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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01760
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 25, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01760
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








000017 120312 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
,205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
I GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Y


Reporter


Wednesday, January 25, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 305 e 75 cents


Scrap to

Music

leader,

71, dies


Funeral services
set for Raymond
Macatee.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@iakecityreporter. com

A funeral mass will be
held Thursday to pay trib-
ute to Raymond Macatee,
the man who created the
Scrap to Music program
that led to the donation
of more than 400 instru-
ments for music programs
in Columbia County.
M r
Macatee's
service is 11
a.m. at the
Epiphany
Church, Macatee
with Father
Michael
Pendergraft officiating.
Mr. Macatee, 71, died
Thursday after a. brief ill-
ness. The Philadelphia
native moved to Lake
City 23 years ago, where
he worked as a machinist
and welder until his health
began failing.
He was the Native
American chaplain for the
Florida Prison system. He
also owned and operated
Macatee's Mobile Home
Park.
MACATEE continued on 3A


Business

trailblazer

dies at 89

Myrtle Wall was an
entrepreneur in
local community.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Local businesswoman
Myrtle Wall, a trailblazer for
women in the local business
community, died Monday.
She was 89.
Janet Creel of Hallmark
Reality said she knew Wall
for nearly 43 years.
"She was really a fron-
tier lady," Creel said, speak-
ing of Wall's influence as a
local businesswoman. "She
was one
of the first


busowned sev-
women e's Butto
stand upfood restaurants
and be rec-
ognizedoin



Creelmunity. Sheaid Wall also
owned sev-King Karl's Seafood
Restau rant.
lady aChicken; It was onk the of therd
first fast food restaurants who


she was," Creel said.
Wall retired close to two
years ago after working well
WALL continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Police Sgt. Jason Byrd (from left) and Investigators Mitchell Cline and David
Greear display the police Medal of Honor they received Tuesday during the Lake City
Police Department's 2011 Annual Awards Banquet held at Christ Central Ministries
Fellowship Hall. They were also awarded Purple Heart medals.



Four heroes


get their due


Officers honored for role
in September standoff,
performance year-round.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com


.W at
the
W WDep
T out
moment of the
department's annu-
al award banquet
Tuesday night.
The three offi-
cers who were
wounded when a
gunman opened
fire on them in
late September
were recognized
for their bravery
and dedication to
serving the public.
,A member of their
team who wasn't
hit was cited for
his .heroism under
fire.
Their awards'
and medals were
just a few of the


could have been a
anunity tiag-dy 'for:
Lake City Police
apartment turned
to be the defining


were awarded and recognized for a
year of service and achievements at the
department's annual banquet.
The City Police Department's 2011
Annual Award Banquet took place
Tuesday night at the Christ Central
Ministries Fellowship Hall with more
than 50 officers and their family mem-
bers in attendance. Several city officials
also attended the ceremony.
Officer Mitchel] Cline, Investigator
Da id Greear and Sgt.. Jason Byrd
received the Police Purple Heart medal.
They and Sgt. Andy Miles also received


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mayor Stephen Witt (left) congratulates and
thanks Lake City Police Investigator Sgt.
Andy Miles after Miles received the Medal of
Honor Tuesday.


more than 40 given to officers and com-
munity members during the event.
Lake City Police Department officers


the Medal of
Honor, the high-
est achievement a
police officer can
receive for their
acts of heroism
during the shoot-
ing.
"It's outstand-
ing to get the
awards," Cline
said. "I'm glad the
department rep-
resented me with
these awards and
I can represent
the department
as well."
Greear said it
was a real honor
to get the awards
in a ceremony
with his peers and


colleagues present.
HEROES continued on 6A


More help for homeless kids


LAURA HAMPSONILake City Reporter
S&S Food Sores donated $6,250 to the Columbia County School District Homeless
Education Program at Tuesday night's school board meeting. Pictured are Michael Millikin,
Columbia County School District superintendent; Keith Brown, vice president of marketing
for S&S Food Stores; Dana Huggins, homeless education liaison; Lisa Gandiana, district
supervisor for S&S; and Steve Nelson, school board chairman. The money will be used
to provide basic necessities to about 385 homeless children in the county. Funded by the
state, the homeless education program can provide students with educational supplies
but must rely on the community to provide food, clothing and hygiene items. "We are just
so blessed," said Huggins. "This is a very giving and kind community." In November S&S
employees purchased food and clothing for homeless students. Brown said the company
decided to support the homeless program after discussing it at a school advisory meeting
and reading about the program in the Lake City Reporter.


Santorum



cancels



visit to



Lake City


Presidential
hopeful's staffer
takes blame.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.comrn

Lake City residents are
going to have to wait lon-
ger maybe a lot longer
- for the first presidential
candidate to come to town.
Rick Santorum's campaign
stump scheduled Thursday
at the Lake City Mall has
been canceled.
Sharon Higgins, secre-
tary of the North Central
Florida Tea Party, said
the state chairman for
Santorum's campaign con-'
tacted her Monday and.
told her the Lake City
visit is canceled because
of some activities he must
attend before Thursday
night's Republican presi-
dential' candidate debate
at the University of North
Florida.
"I think it stinks," Higgins
said. "I couldn't tell you the
hours I spent on this. I think


he missed a chance to meet
the people and get a differ-
ent perspective on Florida."
Organizers for
Santorum's campaign said
the conflict was the fault of '
people scheduling his pub-
lic appearances.
"Please understand this
is completely my fault," said
Jesse Biter, a Santorum
campaign staff member.
"I scheduled the day not
knowing





"try to fig- Santorum
ure out a
way that we
can repay the folks in Lake
City for my mistake.
"Perhaps once Rick is
our nominee, we can make
Lake City the first stop in
Florida," Biter wrote in an
e-mail to Tea Party mem-
bers who invited him to
Lake City. "Please don't let
my mistake reflect negative-
VISIT continued on 3A


Obama calls for

flurry of help to

aid middle class


Wants higher taxes
for millionaires in
State of Union
By BEN FELLER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Declaring the American
dream under siege, President
Barack Obama called
Tuesday night for a flurry
of help for a hurting middle
class and higher taxes on mil-
lionaires, delivering a State of
the Union address filled with
re-election themes. Restoring
a fair shot for all, Obama said,
is "the ,defining issue of our
time."


Obama outlined a vastly
different vision for fixing
the country than the one
pressed by the Republicans
challenging him in
Congress and fighting to
take his job. He pleaded
for an active government
that ensures economic fair-
ness for everyone, -as his
opponents demand that the
government back off and let
the free market rule.
Standing in front of a
divided Congress, with
bleak hope this election
year for his legislative agen-
da, Obama spoke with vot-
ers in mind.
UNION continued on 3A


Shining Star school

gets final board OK


By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakeityreporter.com

Columbia County School
Board members approved
the contract for the first
charter school in the county
Tuesday night at the school
board meeting.
Shining Star Academy of
the the Arts can now enroll
up to 288 students for the
2012-13 school year.
As a charter school,
Shining Star is publicly


funded and privately man-
aged. It is open to students
in pre-kindergarten to sixth
grade. The school's curricu-
lum will focus on instruc-
tion in music, art, drama,
dance, media and technol-
ogy, said Anthony Buzzella,
principal.
Students are not charged
tuition. The school will
receive about $6,000 per
student, which is the same
funding. for students in
SCHOOLS continued on 3A


CALL US: -
(386) 752- 1293 7
SUBSCRIBE TO :7
THE REPORTER: Partly Cloudy
Voice: 755-5445 aAT ER,
Fax: 752-9400 WETHEl r, 2A


y Opinion
People .
SObituarie
(j .i Advice &
Puzzle- .


................ 4A
..... .... .... 2A
is .............. 5A
Comics ......... 3B
2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Surprise Oscar
ri, i1-ii Il- 18


COMING
THURSDAY
Local- news
r,, i':'i .J' lp


f-. lur~lrrr-j~FI~~~-3~:-~j(eE~-~Z~ ;s~y~~udilSl~j~t~icf*aT'.~,-~i~-~~~












2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


FLORIDA'
0o1 Saturday:
CA-0 11-12-27-35-38-45
x5


Ai:bHs3. Tuesday:
"Afternoon: 3-3-4
Night: 7-3-7


F4 Tuesday:
t ~ Afternoon: 0-1-1-2
Night: 7-3-1-0


Monday:
1-14-21-29-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



More surprises in race for Oscar


In a refreshingly open Oscar
field, the surprises outweighed the
snubs among the varied nominees
announced Tuesday.
The favorites "The Artist,"
"Hugo," "The Descendants" all came
away with their predicted boatloads,
but a pleasant quirkiness followed
with several out-of-left-field nods and a
handful of unlikely curiosities.
One thing is clear The year's mov-
ies were less song and more dance.
Only two nominees were deemed
worthy for best song ("Man or
Muppet" from "The Muppets" and
"Real in Rio" from "Rio"). The silence
of the toe-tapping "The Artist," you
could say, was pervasive.
A look at those that sneaked into
the Academy Awards and the ones
that narrowly missed:
UNBROADCAST NEWS:
Throughout awards season, Albert
Brooks has been hailed for his
against-type performance as a vio-
lent gangster in the neo-noir thriller
"Drive." But Brooks like so many
comedic brethren before him was
" left out from a competitive best-sup-
porting actor category that also omit-
ted Ben Kingsley for "Hugo." Brooks
tweeted, "I got ROBBED. I don't
mean the Oscars, I mean literally. My
pants and shoes have been stolen."
He added, "And to the Academy: 'You
don't like me.,You really don't like
me.'"
KEEP YOUR CLOTHES ON:
The best actor nomination for Demian
Bichir of the immigration drama "A
Better Life" was a shocker. He,. along
with Gary Oldman ("Tinker Tailor
Soldier Spy"), landed a nomination
over some favored heavyweights
in Leonardo DiCaprio (with pros-
thetics in "J. Edgar') and Michael
Fassbender (without prosthetics in
"Shame"). Also on the outside was
Michael Shannon, whose paranoid
1'. ':* 1/ *


performance in 'Take Shelter" may,
prove more memorable than some of
those that were nominated.
MAKING NOISE: The academy
tweaked its best picture category this
year, requiring winning nominees to
receive a certain percentage of votes
for inclusion. Anywhere between five
and 10 films could have been nomi-
nated, and in the end it was nine. The
final spot which was dramatically
revealed last on Tuesday's broad-
cast went to "Extremely Loud and.
Incredibly Close," the 9/11-themed
drama about grief and growing up.
Few of the year's films have been
more polarizing, with most critics
lambasting it for being over-the-top '
sentimental kitsch.
TATTOOED: And then we have
the curious case of 'The Girl With
the Dragon Tattoo." David Fincher's
remake of the Swedish thriller
received a strong five nominations
including Rooney Mara for best
actress (over Charlize Theron in
"Young Adult" and Tilda Swinton in
"We Need to Talk About Kevin'), cin-,
ematography, film editing, sound edit-
ing and sound mixing. Those below-
the-line nominations often signal high
regard for a movie's craft, and thus
a directing nomination. But Fincher
(who was nominated by the Directors
Guild) wasn't selected, and the film
failed to land a best picture nod even
with nine nominees in the best picture
category.
A NEW LEAF: There was always
some mystery about how the acad-
emy would handle Terrence Malick's
ambitious cosmic family drama "The
Tree of Life." A masterpiece to some,
a pretentious hodgepodge with Sean
Penn meandering on escalators to
others, the film is the Herman Cain of
the Oscar race: ardently supported by
its backers, snickered at by its critics.
The backers ivon: The film was nomi-


nated for best picture and Malick for
best director.

Hospital must return
Brooks' $500K donation
CLAREMORE, Okla. An
Oklahoma hospital in Garth Brooks'
hometown must return a $500,000
donation to the country singer
because it failed to build a women's
health center in honor of his late
mother, jurors ruled Tuesday eve-
ning.
Jurors also awarded punitive dam-
ages in Brooks' breach-of-contract
lawsuit against IntegrisCanadian
Valley Regional Hospital inYukon.
Brooks said he thought he'd reached
a deal in 2005 with the hospital's
president, James Moore, but sued
after learning the hospital wanted
to use the money for
other construction
projects.
The hospital
argued that Brooks
gave it unrestricted
access to the money
and only later asked
that it build a wom-
en's center and name Brooks
it after his mother,
Colleen Brooks, who
died of cancer in 1999.
Brooks left the courtroom shortly
after the verdict was read. Jurors
were expected to announce how
much money he would be awarded
in punitive damages later Tuesday
evening.
"Obviously we are disappointed,
particularly with the jury's. decision
to award damages, above and beyond
the $500,000," Integris spokesman
Hardy Watkins said. 'We're just glad
to see the case come to a resolu-
tion."
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


The former presi-
dent of Georgia, Eduard
Shevardnadze, is 84.
Actor Dean Jones is
81.
Movie director Tobe
Hooper is 69.
Actress Leigh Taylor-
Young is 67.
Actress Jenifer Lewis
is 55.
Actress Dinah Manoff


is 54.
X Actress China Kantner
is 41.
* E Actress Mia Kirshner
is 37.
Actress Christine
Lakin is 33.
Rhythm-and-blues
singer Alicia Keys is 31.
Actor Michael
Trevino (TV: "The Vampire
Diaries") is 27.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US -
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage.paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home, delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with'your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
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vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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(Tuesday through Sunday)
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Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates'
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and.clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Prison privatization
plan clears panel
TALLAHASSEE A
House panel cleared its
chamber's version of a
South Florida prison privati-
zation plan on Tuesday with,
a party line vote.
The Justice
Appropriations
Subcommittee passed the
bill (PCB 12-05) by a vote
of 10-5. A Senate commit-
tee approved its version on
Monday.
The Republican propo-
nents of the plan said prison
privatization guarantees
savings to state govern-
ment that can be put toward
education and public health.
Estimates sh6w those sav-
ings at $2245 million a year.
A deal with a private pris-
on, company won't be made
if savings can't be shown in
advance, said Rep. Charles
McBurney, a Jacksonville
Republican and vice-chair of
the panel.
"No savings, no contract,"
.he said.
The House bill requires
at least 7 percent savings.
It also excludes the South
Florida Reception Center,
where inmates are classified
by security risk.
Democratic lawmakers
and correctional workers
still oppose the idea, say-
ing the plan will put state
employees out of work and
reduce public and prisoner
safety.
Rep. Cynthia A. Stafford,
a Miami Democrat, said she
worried that private com-
panies would "cherry pick"
younger, healthier inmates
who are less expensive to
house.
That would leave "the
sickest, the toughest the
worst inmates for the state
to deal with, and that's not
fair," she said.
Last year, the Legislature
passed a South Florida
% prison-privatization plan. But
the state was sued by the
Florida Police Benevolent
Association, the union
that formerly represented


corrections officers. A
judge ruled the plan was
unconstitutional because
it was approved as part of
the annual budget and not
as a separate law. Attorney
General Pam Bondi is
appealing the judge's deci-
sion.,

Panhandle deputy
injured in crash
MILTON Authorities
say a Florida Panhandle
deputy was critically injured
in a crash.
The Florida Highway
Patrol reports that Santa
Rosa County Deputy Patric
Gibson was responding to
an emergency call in Milton
Tuesday afternoon when an
SUV pulled out in front of
him. The deputy's patrol car
rear-ended the SUV, causing
both vehicles to go off the
road.
The deputy was take to
a nearby hospital in critical
condition, but the sheriff's
office later reported that the
injuries weren't life-threaten-
ing. The SUV was taken to a
hospital in fair condition.

Court: Traffic charge
requires license
TALLAHASSEE An
appellate court has agreed
with a Clay County man
that he can't be a habitual
traffic offender if he's
never had a driver's
license.
A First District Court
of Appeal panel split 2-1 in
striking down his felony-
conviction of habitual traf-
fic offender for "driving
while license revoked." It
instead ordered judgment
for the lesser-included
misdemeanor of "driving
without a license."
Chief Judge Robert
T. Benton II and Judge
Nikki Ann Clark say the
Legislature never intended
the first offense to apply
to drivers who have never
gotten a license.
But Judge Simone
Marstiller says the law's


mention of a driver's
license includes the idea of


THE WEATHER


a "driving privilege." PARTLY
CLOUDY
Lawmakers glad to CLOUDY
move up primary
I I J :*'


TALLAHASSEE- .-
Republican lawmakers
who sought to enhance
Florida's role in choosing
their presidential nominee
say they hit the jackpot by
moving up the date.
The state's GOP vot-
ers get their chance next
Tuesday to weigh in on
what has become a wide-
open race among the four
remaining Republican can-
didates.
"It was a risk, but we
thought it was a good
risk," Senate President
Mike Haridopolos said
Tuesday. "Clearly, the eyes
of the nation, if not the
world, are on us."
The Republican-led.
Florida Legislature decid-
ed in 2007 to move up the
state's primary date from
early March to the last
Tuesday in January to gain
a more prominent role in
the selection process.
"We're in the place
where we deserve to be,"
Haridopolos said. "We are
the ultimate bellwether
state in the general elec-
tion, why shouldn't we be
the bellwether in the pri-
maries?"
Haridopolos said that
he supports former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney, but he says he
would be OK with former
House Speaker Newt
Gingrich from neighboring
Georgia.
"I think he (Romney)
has got the business back-
ground that we need, I just
think Romney is ready.
He's got to work for it and
I think that that's a good
thing."
Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island, said the primary
process is a good test for
whoever wins the nomina-
tion.
(AP)


S' 77/55 lJacksonville
Tallahassee Lae City,. 76/56
75 56 9:55"
S nc Gainesville Daytona Beach
Pensacola 7 7'B
S 71 63 Panama City 80 57 77'60
73; 60 Ocala *
S1 57 *


PARTLY SUNNY
CLOUDY H


HI 10 '1 1 HIC LO.41
'. t


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Oilando Cape Canaveral Lake City
80 60 7,762 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
81,,64 West Palm Beach Ocala
79 68 0 Orlando
FL Lauderdale P.anama City
Ft. Myers 79, 71 Pensacola
83.,'61 Naples Tallahassee
83,63 Miami Tampa
Key West 79, 70 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


7L 7 1r


I TEMPERATURES
a High Tuesday
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PRECIPITATION
Tuesday)
Month total
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80
55
67
43
85 in 1949
1 in 1960

0.00"
0.64"
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2.46"
2.46"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset toda)
Sunnse tom.
Sunset ton'm.

MOON
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7:25 a.m.
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8:38 a.m.
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Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb.
30 7 14 21
First Full Last New


Thursday Friday


79 64,pc
79 62 pi:
80. 67' pr.
83 68 p:
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An exclusive
(service
5 brought to
MODEi* our readers
30mniestobun .
Today's by
ultra-vioiet The Weather


radiation risk
for ihe area on
a scale rorom 0
to 1I .


Channel.



weather.com


y k Forecasts, data and
eat he graphics 2012 Weather
7 |II\JCentral, LP, Madison, Wis.
we!te J www.weatherpubllsher.com


7a Ip 7p ta 6a On this date in
Wednesday Thursday 1989, bitter cold
rair coming down
from Alaska settled
over the northern
Rockies. Wilson,
Wyo., reported a
morning low of 48
degrees below zero.


S Fore tedt erare Fees "Le" tapuR iEre


Daily Scripture

"[Doing Good to All] Brothers
and sisters, if someone is caught
in a sin, you who live by the
Spirit should restore that per-
son gently. But watch your-
selves, or you also may be
tempted."

Galatians 6:1 NIV


AROUND FLORIDA


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 3A



Anti-abortion bills get House panel approval


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE-The onslaught
of anti-abortion legislation is
continuing in the Republican-
controlled Florida Legislature,
less than a year after lawmakers
took the most significant steps to


curtail the procedure since pass- Subcommittee on party-line votes ered it.
ing a parental notification law in Republicans for and Democrats "She then had a change of heart
2005. against and decided to keep the baby,"
Three more bills received ini- Several women told the panel Harris said. "I was that baby. I'm
tial committee approval Tuesday they had contemplated an abor- thankful to be alive."
after sometimes emotional and tion or were advised to have one Harris said she also was advised
fiery debate and public testi- but decided not to. Heidi Harris to havean abortion when she was
mony. All cleared the House of Tampa said her mother, a drug- 17, pregnant and unmarried, but
Health & Human Services Access and alcohol -abuser, had consid- that she too declined.


"My mom chose life for me and
I chose life for my son," she said.
One bill (HB 1327) would ban
selective abortions based on the
sex or race of the fetus. Another
(HB 839) would prohibit abor-
tions after 20 weeks of pregnancy
based on a presumption the fetus
can sense pain at that point.


Schools: Shining Star Charter School gets board's OK for 2012-13 school year

Continued From Page 1A


public schools. For addi-
tional funding the school
will rely on grants and
volunteer work, he said.
Transportation, meals and
uniforms will be the par-
ents' responsibility. Artistic
talent is the school's only
prerequisite. '
"This is a greater thrill
I've never known," Buzzella
said about the board's con-
tract approval. The school
will be a wholesome envi-
ronment.with an attitude of
success, he said.
To haveL a dream and
see it through to fruition
is a wonderful feeling, said
Rose E. Grier, chairwoman
for the Shining Star board
of directors.
Buzzella said his only
regret was that his friend
Alfonso Levy passed away


before the school contract
was approved. Levy, who
died in July, was a musician
and founder of the Music,
Art, Drama, Dance Spring
Festival. Levy's widow,
Celestine Levy, serves on
the school's board of direc-
tors in his memory.
Shining Star has already
received applications from
80 prospective students and
30 prospective teachers.
The school plans to hire 16
teachers.
The school will be located
on the current Blake School
campus, 7443 Highway 90
West in Lake City. Interested
parents and students can
apply at shiningstaracad-
emyota.com.
Macatee honored
Raymond Macatee, who


donated more than 400
instruments to Columbia
County music programs,
was honored during the
school board meeting
with a horn and a sign dis-
played in his memory.
Macatee, 71, died
Thursday after a brief ill-
ness. The founder of Scrap
to Music, Macatee solic-
ited scrap metal donations
at his machine shop and
used the proceeds to buy
instruments.
School board members
expressed their condo-
lences to Macatee's family,
calling him a true friend
to the district.
"Hundreds of students
benefitted from his work,"
said Glenn Hunter, school'
board member.
"He and his family did


without to provide for chil-
dren in our district that
weren't his," said Michael
Millikin, Columbia County
School District superin-
tendent.
Columbia ranked 48th
In other news Columbia
County ranked 48 out of
the 67 counties in the state.
The state Department of
Education released the
tanking Monday, one of
the first such in the coun-
try.
The ranking is based on
points earned from FCAT
scores. Columbia County
earned 508 points. The
county was 86 points lower
than top-ranking St. Johns
County and 31 points shy
of making it into the top 20
school districts. Columbia


County earned 97 more
points than Madison
County, which came in
last.
The goal of the ranking
is to make it easier for par-
ents to assess school dis-
trict performances, accord-
ing to a press release from
the department of educa-
tion.
The score is based on
the percent of students
scoring a level three or
higher in reading, math
and science; the percent
of students meeting the
writing standard; the per-
cent of students making
learning gains in reading
and math; and the percent
of the lowest performing
students making learning
gains in reading and math.
Next the state will


release a list of individual
schools ranked by number
and divided into elementa-
ry, middle and high school
groups.
District officials were
given little notice before the
rankings were released.
"I don'tthink it's effective
if it's just FCAT scores,"
Millikin said. There are
other factors to consider
in determining the success
of a school district, such as
poverty rates and gradu-
ation rates, he said. The
scores also did not take
into account the district's
tax base and ability to off-
set a loss in state money.
So far, there has been no
indication that the scores
will be tied to the distri-
bution of state money, he
said.


Union: Obama seeks help for struggling middle class

Continued From Page 1A


"We can either settle for a country
where a shrinking number of people
do really well, while A growing num-
ber of Americans barely get by,"
Obama said. "Or we can restore an
economy where everyone gets a fair
shot, everyone does their fair share,
and everyone plays by the same set
of rules."
A rare wave of unity splashed over
the House chamber at the start. Rep.
Gabrielle Giffords, survivor of an
assassination attempt onie year ago,'
received sustained applause from her


peers and hugs from many. Obama,
too, embraced her as he made his
way to the front.
Lawmakers leapt to their feet when
Obama said near the start of his
speech that terrorist leader Osama
bin Laden, killed by a raid autho-
rized by the president, will no longer
threaten America.
At the core of Obama's speech was
the improving but deeply wounded
economy the matter still driving
Americans' anxiety and the one'likely
to determine the next presidency.


"The state of our union is getting
stronger," Obama said, calibrating
his words as millions remain unem-
ployed. Implicit in his declaration
that the American dream is "within
our reach" was the recognition that,
after three years of an Obama presi-
dency, the country is not there yet
He spoke of restoring basic goals:
owning a home, earning enough to
raise a family, putting a little money
away for retirement.
"We can do this," Obama said. "I
know we can."


Visit: Santorum cancels

visit to Lake City

-Continued From Page 1A


ly on the campaign."
Of course, Santorum's
campaign will have to win
some upcoming primary
elections for him to return
as the Republican nominee
for president. Polls have
him running a distant third
place behind Newt Gingrich
and Mitt Romney in the
Jan. 31 Florida Presidential
Preference Primary.


'The sole purpose of this
rally was to welcome Rick
Santorum to this area. and
give him personal expo-
sure to our local citizens,"
Higgins said. "I can't even
begin to express my frus-
tration that the campaign
could just decide to skip us
for some pre-debate events
that have popped up."


Macatee: Scrap to music leader dies at 71

Continued From Page 1A


Mr. Macatee was a
member of the Knights of
Columbus, Cherokee of
Georgia, Rose Creek Band
and, was designated "chief'
of the Alligator Festival.
His contributions sup-
porting music programs
went beyond Columbia
County, where he earned
praise from educators and
public officials. He also
sent musical instruments


to underprivileged children
across the world so they
could learn and appreciate
music. -
In his spare time, Mr.
Macatee enjoyed black-
smithing, fishing and Native
American studies.
He was preceded in
death by a son, Michael
N. Leon Polhamus. Mr.
Macatee is survived by his
wife, Lorraine Macatee;


a son, David Polhamus,
of Lake City; daughters
Raelien Macatee, of Lake
City and Dawn Macatee,
of Pennsylvania; a sister,
Sister Betty Ann Macatee,
of Cleveland, Ohio; grand-
children Ana Moore, William
Ward, Micheala Polhamus,
Michael Holt, Matthew Slinn,
Lilly Slinn and Elizabeth
Slinn; and great grandson
Connor Robinson.


Interment will' be held
privately at Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens. There
will be no public visitation.
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that memo-
rial donations be made to
Scrap to Music. Donations
may be left at the funeral
home of they can be mailed
to Lorraine Macatee at 158
NE Cherokee Ct, Lake City,
32055.


Wall: Local business trailblazer dies at 89

Continued From Page 1A


into her 80s.
"She was a lady that
wore many hats and affected
many people's lives," Creel
said. "She brought the first
Wendy's to Lake City. We
worked a lot of projects
together, Walgreens and a
lot of other commercial real
estate."
Jim Poole, vice president
for community and legislative
affairs for Haven Hospice,
said Wall had known him his
entire life.


"She was a great lady," he
said. "She was very visionary
and definitely ahead of her
time as far as women in busi-
ness. She was a take charge
person as far as business and
she was a good mentor at
working with others."
Poole said Wall's impact
will be remembered in the
business community.
"I think she'll be remem-
bered for being one of the
hardest working people I've
ever known and for her abil-


ity to work extremely well
with others," he said.
Poole said Wall developed
a lot of businesses through
the years, in addition to her
real estate company.
"She was a great entre-
preneur," he said. "She was
willing to try different things.
She had good business sense
and she never sat still on one
thing and was always devel-
oping something else. She
will definitely be missed. She
was a good friend to many."


Gateway Forest Lawn
Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements.
Viewing will take place
from 6-8 p.m. Friday at
Gateway Funeral Home.
Funeral services will be 1:30
p.m. Saturday at Mt Olive
Baptist Church.


LKO has the largest inventory of
OEM Recycled Auto Parts &
Aftermarket Parts by Keystone




Please call us at
& g386-755-0013 or 888-849-7887
a L e 0o4686 E. US Hwy 90
OEM Recyced Aftemaref by Keystone Lake City, Florida


Visit the Holy Land

without leaving Florida!
Parker Tours of Lake City will host
a bus tour to the magnificent Holy
Land Experience in Orlando on
Thursday, February 23. This unique
park brings together the sights and
sounds of the Bible world of 2,000
years ago! The excursion includes
transportation on a luxurious 56 pas-
senger tour bus, all admissions & dinner afterward
at the popular Sweet Tomatoes buffet. We'll return
in early evening. Pickup in Lake City & Wellborn!
$90 per person. But hurry, deadline is Feb. 2!
Parker Tours (386) 754-8524
Our 17th year of escorted bus tours throughout the US. and Canada!


The Lake City Reporter

would like to congratulate

Lake City Institute of Neurology
on theirlaniary 19, 2012 ribbon cutting ceremonir /or
their new localioni at 4355 A-imerican Lane.


. .. .-





...R ... '.,,S.


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Shannon Dionne Kimberly Davis.
A~llt DOB: 7/17/75
DB:3/3/72 Height: 5'7"
DOB: 3 Weight: 135 Ibs.
p j* '^ Height: 56"
Weight: 225 lbs. Hair: Brown
Hair: Black- Eyes: Brown Eyes: Blue
4 '. Tattoo: Right Leg-Bruce Wanted For: VOP Uttering
Wanted For: VOP Possession of Forgery, Grand Theft III;
Controlled Substance with Intent to VOP Driving While License
Sell or Deliver Suspended or Revoked
WANTED AS OF 1/23/2012
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COLUMBIA COUNTR www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General















OPINION


Wednesday, January 25, 2012


ONE I ---


ONE
OPINION


Romney-


Gingrich


face-off


gets ugly

mainstream
Republicans had
to be dismayed
by Monday's
candidate
debate in Tampa.
Although Rick Santorum and
Ron Paul say they're in the GOP's
nominating race for the duration,
they are increasingly nonfactors,
leaving Mitt Romney and Newt
Gingrich to savage each other for
the front-runner's spot
Romney, who has been map-
ping his presidential bid for six
years, seems curiously apologetic
about two of his biggest achieve-
ments: becoming an enormously
wealthy venture capitalist and
the governor of Massachusetts,
a largely Democratic state where
he enacted a signature health-
care plan that he should be brag-
ging about
For someone who is now basi-
cally a professional politician,
Romney was curiously ill-pre-
pared for the question of his tax
returns, delaying their inevitable
release until they had become an
issue and, a distraction.
When they finally became
public, the returns only con-
firmed what everybody knew or
suspected: Romney is extremely
wealthy. His 2010 income was
$21.6 million, on which he paid a
ridiculously. low, (to the pyerage
taxpayer) bJentiily leggl ax, i
rate of 13.9 percent As an exam-
ple of his tin ear, he claimed to
have been "unemployed" in years
when he was earning in excess of
$20 million from investments.
Gingrich is a throwback to
the '90s, a decade that did not
end particularly well for him.
Hilariously and implausibly, the
former House speaker who, as
the saying goes, came to the cap-
ital to do good and stayed to do
well claims to be a Washington
outsider. That is why Freddie
Mac paid him $1.6 million.
For the Republican estab-
lishment, this has to be a Mrs.
Robinson moment "Where have
you gone, Jeb Bush and Mike
Huckabee and Mitch Daniels and
Haley Barbour and Paul Ryan and
Chris Christie? The GOP turns its
lonely eyes to you."
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to.
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
Work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Newt Gingrich's first 100 days


oin with me in an imag-
ined future, one in which
former House Speaker
Newt Gingrich manages
to grab the Republican
ation for president and
then wins the presidency. It had
helped that President Barack
Obama had decided to wipe out
all of America's 2 million miles
of pipeline because of possible
contamination of the moon.
"Here comes a transforma-
tional first hundred days, much
of it patterned after my hero,
Franklin D. Roosevelt," said
Gingrich, a self-avowed, deter-
mined conservative who nev- ''
ertheless goes orgiastic when
thinking about the New Deal.
He went on to outline his
own Phew Deal at an inaugura-
tion in which he had initially
planned to reintroduce top hats.
The idea was dropped when
none could be found to fit his
swollen head.
"Al, how wonderful it is,"
he said in opening remarks at
his first press conference the
next day. He lost his compo-
sure, though, when a reporter
asked why his whole White
House staff had just resigned.
Gingrich took a swing at him
and missed, although he did
land some verbal blows about
liberal media always looking to
embarrass conservatives not
just with old news treated as
new news, but sometimes with
new news treated as new news.
The public loved it, inundat-
ing the White House with favor-
able emails. Some residents of
South Carolina wrote that they
were so enthused they had
gone out and tried to vote for
him for a third time, counting
the primary, though the hated
establishment made it perplex-
ingly difficult.


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojao@aol.com


"Here we are at Day Two,
ready to keep on rolling,"
Gingrich said at his next press
conference. He announced he
was keeping up with the kind
of history-writing he had once,
dune f'r FredieMac, reveal-
ing after some original research
then that Bairneh Frank had
arrived in America on the
Mayflower.
"I am producing an in-depth
historical analysis of how
health-insurance companies
have served America spectacu-
larly well over the years," he
said. "I am getting no money
for this, and the money some
insurance companies are giving
to my campaign for re-election
is simply because they think
I am brilliant It is true that I
have changed my mind and
am back where I was for many
years, favoring mandated
health-insurance purchases, but
the public knew about that"
First donning a football hel-
met with a facemask, a reporter
asked whether this wouldn't
be a conflict of interest, and
Gingrich challenged her to a
series of three-hour Lincoln-
Douglas debates. He also.
winked at her and handed her
a note.
"My goodness, Mr.
President!" she said. "Aren't
you married?"
On Day Three, Gingrich
said he was closing down Bain


Capital, the company Mitt
Romney once worked for, on
the grounds it was still mak-
ing money. He said he figured
on closing down still other
private-equity companies rescu-
ing businesses in trouble and
giving high returns to union
pension funds. It's not that he's
against capitalism, he said. It's
just that he was not about to
put up with profits that ben-
efited workers. Much could be
saved through child labor, he
explained.
On Day Four, he recalled
how he had talked in.a primary:
debate about.ignoring court
decisions he did not like, but
that he Wa6now going beyond
that. He planned to dissolve the
Supreme 1Court.
On Day Five, he sat on
a park bench with Barbra
Streisand, who sang, "All In
Love Is Fair," as he announced
a new cap-and-fade policy that
would actually try to cap the
sun intermittently. "It's a big
idea," he said. "I am a big-idea
man."
Each day of Gingrich's first
100 days was very much like
that, and his administration
might have made it a few days
longer if Congress had not
first decided that some of the
money he received from insur-
ance companies was ethically
dubious.
He was impeached by the
House and evicted by the
Senate, Congress thereby
going further than when he
was once ruled guilty of ethics
violations by the House. The
only good news for him was
that someone finally found a
top hat that would fit.
* Jay Ambrose is a columnist liv-
ing in Colorado.


A story for my grandson


T en he is older,
SI will tell my
grandson Henry
this story.
"Henry," I will
say, deepening my voice to sound
like Catwoman, in the hope of
holding his attention, "listen up.
I'm getting old. Never mind how
old. I want to tell you this before I
forget Are you ready?
"When you were 4 months old
- the size, shape and sweetness of
a big sack of sugar your mama
had to go back to work
"This was not something she
wanted to do. She loved being
a teacher, and she was good at
it But thanks to you, she had
recently discovered the job she
was best at, and loved most of all:
Being your mama.
"Your daddy worked hard, long
hours at a restaurant But when it
came time to decide who'd look
after you while your mama was
at school, he said, 'I will. I want to
take care of my son.'
"This was no small thing.
Knights battling dragons were


..' .



Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com
never as brave as your daddy.
Not that he wasn't up to the task.
He was, absolutely. But he didn't
know it at the time. He'd spent
only an occasional hour alone
with you. Could you both survive
an all-day smackdown?
"Imagine our surprise the
first day your mama went back
to school (after she nursed you,
changed you, pumped breast
milk for later and kissed you a
thousand times) when you flat-out
refused to take a bottle.
"Hours passed like root canals
and you, little toad, kept crying.
'Your daddy rocked you, sang
to you, changed your diaper,
swung you around the house like


a June bug on a string.
"Finally, in desperation, he took
a spoon and ladled your mama's
milk into your mouth. You lapped
it up like a kitten.
"And thafs when I knew what
I'd suspected all along: Your
daddy was going to take good
care of you. When your mama
came home from school each day,
you might cling to her like a cat
trying to avoid a bath. But you
and your daddy were going to be
the best of friends.
"Not every boy is as lucky as
you are, Henry, to know and be
known by his father. Your dad
knows this.
"Maybe thafs why he said
being with you had made him the
happiest he'd ever been.
"Or maybe it was because you
smelled like milk and tasted like
sugar and threw fits like your late
great-grandmother.
"Either way, he's my hero. I
suspect he will be yours, too."

* Sharon Randall can be contact-
ed at randallbay@earthlink.net.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Obama


the


promise


breaker

S tate of the Union
speeches provide pres-
idents an opportunity
to lay out what they
hope to accomplish
in the year and years ahead.
The last time around, President.
Obama's grand oration
sketched his vision of how he
wanted to reshape the country.
Today, it's clear he has failed to
deliver.
From the start, the presi-
dent insisted 2011 would be a
bipartisan year. "What comes
of this moment will be deter-
mined not by whether we
can sit together tonight, but
whether we can work together
tomorrow." The happy feelings
didn't last long. By October,
the campaigner in chief sunk
to challenging the intelli-
gence of people who disagree
with him. At a stemwinder in
Asheville, N.'C., Mr. Obama
insisted he had to break his
jobs bill into "bite-size pieces"
because Republicans "just
couldn't understand the whole
all at once."
Mr. Obama insisted last
January that he had the smart
plan for winning the future and
that we had arrived at "our
generation's Sputnik moment."
By that, he meant his adminis-
tration would invest taxpayer
money in clean-energy tech-
nology to protect our planet
and create countless new jobs.
It turns out 2011 was not a
Sputnik moment. Instead, it
was Mr. Obama's Solyndra
moment.
The California-based solar
plant manufacturer embodied
everything about the admin-
istration's green obsession.
The White House steered $535
million worth of public funds
into a solar-panel manufacturer
with a dubious business plan.
This government stimulus was
supposed to "create" 4,000 jobs.
By August, the firm went bank-
rupt, illustrating the hollow
nature of government-created,
artificial markets.
The only things emptier
than that are the showrooms
at automobile dealerships
that took Mr. Obama up on
his promise to "become the
first country to have a mil-
lion electric vehicles on the
road by 2015." Government
Motors predicted it would sell
10,000 Chevy Volts last year,
but the public wasn't quite
so keen on the idea of paying
$40,000 for a fancy golf cart.
Even with taxpayers chipping
in up to $11,000 to reduce the
sticker shock, the wealthy
liberals who bought the plug-
in hybrid didn't hit the target.
GM ended up selling closer
to 7,600 Volts, a figure that
includes significant fleet sales
to state and local govern-
ments. The Nissan Leaf elec-
tric car also failed to top the
10,000 mark. At this rate, Mr.
Obama's goal will be achieved
in the year 2069. By compari-
son, Ford sold 516,369 F-150
pickup trucks, Chevy sold
367,343 Silverados and Dodge
sold 218,750 Rams in 2011.
Perhaps Mr. Obama would do
more for the economy if he
promised a million new pickup
trucks by 2013.
These high-profile failures
don't faze ideologues on the
left. Expect Tuesday's speech
to contain more of the same
push for bureaucratic inter-
vention of all kinds. It would
be better if the president
admitted this country is flat


broke. Instead of promising to
do more, Mr. Obama should
promise government will do
less. That would create a truly
memorable moment.
* The Washington Times













LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email lhampson@lakecityreporter.com


Today, Jan. 25

Building Assn. lunch
The Columbia County
Builders Association will
hold a General Council
lunch at Guang Dong start-
ing at 11:30 a. m. on Jan.
25. Cost of lunch is $10 for
members and $15 for non-
members. Speaker is Dale
Willians. After the lunch
an attorney from Tritt/
Anderson in Jacksonville
will hold a short seminar.
Reservations are preferred,
call: 386-867-1998 or e-mail:
colcoLintybuild@comcast.
net.
Blood drive.
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have a
blood drive Jan. 25 from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Florida
Gateway College. All
donors receive a T-shirt or
boxer shorts;'
Jan. 26

Blood drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have a
blood drive Jan. 26 from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Florida
Gateway College. All
donors receive a T-shirt or
boxer shorts.
Grief support
Hospice of the Nature
Coast will hold a Grief
Support Group at the
Wings Center, 905 SW
Main Blvd, Suite 105, Lake
City on Thursday, Jan. 26.
at 4 p.m. This group sup-
port group examines the
array of emotions experi-
enced with grief. For more
information call 755-7714.
Landlords' meeting
There will be a landlords'
meeting Thursday, Jan.
26 at 6 p.m. in the Shands
LakeShore Medical Center
conference room. Florida
Gateway College profes-
sor Sherri Carder will
speak about applications
and agreements. All rental
agents and owners are'
invited. For information cal
755-0110.

Jan. 28

Blood donations
The LifeSouth bloodmo-
bile will be at Big Lots from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. All donors
receive free boxer shorts
and a chance to win and .
iPad2.
Sock hop benefit
American Legion Post
57 presents the Brenda
McDiarimid Memorial
Sock Hop Jan. 28 at 8 p.m.
There will be a cake auc-
tion and the Joey Rand
Band will play. Admission
for members and guests
is $5 to benefit Girls State.
Call 755-0926 for informa-
tion.
Illusionist Jason Bishop
'. Illusionist Jason Bishop
will perform as part of
Florida Gateway College's
FGC Entertainment series


on Jan. 28. Bishop, the 2006
APCA Performing Artist of
the Year, will amaze you with
his stunning and original
state-of-the-art magic, includ-
ing his breathtaking Double
Levitation trick. For more
information or for tickets,
call (386) 754-4340 or visit
www.fgcentertainmentcom.
Women's retreat
New Dayspring Baptist
Church, 709 NW Long Street,
Shepherd's Care Ministry will
be hosting a Women's Retreat
on Jan..28th from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Registration and break-
fast beginning at 7:30 am.
Inspirational topics will be
presented along with lunch.
Tickets are available or you
may pay at the door for a
donation of $10. For more
information please contact Sis.
Linda Timmons at 386438-
7974.

Jan. 29
Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 29, 2012
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library: Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita
Nights and Champagne
for Buzzards. Phyllis
Smallman is a Canadian
who has spent a lot of time
in Florida, the setting for
her award-winning mys-
tery series featuring sassy
bartender, Sherri Travis.
A former potter with a
lifelong love of mysteries,
Phyllis divides her time
between her native Ontario
and. Sarasota. She will join
us live via Skype for this
program.
Blood drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have a
blood drive Jan. 29 from
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Winn
Dixie. All donors receive a
T-shirt or boxer shorts.
Jan. 30

Blood drive
LifeSouth Community
Blood Centers will have
1 a blood drive Jan. 30
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at
Florida Gateway College.
All donors receive $25 off
selected prom dresses and.
a T-shirt or boxer shorts.
Wildlife class
s The Columbia County
Extension office, 164 SW
Mary Ethal Lane, will host
Creating Backyard Wildlife
Habitat on Jan. 30 from 1 to
4 p.m. Learn how to create
backyard wildlife habitat
for a variety of wildlife, in
particular birds, bats, and
butterflies.

Feb. 1
Black History Month
Opening Ceremony
Black History Month
Opening Ceremony, 6 pm,
Richardson Comm. Center.

Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1


at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.

Feb. 2

Lake City Masons
We are pleased to
inform you that the 1st
Stated Communication
in February will be Lake
City Masonic Lodge #27's
Americanism program on
Thursday, Feb. 2. Our spe-
cial guests that night will
be recording artist group
The Mercy Mountain
Boys, who will be perform-
ing their song Soldier's
Letter. We are also pleased
to welcome the American
Legion Color Guard, who
will present the colors for
the Pledge of Allegiance. If
that were not enough, we
will also have a speaker
for your entertainment
and information. This
meeting will be open, so
please bring your wife or
significant other and family.
Dinner will, be served at 6
p.m. and the program will
begin at 7 p.m.

Feb. 3

Gospel concert
Southern Gospel soloist
Ann Downing, a popular
performer on the Gaither-
Gospel Homecoming video
series, will be in concert
at the Wellborn United
Methodist Church, 12005
County Road 137, at 7 p.m.
on Friday, Feb. 3. For infor-
mation call (386)754-8524.
Hyssongs in concert
The Hyssongs will be
presenting a concert of
gospel music. at the Lulu
Advent Christian Church,
254 SE Gillen Terrace in
Lulu, on Feb. 3 at 7 p.m.


Feb. 4


Church yard sale
The Lake City Chi
God, 173 SE Ermine
Kid's Club will have
sale Saturday, Feb. 4
Family Life Center fr
a.m. to 1 p.m.

Health fair
The Columbia Cotu
Recreation Departm<
, host ifs annual Healt
Wellness Fair Saturd
Feb. 4 from 8 a.m. to
nooni at the Richards
Community Center. T
ticipate with a booth,
754-7095 or email nic
smith@columbiacoui
com.

West Virginia Day
The West Virginia i
Reunion will be held
Feb. 4 starting at 11:3
Please bring a cover
to share for the lunch
The event will be held
Epiphany Church, 19(
SW Epiphanty Court.
questions, information
reservations please ca
7554937.


Olustee Festival Pageant
The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, Feb.4. Ages
3-12 mos, 13mo-23 mo,
2-4, 5-6 and 7-9 will be
held at 4 p.m. at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be
held at 7 p.m. Winners in
each division will receive a
$50 savings bond, crown,
banner and ride in the
Olustee parade on Feb.
14. The pageant is open to
the public with admission
at the door: $5.00 adults
and students. Applications
are available at the
Columbia County Library
or Chamber of Commerce.
Deadline for entries is 1-23-
2012. For more information
you may contact pageant
director, Elaine Owens at
386-965-2787.

Black History Movie
Festival
Black History Movie
Festival, 4-8pm Olustee
Park.

Feb. 5

Abundant Life Church
Pastor Cagney Tanner
and his wife Shelby invite
the public to the first ser-
vices of Abundant Life
Church, 671 State Road
100 in Lake City, between
'S&S and Ken's Barbecue.
Services include Sunday
school at 10 a.m., Sunday
worship at 11 a.m. and 6
p.m. and Thursday service
at 7:30 p.m. Call (386) 984-
0310 for information.
Church homecoming
*The Vineyard Southern
Baptist, 1832 SW Tomaka
Terrace, will have the 5th
ntnii- l TT' ,tniJ r.rniinr a n


Feb. 5. Sunday services
will be at 10:30 a.m. wit
a covered dish lunch to
follow. There will not be
Sunday school that day
irch of Everyone is welcome. C
Ave., 365-0764 for information
a yard Feb. 8
inthe Feb.8
om 7
Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb.
inty at the Central Building
ent will plan for Olustee 2012.'
th and building is located at 4(
ay, SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.
on
To par- Feb. 10
call
:ole_ Friends of Music
ntyfla.
The Friends of Musi
Concert Series will pre
its second concert of ti
season
Annual on Friday, Feb. 10 at
on p.m. at First Presbyteri
0 a.m. Church, 697 SW Baya]
d dish Dr. Laura Ellis, organis
eon. harpsichordist, and Dr.
I at Steven Thomas, cellist,
05 will perform. Both mus,
For cians are professors at
n, or the University of Floric
ll 386- The concert is free, and


reception will follow. For
more information call Bill
Poplin at 3654932.

Feb. 11

FACS Valentine's Day event
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will have a Valentine's
Day Dinner and Dance on
Saturday, Feb. 11 from 6
to 10 p.m. in the Epiphany
Catholic Church Social
Hall. There will be enter-
tainment, music, dancing
and a cultural food buffet.
Please bring your best
covered dish to share. The
event is free for members,
$10 for nonmembers. Call
965-5905 for information.

Bus trip
"What Freedom Looked
Like" a bus trip to Ft.
Mose, St Augustine,
Florida Florida's all free
black settlement, 7am -
6pm; meet at Richardson
Gym. $25 per person
includes lunch.

Zumba fundraiser for
Habitat for Humanity
All proceeds go to
Habitat for Humanity
of Lake City/Columbia
County Inc. for one hour
long Zumba class facili-
tated by American Family
Fitness, 4578 Sw Heritage
Oaks Circle, Suite 102 on
Feb. 11 at 11 a.m. The
donation cost is $10 per
person. A fire truck and
bloodmobile will be on site
too.
Pre-Valentine Banquet
First Central Association
Women's Department
will host the Annual Pre-
Valentine Banquet on
Saturday, Feb. 11 at 6
p.m. The event will be
held at the Springville
Community 'iCenerte,710'
NW Suwannee Valley Rd.
Tickets are $25 each and
may be purchased from the
Missionary Department
of any of the local First
Central Churches. The
Speaker will be Carla
Herring Blalock of
Suwannee County. Special
music will be provided by
Kyler Burke, a student at
Columbia High School. For
more information you may
contact Gloria McIntosh at
755-1099. Dress is semifor-
mal or church attire.
Founder's Day Program
The Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-Cookman
University Alumni invites
you to our Founder's Day
Program on Feb. 11 at 4
p.m. at the Holiday Inn.
Dr. Trudie Kibbee Reed,
President of Bethune-
Bookman University will be
our speaker. Dress attire
is semi-formal or church
attire.
Valentine's Day Ball
The 1st annual
Valentine's Day Ball,
presented by the Rotary
Club of Lake City, will


be Saturday, Feb. 11
from 6 to10 p.m. at The
Country Club of Lake City.
Cocktails, dinner, dancing
and entertainment with
"Harry, Sally and Billy."
Dress is Black-Tie optional.
Tickets are $50 each and
are available at the Lake
City Reporter, The Wheeler
Agency; Hunter Printing,
First Street Music, Parks-
Johnson Agency on Hwy
90 West or call 752-0812.
Gentlemen...BE A HERO...
bring her to the Valentine's
Day Ball!

Feb. 14

Speed dating
Singles Valentine Day .
Speed dating, (National HIV
Day),5pm-10pm, El Potro. *

Feb. 16

Money Matters
Want to manage your
money better? The UF/
IFAS Columbia County
Extension Office is offer-
ing a series of four classes
on finances. Classes
include money manage-
ment, credit, FISCO Score
and investment on Feb.
16th, 23rd and March 1st
and 8th from 5:30-6:30 at
the Extension office, 164
SW Mary Ethel Lane,
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Cost i* $2 per
class or $5 for the series.
Spaces are limited and reg-
istration date is by Feb. 10.
Please call Jenny Jump at ,
(386) 752-5384 to register
or for more info.

Feb. 17

Sweetheart Dance
The Springville
Community Center, 3710
NW Suwannee Valley Rd,
Annual Sweetheart Dance
is set for Friday, February
17 at8:30 p.m.The, attire
for this event is dressy.
Music will be provided by
DJ Hurricane of Lake City.
Tickets are $8 per person
and may be purchased in
advanced from any Board
meQiber. Please contact
Gloria McIntosh at 755-
1099 or Coretta Ford at
397-1347. Guests may bring
individual refreshment
trays. Sweetheart pictures
will be taken for a nominal
fee by IKE productions.
Golden Dragon Acrobats
Direct from Hibei,
China, the Golden Dragon
Acrobats are the reigning
National Association of
Campus Activities enter-
tainers of the yer and will
perform at Florida Gateway
College on Feb. 17. Their
performance combines
award-winning acrobatics,
traditional dance, spectacu-
lar costumes, ancient and
contemporary music and
theatrical techniques to
present a show of breath-
taking skill and spellbind-
ing beauty. For more
information or for tickets,
call (386) 754-4340 or visit
www.fgcentertainment.
com.


OBITUARIES


Cynthia Jones Kavanagh
Cynthia Jones Kavanagh,
55, of Travelers Rest, died
Sunday, January 22, 2012.
Born in Lynchburg, VA, she
was the daughter of Jack Al-
len Jones and wife Ruby and
the late Gaye Holdren Jones.
She was a member of Mara-
thon Community Church,
worked as Executive Direc-
tor at the YMCA of Travelers
Rest, received her Bachelor's
degree from the University of
South Carolina, and belonged
to many organizations within
Greenville and Travelers Rest.
Surviving, in addition to her fa-
ther, are four daughters, Brandi
Gravley and husband, Nolan,
Carmen Ramantanin and hus-
band, Jason, Carla Fell and
husband, Stephen, and Andrea
Kavanagh; a son, Brett Kava-
nagh; five grandchildren; and a
brother, Richard Allen Jones and
Linda Green, of Lake City, FL.
The visitation will be held
Wednesday, January 25, 2012
from 12:00 noon until 2:00
p.m. at THOMAS MCAFEE
FUNERAL HOME, Northwest.
The funeral service will be held


Thursday, January 26, 2012 at
10:30 a.m. in the chapel of the
funeral home. Memorials may
be made to George I. Theisen
Family YMCAOpen Doors Cam-
paign in Cindy's name, P.O. Box
187, Travelers Rest, SC 29690.
Condolences may be made
to the family by visiting
www. thomasmcafee. corm.

Raymond A. Macatee
Mr. Raymond A. Macatee, 71, of
Lake City, died Friday, January
20, 2012 following a brief ill-
ness. A native of Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania,
Mr. Macatee had B
been a resident
of Lake City for .
the past twenty-
three years having moved here
from Millville, New Jersey. Mr.
Macatee was a veteran of the
United States Marine Corp. and
had worked as a machinist and
welder until his recent ill health
forced him to retire. Mr. Maca-
tee was also the designated Na-
tive American Chaplain for the
Florida Prison system and he
owned and operated Macatee's


Mobile Home Park. He was a
member of the Epiphany Catho-
lic Church, the Knights of Co-
lumbus; Cherokee of Georgia;
Rose Creek Band; and was a
designated "Chief' of the Al-
ligator Fest. Mr. Macatee also
founded and ran "Scrap to Mu-
sic" which has donated countless
musical instruments to Columbia
County students who could not
afford them. He also took used
instruments and sent them to
under privileged children world
wide so that students may learn
and enjoy the art of music. Mr.
Macatee, in his spare time en-
joyed blacksmithing, fishing and
Native American studies. Mr.
Macatee will forever be remem-
bered by all of us that knew him
as an "extremely" generous man.
He was preceded in death by a
son, Michael N. Leon Polhamus.
Mr. Macatee is survived by his
wife of thirty years, Lorraine
Macatee; a son, David Polhamus
(Stephanie) of Lake City; his
daughters, Raelien Macatee of
Lake City; and Dawn Macatee
of Pennsylvania; a sister, Sister
Betty Ann Macatee of Cleve-
land, Ohio; his grandchildren,
Ana Moore, William Ward, Mi-


cheala Polhamus, Michael Holt,
Matthew Slinn, Lilly Slinn and
Elizabeth Slinn and his great-
grandson, Connor Robinson.
A funeral mass will be con-
ducted at 11:00 A.M. on Thurs-
day, January 26, 2012 in the
Epiphany Catholic Church with
Father Michael Pendergraft of-
ficiating. Interment in Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens will
be held privately. There will be
no public visitation. In lieu of
flowers the family requests that
memorial donations be made to
"Scrap to Music". Donations
may be left at the funeral home
or they can be mailed to Lor-
raine Macatee at 158 N.E. Cher-
okee Ct., Lake City, FL 32055.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 S. MarionAve., Lake City, FL
32025 (386)752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Odis Walter Wetherington
Odis Walter Wetherington, age
77, of Jasper, FL. passed away
at his home on Sunday, January


22, 2012. Odis
was the son of -
the late P.O. and 1
Lorena Wether- 1
ington and was
a lifetime resident of Hamilton
County. He served in the United
States Army and Army Reserves.
Following his retirement from the
Hamilton County Road Depart-
ment Odis worked as a hunting
guide for Tiger Creek Hunting
Club and Bienville Plantation.
As long as his health permit-
ted, he was an active member of
the Hamilton County Sheriff's
Posse. He enjoyed farming, rid-
ing and training quarter horses in
his spare time. Odis was a mem-
ber of Sunrise Baptist Church.
Survivors include his wife of 51
years, Linda Lee Wetherington;
daughters, Sandy Beal (Da-
mon), Lake Park, GA., Barbara
Linder (Leroy), Lake City, FL.,
Melissa Simpson (Rodger), Red
Boiling Springs, TN., Ashley
Turnage (Johnny), Live Oak,
FL., Margaret "Lulu" Hobby,
Lake Park, GA.; one son, Adam
Wetherington (Alivia), Jas-
per, FL.; three brothers, Lloyd
Wetherington (Sharon), White
Springs, FL., Michael Weth-


erington, Jennings, FL., and
Curtis Wetherington (Linda),
Jennings, FL.; four sisters, Phyl-
lis Clark, Jasper, FL., Lawana
Ritzmann, Lake City,' FL., La-
veme Lee (Donald), Lake City,
FL. and Linda Erixton (Bobby),
White Springs, FL.; sister-in-
law, Carol Wetherington, White
Springs, FL.; ten grandchildren
and five great grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held
at 2:00 P.M. Wednesday, Janu-
ary 25, 2012 in the chapel of
Harry T. Reid Funeral Home
with Rev. Gene Speights offici-
ating. Interment will follow in
Evergreen Cemetery, Jasper, FL.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be sent to Hospice
857 SW Main Blvd Suite
125, Lake City, FL. 32025.
HARRY T. REID ,
FUNERAL HOME, Jasper, FL.
is in charge of' arrangements.



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


JASON MATTHEW WALKER
Lake City Reporter


At top, Lake City Police
Chief Argatha Gilmore
(from right) and Keith
Heston thank Lt. John
Stock Tuesday. At the
left, LCPD. Officer Larry
Shallar (from left) reacts
after Heston and Gilmore
give him the Meritorious
Service Award during-
the Lake City Police
Department's 2011
Annual Awards Banquet.


JASUN MAI I tW WALKKN/LaKe iUty Reporter
Lake City Police Officer Rebecca Miles smiles as LCPD Chief Argatha Gilmore awards Miles
with the Medal of Bravery Tuesday.


HEROES: Officers honored in standoff
Continued From Page 1A


"It's actually a very hum- zation with them."
bling experience to get the Byrd, who was still wear-
awards, but it was an event ing a medical boot, said it
we all had to go through at was an exceptional honor to
the time," he said. be recognized by the depart-
Miles said he appreci- ment with the awards.
ated being a recipient of "I don't know how to
the department's Medal of explain it after what all we
Honor Award. went through," he said. "I'm
"It means a lot to get just happy that we're all here
the award and it especially to collect the awards that the
means a lot to get the award police department was kind
with. these guys that I got enough to give us."
it with," he said. "They're a Lake City Police Chief
great group of guys .and I Argatha Gilinore aid the
love being part of an orgn--aw ard cerenrioy-ows-p.ut of
,. lintel .-, .... *. ,.


an -utstanding night.
"We got an opportunity
to recognize those officers
who went beyond the call
of duty, who saved lives in
the community and just to
celebrate what we do as
law enforcement officers,"
she said, "This was an out-
standing night to show and
demonstrate courage under
fire."
A listing of other award
winners will be in a later
edition vf the Lake City
Repolr t-r.


I have a TOOTHACHE and need to see my dentist right away!
We strive to see you today or tomorrow!
e \ : AsPIJ. "h,, ,,,

^^ : WeAre Offeing. F o0l
"Soft-Touch"Initial For Only
Panoramic X-Ray (ADA-00330) 0
Diagnosis (if needed) With
S Thepolicy of our office is bat be Patient and any other
oehas a right ih refuse Io pay re lly oerpembrsoe s for me rth This Ad
e n e free, disconte fee, examination or lre ames nnt
d o and reli o responding to
r reten ...


50 Years and Growing ... by


'. -' 'Feel welcome

to come and

help us celebrate

Our 50th Year.

The First Apostolic Church of Lake City, Florida, Inc,


Pastor: L. R. Leguire


Thursday, January 26

Friday, January 27


Saturday, January


28


Sunday, January 29


S7:30 pm

7:30 pm

~7:30 pm


is


~ 6:00 pm


724 S.W. McFarlane Avenue, Lake City, Florida

386-752-0897


etOe


(Ii vitedi


--- -- -. --- -I ~I --- I


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, January 25, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Registration set
for Fort White
The Fort White Girls
Softball Association's
opening weekend of
registration for its spring
season is 5-8 p.m. Friday
and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday at South
Columbia Sports Park.
Leagues offered are
T-ball (starting at age 4)
through 16-and-under.
T-ball cost is $45; fees for
other ages are $55.
For details, call Nora
Harvey at (386) 365-5688.

CHS BASEBALL
Alumni game
on Saturday
Columbia High
baseball's third annual
alumni game is Saturday
at Tiger Stadium.
Registration begins at
10 a.m. and there is no
fee to participate. There
will be a home run
derby at 11 a.m. with a
$5 entry fee.
The Tigers will play a
Purple and Gold game
following the home run
derby. Admission is free.
Barbecue dinners will be
sold.
For details, call coach
J.T. Clark at 365-1754.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Fundraiser car
wash Saturday
Fort White High's
baseball program is
sponsoring a car wash
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Saturday at the S & S in
Fort White. The team
will be seeking donations
at Walmart in Lake City
. on March 3 and April 7.
For details, call coach
Mike Rizzi at 288-8680.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White
registration set
Fort White Babe Ruth
Baseball has spring ball
registration set for
4-7 p.m. Thursday and
Feb. 2, and 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Saturday at South
Columbia Sports Park,
north of Fort White
High. Four divisions are
offered for ages 4-12 and
fees range from $45 to
$65. A birth certificate is
required for new players.
For details, call
Millissa Blakley at
365-4133 or e-mail
fwbrbaseball@gmail. com.


Stanton Prep tops

Lady Tigers in

district preview


Columbia High's Justice


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Campbell goes up for a layup in a game played earlier this season.


Teams will play
for a third time
in tournament.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Colimbia High received
a brief peek into the future
with a matchup against
Stanton Prep in Lake City
on Tuesday.
The only problem is the
future didn't look bright for
the Lady Tigers in a 47-36
loss. '
"We" have to play better
team ball," Columbia head
coach Tera Perry said. "We
have to move more aggres-
sively and rebound better.
We have the ability to drive


the ball and score, but we
didn't do that. I know that
we can play better than
we did tonight. We beat
them by 21 points when we
played them in Jacksonville
the first time."
Columbia (9-9) split the
two meetings with Stanton
Prep this season and the
team will meet in a rub-
ber match at 6 p.m.. on
,Monday in the District 4-6A
tournament at Wolfson.
Hollianne Dohrn led
the Lady Tigers in scoring
with 10 points in the con-
test :
Justice Campbell and
Arnereanna Bryant had
eight points each. Stephanie
Silva had four points in the
game.


Indians




push over



Panthers


By TIM KIRBY --
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's basket-
ball team blasted out of
the halftime break with a
13-2 streak and went on
to defeat Newberry High
67-55 at home on Tuesday.
The Indians started the
run by scoring the final'
six points of the second
quarter to take a 32-29 lead
into intermission.
Fort White dominated
the boards, particularly
on the offensive end. The
Indians had 14 baskets off
offensive boards.
Melton Sanders scored
27 points and got plenty of
help from Raul Colon who
scored 16.
Trey Phillips chipped
in 13 points. Nick Butler
scored six points, while Joe
Powers scored three and
Jonathan Dupree added a
bucket.
Monte Seabrook led the
way for the Panthers (4-12)
with 14 points and Rakheem
Hoyt hit 10.


The Indians lost at-
Hawthorne High on
Monday, 62-55.
Scoring against the
Hornets were Sanders,
22, Phillips, 10, Colon, 9,
Powers, 7, Butler, 5, and
Dupree, 2.
Fort White (9-7) plays the
final game of a tri-match at
Hamilton County High on
Friday.
The Indians will square
off against Columbia High
for two games next week.

Lady Indians basketball
Fort White's girls bas-
ketball team lost 62-35
at Hawthorne High on
Monday.
Kayshanique Cook led
the Lady Indians with
18 points.
Other scorers: Desma
Blake, 5, Rykia Jackson, 4,
Khadijah 3, Shenia Pelham,
2, Cenise Armstrong, 2.
Fort White (4-14) hosts
St. Francis Catholic High at
6 p.m. Thursday, and plays.
in a tri-match at Hamilton
County on Saturday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's A.J. Legree attempts to block a shot of a Keystone Heights High shooter in
a game earlier this season in Fort White.


* From staff reports


GAMES

Today
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. host Chiles
High in District 2-4A
tournament semifinal,
7 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. St. Francis
Catholic High, 6 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
boys basketball at
St. Augustine High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 8 p.m.
(girls-6:30, JV-5)
Saturday
Fort White High girls
weightlifting in sectionals
at Belleview High, 9 a.m.
Columbia High
basketball at Hamilton
County High, 8 p.m.
(girls-6:30)
Columbia High
wrestling in Bobcat Duals
at Buchholz High, TBA


Catherine Kuykendall


Race Day is Feb. 25-26


5K run, fair to
benefit pancreatic
cancer research.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
It is the cruelest of can-
cers and Lake City is look-
ing to run it down.
Catherine Kuykendall
Race Day is Feb. 25-26.
The 5K run with Half-Mile
Timing starts at 8:15 a.m.
Feb. 25 from the Rountree
Moore Toyota Scion lot
on. U.S. Highway 90 west.
The course is a series of
loops along Arlington Road
west of Lake City Middle
School.
Online registration for
the 5K is at active.corn and
costs $20 plus a transaction
fee.


GulfCoast Financial
Services and Rountree
Moore Toyota Scion are pre-
senting the two-day event
for the benefit of Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network.
The Race Day Fair is
Feb. 26 at Rountree Moore
Toyota Scion, and will offer
a men's tricycle race, a hot
dog eating contest, a kid's
box car contest and other
games and prizes. Gates
open at 10 a.m. and festivi-
ties begin at 1 p.m.
Children can design their
own box cars for judging
and a race. Lowe's Home
Improvement is providing
boxes for the cars.
The Daytona 500 race
will be on television inside
the showroom and a limited
number of tickets will be
sold at $100 for a drawing to
win a 2012 Camry, which is


the official pace car of this
year's Daytona 500.
Cost of the Race Day Fair
is $25.
Several sponsor levels
and vendor opportunities
are available. For details,
call Melanie Cosentino at
755-9018.
Catherine Kuykendall
was the wife of GulfCoast
FinancialServicesPresident
John Kuykendall. A teacher
at Westside Elementary,
Kuykendall was diagnosed
with pancreatic cancer in
August of last year and died
in November.
"Nothing can be done
about pancreatic cancer,"
said Cosentino, who is in
business development
at GulfCoast Financial
Services. "It is called the
'silent killer.' By the time
you are showing symptoms,


COURTESY PHOTO
A raffle drawing for this 2012 Toyota Camry will conclude
the two-day Catherine Kuykendall Race Day on Feb. 25-26.
A 5K run is scheduled for Feb. 25 and a Race Day Fair for
Feb. 26. The events are for the benefit of Pancreatic Cancer


Action Network.

you're done."
Pancreatic cancer is the
fourth leading cause of
cancer death in the United
States. It is one of the few
cancers for which the sur-
vival rate has not improved
substantially for more than
40 years. Pancreatic cancer
has the lowest survival rate
- 74 percent of patients
die within the first year of
diagnosis.


Pancreatic


cancer


research represents
approximately 2 percent of
the $5 billion annual cancer
research by the National
Cancer Institute.
Sponsors of Catherine
Kuykendall Race Day plan
to use the events to "raise
awareness, inspire hope
and provide education in
the fight against pancreatic
cancer."













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


TELEVISION

TV. sports

Today
GOLF
4 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Abu
Dhabi Championship, first round, at Abu
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN -Villanova at Louisville
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Missouri at Oklahoma St.
9 p.m.
ESPN Duke at Maryland
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP Detroit at Montreal
TENNIS
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, women's
semifinals, at Melbourne,Australia
3:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, men's
semifinal, at Melbourne,Australia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
NewYork Giants 24,Atlanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
San Francisco 36, New Orleans 32
New England 45, Denver 10
Baltimore 20, Houston 13
N.Y. Giants 37, Green Bay 20
Conference Championships
New England 23, Baltimore 20
N.Y. Giants 20, San Francisco 17, OT
Pro Bowl
Sunday
At Honolulu
NFC vs.AFC
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
N.Y. Giants vs. New England, 6:20-p.m.

College all-star games

Saturday .
Senior Bowl
At Mobile.,Aia ,
North' vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
,Saturday, Feb. 5
Texas vs. Nation
At San Antonio
Texas vs. Nation, 2 p.m. (CBSSN,)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
Philadelphia 103,Washington 83
Boston 87, O rlando 56 . .
Chicago 110, New Jersey 95
Oklahoma City 99. Detrroi, 79, .
San Antonio 104, New Orleans 102
Houston 107, Minnesota 92.
Atlanta 97, Milwaukee 92 "
Dallas 93, Phoenix 87
Portland 101, Sacramento 89
Memphis 91, Golden State 90
Tuesday's Games
New York at Charlotte (n)
Orlando at Indiana'(n)
Cleveland.at Miami (n)
Toronto at Phoenix (n)
Memphis at Portland (n)
Today's Games
New York at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Washington, 7 p.m.'
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Houston, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.


League reports
Results from Lake City Bowl:
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 220; 2. Mary Lobaugh 202;
3. Lori Davis 182.. 1. Willie Frazier
257; 2. Adam Alford 243; 3. Frank
Miller 223.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 607; 2. Lori Davis 522;
3. Maggie Battle 508. 1. Adam Alford
621; 2. (tie) Willie Frazier, Michael
Mcinally 565.
High handicap game: 1. Diane
Madsen 238; 2. Lau Sapp 236; 3. Terry
Townsend 231. 1. Willie Frazier 286;
2. (tie) Marshall Campbell, -Michael
Mclnally 248; 4. Frank Miller 247.
High handicap series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 670; 2. Beth Koppa 657;
3. Lorrie Niquetfe 643. 1. Adam Alford
696; 2. Chris Camacho 695; 3. Bob
Wheeler 651.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 184,
Mark Davis 194.
(results from Jan. 17)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(59.5-28.5); 2. Farmers (51.5-36.5);
3. Pin Busters (48.5-39.5).
High handicap game: 1. Joyce
Crandall 234; 2. Sandi Johns 232;
3. Diane Madsen 221. 1. Johnnie
Croft 243; 2. Keith Herbster 217;
3. Ric Yates 215.
High handicap series: 1. Vy
Ritter 619; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 605;
3. Barbara Croft 598. 1. Vernon Black
663; 2. Ross Meyers 611; 3. Wayne
Johns 602.
(results from Jan. 17)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. 4 S's (55-33);
2. Three Gals & A Guy (52.5-35.5);
3. BMW (52-36).
High handicap game: 1. Susan
Mears 230; 2. Joan Carman 220;
3. Betty Carmichael 219. 1. George
Walters 254; 2. Lee McKinney 243;
3. Dan Ritter 237.
High handicap series: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 632; 2. Elaine Nemeth 625;
3. Pat Hale 617. 1. Jim Burnett 691;
2. Ronnie Grey 661; 3. George


Atlanta at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Portland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
LA. Clippers at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Boston at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

APTop 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Missouri at Oklahoma State,
"7:30 p.m.
No. 4 Ohio State vs. Penn State,
6:30 p.m.
No.8 Duke at Maryland, 9 p.m.
No. 10 Michigan State vs. Minnesota,
8:30 p.m.
No. 12 UNLV at Boise State, 10 p.m.
No. 15 Creighton at Drake, 8:05 p.m.
No. 18 Mississippi State vs. LSU,
8 p.m.
No. 22 Kansas State at Texas Tech,
9 p.m.
No. 23 Florida State at Wake
Forest, 7 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 7 North Carolina vs. NC State,
7 p.m.
No. 14 Florida at Mississippi,
7 p.m.
No. 16 Indiana at No. 25 Wisconsin,
9 p.m.
No. 19 Virginia vs. Boston College,
9 p.m.
No. 21 Saind Mary's (Cal) at Loyola
Marymoynt, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Kentucky at LSU, 4 p.m.
No. 2 Missouri vs. Texas Tech,
1:30 p.m.
No. 3 Syracuse vs. West Virginia,
I p.m.
No. 5 Kansas at Iowa State,*2 p.m.
No. 6 Baylor vs.Texas, I p.m.
No.8 Duke vs. St.John's, Noon
No. 9 Georgetown at Pittsbturgh,
4 p.m.
No. 11 Murray State vs. Eastern Illinois,
8 p.m.
No. 12 UNLV atAir Force, 9 p.m.
No. 13 San Diego State at Colorado
State, 4 p.m.
No. 14 Florida vs. No. .18
Mississippi State, 1:30 p.m.
No. 15 Creighton vs. Bradley,
8:05 p.m.
No. 17 Marquerre stVhllnov3 Noon
No. 19Virginia at NC State, 8 p.m.
No. 21 Saint Mary's (Cal) at BYU,
9 p.m.
No. 22 Kansas State vs. Oklahoma,
7 p.m.
.1 Sunday's Game ,
No.4 Ohio State vs. No. 20 Michigan,
I p.m.
No. 7 North Carolina vs. Georgia
Tech, 6 pm '. '.
No. 1.6 Indiana vs. Iowa, 6 p.m.
No. 24 UConn vs. Notre Darhe at the
XLCenter, Hartford, Conn, Noon

GOLF

Golf-we k, .

PGATOUR
FARMERS INSURANCE OPEN
SitefSan Diego.
Scedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Courses: Torrey Pines, South Course
(7,698 yards, par 72) and North Course
(7,045 yards, par 72).
Purse: $6 .million. Winner's share:
$ 1,044,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
3-6 p.m., 8:W0-.I 1:30 p.m;r Friday, 12:30-
3:30 a,m.,. 3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.;
Saturday, 12:30-3:30 a.m.,, 1-2:30 p.m.,
9.30.1,1:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-2:30 p.m., 9:30-
1.1:30 p:m.) and CBS (Saturday, 3-6 p.m.;
Sunday, 3-6:30 p.m.).
Online:,httpIl/www.pgatour.com .
EUROPEAN TOUR .
ABU DHABI HSBC GOLF
CHAMPIONSHIP
. Site:Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.


BOWLING

Mulligan 636. -
'High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
151.96; 2. Elaine Nerieth '151.57;
3. Betty Carmichael. 150.56. 1. David
Duncan 190.14; 2. Bill Dolly 186.17;
3. George Mulligan 179.38.
(results from 'Jan. 19)
TGIF
Team standings: 1. Strike Zone
(7-1,5,035 pins); 2. Waterbury Builders
(7-1, 4,872 pins); 3. Fun Tyme Travel
(6-2, 5,084 pins); 4. Pacers (6-2, 4,658
pins).
High scratch game: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 210; 2. Karen Coleman
204; 3. Ida Hollingsworth 203. 1. Dale
Coleman 267; 2. Wally Howard 266;
3. John Hilbert 254.
High scratch series: 1. Brigette
Harrelson 593; 2. Karen Coleman 545;
3. Ida Hollingsworth 519. 1. John



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

ZOYOW I E


Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Abu Dhabi Golf Club (7,510
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.7 million. Winner's share:
$450,000:
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 4-8 a.m., 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.,
6:30-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, 4 a.m.-noon,
3-7 p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4 a.m.-
noon, 3-7 p.m., 7-9:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeontour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
Next event Allianz Championship,
Feb. 10-12, The Old Course at Broken
Sound, Boca Raton

TENNIS

Australian Open

At Melbourne Park,Australia
Tuesday
Singles
Men
Quarterfinals
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
Juan Martin del Potro (II), Argentina,
6-4. 6-3,6-2.
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Tomas
Berdych (7), Czech Republic, 6-7 (5), 7-6
(6), 6-4,6-3.
Women
Quarterfinals
Victoria Azarenka (3), Belarus, def.
Agni.eszka Radwanska (8), Poland, 6-7
(0), 6-0,6-2.
KiMi Clijsters (II11), Belgium, def.
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, 6-3,
7-6 (4).
Doubles
Men
Quarterfinals
Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Horia
Tecau (7), Romania, def. Scott Lipsky and
Rajeev Ram (13), United States, 6-4,6-4.
Robert Lindstedt; Sweden, and Horia
Tecau (7), Romania, def. Scott Lipsky and
Rajeev Ram (13), United States, 6-4, 6-4.
Bob and Mike Bryan (I), United States,
def. Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin
Matkowski (6), Poland, 6-4,6-7 (4), 6-4.
Women
Quarterfinals
Svatlana Kuznetsova and Vera
Zvpnareva, Russia, def. Irina-Camelia Begu
and Monica Niculescu, Romania, 7-5, 6-3.
Sara Errani and Roberta Vinci (II),
Italy, def. Alla Kudryavtseva and Ekaterina
Makarova, Russia, 6-8, 6-1.
Andrea HIavackova and Lucie
Hradecka (7), Czech Republic, def.
Vania King, United States, and Yarpslava
Sh.edoV 313). KazakhFt.r. 7-5,6-2.
Sania Mirza, India, and Elena Vesnina
(6), Russia, def. Liezel Huber and Lisa
Raymond (2), United States, 6-3, 5-7,
7-6 (6).

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Edmonton 2, San Jose I, SO
Toronto 3, N.Y. Islanders 0
Carolina 2,Winnipeg I
Detroit 3, St. Louis I
Nashville 4, Columbus I
Los Angeles 4, Ottawa I
Tuesday's Games
Buffalo at New Jersey (n)
Toronto at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Winnipeg at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Boston at Washington (n)
Columbus at Tampa Bay (n)
Philadelphia at Florida (n)
. Pittsburgh at St. Louis (n)
Nashville at Chicago (n)
Anaheim at Dallas (n)
Minnesota at Colorado (n)
San Jose at Calgary (n)
Ottawa at Phoenix (n)
Edmonton atVancouver (n)
Today's Game
Detroit at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No games scheduled


Hilbert 698; 2. Dale Coleman 693;
3. Wally Howard 646.
High handicap game: 1. Nina Howd
240; 2. Tina Sherrod 235; 3. Chrissy
Fancy 234. 1. (tie) Wally Howard, Josh
Johnson 274; 3. (tie) Alvin Poynter,
Dale Coleman 267.
High handicap series: 1. Nina
Howd 680; 2. Shannon Howard
635; 3. Karen Coleman 620. 1. Josh
Johnson 738; 2. John Hilbert 725;
3. Alvin Poynter 712.
(results from Jan. 13)
BANTAMS
High handicap game: I. Heaven
Camacho 198; 2,. Jadyn Freeman 167. I.
Antonio Perez 152; 2. Carson Lyons 141.
High handicap series: I. Heaven
Camacho 547; 2. Jadyn Freeman 438. I.
Carson Lyons 414; 2.Antonio Perez 394.
(results from Jan. 14)
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and. Jeff Knurek


HE WAS IN THE MARKET |
FOR A NEW BANJO, 50 HE
CHUI P NEPEE TO VO THIS.
-- 7 -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: L 1 1 L
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: WHARF TRICK SHIELD SPRUCE
Answer: The underwater casino featured -
FISH AND CHIPS


GOLF REPORTS



New tees for Super Seniors


Joe Herring blitzed the
field to win the Friday
Dog Fight with a score of
+9. Second place went to
Emerson Darst and third
place to Chet Carter.
Closest to the pin winners
were Joey Chamberlin, Jim
Munns, Chet Carter and
Darst.
Herring, as well as other
Super Senior golfers are
taking advantage 6f Quail
Heights superintendent
Todd Carter's creation
of forward tees for golf-
ers over the age of 70. In
meeting with the Men's
Golf Association, Carter
concluded it would allow
our Super Seniors to be
more competitive in weekly
tournaments and so far the
Super Seniors are proving
him correct.
The Wednesday Blitz


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Pete Sands

was won by you guessed
it Joe Herring, who is
really taking advantage of
the young guys. Gerald
Smithy was second and
there was a three-way tie
for third with Larry Boone,
Chet Carter and Jamie
Burton.
Top of the Hill winners
were: Wallace Christie,
first; Joe Herring, second;
Emerson Darst and Randy
Heavrin, tied for third.'
The Sunday Scramble.
had a great turnout with
the team of Mike Kahlich,
his mom, Vinceil, and Dave
Stevens taking first-place
honors.
Only one team had a


shot at winning this week's
pot with an eagle on Dunes
No. 4, but it was not their
lucky week as Tiara Carter
pulled her "lucky No. 9."
The Sunday Scramble is
open to all golfers. Join us
by 2 p.m. for a 2:30 p.m.
tee off.
The Super Bowl team
blitz is Saturday with a
noon shotgun start. Pick a
partner and sign up now.
Girls group:
Chipping competi-
tion Gillian Norris, first;
Rachal Blanton, second;
Anna Grace Blanton; third;
Putting Rachal
Blanton, first; Emma Ward,
second; Gillian Norris,
third;
Four-hole tournament
- Gillian Norris, first;
Rebekah Blanton, second;
Anna Grace Blanton, third.


Plus-25 wins All For One


Fifty MGA members
antd guests were in the
field for the All For One
Tournament.
The blind draw for pair-
ings worked perfectly for
the winning team of Yves
Pelletier, Bruce Gibson,
Steve Osborne and Al
Alvarado. Their final
score of +25 was good
for a five-point win over
the second place group of
Jonathan Allen, Jerry West,
Jim McGriff and Julius
Davenport
Other top finishers were:
Joe Paul, Chad. Hunter,
Dennis Hendershott
and Hugh Sherrill, third
place; Steve Thomas, Joe
Persons, Bud Johnson and
Dan Stewart, fourth place;
Bob Randall, Chris Lewis,
George Bowlin and Dave
Blair, fifth place.
The Mixed Scramble
produced a bogie free
round of 56 for the win-
ning foursome of Ed Snow,
Natalie Bryant, Claude
Ste-Marie and Nicole
Ste-Marie. They were
pushed hard by Bruce
Gibson, Nicole Gibson,
Suzie Peterson and Andy

., Y1" -earmha



ACROSS 43 --
1 As expected Ch
5 Make 44 Ma
tapestries (ste
10 Gesture 48 Or
12 Sheep herder ins
13 .City map line 50 Sh
14 Farm machine tru
15 Arnaz 52 Mu
16 Motel amenity we
18 Auction 53 Dr
motion 54 Ga
19 Like Jell-O, sp
maybe 55 Qu
22 Processed
cotton D
25 Toiled away 1 Co
29 Flat-tasting dw
30 Pushed ahead 2 AllI
32 They have vel
spines 3 Ac
3P Sheer soo
34 Like folk art 4 No
dolls 5 Mi.
37 Roof supports 6 Pai
38 Gave a jerk 7 Brn
40 Riviera Bo
summer 8 We


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


nine win with 33.5.
The Good Old Boys
three-team match was in
doubt until the final hole
when Stan Woolbert,


Peterson who finished a Jerry West, Dave Cannon
stroke back. and Bill Wheeler pulled
Yves Pelletier, Michel out a 5-4 win over Dennis
Lauzon, Use Gilbert and Hendei-shott, Mike
Francine Lauzon claimed Spencer, Jerry Snowberger
third place with 59. and Jim Stevens. Monty
Travis Timmons topped Montgomery, Tom Elmore,
off a steady round of golf Joe Persons and Paul Davis
with two birdies to win the were in third place with
Wednesday blitz with +9. 2 points.
Mike Gough claimed sec- Match two saw Ed
ond at +6. Dennis Crawford Snow, Jim McGriff, Merle
was another stroke back in Hibbard and Dan Stephens
third place. Ed Higgs, Joe pull ahead steadily to take
Paul- and Mickey Wilcox a 5-2 win over Marc Risk,
tied for fourth with +3. Eli Witt, Bill Rogers and
Jordan Hale, Mike Bobby Simmons.
McCranie and Roger Woolbert and
Mitzel split the skins with Montgomery tied for scor-
Timmons and Higgs. ing honors with identical
The LGA staged an old-, rounds of 38-38-76. Snow
fashioned Nassau event-for -was the only other contend-
the ladies. Full handicaps, er at 40-39-79.
were in play. The Chamber of
Cathy Steen notched the Commerce scramble is
18 hole win with a 68. Friday with a noon lun-
Sally Rivers took sole cheon followed by a 1 p.m.
possession of the front shotgun start.
nine payoff with a net 33.5. The Super Bowl tourna-
Natalie Bryant and Nicole ment is Feb. 5. Call Carl at
Ste-Marie shared the back 752-2266 for details.


Dawn
ong
ajor- -
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chestra
strument
own to be
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ikluk
arers
ring cloths
ve out
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aint hotels

)OWN
te
teller
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hicles
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others
t me
fortune
nache
and for
wser
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Get

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9

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cOE -.: I Mli.
Suwww.Iakecityreporrer.com
----.Aw tRiPvuPz et

Answer to Previous Puzzle


Constantly, to
Shakespeare
Angry
Diamond or
Armstrong
Fish basket
Music media


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
1 I s 1 4 EA IA 7 I- o I Q


20 Peculiar thing
21 River in a
waltz
22 U.K.
broadcaster
23 Comedian -
King
24 Tighten
26 Rejected, as a
bill (2 wds.)
27 This, in
Havana
28 Judge
31 Rx givers
35 Holds down a
job
36 Chromosome
material
39 Didn't
relinquish
40 One, in
Frankfurt
41 Publicize
loudly
42 Nadelman or
Ducommun
45 Pizzeria must
46 Alice's diner
47 Switch
positions
48 Vigor's
partner
49 be an
honor!
51 French
monarch


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


I


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


GLO M NT IH AFRO
MER E ,EEO NAIL
C A R AMELS TIDE



I D R E B0S
L ED SERE

AIX E TON UE
DIE MOO E BIS
ETAS NI B ELLA
OSIISMUJGJ
ATH


HU F A IORRC0A

OPEC RE F TAOS











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


DILBERT
F leP I,,


I'M WAITING FOR
PEOPLE TO WALK BY SO
I CAN CRITICIZE YOU
IN FRONT OF OTHERS.


I WANT THE CRITICISM
TO STING AS MUCH AS
POSSIBLE SO YOU'LL BE
INVENTED TO DO ALL
THE RIGHT THINGS IN
THE FUTURE.


BABY BLUES
VV.KT CwOiLE LE661NS t
oI.W ? TTElfAT.__J
A ME TEgen
Awle AJu!O b

..n~-'/ ?\


BLONDIE
-i OBVIOUSLY, THE THAT'S ME,
BOSS LIKES TO HIRE ALL RIGHT!
EMPLOYEES WHO PIT I'M A REAL
IN LIKE A GLOVE 'PEOPLE
PERSON"


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


I GUESS
IT CAN
WAIT
UNTIL THE
STAFF
MEETING.


THAT LWAY I
CAN ENJOY
THE ANTIC-
IPATION,
TOO.


ZITS


I HAVF 131 HErsOFFPAPER
ANPIX S4ARPEioP PNCIl-S
W-INEP UFANP WAITING FOR
N WMUSE.TO sTRIKf4 .


B.C.


DEAR ABBY


College-bound senior doesn't

measure up in parents' eyes


DEAR ABBY: I'm 18
years old. I play two
competitive sports,
maintain a 4.0 GPA, have-
good friends and will be
attending the college of
my dreams. Yet for some
reason I cannot get
along with my parents.
It seems like I can't
live up to their stan-
dards. We get into huge
fights every day over
insignificant things. My
parents continually tell
me they don't think I
will handle college very
well because I "can't get
along with people." But
their lack of faith just
frustrates me and we get
into more fights.
In reality, the only
people I don't get along
with are my parents.
This is unsettling to me
because next fall I will
be across the' country
from them and I feel
they will be happy that
I'm gone. I'm at a loss as
to what to do to control
my temper and fix my
relationship with my par-
ents before I leave. Your ,
advice would be appreci-
ated. -- CLIMBING THE
WALLS IN CLEVELAND
DEAR CLIMBING
THE WALLS: It's pos-
sible that your parents
may be suffering from
separation anxiety. You,
their child, are about to
leave the nest, and they
may be dealing with con-,
flicting feelings of pride
in your accomplishments


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com.
and sadness that you
are about to fly from
the nest. It may not be a
lack of faith in you. Also,
they may be having
second thoughts about
how they can afford the
tuition and other college
expenses beyond pos-
sible financial aid.
Whatever their rea-
sons are, you need some
tools to help you stay
calm and not fly off
the handle when your
buttons are pushed -
- regardless of who is
pressing them. In my
booklet, "The Anger in
All of Us and How to
Deal With It," I offer
suggestions that will
help you gain control
of your emotions so
that you will lose your
temper less often. It can
be ordered by sending
your name and mailing
address, plus a check or
money order for. $7 (U.S.
funds), to Dear Abby
-- Anger Booklet, P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447. Shipping
and handling are includ-
ed in the price. Anger is
a normal emotion. There


are probably no human
beings who don't experi-
ence anger at one time
or another. However,
it's important that you
learn some techniques
to handle your emo-
tional reactions more
constructively than you
have been. Not only will
these techniques help
you with your parents
now, but also they will
help you when you're
away at college adjusting
to new people and new
situations.
Remember, the aver-
age person may become
irritated, angry or frus-
trated several times a
day. The key is to deal
with these emotions
effectively. Talk to your
parents about your feel-
ings and explore what's
going on. By focusing
on what is triggering
your negative emotions
instead of reacting with
an outburst, you can not
only defuse your anger
but also retain your
dignity, and possibly
achieve a more informed
understanding of how
your parents may really
feel. I hope that the
outcome will be a rap-
prochement with your
parents.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Consider what you
offer and what you can get
in return. It's a give-and-
take world, and you must
be willing to take what you
deserve without feeling
guilty. Gracious accep-
tance will make others feel
important and enhance
your relationships as well.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Get to know people
outside of business or
school. The relationships
you build by exploring
the human aspect of the
lives of those you deal
with at work will give you
greater leverage in the
future. Love is in the stars.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Sensitive issues must
be handled.with diplomacy.
You will jeopardize your
chance to advance if you
are oblivious to what oth-
ers are going through.
Don't show anger when
what's required is under-
standing and sympathy.
Reach out with love. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Your sensitivity toward
others will be noted and
appreciated. Love is on the
rise, and making a promise
to someone you cherish
will be well received. A
change at home will be
beneficial for everyone
involved. A pleasure trip is
highlighted. *****


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Watch your spending
habits, your health and
your emotional well-being.
Make sure you can afford
purchases before you com-
mit financially. Charity
begins at home, and keep-
ing things within reason
will be key to your future
success. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll be drawn to
personal matters that can
generate a lot of passion
regarding the things you
want to do and the people
you want to spend time
with. Follow your heart.
Be open about your needs
and what you want to
accomplish. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-
Oct. 22): Listen care-
fully to what's being said.
Complaints may not be
voiced in simple terms.
Focus on home, family and
domestic improvements.
Use your imagination and
foresight to make things
happen. Don't question;
just do. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Put your'heart into
whatever you do. Make *
changes that will allow
you to fit in and contribute
adequately. Don't allow
emotional problems to
escalate into something


you cannot control. Take
action, but do so courte-
ously. *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): First and
foremost, you must look
at your situation and your
behavior honestly. Assess
what you may have done
wrong, as well as what you
can do not only to improve
your relationships with
others but also to better
take care of you. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Check out your,
options and make plans to
start something new. You
will come up with a plan
that can be very lucrative
by capitalizing on past
experience and the trends
you see unfolding. Love is
in the stars. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Show your strengths
by helping others. Your
intuition will guide you to
do the right thing for those
you influence and those
who influence you. Strive
for perfection, but don't
let frustration set in. Take
breaks and you'll accom-
plish more. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Create enthusiasm and
stir up feelings with your wit
and charm. Taking action
is whafs required to turn
your dream into a reality.
Love is on the rise, and a
special relationship will be
enhanced if you are atten-
tive. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: S equals W
"PBZJBCHXAE ... FXB ZCF KU
MBFFAVM KFXBCH' FK SZVF FK JK'
HKDBFXAVM TKR ZCEB YKVOAVYBJ


HXKRPJ NB JKVB."


- ZVY B


E Z Y L Z C J


Previous Solution: "It is great to be a blonde. With low expectations, it's very
easy to surprise people." Pamela Anderson
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-25


M SURE ILL GET ALONG
FAMOUSL WITH




7 _
^~~ L___^f


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


---- - --


zJ 4 L


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


Fielder and Tigers


agree on 9-year deal


NOAH TRISTER
Associated Press
DETROIT Free
agent first baseman Prince
Fielder and the Detroit
Tigers agreed Tuesday on
a nine-year, $214 million
contract that fills the AL
Central champions' need
for a power hitter, a person
familiar with the deal said.,
CBS first reported the
agreement.
The person told the
Associated Press that the
deal was subject to a physi-
cal. The person spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the contract was
not yet complete.
Detroit boldly stepped
up in the Fielder sweep-
stakes after the recent
knee injury to star Victor
Martinez. A week ago, the
Tigers announced that the
productive designated hit-
ter could miss the entire
season after tearing his left
ACL.
The Tigers won their
division by 15 games before
losing in the AL champi-
onship series to Texas.
Adding Fielder gives the
Tigers two of the- game's
premier sluggers, pairing
him with Miguel Cabrera.
The move also keeps
Fielder's name in the
Tigers' family. His father,
Cecil, became a big league
star when he returned
to the majors from Japan
and hit 51 home runs
with Detroit in 1990. Cecil
played with the Tigers into
the 1996 season.
Several teams had shown
interest this winter in the
27-year-old Fielder, who
had spent his entire career
with Milwaukee. He visited
Texas, and the Washington
Nationals also got involved
in the discussions.
The beefy slugger hit


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this July 12, 2011 file photo, National League's Prince
Fielder of the Milwaukee Brewers holds his MVP award
after the Major League Baseball All-Star baseball game,
in Phoenix. A person familiar with the negotiations says
Fielder and the Detroit Tigers are nearing agreement on
a nine-year contract worth about $200 million. The person
spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity
Tuesday because talks are ongoing.


.299 with 38 home runs
and 120 RBIs last sea-
son. He is a three-time
All-Star and was the MVP
of last year's event in
Phoenix.
Fielder has averaged
40 homers and 113 RBIs
over the past five years.
He's also been among the
most durable players in
the majors, appearing in at
least 157 games in each of
the last six seasons.
The deal is only the
fourth $200 .million con-
tract in baseball history,
following Alex Rodriguez's
$275 million, 10-year con-
tract with the New York
Yankees, A-Rod's $252
million, 10-year deal with
Seaftle and Albert Pujols'
$240 million, 10-year con-


tract last month with the
Los Angeles Angels.
Among current players,
his $23.78 million average
salary is behind only A-
Rod ($27.5 million), Ryan
Howard ($25 million), and
Cliff Lee and Pujols ($24
million each).
Detroit general manager
Dave Dombrowski said
last week he felt finding a
replacement for Martinez
was a short-term problem,
but he left himself some
wriggle room, saying it
depended who the player
was.
Acquiring Fielder opens
all sorts of possibilities,
such as moving Cabrera
to third base or having one
of the two sluggers be the
designated hitter. .


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rafael Nadal of Spain stretches out for a return to Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic
during their quarterfinal at the Australian Open tennis championship, in Melbourne, Australia,
Tuesday.


Federer wins 1,000th

match, will face Nadal


By DENNIS PASSA
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia
- .A dominating win
by Roger Federer in his
1,000th career match and a
more difficult workout for
Rafael Nadal set up a rare
Grand Slam marquee semi-
.final between the former
top-ranked players.
Four-time Australian
Open" champion Federer
advanced to his ninth
straight semifinal at
Melbourne Park with a 6-
4, 6-3, 6-2 quarterfinal win
Tuesday over Juan Martin
del Potro, the man who beat
him for the U.S. Open title
in 2009.
Federer's 1,000th match
was similar to most in his
career no-nonsense,
dominating from the start
and hitting some incredible
shots.
"It's a lot.of matches and
a lot tennis," said Federer,
a record 16-time Grand


Slam champion. "Either I
have been around for a long
time or I'm extremely fit.
You decide which way you
want to describe it. But I'm
happy."
In an often tempestuous
night match at Rod Laver
Arena, Nadal advanced
with a tough 6-7 (5), 7-6.
(6), 6-4, 6-3 win over Tomas
Berdych.
"Happy with how I fin-
ished match physically, I
was able to keep running
with high intensity," Nadal
said.,
Federer and Nadal -
they were ranked 1-2 for
many years have been
on opposite halves of the
draw since the 2005 French
Open. That was the last
time the pair met in a Grand
Slam semifinal, won that
year by Nadal in four sets.
"The ranking is impor-
tant, but we are talking
about a player who has won
16 Grand Slams, and I've
won 10," Nadal said.


"We have played a lot bf
matches together, many in
very important moments for
our careers. So the matches'
against him are always spe-
cial, even if we are (ranked)
20 against 25."
Defending women's
champion Kim Clijsters,
still dealing with a left
ankle injury, advanced to
an Australian Open semi-
final against third-seeded
Victoria Azarenka by
beating No. 1 Caroline
Wozniacki 6-3, 7-6 (4)
Tuesday. Clijsters' victory
ensured that Wozniacki
would lose the top ranking
she has held for most of the
last 15 months.
Azarenka beat No. 8
Agnieszka Radwanska 6-7
(0), 6-0, 6-2. Azarenka is one
of three women who could
finish at No. 1 in Melbourne
- Maria Sharapova and
Petra Kvitova are the others.
Wozniacki, 21, needed
to reach the semifinals to
retain the top ranking.


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Yllllr~lCrPISIPI~ --~ -~ ----------


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


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oiuni ia, onty

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER


How about Firehouse Subs, for a change?


From staff reports

Less than a year after
its opening, Firehouse
Subs has become a popu-
lar eatery for local res-
idents as well as trav-
elers who venture into
Columbia County.
Rick Bringger is a co-
owner of the Firehouse
Subs restaurant in Lake
City along with his wife
Wilma. Firehouse Subs,
2929 West U.S. Highway
90, Suite No. 102, opened
its Columbia County loca-
tion April 13, 2011.
Firehouse Subs is open
10:30 a.m. 10 p.m. daily.
The Lake City Firehouse
Subs restaurant employs
about 16 workers. Its
dinning accommodations
includes several interior
and exterior tables. The
restaurant also offers
a delivery service with
a minimum amount of
orders.
Bringger said he decid-
ed to bring Firehouse
Subs to Lake City because
he felt the restaurant
would do well based on
the county's population.
Bringger was a cus-
tomer of Firehouse Subs
restaurants in the Ocala,
St. Augustine Beach and
Gainesville and looked
into bringing one of the
restaurants' to Columbia
County. Bringger's favor-
ite sandwich is the "Hook
& Ladder," which is also
the store's number 1
seller.


"I just enjoyed the
sandwiches and I actu-
ally called to see when
we were getting one here
and the next thing I know
I was meeting with Chris
Holmes, our area repre-
sentatives and decided to
go ahead and do it," he
said.
Before becoming the
local Firehouse Subs co-
owner, Bringger worked
in the insurance industry.
He worked at the local
All-State Insurance com-
pany for 25 years after
moving here in 1980. '
While there is no obvi-
ous connection between
the insurance and restau-
rant industries, Bringger
said there really isn't
much difference when it
comes to running a busi-
ness.
"It's the same thing
- insurance or sand-
wiches, it's still a buisi-
ness," he said. "You're
managifig people. It's the
same thing, just a differ-
ent product."
Firehouse Subs was
founded in Jacksonville
in 1994 by former fire-
fighting brothers, Chris
and Robin Sorensen.
Firehouse Subs has 10
signature sandwiches
and offers customers
an opportunity to order
several other sandwich
combinations. The sand-
wiches are served with
steamed meats and a
choice of condiments.
The subs are labeled as


"Fully Involved," with
mayo, mustard, lettuce,
tomato, onion and a dill
pickle spear on the side.
All the Firehouse Sub
locales have the same
motif, decor that hon-
ors firefighter heritage.
The mural in the Lake
City location features the
Ichetucknee Springs with
two firefighters using an
antique Lake City Fire
truck.
"We appreciate the
support that the commu-
nity has given Firehouse
Subs," said Bringger. "We
do our best to support
our community, schools
and local charities. We
like being in Columbia
County because it's just
a great 'place to live. I
live here and I think
Firehouse Subs as a
unique experience for
the diner."
Bringger said the loca-
tion of the store also cap-
italizes on travelers visit-
ing the restaurant which
has added to the store's
success.
"I would say we are
about 75 percent local
and maybe 25 percent
we get from interstate
traffic," he said. "We are
a local market but it's
good we have 1-75 and
1-10 here because we get
some travelers. We did
extremely well during
the holidays."
The Lake City
Firehouse Subs is also
listed among the top


stores in the region.
"I believe we had the
highest unit volume in
our territory," Bringger


said, noting the store's Alabama. "We've settled
territory encompasses in where we are real
North Florida, South steady every month."
Georgia and parts of


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILt, i? i :. P
Firehouse Subs general manager Sandie Nobles (from left), franchisee Rick Bringger and
assistant manager Mona Beckham pose for a photograph inside the Lake City location at
2929 W. U.S. Highway 90, Suite 102.


PROPANE FILLING STATION
Drive it in and we'll fill it up!


1130 US Hwy 90 W
Lake City, Florida
(386) 752-5890
G.W. Hunter, Inc.


~ V


p TIMeLESS IEmORIES

Their Back!

Rocking

Chairs


1m mmEEmm


386-466-1888 U'4
1034 SW Main Blvd., (next to the Money Man)Lake City, F32055
: '" i = ' LI : . . I ;


Srofmh:-. i -" 4Aaipr 4W IVfM G
I.- r~t c H1' '"--'. a JB nw ^ fP g^im)n.' rr "B "**""
2)n Owd, a
In W..
' 's B~ii~ai'*"'"**r*' ^ |lB B *"** ^""*ftPis **


7Women'4 denterz ofC-oida

Obstetrics and Gynecology
Chandler Mohan, MD Emad Atta, MD
Annmarie Fenn, CNM, MS
S Weight Loss/ Hair Removal/ Chemical Peels/ 4D Baby Ultrasounds
ALL $69
Accepting all Insurance. No Ins visit $50

(386)466-1106
Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak


Chevron


. .- .. . . % ....r.. ,. " - "










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


one Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Eahdidti onal5
Rate applies to private individuals seling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
S Each item must i snclude a price.,
This is a non-refundable rate.





One Item per ad 2 e.




Slines 6 days 'Each additional
,4 lines o y line $1 15
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Each item must Include a prime
This is a non-refundable rate.







One Item per ad 27
4 lines 6 day'Each additional
j4line $1.45
Rate applies to private individuals selling
pemonal merchandise stalling ,00 or less
^ Each tem must Include a price a
This Isa non-refundable rate. a







One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
linj $1.55
Rate applies to private Indvdal selling
persona merchandise totalling $,00 or Les.
This s a non-refundable rate.


One item er ad .3
4 lines 6 days r Er |ddial
Rate applies to pvte Individuals selling
Sperson.al merchandise totalling $,00 or les.



S Each Item must Include a prie. .


4 lines $1 50
3 days 50
ninrludes 2 Signs 6Ed h inld I ne e165


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2XVOper
ad for each Wednesday insertio.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-.
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:00a.mZ
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Tiurs.,9:00ali.m
Saturday Fd.,10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fi.,10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, you# call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements Under.
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for- errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In 1 in and Online
wwvw.latkecityreporter.coni


Legal

Attention Comcast Customers Im-
portant Information about your serv-
ices:
The following is a correction to the
February 1, 2012 price notification
recently included with your billing
notice. The $39.95 price for XFINI-
TY Voice Unlimited requires the
purchase of both TV and Internet
Service. This correction applies to
the following counties: Duval, Clay,
St. Johns, Putnam, Alachua, Nassau,
Baker, Columbia, Suwannee and
Camden. We apologize for this
oversight and thank you for choosing
Comcast. Services 'not available in
all areas. Please call 1-800-XFINITY
for more information.
05530207'
January 25, 2012

020 Lost & Found
LOST CAMERA at CVS Hwy.
90W., on Jan. 16th, approx.
4:00 p.m., Call with information
386-397-5217
Lost small 6-year old beagle,
responds to Maggie. Went missing
from Defender Dr-in Lake City on
1/14/2012. She is tri-colored, but
is mostly black, has a lazy left eye
and a small cyst on her right rear
hip. Reward offered, please call
FOUND OUR BABY!!

0100 ,obrtiies
A U opportunities


0553088.
.EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
Columbia County
'ColumbiaiCounty is accepting
applications for a Wash Rack
Operator/Service Technician.
Position's primary responsibility
is semi-skilled preventative*
maintenance work in the Public
SWorks Truck Wash Facility.
Position is responsible for
maintaining proper water
chemistry control and mechani-
cal work in maintaining autos,
trucks, mowers, pumps, fire and
rescue vehicles, small gas
engines and other equipment.,
Minimum Experience: High
School graduation or G.E.D. and
one year journeyman experience
in the field of automotive
mechanics or an equivalent
combination of training and
experience. Valid FL Driver's
License required. Salary is
$10.02 hourly plus benefits.
Successful applicant must pass
pre-employment physical &
drug screening Applicaiion_.
may be obrained at the'Hum.Ln
Resources Office.or online a3
x cdiftlinbiacountyla corn'
Board of County Commission-
ers, '135 NE Hemando Ave.,
Suite 203. Lake City, FL 32055,
(386) 719-2025, TDD (386)
758-2139. Deadline: 02/03/12.
Columbia County is an
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

Gateway Baptist Church is
accepting apps for paid nursery
workers. Must be at least 18 yoa &
pass a background ck. Must be
available Sun mornings & eve-
nings, Wed. evenings & for other
events as needed. Aps available at.
3252 SW ST Rd. 247, LC or email
gatewaychurch@bellsouth.net.


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
dishingg, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
TAXES, RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


o100 J0ob
Opportunities

05530193

BoiQWortlt

(ladies wear factory outlet)
Lake City Mall
is looking for .
P/T THIRD KEY
Days, nights, and weekends.
Flexible hours a necessity.
Competitive wages, discount,
EOE
Apply in person at store
location Retirees are
encouraged to apply.

05530224
Early Head Start Teacher
(Lawton's Place) HS
Diploma/GED, Bilingual
(Spanish/English) preferred,
5 Hour Literacy and 40 hrs
childcare training. Must pass
physical and DCF background
screening requirements, Current
First Aid/CPR preferred. Child
development associate (CDA)
credential AND training in early
childhood development; three
years of classroom experience
working with infants/toddlers
preferred; Apply in person at
236 SW
Columbia Ave or email resume
to employment(a)sv4cs.org
(386-754-2222).

PT Clerical position. 8-12p
M-F. Must be a people person
w/good organizational, computer,
phone & customer skills. Must
multi task. Send resume &
references'to Box.05082, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056

New Business Expanding to North
Florida. Opportunity Meeting,
Wednesday, January 25, 2012 at
7.00 p.m. at Guang Dong Restau-
rant, Lake City Mall, Hwy. 90.
Free information contact Diana at
386-628-6880.

MECHANIC for'busy truck shop.
, Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754


FLORIDA

4

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,"
MATHEMATICS
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
To Commence Fall Term 2012
V- Teach college-level and
preparatory mathematics; work with
colleagues for the advancement
of departmental goals. Requires:
Master's degree in mathematics; or
master's degree with minimum of 18
graduate credit hours in course work
centered on mathematics. Ability
to use technology in instruction.
Ability to teach on-line and distance
learning courses. Ability to work
well with others. Ability to learn from
colleagues and to share knowledge.
Ability to utilize various instructional
strategies to reach students. Ability
to present information in a coherent
manner and the ability to fairly
-evaluate student retention of that
information. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience.
Ability to teach college level and
preparatory mathematics.
,SALARY: Based on degree and
experience.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 2/17/12
Persons interested should
provide College application, vita,
and photocopies of transcripts.
All foreign transcripts must be
submitted with official translation.
and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrnlfgc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges
of the Southern Association ofColleges and -
Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education
S and Employment


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities

05530240
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for the position of
Office Manager (Economic
Development).This is
responsible, advanced clerical
work assisting the Director in
the coordination of the office.
Strong computer and budgeting
skills required. Minimum
requirements: High school
diploma or GED supplemented
by office skills training plus four
(4) years of progressively
responsible experience in
administrative work or
equivalent combination of
training and experience.
Valid FL driver's license and
residency in Columbia County
within six months of
employment date.req. Salary:
$13.39 hourly plus benefits.
Successful applicant must pass
pre-employment physical, drug
screening, and criminal history
check. Applications: Human
Resources, Board of County
Commissioners, 135 NE
Hernando Ave, Suite 203,
Lake City, FL 32055 or online
at www.columbiacountyfla.com
(386) 719-2025, TDD
(386) 758-2139. Application
deadline: 2/10/2012.
An AA/EEO/ADA/VP
Employer.



FLORIDA




ACCOUNT CLERK II (CASHIER)
Process payments', prepare daily
bank deposits, administer petty cash
and change fund requests, balance
daily deposit with computer balance,
assist students with account
inquiries and general questions.
Minimum Qualifications: High school
graduate plus three years business
office, cash handling and/or
customer service experience. A high
school equivalency diploma from
the State Department of Education
may be substituted for high school
graduation. Special consideration
will be given to applicants with an
Associate Degree or Certificate in a
related area. Knowledge of business
arithmetic. Knowledge of basic
business practices and procedures.
Knowledge of Word, Excel, and
Outlook. Skill in use of a calculator
' and cash register. Knowledge of
multi-line phone system.
Salary: $21,612 annually, plus
benefits.'
Application Deadline: 2/6/12
College employment application
required. Position details and
applications available on web at:
www.fqc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrOfgc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges
of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education
and Employment


100 Job
SOpportunities
PERSONAL ASSISTANT/
RECEPTIONIST, Computer skills
required, reply to: P.O. Box 7246,
Lake City, FL 32055

Sales Help at Florida Visitors
Center. Benefits, hourly wage
plus commission. Excellent
opportunity with National
company. Westgate Resorts.
Call Ed. 904-540-2314 or
Connie 386-344-0082
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

120 Medical
Employment

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05530172
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
EXP MAMMOGRAPHY
TECH wanted full time,
for private Radiology office.
AART & Mammography
certification req. Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044
DENTAL HYGIENIST
needed. Full Time position
M-F 9:00 5:00pm Lake City
Office. Salary Commensurate with
experience. Please fax resume to:
386-752-3122 or email to'
caw70(aol.com
Desto Home Care is accepting
applications for Medical Billing/
Customer Svc. Prefer someone
who has medical billing exp. No
Calls. Apply in person at or drop
of resume to: Desoto Home Care
311 N. Marion Ave. Lake City
MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resumeto P.O. Box
805 Lake City, Florida 32056

240 Schools&
24 Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees.,Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
2 FEMALE 8 moth old
Rottweiler/Bullmastiff pups.
CKC. Parent on site. FREE to
Good Home. 386-984-6796
German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205 '
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances
GE REFRIGERATOR
18-20 cu ft.
Very clean. $250. obo.
386-292-3927
KENMORE Front Load white
washing machine. Works great.
$250. obo
386-292-3927

403 Auctions

Surplus Property Auction for the
Columbia County School Board.
Saturday Jan 28 at 9am
2 IH66 pass buses, 1(98)&1(95)
IH34 pass busses with chair lifts.
92 Ford Taurus, tools, tables, desk
chairs, file cabinets, engine stand,
walk inrefrigerator, walk in
freezer, coolers, stainless steel
tables and more. Term: Cash,
Check, VISA, MC. Directions
from downtown LC go N on US
441 for 2 miles to sale site on Left.
Inspection will be Fri Jan. 27
from 9-3 www.elrodauctions.com
(904)699-7067 AB 1698

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00.
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
2 CHEST of Drawers.
Both for $30.00
386-365-0262

4 METAL
KITCHEN CHAIRS
REALLY NICE. $20.00
386-365-0262
RECLINER
Fair Shape.
$20.00
386-365-0262

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
,, .- -


REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


FiND11


confused?


Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


BUY IT-


I',


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r










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


430 Garage Sales
Leather 3 sweater couch, 2 recliners
built in. 2 real comfy recliners.
Also; full living room set couch 2
swivel chairs, end & coffee tables.
Also, dining room, real oak table
w/ 6 chairs, china cabinet & china.
Plus serving buffet and end table.
All $ Best Offer. 914 SW Lamboy
Cr. Lake City.
MOVING SALE, Wed. 1/25 -
Sun. 1/29.7-?, 832 S.W. Biscayne
Gln, off McFarlane, antiqs., 2 bed-
rooms/like new mattresses, stereo.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
BISSEL Spot Cleaner machine.
Good condition.
$20.00
386-365-0262
FOR SALE
Kennedy 7-Drawer Machinist
Chest $45.00
Call 758-6886
FOR SALE
Pair Parallel Jaw Wooden Clamps
$35.00
Call 368-768-6886
Georgous electric fireplace.
See picture on Craigslist,
Gainesville, ID 2798925013.
$950. 386-344-1060

450 Good Things
Sto Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
'It's.Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
U6 0 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3/2 partially furnished MH
fenced 15 ac. in Suwannee Coun-
ty. SOme farm and animal main-
tance exp. desirable. Terms neg.
386-454-7139 or 305-216-9893
3BR/2BA SWMH on 1 acre in
Ellisville. Private lot
$460. mo 1st, last plus deposit.
.. 386-454-2250.
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
640 Mobile Homes
S for Sale
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Dealer in NW Florida Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating THEIR Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used Mobile Home-
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext 210
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-75'2-6138
Brandywine Apairtments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.'
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.


Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Great location W of 1-75, spacious.
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-315-2509 or 965-5560
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo.plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951


710 Unfurnished Apt. 870 Real Estate
For Rent 870 Wanted


The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 V For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
SUnfurnished
730Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba CountryCottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment. -
Close to downtown & shopping.
$485. mo $585 dep.
386-344-2170
2BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$450 mo.
386-752-0335
Monday -Friday 8A-4P
3/2 Brick Home, fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent w/option to
purchase available. 386-752-5035
X 3114 7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
Nice in town 2br/lba CH/A
$600. mo. $600 deposit.
386-758-3922 or
386-344-5065

750 Business &
Office Rentals
2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1100sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise,"any preference,,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly'
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

820 Farms &
U Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded ,
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605








Lake City Reporter


0553'01(5
The Department of Veterans
Affairs'. Lake City Medical
Director. is seeking to lease
8.800 to 9.000 net usable square
feet for a succeeding or new
lease for the Lake City
Administrative Office. The site
shall have adequate parking
for approximately 80 vehicles.
including 3 dedicated handicap-
ped parking spaces. The site
shall be handicapped accessible
in accordance with the Uniform
Federal Accessibility Standards
(4 CFR 101-19.6. App A) and
shall conform to Federal Laws
& Regulations governing,
Federal Leases, site renovations,
construction and fire codes. A
lease for up to 10 years will be
considered. Expected occupancy
is required by
NOVEMBER 2012.
To be considered, the space
shall be within the delineated
area and within walking distance
(1/8th of a mile) of Public
Transportation. The delineated
area boundary is defined as:
North to: Intersection of U.S.
441 and County Road 100A
West to: Intersection of
Interstate 75 and U.S. Highway
90 South to: Intersection of
U.S. 41/441 and County Road.
252 East to: Intersection of
State Road 100 and U.S. High-
way 90 Usable square feet does
not include such common
building areas as stairs,
elevators, mechanical and utility
rooms, ducts, shafts, vestibules,
public corridors, and public
toilets required by local code.
The Government is limited by
law (40 USC 278a, as Amended
10-1-81) to pay no more than
the appraised fair rental value
for space. Please hote: This
advertisement is NOT a solicita-
tion for offers, nor is-it a request
for proposals. A solicitation for
offers may be issued by the
Department of Veterans Affairs
at a later date. Interested parties
shall provide evidence that
properties are outside the 100
year flood plain. A market
survey will be conducted by the
Department of Veterans
Affairs. For consideration,
please provide the following:
1) Site location;
2) Property description;
3) Total square footage;
4) Floor plans;
5) Photographs.
To be considered, interested
parties (owners, brokers or their
legal representatives) shall
provide a written statement from
the building owner stating
that the interested party has
the authority to represent
the building owner. The
aforementioned information
shall be submitted no later than
4 p.m. on February 6, 2012
to: Rachel Griner,
Contracting Officer
Department of Veterans Affairs,
Activity 8 SAO East
619 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: 386-755-3016 EXT 3660
Email: Rachel.Griier@va.gov.
RESPONDENTS ARE
ADVISED THAT THE VA
ASSUMES NO
RESPONSIBILITY TO
AWARD A LEASE BASED
UPON RESPONSES TO THIS
ADVERTISEMENT.

951 Recreational
51 Vehicles

2003 Allegro 30DA. Workhorse
Chassis. 18300 miles, garage kept.
Excellent cond. w/many extras
$40,000. 386-754-5660


G E 'www.lakecityreporter.com


CONNECTED




NEWS

WEATHER

*OPINION N

SPORTS

ARCHIVES

CLASSIFIED

COMMUNITY

ENTERTAINMENT


STAY


CONNECTED


High Visibility
All utilities furnished including Internet
Kitchen and bathroom facilities included
Partially furnished
Several size offices available

GREAT LOCATION FOR
PERSONAL SERVICE BUSINESS
Please call Buddy Slay@386-755-1666
or Dale DeRosia@386-623-3004


t~

&



~-


.' .gFeaturin


'Teddy Mac" McMi


4. g.,-


SAVE THE DATE

January 27th & 28th


Sunday, January 29th

Gospel Brunch with Elvis


IV

Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!


U 0031940 =,il9.l i i


I


"IT





FST IN THE




CLASSIFIEDS



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from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds.

Let our sales team help you place

an ad today, in print and online!


Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com



Lake City Reporter


lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


Classified Department: 755-5440








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2012


Classified Department: 755-5440


*a sme oca$h
*ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
only 7


4 LINES 3 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!

(386) 755-5440


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-623-9026
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.
E m 'GtY
Vehicle Sol d,
Call Maryk"3i,


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


.. ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


.. ..
2009 Travel Trailer
39 foot, self-contained, 2
slides, awning, W/D, many
extras.
$23,500 OBO
Call Cell
443-306-8710


2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
Price Reduced $5,000
Only 18,300 rhiles, garage
kept motorhome. Exc.
cond. w/many extras.
$40,000
Call
386-754-5660


I . . . ... *. -


Space is limited call today!


|p',L--.. ....... .A..


* Tr aMnable ..:.Iun, .:.,rrr.:l Ir ,.:, i unri, .,j ,- :-r,,r,) n r r.:,r,,ner, :

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* Feed a.:rl< -ducr,.or, t. TrrT.. t p r d-uC .* h l,rln v
* uro ian, pr.c,-..: r: ,.t ..:.e l-,h 11 n .
* El-ti .:.n i.: d.iar-, t.:.r .- Tprn ;l lr n i tih r -r ri, -l
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* Rechargeable option (some models)


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for millions of people for over 60 years."
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Gainesville
Sears Miracle-Ear
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6201 Newberrv Rd.


352-31
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Sat.By A


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Lake City
Miracle-Ear i Gateway
Gateway Center Center
1077 US Hwy. 90 W. WBaya Ave
386-466-0902
M-F 9-4
Sat. By Appointment 90
www.miracle-ear-lakecity.com


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