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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01757
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 21, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01757
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








000017 120312 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943
Saturday, .... ,


Re


ikecityreporter.com


,orter


Vol. 137, No. 302 N 75 cents


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Report
Lake City educator, school administrator and historian Morris Williams speaks Friday in front of a Palatka holly tree that was dedicated
in honor him during the Lake City/Columbia County Florida Arbor Day celebration held in front of the Columbia County School Board
Administrative Complex. Williams said he was "floored" when he found out the was to be honored. "This is the absolute .highlight of my life,"
Williams said.



For one who planted


seeds of knowledge, a tree


Life-long educator
Morris Williams honored
on Arbor Day.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com

Morris Williams has spent
his life as an educator,
starting as a teacher
before working as a coun-
selor, assistant principal
and principal in Columbia County schools.
Though he retired in 1990, Williams
continued to work as an educator, though
most of it was outside the classroom.
He began his retirement by collect-
ing school memorabilia for a museum.
He .helped organize the Columbia county
Public Schools Foundation and create the
Take Stock in Children program, which
currently helps more than 200 at-risk stu-
dents in five counties.
He spent a decade taking books to the
Columbia County Jail, and he worked as
a night-school registrar and counselor. In
between the many community projects he
supported, Williams co-authored a book,
Lake City Florida: A Sesquicentenpial
Tribute. He also wrote a column in the


Santorum to

visit Lake City

on Thursday


GOP hopeful will
swing by on way
to Jax debate.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Presidential candidate
Rick Santorum is slated to
visit Lake City next week as
he makes his way through
the state looking for votes
to gain the Republican pres-
idential nomination.
Santorum has been bat-
tling Mitt Romney, Newt
Gingrich and Ron Paul for


Williams shakes hands witi students from the Gifted Program
Columbia County Florida Arbor Day event.


Lake City Reporter on and off for nearly A Palatka holly, about 12-feet tall, was
a decade. planted on the front lawn of the school
Friday, it was time for Williams to be district's administration offices during a
recognized for his contributions during the ceremony commemorating Arbor Day and
annual Arbor Day celebration in Lake City. WILIAMS continued 3A


the party nod.
Santorum, a former U.S.
Senator from Pennsylvania,
is scheduled to be at the
Lake City _
Mall from
3 4:30 p.m.
Thursday. E
The North
Central
Florida Tea
Party is
sponsoring Santorum
the event.
Sharon Higgins, North
Central Florida Tea Party
secretary/treasurer, said all
VISIT continued on 3A


Second


captain


placed


on leave

But case is unrelated to
that of previous LCPD
capt., says city manager.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Lake City Police Department Capt.
John Blanchard has been placed on paid
administrative leave as the city conducts
an internal investigation into allegations
of inappropriate activity and conduct, city
officials said.
City manager Wendell Johnson said
Blanchard was placed on paid administra-
tive leave Friday at 2 p.m.
According to a memorandum .from
Johnson to Blanchard, on Jan. 11 Chief
Argatha Gilmore informed Johnson about
"allegations of a contrary nature" in refer-
ence to Blanchard and Gilmore has kept
Johnson informed of her activity into the
matter.
Thursday, Gilmore and Johnson met
with Blanchard in the Lake City Police
Department conference room and gave
Blanchard detailed information regarding
the potential magnitude of the situation.
"Due to the nature and extent of this
situation, you (Blanchard) are placed dn
paid administrative leave effective today
(Friday)," Johnson wrote. "The purpose
of the leave period is to allow the City to
conduct an internal investigation of the
CAPTAIN continued on 3A



Jobless


rate dips


to three


year low


State unemployment
falls below 10%;
Columbia's down slightly.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida's unemploy-
ment rate fell below-10 percent for the first
time in nearly three years in December.
Meanwhile, the jobless rate in Columbia
County fell three-tenths of a point to 9.6
percent.
Gov. Rick Scott captained a brief confer-
ence call Friday to tout Florida's 9.9 per-
cent seasonally adjusted unemployment
as evidence that his strategy for putting
the state back to work is successful. The
figures represented Florida's best unem-
ployment rate since April 2009 when 9.7
percent of the workforce was idled.
Scott campaigned on creating some
700,000 new jobs over a'seven-year period
assuming he'd win re-election in 2014. He
said his strategy has led to the creation of
140,000 new jobs since he took office in
January 2011.
"These changes include streamlining
government, removing barriers to job
creation and eliminating burdensome
regulations," said Scott, who didn't take
questions afterward.
Florida's unemployment rate is still
significantly above the 8.5 percent nation-
al unemployment figure and represents
913,000 eligible workers who are still
RATE continued on 3A


3Is nanniiCALL US:
,(386)752-1293 7
SUBSCRIBE TO 7 5
THE REPORTER: Partly Cloudy
Voice: 755-5445
i Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A
1 84264 00S020 Voice:ia5a:9400


Opinion ................ 4A
Faith &Values............ 5A
Calendar ................ 6A .
Advice & Comics......... 7A
Puzzles ................. 8A


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
li .j 2 ii : ,'2V_ t -i:3


COMING
SUNDAY
I_-. nd .
(I Ii',-,n _


Rocket launch delayed


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The SpaceX Dragon Capsule is mated with its trunk inside the com-
pany's launch processing hangar in Cape Canaveial in November 2011.
The first commercial cargo run to the International Space Station has
been put off until spring. SpaceX planned to launch its unmanned sup-
ply ship on Feb. 7, but the company said more testing was needed. On
Friday, officials confirmed the launch would not occur until late March.


.1











2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 2012


FLORIDAA'
LOlO Wednesday:
"<5iw 8-33-36-40-43-51
x5


$H ) Friday:
,,,Afternoon: 2-2-7


Friday:
Afternoon: 7-9-7-2


ei Thursday:
11-18-22-29-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Blues singer Etta James dies at 73


LOS ANGELES Etta James, the
feisty rhythm and blues singer whose
raw, passionate vocals anchored many
hits and made the yearning ballad "At
Last" an enduring anthem for wed-
dings, commercials and even President
Barack Obama, died Friday. She was
73.
James had been suffering from
dementia and kidney problems, and
was battling leukemia. In December
2011, her physician
announced that her
leukemia was terminal,
and asked for prayers .
for the singer.
During her illness, -
her husband Artis
Mills and her two sons
fought bitterly over
control of her $1 mil- James
lion estate, though a
deal was later struck keeping Mills
as the conservator and capping the
singer's expenses at $350,000.
James died at Riverside Community
Hospital, with her husband and sons at
her side, her manager, Lupe De Leon,
said. "It's a tremendous loss for her,
fans around the world," he said. "She'll
be missed. A great American singer.
Her music defied category."
Boldness was as much a trademark
of James, a member of the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame, as her platinum-.
dyed mane.
"Etta James was a pioneer. Her ever-
changing sound has influenced rock
and roll, rhythm and blues, pop, soul
and jazz artists, marking her place
as one of the most important female
artists of our time," said Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame President and CEO
Terry Stewart
She scored her first hit when she
was just a teenager with the sugges-
tive "Roll With Me, Henry," which had
to be changed to "The Wallflower" in
order to get airplay. Over the years,


she'd notch many more, carving a
niche for herself with her husky, soul-
ful voice and her sassy attitude, which
permeated her songs.

Brooks gives tearful
testimony during hearing

CLAREMORE, Okla. Country
singer Garth Brooks has given a
tearful account to an
Oklahoma jury of
his failed efforts to
honor his late mother
by getting a women's
health center named
after her.
Brooks choked up
Friday while testifying ,',
in his lawsuit against
Integris Canadian Brooks
Valley Regional
Hospital. He is seeking the return
of $500,000 he gave the hospital and
punitive damages.
Brooks says he donated, the money
to the hospital in his hometown of
Yukon thinking he had a deal with its
president, James Moore, to name a
planned women's center after his late
mother, Colleen. But the women's
center was never built Moore says
there was never such an agreement

2 hospitalized after stage
collapses at Bluesfest
TORONTO The main stage at
Ottawa Bluesfest collapsed Sufiday
night during a Cheap Trick concert as
a severe thunderstorm sent the musi-
cians and thousands of fans running
for cover. At least five people were
injured, one seriously.
Cheap Trick's band members got
off the stage safely, but witnesses said
they were thrown off their feet'
"Everyone is okay and we. are so


lucky to be alive and hope that all
the fans are okay too," the band, best
known for hits including "Surrender",
"I Want You to Want Me" and 'The
Flame", said in a message posted on
Facebook.
Video of the Bluesfest site posted
on YouTube within minutes of the
storm's passing showed a stage that
had crumpled and collapsed over elec-
tronic equipment Twisted shards of
inetal jutted out from the stage, which
stood several stories tall before it was
destroyed.
Marc Messier, a spokesman for
Ottawa Fire Services, said a 49-year-
old man was in serious condition with
abdominal, pelvic and leg injuries.
Another had a spinal injury and a third
person experienced chest pains. At
,least eight other people were treated
at the scene for minor issues including
twisted ankles and anxiety.

Vanilla Ice. Project goes
ahead with another season
MIAMI An unlikely home
improvement show hosted by 1990s
rapper Vanilla Ice is set to premiere
its second season with the remodel-
ing of another South Florida home.
During the 13-episode run of
"The Vanilla Ice Project" on the DIY
Network, the artist, whose real name
is Rob Van Winkle, and his crew
will take a dilapidated Palm Beach
County mansion along the Intercostal
Waterway and bring it into the 21st
century with technology that isn't on
the market yet
Van Winkle's passion for real estate
and renovation took hold in the early
1990s, after his hit "Ice Ice Baby"
made him an international star with
millions in the bank. He first bought
a home on Miami Beach's exclusive
Star Island.
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


World Golf Hall of
Famer Jack Nicklaus is 72.
Opera singer Placido
Domingo is 71.
Singer Richie Havens
is 71.
Singer Mac Davis is 70.
Singer-songwriter Billy
Ocean is 62.
U.S. Ambassador to
China Gary Locke is 62.
Attorney General Eric


Holder is 61.
Microsoft co-founder
Paul Allen is 59.
Actor-director Robby
Benson is 56.
Actress Geena Davis
is 56.
Basketball Hall of
Famer Hakeem Olajuwon
is 49.
Actress Charlotte Ross
is 44.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation................755-5445
Online..'. www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lisfied Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.'
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S..Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon. ... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed, by 6:30 a:m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia Cpunty, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeksu................... $48.79
52 Weeks .................. $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................. $82.80
52 Weeks ....... ...........$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLOI


Early voting to start
in state today
TALLAHASSEE Early
voting in the Republican
presidential primary is
set to begin throughout
Florida the same day
South Carolina holds its
primary.
Voters in all 67 Florida
counties will be able to go
to the polls Saturday and
casts ballots.
Early voting began
Monday in Hillsborough,
Hardy, Hendry, Monroe
and Collier counties. The
number of days available
to vote ahead of the Jan. 31
primary is shorter in the
rest of the state because of
a new voting law that is not
being applied in those five
counties.
The early voting period
will end the following
Saturday in at least 62
counties. Elections super-
visors can keep polls open
up to 12 hours a day in 62
counties and 8 hours a day
in the five counties that,
began voting last Monday.

Ex-lifeguard guilty
in sex-related case
DAYTONA BEACH A
former beach patrol cap-
tainf has been convicted of
asking a former lifeguard
to lie to authorities during
an investigation of sexual
activity with teenage girls
within the central Florida
agency.
It took jurors an hour
Thursday to find 38-year-
old Jecoa Simmons guilty
of solicitation of-perjury.
He faces up to five years in
prison.
The jury heard recorded
phone conversations
between Simmons and a
lifeguard he had a sexual
relationship with when she
was 19. Simmons made
the calls from a pay phone
and didn't know they were
recorded. In the conversa-
tions, he told her to lie to
investigators.
* Simmons was fired from


the Volusia County Beach
Patrol after investigators
started looking into allega-
tions of sexual relation-
ships between beach patrol
officers and underage
girls. He was arrested in
2010.

Judge denies death
appeal of inmate
CLEARWATER A judge.
has denied a late appeal
from a Florida inmate
scheduled to be executed
next month.
The ruling came Friday
in the case of 65-year-old
Robert Waterhouse. He
was sent to death row for
the rape and murder of a
29-year-old woman in St
Petersburg in January 1980.
At the center of his appeal
was a new witness who said
he saw Waterhouse leaving
a bar with two men, not the
victim, on the night she was
killed. Senior Circuit Judge
Robert Beach rejected it
after hearing testimony last
week.
Waterhouse is scheduled.
to be executed Feb. 15. Gov.
Rick Scott signed the death
warrant earlier this month.

4 more charged in
FAMU hazing case
TALLAHASSEE Four
Florida A&M band mem-
bers have been charged
with hazing in connection
with a series of beat-
ings and paddlings last
year at a private home in
Tallahassee.
Court records released
Friday show Denise Bailey,
Brandon Benson, Hakeem
Birch and Anthony Mingo
were booked and released
on bail from the Leon
County Jail.
The latest charges are
separate from an incident
where another female
band member was beaten
so severely that her thigh
was broken.
FAMU drum major
Robert Champion also
died after an alleged haz-


RIDA THE WEATHER

ing incident during a trip - ,'" '
to Orlando last year. : ,,.
PARTLY PARTLY; MOSTLY.
Man ordered to jail CLOUDY CLOUDY CLOUDY
after twice acquitted C O U :


FORT LAUDERDALE -
A South Florida judge sen-
tenced a man to 15 years
in prison even though two
separate juries acquitted
him on charges of fondling
pre-teen girls.
The South Florida Sun
Sentinel reports 40-year-
old Corey Hipscher
spent more than an hour
Thursday trying to con-
vince Broward Circuit
Judge Martin Bidwill that
he'd already been found
not guilty.
Bidwill pointed out that
Hipscher committed a new
crime while on probation.
He ordered the stiffest
sentence he could.
Hips'cher's lawyers say
they will appeal.
Hipscher was accused
of fondling a 10-year-old
girl at Quiet Waters Park
in 2009. Once the alle-
gations became public,
records show two more
girls ages 7 and 8 came
forward with claims he
did the same thing to
them while they were visit-
ing from the Dominican
Republic.

Man found dead in
burning mobile home
BIG PINE KEY A
65-year-old man was found
dead inside a burning
motor home at a camp-
ground in the Florida Keys
Monroe County Sheriff's
deputies responded
to reports of a fire at
Seahorse Campground
on Big Pine Key late
Thursday. They spot-
ted a body on a mattress
inside the motorhome, but
couldn't get inside because
of intense smoke and heat.
Fire rescue officials later
retrieved the body of the
man, whose name has not
been released.
(AP)


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Fort Myers
Gainesville
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..... Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
6 56, 7 'i" Lake City
Miami
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West Palm Beach Ocala
.5 Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 7 E* Pensacola
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PRECIPITATION
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Year total
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Normal year-to-date


78
137
66
42
5 rin 19.37
9 ir, 19'77


0.00'
0.64"
0.64"
1.97"
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M,:,,:n r ri- s 1. -1..?.-l p rn.
Moonnse tom. 6:42 a.m.
Moonset tom. 5:38 p.m.


Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb.
23 30 7 14
New First Full Last


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.Forecasted Iiapera ire 'Feel lile" twiratie,


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather com


S Forecasts, data and
graphics 2012 Weather
I Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
ater f www.weatherpublisher.com





Getl Connected



|A A MAAAl 'lj l
i~y^


Daily Scripture

"[Trials and Temptations]
Consider it pure joy, my broth-
ers and sisters, whenever
you face trials of many kinds,
because you know that the
testing of your faith produces
perseverance."

James 1:2-3 NIV

Lake City Reporter


"~'"""


dIENEEMM










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 2012 3A


CAPTAIN: Second captain placed on administrative leave from police department

Continued From Page 1A


allegations which have been provided.
While on leave, our normal pay and all
benefits will remain intact."
Johnson would not specifically address
the allegations.
'There are allegations, I can't get into
the specifics, because he (Blanchard) is
subject to the Policeman's Bill of Rights,"
he said. 'There are allegations of inap-
propriate activity and conduct. Again
they are allegations, but that's what we
are going to follow up on in the general
investigation."
Johnson said it was he who placed
Blanchard on paid administrative leave


and he discussed the matter with Gilmore
and the city's labor attorney before mak-
ing the decision.
Johnson said he does not plan to con-
duct the internal investigation through
the city attorney's office.
'This investigation will be done by
an independent authority from another
police department," he said, noting the
specifics haven't been arranged yet.
It is not known how long Blanchard
will remain on paid administrative leave.
"We'll follow the statutes as a far as
time frame," he said. "We're going to
move as expeditiously as possible."


With Blanchard on paid administra-
tive leave, both of the police depart-
ment's captains are unavailable to work
as internal investigations are conducted.
Capt. Robert Smith was placed on paid
administrative leave in November. No
interim captain has been named in their
absence.
"Before we promoted Capt. Blanchard
and hired Capt. Smith, we went a year
without a captain. Lt. (John) Stock and
the sergeants handled that work load for
that period," Johnson said. "We're going
to move as quickly as possible and try
to get results so we can get back to the


operating efficiency that we need."
Johnson did not look favorably on hav-
ing both of the department's captains
on paid administrative leave at the same
time.
"It's very discouraging and very dis-
heartening," he said. "It's coincidental,
but sometimes these kind of things hap-
pen. It's unusual to say the least."
Johnson said the cases involving the
captains are unrelated.
"No one of them as a bearing on the
other," he said. "This is something with
Capt. Blanchard that came up that was
totally unexpected."


VISIT: Santorum plans

stop in Lake City
Continued From Page 1A


tary/treasurer, said all of
the presidential candidates
were invited.
Wilbur Corbittis the event
coordinator for the North
Central Florida Tea Party
and Higgins said he sent an
e-mail to all the presidential
contacts inviting them to
the area to speak.
'The Florida Chairman
of Santorum's campaign got
back in touch with Will and
they started working out
the details for .Santorum to
come here," Higgins said.
Santorum was elect-
ed to the U.S. House of
Representatives in 1990 at
the age of 32, and served in
the U.S. Senate from 1995
to 2007. In 2000, he was
elected Senate Republican
Conference Chairman.
Santorum finished the
Iowa Republican caucus-
es 34 votes ahead of Mitt
Romney, but results from
several precincts are miss-
ing and the actual results
may never be known,
according to a final certi-
fied tally released Thursday
by the Iowa GOP. The new
numbers show 29,839 votes
for Santorum and 29,805
votes for Romney, accord-
ing to the party.
Higgins said she has not
been given details specifical-
ly indicating what Santorum


will discuss during his local
address.
"I hope he talks about
the economy," she said. "I
haven't been to any of his
events to hear what he does,
but I think the economy
is the biggest issue facing
us as Americans and North
Floridians."
Santorum is scheduled to
fly here and land and the Lake
City Municipal Airport and will
travel in a 45-foot long motor
coach to the Lake City Mall for
his speech.
'We don't have a whole lot
of time with him and we're
trying to maximize our time,"
she said.
Santorum is scheduled to
arrive at 2:45 p.m. and has
plans to be back at the air-
port by 4:45 p.m.
"He's going on to
Jacksonville for a [GOP]
debate at the University of
North Florida," Higgins said.
The debate will be tele-
vised.
Santorum will be flying
into Lake City from a cam-
paign stop in West Florida.
The Columbia and
Hamilton County Republican
parties also partnered with
the North Central Tea Party
to bring Santorum to the
area. " ". ' .
Florida's GOP presidential
primary is set for Jan. 31.


Signal upgrade to start Tuesday


From staff reports
Work is scheduled to begin
Tuesday on a Florida Department of
,Transportation project to upgrade the
traffic signals at two State Road 100
intersections in Lake Butler.
The project includes replacing the
traffic signals and concrete poles at
the intersection of State Road 100 and
Lake Avenue and at the intersection of
State Road 100 and State Road 121. The
sidewalks and curbs at both intersec-
tions will be made wheelchair acces-
sible and pedestrian signals will also
be replaced. .
Work will be done during the day-
time Monday through Friday with lane


closures and flaggers directing traffic.
At the intersection of State Road 100
and Lake Avenue, lane closures will
only be allowed after 8:30 a.m. At the
intersection of State Road 100 and State
Road .121, lane closures 'will only be
allowed between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. No
night work is scheduled at this time.
Traffic will be monitored and lane clo-
sures will be adjusted if necessary.
Crews are scheduled to begin
installing new poles at the State Road
121 intersection first and then at the
Lake Avenue intersection. The new
poles and signals will be installed
prior to the removal of the old signal.
Power will be re-routed so there are
no scheduled outages to businesses


in the area of each intersection.
Traffic Control Devices, Inc. of
Altamonte Springs has been hired
by FDOT to complete the project for
$224,650. The work is expected to
take 50 days to complete, depending
on bad weather or other unexpected'
circumstances.
An average of 7,100 vehicles travel
this section of State Road 100 each
day.
For additional information regard-
ing this project or other FDOT proj-
ects around Northeast Florida, visit
www.nflroads.com. The public can
also keep up with the weekly prog-
ress on the project by following the
FDOT on Twitter @MyFDOT_NEFL


WILLIAMS: Educator honored with Arbor Day tree

Continued From Page 1A


Williams.
"We all honor a man
who has honored us," said
Bettye Lane, a member of
the Lake City beautifica-
tion committee that chose
Williams for the honor.
Lane described Williams
as "preserver of our commu-
nity's memories" who always
did the right thing.
"He shies away from being
called a hero, but he is a great
man," she said.
At the beginning of the cer-
emony, former county com-
missioner James "Mr. Month"
Montgomery read the famous


poem Trees, written nearly a
century ago by Joyce Kilmer.
He later learned he stole the
thunder from Williams' son,
who also planned to read
Kilmer's poem.
Williams said he was espe-
cially pleased to have a tree
planted in his honor at the site
where he spent so much time
as a student and educator.
"Over the span of years,
I have walked every square
inch of this campus many
times over," he said. "This is
totally the high point of my
life. I deeply appreciate this
honor and I'm humbled by


Williams' son, Chris.
Williams, described the
tree as a "living monument"
to his father.
"It means a lot to me ana
my family," he said. "Ift's a
wonderful gesture. It's a
deeply special thing."
After the ceremony, Lane
said Friday marked the 13th
consecutive year the beau-
tification committee has
planted a tree in honor of
someone in the community
to commemorate Florida
.Arborpay.She said the orgai,
nization also recognizes the


national celebration of Arbor
Day held the last Friday of
April each year.
Organizers plant trees
at the location where- the
person being honored has
spent much of their time.
It's the first time a tree has
been planted at the school
district's administrative
offices to honor someone,
Lane said.
"We always look among
us to find someone who has
done much to enhance the
lives of everyone," Lane
said.' 'This was an easy
decision this year."


RATE: Florida's jobless rate

Continued From Page 1A


decreases


hunting for jobs across the
state. Florida has lagged
behind the national figures
for nearly four years.
"This commitmentto busi-
ness prosperity is working,"
said Scott, a Republican.
"Florida's job creators are
responding. "
But Rod Smith, chairman
of the Democrat Party in
Florida, was quick to chas-
tise Scott for killing more
jobs than he's created.
"Scott has favored an
extreme agenda that has
rejected jobs and slowed
growth," Smith said in a
statement from the party's
Tallahassee headquarters
that credited President
Barack Obama's leadership
with the improved job num-
bers in Florida.
Smith said the governor's
policies have led to thou-
sands of teachers, firefight-
ers, police and corrections
officers being laid off and
that he rejected federal
dollars for high speed rail
that could have led to up to
26,000 new jobs.
The leisure and hospital-
ity area has rebounded with
30,400 more jobs over the
previous 12 months while
7,900 government jobs at
the local, state and federal
level disappeared over that
period.
The hardest hit met-
ropolitan region was that
surrounding the Kennedy
Space Center in east-central
Florida where 3,500 jobs
have vanished, many as a
result of the shutdown of
NASA's 30-year-old shuttle
program.
Flagler County, a short
drive north of the Space
Center, suffers from the
state's highest unemploy-
ment with 13.9 percent
unemployment with Hendry
County in the southwest-
ern part of the state not
far behind at 13.5 percent
unemployment.
Monroe County, which


has 73,000 residents who
live mostly in the Florida
Keys, reported the stron-
gest employment with 6.2
percent of its workforce


sidelined. Many of the coun-
ties with low unemployment
were those with high pro-
portions of government
employees.


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In Memory of




Justin T.

Brown
11/7/1981-1/21/2011


Forever loved, forever missed. *
In minds and hearts you're always here. t
Forever remembered.


Old fashioned friendly service isjust a way of life at Peo-

pies State Bank. We'll even bring our bank to your busi-

ness. Call Christina Summers, Cessie Cothran, Laurie

Evans or Heather Turbeville today. 586.754.0002


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a free shoulder mount and deer processing

/with Peoples State bank's big Bang Buck

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ends January 22nd. Peoples State Bank.

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OPINION


Saturday, January 21, 2012


ANTE


ONE
OPINION


Finally

a positive

change in

immigration

policy

p reident Barack
Obama's fourth year
in office will be the
12th consecutive -
year that Americans
have lived under a socialistic, ,
Big Government approach to
immigration. In fact, Obama
has taken these hawkish tac-
tics further than George W.
Bush ever did. Since 2009,
the Obama administration has
deported illegal immigrants at a
rate doubling the Bush admin-
istration's most aggressive
deportation drives.
Socialists like to control the
workforce and the freedom to
. roam, so aggressive immigration
policies come naturally.
But 2012 is an election year,
and Obama's deportation pro-
gram has bruised his support
among Hispanics. In an attempt
to win them back, the president
plans to adjust a policy that has
ripped apart families and has kept
illegals from becoming legal
As the policy stands, an illegal
immigrant who wants to be legal
must leave the country to apply
for a green card. Some are barred
from returning for up to 10 years.
This keeps people who want to
comply with the law from doing
so, as being separated from loved
ones and work for as long as 10
years is virtually unthinkable. The
process also victimizes children
by depriving them of a parent
The Obama administration
announced a regulatory change
that would allow non-criminal ille-
gal immigrants to remain in the
U.S. while applying for legal sta-
tus. The change would guarantee
that more illegal immigrants take
steps to comply with the law.
This is a positive move from
an administration that has, until
now, indulged a ham-handed
approach to immigration that was
more oppressive than anything
embarked upon by our last three
Republican presidents.
The policy change should
please activists who say their only
concern involves the residency
status of illegal immigrants..If we
help illegals become legal, the
problem of illegality subsides.
Everyone wins.
Northwest Florida Daily News

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity.and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Romney runs hot and cold


on global warming


Willard Mitt
Romney these
days could
not be more
explicit about
abandoning President Barack
Obama's carbon-dioxide restric-
tions.
"Irresponsibly," Romney
wrote in an Aug. 28 op-ed for
Foster's Daily Democrat in New
Hampshire, the Environmental
Protection Agency "declared
carbon dioxide, the same
carbon dioxide that humans
exhale, to be a 'pollutant' that
poses risks to human health."
He also observed: "Congress
had the good sense not to com-
pound our economic challenges
by imposing cap-and-trade's
extraordinary costs on the
American people."
Romney's website offers this
carbon-friendly promise: "Mitt
Romney will eliminate the regu-
lations promulgated in pursuit
of the Obama administration's
costly and ineffective anti-car-
bon agenda."
Well, surprise, surprise!
Unlike this conservative aria,
Romney sang a totally different
tune as Massachusetts' liberal
Republican governor.
A recently exposed, online
dossier from the 2008 John
McCain campaign offers ,
200 pages of Romney's self-
contradictions, vacillations and
head scratchers. His views on
so-called global warming are.
just the tip of this nonmelting
iceberg of confusion.
McCain's database includes
Ryan Sager's New York Sun
story of April 20, 2007, in which
Romney embraces a 1940s fuel
source. "Liquefied coal, gosh,"
Romney said. "Hitler during the
Second World War I guess
because he was concerned about
losing his oil liquefied coal.
That technology is still there."
Less bizarre were Romney's
2003 comments to religious
leaders. According to the Los
Angeles Times on March 25,


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoil.com
2007, Romney said he was "ter-
rified" about "warming" and
found it "quite alarming."
In July 2003, Romney wrote
then-Gov. George Elmer Pataki
of New York, from one RINO
(Republican in name only) to
another. "Now is the time to
take action toward climate pro-
tection," Romney declared. He
advocated a "regional cap-and-
trade system" for New York and
Massachusetts.
In 2004, Romney launched
the Massachusetts Climate
Protection Plan, "a coordinated
statewide response to reduce
greenhouse gas emissions and
protect the climate," as his
office described it.
In a press release dated Dec.
7, 2005, Romney announced
that "strict state limitations on
carbon dioxide (C02) emis-
sions from power plants" would
take effect Jan. 1, 2006.
'These carbon emission lim-
its will provide real and imme-
diate progress in the battle to
improve our environment," the
communique quoted Romney.
This red tape, it noted, is .
"designed to lower emissions of
nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide
and mercury from power plant
smokestacks." Furthermore,
the experts with whom Romney
consulted "include John Holden
(sic) ... at Harvard University."
John Holdren now is
Obama's science adviser. S.
Fred Singer, a University of
Virginia professor emeritus
of physics and environmental
science, and founding father
of America's weather satellite
system, calls him "a rabid envi-


ronmentalist and collaborator
of the notorious Paul Ehrlich."
Singer says Holdren misled
Romney or his staff: "They con-
sider C02 a pollutant and men-
tion it along with sulfur dioxide,
nitrogen oxides and mercury
- all real pollutants, injurious to
human health. Clearly, they had
no clue about the science."
"No one would choose such a
green course, enlist such advis-
ers, and then suddenly reverse
himself," says Cato Institute
environmental scholar Patrick
Michaels. "As president,
Romney will revert to his more
familiar green self."
"Romney's press release
should be compared to more
recent statements in which
he has changed his views on
climate change," suggests the
Reason Foundation's Julian
Morris. 'The optimistic conclu-
sion would be that he changes
his mind in response to bet-
ter evidence. The pessimistic
conclusion would be that he
changes his mind in response
to the advice of pollsters."
Americans who thirst for
leadership driven by principles
rather than polls should go
see "The Iron Lady." Meryl
Streep, the finest actress in
recorded history, masterfully
portrays former British Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher.
In the film, Her Majesty's head
of government dominates the
United Kingdom, steady in her
conservative convictions and
convincing as she communi-'
cates them. As America drifts
among the waves like a faded
Champagne cork, these memo-
ries of Thatcher's rule trigger
goose bumps.
America now ponders some-
one who is flexible on virtually
everything even the air we
breathe. Clearly no Iron Lady,
Romney is the Man of Foil.

* Deroy Murdock writes this col-
umn for Scripps Howard News
Service.


If Romney wins, Bain comes to front


Perhaps the most
striking thing about
the current fight over
Mitt Romney's career
in private equity is
how little we know about it.
Romney has based his cam-
paign on his experience in pri-
vate business he talks about
it much more than his time
as governor of Massachusetts
- and yet, unlike his governor-
ship, Romney's business experi-
ence has not been the topic of
long and detailed public exami-
nation and debate.
Normally, when a candidate
runs a high-profile campaign,
as Romney did in the 2008
Republican presidential race,
everything in his background


Byron York
comes out in the form of opposi-
tion research. But it appears that
in 2007-2008, the John McCain
campaign, which delved into
Romney's every flip-flop, did not
delve deeply into the Bain years.
McCain's aides simply could not
conceive that Romney's busi-
ness career would become an
issue for generally pro-business
GOP voters.


The attitude in '08 was that
there wouldn't be much room in
a Republican primary for those
kinds of attacks. Those on the
McCain campaign felt they had
enough with the flip-flops.
Fast-forward four years. How
this issue plays out could be
critical to Romney's future, if
not in the GOP primaries, then
in the general election if he
is the nominee. Republicans
can be assured of one thing.
The vastly wealthy Obama re-
election apparatus is doing the
opposition research from every
conceivable angle. Sooner or
later, we'll learn more about
Romney's time at Bain.
* Byron York is a columnist for
Universal Press Syndicate. "


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Plenty of


politics in


pipeline


insider newspaper
Politico described
President Barack
Obama's decision to
reject the planned Canada-U.S.
Keystone XL pipeline as a politi-
cal "win-win" for both parties.
The reasoning is that the
Republicans would attract
independent voters angered
by high gas prices although
it would be years before the
Canadian oil would reach
the market and affect prices
- and attract generous politi-
cal contributions from the oil
companies, a slightly better
bet politically.
Meanwhile, the environ-
mentalists would be jolted out
of their political lethargy and
hit the bricks for Obama's
re-election, and the construc-
tion unions, who really want
the project and the jobs,
would have no choice but to
stick with Obama because
the Republicans have become
anathema to most of labor.
Whatever the political ben-
efits of the decision, it is a
lose-lose for domestic energy
policy and our relations with
Canada.
Technically, the pipeline
is not dead; a final decision
has only been delayed while
a more acceptable route
through an environmentally
sensitive region of Nebraska
is negotiated. Obama is
merely rejecting the project
to circumvent a Feb. 21 dead-
line imposed on him by the
Republicans, giving him more
time to review the route.
The White House would
like to stall the whole busi-
ness until after the election,
but he may not have that
luxury.
The Canadians professed
themselves "profoundly disap-
pointed" by the decision and
pointedly noted that there is
another energy project on the
boards, a $5.4 billion pipeline
from the Alberta oil sands
to ports in British Columbia
where the oil could be sold to
eager Asian buyers.
Already, the Republicans
are trying to make the
pipeline a campaign issue.
"Obama is destroying tens .of
thousands of American jobs
and shipping American energy
security to the Chinese," said
House Speaker John Boehner,
exaggerating on both counts.
(The number of potential
jobs tends to fluctuate wildly
depending which side of the
argument is trying to make
the case.)
Obama insisted that his
announcement was "not a
judgment on the merits of the
pipeline," but on "the arbi-
trary nature of the deadline."
OK. The deadline is now a
moot point, but negotiations
should begin on an acceptable
route and protections for the
water table. After all, the dis-
puted section is only 65 miles
in Nebraska, a small fraction
of the line's 1,700-mile length.
Sparsely populated western
Canada and eastern Alaska
have immense oil and natural-
gas reserves, and the lower
48 states are the natural mar-
ket for them. Ethanol, solar
panels, windmills, dim light
bulbs, bike paths and switch-
grass are all very nice, but
they're not going to do it for
us. At best, they chip away
at the margins of our energy
needs.
North America has the
capacity to be self-sufficient in
oil and gas, but we shouldn't


wait until a crisis point or
the politics are just right to
do something about it.

* Scripps Howard News Service
















FAITH &


VALUES


Tradition says that you
must have a "family" Bible.
Decades ago parents read
their "family" Bible to their
children. Children even
learned to read by reading this Bible.
Do you have a Bible so you can
read your favorite passages? If that
is all you are reading then you are
determining what is important in the
Bible. Paul said that God inspired
the Bible which is "profitable for
teaching, for reproof, for correction,
for training in righteousness; that
the man of God may be adequate,
equipped for every good work" (2
Timothy 3:16,17).
Do you carry a Bible to show how
spiritual you are? In the days of
Jesus, the Pharisees wore phylacter-
ies (Matthew 23:5) which came to be
considered the sign of a pious person.
Inside these wooden tubes which dan-
gled from their garments by leather
strips, were passages of Scripture.
This practice possibly began in the
days of Moses when the law spoke of
binding the word of God upon your
hand and forehead (Deuteronomy
6:8). However, Jesus condemned such
"showing" of piety.
Do you use your Bible to examine
the teachings of preachers and teach-
ers to make sure that what is taught
is actually the word of God? Luke
compliments the Bereans (Acts 17:11)
as "more noble-minded than those in
Thessalonica, for they received the
word with great eagerness, examining
the Scriptures daily, to see whether
these things were so."
Do you have a Bible to study it?
Do you want to be a "workman who
does not need to be ashamed, han-
dling accurately the word of truth" (2
Timothy 2:15)? Do you want to have ,


the understanding of the apostle Paul
concerning the mystery of Christ
(Ephesians 3:3-5), to be able to use it
to teach others (2 Timothy 2:2), and
to know what will determine your
eternal destiny (John 12:48; Romans
2:16)?
The most published book world-
"wide, the Bible is not some book men
wrote from their own intellect, but
rather as they were directed by God
(1 Corinthians 2:13; Ephesians 3:3),
combined "spiritual thoughts with
spiritual words." It is a manual, not an
heirloom. From it you should not only
read your
favorite BIBLICAL MEDITATION
passages,
but "the
whole
purpose of
God" (Acts
20:27).
Take your
Bible to
church,
but more Carlton McPeak
impor- carltonmc@msn.com
tantly, use
it daily to
"grow in the grace and knowledge of
our Lord and Savior Jesus" (2 Peter
3:18). Once you have learne4dwhat
God wants you to do, put it into prac-
tice so you can have eternal life.


Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist working
in the Lake City area. All Scriptural quota-
tions are from the New American Standard
Bible,/Holman Bible Publishers, unless oth-
erwise stated.


It has been said that Hebrews
chapter thirteen "is a basket of
beautiful fruit". They are the fruit
which the Lord looks for in the life
of the believer as a result of his
growing in grace. The more mature and
the healthier the tree, the better quality
of the fruit it will produce. As a tree is
known by its fruit, so too the progress of
the believer will be known. The past few
weeks we have talked about some of the
fruit of chapter thirteen. Today, we will
add another to the list, the "Fruit of our
Lips".
"Therefore by Him let us continually
offer the
BIBLE STUDIES sacrifice
of praise
to God,
that is the
fruit of our
lips, giving
thanks to
His name"
(Hebrews
S 13:15 NKJ).
Hugh Sherrill Jr. it is
ems-hugh43@comcastnet defined as
the sacrifice
of praise to
God, giving thanks to His name. It is
continually; not sporadic, and reserved
for certain occasions; such as testimonial
services and other special times. We are
to continue it when we go to work, when
we mingle with people socially and in
business. It does not necessarily mean
giving an oral testimony, but our lives
and conduct is to be one of praise and
thanksgiving.'We can testify without say-
ing a word. Refusal to indulge in the
questionable practice of the crowd is a
testimony without saying a word. A smile
when insults come your way, kindness
and patience when persecuted, courtesy
to people when they are not to you. These


are a few of the fruits of sacrifice of praise
to God. Bowing your head to ask grace
before a meal in a worldly, ungodly place
is as much a testimony as getting up to
speak. Remember, we are to produce the
fruit of our lip continually.
We should notice that the testimony of
our lips is called a "sacrifice of praise".
It means a sacrifice; and fruitfulness to
Christ may cost us something. It is not
always easy to be firm and unyielding
in the face of temptation. It may cost -a
friend, a job, a family member; but no sac-
rifice is too great when viewed in the light
of Calvary (read I Peter 4:14).
We need to be sure we suffer for His
name sake and not for our own sake.
We must always be wise as serpents and
harmless as doves when giving our testi-
mony. I was told the story of a man who
lost his job for talking about the Lord, giv-
ing out tracts. The sad thing about it his
job was neglected and his testimony dam-
aged because of this foolish mistake.
, Remember, our every action is a tes-
timony of our lips. Until our words are
backed up by works they will convince no
one. That is probably why the admonish-
ment to offer the fruit of our lips is men-
tioned after the other admonishments of
Hebrews chapter thirteen; love, hospital-
ity, sympathy, purity, confidence, submis-
sion, stability, and separation outside the
camp.. If we succeed in all. these, our tes-
timony will be believed, whether spoken
or by action.
How is your testimony?
Hugh G. Sherrill is a Bible teacher at
Eastside Baptist Church. Hugh G. Sherrill
ems-hugh43@comcast.net


!Wo ne f i
OBSiTEFICS& GviNrECOLrL O

(386)466-1106


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFadane Ave.
386-752-3900


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E Duval Street, Lake City
Sunday 10:30AM & Wednesday 7:00PM
www.firstassemblylc.com

GLA I NIN AS' EMBL OF G;)D
993 NW Lake Jeffery-Road

Sunday Worship 1) 3,.M bPMt
VWel FiTm Bitie Sluiy 7:00PM
'Art.urh .,n,,r uE S ,, ,R 'i'

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9 i4r,,
Siunday ',V,:r,.hip ", 4'. .4M & 6PF,'
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
nterim Fritur rI' n ri Er, l'erh:i

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship "0 0kt.1ubi. 13PM
'dj 6 00Pi, Fra,er Sevri, ,
hiloren, Miiiiii; 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422

LIVET M6SiOl!NAR, EAPTrl (H.'Ri:H
541 '1 E tiv i Sit l
(386)752-1990
Ru,,ild V WltlE P.i lJr
Sunday School 9:45AM
IuIdy Mmn ',V i,.,p 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
I9 rJ LIS H.,', 411
386-752-2664 '
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
"uhldav wi.rrniFp 11AM & 6PM
".'- o, Youth Ministry 6:30PM
-Pastor: Ron Thompson


5ALEM PRIMITIvE BRPTIST
Sunday Services u Xi' AM
P'.il:,r _lder Herm Grintffin
752-4198

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E Baya Drive*755-5553
1 jk,,11


TA6,.RHJA'LE PAPTIl CHIIRCH
44 i Ae.* 752-427.pt, 4
44 rE Mii r- A,, 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
10 P1dyt M-E

-'ainr il J, inrm.in

THE VINEYARD
Sunday School

iundijj lrlight


1832 SW Tomaka Terrace
rll S' ., 1 B t:-i i r :ms Dr)
I h fe ',:i l ay: illllldk_. Vt _n;l


CATHOLIC
iPIPHA i CATH.LI' CHURCH
1905 .;:; Epiphanriy CCri 752-4470
Sdtui,.' Vii MaLs; 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass I A 1 10:30 AM.
S' F?.D i:,pariri.tnjli, hi
.Lurd,, ,,,.)l Ruel,-u' Ecu:atli)r,
9:00AM-10:15AM


CHRISTIAN
CHRIST Si lEN1 CE;,' Si0:IET'
239 SE Baya Ave.


Sunday Service
'i.Jr'd .' r. ii b t i'j S.rii e


LAKE Ir rt 'HRlirtil COHIR(:H
. Hwy 247 S. 755-9436


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


CHURCH OF CHRIST
"JEW HORI7IIN
Church of Christ
jicirio.n & Tiine. 35.6-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St 752-5965
Sunday School 1 9:45AM
Sun Wc'rtiip 'I A jI31141 & 6UPM
,t.l Faniily Ni lh 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVAlGEL CH.lRCHOF GOD
3,)' iW Moriilur Glkn* 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Siindai wrriip 10:50 & 6:30
've'l Sp itijil Enni:meni 7PM
'Shrl'c. Youin CrLrLri
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Par tloruin R Hatiaway

EPISCOPAL
T JAMES tEPISCOFAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, FI 32025 386-752-2218
\hebsilt 'v,,, ;tlameila.e,:ty oru
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sunday 8:00& 10:OOAM
Wednesday 5:15PM
Priest Tik Rev. Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER U.ITHERAll CHUR.CHf
LCMS
1 12 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
;55 491i


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75*752-3807
Sunday Worship 9:30AM
Nursery Avail.
We-1 PRi Li. r fPM. Worship 7PM
Pastor/Reverend John David Bryant





Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW !tputy Jelf Do!is htue Infmwrly Plmunlont Rd,.
752-rioo1i !S:-.S(o.597-1526)
Vlnn..S;i! 8,.0,5:3c *Cli" s e Sun l ,


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973,8. Marion Ave. .
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday M.rohng \''.orihip
fasiial IN,') .-p S.rvl e 8:50AM
ra;dilni ', I"P.' r 11:00AM
~,'.i.jrT- ,:;p 1ul:flu : ~ 3i 1 a', i
for all ages:,
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
.-i -4438

TRINITY IJiiTJED tETHODISf CHULIRLH
Suriy Si,-,i:. "5,, Worship 11:00AM
'.'ll Bibl ?!u:' 0 FM ",, u Vr Noon
Friday Prayer 6:00-7:OOPM
Pastor lev FaihaM M eSue

.'SLF,' ME.MORIRAll ITED
17'i2 S MLIiFjri3sit 752-3513
A'lje ^i l it I umm:rn S.lii..ol)
,'ilGhnp 8:00 & t0 1iA1M
Pra rie wo'r, 6:OOPM
Sunday Sch:ol 9:00AM
',ij,'i n ioV, d
Awana (ages 3-18) 5:30-7:30PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey

WATER .iWN Ci LrCREiAToriNAL
MEIHII[SI CHURCH l
U ) 90 E turn on Cortez (next to Quality
.rii;:, h r ih o ,',.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun.Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wd fiijriiP.ie- ,,e 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OFTHE NAZARENE
Services:
.udiy Sc hol 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Yourii ir y. Criioi :, ; Minilry
'Yt. Cr.ii H, i'le'.-l.
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL HI INCH
NE Jones Way I NE v'a3,rgion St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
; .v.n liilf 'i', i:?. 6:00 PM



t \i FO\ im I.OIi I III% I RI
1. t m 1*1 I I l *lit 1IHII
Site Ireparauon Road Building t king Iots
lraiding & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


Vuth rSri:q V,' aner.ly 7 00PM
Muid-..eek SrricE Wednesday 0:, PM
For info cal 755-3408* Everyone Wetrorme


PRESBYTERIAN
l 1R PRESBYTERIAtl H RC'P H
69g bV B.iyr D' I ,: .''1,1)
Sun. School 10AM .urn iW,;i rip 'tAW,
Contemporary 9AM
-raditinal H11AM
'IlJR'.EER PRlOviDFl
Pa'-.i)r [r ROy A t2.cil
j wre(Ci l ui- Bil P,:,ir

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
C- hibit Liithi L r ti.tm-is
Celebration Service 9:30 & 11 65 AMi
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 DyalAve.,from Hwy 90 take
riliSl 'A l e fl r L Rv oj 5 1l' :atliu
church on left.* 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
I Lrii 0n :.:- Ine m .v :"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones* 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Filhi.,i.rte. R.ijad 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 AM.
:.iund and Fourth $uiiay; '10
PdaI, R C,,r.l R P F ,Pr i

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
-linwm y ^ -; E ,, B,,nl ,tH ',jy
Sunday School 10:OOAM
,',in rngVicrsli'p 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
'Alir'lday 7 'iPMt
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


Enterprises
Columbia Countys Feed Headquarters
TlED PET SUPPLIES IAWN & GARDEN
ANIMALIHEA.llII
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarers
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL
386-752-8098





Ig 755-7050


BAYWAYaniuoriai services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Catrpet Care
ilstctil ia & Coinl-tx'inl
755-6142


North Florida
SPharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
( I,, i1 m: 'i-I .,o& Keystone Heights


..,. r.r-l-l r; l +.,Hil .d44 1nl.-.I.-., .l



Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERY DAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427

GW Hunter,; Inc.
evro Chevron Oil
V Jobber




"Quality /work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
p,- ".- ..' ,I
(386) 752-0i7
Tc',h Ma I... frs i oducc!


To Advertise in
this Church Directory
call
755-5440.


Saturday, January 21, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Why do you


have a Bible?


5A


The testimony of our


lips (Hebrews 13:15)


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
','d,,e..,i, Ser,:,.


A: 4JA'i

7:00PM


Bible Study
Morning ,''irsr,
Evening Worship

P,':er BFihe 'iljdy


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

. 45PM
6:15PM


10AM
11AM
6PM
7 1U PM



9:30 AM
10:30 AM
6:00 PM


11:00 AM
7:30 PM


9:30 AM
10:30 AM
7PM


Sunday School

,'.' i r F',.r Meebing


ilay Electfic Cooperatve, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-prolil,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


IIM HARRY'S
i t.tr.i,>Heatg & Condii rng Inc,
Harry Aosity. Prsidoo:

Puon 752-2308 m..


a










6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email lhampson@lakecityreporter.com


Jan. 21

Southside Idol
The Lake City Recreatior
Department 2nd Annual
Southside Idol will be
Saturday at 7 p.m. in the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative
Complex Auditorium, 372
W. Duval St. Admission
is $5 to see 14 talented
local singers in middle and
high school compete to
be Southside's Idol. The
winner takes home $1,000.
Special guest Keisha
Jackson, an R&B singer,
will perform with other
local talents.
Spiritual retreat
A spiritual life enrich-
ment retreat and confer-
ence for adults from 9:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Epiphany
Catholic Church, 1905 SW
Epiphany Court The regis-
tration fee is $10 and theme
is improving and inspiring
spirituality. Reserve your
spot by Jan. 18 by calling
(386)752-5228.
Farmers market
There will be a Chili Cook
Off and live music this week
at the Lake DeSoto Farmers
Market from 9 am. to 1 p.m.
in Wilson Park located along
Lake DeSoto in downtown
Lake City. The cook off
will benefit Relay for Life.
The market features locally
grown fresh produce, herbs,
plants, cheese, milk, eggs
and local baked breads, pies
and other items. Vendors
also sell homemade craft
items like jewelry, wood-
work and other handmade
items. For more informa-
tion about the Lake DeSoto
Farmer Market call 386-719-
5766 or visit marketlcfla.
com.
Wedding Expo
Let the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park.&
Campground help you plan
your special day. 2nd annual
Wedding Expo will be held
at Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Campground
on Saturday, Jan. 21from 1
to 5 p.m. Fashion Show by
Glass Slipper Bridal, Door
Prizes, Vendor Booths,
Refreshments, Taste Testing
and more. Vendors include:
Melissa's Antiques, Glass
Slipper Bridal, Scott Carroll
DJ, Holiday Inn, SOS Cafe &
Restaurant, Top Hat Limo,
Cakes by Pat, Uniquely
Yours Wedding & Event
Planner, Hot Heads Salon
& Spa, Sea Creative/Stacee
Reveron Photo, Joy the Cake
Lady/Elite Photography and
more. Free Admission. For
more information contact
Sharyn at (386) 364-1683.
Baptist school
First Central Missionary
Baptist Association will
start its Mid Year Winter
Education School on Jan. 21,
from 7:30 am. to 5:30 p.m.
at Springfield Missionary
Baptist Church in Live Oak.
There will be classes on
Public Speaking, Survey of
Revelation, Baptist Doctrine,
and Doctrine of Prayer. The
cost is $35 per person and
includes materials. Lunch
by the host church for a
low fee. Revjoseph Francis,
Moderator and Mrs.
Shirley, Franklin, Women's
President
Jan. 22

Church anniversary
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church, 948 Aberdeen
Avenue, will celebrate their
70th Church Anniversary
on Jan. 22 at 11:30 a.m. and
3 p.m. Dr. Dwight Pollock
in charge of the 11:30
a.m. service. Reverend
Isadore L. Williams and the
Philadelphia Missionary


Baptist Church is in charge
of the 3 p.m. service. Please
come out and share with us.
Bridal show
The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &


Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's Bridal,
Belk, Lake City Florist
and Design, Glass Slipper
Bridal, The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices are
$7.00; Day of Event $10.00.
Tickets can be purchased
at the Holiday Inn & Suites,
213 SW Commerce Dr.,
Lake City. For ticket sales
or vendor information, call
' Margie Hicks at (386) 754-
1411.
Riding club banquet
The Columbia County
Riding Club is having its
annual banquet Jan. 22
at 1p.m. at Mason City
Community Center. The
club will have its rides the
2nd and 4th Sat. of each
month. The club will be
hosting Pleasure Shows
this year. Check our web-
site for all information, www.
columbiacountyridingclub.
com.
Jan. 23

Blood donations
The LifeSouth blood-
mobile will be at Walmart
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. All
doners receive free boxer
shorts and a chance to win
and iPad2.

Jan. 24
Friends of the Library
Author Program
Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 7
p.m. at the Main Library,
sponsored by Save Our
Suwannee will host Cynthia
Barnett, author of Mirage:
Florida and the Vanishing
Water of the Eastern U.S.
Barnett is an award-win-
ning journalist and senior
writer for Florida Trend
magazine. She will discuss
Florida's' water crisis and
look at solutions that have
found success in commu-,
nities around the world.
Don't miss this timely pro-
gram on a topic so very rel-
evant to Columbia County
and North Central Florida.
Jan. 26

Landlords' meeting
There will be a lanlords'
meeting Thursday, Jan.
26 at 6 p.m. in the Shands
LakeShore Medical Center
conference room. Florida
Gateway College profes-
sor Sherri Carder will
speak about applications
and agreements. All rental
agents and owners are
invited. For information call
755-0110.
Jan. 25

Building Assn. lunch
The Columbia County
Builders Association will
hold a General Council
lunch at Guang Dong start-
ing at 11:30 a. m. on Jan.
25. Cost of lunch is $10 for
members and $15 for non-
members. Speaker is Dale
Williams. After the lunch
an attorney from Tritt/
Anderson in Jacksonville
will hold a short seminar.
Reservations are preferred,
call: 386-867-1998 or e-mail:
colcountybuild@comcast.
net.
Jan. 28

Blood donations
The LifeSouth bloodmo-
bile will be at Big Lots from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. All donors
receive free boxer shorts
and a chance to win and
iPad2.


Illusionist Jason Bishop
Illusionist Jason Bishop
will perform as part of
Florida Gateway College's
FGC Entertainment series
on Jan. 28. Bishop, the 2006
APCA Performing Artist
of the Year, will amaze you


with his stunning and origi-
nal state-of-the-art magic,
including his breathtaking
Double Levitation trick. For
more information or for
tickets, call (386) 754-4340
or visit www.fgcentertain-
mentcom.
Women's retreat
New Dayspring Baptist
Church, 709 NW Long
Street, Shepherd's Care
Ministry will be hosting a
Women's Retreat on Jan.
28th from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Registration and breakfast
beginning at 7:30 a.m.
Inspirational topics will be
presented along with lunch.
Tickets are available or you
may pay at the door for a
donation of $10. For more
information please contact
Sis. Linda Timmons at 386-
438-7974.
Jan. 29
Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 29, 2012
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library: Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita
Nights and Champagne
for Buzzards. Phyllis
Smallman is a Canadian
who has spent a lot of time
in Florida, the setting for
her award-winning mystery
series featuring
sassy bartender, Sherri
Travis. A former potter
with a lifelong love of mys-
teries, Phyllis divides her
time between her native
Ontario and Sarasota. She
will join us live via Skype
for this program.
Jan. 30

Wildlife class
The Columbia County
Extension office, 164 SW
Mary Ethal Lane, will host
Creating Backyard Wildlife
Habitat on Jan. 30 from 1 to
4 p.m. Learn how to create
backyard wildlife habitat
for a variety of wildlife, in
particular birds, bats, and
butterflies.-
Feb. 1
Black History Month
Opening Ceremony
Black History Month
Opening Ceremony, 6 pm,
Richardson Comm. Center.
Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is.
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.
Feb. 3

Gospel concert
Southern Gospel soloist
Ann Downing, a popular
performer on the Gaither
Gospel Homecoming video
series, will be in concert
at the Wellborn United
Methodist Church, 12005
County Road 137, at 7 p.m.
on Friday, Feb. 3. For infor-
mation call (386)754-8524.
Hyssongs in concert
The Hyssongs will be pre-
senting a concert of Gospel
Music at The Hyssongs locat-
ed at 254 SE Gillen Terrace in
Lulu on Feb. 3 at 7 p.m.
The Hyssongs travel full-
time throughout the United
States and Canada using the
powerful medium of music.
Dell, Susan, and Richard
Hyssong encourage and
delight audiences wherever
they appear with their family
vocal harmony, lively ener-
getic style, humor, and brass
instruments (trumpet and
trombone). This awad win-
ning trio consistently has top
40 songs on the radio charges.
They perform more
than 250 times each year
in church, auditoriums,


gospel cruises, (as well
as television and radio).
During the last two years,
they have sung more than
12 times at Dollywood,
have been featured in
the Singing News, and
appeared on the cover of
Christian Voice Magazine.


Feb. 4

West Virginia Day
The West Virginia Annual
Reunion will be held on
Feb. 4 starting at 11:30 a.m.
Please bring a covered dish
to share for the luncheon.
The event will be held at
Epiphany Church, 1905
SW Epiphanty Court For
questions, information, or
reservations please call 386-
7554937.
Olustee Festival Pageant
The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, Feb.4. Ages 3-12
mos, 13mo-23 mo, 24, 5-6
and 7-9 will be held at 4 p.m.
at the Columbia County
School Administrative
Complex Auditorium. Ages
10-12, 13-15 and 16-20 will
be held at 7 p,.m. Winners
in each division will receive
a $50 savings bond, crown,
banner and ride in the
Olustee parade on Feb. 14.
The pageant is open to the
public with admission at
the door: $5.00 adults and
students. Applications are
available at the Columbia
County Library or Chamber
of Commerce. Deadline
for entries is 1-23-2012. For
more information you may
contact pageant director,
Elaine Owens at 386-965-
2787.

Black History Movie
Festival
Black History Movie
Festival, 4-8pm Olustee
Park.
Feb. 5

Abundant Life Church
Pastor Cagney Tanner
and his wife Shelby invite
the public to the first ser-
vices of Abundant Life
Church, 671 State Road
100 in Lake City, between
S&S and Ken's Barbecue.-
Services include Sunday,
school at 10 a.m., Sunday'
worship at 11 a.m. and 6
p.m. and Thursday service
at 7:30 p.m. Call (386) 984-
0310 for information.
Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.
Feb. 10

Friends of Music
The Friends of Music
Concert Series will present
its second concert of the
season
on Friday, Feb. 10 at 7:30
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 697 SW Baya Dr.
Dr. Laura Ellis, organist/
harpsichordist, and Dr.
Steven Thomas, cellist,
will perform. Both musi-
cians are professors at
the University of Florida.
The concert is free, and a
reception will follow. For
more information call Bill
Poplin at 365-4932.
Feb. 11
FACS Valentine's Day
event
The Filipino American
Cultural Society of Lake
City will have a Valentine's
Day Dinner and Dance on


Saturday, Feb. 11 from 6
to 10 p.m. in the Epiphany
Catholic Church Social
Hall. There will be enter-
tainment, music, dancing
and a cultural food buffet
Please bring your best
covered dish to share. The
event is free for members,
$10 for nonmembers. Call
965-5905 for information.
Bus trip
"What Freedom Looked
Like" a bus trip to Ft.
Mose, St. Augustine,
Florida Florida's all free
black settlement, 7am -
6pm; meet at Richardson
Gym. $25 per person
includes lunch.

Zumba fundraiser for
Habitat for Humanity
All proceeds go to
Habitat for Humanity
of Lake City/Columbia
County Inc. for one hour
long Zumba class facili-
tated by American Family
Fitness, 4578 Sw Heritage
Oaks Circle, Suite 102 on
Feb.. 11 at 11 a.m. The
donation cost is $10 per
person. A fire truck and
bloodmobile will be on site
too.
Pre-Valentine Banquet
First Central Association
Women's Department
will host the Annual Pre-
Valentine Banquet on
Saturday, Feb. 11 at 6
p'.m. The event will be
held at the Springville
Community Center, 3710
NW Suwannee Valley Rd.
Tickets are $25 each and
may be purchased from the
Missionary Department
of any of the local First
Central Churches. The
Speaker will be Carla
Herring Blalock of
Suwannee County. Special
music will be provided by
Kyler Burke, a student at
Columbia High School. For
more information you may
contact Gloria McIntosh at
755-1099. Dress is semifor-
mal or church attire.

Founder's Day Program
The Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-Cookman
University Alumni invites
you to our Founder's Day
Program on Feb. 11 at 4
p.m. at the Holiday Inn.
Dr. Trudie Kibbee Reed,
President of Bethune-
Bookman University will be
our speaker. Dress attire
is semi-formal or church
attire.
Valentine's Day Ball,
The 1st annual
Valentine's Day Ball,
presented by the Rotary
Club of Lake City, will be
Saturday, Feb. 11 from 6
tol0 p.m. at The Country
Club of Lake City. Dress is
Black-Tie optional. Tickets
are $50 each and are
available at the Lake City
Reporter, The Wheeler
Agency, Hunter Printing,
First Street Music, Parks-


Johnson Agency on Hwy
90 West or call 752-0812.
Gentlemen...BE A HERO...
bring her to the Valentine's
Day Ball!
Feb. 14

Speed dating
Singles Valentine Day
Speed dating (National HIV
Day),5pm-10pm, El Potro.
Feb. 17

Sweetheart Dance
The Springville
Community Center, 3710
NW Suwannee Valley Rd,
Annual Sweetheart Dance
is set for Friday, February
17 at 8:30 p.m. The attire
for this event is dressy.
Music will be provided by.
DJ Hurricane of Lake City.
Tickets are $8 per person
and may be purchased in
advanced from any Board
member. Please contact
Gloria McIntosh at 755-
1099 or Coretta Ford at
397-1347. Guests may bring
individual refreshment
trays. Sweetheart pictures
will be taken for a nominal
fee by IKE productions.
Golden Dragon Acrobats
Direct from Hibei,
China, the Golden Dragon
Acrobats are the reigning
National Association of
Campus Activities enter-
tainers of the year and will
perform at Florida Gateway
College on Feb. 17. Their
performance combines
award-winning acrobatics,
traditional dance, spectacu-
lar costumes, ancient and
contemporary music and
theatrical techniques to
present a show of breath-
taking skill and spellbind-
ing beauty. For more
information or for tickets,
call (386) 754-4340 or visit
www.fgcentertainment.
com.
Feb. 18

70's Party
70's Party, 4-8pm, Annie
Mattox.
Feb. 20

Teen Summit
3 p.m.-midnight, Florida
Gateway College.
Feb. 21
CARC membership
celebration
The Annual Membership
Celebration for CARC-
Advocates for Citizens
with Disabilities, Inc. will
be Feb. 21 at 7 p.m. at the
First United Methodist
Church, 973 S. Marion
Ave. Members and friends
are invited. Dinner will be
served. RSVP to 386-752-
1880 ext. 103 or aleis@
lakecity-carc.com by Feb.
14. This celebration is
sponsored by Anderson
Columbia, Baya Pharmacy
and Columbia Bank.


Vacuum. Cleaner


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people, this therapy reduces 2 to 3 clothing sizes and/or stops smoking. Lose weight without
"dieting". No pills, no supplements, eat healthy, move more. "I will shut off your unhealthy
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754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 2012


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Walls are poor conductors

for casual conversations


DEAR ABBY: What do
you think about people who
attempt to converse with
you from another room?
My boyfriend does it fairly
often. He may be on the
computer while I'm reading
or watching TV, and hell
yell out a question or tell me
something. Most of the time
I answer him, but then hell
continue the conversation -
all from the other room.
I find it rude, and to be
quite honest, disrespectful. I
also think it makes no sense
because with the TV on it's
difficult to hear him. If I
want to speak to someone in
another room, I get off my
"keester" and go directly to
him or her. That's common
sense. My former room-
mate used to do the same
thing. Do you think this is a
"guy thing"? CANT HEAR
IN NEW YORK
DEAR CANT HEAR:
Nope. Ifs just lazy. And it
continues because you allow
it Tell your boyfriend that if
he has something he wants
to say to you, he should
come and say it. Point
out that you give him that
respect And if he "forgets,"
stay put and don't answer
from the other room.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I have
a friend with whom I
exchange birthday and
Christmas gifts..1 make a
great deal of effort to find
things I know she would
like, and I have been quite
successful. My friend,
however, buys me things I


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
suspect she would like for
herself.
Example: I'm always hot
while she's always chilly.
She bought me heavy paja-
mas and a warm robe for
Christmas. I don't like spicy
food she does. She gave
me two large containers of
seasoning containing chili
pepper. I love to read fiction
while she prefers nonfiction.
For my birthday I received
a book about history.
This kind of exchange
has been. going on for
years, and I don't remem-
ber receiving one gift I
could really use. What can
I say to her? PEEVED IN
PITTSBURGH
DEAR PEEVED: To say
something would be rude.
I do have a suggestion,
however. On the next gift-
giving occasion, give your
friend some things YOU
would like. Example: A
pretty fan to accessorize
a summer dress, a jar of
your favorite jam, a novel
or two you would enjoy
reading and then you can
agree on a gift exchange.
Problem solved.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I have a
2-year-old son, "Seth." His


father, "Ray," and I went
our separate ways during
my pregnancy. He came to
see Seth a few times when
he was a couple of months
old and promised he'd con-
tinue, but he didn't follow
through. Ray has married
since then, and hasn't
called to ask about his son.
I don't call him either.
He didn't show up for
court and the DNA test,
so the judge ordered
him to pay child support
by default, which he has
been doing. I don't believe
in forcing a man to be aC
father, and I would never
make my son visit him.
It is obvious Ray has no
interest in his child. I con-
tacted the grandparents
and they are just as cold.
What do I tell Seth when
he asks about his father?
- SOLE PARENT IN
ALABAMA
DEAR SOLE PARENT:
Tell him the truth. Explain
that when he was born,
Ray wasn't ready to accept
the responsibilities that go
along with being a dad -
and that as time has passed,
Ray has been unwilling to
step forward. As sad as that
may be, it would be worse
to give your son false infor-
mation or false hope that his
biological father will ever'
be willing to give him more
than the court ordered him
to.
E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


2012JohnHartFLP


FRANK & ERNEST


f WGT APPI-6 JUICf, TOMATO JUIC6 AND
/, 6g.APf JUICf FROM TH$66 PLANTS.
--J--^ --wHAT A0OUT MIL__.


-)THAT FROM
. .. .. .. ..O. .cD~f


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You may like it when
everything moves quickly,
but fior;pnow yoshould.bide,
your time. Trying to force
something or someone to
act will end up taking longer
and add complications to
the situation you face. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Speak up, talk to
people, get a feel for their
overall opinion and you
will know precisely what
to do and say in order
to grab attention. Force,
responsible suggestions,
and actions will result in a
leadership position. Love is
highlighted. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Take care of financial
or medical business. Look
over your personal papers
and decide what you can
afford to do and what you
cannot. Contact someone
in a position to help you
make the right choice.
Knowledge is your best
resource. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Live life. You owe it to
yourself and whoever you
are with to maintain a posi-
tive outlook. If you are fun
to be with, everyone will
want to be by your side.
No doom and gloom when
you should be sharing and
caring. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Uncertainty will lead to too


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

much of everything. Before
you indulge mentally,
physically emotionally or
financially, consider retrac-
ing your steps and look-
ing for an alternate route.
Simplicity and moderation
are key to your success and
happiness. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Play to win. The more.
you put into whatever you
pursue, the less interfer-
ence you will face. Show
confidence to avoid being
'faced with criticism or
complaints. Romance
should be planned for the
evening hours. *****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Listen and consider
options, but most of all,
avoid controversy and
emotional conversations
based on inadequacies.
It's important to put your
effort into something cre-
ative or unique that will
take your mind off worries
and ease stress. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): A partnership can
help you advance. Discuss
your ideas and intentions
for a project you have yet
to finish. A little creative
input, and perhaps joining
forces with someone who
can compliment what you


have to offer, will lead to
success. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec-.21);,Yo.u'll.beJlooking:
for adventure, but think
again before you take an
unnecessary risk. You
are likely to be faced with
a perilous situation and
should consider avoiding
any scenario that can lead
to injury or abuse. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
. Jan. 19): You will be emo-
tional about your current
personal state. Do what-
ever needs to be done to
make things work to your
advantage. Make a prom-
ise that will help keep you
in front of any competition
you face. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Discipline will lead to
success. Contracts, agree-
ments and taking an original,
approach to what needs to
be done will help you make
the changes necessary to
improve your situation. Re-
evaluate the past and get rid
of any negativity. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Size up your situation
and reconsider what you
have to offer. Something
you used to do will be easy
to market, fulfilling to resur-
rect and helpful in raising
your income. Love is in
* the stars, and sharing your
thoughts will get the ball
rolling. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: Y equals B
" Z KJL PLZZ. MKSX NOR, MKSX ZNOE
CSE M KSX NDR LS. CSE X NE YZ LMM
RVL' GVKZE RVCR'M XNR C MNSX." -
SCSGK X H K DDKRV


Previous Solution: "I'm getting grumpier all the time ... I'Mn a
the grumpy old man. I'm really good at it." Ned Beatty
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick


perfect example of


1-21


CLASSIC PEANUTS


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
I I DON'-rCBRF-O IWHT
SyouS FV' -r'tflFA I


Page Editor: Emogene Graham,











Classified Department:. 755-5440


liU-i^
kIBUYIc


SEhL L Ti


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY CIVIL DI-
VISION
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
Vs.
CHARLES FRANKLIN RUSH
AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
Case No. 12-2010-CA-000766
Division
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is herdby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on Jan-
uary 5, 2012, in the Circuit Court of
Columbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Columbia
County, Florida described as:
COMMENCE AT THE SCUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE S( UTH-
EAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW
1/4) OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 6
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES
06'56" WEST ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF THE NW 1/4 A
DISTANCE OF 1127.83 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88
DEGREES 06'56" WEST ALONG
SAID SOUTH LINE 210 FEET TO
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
SAID SE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4;
THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES
48'07" WEST ALONG THE WEST
LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF THE NW
1/4 A DISTANCE OF 315 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES
06'56" EAST 210 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 1 DEGREES 48'07"
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 315 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN 1997. GRANT DOUBLE-
WIDE MOBILE HOME Mobile
VIN GAGMTD2156A &
GAGMTD2156B
and commonly known as: 656 SW
JUNCTION RD, FORT WHITE; FL
32038; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash. AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on Febru-
ary 8, 2012 at 11:00 a.m..
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 5th day of January, 2012.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk -
SEAL
05530043
January 14, 21, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-418-CA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff(s),
v.
PHILLIP A. HENDON and
CHRYSANNE HENDON, a/k/a/
CHRYSANNE C. HENDON, ET
AL,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-
ida, will on the 8th day of February,
2012 at 11:00 a:m. in the Columbia
County Courthouse, Courtroom 1,
173 N.E. Hemando Avenue, in the
City of Lake City, Florida 32055, of-
fer for sale and sell at public outcry
to the highest and best bidder for
cash, the following described proper-
ty situated in Columbia County,
Florida, to-wit:
Lot 89 of Callaway, Unit Three, ac-
cording to the plat thereof as record-
ed in Plat Book 7, Pages 145-146,
public records of Columbia County,
Florida.
Pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 11-418-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens .must file' a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 6th day of
January, 2012.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
-s- B. Scippio
By: Deputy Clerk
SEAL
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA
c/o PAUL V SMITH, ESQ.
P. 0. BOX 2029
4705 U.S. Highway 990 West
Lake City, FL 32056
05530052
January 14, 21,2012
Public Auction
Lake Jeffery U-Store-It
Auction for Friday Jan. 27, 2012 at
9:00 am
Location: 1433 NW Lake Jeffery Rd
Lake City, Fl 32055
386 365-4091
386 397-3306
Quentin Brunell E-2
Pebbles Young C-18, 19
Lashelle Young C-10
Bemrnice Young A-26 & C-23
Tiesha Williams D-7 & D-9
Ariel Walker F-3
Edith Tucker D-12 D-13
Josephine Cristiano A-27
Donnie Jemigan B-12
Tashisha Jones A-28


Brian Cribbs D-11


05530141
January 19, 21, 24, 2012


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10000328CA
JP MORGAN CHASE BANK NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION SUC-
CESSOR IN INTEREST TO
WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK
F/K/A WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK FA,
Plaintiff
Vs.
BECKER, EDWARD, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
EDWARD M. BECKER
260 NE JACKSONVILLE LOOP
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
EDWARD M. BECKER
3505 US HWY 90 E
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
EDWARD M. BECKER
1147 OAKWOOD LAKES BLVD
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ED-
WARD M. BECKER
260 NE JACKSONVILLE LOOP
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ED-
WARD M. BECKER
3505 US HWY 90 E
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ED-
WARD M. BECKER
1147 OAKWOOD LAKES BLVD
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, FL 32433
AND TO: All persons claiming an
interest by, through, under, or against
the aforesaid Defendant(s).
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property locat-
ed in Columbia County, Florida:
SE 1/4 OF BLOCK 9 AS LIES
SOUTH OF THE PUBLIC ROAD
LEADING FROM LAKE CITY TO
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA, IN A
SUBDIVISION OF THE NW 1/4
OF NE 1/4 OF SECTION 33,
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST, AS SURVEYED AND
MAPPED BY A.B. BROWN FEB-
RUARY 5, 1913, LYING IN CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
CONTAINING ONE ACRE, MORE
OR LESS.
has been filed against you, and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to this ac-
tion, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A.,
Default Department, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is Trade
Center South, Suite 700, 100 West
Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauder-
dale, FL 33309, and the file original
with the Clerk within 30 days after
the first publication of this notice in
the LAKE CITY REPORTER, or on
or before February 3, 2012, other-
wise a default and a judgment may b
entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL
OF'SAID COURT on this 3rd day of
January, 2012.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of said Court
By: -s- B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a reasonable accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should,
no later than (7) days prior, contact
the Clerk of the Court's disability co-
ordinator at PO BOX 1569, LAKE
CITY, FL 32056, 3867197428. If
hearing or voice impaired, contact
(TDD) (800)955-8771 via Florida
Relay System.
05530021
January 21, 28, 2012
NOTICE OF INTENT TO SELL
Suwannee River Water Management
District Governing Board has de-
clared surplus a 47-acre tract of land
located in part of Section 30 Town-
ship 1 North, Range 17 East, Colum-
bia County, Florida. Persons interest-
ed in the possible purchase of this
property should contact Poole Realty
Inc. at 386-362.4539.
05530179
January 21, 28, 2012
February 4, 2012
Public Auction to be held
February 25, 2012 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, LLC 2492
SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
87 Ford
Vinm# 1FTEF14Y3HNA14354
05530194
January 21, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2011-185CA
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
acting.through the United States De-
partment of Agriculture, Rural De-
velopment, f/k/a Farmers Home Ad-
ministration, a/k/a Rural Housing
Service,
Plaintiff,
Vs.
KEVIN McGUFFY, heir and lineal
descendant of JOYCE A. BAILEY,
a/k/a JOYCE ANN BAILEY, De-
ceased; VICKI BANKS, heir and lin-
eal descendant of JOYCE A BAI-
LEY, a/k/a JOYCE ANN BAILEY,
Deceased; REBECCA DOLL, heir
and lineal descendant of JOYCE A.
BAILEY, a/k/a/ JOYCE ANN BAI-
LEY, Deceased; et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
TO; CAROLYN RIDGE, heir and
lineal descendent of LILLIAN M.
CLAYTON, a/k/a LILLIAN
LOUISE CLAYTON, Deceased,
whose last known address is 9098
Salmon Falls Drive, Sacramento, CA
95826; Any and all unknown minors,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
trustees, or other claimants by,
through, under, or against the Estate
of JOYCE A. BAILEY, a/k/a
JOYCE ANN BAILEY, Deceased;
and any and all unknown minors,


heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
trustees, or other claimants by,
through, under, or against the Estate
of LILLIAN M., CLAYTON, a/k/a
LILLIAN LOUISE CLAYTON, De-
ceased.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action


Legal

to foreclose a mortgage regarding the
following property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
Lot 6, 341 Estates, a subdivision ac-
cording to plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 6, Pages 34/34A, Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da
Has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on:
FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., Es-
quire, Attorney for Plaintiff, Boswell
& Dunlap LLP, 245 South Central
Avenue, Post Office Drawer 30, Bar-
tow, FL 33831, within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this
Notice of Action, and file the origi-.
nal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 6th day of January,
2012.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTIC-
IPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT FREDERICK
J.MURPHY, JR., ESQUIRE, 245
SOUTH CENTRAL AVENUE,
BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830, TEL-
EPHONE (863) 533-7117, WITHIN
TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NO-
TICE. IF HEARING IMPAIRED,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, OR VOICE
(V) 1-800-955-8770, VIA FLORIDA
RELAY SERVICE.
P. DeWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL
05530051
January 14,21,2012


020 Lost & Found

Lost small 6-year old beagle,
responds to Maggie. Went missing
from Defender Dr in Lake City on
1/14/2012. She is tri-colored, but
is mostly black, has a lazy left eye
and a small cyst on her right rear
hip. Reward offered, please call
386-752-5773.

100 Job'
Opportunities
8 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Pleasureview
Farm, LLC Pleasureville, KY.
.Perform all duties of Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Greenhouse/Nursery,
& Row Crop Production including
seeding, planting, plowing, "
weeding, spraying, harvesting,
packaging and general farm
maintenance. Employment Dates:
03/15/2012 01/15/2013. Wage of
$9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0442886.
05530168
Field Equipment Mechanic
Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a field
equipment mechanic. Prefer
someone with own tools. A
valid drivers license is required.
Please apply in person at
Anderson Columbia, 871 NW
Guerdon Road, Lake City, FL
32055. Please call 386-752-7585
for directions if needed.
We are an Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05530193

Bori Wortl

(ladies wear factory outlet)
Lake City Mall
is looking for
P/T THIRD KEY
Days, nights, and weekends.
Flexible hours a necessity.
Competitive wages, discount,
EOE
Apply in person at store
location Retirees are
encouraged to apply.

05530196
COOK Part-time. Must have
experience and able to work
evenings and weekends. Please.
apply Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehab Center, 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP

2 DETAILERS needed.
Experienced only. Apply in person
between 10a-4p at North Florida
Auto Agencies. Across from ABC
liquor. No phone calls please.
10 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Caseland -
Cynthiana, KY. Perform all duties
of Vegetable, Nursery, & Row
Crop Production including
seeding, planting, plowing,
weeding, spraying, harvesting,
packaging and general farm
maintenance. Employment Dates:
03/15/2012 11/01/2012. Wage of
$9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at
the nearest Florida One Stop
Career Center or call
386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0443851.
MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754


2 A Medical
120 Employment

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have v)ood people skills,


100 Job
100 Opportunities

3 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Clay Mohon
DBA Mohon Farms -
Hopkinsville, KY. Perform all
duties of Tobacco, Greenhouse
/Nursery, & Row Crop Production
including seeding, planting,
plowing, weeding, spraying,
harvesting, packaging and general
farm maintenance. Employment
Dates: 03/11/2012 11/30/2012.
Wage of $9.38/hr. Worker guaran-
teed.3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when
50% of contract is met. Apply for
this job at the nearest Florida One
Stop Career Center or call
386-755-9026 and reference
job order #KY0442824.

4 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Employer: Draper Farms,
LLC Hopkinsville, KY. Perform
all duties of Tobacco, Greenhouse
/Nursery, & Row Crop Production
including seeding, planting,
plowing, weeding, spraying,
harvesting, packaging and general
farm maintenance. Employment
Dates: 03/15/2012 12/15/2012.
Wage of $9.38/hr. Worker
guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0443955.

Gatr ,a, Biap- t Charchc .
acceptin-2 ipp.- lr p.:,d riurrerN
workers. Must be at least 18 yda &
pass a background ck. Must be
available Sun mornings &'eve-
nings, Wed. evenings & for other
events as needed. Aps available at
3252 SW ST Rd. 247, LC or email
gatewaychurch@bellsouth.net.

Janitorial Service needs
responsible person to work
nights. Must have own
transportation references and clean
background. 386-984-0530

OTR Class A driver wanted.
Good pay, Volvo trucks. Go to
www.TravaBros.com under
section drivers and submit your
info. No calls please.

PERSONAL ASSISTANT/
RECEPTIONIST, Computerskills
required, reply to: P.O. Box 7246,
Lake City, FL 32055
Sales Help at Florida Visitors
Center. Benefits, hourly wage
plus commission. Excellent
opportunity with National
company. Westgate Resorts.
Call Ed. 904-540-2314 or
Connie 386-344-0082


Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid y
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but '
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


ACROSS
1 Heidi's
mountains
5 Like some
oxen
10 Pharaoh's
amulet
12 Obstruct
13 Geisha's
attire
14 Herb for kitty
15 "Et tu" time
16 Hearty laugh
18 Baseball's
Mel -
19 Code a
message
23 Honest prez
26 Job ad letters
27 Bewildered
30 Deer's refuge
32 Affluent
person
34 Gentlest
35 Word over a
slot
36 H.H. Munro
37 EPA figure


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


240 Schools &
24 Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/23/10

* Ihlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12
* Continuing education


great attitude and be willing to Fees incl. books, 'supplies, exam
learn. Extreme motivation fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
promotes rapid growth. Send expresstrainingservices.com
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165. To place your
To place your
o553015o classified ad call
Medical Assistant 5 9 .A 0
Several years of exp as a
medical assistant required.
Email: mafaisal05@yahoo.com _8----
or fax to: 386-758-5987


DENTAL HYGIENIST
needed. Full Time position
M-F 9:00 5:00pm Lake City
Office. Salary Commensurate with
experience. Please fax resume to:
386-752-3122 or email to
caw70@aol.com
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resume to P.O. Box
805 Lake City, Florida 32056

REPORTER Classifieds

-. In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to/form four ordinary words.

SGNAET


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
.., '86-961-5896.



THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I I K A ITHE CUSTOMER GOT THIS
AFTER SEEING THE NEW
MI0 EN COMEO TE ON THE MNU.
I -Now arrange, the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
--- suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: I TI.I
'(Answers .Monday)
yesterday'ss Jumbles: BURST TRUCK VOYAGE INFAMY
Answer: The cleaning crew at Grand Central was
enjoying a STATION BREAK


17 Suffix for
forfeit
20 Scottish
monster
21 Drop sharply
22 Stoppers
23 Rear, to
Popeye
24 Glamorous
wraps
25 Ms. Bombeck
28 Pour forth
29 Automotive
purchase
31 Cartoon
shrieks
32 Barking
33 Monsieur's
summer
37 PC rival
40 Host's plea
41 Animated
ogre
42 Retail center
43 Consumer
44 Chop into
cubes
47 Hydrox rival
48 Beaded shoes
49 Meadow
browser
51 Kiwi's kin
52 Belly dance
instrument
54 Landscape or
portrait


1-21 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 2012

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


SADvantage


Answer to Previous Puzzle


CHSM G ULL
POPLAR ARROYO
RETIRE HINGED
MIR ELS
BAM METAL VIM
EMU BARD. LONE
TOSTADA T LT~S

T0S LA
TEENSCHOLLAS
A B UT KE EIN E K -E
SAMI AEREYELS
A L F D A
POSTAL EELERS
RTERY RAPPEL
RO NDnF.OAMIY


38 Itty-bitty
39 Mariachi wear
42 Wet dirt
45 Biol. or
astron.
46 Place of
residence
50 Famed sci-fi
writer
53 Cramped
55 Get back
56 Parthenon
site
57 Escalator part
58 Boxing wins

DOWN
1 Sour
2 Weak, as an
excuse
3 Ordinary
language
4 Antonio
5 Vocalist -
Sumac
6 Make a
choice
7 Casino game


8 Fix a
manuscript
9 Corp. section
10 Travel on
powder
11 Refuse to buy
12 Gross


i













LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 2012


310 Pets & Supplies
2 FEMALE 8 moth old
Rottweiler/Bullmastiff pups.
CKC. Parent on site. FREE to
Good Home. 386-984-6796
German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament.superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

GE REFRIGERATOR
18-20 cuft.
Very clean. $250. obo.
386-292-3927
KENMORE Front Load white
washing machine. Works great.
$250.obo
386-292-3927


407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
2 CHEST of Drawers.
Both for $30.00
386-365-0262

4 METAL
KITCHEN CHAIRS
REALLY NICE. $20.00
386-365-0262
Brown Resin Wicker
Glider & Chair with cushions.
Steel frame. Like new. $125.
386-754-4094
RECLINER
Fair Shape.
$20.00
386-365-0262
Swivel Patio chair
$25.00
386-344-4987


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. Jan 21 8-1. 247 to Upchurch,
follow signs. TV, DVD player,
shelves, collectible tins, computer
and much more.


440 Miscellaneous

BISSEL Spot Cleaner machine.
Good condition.
$20.00
386-365-0262
Total Gym
with attachments
$250.00
call 386-623-3202

450' Good Things
50 to Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood

FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

463 Building
Materials
4 sheets 1/2" plywood
12 pcs. 2"x 4"
$50.00 takes all.
386-344-4987
630 Mobile Homes
6 0 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422


2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3 BR/2 BA, 14 x 80. CH/A, water,
sewage & garbage included. Total
electric. Ist, last + dep., lease
required, $550 mo. 386-752-8978.
3/2 partially furunished MH
fenced 15 ac. in Suwannee Coun-
ty. SOme farm and animal main-
tance exp. desirable. Terms neg.
386-454-7139 or 305-216-9893
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between I-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
3BR/2BA SWMH on 1 acre in
Ellisville. Private lot .
$460. mo 1st, last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Beautiful Main-
tained DWMH, 5br/2ba on 1/2
acre. 12X24 workshop, fenced
.$105,000. MLS 77064
Hallmark Real Estate
4/3 DW w/14X76' porch on 5 ac.
in Ellisville area. 2 carports,
storage, fenced pasture. $99,900
#78295 Ginger Parker 365-2135
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
- maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
Need a Hothe?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Dealer in NW Florida Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating THEIR Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64.4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


650 Mobile Home
& Land


Affordable Lg. Home on 2 ac.,
being sold as is $59,900 .
MLS 74862 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473

71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent








2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867


0 Unfurnished Apt.
I1U For Rent
2br/lba duplex. NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi-
cient. Tile floors. W/D, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special.$99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Rental in 55+ neighborhood.
.2 bedroom/1 bath Duplex across
from Clubhouse. No Pets.
Call Denise.@ 386-752-5290
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+Sec, 386-315-2509 or 965-5560
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,'
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manior Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
'.floors/fresh paint. Great area..
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

{720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Neat as a Whistle! 1br., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
STUDIO APT. FOR RENT
All utilities included & Cable,
$500 month + $300 sec. deposit.
Call 386-697-9950

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
2BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$450 mo.
386-752-0335
Monday Friday 8A-4P
3/2 Brick Home, fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent w/option to
purchase available. 386-752-5035
X 3114 days 7-7 A Bar Sales
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
4BR/2BA. Lake Access.
on 8 acres
$1,000 mo.
Call 386-752-3066
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534


750 Business &
5 Office Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately ll00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please-call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500


750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale

EASTSIDE VILLAGE
REALTY, INC.
MLS#76668 Buildable lot.
High and dry.
SCall Denise @386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

Hallmark Real Estate
A home for all seasons. Lg patio,
fireplace. 4/2 brick & cedar.
Just reduced $20,000 #71691
Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Just Listed. 3/2 on a Terraced hill.
Brick w/fenced'yard. All applian-
ces. Owner Financed offered.
#79683 Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS #71594 $149,900 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
In town, 3/2 Concrete Block home,
fenced yard. $149, 900
MLS 71999, Elaine Tolar
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D.
$129,900 New AC in 2010.
Elaine K. Tolar. 755-6488
,MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Wonderful home on Lake. 4/3
Fireplac,-. mn.,n, up.rueN MLS
76085,' Elaine filu-"755.-a.4. or'
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Close to'town. 2br/2ba, wood lam-
inate floors. Vaulted ceilings.
MLS ,76928 $59,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & Tidy remodeled 2/2 open
floor plan. MLS# 77943
$94,500 Mary Brown Whitehurst
386-965-0887
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot.
on the Suwannee.
Well & anerobic septic system.
MLS 78842 $45,000
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/lst time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 365-5146
Callaway S/D, 3br/2ba. Well
maintained. Fenced back yard &
double car garage. $175,000
MLS 79567 Century 21, The
Darby Rogers Co. 752-6575.
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in
High Springs. Real wood floors,
stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 79601 $178,000 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Immaculate home on 10 + acres in
Wellborn. Tile floors, fenced, barn
w/workshop. $309, 900 MLS
79650, Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent neighborhood. 4br/2ba.
2469 sqft on 1 + acres. $190,000
MLS 79654, Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 5br/4ba Custom
kitchen, screened inground pool.
Many upgrades on 5 ac. Many
extras. .$385,000. MLS 79688
COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence Vlg $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669
CYPRESS LANDING! 3BR/2BA
w/lg great room, split floor plan
& 2-car garage $105,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79634
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom/2 bath.
1 car garage. Priced to sell.
Call Denise @386-752-5290

Contemporary Elegance.


MLS 79579 4br/3ba plush carpet
& so much more! $224,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 8.3 acres.
Has 14x30 workshop with electric.
MLS 79345 $199,900

NICE 3BR/2BA DWMH w/fenced
yard plus double carport &
wkshop $39,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #79078
ONLY $38,500 for 4BR/2BA
concrete block home; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477


810 Home for Sale
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
brick home newly renovated &
inground pool, fenced yard
$69,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST! Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505

820 Farms &
S Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
20 ac Wooded tract.
10 m iles from Cedar Key.
MLS 78886, $70,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
S Property
Hallmark Real Estate
Rental Investment. 4-duplexes
(8 apartments) All units are rented
and in good shape.
#69380 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate Camp-
ground/RV Park w/67 pull thrus,.
cabins & mobile home. Showers,
clubhouse +2 story owner home.
#78793 Janet Creel 719-0382

860 Investment
S Property
Great Investment in city limits.
Both units occupied..
MLS 79206 $50,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT INVESTMENT
2 units w/ 2br/lba, 2 stories
w/balconies. MLS579271,
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Results Realty. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
7 Wanted

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05530165
The Department of Veterans
Affairs', Lake City Medical
Director, is seeking to lease
8,800 to 9,000 net usable square
feet for a succeeding or new
lease for the Lake City
Administrative Office. The site
shall have adequate parking
for approximately 80 vehicles,
including 3 dedicated handicap-
ped parking spaces. The site
shall be handicapped accessible
in accordance with the Uniform
Federal Accessibility Standards
(4 CFR 101-19.6, App A) and
shall conform to Federal Laws
& Regulations governing
Federal Leases, site renovations,
construction and fire codes. A
lease for up to 10 years will be
considered. Expected occupancy
is required by
NOVEMBER 2012.
To be considered, the space
shall be within the delineated
area and within walking distance
(1/8th of a mile) of Public
Transportation. The delineated
area boundary is defined as:
North to: Intersection of U.S.
441 and County Road 100A
West to: Intersection of
Interstate 75 and U.S. Highway
90 South to: Intersection of
U.S. 41/441 and County Road
252 East to: Intersection of
State Road 100 and U.S. High-
way 90 Usable square feet does
,not include such common
building areas as stairs,
elevators, mechanical and utility
rooms, ducts, shafts, vestibules,
public corridors, and public
toilets required by local code.
The Government is limited by
law (40 USC 278a, as Amended
10-1-81) to pay no more than
the appraised fair rental value
for space. Please note: This
advertisement is NOT a solicita-
tion for offers, nor is it a request
for proposals. A solicitation for
offers may be issued by the
Department of Veterans Affairs
at a later date. Interested parties
shall provide evidence that
properties are outside the 100
year flood plain. A market
survey will be conducted by the
Department of Veterans
Affairs. For consideration,
please provide the following:
1) Site location;
2) Property description;
3) Total square footage;
4) Floor plans;
5) Photographs.
To be considered, interested
parties (owners, brokers or their
legal representatives) shall
provide a written statement from
the building owner stating
that the interested party has
the authority to represent
the building owner. The
aforementioned information
shall be submitted no later than
4 p.m. on February 6, 2012
to: Rachel Griner,
Contracting Officer
Department of Veterans Affairs,
Activity 8 -SAO East
619 South Marion Avenue'
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: 386-755-3016 EXT 3660
Email: Rachel.Griner@va.gov.
RESPONDENTS ARE
ADVISED THAT THE VA
ASSUMES NO
RESPONSIBILITY TO
AWARD A LEASE BASED
UPON RESPONSES TO THIS
ADVERTISEMENT.


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Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


Saturday. lanuarv 21. 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page IOA


SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
BOXING
9 p.m.
NBCSP Heavyweights, Eddie
Chambers, (36-2-0) vs. Sergei Liakhovich
(25-4-0); junior middleweights, Gabriel
Rosado (18-5-0) vs.Jesus Soto-Karass (24-
6-0), at Philadelphia
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
6 p.m.
NBCSP NFLPA Collegiate BoWl, at
Carson, Calif.
EXTREME SPORTS
4:30 p.m.
NBC Winter Dew Tour, Pantech
Invitational, at Killington,Vt.
GOLF
8:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo
Champions, third round, at George, South
Africa (same-day tape)
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Humana Challenge,
third round, at La Quinta, Calif.
7:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Mitsubishi
Electric Championship, second round, at
Kaupulehu-Kona, Hawaii
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
CBS -Alabama at Kentucky
ESPN Purdue at Michigan St.
I p.m.
ESPN2 Xavier at Dayton
2 p.m.
CBS National coverage, Michigan
at Arkansas
ESPN Missouri at Baylor
FSN UCF at UAB
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Indiana St. at Creighton
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage, Kansas at
Texas or UConn at Tennessee
ESPN Fldrida St. at Duke
FSN UCLA at Oregon
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Iowa St. at Texas Tech
6 p.m.
ESPN Syracuse at Notre Dame
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Mississippi St. atVanderbilt
9 p.m.
ESPN Louisville at Pittsburgh
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Chelsea at
Norwich City
TENNIS
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, round of
16, at Melbourne, Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, round of
16, at Melbourne,Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
FSN -Texas at Oklahoma

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Conference Championships
Sunday
Baltimore at New England, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 6:30 p.m.

College all-star games
Today
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs.West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Today's Games
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Portland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Denver at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Jersey, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. I Syracuse at Notre Dame,
6 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky vs. Alabama at
Kentucky, Noon
No. 3 Baylor vs. No. 5 Missouri, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Duke vs. Florida State,
4 p.m.
No.6 Ohio State at Nebraska, 8 p.m.
No.7 Kansas atTexas, 4 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State vs. Purdue, Noon
No. 10 Georgetown vs. Rutgers, Noon
No. 12 Murray State at SIU-
Edwardsville, 8 p.m.
No. 13 UConn atTennessee, 4 p.m.
No. 14 UNLV vs. New Mexico,
10 p.m.
No. 16 San Diego State vs. Air Force,
10p.m.
No. 17 Florida vs. LSU, 6 p.m.
No. 18 JMississippi State at Vanderbilt,
7 p.m.
No. 19 Creighton vs. Indiana State,
3 p.m.
No.20 Michigan at Arkansas, 2 p.m.
No. 21 Marquette at Providence,
7 p.m.
No.23 Louisville at Pittsburgh, 9 p.m.
No. 24 Saint Mary's (Cal) at Santa
Clara, II p.m.
No. 25 Kansas State at Oklahoma


State, 1:30 p.m.


CHS


looks to


"


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Nigel Atkinson (10) passes the ball to an open man while playing against
Robert E. Lee High on Dec. 9.


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
For everything
that's going
right with the
Columbia High
basketball
team, there's one thing
that continues to stick out
for me. The Tigers are
missing something and ifs
in no part their fault.
Coach Horace Jefferson


clinch


Tigers host


Wolfson in


district play


Columbia High has a
chance to clinch the No.
1 seed in the District 4-6A
tournament with a win over
Wolfson High tonight.
The .Wolfpack (18-5, 8-2
district) will invade Lake
City as the Tigers (15-4, 8-0
district) look to finish their
district run undefeated.
The Tigers haven't won a
district championship since
Bill Barnett coached the
2000 team to a 27-5 record.
Trey Hosford coached the
Tigers to three playoff
appearances as district run-
ner-up and one No. 1 seed
in the 2004 district tourna-
ment
Coach Horace Jefferson
knows the Tigers have a
tough test .ahead of. them
against the defending dis-
trict champions.
"They love the three,"
Jefferson said. "That's what
they live and die by. They
want to push the ball. I
know they'll try to push it
and they're not shy about
trying to shoot the three.
They have seven kids that
will launch the three at any
given time. In the middle,
there's a 6'7" kid. He can
alter some shots, but I saw
him in foul trouble. But,
our size will match up with
them."
Columbia has a 64-59
win against the Wolfpack
in Jacksonville earlier this
year. Another win would
meet the two teams can't
meet until the district cham-
pionship.
Jefferson believes the
Tigers will use much of the
same strategy they used the
first time depending on the
flow of the game.
'We played them man the
first time and we'll try to
trap a little bit in the half
court," Jefferson said. 'We
want to speed the game up
also. If we play them zone,
we'll play them 3-2. We'd
already be out there on the
perimeter for the threes.
They have range, but it's


more than a set shot than
anything."
Jefferson also said it's
pivotal for the Tigers to get
off to a hot start. He doesn't
want the Wolfpack to get
rolling early.
"We don't want them to
get off to an early start,"
Jefferson said. We're going
to trap the ball, but trap
out of our zone. If you got
a good trap, you can't get
a .shot off. They're active
and will drive to the basket.
They're fearless and well
coached."
But Jefferson also has
great admiration for his
team.
"We have a chance to do
something special here and
we have to step up and do
it," he said.
A key to the long run
will be the play of Morris
Marshall. Jefferson is look-
ing for big things out of him
down the stretch. Marshall
will come off the bench, not
because he's not a starter,
but in an effort to let the
player see what's develop-
ing on the floor.
"Monte Tisdale will start
and I like what Tisdale
defensively," Jefferson said.
'"They run the 2-3 and I
want Marshall to see how
he can break down that 2-3.
We need him to score, but
what we need the most is
for him to get to the line.
Marcus Amerson has made
49 free throws. Marshall
has only attempted 32 free
throws."
Jefferson believes one of
the keys to the run will
be Marshall getting to the
' charity stripe.
"I don't think he's aggres-
sive enough sometimes,"
Jefferson said. "He needs
to be more aggressive. If he
can get to the line and aver-
age of eight or nine free
throws for the game, then
he can be a big-time scorer.
That's how a lot of big-time
scorers get a lot of their
points."


Calling out the Tigers' student body


has done nothing but put a
great product on the court
this season with a team
that has amassed a 14-4
record and sits undefeated
in the district race. You'd
think that there would be
overwhelming fan support,
but in Tuesday's one-point
loss against Palatka it was
surely missing.
This isn't a slight at
the Columbia alumni.
There were plenty
of former Columbia
students in the crowd.
There were parents,
fans, administrators and
supporters in the stands.
But the student body


was missing. At least if
they were there, I couldn't
hear them.
Basketball is a game of
emotion. Players feed off
the crowd, but too many
times it's the players on .
the Tigers' bench that are
being relied upon to create
enthusiasm throughout
the stands.
Where's a student
section? Why isn't the
student body coming out
in support of the Tigers?
This team is on the verge
of possibly winning a
district championship and
has all the talent that's
needed to make a run to


the Final 4.
Yet, players on the
bench are leading cheers
of defense?
I don't want to be one
of those people that says,
"Well, when I was in high
school," but when I was in
high school, this isn't what
I was about If I wasn't
playing a sport, I was
supporting my friends that
were.
It's time that these guys
got more support.
It might make some
people mad, but it's
something that has
been on my mind since
Tuesday's loss.


I couldn't help but feel
the energy leave the gym
late in a close contest
where the Tigers could
have fed off some of that
energy.
This isn't'the
professional game. High
school athletes, more than
any other athletic level,
feed off energy from their
fans.
Let's show the Tigers
that we have their back.
Fill up the stands for
tonight's 7:30 p.m. tip and
be heard.
Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Lady Indians close out district with win


Fort White plays
first in double
dip on Monday.
From staff reports

Fort White High's girls


basketball team closed out
its district season with a
59-57 road win at Bradford
High on Thursday.
Kasha Cook fired in 19
points and had 22 rebounds
to. lead the attack.
Khadijah Ingram (13)


and Cenise Armstrong
(11) also scored in dou-
ble figures. Desma Blake
added seven points, with
five points from Daisha
Rossin and four from Rykia
Jackson.
Fort White (4-13,


3-7) plays the first game of a
doubleheader at Hawthorne
High on Monday. Tipoff for
the girls is 6 p.m., followed by
the boys game at 7:30 p.m.'
The girls finish the
week with games on
back-to-back nights. First


up, the Lady Indains host St.
Francis at 6 p.m. Thursday.
The week concludes with
another doubleheader as
both Fort White teams
host Hamilton County High
beginning at 6:30 p.m. on
Friday.


-I-~' ---/I~--~~-~--~I I I I


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