in America.
If re-elected, Barack Obama
promises that he will make the
United States tax code fair for
everyone, even if Republicans
control the House and want
to keep tax breaks for rich
people. (Obama conveniently
announced this promise on the
day that Romney was forced to
unveil his tax return showing
that in 2010 he paid 13.9 per-
cent on $21.7 million in invest-
ment income while most people
paid a much higher rate.)
Gingrich, who with former
President Bill Clinton pushed
the poor off the welfare system
after, two years and instead
made more of them eligible for
food stamps, disdainfully calls
Obama the "food stamp presi-
dent." Actually, Obama is not
on food stamps, did not create
food stamps and has no control
over who gets food stamps.
Whether or not he'd prefer
jobless Americans to starve
rather than get food stamps,
Gingrich does propose getting


rid of unionized school jani-
tors and having poor children
* mop their school's floors. (The
casino-owning billionaire hates
unions.)
Romney and Gingrich both
promise Cuban-Americans that
if Fidel Castro dies, they will
not go to his funeral. Gingrich
promises that Castro will not
get to heaven, even though
Gingrich knows God has forgiv-
en him for trespassing against
the no-adultery commandment.
Romney and Gingrich both
promise to be the true heir to _
Ronald Reagan, having forgot-
ten they both used to make' '
strongly disparaging remarks
about the former president.
Obama promises he'll push
Congress to raise taxes on mil-
lionaires to 30 percent, noting
that's less than what they paid
during Reagan's administration.
Obama also wants to extend tax
cuts for middle-income families.
This isn't the politics of envy,
Obama says (quoting Romney),
but the politics of math. If the
rich don't pay more, Obama
warns, students will pay more
for loans, government fees will
go up and struggling families
will pay more.
Obama promises he will get
serious about helping people
save their houses from foreclo-
sure, although that will be of
little solace for the newly home-
less in America.
Romney and Gingrich prom-
ise they'll continue attacking
Obama on everything.
What's not to love about elec-
tion years?

Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


Kiriakou case may stifle democracy


eaks are a. fact of
life in Washington,
and while every
presidential admin-
istration since. the .
earliest days of the republic has
sought to prevent them, no one
has succeeded. But President
Barack Obama seems deter-
mined to try even in the face
of mounting criticism from civil
libertarians.
So far, Obama's Justice
Department has brought six
cases against those who have
been accused of releasing
unauthorized information in
contraventiorrof secrecy laws.
The latest of these came the
other day against a former CIA
operative once in the forefront
of counterterrorist efforts, who
was charged with revealing the
names of two CIA interrogators
involved in the waterboarding of
al-Qaida leader Abu Zubaydah.
Whether or not the actions of
John Kiriakou, who helped cap-


Dan K. Thomasson

ture Zubaydah, have damaged
the agency is open to question.
But what isn't is the fact that
over the years, congressional
actions some official, some
not have caused more harm
to the nation's intelligence
efforts than almost anything
else short of the treasonous
activities of Aldrich Ames in
the CIA and the FBI's infamous
Robert Hanssen. ,
Back in the 1970s,
Democratic Sen. Frank Church
of Idaho decided to expose
the CIA's questionable opera-
tions hidden under a blanket
of national security. In a long
investigation, Church and his


allies dug deeply into the dark
secrets of an agency on the
front line of the Cold War.
The revelations of mobster
involvement in efforts to rid
Cuba of Fidel Castro and the
CIA's foreign interventions over
three decades were laid bare as
never before. They resulted in
wholesale changes in the way
the agency did business, not
always for the better. The CIA's
clandestine services ultimately
underwent severe alterations
that damaged its ability to func-
tion in a rapidly changing world.
The use of waterboarding and
other controversial techniques
has been public information
for some time. One can only
hope that this case is not being
motivated by CIA vindictiveness
against a former trusted opera-
tive simply because he didn't like
some of his agency's methods.
* Dan K. Thomasson is for-
mer editor of Scripps Howard
News Service.


4A


HER
W


Romney

should

release

10 years

of returns
n a curt nod to growing
public pressure, Mitt
Romney on Tuesday final-'
ly released his tax return
for 2010 and an estimate
for 2011.
As if that's enough.
Romney is one of the richest" .
men ever to run for the White
House, with an accumulated
wealth of more than $250 mil-
lion. He is campaigning on his.
assertion to be a "jobs creator"'.,
in the private sector but we've.'
seen nothing to convince us
that it's true. Having made
the argument, Romney has a....
special obligation to release
records that can help show
where his money came from,
what causes he supports and
how the tax policies he advo-
cates would affect him.
Romney should produce tax
returns for at least 10 years,
as President Barack Obama
and Vice President Joe Biden
have done. And he should do it
now, before the critical Super
Tuesday primaries.
Romney seemed flummoxed
when he was asked about his
tax returns earlier this month
and no wonder. He has suc-
cessfully dodged having to
reveal them ever since The
Boston Globe first asked for
them in-1994 when he ran for
the U.S. Senate against Ted
Kennedy. Romney refused then
and continued to refuse every
year during his two terms as
Massachusetts governor. Either
he's got something to hide, or
he has an outrageous sense of
entitlement
Personal tax returns are
limited in what they tell us, but
they are the clearest window
we have to see how a candi-
date's statements sync up with
his or her conduct. Here's,
what voters learned Tuesday:
Romney and his wife, Ann,
made $21.6 million in 2010.
Paying about $3 million, the
Romneys.had an effective fed-.
eral income tax rate in 2010 of
13.9 percent, lower than many
top wage earners and nearly
half the rate paid by Obama
and Romney's Republican chal-
lenger Newt Gingrich.
Wealth accumulation is a
source of pride. In Silicon
Valley, we salute those who
build companies and make
fortunes. But the rich should
expect to pay a fair share of
taxes. Romney and Gingrich
advocate tax plans that would
make them wealthier at the
expense of the average worker.
Years ago, Romney said it
would be wrong for him to take
credit for creating jobs dur-
ing his tenure at Bain Capital,
the company from which his
2010 income mostly derives.
But he now asserts that he
created 100,000 jobs. The Wall
Street Journal, Boston Globe,
Washington Post and other
respected news organizations
have been unable to fully
substantiate this. The public
needs access to both Romney's
returns and Bain's records to
confirm or debunk the claim.
American presidents back
to the early 20th century have
released personal tax returns.
Franklin Roosevelt did it. So
did Ronald Reagan, George
W. Bush and Richard Nixon.
Mitt Romney's father, former
Michigan Gov. George Romney,
turned over 10 years of returns
during his 1968 presidential
campaign.
Two years aren't going to cut
it. If Mitt Romney wants voters
to trust him, he's got to come
clean.


E San Jose Mercury News


Election year brings


promises, promises











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Note: Applications
available
The 8th Annual Miss.
Florida Gateway Pro Rodeo
Queens Competition will be
held on March 16 at the 18th
Annual Florida Gateway
Pro Rodeo. Ladies ages 4
to 18 can win scholarships,
tiaras, Montana silver belt
buckles, trophies and more!
Applications are available
at The Money Man, your
school office, The fair-
grounds office or download
at www.columbiacountyfair.
org. For more information
call 386-752-8822.

Jan. 29

Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 29, 2012
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library: Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita Nights
and Champagne for
Buzzards. Phyllis Smallman
is a Canadian who has spent
a lot of time in Florida, the
setting for her award-win-
ning mystery series featur-
ing sassy bartender, Sherri
Travis. A former potter with
a lifelong love of myster-
ies, Phyllis divides her time
between her native Ontario
and Sarasota. She will join
us live via Skype for this
program.
Blood drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have a
blood drive Jan. 29 from 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. at Winn Dixie.
All donors receive a T-shirt
or boxer shorts.
Jan. 30

Blood drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have a
blood drive Jan. 30 from


10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Florida
Gateway College. All donors
receive $25 off selected
prom dresses and a T-shirt
or boxer shorts.
Wildlife class
The Columbia County
Extension office, 164 SW
Mary Ethal Lane, will host
Creating Backyard Wildlife
Habitat on Jan. 30 from 1
to 4 p.m. Learn how to cre-
ate backyard wildlife habitat
for a variety of wildlife, in
particular birds, bats, and
butterflies.
Feb. 1

Black History Month
Opening Ceremony
Black History* Month
Opening Ceremony, 6 pm,
Richardson Comm. Center.
Living on a Few Acres

Interested in an alter-
native small scale farm-
ing enterprise? The UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension is offering a
monthly series of programs
on beginning or improv-
ing small scale agricultural
operations. Programs are
Small Farm Management,
Growing Poultry, Pond
Management, Fruits and
Berries, Beekeeping,
Beef and Small Ruminant
Production, Muscadine
Grapes,' Marketing
Products and Fall Forages.
Registration fee is $10 for
individuals and $15 for'
couples. Enrollment dead-
line is Feb. 1. Classes will
be held the first Monday
of the month starting Feb.
6 and running through
Oct. 1 at the Columbia
County Extension Office
located at 164 SW Mary
Ethel Lane at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds. For
more information please


contact Derek Barber at
the Extension Office at
(386)752-5284.
Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1, at
the Central Building to plan
for Olustee 2012. The build-
ing is located at 409 SW
St. Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.

Newcomers Friendship
Luncheon

The February Friendship
Luncheon of The Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be at Ruby Tuesdays
across from Cracker Barrel
on February 1st at 11:30
a.m.
All members, guests and
friends are welcome. For
more information call
Rose Taylor at 755-2175
or Barbara Test 754-7227.

"Feb. 2

Lake City Masons
We are pleased to
inform you, that the 1st
Stated Communication
in February will be Lake
City Masonic Lodge #27's
Americanism program on
Thursday, Feb. 2. Our spe-
cial guests that night will be
recording artist group The
Mercy Mountain Boys, who
will be performing their
song Soldier's Letter. We
are also pleased to welcome
the American Legion Color
Guard, who will present
the colors for the Pledge of
Allegiance. If that were not
enough, we will also have a
speaker for your entertain-
ment and information. This
meeting will be open, so
please bring your wife or
significant other and family.
Dinner will be served at 6
p.m. and the program will


REPORT: Careless driving cited


Continued From Page 1A
and Hamilton counties,
according to FHP Lt. Mark
Boatwright
Twenty-eight of the 49
fatalities., classified by day
or time occurred between
noon and midnight
Fifty-two percent of those
killed were not wearing seat
belts, the report said. Thirty-
four percent of the accidents
were alcohol-related.
The most common traffic
violation in the fatal wrecks
was careless driving, cited
in 24 cases. In 11 instances
driving under the influence
was the primary traffic vio-


nation. In one instance the
primary violation for the
fatality was disregarding a
stop sign and in another
the primary violation was
driving left of the center
line. There was two instanc-
es where the primary traf-
fic violation was listed as
DUI manslaughter and one
instance where exceeding a
safe/posted speed was the
primary violation.
The greatest number
of victims in the fatal acci-
dents, 13, were 41-50 years
old. Ten victims were 11-20
and 10 were 61-70.


In two cases where
applicable, a motorcycle
helmet was not in use. In
five instances a motorcycle
helmet was in use. In one
instance where applicable,
a bicycle helmet was not
in use.
A total of 57 motorists,
passengers or pedestrians
died in FHP-investigated
accidents in the tri-county
area last year. The Lake
City Police Department
investigated one fatality.
Forty-seven fatalities were
recorded in 2010 and 44 in
2009. -


begin at 7 p.m.
Feb. 3

Gospel concert
Southern Gospel soloist
Ann Downing, a popular
performer on the Gaither
Gospel Homecoming video
series, will be in concert
at the Wellborn United
Methodist Church, 12005
County Road 137, at 7 p.m.
on Friday, Feb. 3. For infor-
mation call (386)754-8524.
Volunteer training
Hospice of the Nature
Coast will provide orienta-
tion training for individuals
who are interested in learn-
ing more about Hospice vol-
unteer opportunities. The
class will be held on Friday,
Feb. 3, at the Hospice of the
Nature Coast Clinical office
Conference Room, 150 N.
Main Street in High Springs,
from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Lunch will be provided.
The class provides an over-
view of Hospice philosophy
and history. Participants will
become acquainted with ser-
vices provided by Hospice of
the Nature Coast for patients
and their families. They will
also become familiar with the
concept of palliative care and
learn the importance of con-
fidentiality. At the end of this
training, those wishing to vol-
unteer in specific areas will
be qualified to do so. Teens
and high school students
are encouraged to attend.
To register for this class,
contact Rebecca McCuller,
Hospice of the Nature Coast
Volunteer Services Manager
at 386-755-7714.
Hyssongs in concert
The Hyssongs will be pre-
senting a concert of gospel.
music at the Lulu Advent


Christian Church, 254 SE
Gillen Terrace in Lulu, on
Feb. 3 at 7 p.m.

Feb. 4

Church yard sale
The Lake City Church of
God, 173 SE Ermine Ave.,
Kid's Club will have a yard
sale Saturday, Feb. 4 in the
Family Life Center from 7
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Haven
Hospice will celebrate 5 years
of the Suwannee Valley Care
Center, 6037 W. US Highway
90, and 25 years serving the
area with a birthday party
Saturday, Feb. 4 from. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be
bounce houses, snacks and
activities, free of charge.

Health fair
The Columbia County
Recreation Department
will host it's annual Health
and Wellness Fair Saturday,
Feb. 4 from 8 a.m. to noon at
the Richardson Community
Center. To participate with
a booth, call 754-7095 or
email nicolesmith@colum-
biacountyfla.com.
West Virginia Day
The West Virginia Annual
Reunion will be held on Feb.
4 starting at 11:30 am. Please
bring a covered dish to share
for the luncheon. The event
will be held at Epiphany
Church, 1905 SW Epiphanty
Court For questions, infor-
mation, or reservations
please call 386-7554937.
Olustee Festival Pageant
The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com


Saturday, Feb. 4. Ages 3-12
mos, 13mo-23 mo, 24,5-6 and'
7-9 will be held at 4 p.m. at
the Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be held at
7 p.m. Winners in each divi-
sion will receive a $50 sav-
ings bond, crown, banner and
ride in the Olustee parade on
Feb. 14. The pageant is open
to the public with admission
at the .door: $5.00 adults and
students. Applications are
available at the Columbia
County Library or Chamber,
of Commerce. Deadline for
entries is 1-23-2012. For more'
information you may con-
tact pageant director, Elaine -
Owens at 386-965-2787.

Black History Movie
Festival
Black *History Movie
Festival, 4-8 pm Olustee Park
Feb. 5

Abundant Life Church
Pastor Cagney Tanner and
his wife Shelby invite the
public to the first services
of Abundant Life Church,
671 State Road 100 in Lake
City, between S&S and Ken's
Barbecue. Services include
Sunday school at 10 a.m.,
Sunday worship at 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. and Thursday ser-
vice at 7:30 p.m. Call (386)
984-0310 for information.
Church homecoming
The Vineyard Southern
Baptist, 1832 SW Tomaka
Terrace, will have the 5th
annual Homecoming on Feb.
5. Sunday services will be at
10:30 a.m. with a covered dish
lunch to follow. There will not
be Sunday school that day.
Everyone is welcome. Call
365-0764 for information.


Florida Tax Payers
please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous
fallacy of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word
of God. It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia
High School, Fort White High School and Challenge Learning Center
students and alumni. All of them are offspring of Adam and his female
wife Eve and therefore are created by God, in the image of God.-(Compare
Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1 End-if-Course Assessment Test Items
Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.]15.1; page 52,- SC.912.L.15.10

http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)

I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com


In The Year of our Lord 2012


Refer to: Proverbs 8:13


Paid for by Kenny Merriken


IMPORTANT

PER FLORIDA STATUTE 98.077 (4):

ALL SIGNATURE UPDATES FOR THIS
ELECTION MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE
START OF CANVASING, WHICH IS
JANUARY 25,2012 AT 1 PM.


Mark Ballot This Way
Completely fill In the oval opposite the
name of eCh candidate or Issue you
wish to vote for.
USE ONLY THE MARKING PEN PROVIDED


OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT
REPUBLICAN PARTY
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
JANUARY 31, 2012
TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE
Use only the marking device provided or a number 2 pencil.
If you make a mistake, don't hesitate to ask for a new ballot.
If you erase or make other marks, your vote may not count.

PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)


C) Michele Bachmann
0 Herman Cain
C Newt.Gingrich
0 Jon Huntsman
0 Gary Johnson
0 Ron Paul
0 Rick Perry
Q Mitt Romney
C Rick Santorum


NEED AN ABSENTEE BALLOT?
CALL 758-1026


EARLY VOTING
8:30 AM -4:30PM
LAKE CITY: 971 W. DUVAL ST, SUITE 102
FORT WHITE: 17579 SW STATE ROAD 47
January 21, 2012 THROUGH January 28, 2012


A VOTE is a terrible thing to waste,


Liz P Home


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS, COLUMBIA COUNTY


Office (386) 758-1026 Fax (386) 755-7233
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102 Lake City, Florida 32055-3734
www.votecolumbla.com Email: election@votecolumbia.com


- I I I


I I" ,


_ L a I














6ALAE IT RPOTR EAHE SNDY JNURY29 21


* valdosta City
64 32 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Lake City, 65/44 Daytona Beach
66/33 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
68/36 7046 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
69/38 p Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral ake City
72/50 70/54 Miami
Tampa Naples
74/47 West Palm Beach Ocala
75/65 0 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 77/66 0 Pensacola
78/51 Naples Tallahassee
78/57 Miami Tampa
77/66 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
78/66


SCHC. OF
lj,00 OWERS



SHI 76 L0 54


Monday
0 .3 :
68/57/s
76/66/pc
78/56/s
69/40/s
64/46/s
75/69/pc
66/38/s
76/67/pc
79/60/s
70/45/s
72/54/s
62/50/s
64/49/s
67/38/s
75/52/s
67/38/s
74/68/pc


Tuesday
.J 6. p.:
73/59/pc
79/69/s
80/61/s
75/50/s
71/53/s
78/69/pc
75/48/s
77/70/s
81/60/s
76/52/s
76/59/s
68/57/pc
70/56/pc
72/46/s
77/59/s
72/47/s
76/69/s


NATIONAL FORECAST: A cold front stretched across the Northeast will be responsible for
scattered snow showers for portions of the Great Lakes, Northeast, and Ohio Valley today.
Meanwhile, a low pressure system will extend from southern Canada to the northern Plains,
generating a few rain and snow showers for the Dakotas. Rain and snow will fall over the
Northwest as well.

* L L~


atiS-Sisiaws wws t. S= ..*w-e---.--'-;*.. r weree-TEaww- YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 89, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Low: -14', Stanley, Idaho

Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today


fr~jy


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday .
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday .
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


71
39
67
43
86 in 1975
17 in 1940


0.00"
0.85"
0.85"
2.96"
2.96"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
'Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:23 a.m.
6:04 p.m.
7:22 a.m.
6:05 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 10:46 a.m.
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.. 11:21 a.m.
Moonset tom. 12:13 a.m.



Jan. Feb' Feb. Feb.
30 7 14 21
First Full Last New


B s L woather eom .

Forecasts, data and graph-
Ics 2012 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
wetlf h _e..' www.weatherpublisher.com


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 42/31/0
Albuquerque 44/30/0
Anchorage -5/-9/0
Atlanta 63/37/0
Baltimore 52/28/0
Billings 34/27/0
Birmingham 58/36/0
Bismarck 35/9/0
Boise 36/23/0
Boston 44/38/0
Buffalo 36/30/.09
Charleston SC 68/41/0
Charleston WV 45/34/0
Charlotte 61/30/0
Cheyenne ? 1I, .,
Chicago 34/26/.05,
Cincinnati 42/34/0
Cleveland 36/33/.15
Columbia SC .7n 3' ,
Dallas 51/42/0
Daytona Beach 71/46/0
Denver 44/15/0


Hl)Lo/W CITY


41/23/pc
53/27/s
11/5/pc
56/31/s
47/33/sh
53/32/pc
57/31/s
34/22/sn
44/32/c
44/29/s
36/22/sf
61/33/s
46/25/pc
53/29/s
51/32/pc
30/22/pc
.38/24/pc
33/23/sn
59/30/s
53 1/. '
70 4. :
61/34/s


Des Molnes 43/23/0
Detroit 36/31/.04
El Paso .52/43/0,
Fairbanks -45/-51/0
'Greensboro 59/30/0
Hartford ,46/35/0
Honolulu 78/70/0
Houston r'. "., 1,
Indianapolis 2:, .', u7
Jackspn'MS 58/39/0
Jacksonville ';7.0/39/0
Kansas City 45/20/.01
Las Vega 54/42/0
Uttle Rock 51/39/0
Los Angelet 74/49/0
Memphis \ 52/42/0
Miami 82/69/0.
Minneapolis 27/18/0
Mobile 70/39/0
New Orleans 68/44/0
New York" 45/37/0
Oklahoma City 46/29/0


36/29/pc
31/20/sn
61/35/s
-26/-34/s
51/30/s
42/27/s
81/69/s
64/43/s
36/25/sf
61/33/s
65/44/s
49/33/pc
62/42/s
60/33/s
72/48/s
58/38/s
77/66/pc
22/21/pc
c? ?7 ,
61/42/s
45/31/pc
61/36/s


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1993, njig, vund j
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High FPlai. 1ris kri
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reported at Ld
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Saturday Today Saturda Today Saturday Today
CITY HI, Lo, Pcp. HI, Lo W CITY HI Lo,. Pcp. HI. Lo. W CITY Hi.Lo Pcp. HI Lo. W
Acapulco 4 ':4 5 :.' 70 ".: LaPaz .4 4l1 1.1 J J4 :r. Rio 7,. 21 7 i
Amsterdam 43 :1 ?? -7 ,." Lima -. 1._ -, I -r. r .. Rome 5J I4 :U ,: .
Athens 4 J ,: JI v 4i,c": London 43 .'l 4; :4 .: St. Thomas VI -J 7? 0 :1 01:r
Auckland I5 .5. l .1 .1 :.,: Madrid 5. 0 J : San Juan PR :; I l .' :ri,
Beijing 3 1 I 12 ,i : M exico City .2 J 1 :. 4 c,.: Santiago J 5 Q a m .
Berlin -. '1 .) 2.- 1 i Montreal :< .2 -' 9 1 .1 Seoul 36 ? 0 !5.
Buenos AIres )'1 .2 93 .. i Moscow 1 2 11. I Singapore 7 7 .
Cairo 63/52/0 66/53/pc Nairobi 86/59/0 85/54/pc Sydney 79;iuu/ i8/ I/ptc
Geneva 41/32/0 37/33/c Nassau' 84/70/0 83/61,pc Tel Aviv 61 50 -- .. 4 i '
Havana 84/43/0 82/64/c New.Delhi 68/45/0 65/44/s Tokyo 43/32/0 42/31/pc
Helsinki 23/3/0 19/14/pc Oslo 25/23/0 21/15/sn, Toronto 36/28/0 31 19 .
Hong Kong 66/57/0 67/60/s Panama 90/75/0 89/77/pc Vienna. 36/25/0 34/24/pc
Kingston 84/73/0 .86/73/pc Paris 43/37/0 39/30/pc Warsaw .18/9/0 20/7/s
KEYTO CONDIIIONS: ..=.: .u.1,. =dr. f -r if=:. h h -:, ;=;ce, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
' ri=.;r. ^ ., :ri,.. i .:. T. w-windy.


THIS SHOULD START


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THE WEATHER


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MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY



HI 660L33 HI 661038 HI 75 L048I


Tallahassee*
64/32
Pensacola n
63/39 Panda City
60/41


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY


Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. LoUils
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Hl/Lo/Pcp.
45/23/0
71/46/0
49/33/0
70/46/0
40/32/.04
42/28/0
40/30/0
60/32/0
?,. I S, ,.-,
40/21/0
59/32/0
56/32/0
43/30/.07
36/20/0
62/48/0
73/50/0
55/40/0
39/33/0
33/23/0
71/54/0
68/43/0
53/33/0


HI/Lo/W
44/28/pc
72/50/s
48/31/pc
76/43/s.,
37/20/st.
37/25/s
49/41/r
51/29/s
57/33/pc
51/30/s
62/42/pc
41/31/pc
44/32/pc
E.,5 .46 : .
78/48/s
59/46/pc
49/43/r
40/33/sh
48/32/sh
48/32/sh


Apply Nowf

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www.1 akecityreparter.coca
U City Re,
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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Sunday, January 29, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Fab

Columbia looks
to return to form
in 2011 season.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Four years ago, Columbia
High welcomed in the
Freshman Four. It was a
group of players consisting
of Michaela Burton, Jessica
Keene, Stephanie Pilkington
and Peyton Sund that have
led the Lady Tigers to two
district championships.
After a 24-6 season, the
Lady Tigers added another
addition to the group to cre-.
ate the 'Fab 5'.
Taylor Douglass trans-
ferred from Fort White
High and will play first
base and pitch for the Lady
Tigers this season.
Her goal is to help put the
Lady Tigers over the top to
achieve their goal.
"We're going for a state
championship," Pilkington
said.
That's the mindset of the
Lady Tigers this year. While
each has individual goals,
the team has their eyes set
on the big prize.
Sund returns from injury
last season and she'll help
improve an already steady
lineup.
"I just want to prove to
people that I could come
back and be 100 percent,"
she said.
While Douglass is used
CHS continued on 4B


5


shoot


Columbia High seniors (from left) Peyton Sund,
the Lady Tigers in 2012.


for


State


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Stephanie Pilkington, Taylor Douglass, Michaela Burton and Jessica Keene will be counted on to help carry


While new faces take over in Fort White


Sparks looks to
lead Lady Indians
in new district.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High softball is facing
a new district this season
and has a lot of new faces to
take on the challenge.
Coach CassieSparks'Lady
Indians are in District 5-4A
with Bradford, Interlachen,
Keystone Heights, Santa Fe
and Williston high schools.
Williston, the two-time
defending district champi-
on, is back from the last two
years, as is Santa Fe which
was district runner-up in
2010. Keystone Heights
was runner-up in its district
last year.
"Keystone Heights is
loaded; they are the team
to beat," Sparks said.
"Williston is always strong
and Santa Fe dropped its JV
team and will have a large
varsity squad."
Fort White was a major
player in 2011, going 14-5


but falling in the district
tournament semifinals to
Williston.
"I was blessed last year
and a little spoiled," said
Sparks, who is entering
her second season as var-
sity coach. "We are a very
young team with a handful
of ninth-graders stepping
up to the varsity. The dis-
trict will. be' tougher, but
a lot of that is the transi-
tion year we will be going
through. It will definitely
be a year that will make or
break some of them."
Sparks coached a year
of middle school softball at
Fort White before taking
over the varsity, so many of
the young players are famil-
iar with her.
"Our girls coming back
know this is a rebuilding
year and they are patient
with the new girls," Sparks
said. 'They are letting them
know my expectations. The
young girls know what they
are here for and everybody
is working hard."
Sparks said the backbone
INDIANS continued on 4B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Fort White High School varsity softball team pose for a photograph. Pictured are Ashley Chesney (front row, from left),
Shea Chesney, D'Kota Cassady, Ali Wrench, Emily Roach, Alexa Hatcher, assistant coach Gary Williams (back row, from left),
Tayler Terry, Alex Walker, Cecile Gomez, Sydney Walker, Kayla Williams, Ayla Gonzalez and head coach Cassie Sparks. Not
Pictured is Ashley D'Antonio.


Five seniors given

Captains Awards


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High seniors Jonathan Dupree (from left), A.J. Legree, Dalton O'Dell, Soron Williams and Wesley Pitts are
honored with Captain Awards at the awards banquet in Fort White on Saturday.


Legree claims
MVP honors for
Indians' football.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
FORT WHITE An 8-4
season that saw the Fort
White High football team
make it to the second round
of the state playoffs came
to conclusion on Saturday
with the awards banquet for
the Indians.
Coach Demetric Jackson


and others honored the
seniors and members of
the Indians for a season
that saw Fort White make a
playoff run.
"We spent more time with
these players than they did
with their families," Jackson
said. 'Tonight's not about
awards. It's about honoring
these players."
Award winners were:
Varsity Academic
Award Blair Chapman
Most Improved
FOOTBALL continued on 2B


I '


"













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV. sports

Today
AUTO RACING
9 a.m.
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series,
24 Hours at Daytona, finish of race, at
Daytona Beach, Fla.
BOWLING
12:30 p.m.
ESPN PBA, USBC Masters, at
Henderson, Nev.
EXTREME SPORTS
2 p.m.
ESPN Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo.
9 p.m.
ESPN Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo.
2 a.m.
ESPN2 -Winter X Games, at Aspen,
Colo. (delayed tape)
FIGURE SKATING
3 p.m.
NBC U.S. Championships, at San
Jose, Calif.
GOLF
I p.m.
TGC PGATour, Farmers Insurance
Open, final round, at San Diego
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance
Open, final round, at San Diego
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
I p.m.
CBS Michigan at Ohio St.
6:30 p.m.
FSN Oregon St. at Oregon
8:30 p.m.
FSN Stanford at California
NBA BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
ABC Chicago at Miami
6:30 p.m.
ESPN San Antonio at Dallas
NFL FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
NBC Pro Bowl, at Honolulu
NHL HOCKEY
-4 p.m.
NBCSP -'All-Star game, at Ottawa
SOCCER
8 p.m.
NBCSP Women's, Olympic
Qualifying Tournament, championship
match, teams TBD, at Vancouver, British
Columbia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
FSN Marshall at Tulane
2 p.m.
FSN Iowa St. at Texas A&M
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Penn St. at Michigan St.
4 p.m.
FSN UCLA at Colorado
5 p.m.
ESPN2 -Tennessee at Georgia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs


Pro Bowl
Sunday
At Honolulu
NFC vs.AFC
Super Bowl


Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
N.Y. Giants vs. New England, 6:20 p.m.

Super Bowl lineups

New England Patriots
Offense
WR 84 Deion Branch; 85 Chad
Ochocinco
LT 72 Matt Light
LG 70 Logan Mankins -
C 63 Dan Connolly; 62 Ryan
Wendell
RG 54 Brian Waters; 64 Donald
Thomas
RT 77 Nate Solder; 76 Sebastian
Vollmer
TE 87 Rob Gronkowski; 81 Aaron
Hernandez
WR 83 Wes Welker; I I Julian
Edelman; 18 Matthew Slater
QB 12 Tom Brady; 8 Brian Hoyer;
15 Ryan Mallett
RB 42 Benjarvus Green-Ellis; 39
Danny Woodhead; 33 Kevin Faulk
FB 34 Shane Vereen; 22 Stevan
Ridley
Defense
LDE 94 Shaun Ellis; 71 Brandon
Deaderick
LDT 74 Kyle Love
RDT 75VinceWilfork; 97 Ron Brace
RDE 95 MarkAnderson; 98 Gerard
Warren
LLB 58 Tracy White; 51 Jerod
Mayo
MLB 55 Brandon Spikes; 52 Dane
Fletcher
RLB 50 Rob Ninkovich; 59 Gary
Guyton
LCB 32 Devin McCourty; 27
Antwaun Molden
RCB 24 Kyle Arrington; 23 Nate
Jones; 41 Malcolm Williams
SS 25 Patrick Chung; 29 Sterling
Moore
FS 31 Sergio Brown; "44 James
Ihedigbo
Special Teams
K 3 Stephen Gostkowski
P- 14 Zoltan Mesko
H 14 Zoltan Mesko
PR II Julian Edelman; 83 Wes
Welker
KR 18 Matthew Slater
LS 48 Danny Aiken

New York Giants
Offense
WR 88 Hakeem Nicks; 82 Mario
Manningham; 15 Devin Thomas
LT 79 James Brewer
LG 66 David Diehl; 77 Kevin
Boothe
C 64 David Baas
RG 76 Chris Snee; 62 Mitch"
Petrus
RT 67 Kareem McKenzie
TE 85 Jake Ballard; 47 Travis
Beckum; 86 Bear Pascoe
RB 44 Ahmad Bradshaw; 27
Brandon Jacobs; 28 D.J.Ware
FB 45 Henry Hynoski
QB 10 Eli Manning; 8 David Carr
WR 80 Victor Cruz; 12 Jerrel
Jernigan
Defense
LDE -'90 Jason Pierre-Paul; 72 Osi
Umenyiora
LDT 97 Linval Joseph; 95 Rocky
Bernard
RDT 99 Chris Canty; 73 Jimmy


Kennedy
RDE 91 Justin Tuck; 71 Dave
Tollefson
LLB 59 Michael Boley; 57 Jacquian
Williams
MLB 53 Greg Jones
ROLB 94 Mathias Kiwanuka
LCB 23 Corey Webster; 36 Will
Blackmon
FS 26 Antrel Rolle; 34 Deon Grant
SS 21 Kenny Phillips; 39 Tyler Sash;
22 Derrick Martin
RCB 31 Aaron Ross; 20 Prince
Amukamara
Special Teams
P 5 Steve Weatherford
K 9 Lawrence Tynes
LS 51 Zak DeOssie
H 5 Steve Weatherford
KR 36 Will Blackmon; 28 D.J.Ware;
12 Jerrel Jernigan
PR 36 Will Blackmon; 31 Aaron.
Ross

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
Philadelphia 89, Charlotte 72
Boston 94, Indiana 87
New Jersey 99, Cleveland 96
Atlanta 107, Detroit 101,;OT
Chicago 107, Milwaukee 100
Houston 103,Washington 76
4 New Orleans 93, Orlando 67
Minnesota 87, San Antonio 79
Miami 99, New York 89
Dallas 116, Utah 101 -
Denver 96,Toronto 81
Portland 109, Phoenix 71
Oklahoma City 120, Golden State
109
Saturday's Games
Washington at Charlotte (n)
Detroit at Philadelphia (n)
New York at Houston (n)
L.A. Lakers at Milwaukee (n)
Memphis at Phoenix (n)
Sacramento at Utah (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at Miami, 3:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Boston, .6 p.m.
Toronto at New Jersey, 6 p.m.
Indiana at Orlando, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Dallas, 6:30 p.m.
Atlanta at New Orleans, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Denver, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Chicago at Washington, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Houston, 8 p.m.
'San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Portland at Utah, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 10:30
p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open

At Melbourne Park,Australia
Saturday
Women
Finals
Victoria Azarenka (3), Belarus, def.
Maria Sharapova (4), Russia, 6-3, 6-0.


CHS falls at St. Augustine


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

ST. AUGUSTINE -
Columbia High was caught
by a spark in the third
quarter as theYellowJackets
outscored the Tigers,
27-14, and held on for a 65-
57'in a district contest on
Friday.
Tre Simmons led the
Tigers with 15 points in the
contest and Nigel Atkinson
had 14 points for Columbia.'
Marcus Amerson had
11 points with seven free
throws.
Other scorers irtclud-
ed: Javonta6 Foster, 7;
Morris Marshall, 5; Monte
Tisdale, 4; and Laremy
Tunsil 2.
Columbia (15-6) will
begin a county-clash week
with Fort White High in
a 7:30 p.m. game in Fort
White on Tuesday.



FOOTBALL

From Page 1B

Defense -Cameron White
Unsung hero/Rising
Star Tavaris Williams
Warrior Award -
Dalton O'Dell
Most Versatile -
Wesley Pitts
Best Back Andrew
Baker
Tomahawk Award -
Kellen Snider
Head Hunter Award
- Trey Phillips
Top Offensive Player
- Soron Williams
Top Lineman -
Jonathan Dupree
FWHS QB Spirit Award
- coach John Wilson
Captains Award -
Williams, Dupree, Wesley
Pitts and AJ. Legre
MVP Legree.


FILE PHOTO
Columbia High's. Monte Tisdale battles for a loose ball.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

GABGYY


@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
SRAHH




DPLUED




OLEEPP


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print answer here: L
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: BRINK TROLL TENDON PAUSED
Answer: The mime wanted to expand his business
and was looking for a SILENT PARTNER


JV SOFTBALL


BRANDON FINLEYfLake City Reporter
Columbia High's junior varsity are (front row, from left) Leslie Ann Ronsonet, Breland Phelps,
Kaitlyn Hill, Savannah Thomas, Ashley Shoup, Jessie Thomas and Emily Martinez. Back row
(from left) are head coach Mitch Shoup, Caleigh McCauley, Jessica Shimmel, Jara Courson,
Enigiah Manning, Callie Ward and assistant coach Jamie Crews.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The Fort White High School junior varsity team pose for a photograph. Pictured are
Samantha Gibson (front row, from left), Kendall Day, Caitlyn Bruce, Hollee Beach, Brianna
Selgas, head coach Randall Edenfield (back row, from left), Jessica Widlan, Kayla Redwine,
Bailey Robison, Mallorie Godbey and Madysen Greek.




Tiger Woods shoots 66 to


share lead in Abu Dhabi


By MICHAEL CASEY
Associated Press

ABUDHABI,UnitedArab
Emirates Tiger Woods
put himself in position to
win his second straight
tournament Saturday, and

ACROSS 36 D
1 River 38 P
crossing 3P
5 Color 39 P
8 Wearisome 40 R
task 41 B
12 Jai- 44 E
13 Khan of note 47'
14 Dubuque's s
state (;
15 Salt, to a 49
chemist 51
16 Late riser 52 M
18 Vassal's oath 53 A
20 They run on 554
runners 55 B
21 Mao -tung 56 P
22 Prompter's
hint
23 Farewell 1 S
26 Steered e
29 Unruly 2 V
crowds 3 T
30 Golf 'stroke 4 M
31 Chaotic spot 5 R
33 Absorbed, as 6 U
costs 7 P
34 Trig function w
35 Jason's ship 8 C


this one would leave little
doubt about which direc-
tion his game is going.
He finally won two
months ago against an
18-man field in
California.
On Saturday, against the

)emands Answc
Pet owner's
purchasee
'ony up P RO
Foofer's gunk T A T
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DOWN C R E-
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nthusiast SS TS
kingg name
rack event 9 Night ati
lakes wider 10 Totally
rapidity amazed
Jnsightly 11 Rambles
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vord 17 Astronai
called up garb (hy


strongest field golf has seen
in at least three months,
Woods shot a 6-under 66
for a share of the lead
with Robert Rock going
into the final round of the
Abu Dhabi Golf
Championship.

er to Previous Puzzle



AMAH OHIO



IG S MAC






N RUIAPR


SOTE GLEE

EER TIANYL
N E R :T I N Y


tire




ut's
ph.)


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


19 Baton Rouge
campus
22 Appealing
23 GP group
24 Be overly
fond
25 Alpine goat
26 Six-shooters
27 "Rabbi
Ben -"
28 Musher's
team
30 Feel sorry for
32 Gasp of
delight
34 False alarm
35 Spray can
contents
37 Tarzan's
moniker
38 an egg
40 Teach
privately
41 Client mtg.
42 Cracker
topping
43 Bank
annoyance
44 Wine barrel
stopper
45 Chimney pipe
46 Flat-needled
trees
48 Web suffix
50 Colo. setting


1-30 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0421
















Azarenka routs Sharapova to win Australian


By JOHN PYE
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia
- Victoria Azarenka beat
Maria Sharapova 6-3, 6-0
Saturday night to win the
Australian Open and take
over the women's No.
1 ranking, all in her first
Grand Slam final.
The 22-year-old
Belarusian had her serve
broken in the opening
game and was down 2-0
after a nervous start before
winning 12 of the next f3,
games to take the match
away from Sharapova, a
three-time major winner
and the 2008 Australian
champion.
She became only the
third woman to earn the
No. 1 spot after winning
her first Grand Slam title.
Caroline Wozniacki vacated
the top spot when she lost
in the quarterfinals, leaving
Azarenka and Sharapova to
play for the title and the top
ranking.
The third-seeded
Azarenka set up champion-
ship point with a stunning
forehand winner and.sealed
it when Sharapova netted a
backhand.
She dropped on to her
knees at the baseline with
her hands over her face.
She got up, held up her
hands and mouthed "What
happened?" before jog-
ging up to her coach, Sam'
Sumyk, in the stands to cel-
ebrate.
"The best feeling, for
sure," Azarenka said. "I
don't know about the game.
I don't know what I was
doing out there.
"It's just pure joy what
happened. I can't believe
it's over."
.: At the trophy presenta-
tion, her first word was
"Wow." Then she started
giggling. She thanked her
support team, saying "You
made me realize I can


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Victoria Azarenka of Belarus hits a backhand return to Maria Sharapova of Russia during their women's singles final at the
Australian Open tennis championship, in Melbourne, Australia on Saturday.


believe in myself and I can
finally raise this trophy."
And she paid special
credit to her grandmother,
"the person who inspires
me the most in my life."
Azarenka has been a
distinctive presence at
Melbourne Park as much
as for her shrieks and hoots
with each shot and seem-
ingly boundless energy as
for her white shorts, blue
singlet and lime green head
and wrist bands.
.Against Sharapova, she


maintained the frenetic
movement that has been
the hallmark of her cam-
paign in Australia, her 25th
consecutive major. She won
the Sydney International
title the weekend before
the year's first major :and
is now on a 12-match win-
ning streak, including a
semifinal win against 2011
Australian Open champion
Kim Clijsters. She's the first
player since 2004 to win a
WTA tour event the week
before winning a major.


A lot of attention before
the final was on the grunt-
ing of both players. In the
second game, someone
shouted "turn the volume
down," but there was noth-
ing after that except for a
few mutterings when the'
shrieking got really loud. '
Finishing off the match
in 1 hour, 22 minutes at
Rod Laver Arena seemed to
silence the critics.
"She did everything bet-
ter than I did today. I had a
good first couple of games,


and that was about it,"
Sharapova said. "'Then she
was the one that was tak-
ing the first ball and hitting
it deep and aggressive. I
was always the one running
around like a rabbit, you
know, trying to play catch-
up all the time."
,Sharapova also won only
three games in a 2007 final
loss to Serena Williams,
who also conceded only
three games in the 2009
final against Dinara Safina.
When Sharapova won the


first two games, there was
no indication of how lop-
sided the match would be.
Azarenka took control after
holding for the first time,
breaking Sharapova at love
and then holding again on a_
three-game roll.
Sharapova held, finishing
off with an ace, to even the
score at 3-3 in the first set
but then didn't win another
game.
Azarenka started dictat-
ing the points, -coming to
the net at times, hitting
winners from the baseline
and forcing the 24-year-old
Russian to the extremes
on both sides of the court.
Sharapova seemed barely
able to move by compari-
son, and had 30 unforced
errors in the match.
The second set was com-
pletely lopsided 'and last-
ed only 36 minutes, with
Sharapova winning only 12
points in six games.
"As in any sport, you
have your good days, you
have your tough days and
you have days where things
just don't work out," said
Sharapova, who has now
been on the losing end of
two of the most lopsided
scorelines in a final at
Melbourne Park.
Azarenka had momen-
tarily flirted with the idea
of quitting the sport, dur-
ing a- quick trip home to
Minsk after a loss at Doha
early last year. But' she. was
quickly set straight by her
family, including her grand-
mother, who had reported-
ly worked three jobs to the
age of 71.
She couldn't get through
to her family immediately
"because my phone is freak-
ing out right now," but she
texted them from the court
"I made a pretty smart
decision, nqt walking out,
right? That was pretty spe-
cial,"' she said. "There's
always ups and downs, now
I'm up."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Erick Murphy (33) and Kenny Boynton (1) pressure Missisippi State's Dee Bost
(3) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Gainesville on Saturday.


No. 14 Florida beats No.


18 Mississippi St 69-57


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

.,GAINESVILLE Early
ip the week, Florida coach
Billy Donovan called cen-
ter Patric Young into his
office for a little chat
.,Donovan wanted Young
to play with more energy,
more passion and more
enthusiasm.
:Cle1arly, Youngembraced
the challenge.
,Young scored 12 points
off the bench, making sev-
eral crowd-rousing plays
in the second half, and
No. 14 Florida beat No.
18 Mississippi State 69-
57 Saturday to extend its
home winning streak to 17
games.
"His energy really
helped us on both ends of
the floor," Donovan said.
'Bradley Beal led the
Gators with 19 points.
Erik Murphy added 14,
including 11 in the, first
half, and Erving Walker
finished with 10 thanks to
a 3-pointer with 10 seconds


remaining.
Coming off a physical
game Thursday night at
Mississippi, the Gators
(17-4, 5-1' Southeastern
Conference) started a little
sluggish Saturday but real-
ly got things rolling in the
second half. An 11-0 run
sparked by Beal's third 3-
pointer and highlighted by
,Young's two dunks turned
a tight game into a double-
digit affair.
Mississippi State (17-5,
4-3) trailed 62-47 after the
spurt and never got within
single digits. The Gators
made enough plays down
the stretch to secure their
second win in six games
against the Bulldogs.
Florida also improved
to 5-1 in short-turn-
around games (Thursday-
Saturday) over the last
three seasons.
"I'm not going to lie. I
was a little nervous com-
ing into this game," Young
said. "I'm sure we don't
have a good history since
I've been here with these


early games. They're a
good team. I thought, 'Oh
man, this is a really tough
game."'
Young and Florida's
3-point shooting made it
look easy in the second
half.
Young made 6 of
11 shots and added six
rebounds. He was active on
both ends, grabbing three
offensive boards, taking
two charges and scoring
in' a variety of ways.
Still dealing with ten-
dinitis in his right ankle,
Young showed no issues
with' the nagging injury.
He had three dunks and
a putback in the final 12
minutes that helped turn
the game. It started when
he' grabbed a rebound
off Walker's missed 3,
slammed it home and
screamed at the top of his
lungs.
"Pat's a competitor," Beal
said. "Coach (Donovan) is
always pushing him to the
extra limit and Pat's will-
ing to accept that."


Colts and Manning


heading for split


By TIM DAHLBERG
Associated Press

The idea didn't seem so
outlandish at the time. Not
for a city about to open
a spanking new $720 mil-
lion stadium, and surely
not for a team with Peyton
Manning under center. *
Hosting a Super Bowl
would put Indianapolis on
the map, sure. Give resi-
dents something to do, too,
like talk to those people
with the funny accents from
New York or ride the new
zip lines downtown.
But couldn't Colts fans
dream of the day when
their team became the first
home team to play in the
big game?
They could, and they did.
It wasn't the biggest stretch,
either, because the Colts
had already won a Super
Bowl behind Manning and
were coming off a 13-3 reg-
ular season when the game
was awarded to Indianapolis
in the spring of 2008.
Then Manning got hurt.
And the Colts went south
in less time than it takes to
complete a warmup lap at
the Speedway.
Now, on the eve of what
was supposed to be a glori-
ous week in Indianapolis,
the home team is a dysfunc-
tional mess.
A joint statement issued
Friday by Manning and
Colts owner Jim Irsay
claimed otherwise, though
that was to be expected.
The dirty laundry aired
publicly the previous few
days was so distasteful that
something had to be said
to get the attention off the
home team and back on a
game that means so much
to the city's pride.
The self-styled great
protector of the horseshoe
himself that would be
Irsay says it was all a
misunderstanding. Surely


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 1, file photo, Indianapolis Colts quarterback
Peyton Manning watches from the sideline during the first half
of an NFL football game against the Jacksonville Jaguars in
Jacksonville.


not anything that a good
talk between friends or,
say, a payment of $28 mil-
lion couldn't resolve.
Manning got the talk.
Whether he gets the check
will ultimately determine
just how friendly the owner
and his quarterback really
are.
The Colts seem ready to
move on without the face
of their franchise, a player
so valuable that they may
not have been able to build
their new stadium without
him. Manning transformed
a woeful franchise into a


perennial playoff contend-
er, taking the Colts to two
Super Bowls and winning
one. The prospect of even
better times ahead helped
Indianapolis residents swal-
low the increased taxes
they were forced to pony up
for the new stadium, which
opeiecd in 2008.
The NFL gave the city
a Super Bowl as a reward,
something that seems to
have boosted civic pride
even if few area residents
will actually get inside the
Lucas Oil Stadium for the
event.


' '


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0421











4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High School softball team seniors Ali Wrench (from left), Cecile Gomez and Kayla
Williams pose for a photograph.

INDIANS: Return three seniors
Continued From Page 1B


of the team will be return-
ing seniors Cecile Gomez,
Kayla Williams and Ali
Wrench. Gomez has signed
with Jacksonville University
,and Wrehch has signed
with Thomas University.
Williams' was Defensive
Player of the Year in 2011.
"Cecile is one of those
players you love to have,"-
Sparks said. "She is our.
No. 1 pitcher and can play
anywhere you want her. Ali
is a phenomenal outfielder'
and we will try to keep her
on the green so she can
show her skills. Kayla has
come a long way. Her arm is
much stronger and we want
her back at second base or
shortstop." .
Alexa Hatcher and Tayler
Terry played varsity last
year.
"Terry played third


base and shortstop in fall
league," Sparks said. "With
her and Kayla, we should'
be solid in the middle of
the infield. Alexa has been
behind the plate some and
has worked at third base,
and maybe shortstop and
second base."
Sparks said Alex Walker
will spell Gomez on the var-
sity and split mound time
with Samantha Selgas on
the junior varsity, so each
can get in pitching time.
. Ashley Chesney and
D'Kota Cassady are work-
ing with Hatcher in catching
Gomez. Ashley D'Antionio
and Sydney Walker will
work in-the infield and Shea
Chesney has "great" out-
field skills. Ayla Gonzalez is
working through a leg inju-
ry and Emily Roach will join
the team after basketball.


.The three seniors are
going to be our leaders,"
Sparks said. "It is nice to
look back and see what I
started with the Chesney
and Walker twins and a
few others from the JV. It
is nice to see they stuck
with it and have grown and
matured. They are trying
what I taught them and it is
working."
In a transition season,
Sparks said it is even more
important for the team to
follow her philosophy.
"Play the game and not
the opponent," Sparks said.
"Play the game the way it is
supposed to be played and
we will be fine. We have
the same expectations this
year and as long as they
get better throughout the
season, 'that's what matters
-to me."


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Pp:on .r
Columbia High's 2012 softball team is (front row, from left) Stephanie Pilkington,
Lacey King, Jessice Keene, Brandy Morgan, Holly Boris, Erin Anderson and
Brittany Morgan. Back row (from left) are assistant coach Greg Sund, head coach
Jimmy Williams, Peyton Sund, Kayli Kvistad, Taylor Douglass, Lauren Eaker, 5
Hollianne Dohrn, Michaela Burton, coach Robbie Crews and coach Mitch Shoup.


title

Helping the senior,
will be Kayli Kvistad -
University of Florida cony-
mitment as a sophomore
- who set a Columbix
record with 11 home rurl
last season.
"She's a once in a lifetime
kind of player," Willianl
said.
Other varsity members
include Lauren Eaker,
Holly Boris. Hollianny
Dohrn, Brandy Nlorgaq,
Brittany Morgan,
Lacey King and Erin
Anderson.


playing second after switch-
ing from shortstop during
her first two seasons.
"I enjoy it more and feel
like I have more range,"
she said. "I just love to play
the field."
After a tough playoff loss
last season, head coach
Jimmy Williams knew that
it wasn't the end of the run
for the Lady Tigers.
"I told them it wasn't the
end. but the beginning."
he said. "We are ready to
compete at the Final-Four
level."


I pray, I Ihink


Continued From Page 11
to starting on the mound,
she'll have to give up some
of her time this year. It's
something that the senior
won't mind.
"I'm just here to bring
different pitches and mix it
up," Douglass said.
Keene admits it will be
hard to give up some of
the playing time, but is all
in for the team.
"It's gonna hurt some-
what. but it will make us
strong." she said. "The
help will be nice."
Burton will continue


"When


-. aboul how blessed we
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Sour best chance to pay
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"A lot of doctors talk, but don't listen. I have a great doctor
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James Johndro Cancer Survivor



LAKE CITY

MEDiCAL CENTER

Read James' full story online at LakeCityMedical.com


:-1 a Potashforpl ) FN*MG ^ ^ 9|
Hunt ().,' 5 ..
S fl] i ndu'- I- d --,.. w,,
-n m '.1
Zu =1 Mtedl-x%,^ZyOoel~p.


CHS: Looking for state ti












Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


Sunday, January 29, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Lawn business is


Go on

MIN e


Green Star
Grounds
Management
converts its com-
mercial mowers
to propane.
By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com

*Ilocal commer-
I cial lawn care
business urges
People to "go
green with Green Star."
It turns out these are
more than just empty
words for the owners
of Green Star Grounds
Management
The Lake City busi-
ness has just converted
all four of its commercial
mowers to run on propane
instead of gasoline. The
process involves replacing
the carburetor, installing
a propane regulator and
mounting a rack to hold'
a propane tank. The con-


version can be completed
as quickly as two hours,
depending on the type of
mower.
The conversion can
cost as much as $1,000,
but Kelly Everett, district
manager for Sawyer Gas,
said the
owner of a
commercial 'Gree
mower can
get the the f
investment scap
back in ness ir
about three Count
months
through vert r
gas savings, run or
Everett said Kelly E
propane is manager
as much as
$1 a gallon
cheaper
than gasoline.
Green Star is the first
landscaping business
in Columbia County to
convert mowers .to run
on propane, Everett said.
While it's impractical for
the private owner of a
lawn mower to convert to
propane power because it


en
irs
ing
1C
ty
no
SP
'p
ver
for


would be difficult to justify
the financial investment,
Everett predicted more
commercial lawn services,
which run mowers as
much as 35 hours a week,
will make the conversion GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
to save money. 're Wes Faris, manager of Alachua Tractor & Equipment, converts a gas-powered commercial
"We're lawn mower to propane. The conversion can be done as quickly as two hours, depending on
concen- the mower. Faris said he expects more commercial lawn service businesses to convert to pro-
Star s primarily pane because gasoline costs as much as $1 a gallon more.
it land- on land- .-*_j.-,u(^ ..- _6.- ._ -


:olumbia. Everett
tocon- said of
o Scon the big
iwers to push by
propane.' his busi-
ett, district ness to
Sawyer Gas convince
lawn ser-
vices to
convert
to propane. 'The biggest
advantage is the financial
impact."
Besides the fuel savings,
Everett said his company
delivers canisters of pro-.
pane directly to business-
es. Propane-powered mow-
GOING GREEN
continued on 2C


. Al. .


Sr Matnhew s Grfeerne. CFP'o
PEOPLES
St ed at Peopes State Bar,k
INVEFSTMENT iR'RT I-. SSiON'AS 3882W US a-w 90 Lake city, FL 3255
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dF ff











LAKE CITY REPORTER


BUSINESS


SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


Defining Terms
Q What are "defined contribu-
tion" and "defined benefit'
plans? E.C., Pensacola, Fla.
A They're the two main kinds of
retirement plans. Traditional
pensions are defined benefit plans,
where employees know exactly what
they'll receive in retirement. It's the
employer's responsibility to have the
needed money available for retirees..
Defined contribution plans, such .
as 401,'k) and 403ibis. have replaced
many tradinonal pension plans.
\\ ith them, the amount oftmoneN
contributed into the plan is defined
You know how much )ou and ,our
company. are depositing into your
account. The sunm available at renre-
ment is uncertain and will depend on
ho'' the contributions are invested
and ho"t the\ perform You t pi-
call\ haj\e more control over these
accounts, as .\ou can usually speciA.
Slihat kinds of nm\ estments your dol-
lars are plunked into growth mutual
funds, company stock, bonds, etc.)..
With both Social Security and
tinestment results uncertain. It '
vital to plan effecti\elN for retire-
ment. You'll find practical guidance
at w,.fool.com/retirement/
index.aspx and in our "Rule Your
Retirement" newsletter, which you
can trl tfor free at wwi,.fool.com/
shop/newsletters.

Q Wiat are ADRs -. D1
F16o c s,'tt '. ,[as "
A A mencan Depositary Receipts
enable us to easily bu
and sell shares of foreign stocks
that don't nonnalh trade on U.S
exchanges WVithout them, if you
,.'anted to buy stock in Canon, for
instance, oti'd have to con% ert yNour
dollars uito en and then somehow
buL shares -;on the Japanese exchange.
Through ADRs. shares of Canon are
held b\ an .nmencan financial uistitu-
* non Co\ erseas and ) ou can trade shares
with U.S. dollars ADR holders are
enutled to dividends and capital gains
Othei ADRs include BP, Nokia.
PetroChina. Soni Alcatel-Lucent.
GlaxoiSmithKlmne, France Telecom,
Tata Motors, Toyota, Unilexer,
Nanonal Gnd. No% artis. Diageo,
Siemens and Credit Suisse.
GlI a LI tion tor th- F. 1 '.IP SOIl at in
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to share in such growth. (In other relatively small. Concentrate your
words, look for competitive advan- money in the most desirable oppor-
tages such as economies of scale.) tunities. Holding more than 20
(2) Aim to find such companies companies is unmanageable (and "a
when they are out-of favor when sign of financial incompetence").
market conditions are not favorable (7) Don't blindly follow the crowd
or the financial community does Have more knowledge than others,
not properly see their true worth. and apply, your judgment after thor-
(That's when they'll be trading at oughly assessing specific situations.
attractive prices.) You'll need courage to go against thi
(3) -Hold the stocks you buy until crowd and follow your convictions.
there has been either a fundamental (8) Your success will be highly
change in the company's condition dependent on a combination of hard
or it has gro.'.n to a point where its work, intelligence and honesty.

.Name That Company
S-T /,. I trace my roots back to the pur-
...' chase ofa New York curtain-rod
0 0 maker in 1903. I have acquired many
S/ companies over several decades,
and today, based in Atlanta, I'm a
S- consumer and commercial product
giant. A big 1999 merger doubled my
size and gave me my current name. My
Brands That Matter include Sharpie, Graco,
Calphalon, Irwin, Lenox, Levolor, Rolodex,
Dymo, Shur-Line, teutonia, Aprica, Paper
Mate, Waterman, Parker, Pelouze, Solano and
Goody. More than 90 percent of U.S. house-
Sholds use at least one of my products, and my
global annual sales approach $6 billion. Who am I?


Ai,1, It, ilr,.,ii ,'? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you'll
h,: ,it, t dii ,i drawing for a nifty prize!
.. . . . ..l l : . ,' ql . .....Ill ]l ?1l. h 1,'..? i-O i.


Netflix: Sell or Hold?
I bought shares of Netflix
just before it announced a price
hike and that it was splitting its
streaming video and DVD rental
businesses. Since then, the com-
pany has made one misstep after
another! It lost some 800,000
customers recently, and may lose
more. It also sold $200 million
of shares to a mutual ;.
fund at too cheap a price, F'L.
and bought back many
sharesat high prices by borrow-
ing money. I'm down 50 percent
in my investment. So do I ride it
for the next five years and hope it
recovers, or do I sell? I know you
Fools have recommended Netflix.
- B. W.; overseas
The Fool Responds: Netflix
has committed numerous blunders.
Yet it remains a formidable power,
with 24 million subscribers, vs. just
5 million for Amazon Prime. We
have indeed recommended it, and
have seen our gains shrink in recent
months. The company still has much
potential, though, and it's priced
more attractively lately than it has
been in recent years. Don't decide
now to hold it for five years. Sell if
you've lost faith, or hold, watching.
it closely to see how it does.


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' If we print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap!


It's Getting Tougher
for General Motors
General Mdtors (NYSE: GM) had
a solid 2011, with domestic sales up
14 percent, well above the industry's
10 percent and reflecting a gain
in market share. That's great for a
company that some,say should have
died three years ago, but GM may
find 2012 to be tougher, even if the
economy continues to improve.
December sales showed Buick
sales down 12 percent over last
year and Cadillac off by 3 percent.
But that's largely due to the'phase-
out of the Lucerne and the DTS,
respectively. Chevy numbers were
better, with Cruze sales strong and
Camaro sales up 20 percent. Even
the Volt posted record sales.
Competition is likely to heat up
considerably in 2012, though. Both
Toyota and Honda faced production
issues in 2011, creating an oppor-
tunity that GM seized. But after
months of sales declines in the wake
of production disruptions caused by
last March's tsunami in Japan, Toy-
ota's sales have stopped shrinking
and are likely to start growing.
Competition will be spiked fur-
ther by Volkswagen, which has
signaled that it will look to the U.S.
for growth as its European home
market has stalled. Other rivals are
revving their motors, too.
Meanwhile, General Motors is furi-
ously working on major new prod-
ucts, but they're not scheduled to
start rolling out until 2013. (Motley
Fool newsletters have recommended
General Motors and Ford.)


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Founded in 1937 and based in Winston-Salem, N.C., I'm a retailer and
wholesaler of sweet treats. Through my 678 stores, I offer about 20
varieties of my flagship product, along with coffees and other beverages.
You'll find me in convenience stores and supermarkets, too. My founder "
started with a recipe for doughnuts that he bought from a French chef
in New Orleans. I'm best-known in southeastern America, but I'm now, in
20 other nations, as well. I was sold to Beatrice Foods in 1976 and bought
back by franchisees in 1982. The red light means hot and fresh. Who am
I? (Answer: Krispy'KremeDoughnuts)
A Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
,.>^ Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries
to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
SMotley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individual financial advice.


Ii* S, i I,, *,. 0 0 S I*. Il 5 **S


Teens are migrating to Twitter


By Martha Irvine
Associated Press
, CHICAGO Teens don't
.tweet, will never tweet too
public, too many older users.
Not cool
Thats been the prediction
for a while now, born of num-
bers showing that fewer than
one in 10 teens were using
Twitter early on.
But then their parents,
grandparents, neighbors,
parents' friends and anyone
in-between started friending
them on Facebook, the social
networking site of choice for
many and a curious thing
began to happen.
Suddenly, their space wasn't
just theirs anymore. So more
young people have started
shifting to Twitter, almost hid-
ing in plain sight.
"I love twitter, it's the only
thing I have to myselfcause
my parents don't have one,"
Britteny Praznik, a 17-year-old
who lives outside Milwaukee,
gleefully tweeted recently.
While she still has a
Facebook account, she
joined Twitter last summer,
after more people at her high
,school did the same. "It just
sort of caught on," she says.
Teens tout the ease of use
and the ability to send the
equivalent of a text message
to a circle of friends, often a
smaller one than they have on
crowded Facebook accounts.
They can have multiple
"accounts aid don't have to
use their real names. They
also can follow their favorite
celebrities and, for those inter-
'ested in doing so, use Twitter
,as a soapbox.
The growing popularity
teens report fits with.findings
from the Pew Internet &
American Life Project, a non-
profit organization that moni-
.tors people's tech-based hab-
its. The migration has been
slow, but steady. A Pew survey
last July found that 16 percent
of young people, ages 12 to 17,


Taylor Smith holds
her smartphone
while posing for a
photograph at her
home in Kirkwood,
Mo, in this Jan. 20
photo. The 14-year-
old started tweeting
18 months and is
one who likes to "get
small points across"
with recent tweets
that included her
dislike for strawberry
Pop Tarts and her
admiration for a
video that features
the accomplish-
ments of girl scien-
tists.


said they used Twitter. Two
years earlier, that percentage
was just 8 percent.
"That doubling is 'defi-
nitely a significant increase,"
says Mary Madden, a senior
research specialist at Pew.
And she suspects ifs even
higher now.
Meanwhile, a Pew survey
found that nearly one in five
18- to 29-year-olds have taken
a liking to the micro-blogging
service, which allows them to
tweet, or post, their thoughts
140 characters at a time.
Early on, Twitter had a rep-
utation that many didn't think
fit the online habits of teens -
well over half of whom were
already using Facebook or
other social networking ser-
vices in 2006, when Twitter
launched.
'The first group to colonize
Twitter were people in the
technology industry con-
summate self-promoters," says
Alice Marwick, a post-doc-
toral researcher at Microsoft
Research, who tracks young
people's online habits.
For teens, self-promotion
isn't usually the goal. At least
until they go to college and


start thinking about careers,
social networking is, well, .
social.
But as Twitter has grown,
so have the ways people, and
communities, use it
For one, though some don't
realize it, tweets don't have
to be public. A lot of teens
like using locked, private
accounts. And whether they
lock them'or not, many also
use pseudonyms, so that only
their friends know who they'
are.
"Facebook is like shout-
ing into a crowd. Twitter is


like speaking into a room" -
thafs what one teen said when
he was participating in a focus
group at Microsoft Research,
Marwick says.
Other teens have told Pew
researchers that they feel
"social pressure," to friend
people on Facebook "for
instance, friending everyone
in your school or that friend
of a friend you met at a foot-
ball game," Pew researcher
Madden says.
Twitter's more fluid and
anonymous setup, teens say,
gives them more freedom


to avoid friends of friends of
friends not that they're
saying anything particularly
earth-shattering. They just
don't want everyone to see it
Praznik, for instance, tweets
anything from complaints and
random thoughts to angst and
longing.
"i hate snow i hate winter.
Moving to California as soon
as i can,", one recent post from
the Wisconsin teen read.
"Dont add me as a friend for
a day just to check up on me
and then delete me again and
then you wonder why im mad
at you.duhhh," read another.
And one more: "I wish you
were mine but you don't know
wht you want Till you figure
out what you want I'm going
to do my own thing."
Different teenagers use
Twitter for different reasons.
Some monitor celebrities.
'Twitter is like a backstage
pass to a concert," says Jason
Hennessey, CEO of Everspark
Interactive, a tech-based mar-
keting agency in Atlanta. "You
could send a tweet to Justin
Bieber 10 minutes before the
concert, and there's a chance
he might tweet you back."
A few teens use it as a plat-
form to share opinions, keep-
ing their accounts public for
all the world to see, as many
adults do.
Taylor Smith, a 14-year-old


in St Louis, is one who uses
Twitter to monitor the news
and to get her own "small
points across." Recently, that
has included her dislike for
strawberry Pop Tarts and her
admiration for a video that fea-
tures the accomplishments of
young female scientists.
She started tweeting 18
months ago after her dad
opened his own account He
gave her his blessing, though
he watches her account close-
ly.
"Once or twice I used bad
language and he never let me
hear the end of it," Smith says:
Even so, she appreciates the
chance to vent and to be heard
and thinks it's only a.matter of
time before her friends realize
that Twitter is the cool place
to be always an important
factor with teens.
They need to "realize its
time to get in the game,"
Smith say, though she notes
that some don't have smart
phones or their own laptops
- or their parents don't want
them to tweet, feeling they're
too young.
Pam Praznik, Britteny's
mother, keeps track of her
daughter'sFacebookaccounts.
But Britteny asked that she
not follow her on Twitter -
and her mom is fine with that,
as long as the tweets remain
between friends.


GOING GREEN: Mowers converted to propane


Continued From Page 1C
ers run better on propane, which has
higher octane levels than gasoline.
"It seems to -give them more
power," said Andrew Hillhouse, co-
owner of Green Star.
Wes Faris, manager of Alachua
Tractor & Equipment, converted
the Green Star mowers and is so
impressed that he plans to advertise
propane conversions in local publica-
tions.
"People tend to stay away from


* something new," Faris said. "It's for
the commercial guys."
Once word spreads about the
advantages of propane, Faris said he
expects more businesses to convert
from gasoline.
Hillhouse said the bulk of his work
is commercial, but about 20 percent
is residential. He said it didn't take
much convincing when Everett
contacted him about converting his
equipment.


"When Kelly approached us, it was
a win-win situation," he said.
Hillhouse said the warranty on his
mowers will not be affected by the
conversion.
'The warranty stays in place as
long as a certified person works on
them," he said. "I hope other people
see the benefits and spend the extra
money to get their equipment con-
verted."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, JANUARY29, 2012 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review -


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights

NYSE Amex Nasdaq
7,876.61 +47.27 2,356.42 +56.97 2,816.55 +29.85


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Solutia 27.52 +8.86 +47.5
Sequansn 3.80 +1.01 +36.2
ProSUItNG 16.60 +3.96 +31.3
GoodrPet 18.29 +4.23 +30.1
DirDGIdBII 25.97 +5.85 +29.1
MPGOffTr 2.57 +.57 +28.5
USAirwy 8.18 +1.81 +28.4
NBGrcers 3.24 +.70 +27.6
PulseElec 3.05 +.64 +26.6
Xerium 8.40 +1.70 +25.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MediaGen. 3.88 -1.57 -28.8
ProUShtNG 77.54-30.20 -28.0
DirDGIdBr 29.44-10.44 -26.2
Energy 17.33 -5.15 -22.9
CarboCer 102.07-25.93 -20.3
MonstrWw 7.35 -1.65 -18.3
TCFFnwt 2.20 -.47 -17.6
CSVS2xVxS16.90 -3.30 -16.3
PrUltVixST 6.46 -1.25 -16.2
CSVS3xlnSlv3l.06-5.98 -16.1

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 12872075 7.29 +.22
S&P500ETF6633431131.82 +28
SPDRFnd3851690 14.13 -.01
FordM 3531636 12.21 -.38
Pfizer 3256726 21.48 -.42
iShEMkts 2825368 42.38 +.98
iShR2K 2265726 79.72+1.47
GenElec 2157479 19.03 -.12
NokiaCp 2130659 5.08 -.53
SprintNex 2088811 2.17 -.10

Diary
Advanced 2,278
Declined 871
New Highs 371
New Lows 29
Total issues 3,192
Unchanged 43
Volume 20,001,299,238


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Quepasa 4.90 +1.47 +42.9
HalIwdGp 15.54 +3.97 +34.3
GoldStrg 2.20 +.46 +26.4
Minefnd g 14.34 +2.99 +26.3
IntTowerg 5.62 +1.07 +23.5
ExeterRgs 3.69, +.64 +21.0
ExtorreGg 9.95 +1.47 +17.3
NwGoldg 11.67 +1.71 +17.2
CT Ptis 5.96 +.87 +17.1
NAPallg 2.74 +.40 +17.1

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SLInd 17.76 -2.15 -10.8
RadiantLog 2.30 -.24 -9.4
ChinNEPet 2.33 -.24 -9.3
MtnPDiag 4.34 -.35 -7.5
Glowpoint 2.80 -.20 -6.7
InvCapHld 3.85 -.27 -6.6
ASpecRIty 6.15 -.42 -6.4
Geokinefics 2.01 -.13 -6.1
Protalix 5.57 -.34 -5.8
TrioTch 2.25 -.13 -5.5

Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol(00O) Last Chg
CheniereEn384328 12.71 +1.78
NovaGIdg 270305 10.66+1.43
Minefndg 195826 14.34+2.99
GoldSirg 172793 2.20 +.46
NwGoldg 172751 11.67+1.71
GrtBasGg 148497 1.24 +.17
NAPallg 107774 2.74 +.40
RareEleg 93165 6.11 +.11
Rentech 88541 1.71 +.15
AvalnRare 87197. 3.08 +.09

Diary
Advanced 382
Declined 136
New Highs 77
New Lows 12
Total issues 528
Unchanged 10
Volume 501,435,715


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
AES Corp ... ... 20 -.25 +8.2 12.81
AFLAC 1.32 2.7 10 +1.13 +13.4 49.04
AK Steel '20 2.0 ...+.64 +20.0 9.91.
AT&T Inc 1.76 6.0 44 -1.35 -3.6 29.16
AbtLab 1.92 3.5 16 -.74 -2.2 55.02
AberFito .70 1.5 18 +2.72 -3.3 47.23
Accenture 1.35 2.4 17 +.61 +6.0 56.42
AMD ... ... 5 +.40 +26.3 6.82
Aetna .70 1.6 9 -.31 +2.9 43.43
Agilent .40 .9 15 +1.68 +22.2 42.68
AlcatelLuc ... ... ... -.17 +17.3 1.83
Alcoa .12 1.2 15 +.26 +20.6 10.43
AllegTch .72 1.5 24 -4.40 -2.3 46.70
Allstate .84 2,9 43 -.74 +6.1 29.09
AlphaNRs ... ... 50 +1.74 +6.0 21.65
Altria 1.64 5.8 17 -.56 -5.1 28.14
AMovilLs .28 1.2 11 +.19 +4.1 23.53
AEagleOut .44 3.1 15 +.18 -8.5 13.99
AEP 1.88 4.7 11 -1.06 -3.3 39.95
AmExp .72 1.4 12 -.19 +5.7 49.85
AmlntlGrp ... ... ... -.40 +8.8 25.25
AmeriBrgn .52 1.3 15 -1.11 +4.8 38.98
Anadarko .36 .5 ... +.30 +3.9 79.32
Annaly 2.43 14.5 8 +.27 +5.3 16.81
Apache .60 .6 10 +1.20 +8.2 98.00
ArcelorMit .75 3.4 17 +.67 +19.6 21.75.
ArchCoal .44 3.0 13 +.64 ... 14.51
ArchDan .70 2.3 9 -.22 +4.3 29.82
ArmourRsd1.32 18.4 16 +.14 +1.8' 7.18
ATMOS 1.38 4.3 14 -.22 -3.0 32.34
Avon .92 5.0 11 -.22 +5.1 18.36
BB&T Cp .64 2.4 15 -.54 +7.1 26.95
BakrHu .60 1.2 13 .+.03 +1.4 49.31
BcoBrades .80 4.2 ... +.52 +13.8 18.97
BcoSantSA .84 10.3 ... +.40 +8.4 8.15
BcoSBrasil 1.50 15.5 ... +.33 +18.6 9.65
-BkofAm .04 .5 ... +.22 +31.1 7.29
BkNYMel .52 2.6 10 -1.05 +1.6 20.23
Barclay .36 2.6 ... +.14 +28.2 14.09
Bar iPVix ... ... ... -2.35 -26.6 26.07
BarrickG .60 1.2 11 +3.68 +9.4 49.51
BasicEnSv ... ... 33 +.57 -.10.2 17.70
Baxter 1.34 2.4 14 +3.19 +12.9 55.87
BerkHB ... ... 17 -.49 +4.1 79.42
BestBuy .64 2.5 9 +.44 +8.9 25.44
BlockHR .80 4.8 16 +.28 +2.7 16.77
Boeing 1.76 2.4 14 -.97 +1.6 74.55
BostonSci ... ... 16 -.05 +11.0 5.93
BrMySq 1.36 4.2 15 -.36 -8.4 32.29
CBREGrp ... ... 23 +1.21 +25.3 19.07
CBSB .40 1.4 16 +.80 +6.3 28.84
CSXs .48 2.1 14 -.06 +8.1 22.76
CVS Care .65 1.5 17 -.51 +3.6 42.26
CYSInvest2.00 15.1 10 -.22 +1.1 13.28
CblvsNYs .60 4.2 12 -.19 +1.2 14.39
CabotOG s .08 .2 56 +2.32 -13.4 32.88
Cameron .. .... 22 +.10 +8.7 53.45
CdnNRsgs .36 ... .+1.69 +7.6 40.20
CapOne .20 .4 7 +.02 +8.9 46.05
Carnival 1.00 3.3 13 -1.08 -6.6 30.48
Caterpillar 1.84 1.7 15 +5.64 +22.8 111.28
Cemex ... ...... +.30 +24.9 6.73
CenterPnt .81 4.4 14 -.58 -9.3 18.23
CntryUnk 2.90 7.8 17 -.69 +.2 37.26
ChesEng .35 1.6 7 +1.09 -1.1 22.05
Chevron 3.24 3.1 8 -2.93 -2.3 103.96
Chimera .51 16.7 6 +.14 +21.5 3.05
Cigna .04 .1 9 -.96 +7.6 45.18
Citigrprs .04 .1 8 +1.23 +17.3 30.87
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.5 6 +1.56 +17.2 73.06
CloudPeak ... ... 9 +.30 +.4 19.39
Coach .90 1.3 21 +3.63 +12.2 68.47
CocaCola 1.88 2.8 12 -.65 -3.6 67.44
Comerica .40 1.4 13 -1.56 +8.6 28.02
ConocPhil 2.64 3.8 8 -1.80 -4.8 69.40
ConsolEngy.50 1.4 11 +3.44 -.7 36.46
ConEd 2.42 4.1 16 +.13 -5.1 58.89
ConstellEnr .96 2.7 16 +.16 -8.9 36.15
Corning .30 2.4 7 -1,80 -2.8 12.62




Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AcmePkt
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy ....
AkamaiT
AlIscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .32
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.44
Amylin
Apple Inc
ApldMatl .32
AriadP
ArmHId .15
ArubaNet
AsscdBanc .04
Atmel
Autodesk
AutoData 1.58
AvagoTch .48
Baidu
Bionovo rsh
BioSante
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm
CA Inc 1.00
Cadence
CpstnTitb h...
Celgene
CellTher rsh..
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco .24
CitrixSys ...
Clearwire ...
ColumLabs..


44 +.20
19 -.07
19 +.55
32 -.03
86 -.42
17 -.12
... -.33
... +4.44
4 +.09
3 +.26
17 -1.23
... +.71
13+26.98
8 -.24
... +.71
... +1.26
40 +.46
26 -.31
9 -.63
31 +1.56
20 -1.45
16 +.17
52 +8.56
... +.07
... -.64
21 +.06
56 +.02
14 +2.77
25 +.05
... +.03
26 -.47
... +.02
... -.24
9 -1.37
17 -.36
35 -2.98
... -.05
11 -.72


Name DIv
Covidien .90
CSVS2xVxS...
CSVellVSts...
DCT Indl .28
DDR Corp .48
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
Danaher .10
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir ....
DenburyR ..
DxFnBullrs...
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEnBear ...
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .40
Disney .60
DomRescs 2.11
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
DukeRlty .68
E-CDang ...
EMC Cp ...
EQT Corp .88
EastChm s 1.04
Eaton s 1.52
EIlPasoCp .04
Elan
EldorGld g .18
EmersonEI 1.60
EnCana g .80
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FstHorizon .04
FrstEngy 2.20
FordM .20
FordM wt ...
ForestOil s ..
FMCGs 1.00
Fusion-lon ...
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop ...
Gannett .32
Gap .45
GenMotors ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .20
GoldFLtd .24
Goldcrpg, .54
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
HCAHIdn ...
HCP Inc 2.00
Hallibrtn .36
HarleyD .50
HartfdFn .40
HItMgmt ...
Heckmann ...
HeclaM .02
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HomeDp 1.16
Honwlllntl 1.49
HostHotis .20
HovnanE
Huntsmn .40
ICICI Bk .63
iShGold
iSAstla 1.09
iShBraz 1.50
iShGer .67
iSh HK .41
iShJapn .20
iSTaiwn .47


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
VISTFnd 11.19 +4.50 +67.2
EntreMdh 2.60 +1.01 +63.5
TranS1 3.05 +1.14 +59.7
UveDeal 4.40 +1.49 +51.2
HudsonTc 2.77 +.92 +49.7
Datawatch 8.60 +2.64 +44.3
IndiCmtyB 20.80 +6.25 +43.0
Illumina 51.69+15.39 +42.4
SpanBdrsh 6.15 +1.77 +40.4
GeneticTh 4.51 +1.19 +35.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
lnfinityPh 5.98 -3.99 -40.0
Ambient rs 4.65 -1.48 -24.1
ZionsBcwt 3.10 -.90 -22.5
BroadVisn 21.22 -578 -21.4
ChinaMed 2.84 -.74 -20.7
Oncolyt g 3.55 -.92 -20.6
Radvisn 7.51 -1.92 -20.4
TwinDisc 31.53 -7.87 -20.0
Moment 15.19 -3.72 -19.7
EntFnSv 12.35 -2.70 -17.9

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 3046691 2.04 -.06
Intel 2798768 26.73 +.35
Microsoft 2748547 29.23 -.48
PwShs QQQ212713260.40 +.63
Cisco 1956317 19.56 -.36
RschMotn 1841862 16.80 -.20
MicronT 1638762 7.43 -.33
Orade 1475616 28.42 -.29
FrontierCm1360219 4.31 -.56
HuntBnk 961265 5.70 -.22

Diary
Advanced 1,685
Declined 986
New Highs 196
New Lows 37
Total issues 2,729
Unchanged 58
Volume 9,130,843,841





Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.7 14 +3.65 +14.8 51.69
...... -3.30 -47.1 16.90
...... +.73 +35.0 8.79
4.9 ... +.18 +12.1 5.74
3.4 ... +.29 +15.7 14.08
1.0 63 +.57 +14.1 14.39
4.4 13 -.03 -1.6 53.60
.2 19 +.92 +11.1 52.26
1.9 13 +.95 +13.8 87.99
... 9 +.98 +28.4 10.39
... 14 +.87 +23.0 18.57
...... +.24 +24.3 80.64
-1.25 -21.3 20.83
... ... -.15 -21.1 29.46
... ... +.02 -9.1 10.28
...... +3.02 +25.3 56.20
...... -.21 +8.2 5068
1.5 7 -.25 +13.1 27.14
1.5 16 -.06 +4.7 39.25
4.3' 17 -1.01 -6.6 49.56
3.0 14 +.07 +16.3 33.46
4.7 17 -.12 -3.7 21.18
5.0 ... +.01 +12.1 13.51
...... +.80 +89.5 8.34
... 26 +2.58 +19.9 25.83
1.8 22 +2.48 -11.0 48.78
2.1 11 +4.42 +29.1 50.41
3.1 13 +1.19 +13.9 49.57
.2 ... -.33 -.1 26.54
... 13 +.63 +.4 13.80
... 29 +1.55 +9.8 15.05
3.1 16 +2.34 +10.9 51:67
4.1 35 +2.11- +5.8 19.60
1.9 91 +.35 -21.4 8.21
5.3 11 +.19 -8.8 39.55
2.2 10 -1.66 +1.3 85.83
.5 15 -.25, +9.9 8.79
5.2 13 +.73 -4.6 42.26
1.6 7 -.38 +13.5 12.21
...... -.24 +45.4 3.49
... 13 +.95 +2.3 13.86
2.2 10 +3.03 +25.4 46.13
... ...-4.44 +2.7 24.85
5.6 ... +.29 +12.6 5.18
... 9 -.23 +.8 24.32
2.1 7 -.17 +13.8 15.22
2.4 11 +.30 +2.0 18.93
... 5 -.63 +20.2 24.37
... ... +.06 -18.0 2.14
... ... -.41 +19.5 7.83
2.1 ... +.13 +23.6 9.65
1.4 2 +1.35 +11.0 16.92
1.1 20 +4.26 +11.3 49.24
1.3 25 +3.03 +23.6 111.77
... 30 -.15 -4.7 13.50
... +1.22 +16.7 25.72
4.8 27 +1.07 +1.2 41.92
1.0 12 +.90 +7.5 37.10
1.1 17 +2.38 +14.1 44.34
2.3 7 -.96 +8.1 17.57
... 9 +.34 -10.4 6.60
. ... ... -.66 -24.5 5.02
.... 13 +.54 +1.7 5.32
.. 17 +1.12 +19.6 14.02
.7 11 -6.01 -2.7 55.26
1.7 8 -.25 +8.2 27.88
2.6 19 +.36 +6.7. 44.87
2.6 15 +.89 +7.2 58.27
1.2 ... +.29 +11.8 16.52
+.25 +84.1 2.67
3.2 9 +1.22 +26.9 12.69
1.8 ... +1.16 +33.4 35.27
+.71 +11.3 16.95
4.6 ... +.66 +10.1 23.60
2.3 ... +1.02 +15.1 66.07
3.1 ... +.74 +12.7 21.67
2.4 ... +.32 +10.7 17.12
2.1 ... +.10 +4.8 9.55
3.7 ... +.16 +7.8 12.62


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Comcast .45 1.7
Comc spcl .45 1.8
Cree Inc
CypSemi .36 2.1
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DonlleyRR 1.04 9.0
DryShips .12 ...
E-Trade
eBay
ElectArts ...
EngyCnvh ...
ErcsnTel .37 4.1
Expedias ...
ExpScripts ...
FiberTwr If ...
FifthThird .32 2.4
Finisar ... ...
FstNiagara .32 3.3
FstSolar ... ..
Rextm ... ...
FrontierCm .75 17.4
FultonFncl .24 2.5
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC ...
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32 4.7
HumGen
IdenixPh ...
Illumina
Incyte
Informal
Inhibitex
Intel .84 3.1
InterDio .40 1.1


19 +.26 +11.1 26.33
18 -.12 +7.2 25.26
47 -.63 +20.5 26.56
15 -1.79 +2.7 17.26
9 +.07 +14.4 16.74
... +1.27 +92.6 14.64
14 +1.33 +3.7 44.36
9 -1.22 -2.9 27.64
7 -.68 -20.2 11.52
... -.15 +10.5 2.21
25 -1.47 +2.9 8.19
13 -.08 +5.0 31.85
... +.21 -11.9 18.14
... +.18+499.0 1.21
...-1.25 -11.4 8.98
9 +.76 +9.6 31.80
20 -.46 +15.1 51.44
... -.22 -8.2 .19
11 +.06 +4.0 13.23
28 -.64 +18.7 19.87
15 +.18 +13.6 9.80
7 +7.09 +34.9 45.54
9 +.03 +19.3 6.75
29 -.56 -16.3 4.31
13 -.02 -3.5 9.47
14 +1.28 +19.0 48.72
19 -6.01 -10.2 579.98
40 +1.60 +17.1 52.50
... +.25 +7.4 4.77
... -.27 +9.3 6.83
... +1.60 .+42.5 10.53
... +.22 +92.2 14.31
66+15.39 +69.6 51.69
... +.64 +19.4 17.92
41 +3.43 +17.4 43.37
... +.65 +129.2 25.07
11 +.35 +10.2 26.73
17 -7.92 -12.7 38.05


Name DIv YId PE
JA Solar ... 4
JDS Uniph ... 46
JamesRiv ... ... 12
JetBlue 21
KLATnc 1.40 2.7 12
LamResrch ... 13
UbtyintA ... ... 16
LifeTech ... ... 25
UnearTch 1.00 3.0 16
MarvellT ... ... 13
Mattel .92 3.1 14
Maximlntg .88 3.2 17
MelcoCrwn ... ... 54
Micromet ... ... ...
MicronT ... ... ...
Microsoft .80 2.7 11
Nil HIdg ... ... 12
NetApp ... 22
Netflix ... ... 29
NewsCpA .19 1.0 17
NewsCpB .19 1.0 17
Novlus ... 14
NuanceCm ... ... ...
Nvidia ... 14
OnSmcnd ... ... 25
Oracle .24 .8 16
PMCSra ....23
Paccar .72 1.6 19
PacEth rs ... ... ...
PanASlv .10 .4 11
ParamTch ... ... 33
PattUTI .20 1.1 10
Paychex 1.28 4.0 22
PeopUtdF .63 5.0 21
Polycom s ... ... 26
Popular ... ... 10
Power-One. ... 4
PwShsQQQ.46 .8 ...


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wiay ID
Name Ex Div Lil Cng 'Cng %Cng
T.,i IiT 1 '. .'



6l.:.i r.E II r :1 1 v
'.:.[.E .',' i>1 I 0'A a ,', 1 *' 1 :. Ii
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 16.20 -.47 -2.8 +2.7
CSXs NY .48 22.76 -.06 -0.3 +8.1
ChesEng NY .35 22.05 +1.09 +5.2 -1.1
Chevron NY 3.24 103.96 -2.93 -2.7 -2.3
Cisco Nasd .24 19.56 -.36 -1.8 +8.5
Ciigrp rs NY .04 30.87 +1.23 +4.1 +17.3
CocaCola NY 1.88 67.44 -.65 -1.0 -3.6
Coming NY .30 12.62 -1.80 -12.5 -2.8
Delhaize NY 2.45 56.29 +1.22 +2.2 -.1
DrSCBrrs NY ... 20.83 -1.25 -5.7 -21.3
EMCCp NY ... 25.83 +2.58 +11.1 +19.9
FamilyDIr NY .84 55.68 +.90 +1.6 -3.4
FordCM NY .20 12.21 -.38 -3.0 +13.5
FrontierCmNasd .75 4.31 -.56 -11.5 -16.3
GenElec NY .68 19.03 -.12 -0.6 +86.3
Hallibrtn NY .36 37.10 +.90 +2.5 +7.5
HomeDp NY 1.16 44.87 +.36 +0.8 +6.7
iShEMkts NY .81 '42.36 +.98 +2.4 +11.6
iShR2K NY 1.02 79.72 +1.47 +1.9 +8.1
Intel Nasd .84 26.73 +.35 +1.3 +10.2
JPMorgChNY 1.00 37.21 -.15 -0.4 +11.9
Lowes NY .56 26.91 +.52 +2.0, +8.0


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Die Lasi Cng %Cng %Cng


M.: ,'hl-. ; H .


S TErSEr. t rI, I : 1
rl.:.t.lrT H II Ha 1.
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Orade Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .88
Potash s NY .58
PwShsQQQNasd .46
RegionsFn NY .04
RschMon Nasd .
Ryder NY 1.16
S&PSOOETFNY 2.58
SearsHldgsNasd .33
SiriusXM Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .22
TimeWamn NY .94
US NGs rs NY
WalMart NY 1.46
SWelsFargo NY .48
Xerox NY .17


i, 1 2

I. ,I I0 -1 6
Ate .1' 144
-.53 -9.4 +5.4
-.12 -0.1 +7.0
-.29 -1.0 +10.8
+6.33 +18.0 +17.8
-.47 -0.7 -.8
-.42 -1.9 -.7
+2.70 +6.0 +14.9
+.63 +1.1 +8.2
+.40 +8.1 +23.5
-.20 -1.2 +15.9
+1.69 +3.0 +7.6
+.28 +0.2 +5.0
-4.94 -10.1 +38.6
-.06 -2.9 +12.1
-.28 -0.6 -2.7
-.10 -4.4 -7.3
-.01 -0.1 +8.7
-.06 -0.2 +3.9
+.79 +15.5 -9.0
-.30 -0.5 +1.6
-.94 -3.1 +7.4
-.88 -10.0 -1.0


Stock Footnotes: g = D. aer.l r, ear"nir r. Caudun. 13o'a: 1 a r, notIrr, .i cntir.uea.Iiilns lan-d.a
II = L le filltr., lUI S t. ,' = N: hew I i.rl E-l pJl I : Pil.rred rc : = ,l,:, .:=.. ,jr. r, r. ,ramr.j a r a t.:.,;) ipIpl
.jl 3 u1 I S. Fhe eC l inos t arzTn i ymi Ai n = Rl.rt.i Ic r.u suVnmnzuiv.i nLw i pnri = ?ic., a p s r 5. in E. 31
:lI.'1 pvic:.rl wanjrir.r i4, ia f y u ur.= UJ.t -t = l', ..i r.irurv.yf C. t.; 6.':.l a = Vw ir,t >l1irADul =
Wrer, I .uu = Wan. '; ,,
Muiual Funl Footnotes c, = Fe- .xOv.rng rnaii .:Co:L 1 F pa.l Irr. fur.3 ::. .3 = Del',-a. alei c ,rgi .r
l6,3.iTi.Ilorivtv I m lLada l=l fld arj l in. MuirTpl-ie :. aluCt rctm N mA : .1 i.al haIir? PQ pro; IOu5.i'y
.'i,:i .!t n ue = luri ii Inir.: titnaa i A,-,i lu ruN o a t.'in[ruI.mn ourr4 Ig e A,'.t Gainers and
Losera mul- ;tr, f'nrt. a i16. a i -' 52 .v h.te 1 ir irn la I, at a lhI Most Aclltes rr.ui t v iulr. at Iaf .;1 'voluTme in.
tutarAr l 1irn rira. Source: T-.m A-wiijal. 51 Prs a, 5 ij lgure: art uriii. VlrtIi


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9388 .9414
Britain 1.5724 1.5688
Canada 1.0012 1.0014
Euro .7571 .7631
Japan 76.72 77.49
Mexico 12.9500 12.9899
Switzerind .9129 .9205
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


New York Stock Exchange






SO MUCH PLANNING


GOES INTO RETIREMENT.

HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT TAXES AS WELL?

I's likely that your retirement income may come from
many sources. suweh as Social Security, pension distributions
a I) Irk) or I A withdrawals. That's why, if taxes are a
concern for you, it's important to choose the ri,.ii inM'-Ir11,iilt,
for your IIti iiifiiin. \i Edward Jones. we Ihave many options
that can 2'i. jm 111 n(orc control over your taxes, so you can
q'riji ositil you've worked so hard to achieve.
Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisers cannot provide tax advice. You should
consult with a qualified tax specialist for professional advice on your specific situation.


Call today to see how our unique, face-to-face approach
makes us best-suited to help long-term Investors meet their
current needs and future financial goals.
S Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847 www.edwardjones.com MembirsIPc


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


iShSilver ...
iShChina25 .77
iSSP500 2.60
iShEMkts .81
iShB20 T 3.93
iS Eafe 1.71
iShiBxHYB7.08
iShR2K 1.02
IShREst 2.17
IngerRd .64
IBM 3.00
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic,.24
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .82
IvanhM g
JPMorgCh 1.00
JanusCap .20
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtl .72
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25
KeyEngy
Keycorp .12
KimbClk 2.80
Kimco .76
Kinross g .12
KodiakOg ...
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp ...


+1.74 +22.3 32.96
+.93 +13.6 39.60
+.34 +5.0 132.25
+.98 +11.6 42.36
+1.10 -2.6 118.08
+.56 +6.0 52.49
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-.63 -6.5 16.09
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-.32 +4.8 10.20
+.55 +14.4 22.99
-.29 +12.1' 20.81
-2.02 -3.6 17.08
-.15 +11.9 .37.21
+.69 +28.2 8.09
+.29 ... 65.56
+.16 +1.3 31.66
-1.30 +6.3 21.69
+.54 +46.6 9.85
+.09 -4.1 14.84
-.29 +4.2 8.01
-2.70 -3.3 71.13
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+1.45 +2.3 11.66
-.25 -4.8 9.04
-.68 -5.4 46.69
-.20 +3.0 38.47
+.68 +30.1 7.74




Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last
+.08 +37.3 1.84
-.61 +23.0 12.84
+.41 -.6 6.88
+.37 +11.7 5.81
+.83 +8.5 52.33
+.87 +16.4 43.10
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-.31 +5.8 18.88
-.14 +7.4 19.52
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-1.16 +11.0 27.92
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+.16 +20.0 6.61
+.69 +19.0 44.59
-.10 ... 1.06
-1.55 +6.2 23.17
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-.12 +6.9 32.19
-.18 -1.0 12.72
+1.93 +20.7 19.67
+.06 +18.7 1.65
+.01 +15.9 4.53
+.63 +8.2 60.40


Name DIv
LVSands ...
LennarA .16
ULillyEli 1.96
UncNat .32
LyonBas A 1.00
MEMC
MFA Fncl 1.00
MGIC
MGM Rsts
Macys .80
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .80
Manulifeg .52
MarathnO s .68
MarathP n 1.00
MktVGold .15
MktVRus .58
MktVJrGId 1.59
MarlntA .40
Masco .30'
McDrmlnt ...
McMoRn ...
McEwenM ...
Mechel
MedcoHIth ...
Medtmlc .97
Merck 1.68
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
MobileTele 1.06
Molycorp ...
Monsanto'1.20




Name DIv
Qualcom .86
Questcor ..
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ..
RiverbedT ...
SLM Cp .50
SanDisk
SeagateT 1.00
SearsHIdgs .33
SvArts rsh
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Staples .40
StarScient ...
Starbucks .68
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .24
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .90
Texlnst .68
TibcoSft ...
TrQuint
UrbanOut
VertxPh ...
ViacomB 1.00
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 2.10
WamerCh ...
Wendys Co .08
Windstrm 1.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04
Zvnqa n


E^WkrJly YT
MAKING StN!5C Ut INVEIIN6^^^H^


Wkly YTD
YId PE Chg %Chg
... 29 +3.06 +15.9
.7 46 +.26 +13.4
5.0 9 -.61 -5.7
1.5 7 -1.52 +8.0
2.4 8 +1.33 +26.9
+.26 +23.9
13.8 8 +.31 +8.2
... ... -.08 +11.0
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2.4 12 -1.56 +5.1
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1.9 ... -.04 +16.0
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2.2 7 -.80 +6.7
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1.2 68 -.27 +18.5
2.4 .,. -.08 +17.7
... 16 +.59 +11.3
... ... -.95 -14.6
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2.1 10 -.83 +13.9
... 14 +.02 +.7
6.4 13 +.38 +13.7
... 32 +2.80 +32.3
1.5 25 +.48 +14.9


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
1.5 23 +.06 +5.6 57.79
... 42 -.12 -12.3 36.48
... 39 -.02 -5.7 5.09
... 3 -.20 +15.9 16.80
... 63 -4.18 +4.0 24.45
3.3 13 +.51 +12.9 15.13
12 -5.79 -5.1 46.70
4.8 55 +.75 +26.6 20.77
... -4.94 +38.6 44.06.
-.10 -5.9 .32
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.. 51 -.06 +12.1 2.04
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2.5. 12 +.01 +15.3 16.01
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1.4 29 -.30 +4.0 47.85
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1.5 14 -.72 +4.3 16.33
1.9 ... +.10 +6.2 4.29
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2.1 17 -.86 +12.0 32.61
... 40 +.28 +9.8 26.25
... 12 -.01 +24.2 6.05
20 +1.59 -2.1 26.99
-.33 +8.3 35.98
21 13 '+.19 +5.3 47.82
.7 ... +.45 +13.2 24.20
7.7 ... -.62 -3.2 27.14
... 45 -.78 +10.3 16.69
1.5 ... -.04 -2.8 5.21
8.3 23 -.33 +2.2 12.00
2.1 18 +.22 +12.3 35.99
... 19 -.22 -2.4 15.74
.2 20 -1.96 +3.7 16.89
... ... +.96 +6.8 10.05


Dow Jones Industrials
Close 12.660 46
1-week change: -60 02 1.0.5":1:
13.000


11,000



10,000


Wkly YTD
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg


AbdAsPac .42 5.5
AdeonaPh ...
Adventrx
AlexcoR g ...
AlidNevG ;..
AntaresP ...
Augusta g .. ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalnRare ...
Banro g
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ...
BioTime
BrdgusG g ...
CAMACEn...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci ... ...
CFCda g .01 ...
CheniereEn...
CheniereE 1.70 8.0
ChinaShen ...
ClaudeRg ...
CrSuiHiY .32 10.4
Crosshrg
DejourEg .
DenisnM g ...
EnovaSys ..
ExeterR gs ..
GamGldNRl.68 10.4
GascoEngy ...
Gastar grs ...
GenMoly ...
GoldenMin ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ... ...
GtPanSilvg ...
Hemisphrx...


+.16 +4.5
-.08 +66.7
+.11 +16.9
+1.08 +13.7
+4.51 +23.0
+.25 +11.8
-.17 -1.9
+.68 +15.0
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-.03 -1.8
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-.09 +46.4
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-.01 -9.3
+.24 -6.9
+.39 +19.4
+.96 +67.8
+.46 +33.3
+.28 +17.5
+.17 +36.1
+.28 +38.5
+.20+110.3


-11.66 -33.07 81.21 -22.33 -74.17


MONJ TUES. WED THUR FRl


I V


A^ . S......^ 0.......-^ ....- N...^ ...... 0


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pet MIn Init
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load InVt


PIMCO TotRetls Cl,
Vanguard TotStldx LB
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds GrtmA., m LG
Arrerii.;aFund: IncAmerA m MA
var.jguai, &':14aml LB
vani.uar.1 T.i.nIlAdm LB
Ar.en.:ar. Fund!. CpWldGrlA m WS
Airl,.ar, Furii IlnvCoAmA m LB
ATren.ran Furind WAMutlnvA m LV'
Dod1J a CoI. tc."*k LV
D SdIHB i C.:., InrtlStk FV
Fric, l0ap-FIrliln Income A m CA
var.guinr In r.'lu LB
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl
American Funds BalA m MA
American Funds FnlnvA m LB
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Vanguard Totlnt d FB
Vanguard TotStllns LB
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCO TotRetA m Cl
Vanguard 5001nv LB


144,428
62,667
58,398
55,027
54,719
53,225
52,517
51,925
49,496
44,528
42,643
38,129
36,562
35,923
35,298
35,140
31,439
31,366
30,715
30,175
30,138
29,949
29,467
29,035
27,706
26,135
25,966


+6.1/D
+3.0/B
+3.4/A
+2.8/B
+3.0/B
-0.5/D,
+5.4/A
+3.4/A
+3.1/B
-5.2/C
-0.4/D
+6.9/A
-2.5/D
-11.7/D
+2.4/D
+3.5/A
+5.8/D
+8.2/A
+4.9/A
+0.6/;
+4.5/A
-9.6/C
+3.2/B
-9.1/B,
-3.1/C
+5.7/D
+3.3/A


+8.7/A
+1.2/B
+0.6/B
+1.1/C
+3.4/B
+0.7/D
, +2.1/C
+0.6/B
+1.3/B
+0.1/B
0.0/C
+0.6/B
* -3.1/E
-2.2/A
+3.1/D
+0.7/B
+8.4/A
+6.7/B
+3.1/B
+1.5/A
+4.3/A
-2.0/B
+1.3/A
0.0/A
+2.0/A
+8.2/A
+0.5/B


NL 1,000,000
NL -3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 '. 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
4.25 1,000
NL 200,000,000
NL 1,000,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL, 50,000
NL 3,000,
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
3.75 1,000
NL 3,000


CA -Conservative Allocaion, Cl ntermnedlteTerm Bond, ES -Europe Stock FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Feign
Large Value, IH -Word Aluocalm, LB -large Blen, ,L -Large Growth, LV -Lare Value, MA 4oderae locatll, B -MeCap Blend, MV -
M Hp vlue, SH -Spedallyati, WS -Wod Sod Totl Return: Cng V with dividends reinveste. Rank: How fund performed vs,
others with same ecve: A is n top 20%, E In bottom 20%, Min In Intinimum $ needed to Invest in fund. Source: Momingstar. :


.Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chq %Chg Last


MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20 1.1
Mosaic .20 .4
NCR Corp ...
NRG Egy ...
Nabors
NatGrid 3.00 6.2
NOilVarco .48 .6
NY CmtyB 1.00 7.9
NewellRub .32 1.7
NewmtM 1.40 2.3
NextEraEn2.20 3.7
NiSource .92 4.0
NobleCorp .55 1.6
NokiaCp .55 10.8
NorflkSo 1.88 2.5
Novartis 2.53 4.6
OcciPet 1.84 1.8
OfficeDpt ...
OldRepub .70 7.2
Owensll
PG&ECp 1.82 4.5
PNC 1.40 2.4
PPLCorp 1.40 5.0
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 .9
Penney .80 1.9
PepsiCo 2.06 3.1
PetrbrsA 1.28 4.5
Petrobras 1.28 4.1
Pfizer .88 4.1
PhilipMor 3.08, 4.1
Potash s .56 1.2
PS USDBull... ...
ProLogis 1.12 3.4
PrUShS&P'.. .
ProUltQQQ ... ...
PrUShQQQrs... ...
ProUltSP .31 .6
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIvlrs...
ProUShEuro... ..:
ProgsvCp .41 2.0
Prudent 1.45 2.5
PSEG 1.37 4.5
PulteGrp ...
QksilvRes ...
RPC .48 3.1
RadianGrp .01 .4
RangeRs .16 .3
Raytheon 1.72 3.5
RegionsFn .04 .8,
Renrenn ...
RioTinto 1.17 2.0
RiteAid
RylCarb .40 1.4
SpdrDJIA 3.45 2.7
SpdrGold ..;. ...
S&P500ETF2.58 2.0
SpdrHome .15 .8
SpdrS&PBk .37 1.7
SpdrLthHY3.77 8.9
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SpdrOGEx .59 1.1
SpdrMetM .46 .8
Safeway .58 2.6
StJude .84 2.0
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Schlmbrg 1.10 1.4
Schwab .24 2.1
SiderurNac .81 7.7
SilvWhtn g .18 .5
Solutla .15 .5
SouthnCo 1.89 4.2
SthnCopper2.46 6.8
SwstAird .02 2
SwstnEngy ... ...


17 -1.65
17 +.22
11 +1.55
12 +.51.
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18 +2.60
12 -.43
43 +1.52
14 +2.24
13 +.61
21 +.06
26 +.69
... -.53
14 -3.32
11 -.70
12 -.12
+.34
... +.26
.. +1.33
16 +.47
10 -.55
10 +.30
... +1.03
11 -1.71
25 +6.33
16 -.47
... +1.01
... +1.29
14 -.42
16 +.94
14 +2.70
.. -.38
... +.74
... -.04
.. +1.97
.. -.85
... +.17
... -.34
-.08
...-1.33
.. -.88
13 +.01
7 -.14
11 +.13
... +.03
2 -.05
8 -2.65
... -.43
... +3.41
9 -1.24
31 +.40
... +.96
...+2.65
... +.02
10 -.34
... -.51
... +6.90
+.28
... +.52
-.45
+.50
-.52
... +1.04
.... +1.86
... +2.82
13 +.71
13 +2.71
12 +.57
21 +2.86
16 -1.14
... +.30
24 +4.20
14 +8.86
18 -.28
13 +.98
37 +.22
18 +2.61


-7:3 7.35
+22.7 18.56
+12.2 56.56
+11.2 18.30
-7.9 16.68
+3.4 17.93
-.2 48.40
+13.8 77.40
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-1.6 5P.92
-3.8 22.90
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+5.4 5.08
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-4.8 54.41
+7.0 100.25
+36.7 2.94
+4.9 9.72
+27.3 24.67
-.9 40.83
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-5.5 27.80
+.8 8.54
+9.2 36.14
+17.8 41.42
-.8 65.81
+22.0 28.66
+25.2 31.11
-.7 21.48
-3.8 75.46
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-2.1 21.99
+13.7 32.52
-9.2 17.51
+16.9 95.19
-15.0 38.38
+9.9 51.00
+4.8 18.94
-13.8 11.32
-36.2 10.13
-4.6 19.41
+4.7 20.43
+14.2 57.22
-8.1 30.33
+23.5 7.79
-21.2 5.29
-16.5 15.24
+13.7 2.66
-7.3 57.43
+.5 48.64
+23.5 5.31
+47.9 5.25
+22.6 59.99
,+11.1 1.40
+11.8 27.69
+3.8 126.45
+11.2 168.97
+5.0 131.82
+12.3 19.20
+7.3 21.27
+2.6 39.46
+6.3 25.94
+6.2 55.81
+5.6 55.65
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+7.2 22.56
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+.2 8.18
+12.2 76.66
+3.6 11.67
+28.9 10.54
+23.3 35.70
+59.3 27.52
-2.7 45.02
+19.7 36.12
+12.4 9.62
+.3 32.04


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Cha %Chg Last


SpectraEn 1.12 3.5 17
SprintNex .
SPMatls .74 2.0 .
SPHIthC .67 1.9
SP CnSt .88 2.7 .
SP Consum .61 1.5 '
SPEngy 1.07 1.5
SPDR Fncl .22 1.6
SP Inds .73 2.0 .
SPTech .38 1.4
SP Util 1.38 4.0
StateStr .72 .1.8 10
Suncorgs .44 ... 12
Suntech ... ... 32
SunTrst .20 1.0 19
SupEnrgy ... ... 15
Supvalu .35 5.0 .
Synovus .04 2.3 ..
TE Connect .72 2.1 12
TaiwSemi .52 3.7 .
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20 2.4 12
TelefEsp 2.14 12.1
TempurP ... ... 23
TendtHIth ... ..13
Teradyn ... ... 14
Terex
Textron .08 .3 32
ThermoFis ... ... 15
3M Co* 2.20 2.5 15
TW Cable 2.24 3.0 15
TimeWarn .94 2.5 14
TollBros ... ... 94
Transocn 3.16 6.6
Travelers 1.64 2.8 16
TrinaSolar ... ... 4
TwoHblnv 1.60 16.2 6
Tyson .16 .9 10
UBSAG ... ... ...
USAirwy ... ... 16
UltraPt g ... ... 11
UnionPac 2.40 2.1 17
UtdContl ... ... 10
UtdMicro .19 7.5 8
UPS B 2.08 2.7 18
UtdRentals ... .. 29
USBancrp .50 1.8 11
US NG rs ... ... ...
US OilFd ... ... ...
USSteel .20 .7 ...
UtdhlthGp .65 1.3 11
UnumGrp .42 1.8 8
ValeSA 1.76 7.1 ...
Vale SA pf 1.76 7.4 ...
ValeroE .60 2.5 9
VangEmg .91 2.1 ..
VedzonOm2.00 5.4 44
Visa .88 .9 20
VMware ... ... 55
WPXEnn .n ......
Walgm .90 2.6 12
WalterEn .50 .7 12
WatsnPh ... ...41
WeathflntI ... ... 65
WellPoint 1.15 1.8 9
WellsFargo .48 1.6 10
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WmsCos 1.04 3.6 18
XcelEngy 1.04 3.9 16
Xerox .17 2.2 8
Yamana g .20 1.2 18
YingliGm ... ... 4


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Last Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ImpOil gs .44
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IntTower g ...
KeeganRg ...
LongweiPI ...
MGTCap ..
MdwGoldg ...
Minefndg ...
NeoStem ...
Nevsun g .10
NwGold g ..
NA Pallg ...
NthnO&G
NovaGld ...
ParaG&S ..
PionDrill ...
Quepasa ...
QuestRMg .
RareEleg
Rentech
Richmntg ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G...
SeabGldg ...
TanzRyg ...
Taseko
TmsatlPet ...
TriValley ...
TriangPet ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn
VantageDr ..
VimetX
VistaGold
WizzardSft ...
YMBioq ...


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Weekly Dow Jones|


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.055 0.045
6-month 0.08 0.06
5-year 0.77 0.89
10-year 1.89 2.02
30-year 3.06 3.10


Nasdaq Most Active


AMEX Most Active


I I


Y












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


Legal

PUBLIC NOTICE ON
INVITATION TO BID
ITB-009-2012
Sealed bids will be accepted by the
City of Lake City, Florida, 205 N
Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055 until Thursday, February 23,
2012 at 11:00 A.M. All bids will be
opened and read aloud at 11:15 A.M.
in the City Council Chambers locat-
ed on the 2nd floor of City Hall, 205
N Marion Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da.
CONSTRUCTION OF A REST-
ROOM FACILITY AT WILSON
PARK '
Documents may be obtained on the
City website at
procurement.lcfla.com; by contacting
purchasing@lcfla.com or by phone
(386) 719-5816 or (386) 719-5818.
05530333
January 29, 2012


020 Lost & Found

LOST CAMERA at CVS Hwy.
90 W., on Jan. 16th, approx.
4:00 p.m., Call with information
FOUND!!!
MALE CAT, went missing
1/23/12, in the area of CR 137 &
208th Str., white with beige mark-
ings & fluffy tail. FOUND!!,

100 Jobr
Opportunities


One IlHm per ad
4 lines 6 days ''"'"








\. c^ "^ ^ ^' h,,. ^' i' -,
srt:
One item per ad
4 lines 6 days ,',"








H. ,,^ Tri 'j... p .'., '. ',1-', :. ..',',,^j :- ^ ^
^^ ^^ ^ *-. *-- L."



One idem per ad 16 1
4 lines o6 days ;' .






One dlE-m per add s 3
4 lines 6 days ,:, ; ..



.f-"' s '. "3 .


One ilem per ad .
4 lines 6 days!; .`, ,

: ,


One 1. m per ad p.r ;
4 lines 6 days ;'.' [



f"..... -- ).". :7g 4: '' ?
' y --- | ', *' ',ii.i....
4 S dI.'da I
Al


4i-ines$ $ 5O
3 days 1J i
locldude 2 Signs id l



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....192.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.
: : .

You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com


Ad is to Appear: Call by; Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,,9:00a.m.
Fdday T rs., 11:00a.m. Thurs, 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion apd billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In - an Online
WWW '* '" "' .,* ,'. .oiOin


05529880
VyStar Credit Union Seeking
Member Relationship
Specialist Supervisor
Location: Lake City Branch
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS:
Trains, monitors, coaches and
develops member service and
teller staff on a daily basis.
Provides on-going training for
all member service and teller
staff as changes are
implemented and other duties
JOB KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS
& ABILITIES:
A minimum of three years of
experience with a financial
institution.
A minimum of two years in a
leadership or supervisory
position is preferred.
Knowledge of Microsoft Word
and Excel are required.
EDUCATION:
An Associate Degree is required
and a four-year undergraduate
degree is preferred. Work and/or
supervisory experience may be
substituted for the Associates
Degree.
Please visit
www.vystarcu.org/home/careers
to apply.
VyStar Credit Union is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

05530291
Advertising Director
The Lake City Reporter, a daily
newspaper, seeks an advertising
director to lead its seven-person
display and classified sales
team. Our team leader must be
an enthusiastic manager in the
department and be equally street
savvy in dealing with clients.
This is a director position that
ires big-picture vision when
it comes to revenue budgeting
and new product development.
Email your resume and a letter
outlining why you are the best
candidate and how you will
excel in this position to:
Todd Wilson, publisher, at:
twilson(@lakecitvreporter.com.


05530322
United States Cold Storage
Now excepting applications for:
Experienced Warehouse
Fork-lift Operators
Excellent pay and benefits
Apply in person Feb. 2 & Feb. 3
9am 4pm
211 NE McCloskey Ave.
Lake City 32055

J5530324
HOLIDAY INN & SUITES
Lake City's only full service
hotel is seeking the following:
* Housekeeping Manager
* Banquet Chef (PT)
Apply at: www.ihg.jobs.net
or in person Mon-Fri 12-5pm 213
SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.


Receptionist needed for Doctor's
office. Part-time with the
possibility of full-time. Send reply
to Box 05084, C/O The Lake City
Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL, 32056








Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 J0ob
100 Opportunities

05530285
Drivers- Exp. Tanker.
Great Pay!
Regional/Linehaul.
*No Layoffs*
Full Benefits. CDL-A w/H&T,
Dbls. Good MVR.
www.drive4sbi.com
Paul: 800-826-3413

Exp. Licensed Real Estate agent
wanted. Friendly work environ-
ment. No desk fees. Ask for Mike
Foster, Accredited Real Estate
Services, LLC. 386-288-3596
HELP WANTED
Full time Energetic-Retail Exp.
people person. Computer register
& stock exp a plus. Apply in
person. Smitty's Western Store.
MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
New Business Expanding to
North Florida. Opportunity Meet-
ing, Wed., Feb. 1, 2012 at 7:00 p.
at Guang Dong Restaurant, Lake
City Mall. Free info. and to pre-
register contact Nile or Diana at
386-628-6880 or 386-754-8811
Now accepting resumes for a
general manager for Mochi Frozen
Yogurt. Full time 50-60 hrs per
week. Scheduled to open in
March. Please mail to: 1396 NE
20th Ave. Bldg 300 Ocala, FL
34470 or email to:
bulldog@laloenterprises.com
Office Manager Position:
Needed Immediately!
2 year degree; 4 years experience
in office management.
Candidate must possess skills in
and knowledge of the following:
business & bookkeeping, Payroll,
Editing, day to day office manage-
ment, ordering supplies, client.
scheduling, professional phone and
interpersonal skills; computer
competency to include creation of
Word documents and Excel
spreadsheets. Candidate must be
organized and flexible as this
position is highly involved with all
aspects and programs within this
agency.$25,000 to $28,000 per
year plus benefits. Please email
resume to: employment(rhap.net
or fax to 386-754-9017.
P/T Caregiver for partially
paralyzed elderly woman. Two
weekends a month with more
nights possible. Exp a must. Ellis-
ville area. Fax resume to 755-2165
PT Clerical position. 8-12p
M-F. Must be a people person
w/good organizational, computer,
phone & customer skills. Must
multi task. Send resume &
references to Box 05082, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


--DA-




ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
MATHEMATICS
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
To Commence Fall Term 2012
Tepch college-level and
preparatory mathematics; work with
colleagues for the advancement
of departmental goals. Requires:
Master's degree in mathematics; or
master's degree with minimum of 18
graduate credit hours in course work
centered on mathematics. Ability
to use technology in instruction.
Ability to teach on-line and distance
learning courses. Ability to work
well with others. Ability to learn from-
colleagues and to share knowledge.
Ability to utilize various instructional
strategies to reach students. Ability
to present information in a coherent
manner and the ability to fairly
evaluate student retention of that
information. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience.
Ability to teach college level and
preparatory mathematics.
SALARY: Based on degree and
experience.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 2/17/12
Persons interested should
provide College application, vita,
and photocopies of transcripts.
All foreign transcripts must be
submitted with official translation
and evaluation.
Position details and a applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrlSfqc.edu
FGC is accsrodttd by the Commissron on Colleges
of lhe Sootihern .\ssocialion of Colleges and
Schools, Vi'/ADA/EA/EO College m Education
and Eosploymonl


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

05530345
Early Head Start Teacher
(Lawton's Place) HS
Diploma/GED, Bilingual
(Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy and 40 hrs
childcare training. Must pass
physical and DCF background
screening requirements, Current
First Aid/CPR preferred. Child
development associate (CDA)
credential AND training in early
childhood development; three.
years of classroom experience
working with infants/toddlers
preferred; Apply in person at
236 SW
Columbia Ave or email resume
to employment@sv4cs.org
(386-754-2222).
Preschool Teacher. Must be 21 &
have req'd 40 hrs. Apply iri person
at Bullfrogs and Butterflies 1226
SW Grandview St. Lake City.

120 Medical
Employment

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05530172
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY
TECH wanted full time,
for private Radiology office.
AART & Mammography
certification req. Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

DENTAL HYGIENIST
needed. Full Time position
M-F 9:00 5:00pm Lake City
Office. Salary Commensurate with
experience. Please fax resume to:
386-752-3122 or email to
caw70(&aol.com

Desto Home Care is accepting
applications for Medical Billing/
Customer Svc. Prefer someone
who has medical billing exp. No
Calls.'Apply in person at or drop
of resume to: Desoto Home Care
311 N. Marion Ave. Lake City
Medical Office looking for full
time employee in Optical. Experi-
ence preferred but not required.
Will train. Send resume to 763 SW
Main Blvd. Lake City, Fl. 32025
Medical practice needs
Ophthalmic Technician.
FT or PT. Experience preferred.
Fax resume 386-755-7561.
Resp. Therapist needed for
medical office.
Please fax resume to
(386) 754-1712

240 Schools &
240v Education

05530293
Interested in a Medical Career?
.Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-02/06/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-02/13/12

LPN 03/12/12
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205

* Lg CKC American Bulldog pups.
12 wk old, health certs, shots,
wormed. Male/females brindle
/white, Fawn/white. POP $350-
$500. Socilized. 386-984-6796
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

412 Medical
Supplies
Convalescent Equipment Wheel
chair crutches, potty, supports and
braces. Best Offer. 914 SW
Lamboy Cr. Lake City. 32024


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

Georgous electric fireplace.
See picture on Craigslist,
Gainesville, ID 2798925013.
$950. 386-344-1060
SOLD
Kennedy 7-Drawer Machinist
Chest.$45.00
SOLD
SOLD
Pair Parallel Jaw Wooden Clamps
$35.00
SOLD

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
"We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood

FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

l6 0 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3 BR/2 BA, 14 x 80, CH/A, water,
sewage & garbage included. Total
electric. 1st, last + dep., lease
required, $550 mo. 386-752-8978.
3/2 partially furunished MH
fenced 15 ac. in Suwannee Coun-
ty. SOme farm and animal main-
tance exp. desirable. Terms neg.
386-454-7139 or 305-216-9893
3BR/2BA SWMH on 1 acre in
Ellisville. Private lot
$460. mo 1st, last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
COUNTRY LIVING
Great location. 2br/2ba MH.
Porches, utility bldg. $500. mo.
386-752-0608 or 365-2430
Country Living
3bdrm,$525.mo.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Newer 2/2. Super clean on 1 ac.
North by distribution center.
Perfect for Target employee. $550.
mo Call for details. 386-867-9231

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Beautiful Main-
tained DWMH, 5br/2ba on 1/2
acre. 12X24 workshop, fenced
.$105,000. MLS 77064


640 DMobile Homes
640 for Sale

Hallmark Real Estate
4/3 DW w/14X76' porch on 5 ac.
in Ellisville area. 2 carports,
storage, fenced pasture. $99,900
#78295 Ginger Parker 365-2135
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspauia@yahoo.com
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air -$799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Dealer in NW Florida Shut
Their doors and we are
i Liquidating THEIR Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal

Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Affordable Lg. Home on 2 ac.,
being sold as is $59,900
MLS 74862 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473

1 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








lbr Apt with
all utilities included.
Close to the VA.
(727)415-2207


2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
L, 386-755-6867


L"i


set Y.OW sig hts








STEL
Apply in person or online


2BR/IBA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652


Ira


IFIND!Tll


\












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


710 A Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Rental in 55+ neighborhood.
2 bedroom/1 bath Duplex across
from Clubhouse. No Pets.
Call Denise.@ 386-752-5290
Greeritree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951-
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
' Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup..
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


Winter Special! 1 Month FREE
with 1 year lease. Updated Apt,
w/tile floors/fresh paint.
Great area. 386-752-9626

720 'Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
73 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
,dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment. ..
Close to downtown & shopping.
$485. mo $585 dep. .
386-344-2170
2BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$450 mo.
386-752-0335
Monday -Friday 8A-4P
3/2 Brick Home, fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent w/option to
purchase available. 386-752-5035
X 3114 7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales
3/2, newer home,
nice neighborhood
386-623-2848

3br/1.5 ba. Completely renovated.
Centrally located, completely
fenced yard. $825. mo + 1st, last &
security. 386-938-5637
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
Lake City Country Club fairway at
back. 3BR/2BA 1760 SQFT, car-
pet, tile, encl porch, all appliances,
Irg gar, big kitchen, 386-269-0123


75 Business &
S Office Rentals

05530343
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq'$5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1100sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Bam on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale


EASTSIDE VILLAGE
REALTY, INC.
MLS#76668 Buildable lot.
High and dry.
Call Denise @386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate
Just Listed. 3/2 on a Terraced hill.
Brick w/fenced yard. All applian-
ces. Owner Financed offered.
#79683 Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Owri a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ AcCess Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-,6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
In town, 3/2 Concrete Block home,
fencedyard. $149, 900
MLS 71999, Elaine Tolar
386-755-6488


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D.
$129,900 New AC in 2010.
Elaine K. Tolar. 755-6488
MLS# 75198.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Wonderful home on Lake. 4/3
Fireplace, many upgrades. MLS
76085, Elaine Tolar 755-6488 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Close to town. 2br/2ba, wood lam-
inate floors. Vaulted ceilings.
MLS 76928 $59,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & Tidy remodeled 2/2 open
floor plan. MLS# 77943
$94,500 Mary Brown Whitehurst
386-965-0887


810 Home for Sale
. Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot.
on the Suwannee.
Well & anerobic septic system.
MLS 78842 $45,000
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/1st time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 365-5146
Callaway S/D, 3br/2ba. Well
maintained. Fenced back yard &
double car garage. $175,000
MLS 79567 Century 21, The
Darby Rogers Co. 752-6575.
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in
High Springs. Real wood floors,
stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 79601 $178,000 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Immaculate home on 10 + acres in
Wellborn. Tile floors, fenced, barn
w/workshop. $309, 900 MLS
79650, Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent neighborhood. 4br/2ba.
2469 sqft on 1 + acres. $190,000
MLS 79654, Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 5br/4ba Custom
kitchen, screened inground pool.
Many upgrades on 5 ac. Many
extras. .$385,000. MLS 79688


COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence Vlg $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669
CYPRESS LANDING! 3BR/2BA
w/lg great room, split floor plan
& 2-car garage $105,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79634
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom/2 bath.
1 car garage. Priced to sell.
Call Denise @386-752-5290

Contemporary Elegance.
MLS 79579 4br/3ba plush carpet
& so much more! $224,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 8.3 acres.
Has 14x30 workshop with electric.
MLS 79345 $199,900

NICE 3BR/2BA DWMH w/fenced
yard plus double carport &
wkshop $39,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #79078
ONLY $38,500 for 4BR/2BA
.concrete block home; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
brick home newly renovated &
inground pool, fenced yard
$69,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST! Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful
older home with mature land-
scaping and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5
baths, 3 fireplaces, private paved
drive. 39.? acres of property in-
cluded with home. $994,000 or
$2,500 per mo. for rent or home
plus 2 acres only $495,000. Call
for additional info and showings.


820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
20 ac Wooded tract.
10 miles from Cedar Key.
MLS 78886, $70,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
Property
Hallmark Real Estate
Rental Investment. 4 duplexes
(8 apartments) All units are rented
and in good shape.
#69380 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate Camp-
ground/RV Park w/67 pull thrus,
cabins & mobile home. Showers,
clubhouse +2 story owner home.
#78793 Janet Creel 719-0382

0 Investment
U8 0 Property
Great Investment in city limits.
Both units occupied.
MLS 79206 $50,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT INVESTMENT
2 units w/ 2br/lba, 2 stories
w/balconies. MLS 79271,
$230,000., Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
SWanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only
5o

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS I

(386) 755-5440


1~ J1I~~J.


Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887

or co-owner (386)397-5131


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT






2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
Price Reduced $5,000
Only 18,300 miles, garage
kept motorhome. Exc.
cond. w/many extras.
$40,000
Call
386-754-5660


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


I -g

TImELEss tleNmORIEes

t ."I CZ Jewelry

50%OFF
W UNCONDMONAL ouETnE GUARANTEE
386-466-1888 OnABlue Luster
1034 SW Main Blvd., (next to the Money Man)Lake City, FL 32055


Per Carton plus tax.
Exprres 2 5-1 2




tOc e Sun l Oan-6pm


PROPANE FILLING STATION
Drive it in and we'll fill it up!
Chevron
-- 1 "1130 US Hwy 90 W
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-- -(386) 752-5890
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Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lokecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, January 29, 2012


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Section D


TASTE BUDDIES


Genie Norman and
Mary Kay
Holhngsworth
TosteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com

The Players

Club:

Something

for everyone
Don't let the
name fool you!
The Players
Club Seafood
Bar and Grill
(TPC) truly offers fun for
just about everyone and
the menu is chock full of
options that are sure to suit
your taste buds.
Folks who are interested
in video slots and other
internet activities can pass
the time away at the inter-
net caf6 in the front of the
house.
The big horseshoe-
shaped bar, a couple of
pool tables and multiple big
screen TVs in the middle
of the house are huge hits
with sports fans and the
younger generation on
weekend nights.
At the back of the house,
the family friendly dining
area along with an outdoor
deck is a great place to
grab a bite to eat, either for
lunch or dinner.
We've been to TPC sev-
eral times and it gets better
every time.
There are so many
items on the menu that we
love, it's hard to figure out
where to start.
If you stop by Friday,
Saturday or Sunday, make
sire you try out the Raw
Bar where you can get suc-
culent raw or steamed oys-
ters by the dozen. Served
with cocktail sauce and
lemons, these salty little
jewels are fabulous. You
can also order clams, peel
and eat shrimp or snow
crab legs. Ask for Old Bay
Seasoning for an extra little
kick!
TPC's appetizers are
hard to beat. The crispy
fried corn nuggets and
battered pickle chips, both
served with a homemade
Remoulade type sauce are
kid tested and approved.
Lobster Bites are filled with
big chunks of real langous-
tine lobster meat mixed
with creamy secret ingredi-
ents and some of the best
we've tasted in the area.
On a recent visit dur-
ing lunch hour with Cindy
Gaylord, we enjoyed TPC
Famous Fish Tacos, which
features grilled fish on
flour tortillas with mixed
cheese, lettuce, tomato
and a delicious wasabi
sauce with just enough
heat to make it interest-
ing. We also tried out the
French Dip, a sandwich
big enough for two, with
succulent prime beef sliced
paper thin and creamy
cheese sauce. Served with
a cup of au jus for extra
juiciness and battered fries,
we think this should be a
regular menu item, it's that
good! Cindy had the Philly
Cheese Steak that featured
thinly sliced black angus
rib-eye steak smothered
with sauteed onions and
green peppers and topped
off with melted American
cheese. All sandwiches
and burgers come with
fries and a dill pickle spear.
On another lunch trip,
Mary Kay and her signifi-
cant other, Timn, tested the
TASTE BUDDIES
continued on 2D


Dr. Fritz M. Fountain,
75, is leaving
Suwannee Baptist
Association.

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com :
A after a lifetime of guid-
ing students, families
and congregations
through the ups and
downs of life, Dr. Fritz
M. Fountain. of Lake City, is retir- -
ing for the second time.
By February he will retire from
the Suwannee Baptist Association
at 75 years old.
The association serves 39
Southern Baptist Churches in
Suwannee and Hamilton counties.
As director of missions, Fountain
helped churches solve problems.
filled in as-interim pastor and
organized mission trips.
Nine mission trips have taken
Fountain, his wife and members
of several churches to Kentucky.
West Virginia, Mexico and Haiti.
where they renovated buildings.
offered bible school and served
free meals.
Fountain was born and raised
in Lake City. He went to school
for 12 years in what is.now the
Columbia County School District
Administrative Complex. He
played Tiger football in 1952 and
1954, but missed the 1953 season
with a broken leg, he said.
Fountain said he is still occa-
sionally introduced as a former
. Tiger player and gets a kick out
of it.
After graduating from Stetson
University in 1959, Fountain was
a history teacher, athletic coach
and radio announcer. He met his
wife Marie, of Fort White, in 1962
while he was a basketball coach
at Fort White High School. They
will celebrate their 50th anniver-
sary this summer.
With a master in education
in 1969 from the University of
Florida, he became a school guid-
ance counselor.
"I was bi-vocational most of the
time," he said.
A school guidance counselor
during the day, he ran a private
counseling practice several nights
a week in addition to pastoring a
church.
Fountain said he was the first
elementary guidance counselor
in Columbia County when he
started in August 1973. As a
high school counselor, he saw
the need to counsel students at
younger ages, he said. He was
also one of the first family coun-
selors in the state.
At his private marriage arid
family practice his rule of thumb
was when "a client came to see
RETIREMENT continued on 2D


Dr. Fritz Fountain after tearing down a chimney in an old school building during a mission trip in 2009. About 50
people worked for a week to turn the building into a church.


At.left: Marie Fountain and husband Dr. Fritz M. Fountain stand together at a scenic outlook in Kentucky while on a mission
trip in 2009. At right: Lake City resident and minister Dr. Fritz M. Fountain, 75, will retire in February from the Suwannee
Baptist Association as the director of missions. Fountain also worked as a history teacher, athletic coach and radio announcer.


Planting a palette of memories along life's pathway


C childhood memo-
ries seem to fade
as we continue .
along life's path,
but some memo-
ries are so strongly embed-
ded in emotion that they keep
us company along the way.
My mother, who is well into,
her 80's, has shared many of
her precious memories with
me.
Mother recently painted
a lively picture of her home
when she was young.
Grandpa's tractor was in the
drive, and Toby, the dog; was
chasing the fishmonger in his
old jalopy. The mailman must
have been expected because
the red flag on the mailbox


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu
was up.
The chicken coup and
smokehouse are there in
her painting, as well as the
big tree where there always
hung a rope swing. Mother
loved the vegetable garden,
Grandma's flowers, and the


grape arbor. She has won-
derful memories of sitting in
that arbor, eating those sweet
grapes from the vine.
Many of us have fond
memories of picking delicious
sweet-tart grapes in the fall.
If you grew up in the South,
you probably feasted on mus-
cadine grapes. The bunch
grape, which is more reliable
farther north, was once raised
here as a crop in the early
1900's. A devastating disease
destroyed that industry but
didn't harm the native musca-
dine grapes.
There are now over 100
improved cultivars of mus-
cadine grapes with different
colors, sizes, and flavors.


Uses for these grapes include
jelly, juice and wine. And, of
course, munching. Several
of my munching favorites
are Black Beauty, Southern
Home, Fry and Summit
Black Beauty is a huge,
sweet grape with nearly black
skin. Summit is a very sweet,
medium sized grape. Fry, a
large bronze grape, is prob-
ably the most popular. My
favorite, Southern Home, is a
winner in two ways. First, it is
a delicious dark grape. And
because the leaves have such
an unusual feathery shape, it
also serves as a very attractive
ornamental vine.
Read more about starting
your own memorable grape


arbor at http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/hs100 Ask the Master
Gardeners by calling the
Extension Office, or visit them
on Wednesday afternoons at
the Fort White Library.
Attend our UF/IFAS
Extension program, -Back to
Basics Growing Food for
the Fanily'. This five-session
course, beginning February
28th, covers edible landscap-
ing, fruits, and vegetable
gardening. Call 753-5384 for
details.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent' with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences.


Retirement



the second time around











2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012



New federal map for what


to plant reflects warming


ASSOCIATED P
The Xoloitzcuintli, left, previously known as the Mexican
Hairless and the Norwegian Lundehund, right.


Westminster

introduces 6

new breeds


to competition


BY SUE MANNING
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES- Six dogs
will make history this year
as the newest breeds eligible
to compete at Westminster. If
they have visions of winning,
though, history is against
them.
The names of some of
these rookie breeds compet-
ing in this year's Westminster
Kennel Club Dog Show on
Feb. 13-14 at Madison Square
Garden are a mouthful: 'the
.Entlebucher mountain dog,
the Norwegian Lundehund,
the American English
coonhound, the Finnish
Lapphund, the Cesky terrier
and the Xoloitzcuintli, previ-
ously known as the Mexican
Hairless.
The six new breeds bring to
185 the number that will com-
pete this year for the best of
show grand prize, in the annu-
al contest, the oldest sporting
event in the United States next
to the Kentucky Derby, said
David Frei, the club's director
of communications and& the
USA Network show host
In 1990, there were 142 eli-
gible breeds. ...
This is no limit on the num-
ber of new breedr-tth t can be
admitted each year. buttherel&
are strict criteria. For the last
12 years, no more than six
rookies have been approved
in any year. Frei said.
Before the American
Kennel Club will approve a
new breed, there must be a
significant number of the dogs
in the United States as well
as a breed club to oversee
enthusiasts and geographic
diversity.
The rookies will compete
with all the other dogs but
they won't be a good bet to
win best in show.
Frei ;said the rookie that


Cesky terrier


Entlebucher mountain d


American English coonh

rose to the top and bE
best in show fastest w:
Bichon Frise. That
made its debut in 197
was named best of sh
2001, a 27-year gap.


TASTE BUDDIES:

The Players Club:

Continued From Page 1D


fried fish finger basket and
Jalapeno Cheese Burger.
The fish finger basket
came with four nicely sea-
soned and crispy strips of
fish, a huge serving of fries
and creamy coleslaw. Not
for the faint of heart, the
Jalapeno Cheese Burger is
cooked to order, tasty black
angus beef and loaded with
a creamy cheddar sauce
and saut6ed jalapenos. At
first glance, you might not
think you can eat the whole
thing, but by golly, it's so
good you'll try your best!
Give The Players Club


Seafood Bar & Grill a try,
you won't be disappointed!
Located at 2888 US
Highway 90 West Open
Monday Thursday 10:00
am Midnight; Friday and
Saturday 10:00 am 1:00
am and Sundays, noon to
Midnight.
* Genie Norman and Mary
Kay Hollingsworth are
Columbia County residents
who love good food and fun,
at home and out. Their col-
umn on area restaurants
appears twice monthly.
You can contact them at
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@
gmail.com.


ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCEMENT

Algarin-Baugh .-'. -. 4',
Debbie Baugh "'
of Lake City
is pleased to ',, .%
announce the
engagementofher
son, Jason Baugh
(Orlando, Fla.) to
Carolyn Algarin
(Poinciana, Fla.).
Carol is the daugh-
ter of Esnaldo and
Judy Algarin of
Poinciana, Fla.
The wedding is
scheduled for
April in Orlando.


3


BY SETH BORENSTEIN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Global
s warming is hitting not just
home, but garden. The govern-
ment's colorful map of planting
zones, most often seen on the
back of seed packets, is chang-
ing, illustrating a hotter 21st
century.
An update of the official
guide for 80 million gardeners
reflects a new reality: The cold-
est day of the year isn't as cold
as it used to be. So some plants
and trees that once seemed
too vulnerable to cold can now
survive farther north.
Ifs the first time since 1990
that the U.S. Department of
Agriculture has updated the
map and much has changed.
Nearly entire states, such as
Ohio, Nebraska and Texas, are
in warmer zones.
The new guide, unveiled
Wednesday at the National
Arboretum, also uses better
weather data and offers more
interactive technology. For the
first time it takes into factors
such as how cities are hotter
than suburbs and rural areas,
nearby large bodies of water,
prevailing winds, and the slope
of land.
"It truly does reflect state
of the art," said USDA chief.
scientist Catherine Woteki.
Gardeners can register their
zip code into the online map
and their zone will pop up. It
shows the exact average cold-
est temperature for each zip
code. The 26 zones, however,
are based on five degree incre-
ments.
For example, Des Moines,
Iowa, used to be in zone 5a,
meaning the lowest tempera-


Manager Jerry Holub looks at seed packages on display at the Earl May Nursery and Garden
Center in Des Moines, Iowa, in this Jan. 24 photo. The USDA announced Jan. 25 new maps for
plant hardiness zones, a key to determine which plants can survive in what parts of the country. The
government's official guide of colorful planting zones is being updated for a warmer 21st century.


toure on average was between
minus 15 and minus 20 degrees
Fahrenheit Now its 5b, which
has a coldest temperature of
10 to 15 degrees below zero.
"People who grow plants are
well aware of the fact that tem-
peratures have gotten more
mild throughout the year, par-
ticularly in the winter time,"
said Boston University biology
professor Richard Primack.
'There's a lot of things you can
grow now that you couldn't
grow before."
He uses the giant fig tree in
his suburban Boston yard as
an example.
"People don't think of figs
as a crop you can grow in
the Boston area. You can do it


now," he said.
In the old 1990 map, the
USDA mentions 34 different
U.S. cities on its key. Eighteen
of those, including Honolulu,
St Louis, Des Moines, St
Paul and even Fairbanks,
are in newer warmer zones.
Agriculture officials said they
didn't examine the map to
see how much of the map
has changed for the hotter.
But Mark Kaplan, the New
York meteorologist who co-
created the 1990 map and a
2003 update that. the USDA
didn't use, said the latest ver-
sion clearly shows warmer
zones migrating north. Other
experts agreed.
The 1990 map was based


on temperatures from 1974 to
1986; the new map from 1976
to 2005. The nation's average
temperature from 1976 to 2005
was two-thirds of a degree
warmer than for the old time
.period, according to statistics
at the National Climatic Data
Center.
. USDA spokeswoman Kim
Kaplan, who was part of the
map team, repeatedly tried
to distance the new zones in
the map from global warming
issues. She said even though
much of the country is in
warmer zones, the map "'is
simply not a good instrument"
to demonstrate climate change
because it is based on just the
coldest days of the year.


RETIREMENT: The second time around
SRETIREMENT: The second time around'


log Continued From Page 1D
r;i14" me if they could pay noth-
ing, they were charged
nothing."
After counseling trou-
bled couples, Fountain said
it was rewarding to see
.N the couples together as a
family at a restaurant or
football game.
A. He was pastor of New
Oak Grove Baptist Church
hound i Alachua for 18 years
beginning in 1957. From I
became 1977 to 1994 Fountain I
as the was the founding pastor
breed of Berea Baptist Church
4. and of Lake City. While there
ow in he earned a master of
ministry from Luther Rice
Seminary. He worked six
years as the senior pastor
of First Baptist Church
of Cross City beginning
in 1994. He was served
as interim pastor at First
Baptist Church of Trenton
and First Baptist Church of


1 .. ..
,,,, .- - '.--





China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Hannah Herdon
Yoric Erb-Summers
March 3, 2012

Jaci Chapman
Chris Ward '
April 14, 2012

Avery Crapps
Thomas Olmsted
May 27, 2012
We know exactly what they
want in a wedding or shower
gift. We update their list as gifts
are purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEVLEELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
Downtown
752-5470


Jasper.
Fountain said he
attempted retirement in
2000, but 13 hours later a
church contacted him in
need of a pastor.
"I don't golf, hunt or fish,
generally I put that time
into ministry," he said.
Fountain and his wife
have four daughters,
Alisande Mayer, a librarian;
Leigh Ann Mills, an office
manager; Kristi Plemons,
a librarian and Dana
Mostashari, an attorney.
He credits his two
daughters' library work to
the family's love of read-
ing. "We are a reading fam-
ily," he said. -
Fountain said he writes
Christian nonfiction, draw-


ing on his owi experienc-
es. He published a novel,
"Gradually Forgetting
Righteousness," in 2009.
Mills, who works at
Metal Masters in Lake
City, said customers and
friends often ask about
her father and tell her how
much he touched their
lives.
Living in Columbia
County most of his life,
Fountain said he has
watched the area grow
and move closer to the
interstate. Growing up
the population was about
7,000, he said. 'There were
77 people in my senior
class."
He said he remembers
when the downtown area


was full of people and
- anevening at the Lake
Theater cost 15 cents.
As a child Fountain said
he used to fish with his
father, George Fountain,
on Lake' Lona in Lake City.
Now he lives on the lake.
"I never thought I'd reach
a point where I could own,
that piece of property."
"We feel extremely
blessed,"\he said. "We are
very comfortable."
Fountain said he likes
to refer to retirement as
changing lanes. He plans
to stay active with writing,
frequent walks with his
wife and ministry work.
"We remain absolutely
open to the leadership of
God in our life," he said.


Stop by the

Lake City Reporter v

for your complinilmentiia y-

engagement package.






















*4





Complimentary
Engagement Package












LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


DEAR ABBY


Man wants to cook up a storm


without thunder from his wife


DEAR ABBY: I'm fortunate
to be married to an amaz-
ing woman. There's just one
problem. She's convinced that
I'm going to burn down the
house. She constantly nags
me when I'm cooking, even
when I'm literally standing
over the pots. I find her tone -
and the idea that I don't know
how to use a stove insulting.
She insists I have the burner
on too high when I'm making
spaghetti, and it will somehow
result in a catastrophe far
worse than a ruined meal. I
find it extremely annoying
because I am 30, served my
country honorably in Iraq, have
been main" spaghetti since I
was 12 and have never caused
any sort of kitchen fire.
My wife hasn't cooked for
me in more than a year. That
doesn't upset me because I
know she works hard to earn
money for our family.,But if
she doesn't cook for me and
I'm not allowed to cook for me,
then how am I supposed to eat?
Is there anything I can do
to make my wife understand
that I can be trusted to make
a simple meal on a simple
' stove?- PASTA GUY IN
SPHILLY
DEAR PASTA GUY: Probably
not, 9fyou haven't been able to
convey that message in more
than a year. So insist that she
stay out of the kitchen while
you're cooking, or prepare your
meals after she has left for work.
Or expand your repertoire
beyond spaghetti and make a
salad instead.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

*'* ** **
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 15-
year-old high school student
with a wonderful life, but I'm
not happy. I get good grades,
have many great friends, a
weekend job and an amazing
boyfriend. (He's 17.)
The problem is I'm bored.
I have had only one technical
boyfriend besides the one I
have now. I had two "flings"
where I got involved with
guys without an official or
physical relationship. I know
most teenagers would kill for
a boyfriend like mine who
buys them things and tells
them they're beautiful. But
I want a relationship with-
ups and downs drama and
fighting. Am I crazy to want
to date other people, or is this
normal? LOST IN LOVE
DEAR LOST IN LOVE:
You're not crazy. It is normal
for some teenage girls to want
variety. However, please don't
equate the kind of drama you
see on TV and in films with
what real life is supposed to be
about Relationships filled with
drama and fighting do not have
happy outcomes. They can lead


to bruised hearts and some-
times violence.
If you want to end the rela-
tionship with your boyfriend,
by all means do so. But
before you become involved
in the kind of relationship
you think would be exciting,
please discuss it with your
mother or another trusted
adult, because a mature per-
son with insight should share
some of it with you.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My mother
gives gifts sometimes very
generous ones but always
with strings attached. She
also keeps a record of which
recipients have responded
with appropriate gratitude
(cards, phone calls) and those
who have not. Those individu-
als on the "not" list are ridi-
culed behind their backs and
.slighted in other ways.
My mother considers
herself a "good Christian,"
but I believe her actions are
selfish, and I have conflict- '
ing emotions when I receive
gifts from her. What do yo.u
think? CONFLICTED IN
WISCONSIN
DEAR CONFLICTED:
I think you should always
thank your mother graciously
and appropriately for her gen-
erosity when she gives you a
gift, if only because it is con-
sidered good manners.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Keep your pace consis-
tent and you will set a new
standard for the competi-
tion. Don't allow change to
slow you down. Instead, let
it illustrate your ability to
react, redirect and diversify
to impress and secure your
position. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): The question is whether
to proceed or hang back. You
mustn't allow others to see
your uncertainty or judge
you on your performance.
Keep a low profile until you
know what you should do.
Damage control may be
required. ***A
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You know exactly what
to say in order to get what
you want. Forge ahead
with your plans but make
sure you put aside time to
rejuvenate. Health issues or
injuries must be avoided at
all costs, or you will face set-
backs. k****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't make snap deci-
sions based on emotions.
Focus on love and family, and
do what you can to improve
your relationships with the .


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

people who count in your life.
Don't limit the possibilities;
strive to get the best and the
most out of everything. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You'll receive interesting
information that will help
you make alterations to your
overhead, as well as your
assets. Buying and selling
will bring the changes you
need to move forward with
your latest plans and con-
cerns. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Forward thinking will help
you reach your destination
mentally, physically or philo-
sophically. Share your inten-
tions with someone you want
to spend more time with.
Love is highlighted. Plan a
romantic evening to enhance
your relationship. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
Put your best foot forward.
Engage in interesting new
pastimes and do your best
to share what you have with
someone special. Opportunity
will develop through the
people you meet and the ones


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people past and present.
Each better in the cpher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: W equals V
" HU PR FKX SRZZ RWH Z OSTM HRO ST
Y KGR BRTB Z R OM HFG, PR F KX KZOT
SRZZ JTTC YVSNO SN KS Y KGR SNR Y
PRZZ." M.P. UKOOAHXCRM

Previous Solution: "If God is a DJ. then life is a dance floor; love is the rhythm,
and you are the music." Pink
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-30


who have always been there
for you. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Take action. Failing to
follow through will not bode
well for your reputation. It's
vital that your points and
concerns are heard and
addressed. Set the precedent
and everyone will get on
board. ***
SAG1ITARIUS (Nov..22-
Dec. 21).: Make the initial
alterations at home, and'the
people who have the most
to offer will try to accom-
modate you. It's important to
feel comfortable in your own
surroundings, so make sure
what you do is for you, not
someone else. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Emotions will skyrocket
if you are too verbal or erratic.
Set a guideline for others tb
follow without offending or
abusing someone's trust in
you. Suggestions coupled with
diplomacy will work best **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You need a change in
order to hold your interest.
Consider ways to utilize what
you already know and apply
your skills to an entirely dif-
ferent genre. Expansion can
be good, as long as you don't
offer something you cannot
deliver. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Aggressive action will
help you engage in some-
thing that exhilarates, stimu-
lates and inspires you to do
something unique or chal-
lenging. The sense of accom-
plishment you gain will boost
your confidence and enhance
your reputation. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


SNOW WHITE'S EMPLOYMENT AGENCY By Adam Fromm / Edited by Will Shortz 4 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 1415 16 17


Across
1 Colo. __, Colo.
4 1040 preparer, for
short
7 Heartbeat
13 Plied with spirits
18 Shakespeare
20 National
Forensic League
skill
22 Rare violin
23 Royal house until
the early 20th
century
24 Bad occupation
for Sleepy?
26 One
27 Head of. ancient
Sparta?
28 Hardest to ship,
say
29 Bad occupation
for Happy?
31 Bit of wear for a
fop
32 Hero who
debuted in Weird
Tales magazine.
in 1932
33 M.A. hopeful's
ordeal
34 Like Oscar
Wilde's humor
37 Ruler in a robe
41 Touch while
running
42 Home of two
M.L.B. teams
44 Villains in
1939's
"Stagecoach"
48 Last
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554. -


50,Ones running
away with the
game?
54 Mrs. Robinson's
daughter
55 Having hands, .
maybe
57 Bad occupation
for Sneezy?
59 More than
quarter of the
eartli's crust, by
mass
61 Longtime Yankee
nickname
62 Spot for a flame
63 Bad occupation
for Grumpy?
69 2000 musical
with .the song
"Fortune Favors
the Brave"
70 Diplomatic, say
71 Some juices
73 Bad occupation
for Dopey?
79 Grippers
80 Spanish dish
81 Classic figure in
a top hat
83 It qeeds to be fed
'frequently
84 Best in the
market
86 Last word of
"Finnegans
Wake"
87 .-- Canals
89 Gives a darn?
90 Bridge maker's
deg.
91 Biblical mount
93 Singer John
95 Common tattoo
spot
98 Bad occupation
for Doc?
105 Hippocampus
hippocampus,
e.g.


108 Mishmashes
109 Employee of the
month award,
say
110 Bad occupation
for Bashful?
112 Waldorf salad:
ingredients
113 Sports anchor
Rich
114 Attacked ground
unit$, in a way
115 Honchos.
116 Lands in a
puddle, maybe
117 Accent
118 ___-Magnon
119'_-_-la-la

Down
1 Kerri .., U.S.
gymnastics star
at the 1996
Olympics
2 45 player
3 Pay up
4 Cave _
5 One going to
market
6 Daily or weekly:
Abbr.
7 "Friends" role
8 (0,0), on a graph
9 Eruption sight
10 Frome"
11 A picky person
may pick one
12 Trailer
attachment
13 Bananas
14 "Somebody shot
mee!" j
15 Questionnaire
blank
16 Airport postings,
for short
17 Force


19 Subject of dozens
of Degas
paintings
21 Vertigo symptom
25 Group with the
1995 #1 hit
' '' waterfallss"
27 Honor like a
troubadour
30 Bar that shrinks
33 Miss
34 Like four U.S.
presidents
35 Mathematician
I Descartes
36 River to the
North Sea
37 Chapters in
history
38 Half note
39 Novelist Calvino
40 Like lanterns at
the start of
evening
42 Log
43 Big bother-
.45 Degree of
interest?
46 "VoilA!"
47 Fire
49 Convivial
51 Jai ___
52 Funeral song in
Scotland
53 Cuts
56 Become a
YouTube
sensation
58 Finally edible
60 Zip .
64 Duo with the
2003 hit "All the
Things She Said"
65 Levi's alternative
66 Actors
MacLachlan and
Chandler
67 Serve up some
ham?


68 Extend, in a way
72 Georgia and ,i
Moldova, once:
Abbr.
73 Like two peas in

74 Hail
75 Is allowed (to)
76 Overhead
transports
77 Tolkien's tree
creatures
78 Some Jamaicans


82 "Switched-On
Bach"
instrument
85. Snares
88 Not a great hand
for raising
92 Surgical inserts
93 Aristocracies
94 Big name in
insurance
95 [Give me the
worm! Give me
the worm!]


96 Hallmark of the .
Philadelphia
sound
97 Sounds of
hesitation
98 Relating to the
palm of the hand
99 Apple software
bundle that
includes
GarageBand
100 Volunteer's cry
101 "Shoot!"
102 Disgruntled
worker's parting
cry


103 External
104 "The
Gondoliers"
bride
105 Ballet bit
106 Malevolent
107 Lhasa __
111 "Either
plagiarism or
revolution," per
Paul Gauguin
112 Fighters' org.


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
COLDCASE ZAPS PHASE
OP ERATOR DEE PHALANX
C'A STILE NSP AIN S3RBIETS
ALT IMS TIM SAINTS

A BEMOT IClN OLBAG




NAE TKOD AIRER HERB
SI TSRA NIINGCATSANDDOGS

MAT E GROPE C LIME EBON
A BCS TEND FA I R DWEEBS
SOO PHL KARMA LEGREE
ADMIRE I NIT ENDED SRI
MESMER NOMINATE
LAPU R GAD LGA LIV
MI RACE EUS M AC I N A
EPITHET IGE T EARMARKS
H-ONIE-YS COSY DR ERASE


9 3 '8 4


2 4 6 7


6 8 9


8 2 5 3

3 8 1


6 4 2 9


7 6 5


1 5 2


8 5 3 1


6 L L.7 VEt998


S 89 L 9 L 6 8 9


E7 9L 968 L9L





L L 8 9, 69


9 17 9 L 6 Z 8 L


9 Z L 6 l L 89 8


L 6 8 L 8 9 9 VZ


V 9 8 Z 9 L L 6


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415










4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2012


Newbery,
Caldecott
winners
announced

BY HILLEL ITALIE
Associated,Press
NEW YORK Jack
Gantos' "Dead End in
Norvelf't" has won the John
Newbery Medal for the best
children's book of 2011.
Chris Raschka's "A Ball for
Daisy" won the Randolph
Caldecott award for best
illustrated story.
The Newbery and
Caldecott prizes, the most
prestigious in children's lit-
erature, were announced
Monday by the American
Library Association during
its "Midwinter Meeting" in
Dallas. No cash prizes are
given; but the awards are
watched closely by booksell-
ers and librarians and often
lead to increased sales and
a lasting place on a school
or store bookshelf. Previous
winners include such
favorites as Louis Sachar's
"Holes" and Brian Selznick's
"The Invention of Hugo
Cabret," the basis for Martin
Scorsese's film "Hugo."
Gantos' novel follows the
improbable adventures of a
boy named "Jack Gantos,"
grounded from a family
vacation, but restored by the
stories he learns about his
hometown. Raschka's pic-
ture book recounts the saga
of a dog whose favorite toy
is destroyed. Both winners
are well established in chil-
dren's publishing. Gantos,
60, has been a finalist for
the Newbery and National
Book Award. Raschka, '52,
won the Caldecott in 2006
for 'The Hello, Goodbye
Window." .
Numerous other win-
ners were announced
Monday, :including John
Corey Whaley's "Where
Things Come Back," which
received the Michael L
Printz Award for best young
adult literature; and Kadir
Nelson's "Heart and Soul,"
winner of the Coretta Scott.
King Book Award for best
African-American story.


Effort outfits Super Bowl



volunteers with scarves


Thousands of scarf-makers,
from great-grandmothers
to prison inmates, put in hours
of work on the 6-foot-long scarves.


BY RICK CALLAHAN
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS A
nationwide army of knitters,
crocheters and weavers has
created more than 13,000
blue-and-white scarves to
help keep Super Bowl vol-
unteers warm and highly
visible when the big game
comes to this cold-weather
city.
Thousands of scarf-mak-
ers, from great-grandmoth-
ers to prison inmates, put in
hours of work on the 6-foot-
long scarves.
Super Bowl organizers
hoped to get 8,000 scarves
one for each volunteer.
They ended up with thou-
sands more, sent from 45
states, as well as Belgium,
Canada, South Africa and
the United Kingdom.
The. designs vary widely,
from simple blue'and-white
stripes to intricately plotted
Super Bowl themes.
The idea behind .the
Super Scarves program was
to give the unpaid volun-
teers "a warm thank you" to
keep them snug during the
week leading up to the Feb.
5 game and make it easy for
.visitors to the city to iden-
tify someone who can give
directions and other help,
said host committee spokes-
woman Dianna Boyce.
She said the scarves pro-
gram was inspired by a simi-
lar effort staged a few years
ago by the Special Olympics.'
Each scarf is adorned with
an official Super Bowl host-
city patch all sewn on
by inmates at the Indiana
Women's Prison.


Bev Meska, an 82-year-
old retired school secretary
from Michigan City, Ind.,
was the most prolific of the
more than 3,000 Super Bowl
scarf-makers. She planned
on crocheting only a few
when she set to work in
April 2010, after her daugh-
ter emailed her a link to the
project website.
But Meska, who's been
crocheting since age 16
and has made hundreds of
afghans over the decades,
ended up creating a stag-
gering 250 scarves by
November's deadline. She
estimates she spent three
to four hours on each one,
using crocheting's single-
hooked needle. Each of her
scarves sports tasseled or
fringed ends.
Every day, Meska said,
she used her spare time to
work on the scarves, often
as she and her 12-year-old
great-grandson, Ben Fore-
Knight, watched sport-
ing events, including NFL
games. She said Ben kept
encouraging her to make
more. During the summers,
she took her scarf work to
nearby Lake Michigan.
"I crocheted everywhere
- even down on the beach.
I took my lawn chair and bas-
ket down there and worked
away on them," she said.
Meanwhile, a group of
inmates at a state prison in
Indianapolis who call them-'
selves the Naptown Knitters
were learning how to knit,
guided by prison volunteer
Doreen Tatnall.


-17



ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bev Meska of Michigan City, Ind., works on a scarf in
Indianapolis in this Noy, 11, 2011 photo. Meska crocheted about
250 scarves for a "Super Scarves" program the Indianapolis
Super Bowl host committee started to outfit Super Bowl volun-
teers with easily recognizable blue and white scarves.


Tatnall, a real estate
agent, didn't know how to
knit either when she started.
But she and 17 inmates at
the 350-inmate Indianapolis
Re-Entry Educational
Facility, where inmates go
as their release date nears,
learned together by follow-
ing YouTube instructional
videos.
The men slowly picked up
speed, creating more than
two dozen scarves. Two
prison staff members who
knew how to knit gave them
lessons during their twice-


weekly, two-hour sessions.
"Once you get the hang of
it, it's kind of calming. Some
of the men said that for a
couple of hours they forgot
where they were," Tatnall
said.
Steve Jordan, a 44-year-
old from Kokomo who is,
due for release the day after
the Super Bowl, made three
scarves and said he would
have made more if not for
a prison rule forbidding
inmates from taken their
plastic knitting needles back
to their cells.


Jordan, who is finishing
out a murder sentence, said
the courses were a nice
break from the monotony of
prison life.
"Here's a group of a guys
sitting around knitting,
something we normally
don't have inside prison. No
tension, everybody just sit-
ting back and laughing. And
knitting," he said.
Elsewhere, Belinda
Martinez of St Paul, Minn.,
'knitted 46 scarves, some
with elaborate Super Bowl
or football designs. One
captures in yarn the game's
kickoff, showing a player's
leg down to the shoe making
contact with the ball.
Another pays homage
to late "Peanuts" creator
Charles Schulz, a Minnesota
native, rendering in comic-
strip style the moment when
hapless Charlie Brown once
again tries to kick a foot-
ball held by Lucy, who, once
again snatches it away.
Martinez let her patrio-
tism show in other scarves,
including one that includes
the first verse of the National
Anthem on one side, and
a traditional Scandinavian
design on the other.
She also knit a striped,
blue-and-white "Uni-Scarf"
jumpsuit for the Indianapolis
Colts' mascot, a horse named
Blue, to promote the Super
Scarves project
Because many of her
designs are complex,
Martinez, 58, charts her
work first on graph paper.
She'd often knit while watch-
ing football and rooting for
Midwestern teams.
"I've been teasing, my two
brothers fora long time that
knitting goes with football,
and now I have so much
proof that I was right," she
said.