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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01756
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 20, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01756
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








000017 120312 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Friday, january 20, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 301 0 75 cents


New bill targets Internet cafes


Oelrich legislation would
prohibit simulated
gambling devices.
From staff reports
TALLAHASSEE State Sen. Steve
Oelrich, R-Cross Creek, introduced Senate
Bill 428 Thursday, "Prohibition of Simulated
Gambling Devices."


The bill codifies the illegality of estab-
lishments that offer simulated gambling
also known as "Internet Cafes."
'"These internet cafes violate the prohibi-
tions of gambling in both the law and the
constitution," Oelrich said. 'These corpora-
tions seek to sidestep the law on technicali-
ties and this flouting of the. law cannot be
tolerated."
Oelrich has joined with both Gov. Rick
Scott and Attorney General Pam Bondi in


saying the sites are illegal. Typically, inter-
net cafes sell internet time or phone cards
with the opportunity to win sweepstakes.
Consumers then use computer terminals
to then determine if they have won the
sweepstakes using slot machinie-like visual
and auditory cues.
Meanwhile, state legislators are growing
more and more divided over whether to
regulate or ban Internet cafes.
A Senate panel on Thursday voted to


regulate more than 1,000 operations that
offer sweepstakes entries despite opposi-
tion from prosecutors and sheriffs. Law-
enforcement officials instead back a bill
that passed a House panel this week that
would ban all Internet cafes.
Internet cafe operators maintain they are
already legal under existing law. But they
are seeking regulations to end ongoing

BILL continued on 3A


Twins go

head to

head in

concert


Brothers Mark &
Clark concert give
double the fun.
From staff reports
Identical twins Mark &
Clark play head to head on
identical custom-built baby
grand pianos in a concert
today at 7:30 p.m. at Levy
Performing Arts Center
on the campus of Florida
Gateway College. Mark &
Clark play, sing, and do every-
thing from musical comedy
to the dramatic interpretation
of the classics..
Their highly personable
and dynamic entertaining
style has enthralled audi-
ences throughout the world.
They have played Europe,
Southeast Asia, Hong Kong,
Japan, the Panama Canal,
South America, Mexico and
every state in the United
States, as well as numerous
islands.
To watch a Mark & Clark
performance is to double
your enjoyment and double
your fun.
Tickets are available for
$18 at the door. Piano stu-
dents K-12 will be admitted
free with a paid adult For
more information or dis-
counted season tickets visit
www.communityconcerts.
info or call 466-8999.


COURTESY PHOTO


Nothing


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White Middle School sixth-grader Shelby DuBose, 12, spells the word 'crimp' to win the Columbia
County Spelling Bee on Thursday at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex
Auditorium. DuBose beat out 13. other children from the county's middle and elementary schools, as
well as some.private schools. 'I feel really good. I'm still shaking,' DuBose said. 'Everyone did so well.
I'm relieved it's over.'


her style


Bee winner got the hard,
words right and did not
let the easy ones trip her up.

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com

Two Fort White students spelled their way
to the top of the county Thursday morning
and beat out 12 other students in the Columbia
County Spelling'Bee.
Shelby DuBose, a Fort White Middle School
sixth grader, was crowned district champion
and will advance to the Times-Union Regional
Spelling Bee in Jacksonville on Feb. 18.
Shelby won after spelling her 14th word,
"crimp," correctly.
Aubrey Callum, a Fort White Elementary
fifth grader, was 'runner-up after making it 13
rounds.
Students in fifth to eighth grade won spelling
bees at their schools to make it to the county-
wide bee held in the Columbia County School
Board Administrative Complex Auditorium.
The winner of the regional bee in Jacksonville
will move on to the national championship in
Washington, D.C.
By the third round only five of the 14 students
were left standing. The auditorium was silent as
four students took turns spelling for six rounds.
Lake City Middle School student Daniel Rendel
made it 11 rounds, spelling "polenta," "extraor-
dinarily" and "philosophize." He was out after
misspelling "sultan."
Richardson Middle School student Eva Kirby-
also made it 11 rounds by spelling "circumlocu-
tion," "tableau" and "leniency." She lost after
misspelling misoo."
Aubrey lost on her 13th word, "talc," after spell-
ing "beatific," "stroganoff" and "mezzanine."
Shelby said before the competition she was
nervous but grew more confident with each
round. "When it got down to the end, I got
BEE continued on 3A


Burned out tag light

leads to meth bust


Lake City woman arrested
after drugs found in car
after traffic stop.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City woman was arrested
Wednesday night after authorities stopped
her for a broken tag light and found drugs
in her car, reports said.
Kelly Marie Titus, 25, 2959 208th St., was
charged with possession of drug parapher-
nalia and possession of methamphetamine
within 1,000 feet of a church or business.
She was booked into the Columbia County
Detention Facility on $12,000 bond.
According to Columbia County Sheriff's
Office reports, around 7 p.m. Wednesday a
deputy stopped an older model Nissan car
near the intersection of Northwest Turner


Road and U.S. Highway 90 for not having
an operating tag light.
The driver of the vehicle, Titus, told
the deputy she had been
recently stopped for her tag
light and it needed to be
fixed.
The deputy reported that
Titus' hands were shaking
while he was talking to her
and she appeared to be ner-
vous.
After, running a crimi- Titus
nal check on her license,
which came back negative,
the deputy gave Titus her license back and
showed her the tag light bulb that needed
to be replaced.
As Titus was walking away, the deputy
asked whether she had anything illegal and
was given consent to search the vehicle.
DRUGS continued on 3A


OI CALL US: .. ..
(386) 752-1293
TH SUBSCRIBE TO 7r 4
STHE REPORTER: Partly Cloudy
SVoice: 755-5 AWATHR
. 'I ,.1Fax: 752-9400 WEATHErIr, 2A


.. O p.rcr ...
P'C E C le ...
Sdvce & Comrics.
CI Cl. :,.,ed .


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Pu ll .rn-1 : :-
t,-, t .ll iT -, F'I-,,2, ,


COMING
SATURDAY
I_, r, .-ri


- 1.- : : .... ."


Lal


Rotary named top fundraiser


COURTESY
For the third year in a row, the Lake City Rotary Club was the top fundraising club during the
Salvation Army's bell ringing campaign. Chris Candler (left), Lake City Rotary Club president,
shakes hands with Kenneth Watson, Salvation Army kettle chairman for Columbia County,
Thursday after presenting $10,682.94 to the Salvation Army. Altrusa International, Kiwanis
Club, Knights of Columbus, Masons as well as the Rotary helped raise $29,720.85. .











2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2012


FLORIDA"
n1'o Wednesday:
I-,r y8-33-36-40-43-51
x5


AH 3. Thursday:
I%,f /'Afternoon: 6-2-0


,tY4 A Thursday:
^. Afternoon: 2-0-5-6


Wednesday:
2-7-9-14-23


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Russell Brand interviews Ringo


NEW YORK

Russell Brand will inter-
view former Beatles
drummer Ringo Starr for
Sirius XM Radio.
'Town Hall With Ringo Starr" will
air live from Los Angeles on Jan. 30.
Music producer Don Was will
moderate the Q&A, and Starr will
perform at the event
A day later, Starr will release his
17th solo album, "Ringo 2012."
Brand said in a statement
Thursday that he's a "massive fan"
Sof Starr, "but like most people I am
ignorant as to his life before he rose
to prominence with 'Thomas the
Tank Engine.'"
Added Brand: "Now we can unrav-
el the enigma of Ringo."

Rihanna, Coldplay to perform
together at Grammys
NEW YORK Rihanna and
Coldplay sing together on the
group's latest album, and they'll do
so again at next month's Grammy
Awards.
Rihanna, who is nominated for
four Grammys including album of
the year for "Loud," tweeted the
news to, her followers Wednesday
night, calling it "BONKERS."
Coldplay is up for three awards.
Paul McCartney was announced
Thursday by The Recording
'Academy as another performer on
the Feb. 12 broadcast
McCartney is being honored dur-
ing Grammy week as the MusiCares
person of the year. His new album,
"Kisses on the Bottom," will be
released Feb. 7.
LL Cool J will host the show, to be
broadcast on CBS from the Staples
Center in Los Angeles.
Other performers include the Foo


SRussell Brand


Fighters, Taylor Swift, Bruno Mars
and Jason Aldean.

Hospital chief: Brooks
discussed $15 million gift
CLAREMORE, Oklahoma -An
Oklahoma hospital executive says
country singer Garth Brooks, consid-
ered giving $15 million to his facility
if it would name itself after his late
mother. .
Brooks is suing the Integris
Canadian Valley Regional Hospital,
saying it wouldn't name a women's
center for Colleen Brooks after
receiving $500,000 from him.
The Tulsa World reports that hos-
pital president James Moore testified:
Thursday that discussions initially
involved a much larger gift.


An internal document from the
hospital quotes Brooks as saying a
$15 million gift for naming rights
was "exactly" what he had in mind.
Moore says he never spoke to
Brooks about naming a women's
center for a half-million dollars.
The hospital considers Brooks'
donation unconditional.
Colleen Brooks died of cancer in
1999. A women's center never was
built

'Red Tails' airmen have new
target: box office
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Tuskegee
Airman Herbert Carter flew 77
. missions during World War IIand
crash landed only orice, impres- .
sive numbers that challenged those
skeptical of the abilities of black avia-
tors. Decades later, he and the other
legendary African-American airmen
he flew with must once again prove
themselves at the.box office. ..
"Red Tails," a movie chronicling
the heroism of the Tuskegee Airmen
and starring Cuba Gooding Jr. and
Terence Howard, opens'today in
2,500 theaters nationwide.
"'Star Wars" creator George Lucas
has been blunt about his 23-year
struggle-to make the film. He said
executives at every major studio
rejected it because they didn't think
mainstream viewers would pay to
see an all-black cast.
The 94-year-old Carter sees the
hesitation by studios as. history
repeating itself.
"It goes back to the old axiom
that the all-black fighter squadron,
in their estimate, wasn't going to
do well," said Carterr who made a
career of the Air Force and retired
as a lieutenant colonel. "It ... doesn't
'surprise me." '


Celebrity Birthdays


Country singer Slim
Whitman is 88.
Comedian Arte
Johnson is 83.
Former astronaut
Buzz Aldrin is 82.
Singer Eric Stewart
(10cc) is 67.
Movie director David
Lynch is 66.
Country-rock musi-
cian George Grantham
(Poco) is 65.
Rock musician Paul
Stanley (KISS) is 60.
Comedian Bill Maher


is 56.
Actor Lorenzo Lamas
is 54.
Actor James Denton
is 49.
Country singer John
Michael Montgomery is
47.
Actor Rainn Wilson
(TV: "The Office") is 46.
TV personality
Melissa Rivers is 44.
Singer Edwin McCain
is 42.
1 Actor Skeet Ulrich is
42.


Daily Scripture
"So in everything, do to others
what you would have them do
to you, for this sums up the Law
and the Prophets."

Matthew 7:12 NIV

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation .............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake, City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City. Reporter. Reproductionin whole or call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
in- part is forbidden without the penis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 1030 am., net day re-delivery or ser-
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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(twilson@lakecityrelorter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(clrculation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
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(rbnidges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks..............$26.32
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for-reading


New youth ranch would
serve Suwannee Co.
TALLAHASSEE, -
Plans are underway for
a new youth ranch that
will eventually serve 100
children in the residential
program and provide foster
care services for Madison,
Suwannee, and Taylor coun-
ties..
Florida United Methodist
Children's Home
announced Tuesday that
more than 100 acres were
donated to the project The
first phase is expected to
be completed by 2014 and,
will provide homes for
24 children, a chapel and
horse stables. The builders
also hope to raise enough
money for a learning center,
daycare, ball fields and gym.
The ranch will use differ-
ent kinds of therapy, includ-
ing psychotherapy with
horses.
Children will live with
house parents in a family-
like atmosphere.
Their length of stay may
vary from few weeks to a
few years.

Weatherford proposes
virtual university
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's next university
may not have a football sta-
dium, dormitories or even
classrooms.
It would be a virtual uni-
versity offering only online
classes.
State House Speaker-
designate Will Weatherford
on Thursday asked the
Board of Governors to look
into that idea.
The board oversees the
state's current 11 public
universities, which already
offer some courses online.
The Wesley Chapel
Republican said he merely
wants to get a conversation
started.
Board chairman Dean
Colson said its an idea
o. worth exploring.
But it's not a new idea.
: The nonprofit Western


Governors University was'
founded.by 19 governors
in 1995 as an online-only
institution.
Weatherford, though,
said he envisions a bigger
and broader virtual univer-
sity for Florida.

Ex-juror pleads guilty
to soliciting bribe
MIAMI A former juror
in a South Florida federal
criminal case has pleaded-
guilty to soliciting a bribe in
exchange for helping sway.
the panel not to vote for
conviction.
Prosecutors say 55-year-
old Italo Campagna could
get up to 15 years in prison.
Campagna pleaded guilty
Thursday in Miami federal
court
Documents show
Campagna met in October
with the brother of a man
charged in a cigarette smug-
gling case. Campagna said
he would try to persuade
jurors to acquit the defen-
dant for between $50,000
and $100,000. .
The brother contacted
the FBI, which recorded a
telephone call between the
two discussing the proposed
bribq. When they arranged
to meet later, Campagna
was arrested.
A mistrial was declared in
the cigarette smuggling and
a new trial got started this
week.

Statewide child abuse
deaths decrease
TALLAHASSEE -
Nearly 150 children were
fatally abused in Florida
in 2010, a decrease from
around 200 in 2009.
The Department of
Health recently confirmed
136 child abuse deaths in
2010 and 11 deaths from the
previous year in a prelimi-
nary report Thafs roughly
a 20 percent decrease from
2009. It's also a drop from
2008 when there were also
about 200 verified child
abuse deaths.


The latest figures are
a marked increase from
163,child deaths in 2007.
Officials said domestic vio-
lence and substance abuse
play a role each year.
But researchers say the
figures have spiked and
dropped in the past decade
with no consistent trends.
According to the new
report, drowning was the
highest cause of death,
claiming 42 lives. Twenty-
one died from unsafe sleep-.
ing environments.

FAMU faculty: Hazing
not biggest issue
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida A&M University
faculty leaders on Thursday
told the board oversee-
ing state universities that
FAMU faces bigger issues
than hazing even as they
acknowledged that the
death of a student last
November was tragic.
Among the major issues
facing the school, faculty
representatives said, are
budget cuts, teaching stu-
dents and accountability
criteria that are unfair to the
historically black school.
The death of Robert
Champion, a Marching
100 drum major, and sub-
sequent disclosures of
pervasive hazing within the
band didn't even come up,
until Board of Governors
Chairman Dean Colson
asked about them at the end
of a breakfast meeting.
"They probably feel a
little beat up and battered
and I think they want to go
back to doing what they do
best, which is teach kids,"
Colson later said.
The Miami lawyer expect-
ed more discussion of the
matter but said he under-
stood the professors' desire
to take advantage of an
opportunity to present their
ideas and grievances to the
board. The panel rotates its
regular meetings, usually
one a month, among the 11
state universities.
AP


THE WEATHER


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75/49O 3al54 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
75 52 0 W
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
74J 56 72,/57 Lake ity
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Tampa Naples
16/55 West Palm Beach Ocala
73 63 0 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 75 64 Pensacola
78, 56 Naples Tallahassee
77,58 Miami Tampa
75,66 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
75,66


'-rifi~shEmer~~as ____________________


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
riJormail low
Record high
Record loWv

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normrnal month-to-date
Normal year.to-date


65
36
66
42
85 in 1937
20 in 1977


0.00"1
0.64"
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SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunnse tornm.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonnse today
Moonselt todaC
Moonnse tom.
.Moonset tom.


7:27 a.m.
5:57 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
5:57 p.m.

4:58 a.m.
3:31 p.m.
5:53 a.m.
4:34 p.m.


@*O00
Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb.
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Saturday
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76. 58, pc
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72 58 in
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30 niesto bun m
Toa>'s
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radiation rnsP
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a scale from
to 10.


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service
brought to
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by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


&* Forecasts, data and
SV graphics 2012 Weather
40 IV Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather Y www.weatherpubllsher.com

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LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, JANUARY 20,2012


Few teachers in Miami school


district fired for poor performance


Nation's fourth largest
school system dismiss-
es fewest teacher.

By CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press
MIAMI A group that analyzes
teacher quality says the nation's
fourth largest school district dis-
misses the fewest teachers for
poor performance of any they've
studied.
The National Council on Teacher
Quality found no more than 10
teachers out of more than 20,000
in Miami-Dade Public Schools
were dismissed for poor perfor-
mance in the 2010-11 school year.
"We know in any workforce, in
any profession, there, .are always
going to be people who are not
effective at their jobs," said Emily
Cohen, district policy director for
the research organization. "When
we're talking about students and
kids, it's unfair to place students
in classrooms where we know
their teacher is not as effective as
other teachers."
Miami Dade officials disputed
the findings, saying more than
1,000 teachers were not rehired
because of poor performance over
the last three years all of those,
teachers who were in their first
year in the district and on a one-
year contract.
The report notes a practice in
which large numbers of teachers
on temporary one-year contracts
are not rehired or are counseled
out of the profession in one
year, about 350 were let go. It'
states the stark contrast between
first-year dismissals, compared


to those for teachers with more
secure contracts, suggests not all
are being held to the same stan-
dard.
"The release of teachers from
these temporary positions is prin-
cipally motivated by budget con-
siderations, and fails to address
the issue of poor performance
among teachers working under
more secure contracts," the report
states. "It gives undue weight to
seniority."
District spokesman John Schuster
said because of contractual and
statutory requirements, "it is at
times difficult and a very lengthy
process to terminate teachers for
poor performance."
Another major finding: While,
Miami-Dade officials reported that
all teachers were evaluated annu-
ally, the district was not able to pro-
vide any data demonstrating this
for the past three years. Nor was it
able to provide a breakdown show-
ing how teachers had been rated.
District officials said there are
evaluations on hand for all teach-
ers in the district, but not in the
electronic format the organization
requested. The district expects
a new electronic system to be
in place, using money from the
state's Race to the Top grant, by
May. Officials said evaluations are
used for staff decisions and pro-
fessional development.
"It's really the whole focus of
this superintendent and what
we do in this district," Christine
Master, administrative director of
professional development, said of
the evaluation and data system.
The National Council onTeacher
Quality looked at four standards it
says are essential to improving


teacher quality, including effec-
tive evaluations, staffing policies
and compensation systems that
attract and reward the highest
quality teachers. Researchers sur-
veyed nearly 5,000 teachers, an
estimated 25 percent of the total
workforce, and 396 administra-
tors.
It is the eighth district the organiza-
tion has examined teacher policies in.
Usually, the district takes part in
the release of the report, but the
NCTQ says Miami-Dade Public
School officials have declined to
participate. Cohen said two other
Miami organizations also dropped
out after learning the district
superintendent didn't. want to be
involved.
"This is the first districtwe've been
in where the district has expressed
to us they weren't interested in the
results," said Kate Walsh, president
of the NCTQ said.
Schuster said they are not par-
ticipating because the report is
not reflective of the achievements
of the district's teachers, students
and administrators.
The policy standards used by
the organization in evaluating the
district align with many of those
already in place in Miami-Dade
and in Florida, where a sweeping
law was passed last year eliminat-
ing tenure for new teachers, cre-
ating new evaluations tied to stu-,
dent performance, and establish-
ing at performance pay plan. Some
education leaders and unions have
raised concerns and objected to
the effectiveness of those reforms,
saying they rely too heavily on
standardized tests, for which fac-
tors beyond, a teacher's abilities
can have an affect the results.


ma,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama speaks about tourism and travel
Thursday along Main Street USA at the Walt Disney World.

Obama speaks about

tourism at Disney


ORLANDO President
Obama is headed to the
heart of Florida's tourism
industry to announce a new
travel proposal.
Obama made his
announcement at the'Magic
Kingdom at Walt Disney
World Thursday.
His Florida visit comes 10


days before Sunshine State
Republicans are set to vote
in a presidential primary.
Obama carried Florida
in 2008 against Republican
John McCain, 51 percent
to 48 percent. And, for now,
Florida voters don't seem
to be abandoning Obama in
droves.


DRUGS: One arrested

Continued From Page 1A


The deputy reported finding
a clear, plastic bag with a white
substance in a cup holder on
the driver's,side door.
When the deputy askedTitus
what the white substance was,
she told him it was cocaine, but
that it didn't belong to her.
The deputy put Titus in
handcuffs and secured her
in the back of his patrol car.
He reported later finding sev-
eral pieces of rolled-up tinfoil
and a straw in a cigarette box.


The tinfoil had burnt, black
residue on it The powder
was tested and it proved to be
methamphetamine. according
to reports.
Titus was arrested and read
her Miranda rights. After she
was read her rights, Titus
reportedly told the deputy she
has been using meth for a few
weeks. She said the meth was
hers, but she forgot it was in
the vehicle.
Titus was then taken to jail


BEE: Nothing 'crimps' her style

Continued From Page 1A


really nervous," she
said. "I can't wait tq go to
Jacksonville and represent
Columbia County."
Shelby said her final..
word, "crimp," was tricky
because she thought it
might not be spelled just
like it sounds. "I was get-
ting tripped up."
In the end Shelby said
she went with her gut feel-
ing and spelled the word
correctly.
"Extemporaneous," she
said, was the hardest word
she was asked to spell.
Shelby said she practiced
for about two hours a day
for about four weeks. Her
grandmother Anne Ritch,
an Alachua County librari-
an, called out words for her.
They worked on spelling
between Shelby's dance,
piano and softball practices.
Ritch said she was ner-
vous watching Shelby from
the audience. Shelby's uncle
Whley Ritch was also in the
audience.
Shelby credits her love
of reading for her spelling
ability. "I really like read-
ing." Her favorite authors
are Stephenie Meyer,i who
wrote the Twilight series,
and Sarah Porter.
"Everyone else did so
well," she said of the other
participants.
Shelby said she was glad
to have Aubrey as an alter-
nate as they became friends
at Fort White Elementary.
"My alternate is really, really
good."






tiFFSy





t^ I ETPY


CRMMRWfY tAL UNClE P..
pT FIsAH. TIMv
MS. MEAnat. CEOv


"I was in tears," said
Pauline Albright, Shelby's
language arts teacher at
Fort-White Middle. "I' felt
like she was.myown." ..'
Albright said she will
definitely make the trip to
the regional bee to support
Shelby.
Shelby practiced- spell-
ing outside of class, but in
class students learn a lot of
vocabulary, Albright said.
"Some ofthemwere pretty
difficult," said Narragansett
Smith, assistant superinten-
dent of elementary education,
about the words participants
spelled. "You have nothing to
be sad or upset about First of
all you were a winner when
you stepped on this stage,"
Smith told students after the
competition.
"I'm very excited. Some
of the words Aubrey spelled
were bigger then Aubrey,"
said Wanda Conner, Fort
White Elementary princi-
pal. "We are so very proud
of them both."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Aubrey Callum, a Fort White Elementary School fifth-grader,
attempts to spell the word 'talc' on Thursday. Callum, who
came in second place, will be the alternate to the regional
spelling bee in Jacksonville on Feb. 18.


..g *



6, g 6 6 ,. ..66 6.
this*-





EAelHH

Slep 6eter6n 01


BILL: Gambling targeted

Continued From Page 1A


legal disputes. Some pros-
ecutors have moved to shut
them down.
.Gov. Rick Scott on
Wednesday said he backs
a complete ban on the
operations. A
But because the Senate


and House are now mov-
ing in opposite directions
there is a chance that
lawmakers will wind up
doing nothing-this year.
The Associated Press
contributed to this
report.


LAKE CITY REPORTER


--w w wo


.rJ N"*10
A.A.^^ -. MM I AI















OPINION


Friday. January 20, 2012


ONE
OPINION


Obama's


pipe


dream


economy

The White House's
pre-emptive strike
on the Keystone
XL oil pipeline
is a disaster for
American workers and consum-
ers. President Obama continues
to demonstrate that he has no
idea how real jobs are created
or how the economy works.
The proposed pipeline would
bring oil from the tar sands in
Alberta to refining centers in
the United States. The project
would produce 20,000 direct
jobs and indirectly employ
118,000. Once completed., it
would enable America to con-
tinue to shift oil imports away
from trouble spots such as
the Middle East and regimes
that American consumers
would rather not be support-
ing. Predictably for a fossil-fuel
project, Keystone XL ran into
opposition from environmental
groups and became a rallying
cry for greens disappointed by
Mr. Obama's perceived failure
to energetically push their
agenda. The pipeline project
was seen as the last straw, espe-
cially after uber-global-warm-
ing alarmist James Hansen
declared that completing
Keystone would mean "game
over for the planet."
In November, after a series of
high-profiile protests by celeb-
rities, the State Department-
announced that-a lengthy .
review process was neces-
sary to find a route around
the sensitive Sand Hills region
of Nebraska. That pushed off
the decision on Keystone until
after the 2012 election, allow-
ing Mr. Obama to dodge the
issue. Congress responded by
demanding an answer by Feb.
21, and rather than use the
remaining month to conclude
the study, the White House
punted on third down and
blamed Republicans.
By the environmentalists'
own logic, "game over" will
come more swiftly without
Keystone. It's a good thing
man-made global warming is a
myth.

* Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Hollywood portrayals of childbirth


deliver misconceptions


I t continues to amaze
me that women in the
Western world have
babies at all today.
Why? Because of the
excruciatingly painful and
very loud way that childbirth
is almost always portrayed
by Hollywood. My girls are
already terrified at the pros-
pect
Again this past weekend,
one of my daughters and I had
to suffer through a depiction
of incomprehensible torture,
as Debra Messing's character,'
"Edie," birthed a baby in the
remake of the classic 1939
film "The Women." (Overall,
though, the 2008 version was
still very funny.) I'm convinced
such Hollywood portrayals of
birth are also partly responsi-
ble for the high rate of planned
Caesarean sections in the U.S.
today, too. Why not just avoid
all that in the first place?
And, by the way, the women
in these films are always
screaming expletives at their
husbands as they give birth,
but I really don't know why that
is so hilarious. I once wrote a
controversial column arguing
that husbands not be forced
into the delivery room. In fact,
that they may not even belong
there at all. While I myself had
succumbed to the cultural pres-
sure to have my husband there
for our first three babies, by
number four I gave him a pass
to play golf until I called him.
The whole thing couldn't have
been more peaceful. I'm not
making that up.
But I digress.
I've written before about the
childbirth-as-Hollywood-sees-it
nonsense. But now that my own
daughters are getting into their


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.comrn


teen years, this largely mythi-
cal version of events is already
plaguing them. So now it's per-
sonrial for mfie. want grandchil-
dren' some day!
So, I thought I would step in
for the record:
I'm not necessarily making
the case for heavy doses of
pain medication for childbirth.
I will just say that for all four
of mine I was what I called "an
epidural waiting to happen."
While many women will not
plan to do so ahead of time,
most in the U.S. will end up
getting some medication for '
pain relief when they have their
babies. So what? There are no
ribbons handed out for doing
without it. Still, even my friends
who have chosen to go through
childbirth with no pain medica-
tion whatsoever don't recount
the screaming or the expletives
that are inevitably the stuff of
Hollywood childbirth portray-
als.
In any event, sure I can't
make any promises that things
will go smoothly and comfort-
ably and, for the most part, qui-
etly for anyone. I do know that
they very often do. Personally,
I never found childbirth myself
particularly magical or tran-
scendent another Hollywood
depiction but I did think it
was really cool. Any pain was
quite manageable. And, of


course, ifs really fun when it's
over and you've got this weird-
looking little thing they put in
your arms. Moreover, most of
my contemporaries had very
similar experiences.
Anyway, here's a reality
Hollywood rarely reminds us
of: Historically, women and
babies died in childbirth all the
time. (They still do in parts of
the world,) Now that is scary.
Yet, women kept having those
little ones anyway. In the end, I
suppose something ver? innate
takes over when it comes to>
how much we want those
babies and, thankfully, here it's
hard to be deterred by fact or
fiction.
By the way, there are some
things no one ever told me
before my first baby, and this is
information I could have used:
Your belly does NOT fully
deflate after the birth that
actually can take weeks or even
months; and those first few
months after the baby is born
can be particularly "unmagical."
Little sleep, lots of worry about
how much he or she is eating,
a great deal of crying (some-
times by Mom and child), and
he or she isn't smiling at you
for weeks. So; no emotional
payback.
But hang in there. In fact,
you'll find that some of those
things will happen again when
they are teens. (Hollywood
often gets that one right.) But
this time you will likely be a
little more prepared for reality.
And, just like your foremoth-
ers and forefathers, will get
through that experience, too!

* Betsy Hart hosts the "It
Takes a Parent" radio show on
WYLL-AM 1160 in Chicago.


Cut those young Marines some slack


When I first met
the editor of
the interna-
tional German
press service
DPA, I was startled that this
dapper, erudite man spoke per-
fect English but with an unmis-
takable Deep South accent.
How did this occur?
"It happens when you learn
English at a young age while
washing dishes in Alabama,"
he said, and went on to explain
that, as a 16-year-old, he was
conscripted into the German
army during the waning days
of World War II, captured in his
first contact with U.S. troops
and quickly shipped as a POW
to a prison camp in Alabama.
"Thank heaven," he added, "it
probably saved my life or at
least kept me from doing some-
thing atrocious for the honor of
the Fatherland."
The last was said in a distinct
tone of cynicism.


- ---.






Dan K. Thomasson
I thought back to that meet-
ing years ago in learning about
the misjudgment of several
young Marines pictured urinat-
ing on dead Taliban fighters in
Afghanistan. The initial reac-
tion is one of disgust and anger
that American fighting men
would commit such an atrocity.
But stopping to think about it
for a moment, I found myself
in agreement with Texas Gov.
Rick Perry, who had the cour-
age to put the whole matter in
its proper perspective.
Before going further, I must
say that I am not a Perry fan
and have been critical of a num-


ber of his past analyses about
what the country needs. But
on this occasion, he was dead
right: He noted that while the
act was clearly disgusting and
brought no honor to the Marine
Corps, it was performed by
teenagers whose judgment is
not always the best when it
comes to these circumstances.
To ruin the lives of these young
men over this obvious mistake
would be absolutely a tragedy.
It was not, Perry opined, a
criminal act.
War is a horrible thing. It
makes hardened veterans,
not to mention youngsters, do
things they would never dream
of otherwise. My DPA friend,
Hans, understood this as well
as anyone and was thoroughly
relieved to have been sent to
Alabama.
* Dan K. Thomasson is for-
mer editor of Scripps Howard
News Service.


4A


I' I I -ANOTHER


ANOTHER
VIEW


GOP girds

for Round

3: South

Carolina

demolition

derby

The way the GOP
primaries are going,
Barack Obama may
not have to cam-
paign for re-election.
The Republican presidential
candidates are doing it for
him.
Republicans approached
the start of the primary
and caucus season with a
field of second-string can-
didates, except for Mitt
Romney. For widely varying
reasons, the GOP's political
stars declined to enter the :
race, even though Obama
appeared clearly vulnerable..
Even with the junior var-
sity, two candidates, Herman
Cain and Gary Johnson,
never made it as far as the
season opener, the Iowa
caucus. Michelle Bachmann
dropped out soon after.
Saturday's South Carolina
primary is looking less
and less like the make-or-
break event it once was.
The process leading tip to
it was enlivened by a series
of debates that were less a
clash of ideas than .a sort of
verbal game of Whac-A-Mole.
This past week, Jon
Huntsman, who had perhaps
-the'best credentials in the
field in terms of political
and foreign policy experi-
ence, dropped out after an
indifferent showing in New
Hampshire. He departed
the scene with an offhand
endorsement of Romney that .
was almost an afterthought.
On Thursday, Texas Gov.
Rick Perry, from whom polit-
ical handicappers expected
great things, also dropped
out, his poll numbers hav-
ing tanked after a series of
gaffes. In what seems to
be becoming a tradition in
this race, he left the stage
with a backhanded endorse-
ment of a competitor: "Newt
Gingrich is not perfect, but
who among us is?" There's a
great bumper sticker.
That leaves: Gingrich
with his checkered past;
three wives, two of whom
he cheated on; and huge
ego. Rick Santorum, whose,
views do not play well out-
side of a narrow wing of the
Republican Party and whose
personality becomes wear-
ing on repeated exposure.
And Ron .Paul, who seems to
be campaigning in a parallel
political universe, although
admittedly he does very well
there.
It also leaves Romney, a
hugely successful business-
man, former governor and
the consensus frontrunner.
Obama's biggest political
*weakness is the economy,
particularly joblessness.
Romney is best poised to
exploit that weakness by
pledging to energize the
private sector, but his fel-
low Republicans seem to be
doing their best to see that
he doesn't.
Perry stigmatized him as a
"vulture capitalist." Romney
has been beaten about the
head for the excesses of ven-
ture capitalism, his low but
legal tax rate on investment
income and his business
bank accounts in the Cayman
Islands.
Sarah Palin says she hopes
Gingrich wins Saturday


because it will prolong the
Republican primary. The
Obama White House hopes
so, too.

* Scripps Howard News Service










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2012 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today, Jan. 20

Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. Identical twins
Mark & Clark play head to
head on identical custom-
built baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled audi-
ences around the world
with everything from musi-
cal comedy to dramatic
interpretation of the clas-
sics all with the flash of
Liberace, a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano artist-
ry of Ferrante and Teicher.
Ticket and membership
information is available at
www.communityconcerts.
info.
Arbor Day planting
The Lake City/Columbia
County Beautification
Committee will honor
Morris Williams by plant-.
ing a Palatka Holly in com-
memoration of the 2012
Arbor Day. The ceremony
will be held at 11 a.m. in
front of the school admin-
istration building on Duval
Street. The public is urged
to attend.
Jan. 21

Southside Idol
The Lake City Recreation'
Department 2nd Annual
Southside Idol will be
Saturday at 7 p.m. in the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative
Complex Auditorium, 372
W. Duval St Admission
is $5 to see 14 talented
local singers in middle and
high school compete to
be Southside's Idol. The
winner takes home $1,000..
Special guest Keisha
Jackson, an R&B singer,
will perform with other
local talents.
Spiritual retreat
A spiritual life enrich-
ment retreat and confer-
ence for adults from 9:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Epiphany
Catholic Church, 1905
SW Epiphany Court. The
registration fee is $10
and theme is improving
and inspiring spirituality.
Reserve your spot by Jan.
18 by calling (386)752-
5228.
Farmers market
There will be a Chili
Cook Off and live music
this week at the Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
in Wilson Park located
along Lake DeSoto in
downtown Lake City. The
cook off will benefit Relay
for Life. The market fea-
tures locally grown fresh
produce, herbs, plants,
cheese, milk, eggs and
local baked breads, pies
and other items. Vendors
also sell homemade craft
items like jewelry, wood-
work and other handmade
items. For more infor-
mation about the Lake
DeSoto Farmer Market
call 386-719-5766 or visit
market.lcfla.com.
Wedding Expo
Let the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park &
Campground help you
plan your special day. 2nd
annual Wedding Expo
will be held at Spirit of
the Suwannee Music
Park & Campground on
Saturday, Jan. 21from 1
to 5 p.m. Fashion Show
by Glass Slipper Bridal,
Door Prizes, Vendor
Booths, Refreshments,
Taste Testing and more.
Vendors include: Melissa's
Antiques, Glass Slipper
Bridal, Scott Carroll DJ,
Holiday Inn, SOS Cafe &
Restaurant, Top Hat Limo,


Cakes by Pat, Uniquely
Yours Wedding & Event
Planner, Hot Heads Salon
& Spa, Sea Creative/
Stacee Reveron Photo,
Joy the Cake Lady/Elite
Photography and more.
Free Admission. For more
information contact Sharyn
at (386) 364-1683.


Baptist school
First Central
Missionary Baptist
Association will start
its Mid Year Winter
Education School on
Jan. 21, from 7:30 a.m. to
5:30 p.m. at Springfield
Missionary Baptist
Church in -Live Oak.
There will be classes
on Public Speaking,
Survey of Revelation,
Baptist'Doctrine, and
Doctrine of Prayer. The
cost is $35 per person
and includes materials.
Lunch by the host church
for a low fee. Rev.Joseph
Francis, Moderator and
Mrs. Shirley, Franklin,
Women's President.
Jan. 22

Church anniversary
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church, 948
Aberdeen Avenue, will
celebrate their 70th
Church Anniversary on
Jan. 22 at 11:30 a.m. and
3 p.m. Dr. Dwight Pollock
in charge of the 11:30
a.m. service. Reverend
Isadore L. Williams and the
Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church is in charge
of the 3 p.m. service.
Please come out and share
with us.
Bridal show
The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January'
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's Bridal,
Belk, Lake City Florist
and Design, Glass Slipper
Bridal, The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes, :.
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices are
$7.00; Day of Event $10.00.
Tickets can be purchased
at the Holiday Inn & Suites,
213 SW Commerce Dr.,
Lake City. For ticket sales
or vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386) 754-
1411.
Riding club banquet
The Columbia County
Riding Club is having its
annual banquet Jan. 22
at 1p.m. at Mason City
Community Center. The
club will have its rides the
2nd and 4th Sat. of each
month. The club will be
hosting Pleasure Shows
this year. Check our web-
site for all information, www.
columbiacountyridingclub.
com.
Jan. 24

Friends of the Library
Author Program
Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 7
p.m. at the Main Library,
sponsored by Save Our '
Suwannee will host
Cynthia Barnett, author,
of Mirage: Florida and
the Vanishing Water of
the Eastern U.S. Barnett
is an award-winning jour-
nalist and senior writer
for Florida Trend maga-
zine. She will discuss
Florida's water crisis
and look at solutions
that have found success
in communities around
the world. Don't miss
this timely program on
a topic so very relevant
to Columbia County and
North Central Florida:

Jan. 26

Landlords' meeting
There will be a lanlords'
meeting Thursday, Jan.


26 at 6 p.m. in the Shands
LakeShore Medical
Center conference room.
Florida Gateway College
professor Sherri Carder
will speak about applica-
tions and agreements. All
rental agents and owners
are invited. For informa-
tion call 755-0110.


Jan. 25

Building Assn. lunch
The Columbia County
Builders Association will hold
a General Council lunch at
Guang Dong starting at 11:30
a. m. on Jan. 25. Cost of lunch
is $10 for members and $15
for non-members. Speaker
is Dale Williams. After the
lunch an attorney fromTritt/
Anderson in Jacksonville
will hold a short seminar.
Reservations are preferred,
call 386-867-1998 or e-mail:
colcountybuild@comcast.net.
Jan. 28

Illusionist Jason Bishop
Illusionist Jason Bishop
will perform as part of
Florida Gateway College's
FGC Entertainment series
on Jan. 28. Bishop, the 2006
APCA Performing Artist
of the Year, will amaze you
with his stunning and origi-
nal state-of-the-art magic,
including his breathtaking
Double Levitation trick. For
more information or for
tickets, call (386) 754-4340
or visit www.fgcentertain-
mentcom.
Women's retreat
New Dayspring Baptist
Church, 709 NW Long
Street, Shepherd's Care
Ministry will be hosting a
Women's Retreat on Jan.:
28th from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Registration and breakfast
beginning at 7:30 a.m.
Inspirational topics will be
presented along with lunch.
Tickets are available or you
may pay at the door for a
donation of $10. For more
information please contact
Sis. Linda Timmons at 386-
438-7974.
Jan. 29

Friends of the Lbrary
Author Program
Sunday, January 29,.2012
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library: Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita
Nights and Champagne
for Buzzards. Phyllis
Smallman is a Canadian
who has spent a lot of time
in Florida, the setting for
her award-winning mystery
series featuring '
sassy bartender, Sherri
Travis. A former potter
with a lifelong love of mys-
teries, Phyllis divides her
time between her native
Ontario and Sarasota. She
will join us live via Skype
for this program.
Jan. 30

Wildlife class
The Columbia County
Extension office, 164 SW
Mary Ethal Lane, will host
Creating Backyard Wildlife


Habitat on Jan. 30 from 1 to
4 p.m. Learn how to create
backyard wildlife habitat
for a variety of wildlife, in
particular birds, bats, and
butterflies.


Feb. 1


Black History Month
Opening Ceremony
Black History Month
Opening Ceremony, 6 pm,
Richardson Comm. Center.
Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.
Feb. 3

Gospel concert
Southern Gospel soloist
Ann Downing, a popular
performer on the Gaither
Gospel Homecoming video
series, will be in concert
at the Wellborn United
Methodist Church, 12005
County Road 137, at 7 p.m.
on Friday, Feb. 3. For infor-
mation call (386)754-8524.
Hyssongs in concert
The Hyssongs will be
presenting a concert of
Gospel Music at The
Hyssongs located at 254
SE Gillen Terrace in Lulu
on Feb. 3 at 7 p.m.
The Hyssongs travel
full-time throughout the
United States and Canada
using the powerful medi-
um of music. Dell, Susan,,
and Richard Hyssong
encourage and delight
audiences wherever they
appear with their fam-
Sily vocal harmony, lively
energetic style, humor,
and brass instruments
(trumpet, and trombone).
This awad winning trio
consistently has top 40
songs on the radio charges.
They perform more
than 250 times each year
in church, auditoriums,
gospel cruises, (as well
as television and radio).
During the last two years,
'


they have sung more than
12 times at Dollywood,
have been featured in
the Singing News, and
appeared on the cover of
Christian Voice Magazine.
Feb. 4


West Virginia Day
The West Virginia*
Annual Reunion will be
held on Feb. 4 start-
ing at 11:30 a.m. Please
bring a covered dish to
share for the luncheon.
The event will be held at
Epiphany Church, 1905
SW Epiphanty Court For
questions, information, or
reservations please call
386-755-4937.


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email lhampson@lakecityreporter.com


Feb. 10

Friends of Music
The Friends of Music
Concert Series will pres-
ent its second concert of
the season
on Friday, Feb. 10
at 7:30 p.m. at First
Presbyterian Church,
697 SW Baya Dr. Dr.
Laura Ellis, organist/
harpsichordist, and Dr.
Steven Thomas, cellist,
will .perform. Both musi-
cians are professors at
the University of Florida.
The concert is free, and a
reception will follow. For
more information call Bill
Poplin at 365-4932.


Olustee Festival Pageant Feb. 11
O0lustee Festival Pageant


The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, Feb.4. Ages 3-12
mos, 13mo-23 mo, 2-4, 5-6
and 7-9 will be held at 4 p.m.
at the Columbia County
School Administrative
Complex Auditorium. Ages
10-12, 13-15 and 16-20 will
be held at 7 p.m. Winners
in each division will receive
a $50 savings bond, crown,
banner and ride in the
Olustee parade on Feb. 14.
The pageant is open to the
public with admission at
the door: $5.00 adults and
students. Applications are
available at the Columbia
County Library or Chamber
of Commerce. Deadline
for entries is 1-23-2012. For
more information you may
contact pageant director,
Elaine Owens at 386-965-
2787.

Black History Movie
Festival
Black History Movie
Festival, 4-8pm Olustee Park. '

Feb. 8,

Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.


FACS Vajentine's Day event
The Filipino American -"
Cultural Society of
Lake City will have a
Valentine's Day Dinner "
and Dance on Saturday, '
Feb. 11 from 6 to 10 p.m.
in the Epiphany Catholic
Church Social Hall. There'
will be entertainment, '
music, dancing and a cul-
tural food buffet. Please
bring your best covered '
dish to share. The event
is free for members, $10 "'
for nonmembers. Call 965-
5905 for information. '
Bus trip
"What Freedom Looked
Like" a bus trip to Ft.
Mose, St Augustine,
Florida Florida's all free'
black settlement, 7am -
6pm; meet at Richardson
Gym. $25 per person
includes lunch.

Zumba fundraiser for
Habitat for Humanity
All proceeds go to Habitat'
for Humanity of Lake City/
Columbia County Inc. for
one hour long Zumba class
facilitated by American.
Family'Fitness, 4578 Sw
Heritage Oaks Circle, Suite
102 on Feb. 11 at 11 a.m.
The donation cost is $10
per person. A fire truck and
bloodmobile will be on site
too.


FREE to the public
Weight Loss 8 Stop Smoking Hypnotherapy
Dave Miller is providing hypnotherapy for weight loss, stop smoking, & stress relief. For many
people, this therapy reduces 2 to 3 clothing sizes and/or stops smoking. Lose weight without
"dieting". No pills, no supplements, eat healthy, move more. "I will shut. off your unhealthy
eating habits". Stop smoking or chewing tobacco. No patches, pills, lotions or potions."I will
.shut off your tobacco habits without an cravings or withdrawals". I am a retired counselor and
have been conducting hypnosis seminars for over 30 years. I have helped thousands stop
smoking and lose weight or both without any side effects or dieting. A modest $5 donation
when signing in is appreciated. Only one 2-hour session is needed for desirable results.
Sign In 30 minutes early. All meetings begin at 7:30 PM
Mon., Jan. 23 LAKE CITY Fairfield Inn 538 sw corporate Dr.
(behind Travel Country RV Center)
ThUe., Jan 24 LIVE OAK- Garden Club 1300 11th St. sw
David Miller S.W. C.Ht. 231-288-5941 www.DMSeminars.com


NOTICE OF MEETING
ADVISORY AIRPORT COMMITTEE
CITY OF LAKE CITY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Advisory Airport Committee for the City of Lake City,
Florida will hold a meeting on Monday, January 23, 2012. The meeting is scheduled for 6:00
p.m. at City Hall, 205 North Marion Street, Lake City, Florida.

All interested persons are invited to attend.
AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


CITY COUNCIL MEETING


THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA WILL
MEET ON MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2012 AT 7:00 P.M. IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY
HALL AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA

All interested persons are invited to attend.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk









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FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT












Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, January


20,2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Seto B


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

College

football

Indians


Fort White's
A.J. Legree
made a verbal
commitment
to Kentucky
in December, but is still
sought after.
Legree has been
pursued by Western
Kentucky and Southern
Mississippi. He is on an
official visit to Kentucky
this weekend and has
visits planned to the
other two schools.
Jonathan Dupree
has been contacted by
Presbyterian College,
Western Carolina,
Chowan College (N.C.)
and Weber State. Dupree
is playing in another
all-star game this
weekend in Valdosta.
After a year off
from football, Alexis
Blake is going to Dean
Community College in
Franklin, Mass.
Coach Demetric
Jackson has a contact
at Antelope Community
College in Lancaster,
Calif., and Roy Blake and
Zach Lewis are on the
team.
Jordan Dewhirst was
injured and redshirted at
Jacksonville University,
and is back in good
graces with the Dolphins.
Zach Bentley is at
Kentucky Wesleyan, and
was redshirted last year.
Donnell Sanders is a
January preferred
walk-on at Florida A&M.
Robert Hartley
graduates from FAMU
in April.
If Legree accepts the
Kentucky offer, he will
be one of four players to
sign with the Wildcats
from Columbia County.
Covington Woodley
played his senior year for
the Indians when Fort
White started its football
program in 2000. He
signed in March 2001.
Michael Daies
graduated from
Columbia High in 1996
and was a late signee by
the Wildcats.
Bryan Johnson, who
was the senior
quarterback for
Columbia's state
championship team in
1967, also' signed with
Kentucky.
The Gatorade Florida
Football Player of the
Year is William Likely
of Glades Central
Community High.
The Raiders advanced
to the Class 5A third
round before falling to
eventual state champion
Miami Norland.
In the first 12 games
of the season, the 5-8,
170-pound Likely rushed
for 742 yards and 11
touchdowns, and caught
31 passes for 586 yards
and five touchdowns. He
added two touchdowns
on kick returns and had
36 tackles and five
interceptions on defense.
* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Indians have


senior sendoff


for soccer


Fort White defeats
Hamilton County
3-0 on Thursday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's Josiah Miller
scored his first goal as an
Indian and helped the soc-
cer team pick up a 3-0 win
on senior night.
Miller, one of six seniors
honored, scored his goal
off a penalty kick with 22:12
remaining in the first half to
put the Indians on top, 1-0.
Fort White then received
two goals .from Anthony
Gonzalez in the first half
to build a 3-0 lead and, the
Indians would sit on it dur-
ing the second half.
Gonzalez's first goal came


with 17:56 remaining in the
first half. He would add his
second goal at the 39:06
mark of the first half.
"It was nice to get a win
after three tough games in
a row," Fort White head
coach .Pete Blanchard said.
"It's been tough, but we
played well. Josiah got his
first varsity goal after four
years with the team."
Ryan Cotrell, Colton Jones,
Reno Marmon, Brandon
Moulton and Brandon
Sharpe were also honored
during Senior Night.
Fort White (4-13-1, 1-6-1
district) will head into the
District 5-2A tournament at
5 p.m. on Monday against
Newberry High at Santa Fe
High in Gainesville.
The winner will play
top seed PK. Yonge on
Wednesday.


. ......: ^ ,> ** ..... 4.-,.
" . %-. ." : "" - : _. ., '' ' : "
~ ~~~~~~.. .. . ,. .
.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's 'Brandon Sharpe (10) prepares to kick the bll downfield in a game against.
Columbia on Dec. 6.


Bradford takes series


Tornadoes take

: down Fort White

in district matchup


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreoor ter..:on

FORT WHITE Fort White
High's basketball team started
slow and-could never did out of
the hole in a 55-49 district loss
to visiting Bradford High.
The Tornadoes opened with
a 9-0 spurt. They added a 9-0
run in the second quarter and
8-0 run in the third quarter.
Each time Fort white e surged
back. The Indians closed the
first quarter with a 14-2 run to
trail 16-14 at the buzzer.
Fort White ended the sec-
ond quarter, 9-4, and was down
29-25 at halftime.
The third quarter late run
was 8-3, but now the deficit was
seven, 41-34.
A pair of three-pointers by
Melton Sanders pulled the
Indians within .three points,


461-43, midway through the
fourth quar ter.
The Turnadoes settled down
and took the air out of the ball.
The.iv made enough free throw s
dotwn the stretch to hold on for
the win.
Sanders poured in 24 points
for the Indians.
Other scorers: Trey Phillips,
9. A.J. Legree, 7. Raul Colon,
5 and two apiece from Nick
Butler and Jonathan Dupree.
Justin McBride led Bradford
with 16 points, as thdie Tornadoes
moved to 12-9 overall and 6-1 in
district play.
Keaars Ardley and Brian
Walten each scored 10 points.
Fort White (S-6, 5-5 district)
hosts Nexwberr\ High at 7.3)l
p.m. on Tuesday. The boys will
\wrap up the week as part of a
doubleheader with the girls at
Hamilton County High at 8 p.m.
on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Nick Butler (15) shoots a lay-up against Keystone Heights on Dec. 16.


Columbia, Fort

White fall in

soccer matches


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Rogelio Sosa (25)- heads the ball while playing against Fort White on Dec. 6.


Lady Indians
eliminated from
district tourney.
From staff reports

Columbia High fell 3-1 on
the road at Vanguard High
in Ocala on Wednesday.
The Tigers received
their only goal from Jimmy
Blakely off an assist from
Shane Hartopp. Blakely has
three goals in the last two
games.
The Tigers will end their
regular season on the road
at Eastside High at 7 p.m.
tonight.
Columbia (9-13-1)
will play Panama City
Mosely in the opening
round of the District 2-4A
soccer tournament at
6 p.m. in Tallahassee on
Monday.


Lady Indians soccer
Fort White's girls soccer
team fell to No. 1 seed and
host Santa Fe High, 4-1, in
a District 5-2A tournament
semifinal on Wednesday.
The fifth-seeded Lady
Indians got an early goal
from Rebecca Onorati on a
long free kick. Santa Fe tied
it in the 37th minute on a
goal by Amy Phillips, and it
stayed 1-1 into halftime.
The Raiders took over in
the second half with goals by
Summer Bromenschenkel,
Suzanne Anderson and
Jordyn Register.
Santa Fe will face
No. 2 P.K Yonge School
both teams were 12-1-1
in district play in the
championship match at
7 p.m. today.
Fort White finished the
season 12-8-2.


Section B












2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2012


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo
Champions, second round, at George;
South Africa (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC PGATour, Humana Challenge,
second round, at La Quinta, Calif.
6:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Mitsubishi
Electric Championship, first round, at
Kaupulehu-Kona, Hawaii
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP -, Michigan at Notre Dame
NBA
8 p.m.
ESPN LA. Lakers at Orlando
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Minnesota at LA. Clippers
TENNIS
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, third
round, at Melboume.Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, third
round, at Melbourne,Australia

FOOTBALL

1 NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
NewYork Giants 24,Atanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
San Francisco 36, New Orleans 32
New England 45, Denver 10
Baltimore 20, Houston 13
N.Y. Giants 37, Green Bay 20
Conference Championships
Sunday
Baltimore at New England, 3 p.m.
I N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 6:30 p.m.
Pro Bowl \
Sunday, Jan. 29
At Honolulu
NFC vs.AFC
Super Bowl
SSunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
NFC vs.AFC, 6:20 p.m.

" College all-star games

Saturday
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs.Wekt, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Jan. 28
Senior Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Feb. 5
Texas vs. Nation
At San Antonio
Texas.vs. Nation, 2 p.m. (CBSSN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
San Antonio 85, Orlando 83, OT
Washington 105, Oklahoma City 102
Denver 108, Philadelphia 104, OT
Boston 96,Toronto 73
New Jersey 107, Golden State 100
Phoenix 91, New York 88
Memphis 93, New Orleans 87
Minnesota 93, Detroit 85
Atlanta 92, Portland 89
Sacramento 92, Indiana 88
LA.'Clippers 91, Dallas 89
Thursday's Games


YOUTH BASEBALL

Registration for

Lake City today

Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
5-7 p.m. today, and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
at Southside Sports
Complex with a cost of $80,
Online registration is
available at www.lcccyb.com
for $75 plus a transaction
fee.
For details, call president
Tad Cervantes at 365-4810
or vice-president David
Williams at (386) 697-0764.


New Orleans at Houston (n)
LA. Lakers at Miami (n)
Dallas at Utah (n)
Today's Games
Portland atToronto, 7 p.m.
Denver atWashington, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at New York, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Cleveland at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Portland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Denver at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Chicago, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.
Dallas at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Jersey, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Saturday's Games
No. I Syracuse at Notre Dame,
6 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky vs. Alabama at
Kentucky, Noon
No. 3 Baylor vs. No. 5 Missouri, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Duke vs. Florida State,
4 p.m.
No. 6 Ohio State at Nebraska, 8 p.m.
No.7 Kansas atTexas,4 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State vs. Purdue,
Noon
No. 10 Georgetown vs. Rutgers,
Noon
No. 12 Murray State at SIU-
Edwardsville, 8 p.m.
No. 13 UConn at Tennessee, 4 p.m.
'No. 14 UNLV vs. New Mexico, 10
p.m.
No. 16 San Diego State vs. Air Force,
10p.m.
No. 17 Florida vs. LSU, 6 p.m.
No. 18 Mississippi State at Vanderbilt,
p.m.
No. 19 Creighton vs. Indiana State,
3 p.m.
No. 20 Michigan at Arkansas, 2 p.m.
No. 21 Marquette at Providence, 7
p.m.
No. 23 Louisville at Pittsburgh, 9 p.m.
No. 24 Saint Mary's (Cal) at Santa
Clara, II p.m.
No. 25 Kansas State at Oklahoma
State, 1:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. I I Indiana vs. Penn State, Noon
No. 15 Virginia vs.Virginia Tech, 6 p.m.
No. 22 Illinois vs.Wisdonsin, 2 p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open'singles

At Melbourne (Australia) Park
SThursday
Men
Second Round
Juan Ignacio Chela (27),Argentina, def.
Pablo Andujar, Spain, 6-4,6-4,6-3.
Milos Raonic (23), Canada, def. Philipp
Petzschner, Germany, 6-4,5-7, 6-2, 7-5.
Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (6), France, def.
Ricardo Mello,Brazil, 7-5,6-4, 6-4.
Michael Llodra, France, def. Alex
Bogomolov Jr. (32), Russia, 6-1, 6-3, 4-6,
5-7, 6-4. .
:Novak Djokovic (I), Serbia, def.
Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 6-3, 6-2, 6-1.
Janko Tipsarevic (9), Serbia, def. James
Duckworth, Australia, 3-6, 6-2, 7-6 (5),
6-4.
Frederico Gil, Portugal, def. Marcel
Granollers (26), Spain, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3.
SNicolas Mahut, France, def. Tatsuma
Ito, Japan, 1-6,7-6 (6), 6-2, 6-2.
David Ferrer (5), Spain, def. Ryan
Sweeting, United States, 6-7 (4), 6-2, 3-6,



BRIEFS

OLUSTEE

Blue Grey 5K

run/walk Feb. 18

The Olustee Blue Grey
5K Run/Walk is 7 a.m.
Feb. 18 at Olustee Park in
downtown Lake City. Race
day registration begins at
6 a.m. Early online
registration for the
professionally chip timed
event is $25 at
www.stepfitnessonline. cornm.
There also is registration
at Carquest Auto Parts
on Pinemount Road. The


SFort White spring Unscramble these four Jumbles,
Frt M spring one letter to each square,
registration set to form four ordinary words.
I SRUBT


Fort White Babe Ruth
4Baseball has spring ball
registration set for 4-7 p.m.
Jan. 26 and Feb. 2, and
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 28
at South Columbia Sports
Park, north of Fort White
High. Four divisions are
offered for ages 4-12 and
fees range from $45 to
$65. A birth certificate is
required for new players.
Coaches are needed and
can register at the same
(dates. There will be a late
registration day on Feb. 11
- with a $5 additional charge
abd a holding list.
For details, call Millissa
Blakley at 365-4133 or
Se-mail
fwbrbaseball@gmail. com.


FANYIM






I Jumbles: JOINT


6-2, 6-3.
Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Edouard
Roger-Vasselin, France, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4.
Richard Gasquet (17), France, def.
Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 6-2,
3-0, retired.
Kei Nishikori (24),Japan, def. Matthew
Ebden,Australia, 3-6, 1-6, 6-4, 6-1, 6-1.
Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, def.
Viktor Troicki (19), Serbia, 5-7, 6-4, 6-2,
4-6,6-3.
Gael Monfils (14), France, def.Thomaz
Bellucci, Brazil, 2-6, 6-0, 6-4, 6-2.
Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Andy
Roddick (15), United States, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4,
retired.
Julien Benneteau, France, def. Gilles
Simon (12), France, 7-5, 7-6 (8), 1-6,
3-6, 6-2.
Women
Second Round
Maria Sharapova (4), Russia, def. Jamie
Hampton, United States, 6-0, 6-1.
Ana Ivanovic (21), Serbia, def. Michaella
Krajicek, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-3.
Vera Zvonareva (7), Russia, dlef. Lucie
Hradecka, Czech Republic, 6-1, 7-6 (3).
Sara Errahi, Italy, def. Nadia Petrova
(29), Russia, 6-2, 6-2.
Angelique Kerber (30), Germany, def.
Stephanie Dubois, Canada, 7-5, 6-I.
Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Kaia
Kanepi (25), Estonia, 6-2, 7-5.
Serena Williams (12), United States,
def. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech
Republic, 6-0, 6-4.
Zheng Jie, China, def. Roberta Vinci
(23), Italy, 6-4, 6-2.
Vania King, United States, def.Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova (I5), Russia, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4.
Sorana Cirstea, Romania, def. Urszula
Radwanska, Poland, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3.
Petra Kvitova (2), Czech Republic, def.
Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, 6-2, 2-6, 6-4.
Greta Arn,' Hungary, def. Dominika
Cibulkova (17), Slovakia, 6-2, 3-6, 10-8.
Sabine Lisicki (14), Germany, def.
Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-I, 6-2.
Maria Kirilenko (27), Russia, def.
Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, 6-4, 1-6,
6-2.
Marion Bartoli. (9), France, def. Jelena
Dokic,Australia, 6-3, 6-2.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (18), Russia, def.
Sloane Stephens, United States, .7-6 (6),
7-5.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Washington 3, Montreal 0
Chicago 6, Buffalo 2
Colorado 4, Florida 3, OT
Anaheim 6, Phoenix 2
Thursday's Games
Minnesota at Toronto (n)
Boston at New Jersey (n)
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia (n)
Nashville at Columbus (n)
Edmonton at St. Louis (n)
Buffalo at'Winnipeg (n)
Detroit at Phoenix (n)
Calgary at Los Angeles (n)
Ottawa at San Jose (n)'
Today's Games
Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Florida at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Boston, I p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, I p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 4 p.m.
Ottawa at Anaheim, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Florida at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at St Louis, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


race will benefit the family
of Melanie North and the
March of Dimes.
For details, call Michelle
Richards at (386) 208-2447.

YOUTH BASKETBALL

Registration for

Boys Club hoops

Boys Club registration
for its basketball program
is under way. Cost is $45
for ages 6-14.
For details, call 752-4184.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I T-E CLEANING CREW AT
GRANP CENTRAL WA5
ENJOYING A--
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
TYING THORNY BICKER


yesterday's| Answer: His new position at the medieval-themed
restaurant was this HIS "KNIGHT'" JOB


League reports

Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lorrie Geiger
215; 2. Susie Camacho 185; 3. Chrissy
Fancy 183. 1. (tie) Dan Cobb, Chris
Sanders 214; 3. Jesus Camacho 212;
4. Michael Mclnally 2,10.
High scratch series: 1. Lorrie
Geiger 477; 2. Chrissy Fancy 475;
3. Lori Davis 470. 1. Michael Mcinally
618; 2. Adam Alford 607; 3. Jesus
Camacho 563.
High handicap game: 1. Lomie
Geiger 244; 2. Susie Camacho 229;
3. Beth Koppa 228. 1. Dan Cobb
247; 2. Jesus Camacho 244; 3. Chris
Sanders 236.
High handicap series: 1. Dani Fair
697; 2. Terry Townsend 664; 3. Rachel
Mclnally 634. 1. Michael Mclnally
726; 2. Adam Alford 685; 3. George
Mulligan 634.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 183,
Mark Davis 194.
(results from Jan. 10)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. The
Sandbaggers (7-1); 2. Spare Us (6-2);
3. Legal Ladies (5-3, 561 average);
4. Alley Oops (5-3, 505 average).
High handicap game: 1 ..(tie) Karen
Clampett, Karen Gardner 236; 3. Vicki
Baker 220.
High handicap series: 1. Linda
Herndon 638; 2. Susan Newbern 603;
3. (tie) Jane Sommerfeld, Charlene


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

Moss 590.
(results from Jan. 17)
SUNDAY NITE. MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ (4-0,
38,525 pins); 2. McGhghy's Navy
.(4-0, 36,683 pins); 3. We've Been
Framed (4-0, 33,842 pins).
High scratch game: 1. Angela
Pond 192; 2. Cheryl Jacks 181;
3. Di Drehoff 175. 1. Robert Pond
226; 2. A.J. Dariano 221; 3. A.J.
Dariano 217.
High scratch series: 1. Di Drehoff
476; 2. Cheryl Jacks 473; 3. Jennifer
Freeman 459. 1. A.J. Dariano 608;
2. Mark Moore 588; 3. Tim Carberry
566.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169.74; 2. Cheryl Jacks 159.81;
3. Jennifer Freeman 152.4. 1. Dan
McNair 200.81; 2. A.J. Dariano
195.06; 3. Mark Moore 193.13..
(results from Jan. 15)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. The Move
Connection (44.5-15.5); 2. Team 12
(41-19); 3. Ronsonet Buick/GMC
(39.5-20.5).
High scratch game: 1. Gregg
Moravec 258; 2. Bill Duncan 255;
3. John Janki 254.
High scratch series: 1. Gregg
Moravec 682; 2. John Janki 667;
3. Dale Coleman 651.
High handicap game: 1. Gregg
Moravec 272; 2. John Janki 266;
3. Bill Duncan 263.
High handicap series: 1. Gregg
Moravec 724; 2. John Janki 703;
3. Steve Madsen 695.


Owens heads indoors


for return to pro football


Associated Press


ALLEN, Texas-Terre]
Owens is going indoors fo
his return to pro football.
The six-time Pro Bow
receiver has accepted a
offer to be a player and wi
have an ownership stake ii
the Allen Wranglers of th
Indoor Football League.
The Wranglers, wh
open their season Feb
25 at home, extended th.
offer to Owens last month
They posted on their web
site Thursday that the
were excited to announce
it was official.
"Uh-oh, it's official,
Owens exclaimed in
video message post
on his Twitter page. "I'r
headed back to Texa
That's right, IFL, here
come. Allen, Texas, here
come. I'm going to be m
.Allen, Texas, I'll see yo
in the end zone."
The 38-year-old Owei
didn't get any NFL offe.
to play last season aft
surgery on his left kne
Allen is a suburb north

ACROSS 37
1 Gorge 38
6 Sea birds 39
11 Pulp tree 40
13 Dry gully 41
14 Call it a night
15 Like a drop 42
leaf
16 Earth orbiter 44
1 of yore 47
17 Windy City
trains 51
18 Comic book
thud 52
21 Ore yield
23 Energy 53
26 Grounded
bird 54
27 Shakespeare
nickname
28 Isolated'' 1
29 Taco cousin
31 Goes against 2
Galahad
32 Prom 3
attendees 4
33 Spiny cacti 5
35 Lean against
36 Lament loudly 6


r

v1
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1l
n
e

o
i.
e
L.
b-
y
e


a
d
n


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 31, 2010, file photo, Cincinnati Bengals wide
receiver Terrell Owens warms ~l'ptio'rItdan NFL football '
game against the Miami Dolphins in'Cincinnati.


is. Dallas.
I Over 15 NFL seasons
I with five teams, Owens had
e. 1,078 catches for 15,934
u yards with 153 touchdowns.
He is sixth in career recep-
ns tions, and second in yards
rs receiving and touchdowns
er behind Jerry Rice.
e. Owens began his career
of with San Francisco' (1996-

Economize Answe
Hammett's -
Spade
Eagle's lair A DAN
Of course' P A C
Belt maker's -
tool U C C
Vitamin B T U
monitors Am
Go (lose it) R
Conger BA KE
catchers
Major ICE
highway L E G
Descend a -
cliff I1
18 holes, B E L
generally -F-
Frothy -L- IN

DOWN R APS
Paramedic's S T
skill I'
Garden 7 Impressi
implement vases
Quick to learn 8 Written
Willowy record
Xylophone 9 Old soap
cousins ingrediel
Patio appliance 10 Turf


2003), where he was team-
mates with Rice for five
seasons, and then played
in Philadelphia (2004-05),
Dallas (2006-08), Buffalo
(2009) And Cincinnati
(2010).
In late October, Owens
held a workout in California
to show teams he was
healthy.

er to Previous Puzzle


EWER LASS



SE CA INE
ODS G NIAW


E I OSNIIP


SANE A NE






T AID ATE


ve




nt,


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


12 Look over
again
13 Yet to come
18 Fighting fish
19 One-celled
animal
20 Dinosaur's
place
22 Shipping
inquiry
23 Hit on the fly
24 Fuel valve
25 Predicaments
28 Small, in
Dogpatch
30 High
explosive
31 Not good at.
music (hyph.)
34 Young cow
36 "Pogo"
cartoonist
39 Trophy
41 Two fives'
for -
43 Puppy chow
brand
44 Standard
45 Galleon cargo
46 Three
before V
48 Pollution
control org.
.49 Sleep stage,
for short
50 Crafty


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


High average: 1. Zech Strohl
220.73; 2. Dale Coleman 218.54;
3. Robert Stone 216.72.
(results from Jan. 9)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(57.5-26.5); 2. Farmers (48.5-35.5);
3. Pin Busters (46.5-37.5).
High handicap game: 1. Yvonne
Finley 237; 2. Joanne Denton 224;
3. Sherl Reeve 217. 1. Chuck Shorter
242; 2. Earl Hayward 229; 3. Jim
Hawkins 221.
High handicap series: 1. Jeanne
Sireci 646; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 598;
3. Louise Atwood 597. 1. Morrell
Atwood 666; 2. Joe Peterson 654;
3. Ronnie Grey 611.
(results'from Jan. 10)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. 4 S's (54-30);
2. BMW (51-33); 3.-Ups and Downs
(49.5-34.5,49,815 pins); 4. Three Girls
&'A Guy (49.5-34.5, 49,097 pins).
High handicap game: 1. De De
Young 237; 2. Louise Atwood 236;
3. Diane Madsen-235. 1. Ronnie Grey
245; 2. David Duncan 231; 3. Bill
Price 227.
High handicap series: 1. Susan
Stanfield 630; 2. Doreen Waters 625;
3. Elaine Nemeth 624. 1. Wayne
Johns 671; 2. Ray Denton 642; 3. Earl
Hayward 638.
High average: 1. Shirley Highsmith
151.15; 2. (tie) Betty Carmichael,
Elaine Nemeth 150.88. 1., David
Duncan 190.21; 2. Bill Dolly 187.83;
3. George Mulligan 178.73.
(results from Jan. 12)


I %-j y I I















Ravens, Patriots provide interesting matchups


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

Matchups for the AFC
championship game Sunday
between the Baltimore
Ravens and New England
Patriots at Gillette Stadium:

When the Ravens have
the ball
Run, Ray, run.
Catch, Ray, catch.
Those are the top two pri-
orities for the Ravens (13-4),
who must get the ball in the
hands of RB Ray Rice (27),
the league's leader in total
yardage with 2,068 (1,364
rushing). Rice was dynamic
the last time he faced the
Patriots in a playoff game
at Foxborough, breaking
an 83-yard run on the first
Baltimore play from scrim-
mage. He needs to set the
tone again, aided by All-Pro
fullback Vonta Leach (44).
Baltimore wants to get
Rice open in space as a
receiver, putting pressure
on LBs Jerod Mayo (51)
and Rob Ninkovich (50),
and all the defensive backs.
The Ravens also want their
offensive line, which has
been inconsistent, to set the
tempo inside for Rice and
backup Ricky Williams (34).
That is a key, because only
guard Marshal Yanda (73)
has stood out this season,
and the line was outplayed
by Houston last week.
Expect Patriots coach Bill
Belichick to have something
schemed up to neutralize
Rice, forcing QB Joe Flacco
S(5) to beat his team. Flacco
isn't spectacular and the
Ravens rarely have asked
him to be the focal point of
the offense. Belichick could
force thatto happen, especial-
ly if superb NTVince Wilfork
(75) has his way in the
trenches. Journeyman DE
Mark Anderson (95) had 10
sacks in Belichick's defense,
and Wilfork and Ninkovich
each had 1' against Denver
last weekend.
Veteran WR Anquan
Boldin (81) joins Rice as the
main target for Flacco. New
England's secondary has


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (12) runs with ball as he is shadowed by quarterback Brian Hoyer (8) while
performing field drills during NFL football practice at the team's facility, in Foxborough, Mass. on Thursday. The Patriots are
slated to host the Baltimore Ravens in the AFC championship on Sunday.


been mediocre for much
of the year, but does make
big plays, led by CB Kyle
Arrington (24), who had a
league-leading seven inter-
ceptions. The Ravens need
rookie Torrey Smith (82)
and veteran Lee Evans (83)
to contribute, particularly
downfield, in matchups
with CB Jason McCourty
(32) and safeties James
Ihedigbo (44) and Patrick
Chung (25).
Where the Ravens could
surprise New England (14-
3) is with tight ends.Dennis
Pitta (88) and Ed Dickson
.(84). Each can be danger-
ous in the red zone and on.
third downs.

When the Patriots have
the ball
As they showed in last
week's rout of Denver, the


Patriots will feast on any
defense that doesn't chal-
lenge them from the out-
set. Baltimore must be
physical and aggressive
from the opening play, and
that's a staple of the Ravens'
defense, which had 48 sacks
during the season.
Led by All-Pro NT Haloti
Ngata (92) and LB Terrell
Suggs (55) plus the age-
less LB Ray Lewis (52) and
S Ed Reed (20) and using
a never-back-down philos-
ophy, the Ravens will get
after Tom Brady (12) as best
they can. But they managed
zero sacks and not a ton of
pressure against Houston,
whose' offense resembles
New England's as much as
the weather of the two cit-
ies matches up.
Given time, as he has
proven for more than a
decade, Brady will destroy


even the best defenses. But
he hasn't faced a high-qual-
ity one in months, and the
best defense the Patriots
played in 2011, Pittsburgh's,
held them to a season-low
17 points.
Brady will run the no-
huddle as often as possible,
hoping to gas the Ravens
and force their defenders
to stay on the field more
often than usual. Belichick
and offensive coordinator
Bill O'Brien, who leaves
to becomes Penn State's
coach when the Patriots are
done playing, came up with
some nice wrinkles this
season. Their use of TE
Aaron Hernandez (81) as a
running back was effective,
and they find ways to isolate
All-Pro TE Rob Gronkowski
(87) in mismatches.
Baltimore needs to blan-
ket Gronkowski as best it


can with Reed and fellow
S Bernard Pollard (31),
or maybe even try getting
CB Lardarius Webb (21)
involved in .coverage. Of
course, that could leave All-
Pro wideout Wes Welker
(83) in single coverage.
Also worrisome for the
Ravens is how Houston ran
the ball on them a week
ago. The Patriots don't rely
heavily on 'the run, but if
Benjarvus Green-Ellis (42)
and Danny Woodhead (39)
are being successful, it sets
up Brady for even more big
plays.
Ngata will try to disrupt
the middle of the Patriots'
solid O0-line,- where-'C, Danri
Connolly (63) and guards
Logan Mankins (.70) and
Brian Waters (54) will
be tested. If he does so,
Baltimore. has a far better
chance of slowing down


Brady's aerial show.

Special Teams
Coach John Harbaugh
has a special teams back-
ground, and with PK Billy
Cundiff (7) and P Sam Koch
(4), he has to feel comfort-
able. Cundiff missed some
games with a calf injury, but
has recovered.
Baltimore's coverage
and return teams are noth-
ing spectacular, with Webb
the most reliable as a punt
returned.
New England has no
qualms about having
Stephen Gostkowski (3)
try critical kicks. While he
hasn't made them forget
Adam Vinatieri, Gostkowski
is steady, enough to not
worry Patriots fans. P
Zoltan Mesko (14) is a lefty
kicker and the ball can act
funky off his foot.
Belichick also has a spe-
cial teams background and
his coverage groups are
trustworthy.

Coaching
Harbaugh has guided the
Ravens to the postseason in
all four of his years as coach;
by contrast, Belichick did
that only once in his first
four of five seasons as
coach of the franchise when
it was still the Cleveland
Browns. For- the first time
under Harbaugh, Baltimore
won the AFC North and got
a home playoff game.
Harbaugh knows his
team must push it against
Belichick, the game's most
successful coach since Bill
Walsh and Joe Gibbs were
on the sideline in their
primes. The Ravens have
been taught to do what they
do best and dare someone
to stop them. Belichick and
the Patriots can be more
devious and more ver-
satile. '
While -Harbaugh has
been this far" only once,
.losing" to Pittsburgh for
the 2008 AFC crown,
Belichick makes a habit of
reaching conference title
games.


Waltrip headlines NASCAR's


third Hall of Fame class


By JENNA FRYER
*Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C.-
Darrell Waltrip was nick-
named "Jaws" as a driver
for his outrageous trash-
talking. His loquaciousness
launched his second career,
as one of NASCAR's most
recognized and outspo-
ken television analysts.
But on the eve on his
induction into the NASCAR
Hall of Fame, 'ol DW has
no idea what he's going to
say in Friday night's cer-
emony.
"I've written .10 speech-
es and after the 10th one,
I threw it away, and said
'I can't write a speech,"'
Waltrip said. "I'm pretty
spontaneous, so I'm just
going to get up and say
what I think and hope it's
the right thing."
Waltrip hasn't always
said the right thing in a
career that dates back to his
1972 debut in NASCAR's
top series. He angered his
rivals as a driver, and his
strong opinions as an ana-
lyst for both Fox Sports and
Speed have made him one
of the more polarizing com-
mentators in NASCAR
Some might even think
it cost him a shot in last
year's voting, when despite
three championships and
84 victories, Waltrip was
shut out of the second Hall
of Fame class. Waltrip had
signed on with Speed as an
analyst for voting day, and
from his perch on the stage
at the back of the Great
Hall, his face couldn't hide
his heartbreak over not
making the second class.
He tried not to get his
hopes up this time around,
but everybody knew how


1
'" "' 7..,r .


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 20, 1989 file photo, Darrell Waltrip hugs his wife Stevie in victory Lane after
winning a Daytona 500 auto race in Daytona Beach. Waltrip has made a living from running
his, mouth, with a trash-talking style that helped him become a NASCAR superstar'and led
to a second career as a television analyst. Now the three-time champion is headed into
NASCAR's Hall of Fame.


badly .Waltrip wanted to
be included in the third
class. Brian France called
his name last June, Waltrip
rushed onto the podium
and kissed the NASCAR
chairman.
Waltrip goes into the
Hall of Fame with three-
time champion Cale
Yarborough, NASCAR
modified great Richie
Evans, innovative crew
chief Dale Inman and Glen
Wood, one of NASCAR's
original team owners.
The show will belong to
Waltrip, though, who knew
as a child he wanted to be
an entertainer and found
a way to incorporate his
desire to perform into his
NASCAR career. He was
brash and bold and loved
being in front of the cam-


eras.
His style, his showman-
ship, was like nothing
NASCAR had ever seen
before and paved the way
for more personality from
the drivers.
"I always thought it
would be fun to be an actor,
or a comedian, but I guess
race car driving suited me,"
he said. "I like to make
people laugh, which is bet-
ter than making them cry,
right? Some people take
the path of least of resis-
tance, but I take the path I
couldn't resist. I looked at
everything I did, what if I
did everything that every-
body else is doing as they
go down that path.
I figured there's a lot
more room going in this
other direction then there


is in that direction with all
the other guys who chewed
Skoal and wore belt buckles
and cowboy hats. I'm not
making fun of them, I just
chose not to go down that
route, to be more upscale,
in a class by myself. I was
a Penske guy living in an
Earnhardt world."
He will be again on Friday
night when his larger-than-
life personality is sure to
outshine Yarborough,
Inman and Wood. Evans,
winner of nine NASCAR
national modified cham-
pionships over a 13-year
span, was killed in a 1985
accident at Martinsville
Speedway. He was 44.
Yarborough from 1976-
78 became the first driver in
NASCAR history to win three
consecutive championships.


Bama, LSU


stars among


underclassmen


set for draft


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

Six players from the
BCS national title game
- including Alabama tail-
back Trent Richardson and
LSU cornerback Morris
Claiborne are among
college football's under-
classmen declaring for the
NFL draft..
They've got plenty of
company.
The two All-Americans
are among a record 65 play-
ers who have been declared
eligible for the April draft,
a field that also includes
Heisman Trophy winner
Robert Griffin III and run-
ner-up Andrew Luck as the
top quarterbacks. Counting
Richardson, the top three
Heisman vote getters are
all leaving early to start
cashing NFL paychecks.
The NFL released its offi-
cial underclassmen list
Thursday.
Despite a rookie wage
scale established in the
new collective bargaining
agreement, the number of
players choosing to leave
school early tops the previ-
ous record of 56 set last
year. NFL draft consultant
Gil Brandt isn't sure that's a
good thing.
"I don't think it's sur-
prising, because there's
so much more activity by
agents today, telling these
young guys to come out
of school," Brandt said.
"Consequently, I think
that's the whole story.
"What a lot of them have


told kids is that they're
going to be drafted high,
or that they've seen the
draft list and they're going
be second-round picks and
things like that."
Others who are draft
eligible include Oklahoma
State wide receiver Justin
Blackmon, Southern
California offensive tackle
Matt Kalil, Boston College
linebacker Luke Kuechly
and Illinois defensive end
Whitney Mercilus.
. Plus the: LSU and
Alabama trios.
Claiborne was joined
by. LSU defensive tackle
Michael Brockers and wide
receiver Rueben Randle in
leaving early.
AlabamalinebackerDonfa
Hightower and cornerback
Dre Kirkpatrick also declared
for the draft a few days after
the Crimson Tide's 21-0 win
over the Tigers in the BCS
championship.
Brandt said he had
thought the rookie wage
scale might have the
reverse effect
He said some players like
USC's Kalil are likely Top 5
picks, making leaving early
an economic no-brainer.
Others, like South Carolina
cornerback Stephon
Gilmore, could have poten-
tially improved their stock
with another year in col-
lege, Brandt said.
"I think in a lot of cases
guys that are coming out, it's
a mistake," he said. "I was
really happy to see Landry
Jones and Matt Barkley and
those guys stay in school."


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2012


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2012 4B


DILBERT


I'LL MANAGE YOUR
PORTFOLIO FOR A
STANDARD INDUSTRY
FEE OF 1% PEPR YEAR.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


I'M INVESTING A
BILLION DOLLARS.
YOUR FEE WOULD BE
$10 MILLION PER YEAR.


DEAR ABBY


Daughter's behavior puts her

on the brink of banishment


THOSE INDEX FUNDS
AREN'T GOING TO
PICK THEMSELVES.
E


DEAR ABBY: I caught
my 16-year-old daughter,
"Krista," smoking mari-
juana. I punished her for
it, but never told my wife
because I was afraid she'd
force me to make a deci-
sion that I don't want to
make.
I have been married to
my second wife for three
years. For much of that
time, Krista has been a
nightmare. When she goes
to school, more often than
not she's.in the principal's
office for bad behavior.
At home she's worse. She
doesn't listen to anyone.
We have tried every type
of punishment we can
think of and nothing has
worked.
Recently, my wife
brought up the idea of
sending Krista to a board-
ing school for troubled
teens. At first, the sugges-
tion made me angry, but
after the marijuana inci-
dent I am more receptive
to it. I am wracked with
guilt. Sending my daughter
away makes me feel like
a failure as a father. But
there may be no other
choice. How does a par-
ent know when enough
is enough? FED-UP
FATHER IN MINNESOTA
DEAR FATHER. Do not
send your daughter away
to a boarding school for
"troubled teens" without
first having a psychologist
identify what is troubling
her. If you do what your
wife is suggesting, your


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
daughter could return
home with more problems
than she left with. Sending
her away should be a
LAST resort. Some family
counseling should be tried
first.

DEAR ABBY: A friend
has been confiding in me,
telling me her husband
abuses her. She says it
has gone on the entire
12 years they have been
together. He does it in
front of the kids, some-
times even while she's
nursing or holding their
youngest. He also threat-
ens to shoot her. I'm
afraid for her safety.
She left him once,
but went back after he
promised to change and
temporarily became the
charming man she wishes
him to be. She knows she
needs to leave again, and
I have told her I'll help
her in any way I can to
make it happen. She's try-
ing to hold out until she
finishes her degree and
can financially support
the kids on her own. I'm
afraid she won't make it
that long.
I feel so helpless. I


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Emotions will mount,
causing you to take unnec-
essary risks. Be careful,
especially while traveling
or discussing important
matters with anyone in
an authoritative position.
Best to side with caution
than to end up in trouble.
Use your energy wisely.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Open your mind and
your heart and you will
experience possibilities
that can help you obtain a
better lifestyle. Your beliefs
and attitude can take a
positive turn that will help
you mentally, physically
and emotionally. Strive to
be your best ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Put your energy into
physical self-improvement.
It's time to start anew and
build up your confidence
by reaching for your prime
target. Don't let love or
an emotional relationship
hold you back. Focus on
what's best for you. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Let your imagination
lead the way. A chance to
develop a skill or embrace
a challenge you've always
wanted to conquer must be
taken. Fear of failure is no
reason to shy away from
trying something new.
Love is on the rise. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

You'll thrive on change and,
excitement, but beware
of the pitfalls that accom-
pany such activities. Too
much of anything will be a
problem. Stick to what you
know you can do and the
budget you've allowed, and
you will be fine. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You can accomplish
whatever you set out to
do. Your energy is high
and your ability to surpass
expectations is on target.
A chance to show off and
enhance your reputation
will add to your satisfaction
and confidence. *****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22):
Listen carefully to griev-
ances or complaints from
roommates or loved ones.
If you don't make an effort
to fix whatever isn't work-
ing, you will be criticized.
Whatever you do, take care
of your responsibilities first
and foremost **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Talk about your plans
and discoveries. You will
interest someone in a
project you need help fin-
ishing. The favors offered
will be worth considering
a partnership. The oppor-
tunity to turn an idea into a
profitable venture is look-
ing good. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Emotions
coupled with bravado will
end in disaster. Don't jump
to conclusions or take
sides. Meddling or getting
involved in matters that
can lead to a precarious
situation must be avoided.
Concentrate on your home
and make it the best it can
be. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-,
Jan. 19): Travel and share
your experiences with
people who have similar
interests. You can make
positive changes to your
personal life and your
home base if you are open
to suggestions from those
the alterations will affect
most. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Good fortune will be
yours if you use your imagi-
nation and innovative ideas
to help others. What you
offer will be well-received,
and the favors you get in
return will help you move in
a positive and progressive
direction. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't make impulsive
moves that might hinder
your position or status.
You have to protect your
reputation and wdrk
diligently toward a worth-
while goal that will bring
you positive recognition.
Strive for perfection and
you will receive praise. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: X equals C
"Y'W TZAAYGT TEPWKYZE SJJ AFZ

AYWZ ... Y'W S KZECZ'XA ZBSWKJZ LC

AF'Z TEPWKD LJV W S G Y'W EZSJJD

TLLV SA YA." GZV UZSAAD

Previous Solution: "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for
something, sometime in your life." Winston Churchill
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-20


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


worry that by standing
by and not taking some
kind of action, I'll be partly
responsible for anything
that may happen to the
kids. On the other hand,
she tells me these things
' in confidence. What can I
do to help? TERRIFIED
FOR MY FRIEND
DEAR TERRIFIED:
Continue encouraging
your friend to leave. A man
who abuses, terrorizes and
threatens to shoot his wife
in front of the children,
yet would have no hesita-
tion about hurting all of
them.
By now she should
have realized that her
abuser will never be the
man she imagined him
to be. The time to leave
is while things are calm
before his next outburst.
In order for him to control
her, he needs to keep her
dependent. If he senses
that she's nearing a point
where she can support
herself and the children
without him, he could
explode.
Make sure she
knows how to contact
the National Domestic
Violence Hotline. The
toll-free number is 800-799-
7233. The experts there
can help her formulate as
safe an escape plan as pos-
sible.

0 Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


--


-------------- -- - jol W/ I I "I


1i





.se I. I i S


Classified Department: 755-5440


EinI

milwo



FIND Il


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2012

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
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'I I


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EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
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omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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regarding the prohibition of 'discrimi-
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public accommodations. Standard
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In Print and Online
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Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO: 11-645-CA
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPOR-
TATION,
Petitioner,
VS.
COLUMBIA BANK f/k/a COLUM-
BIA BANK,
a Florida Corporation; and RONNIE
BRANNON,
,Columbia County Tax Collector,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE TO SHOW
CAUSE AND NOTICE OF SUIT
STATE OF FLORIDA TO:
To all said defendants who are liv-
ing, and if any or all defendants are
deceased, the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, lienors,
or other parties claiming by, through,
under or against any such deceased
defendant or defendants, if alive,
and, if dead, their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees,
creditors, lienors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under, or
against any such deceased defendant
or defendants, and all other parties
having or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in and to the property
described in the Petition, to-wit:
Item #2083732
Parcel 710
SR 10 (US 90) COLUMBIA
COUNTY
PARCELS 710
COLUMBIA BANK f/k/a COLUM-
BIA BANK, a Florida Corporation
Bruce A. Naylor, Registered Agent
173 N.W. Hillsboro Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
ALL PARCELS
RONNIE BRANNON
Columbia County Tax Collector
135 N.E. Hemando Avenue, Suite
125
Lake City, Florida 32055
You are hereby notified that the Peti-
tioner filed its Petition and its Decla-
ration of Taking in this Court against
you as defendants, seeking to con-
demn by eminent domain proceed-
ings the above described property lo-
cated in the State of Florida, County
of Columbia.
You are further notified that the Peti-
tioner will apply to The Honorable
Paul S. Bryan, one of the judges of
this Court, on the 27th day of Febru-
ary, 2012, at 10:30 a.m., in the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, for an Order of Taking
in this cause. All defendants to this
suit may request a hearing at the time
and place designated and be heard.
Any defendant failing to file a re-
quest for hearing shall waive any
right to object to the Order of Tak-
ing. .. ,- ... .
AND
Each defendant is hereby required to
serve written defenses, if any, and re-
quest a hearing, if desired, to said
Petition on:
DAVID M. ROBERTSON, ES-
QUIRE
Eminent Domain Department
Department of Transportation
1109 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025-5874
(386) 758-3727
on or before, February 17, 2012, and
file the originals with the Clerk of
this Court on that date, to show cause
what right, title, interest, or lien you
or any of you have in and to the
property described in' the Petition
and to show cause, if any you have,
why the property should not be con-
demned for the uses and purposes set
forth in the Petition. If you fail to
answer, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Petition. If you fail to request
a hearing on the Petition for Order of
Taking, you shall waive any right to
object to said Order of Taking.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL
of this Court on the 17th day of Janu-
ary, 2012.
P. DEWITTI CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
(SEAL)
By: /s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05530166
January 20, 27, 2012


To Whom It May Concern:
You are hereby notified that the fol-
lowing described livestock, a tan col-
ored mini horse found on January 13,
2012 at 1632 SW Bethlehem Ave-
nue, is now impounded at an author-
ized Columbia County Sheriff's Of-
fice livestock facility and the amount
due by reason of such impounding is
$263.90 plus an additional fee of
$5.00 per day for care and custody of
said animal. The above described
livestock will, unless redeemed with--
in 3 days from date hereof, be of-
fered for sale at public auction to the
highest and best bidder for cash.
Mark Hunter, Sheriff
Columbia County, Florida
05530170
January 20, 2012

To place your
classified ad call











Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO: 11-646-CA
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPOR-
TATION,
Petitioner,
VS.
STAFFORD L. SCAFF, JR., ANNE
C.
SCAFF; and RONNNIE BRAN-
NON,
Columbia County Tax Collector,
Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE TO SHOW
CAUSE AND NOTICE OF SUIT
STATE OF FLORIDA TO:
To all said defendants who are liv-
ing, and if any or all defendants are
deceased, the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, lienors,
or other parties claiming by, through,
under or against any. such deceased
defendant or defendants, if alive,
and, if dead, their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees;
creditors, lienors,- or other parties
claiming by, through, under, or
against any such deceased defendant
or defendants, and all other parties,
having or'claiming to have any right,
title or interest in and to the property
described in the Petition, to-wit:
Item #2083732
Parcels 712 and 723
-SR 10 (US 90) COLUMBIA
COUNTY
PARCELS 712 and PARCEL 723
STAFFORD L. SCAFF, JR.
134 S.E. Colbum Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025
ANNE C. SCAFF
134 S.E. Colbum Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025
ALL PARCELS
RONNIE BRANNON
Columbia County Tax Collector
135 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Suite
125
Lake City, Florida 32055
You are hereby notified that the Peti-
tioner filed its Petition and its Decla-
ration of Taking in this Court against
you as defendants, seeking to 'con-
demn by eminent domain proceed-
ings the above described property lo-
cated in the State of Florida, County
of Columbia.
You are further notified that the Peti-
tioner will apply to The Honorable
Paul S. Bryan, one of the judges of
this,. Court, on the 27th day of Febru-
ary, 2012, at 10:00 a.m., in the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, for an Order of Taking
in this cause. All defendants to this
suit may request a hearing at the time
and place designated and be heard.
Any defendant failing to file a re-
quest for hearing shall waive any
right to object to the Order of Tak-
ing.
AND
Each defendant is hereby required to
serve written defenses, if any, and re-
quest a hearing, if desired, to said
Petition on:
DAVID M. ROBERTSON, ES-
QUIRE
Eminent Domain Department
Department of Transportation
1109 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025-5874
(386) 758-3727
on or before, February 17, 2012, and,
file the originals with the Clerk of
this Court on that date, to show cause
what right, title, interest, or lien you
or any of you have in and to the
property described in the Petition
and to show cause, if any you have,
why the property should not be con-
demned for the uses and purposes set
forth in the Petition. If you fail to
answer, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Petition. If you fail to request
a hearing on the Petition for Order of
Taking, you shall waive any right to
object to said Order of Taking.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL
of this Court on the 17th day of Janu-
ary, 2012.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
(SEAL)
By: /s/B. Scippio.
Deputy Clerk
05530167
January 20, 27, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 11-513-CA
BKL INVESTMENT CO., a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
RICHARD F. DAVIS and
AILEEN M. RUSSELL,
Defendants
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 7, Crawford Pointe, a subdivi-
sion according to the plat thereof as
recorded in Plat Book 9, Page 65, in
the office of the Clerk of the Circuit
Court, in and for COLUMBIA Coun-
ty, Florida.
shall be sold by the clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated January 17, 2012, at the
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
February 22, 2012, to the best and
highest bidder for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the notice of
lis pendens, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
17th day of January, 2012.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ Sarah Barry
Deputy Clerk

05530169
January 20, 27, 2012


NH,.> i .J.





Lake City Reporter


Legal

PUBLIC NOTICE
A SPECIAL MEETING OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HAS BEEN SCHEDULED ON
MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2012
COMMENCING AT 6:00 P.M. IN
THE AUDITORIUM OF THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE
COMPLEX LOCATED AT 372
WEST DUVAL STREET, LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA 32055. THE PUR-
POSE OF THE MEETING IS TO
DISCUSS FINANCIAL ISSUES
RELATED TO SUWANNEE VAL-
LEY TRANSIT AUTHORITY AND
TO ALLOW PRESENTATION OF
THE SAME.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS DISABILITIES
ACT, A PERSON NEEDING SPE-
CIAL ACCOMMODATIONS OR
AN INTERPRETER TO PARTICI-
PATE IN THIS MEETING
SHOULD CONTACT LISA 'K.B.
ROBERTS, 386-758-1006 OR
T.D.D. SERVICES 386-758-2139,
AT LEAST SEVEN DAYS PRIOR
TO THE MEETING.
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS
RELATED TO THE ABOVE
STATED MEETING, PLEASE
CONTACT THE BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AT 386-758-1005.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Scarlet Frisina, Chairperson
ATTEST:
P. DeWitt Cason, Clerk of Court
(SEAL)
05529932
January 13, 20, 2012


020 Lost & Found

Lost small 6-year old beagle,
responds to Maggie. Went missing
from Defender Dr in Lake City on
1/14/2012. She is tri-colored, but
is mostly black, has a lazy left eye
and a small cyst on her right rear
hip. Reward offered, please call
386-752-5773.


100 'Opportunities

05530168
Field Equipment Mechanic
Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a field
equipment mechanic. Prefer
someonee with owirtools. A
SalJd drn.e s license i- required
Please apply in person at
Anderson Columbia, 871 NW
Guerdon Road, Lake City, FL
32055. Please call 386-752-7585
for directions if needed.
We are an Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

05530193

BoiriWorttL

(ladies wear factory outlet)
Lake City Mall
is looking for
P/T THIRD KEY
Days, nights, and weekends.
Flexible hours a necessity.
Competitive wages, discount,
EOE
Apply in person at store
location Retirees are
encouraged to apply.

05530196
COOK Part-time. Must have
experience and able to work
evenings and weekends. Please
apply Baya Pointe Nursing &
Rehab Center, 587 SE Ermine
Ave., Lake City, Fl 32025
EOE/DFWP

2 DETAILERS needed.
Experienced only. Apply in person
between 10a-4p at North Florida
Auto Agencies. Across from ABC
liquor. No phone calls please.

11 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Cecil Tobacco Company,
LLC Owensboro, KY. Perform
all duties of Tobacco, Nursery,
fHay/Straw, & Row Crop Produc-
tion including seeding, planting,
weeding, topping, spraying,
cutting, harvesting and stripping.
Employment Dates: 03/10/2012 -
12/15/2012. Wage of $9.38/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0443721..

5 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Dennis McKay DBA
McKay Tobacco Owensboro,
KY. Perform all duties of
Tobacco, Nursery, Hay/Straw, &
Row Crop Production including
seeding, planting, weeding,
topping, spraying, cutting, harvest-
ing and stripping. Employment
Dates: 03/12/2012- 11/30/2012.
Wage of $9.38/hr. Worker guaran-
teed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest Florida One
Stop Career Center or call
386-755-9026 and reference
job order #KY0443795.


Sales Help at Florida Visitors
Center. Benefits, hourly wage
plus commission. Excellent
opportunity with National
company. Westgate Resorts.
Call Ed. 904-540-2314 or
Connie 386-344-0082


100 JObportunities

3 TEMP Tree Farm workers
needed 2/13/12-11/1/12. Workers
will perform any combo of duties
to plant, prune, cultivate,
propagate, grade, harvest, store
and ship container and field grown
plants, trees and shrubs.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract-hours.
Tools, supplies, equipment
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Random drug testing at
employer's expense. Transporta-
tion & subsistence reimbursed to
worker upon completion of 50% of
contract. $9.30/hr. Worksite in
Jackson Co, MS. Report or send a
resume to nearest local FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office or
call (386) 755-9026 & reference
Job #45089 Derek Hamilton
Nursery Moss Point, MS:
Gateway Baptist Church is
accepting apps for paid nursery
workers. Must be at least 18 yoa &
pass a background ck. Must be
available Sun mornings & eve-
nings, Wed. evenings & for other
events as needed. Aps available at
3252 SW ST Rd. 247, LC or e-mail
gatewaychurch@bellsouth.net.
3 Temp Nursery Workers needed
2/20/12-11/15/12. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, propagate,
prune, grade, store, & ship
container & field grown
horticultural products. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools,
supplies, equip. provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Random drug testing at employer's
expense. Worksite in Ashland Co,
OH. Pay rate is $11.10/hr. Report
or send resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & ref. job order #OH536523
or call 850-921-3466. Hobby
Nursery Loudonville, OH

Janitorial Service needs
responsible person to work
nights. Must have own
transportation references and clean
background. 386-984-0530
2 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Joe A Chapman -
Woodburn, KY. Perform all
duties of Tobacco, Nursery,
Hay/Straw, & Row Ctop Produc-
tion including seeding, planting,
weeding, topping, spraying,
cutting, harvesting and stripping.
Employment Dates: 03/15/2012 -
01/15/2013. Wage of $9.38/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free.housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0443846.
MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
OTR Class A driver wanted.
Good pay, Volvo trucks. Go to
www.TravaBros.com under
section drivers and submit your
info. No calls please.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
15 Temp Farm Workers 2/15/12-
12/15/12. Workers will plant,
cultivate, & harvest: cotton,
peanuts, pecans, corn, rice, hay &
wheat. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Work tools,.supplies, equip.
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation & subsis-
tence reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Random drug testing at employer's-
expense. $9.39/hr forAL &
$9.30/hr for MS. Worksites in
Mobile Co. AL & Jackson, George
Co. MS. Report or send a resume
to the nearest FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office or
call (386) 755-9026 &,ref. job
order #AL758849. Seward Farms,
Shumock Farms, Darryl Miller
Nursery, Tanner Farms &
Thornburg Farms
Wee Care of Columbia City
is hiring CDAAfter school Teach-
ers. 20-35 hrs per week. Experi-
ence required. Apply in person.

120 Medicalnt

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/Tor P/f.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-75-3165


120 Medical
120 Employment

MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resume to P.O. Box
805 Lake City, Florida 32056

40 Schools &
24 Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets Supplies

2 FEMALE 8 moth old
Rottweiler/Bullmastiff pups.
CKC. Parent on site. FREE to
Good Home. 386-984-6796

German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarians documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

Whirlpool, side by side,
refrigerator. Black with ice maker,
water & ice dispenser.
$300. obo. 386-365-5173


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
-. 386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

2 CHEST of Drawers.
Both for $30.00
386-365-0262 '


4 METAL.
KITCHEN CHAIRS
REALLY NICE. $20.00 -
386-365-0262

Brown Resin Wicker
Glider & Chair with cushions.
Steel frame. Like new. $125.
386-754-4094

RECLINER
Fair Shape.
$20.00
386-365-0262
Swivel Patio chair
$25.00
386-344-4987


4 Musical
413 Merchandise

NEW Guitar Estaban
Small Amp. Hard case. Stand.
$200.00
386-719-4819


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

Wanted Junk Cars, Ts, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Patd.


Sat. Jan 21 8-1. 247 to Upchurch,
follow signs. TV, DVD player,
shelves, collectible tins, computer
and much more.


440 Miscellaneous

BISSEL Spot Cleaner machine.
Good condition.
$20.00
386-365-0262

Total Gym
with attachments
$250.00
call 386-623-3202


1_450 Good Things
05530150 45 to Eat
Medical Assistant The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Several years of exp as a Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
medical assistant required. 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Email: mafaisal05(ayahoo.com Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
or fax to: 386-758-5987 386-963-4138 or 961-1420


Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


I _


ft-,&J -%*? i














LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2012


Classified Department: 755-5440


460 Firewood
FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

463 Building
463 Materials
4 sheets 1/2" plywood
12 pcs. 2"x 4"
$50.00 takes all.
386-344-4987

63 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3 BR/2 BA, 14 x 80, CH/A, water,
sewage & garbage included. Total
electric. 1st, last + dep., lease
required, $550 mo.-386-752-8978.
3/2 partially furnished MH
fenced 15 ac. in Suwannee Coun-
ty. SOme farm and animal main-
tance exp. desirable. Terms neg.
386-454-7139 or 305-216-9893
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between I-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
3BR/2BA SWMH on 1 acre in
Ellisville. Private lot
$460. mo 1st, last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Beautiful Main-
tained DWMH, 5br/2ba on 1/2
acre. 12X24 workshop, fenced
.$105,000. MLS 77064
Hallmark Real Estate
4/3 DW w/14X76' porch on 5 ac.
in Ellisville area. 2 carports,
storage, fenced pasture. $99,900
#ft7295) Ginger Parker 365-2135
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
'master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!


Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641


NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Dealer in NW Florida Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating THEIR Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
ONLY $59,995
New 20,12 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Doh't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
Onie Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


0 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Affordable Lg. Home on 2 ac.,
being sold as is $59,900
MLS 74862 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473

710 Unfurnished Apt.









2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2br/lba duplex, NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi-
cient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.



Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft,,W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Rental in 55+ neighborhood.
2,bedroom/1 bath Duplex across
from Clubhouse. No Pets.
Call Denise.@ 386-752-5290
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-315-2509 or 965-5560
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1,2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 riesbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951


Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you,.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com


Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
STUDIO APT. FOR RENT
All utilities included & Cable,
$500 month + $300 sec. deposit.
Call 386-697-9950

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
2BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$450 mo.
386-752-0335
Monday -Friday 8A-4P
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3/2 Brick Home. fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent w/option to
purchase available. 386-752-5035
X 3114 7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales
4 BR/2BA in towonon cul-de-sac.
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.

4BR/2BA. Lake Access.
on 8 acres
$1,000 mo.
Call 386-752-3066
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
5v Office Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately ll00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
REALTY, INC.
MLS#76668 Buildable lot.
High and dry.
Call Denise @386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
,dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate
A home for all seasons. Lg patio,
fireplace. 4/2 brick & cedar.
Just reduced $20,000 #71691
Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Just Listed. 3/2 on a Terraced hill.
Brick w/fenced yard. All applian-
ces. Owner Financed offered.
#79683 Janet Creel 386-719-0382
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS #71594 $149,900 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
In town, 3/2 Concrete Block home,
fenced yard. $149, 900
MLS 71999, Elaine Tolar
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D.
$129,900 New AC in 2010.
Elaine K. Tolar. 755-6488
MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Wonderful home on Lake. 4/3
Fireplace, many upgrades. MLS
76085, Elaine Tolar 755-6488 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Close to town. 2br/2ba, wood lam-
inate floors. Vaulted ceilings.
MLS 76928 $59,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & Tidy remodeled 2/2 open
floor plan. MLS# 77943
$94,500 Mary Brown Whitehurst
386-965-0887
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot.
on the Suwannee.
Well & anerobic septic system.
MLS 78842 $45,000
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/lst time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 365-5146


Callaway S/D, 3br/2ba. Well
maintained. Fenced back yard &
double car garage. $175,000
MLS 79567 Century 21, The
Darby Rogers Co. 752-6575.
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in
High Springs. Real wood floors,
stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 79601 $178,000 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Immaculate home on 10 + acres in
Wellborn. Tile floors, fenced, bam
w/workshop. $309. 900 MLS
79650, Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent neighborhood. 4br/2ba.
2469 sqft on 1 + acres. $190,000
MLS 79654, Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678


810 Home for Sale
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 5br/4ba Custom
kitchen, screened inground pool.
Many upgrades on 5 ac. Many
extras. .$385,000. MLS 79688
COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence Vlg $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669
CYPRESS LANDING! 3BR/2BA
w/lg great room, split floor plan
& 2-car garage $105,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79634
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom/2 bath.
1 car garage. Priced to sell.
Call Denise @386-752-5290

Contemporary Elegance.
MLS 79579 4br/3ba plush carpet
& so much more! $224,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers,.
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 8.3 acres.
Has 14x30 workshop with electric.
MLS 79345 $199,900

NICE 3BR/2BA DWMH w/fenced
yard plus double carport &
wkshop $39,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.,
755-5110 #79078
ONLY $38,500 for 4BR/2BA
concrete block home; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
brick home newly renovated &
inground pool, fenced yard
$69,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST! Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 Acres, Wellborn, Newv Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
20 ac Wooded tract.
,10 m iles from Cedar Key.
MLS 78886, $70,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

Q80 Commercial
3 Property

Hallmark Real Estate
Rental Investment. 4 duplexes
(8 apartments) All units are rented
and in good shape.
#69380 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate Camp-
ground/RV Park w/67 pull thrus,
cabins & mobile home. Showers,
clubhouse +2 story owner home.
#78793 Janet Crpel 719-0382

Q860 Investment
860v Property
Great Investment in city limits.
Both units occupied.
MLS 79206 $50,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT INVESTMENT
2 units w/ 2br/lba, 2 stories
w/balconies. MLS 79271,
$230,000., Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
87 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605




Contact us


at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS

386-755-5440



SUBSCRIPTION

386-755-5445



ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

386-752-1293



ELECTRONIC ADS SEND TO

ads@lakecityreporter.com


Mon-Fri.:8 a.m,- 5:00 pm.

THIS REPORTER WORKS FOR YOU!

Lake C ityRep


180 East Duval St.
Lake City, FLorida 32055


870 Real Estate
701 Wanted

05530165
The Department of Veterans
Affairs', Lake City Medical
Director, is seeking to lease
8,800 to 9,000 net usable square
feet for a succeeding or new
lease for the Lake City
Administrative Office. The site
shall have adequate parking
for approximately 80 vehicles,
including 3 dedicated handicap-
ped parking spaces. The site
shall be handicapped accessible
in accordance with the Uniform
Federal Accessibility Standards
(4 CFR 101-19.6, App A) and
shall conform to Federal Laws
& Regulations governing
Federal Leases, site renovations,
construction and fire codes. A
lease for up to 10 years will be
considered. Expected occupancy
is required by
NOVEMBER 2012.
To be considered, the space
shall be within the delineated
area and within walking distance
(1/8th of a mile) of Public
Transportation. The delineated
area boundary is defined as:
North to: Intersection of U.S.
441 and County Road 100A
West to: Intersection of
Interstate 75 and U.S. Highway
90 South to: Intersection of
U.S. 41/441 and County Road
252 East to: Intersection of
State Road 100 and U.S. High-
way 90 Usable square feet does
not include such common
building areas as stairs,
elevators, mechanical and utility
rooms, ducts, shafts, vestibules,
public corridors, and public
toilets required by local code.
The Government is limited by
law (40 USC 278a, as Amended
10-1-81) to pay no more than
the appraised fair rental value
for space. Please note: This
advertisement is NOT a solicita-
tion for offers, nor is it a request
for proposals. A solicitation for
offers may be issued by the
Department of Veterans Affairs
at a later date. Interested parties
shall provide evidence that
properties are outside the 100
year flood plain. A market
survey will be conducted by the
Department of Veterans
Affairs. For consideration,
please provide the following:
1) Site location;
2) Property description;
3) Total square footage;
4) Floor plans;
5) Photographs.
To be considered, interested
parties (owners, brokers or their
legal representatives) shall
provide a written statement from
the building owner stating
that the interested party has
the authority to represent
the building owner. The
aforementioned information
shall be submitted no later than
4 p.m. on February 6, 2012
to: Rachel Griner,
Contracting Officer
Department of Veterans Affairs,
Activity 8 SAO East
619 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: 386-755-3016 EXT 3660
Email: Rachel.Griner@va.gov.
RESPONDENTS ARE
ADVISED THAT THE VA
ASSUMES NO
RESPONSIBILITY TO
AWARD A LEASE BASED
UPON RESPONSES TO THIS
ADVERTISEMENT.


Recreational
951 Vehicles
2003 Allegro 30DA. Workhorse
Chassis. 18300 miles, garage kept.
Excellent cond. w/many extras
$40,000. 386-754-5660
2009 39 Foot Travel Trailer,
Self Contained, 2 slides, Awning,
W/D, many extras. $23,500 OBO
Call 443-306-8710 Cell


Gj E"F| wwlakecityreporterxcorn



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CONNEITED31


2009 Travel Trailer
39 foot, self-contained, 2
slides, awning, W/D, many
extras.
$23,500 OBO
Call Cell
443-306-8710


ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only



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2 FREE SIGNS I

(386) 755-5440


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!

* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid. ,
* Private party only.

anv !'leAj


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




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WATERCRAFT
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2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
Price Reduced $5,000
Only 18,300 miles, garage
kept motorhome. Exc.
cond. w/many extras.
$40,000
Call
386-754-5660


We're on target!


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