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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01755
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 19, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01755
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text









0 00017 12031 0,11
12 ***3 D -
LIB Op 0312 -ICIT 326
P OX FLORIDA HISTORY
2f BOX 117007
205 ESMA UNIV O FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Thursday, January 19, 2012


/reporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 300 0 75 cents


Panel




bucks




open




gov't


Bills would allow secret
privatization of state
programs, services.

By JAMES L. ROSICA
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -A Senate committee,
bucking a decadeslong trend of open gov-
ernment in Florida, formally introduced
two bills on Wednesday aimed at allowing
the secret privatization of prisons.
But the measures also would make
secret the outsourcing of other state agen-
cy functions, ,which has raised concerns
from open government advocates.
The Senate rules committee introduced
the first bill (PCB 7170), which essentially
means that an agency would.not have to
report its privatization of a program or
service until after the contract is signed.
Committee chair John Thrasher, a St.
Augustine Republican, told a standing-
room-only audience that the introduction
of the bill and that of its companion (PCB
7172) means both will be assigned to
other committees for "substantive consid-
eration."
A staff analysis says the first bill "makes
clear that the Legislature may direct priva-
tization of agency function itself, without
any agency.request."
The bills' opponents, which include
the First Amendment Foundation, have
said the bills would keep the public in the
dark about the costs of outsourcing any
government service, not just prisons.
Supporters, including committee vice-
chair JD Alexander, counter, that the mea-
sures ultimately require any privatization
deal to first offer a substantial savings to
the state.
Thrasher said the bills were meant to
address a South Florida prison-privatiza-
tion plan stymied by a Tallahassee judge.
Privatizing those prisons could save tax-
payers up to $40 million a year, Alexander
said.
The state tried to privatize about 30
state prison facilities and was sued by
the Police Benevolent Association, the
union that formerly represented correc-
tions officers.
Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford later ruled
that the state's plan is unconstitutional
because it was passed as part of the
annual budget and not as a separate law.
Attorney General Pam Bondi is appealing
BILLS continued on 3A


GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
Pam Taylor, director of rescue and adoptions for North Florida Animal Rescue, with Jake, an English pointer waiting for adoption. The new
animal shelter off County Road 137 near Wellborn takes unwanted animals with health problems that are slated for euthanization at other
shelters because of lack of funding. The shelter was built though a donation by Anthea Duron, of Lake City, who died three weeks ago. So
far, an estimated'$1 million has been spent to build the facility.




Saving Unwanted Pets


Lake City benefactor
provides money for
new animal shelter.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com

The occupants at the Anthea
Duron Adoption Center near
Wellborn have no idea how
close they came to death.
But workers at North Florida
Animal Rescue do.
Pam Taylor, director of rescue and adop-
tion for North Florida Animal Rescue, said
as many as 8,000 unwanted animals are
euthanized each year in Columbia and
Suwannee counties. And the animals held
at the new shelter, where construction is
nearly complete, would have among them.
The animals at the Wellborn shelter are
castoffs who were on the animal equivalent
of death row at other facilities because of
health problems such as worms, malnour-
ishment or injury.
Shelters operating with public funding
typically don't have money or space to
house animals for extended periods to
nurse them to health, so those animals are
among the first to be euthanized, Taylor
said.
'They have no other option other than


to euthanize to make space," Ta.vlor said.
"We go to those shelters and take those
animals. If they're treatable,,we'll take
them."
The only animals that will be euthanized
at the new shelter are those with health
problems so severe that they have to be
put down for'humane purposes and only
on the recommendation of a veterinarian,
Taylor said. All other animals will be held
until they are adopted, she said.
"We don't have anyone tell us how many
animals to euthanize," she said. "We can
help people re-home an animal if you give
us time."
The guardian angel and benefactor who
made the shelter happen was the adoption
center's namesake, Anthea Duron, a Lake
City resident who died about three weeks
ago, Taylor said.
The exact amount Duron donated to
North Florida Animal Rescue to build the
new shelter is a closely kept secret, but
Taylor estimated that $1 million has been
spent so far.
The facility features separate buildings
for dogs and cats, a welcome center, barn,
quarantine building for animals with con-
tagious diseases and a hospital with state-
of-the-art equipment such as a digital X-ray
machine that Taylor said is the only one in
the region strictly for animals.
A veterinarian is at the facility two days
i week and a local veterinarian also volun-
teers to spay and neuter animals at no cost


to the shelter, Taylor said.
The facility has the capacity to house up
to 100 cats and has 40 kennels for dogs.
Cats are held in rooms, not cages, where
they can socialize with each other. Dogs
have separate kennels with unrestricted
access to an outdoor run.
The shelter is capable of housing horses
that are brought to the facility by law
enforcement officials. Several turtles have
also been given homes in two ponds at the
site.
And a pet cemetery will be built at the
facility, along with an area for animals to.
live out their lives after their masters die.
Taylor said Plumb Level Construction,
of Lake City, played an important role by
offering a reduced price to build the struc-
tures at the complex.
An enclosed dog park with separate
areas for small dogs, large dogs and a pic-
nic area for pets and their masters is also
slated for construction in coming months.
STaylor said she is currently visiting
other dog parks in the region for ideas
on different features she might bring to
her facility. She said the dog park will be
completed by summer 2013, but it could
open earlier.
Once the public dog park opens, Taylor
said she expects more animals will be
adopted by visitors.
'We hope this will be a complex where
people come and learn and adopt," she
SHELTER continued on 3A


Creel wins Realtor honor


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Janet Creel reacts as Darrell Hunt, the 2011 Lake City Board
of Realtors immediate past president, names her as the
Realtor of the Year Wednesday at the organization's luncheon
held at the Holiday Inn & Suites. 'I think it's absolutely awe-
some for anyone to ever be recognized by the people you
work with,' said Creel, who first won the award in 1972.


1lllilil


CALLUS: _
(386)752-1293 6 "
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER: Mostly Sunny
Voice: 5 WEATHER, 2A
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I.. -


Lake City agent praised
for her knowledge and
community efforts.

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter. corn
Forty years after first receiving the
award, Janet Creel was named 2012
Realtor of the Year Wednesday by the
Lake City Board of Realtors
Creel, of Hallmark Real Estate of
Lake City, exemplifies a knowledge-
able,, respected real estate agent as
well as an active member of the com-
munity, said Darrell Hunt, 2011 board
president. She was selected from 177
board members.


Ur
c:s'iy

4w


Creel, who is currently the activi-
ties chairwoman, has served in every
capacity of the board, he said.
Playing an active part in the com-
munity is also a factor in choosing
the Realtor of the Year, said Sandy
Kishton, current board president.
Creel was a foster parent for many
years and does much of her communi-
ty service without fanfare, Hunt said.
"She is just a jewel of a person."
Creel said the award was an honor
considering it was from a group of
people she's worked with for about 42
years. She previously won Realtor of
the Year in 1972.
Real estate agents have a great
responsibility to help buyers get their
money's worth on a home, she said. A
home, "can change people's lives."


Opinion
Health ...
Obtuares . .
Advice & Comcs
Calendr. .


Creel said she asks herself often,
"Am I doing the best job I can?"
Board members nominate individu-
als for the Realtor of the Year and past
winners make the selection, Kishton
said.
As 2012 is an election year, she said,
the board's theme is "move the vote."
Local real estate agents often help
new residents get settled in Columbia
County and should also remind them
to register to vote, she said. This year
members should work to increase
voter participation in their customers,
friends and family, she said.
"If we don't actively participate,
what do we have to complain about?"
she said.
CREEL continued on 3A


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Jackson's doctor
avoids payment


COMING
FRIDAY
Local news
roundup


La










2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012


Celebrity Birthdays


AH.3e Wednesday: Wednesday:
S Afternoon: 5-6-3 "- Afternoon: 7-5-0-4 Tuesday:
15-16-18-23-24


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Jackson doc won't pay restitution


LOS ANGELES Prosecutors
will not seek restitution against the
doctor convicted of killing Michael
Jackson after conferring with the
singer's parents and attorneys for his
estate and children.
The request for payments from
Conrad Murray was withdrawn
Wednesday during a brief court
hearing, just days before a judge was
scheduled to consider how much the
former cardiologist should pay to
members of Jackson's family or his
estate.
Deputy District Attorney David
Walgren told the judge handling
the case that he was withdrawing
the restitution request after speak-
ing with Jackson's
mother, Katherine,
and attorney for
his father, Joseph.
Walgren also con-
suited with an attor-
ney for the singer's
estate and a court-
appointed attorney
representing the Murray
interests of Jackson's
three children, a
transcript of the proceedings shows.
Murray remains in jail after being
convicted in November of invol-
untary manslaughter. He was sen-
tenced to serve four years in jail, but
his incarceration will be cut in half
due to overcrowding and California's
budget crunch.
Jackson's estate estimated the
singer would have earned at least
$100 million if he had performed
his "This Is It' concerts planned
for London's 02 arena. Murray
might have also been found liable
for Jackson's funeral expenses,.
which totaled more than $1.8 mil-
lion. Murray's attorneys said he
had nowhere near the money to pay
either amount, and he filed paper-


work last month indicating he is
indigent.
Superior Court Judge Michael
Pastor ruled that the family was
waiving its right to restitution perma-
nently, although two separate cases
pending in a Los Angeles civil court
seek damages against for the King
of Pop's June 2009 death. Katherine
Jackson is suing concert giant AEG
Live, which was promoting Jackson's
planned series of comeback con-
certs, claiming they failed to prop-
erly supervise Murray.
Joseph Jackson is suing AEG Live,
alleging negligence by the entertain-
ment promoter in his son's death,
and he is suing Murray for wrongful
death in the case.
A phone message left for Murray's
attorney, J. Michael Flanagan,
was-not immediately returned. He
indicated during Wednesday's hear-
ing that he intends to seek bail for
Murray while he appeals his convic-
tion, according to the transcript, but
was told to put the request in writ-
ing.
The fate of Joseph Jackson's civil
case remains unclear. A California
bar court in Los Angeles recom-
mended on Friday that the Jackson
family patriarch's attorney, Brian
Oxman, be barred from practicing
law because of conduct on 'other,
unrelated cases. Oxman filed Joseph
Jackson's lawsuit in federal court on
the one-year anniversary of the sing-
er's death, but a judge later ruled
it should be heard in state court.
Oxman is the only attorney who has
been listed on the case so far and
has been a vocal antagonist against
Murray and AEG Live.
Reached by phone, Oxman
declined to comment on the rec-
ommendation, which still must be
approved by the California Supreme
Court


Publisher: Bacharach doing
work on his memoirs
NEW YORK Burt Bacharach will
be handling the words for his next
project a memoir.
The award-winning collaborator
on such hits as "I Say a Little Prayer"
and "What the World Needs Now"
has a deal with HarperCollins for
a memoir due in November. The
publisher announced Wednesday
that his book will be called "Anyone
Who Had a Heart," named after
one of many songs Bacharach and
lyricist Hal David wrote for Dionne
Warwick.
According to HarperCollins,
Bacharach will open up about profes-
sional success.and personal troubles.
His partnership with David broke up
bitterly, and he has been divorced
three times, from singer Paula
Stewart, actress Angie Dickinson
and fellow songwriter Carole Bayer,
Sager. His daughter, Nikki, commit-
ted suicide at age 40.
Bacharach, 83, has won three
Academy Awards and eight
Grammys. He helped write dozens
of top 40 songs, covered by every-
one from Elvis Presley and Aretha
Franklin to Alicia Keys and the cast
of "Glee." His career spans decades,
of music history: He was Marlene
Dietrich's arranger in the 1950s and
'60s and caught on with audiences
in recent years through his work
with Elvis Costello, Dr. Dre and oth-
ers and through his cameos in the
"Austin Powers" movies.
His book, like so many of his
songs, will be a team effort Robert
Greetifield, whose biography of
Atlantic Records founder Ahmet
Ertegun came out in 2011, will assist
with a story "told in Bacharach's
own words."
(AP)


Actress Jean Stapleton
is 89.
Actress Tippi Hedren
is 82.
Former PBS newsman
Robert MacNeil is 81.
Singer Phil Everly is
73.
Actress Shelley
Fabares is 68.


Country singer Dolly
Parton is 66.
TV chef Paula Deen
is 65.
Actress Katey Sagal is
58.
Comedian Paul
Rodriguez is 57.
Actress Katey Sagal is
58.


Daily Scripture

"No temptation has overtaken
you except what is common to
mankind. And God is faithful;
he will not let you be tempted
beyond what you can bear. But
when you are tempted, he will
also provide a way out so that
you can endure it."

-1 Corinthians 10:13 NIV


Lake Cit
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden, without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery oriser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
Sis available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.............. $26.32
24 Weeks .............. $48.79
52 Weeks.................. $83.46
Rates include 7%sales tax
Mall rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks.................. $82.80
52 Weeks ...............$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. ,nd thanks for reading.


AROUND FLOI


FAMU officials speak
out on death fallout
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida A&M University
students registering for,
classes this fall will have to
*sign an online form saying
they're aware of anti-hazing
policies.
Members of the state
,Board of Goverfiors
Were told Wednesday
that it's one of the steps
being-taken in the wake
'of the death of drum
major Robert Champion.
;Champion died after a haz-
.ing ritual last November
and his death has triggered
Several investigations.
SThe board which over-
>:sees the state's 11 universi-
ties has launched its qwn
investigation into whether
FAMU officials ignored
: -past warnings about haz-
.:ing.

-Few Miami teachers
dismissed for effort
MIAMI -A group that
'analyzes teacher quality
;says the nation's fourth larg-
Sest school district dismisses
the fewest teachers for poor
,performance of any they've
studied.
The National Council
'on Teacher Quality found
no more than 10 teachers
out of more than 20,000 in
Miami-Dade Public Schools
were dismissed for poor
performance in the 2010-11
school year.
"We know in any work-
force, in any profession,
-there are always going to be
people who are not effective
at their jobs," said Emily
Cohen, district policy direc-
tor for the research organi-
zation. "When we're talking
about students and kids, it's
unfair to place students in
classrooms where we know
their teacher is not as effec-
tive as other teachers."
Miami Dade officials dis-
puted the findings, saying
more than 1,000 teachers
were not rehired because
of poor performance over


the last three years all of
those, teachers who were in
their first year in the district
and on a one-year contract
The report notes a prac-
tice in which large numbers
of teachers on temporary
one-year contracts are not
rehired or are counseled
out of the profession in
one year, about 350 were let
go. It states the stark con-
trast between first-year dis-
missals, compared to those
for teachers with more
secure contracts, suggests
not all are being held to the
same standard.

University leaders
tout higher education
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida university presi-
dents urged lawmakers
on Wednesday not to
forget general education
in the push for expanding
science, technology, engi-
neering and math studies.
The emphasis on the
so-called STEM fields
remained a major focus
as the House Education
Committee continued its
talks with presidents of
Florida's 11 public univer-
sities.
Gov. Rick Scott, who
has made job-creation the
top priority of his admin-
istration, is among politi-
cians pushing to increase
the output of STEM
graduates because they
have better employment
prospects.
That's already hap-
pening and it began
before Scott took office a
year ago, according to a
new report by the State
University System.
It shows a 27 percent
increase in undergraduate
STEM enrollment and a
20 percent increase at the
graduate level over a four-
year period through the
fall of 2010.
That compares to
increases of just 3 percent
in non-STEM undergradu-
ate enrollment and 17 per-
cent in graduate classes.


RIDA

Mother, aunt charged
in infant's death


NEWBERRY Author-
ities say a 5-year-old north
Florida boy's mother and
aunt have been charged in
his death.
The Alachua County,
Sheriff's Office reports that
the boy's mother, 26-year-
old Valerie Sharonne
Owens, and his aunt,
55-year-old Alice J. Owens,
were charged Wednesday
with murder and child
neglect
The Gainesville Sun
reports that rescue workers
responded to the family's
home last month following
a 911. Javarian Wallace was
taken to a nearby hospital,
where he later died. A medi-
cal examiner determined he
died from blunt traumatic
injuries to his head, body
and limbs.
Investigators say the
boy's mother and aunt were
the only ones watching him
the day he' died. Jail records
didn't say if either woman
had an attorney.

Jacksonville pair
charged in tot killing
JACKSONVILLE A
Jacksonville man and
woman have been charged
after authorities say a
3-year-old boy accidentally
shot himself.
Jacksonville police
reported Tuesday that
22-year-old Barbara
Anne Powell and 24-year-
* old Gregory Eugene
Chisholm were each
charged with child neglect
and culpable negligence.
Chisholm also was
charged with violating the
terms of his probation.
Police wouldn't identify
the child or how he was
related to the suspects.
The Florida Times-
Union reports that the
child sustained a gun-
shot wound to the chest
Monday, but officials say
it wasn't life-threatening.
(AP)


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TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low We.rinesta',
rNormal hign

Record high
Record lic,

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


65

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20 in 1977

0.45!"
0.53"
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SUN
Sunnse today
Surse- rfodal
Sunnse tom.
Sunset tom.


7:27 a.m.
5:56 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5.57 p.m.


MOON
Moonnse today 3;58 a.m.
Moonset today 2:31 p.m.
Moonrise tom.' 4:58 a.m.
Moonset tom. 3:31 p.m.


Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb.
23 30 7 14
New First Full Last


5

30 uniutesto ibunm
MU id'


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service
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weather www.weatherpublisher.com


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012


SHELTER: Saving pets

Continued From Page 1A


said. "We also want people
who understand how to fix
the problem [of unwanted
animals] through spaying
and neutering."
One condition for Duron's
donation, which included
her purchase of a 108-acre
tract off County Road 137, is
for the shelter to be self suf-
ficient. Taylor said the dog
park, dog training classes,
fund raisers and donations
are just some of the ways
they plan to generate rev-
enue.
One coming event is the
Doxie Derby on March 24.
The event features different
events for dachshunds in a
number of categories such
as fastest, oldest, mixed-
breed,best dressed and lon-
gest doxie. Call the shelter
at (386) 963-1295 to enter or


for information.
Individual rooms at the
shelter are also available for
sponsorships in the name
of a loved one or pet, Taylor
said.
Taylor said a date for
the ribbon cutting hasn't
been set, but animals
are already waiting at
the shelter for someone
to provide a good, loving
home. All adopted animals
are spayed or neutered,
have a clean bill of health
and have microchips so
they can be identified if
they stray from their new
homes.
"Any of these dogs and
cats would give anything
to have someone spend 10
or 15 minutes with them,"
Taylor said. "This is such
an amazing gift."


CREEL: Agent honored

Continued From Page 1A


This year the board will
partner with Habitat for
Humanity of Lake City/
Columbia County.
"Our goals are the same,"
Kishton said. "We want to
put people in homes."
During the meeting 2012
officers and directors were
installed for the Lake City
Board of Realtors. They are:
Sandy Kishton, president;
Stan Batten, president elect;
Anita Handy, secretary;
Darrell Hunt, immediate
past president. Directors are


Janet Creel, Susan Eagle,
Travis Land,'Kellie Shirah,
Lori Simpson, Susan Sloan
and Jeff Taylor.
New North Florida
Multiple Listing Service
officers and directors are:
Lisa Hicks, president;
Robin Schwartz, vice
president and secretary.
Directors are Jim Curry,
Thom Duncan, Martha
Jo Khachigan, Joe Perez,
Nancy Rogers, John
Stanford, Gary Thomas
and Elaine Tolar.


BILLS: Seeking secrecy

Continued From Page 1A


Fulford's decision.
But when asked, the
Lake Wales Republican said
he couldn't explain the bills'
secrecy provisions.
"I didn't draft the bill,"
Alexander said. "I haven't
looked at all the language."
Brian Pitts, a lobbyist for a
group called Justice-2-Jesus,


told the. committee both bills
undermine "the transpar-
ency, accountability and due
diligence of this body and
citizens of this state."
Two Democrats on ,the
.panel -,- Gwen Margolis
of Miami and Chris Smith
of Fort Lauderdale also
voiced their opposition.


Citizens' growth

starting to slow


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE The
state's insurer of last resort
has halted the runaway
growth of policyholders in
recent months and begun
to reduce its size and the
corresponding risk it pres-
ents to millions of Floridians,
the company's president
told Gov. Rick Scott and the
Cabinet on Wednesday.
Scott Wallace, who is
leaving as president of state-
backed Citizens Property
Insurance Corp. in early
April, said its number of
policies have leveled off at
roughly 1,470,000 in recent


weeks after more than a year
of increasing by an estimated
30,000 policies a month.
Wallace's report was
music to the ears of Gov.
Rick Scott, who has made it
a top priority for Citizens to
once again be a last-resort
backup, if not sold, instead
of the state's largest insurer
of businesses and homes. If
Citizens were unable to pay
claims, the difference would
have to be made up'by all
Florida residents with insur-
ance on their homes, busi-
nesses and vehicles.
'We're starting to depopu-
late and not growing and thafs
all good," Scottsaid afterward.
"We're making progress."


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Advice for working with flowers

~~T.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Claudia Bates (center), a nationally accredited Florida design instructor, gives a few.tips to Jo Ann'Torrans (right)
Wednesday at the Woman's Club during Florida Federation of Garden Clubs Floral Design Series class. Bates said a
common mistake is when 'people tend touse too many flowers. It's an art form. You should stand back and look and see
the line and depth.'


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Pinemount Elementary School student Christian Chiong,
11, wins the 2011 Columbia County Spelling Bee last
year by correctly spelling the word 'alcove.' Spellers
from 14 schools will compete today at 10 a.m. in the
School Board Administrative Complex Auditorium, 372
West'Duval St:, to be the 2012 winner.


~ -------- ----

II.- . ~;


I















OPINION


Thursday, January 19, 2012


ANOTHER
ONE


ONE
OPINION


Show


voters


who pays


for PACs

California lawmakers
have an opportunity
to shine light into
the shadows that
can hide the big
money donors who pay for
political campaign ads.
The California DISCLOSE
Act, sponsored by
Assemblywoman Julia
Brownley, D-Los Angeles,
would require political adver-
tisements on TV, radio, mail-
ers or websites to list the
three largest donors to the
political action committee
paying for the ad. Merely list-
ing the PAC's name such
as "Citizens Together," a title
so vague it is meaningless -
wouldn't be enough. Whether
these contributors are corpo-
rations, unions, other organi-
zations or individuals, their
names would appear in big,
bold print. Lawmakers should
pass this measure.
Two years ago, the U.S.
Supreme Court lifted limits
on the amount of money that
organizations and corporations
can donate to PACs in federal
elections. That ruling handed
even more power to rich con-
tributors'paying for political ads
in the 2012 presidential race.
It's hard to evaluate attack ads
when we don't know who's pay-
ing for them.
California already requires
more disclosure than federal
laws do, btit most of the infor-
mation goes to the secretary of
state's website, which many vot-
ers never'see. Brownley's bill,
which is endorsed by California
Common Cause, would man-
date that donor names appear
in the ads. The PAC placing the
ads would also be required to
maintain a website showing its
top five donors. This measure
would apply to state and local
elections only.
The bill, AB 1148, faces a
vote Thursday in the Assembly
appropriations committee. This
is a step toward giving voters
the information we need to
identify who's backing political
campaigns.
San Jose Mercury News


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City R6porter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding'counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities--"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


he airlines have
been wrestling for
years with the prob-
lem of overweight
Americans, passen-
gers who can't fit in their seats
and slop over onto the hapless
person next to them.
Before the airlines began
shoehorning travelers into
every available seat, the prob-
lem could be resolved by mov-
ing one or another of the two
into a row with an empty seat.
Now they are wrestling with
the concept of charging super-
sized passengers for two seats.
It may be fair, but it's terrible
public relations.
Mass transit systems are
wrestling with similar problems,
and indeed have been for quite
some time. The New York Times
tells us that, back in 1984, the
city held.the "First All-American
Tush Tally" in which officials
sought to determine whether
the average Big Apple bot-
tom could fit into the seats of
Japanese-made subway cars.


www.lakecityreporter.com


A more humane world offers


hope for animals too


several new books point
to the fact that planet
wide, wars are becom-
ing scarcer and we as
people are becoming
less violent as a result One
of those books is by Joshua
Goldstein, professor emeritus
of international relations at
American University, who wrote,
"Winning the War on War." He
told a public radio interviewer
last month that there is measur-
ably less violence this decade.
than in the past 100 years. As
an example, he offered this fact:
World War II, which started
70 years ago, created levels of
violence that were 100 times
higher than the wars of today,
including Iraq and Afghanistan.
SWhen wars do conflagrate,
there is more global outrage
and more pressure for them
to end. There is also much
more exposure of the bloody
entrails of war, via the Internet
and social media, which in turn
increases pressure for the vio-
lence to cease.
I have always thought that
as people become more humane
toward other people, they will
become more aware of the
socially ingrained tolerance we
sport when it comes to cruelty to
animals. Today's young people
are more aware of the brutality
of factory farming and there-
fore more of them are vegetar-
ians, and so on. There is finally
evidence of man's continued
enlightenment on the topic of
animal intelligence and a grow-'
ing body of it The more we learn
about how animals think and the


. L. : -' ^


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com


sophistication of their thinking,
the more difficult it becomes
to treat them as if they were
unthinking, unfeeling machines.
The Discovery Channel's
website quotes Jonathan
Balcombe, a research scientist
at the Physicians Committee for
Responsible Medicine as echo-
ing one of my long-held beliefs.
The more we learn about
animal intelligence, the more
we see that it is we who have
failed to understand animals
and not the other way around.
"Chickens practice deception,
pigeons can categorize images
in photographs as quickly as
we can, a gorilla plays a joke
on a human teacher, and a tiny
fish leaps from one tide pool
to another using a mental map
formed during high tide."
National Public Radio
recently relayed a new study
undertaken by a University
of Chicago researcher, which
found that "rats are empathetic
and will altruistically lend a
helping paw to a cage mate who
is stuck in a trap." Not only
will rats frantically work to free
the trapped cage mate; they
will do so even when there's a


tempting little pile of chocolate
chips nearby, the study reveals.
"Instead of leaving their pal in
the trap and selfishly gobbling
the candy all by themselves,
rats will free their cage mate
and share the chocolate."
Knowing what we now know
about rodent intelligence, it is
not surprising that the National
Institutes of Health revised the
guidelines on cage sizes for
mice and rats used in animal
testing. It is no longer accept-
able to crowd a female mouse
and her litter into fewer than
51 square inches of space, or
a female rat and her litter into
fewer than 124 square inches
of space. As tiny as those
increased spaces are, scientists
still worry the cost of compli-
ance is too high and they stand
to lose federal funding altogeth-
er if they don't comply.
My hope is that as we
become more human toward
people and animals alike we
will end the practice of animal
testing for human medical
advancements. The fact is
our chemistry is quite differ-
ent from that of animals. So
animal experimentation is a
highly unreliable precursor of
how humans will react to new
drugs, procedures and so on.
The more we recognize the
cruelty of violence (in the form
of war) toward people, the
more we will also recognize the
cruelty we now visit on animals.

* Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


-l


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
At the time, some transit
systems had seats 17 inches
wide, but it was clear from the
passengers' ever-increasing
avoirdupois that the days of
those seats were numbered.
The standard now seems to be
17.55 inches to 17.75 inches,
with Amtrak settling on a com-
paratively roomy 18.5 inches.
Mass-transit passengers have
solutions denied to their air-
line brethren. They can stand,
clutching a pole or strap-hang-
ing, or wander through cars in
hopes of finding an empty seat
next to a reasonably svelte pas-
senger.
Martin Schroder, chief, engi-


neer for the American Public
Transport Association, was
Quoted in The Times as saying,
"It's clear that the U.S. popula-
tion is getting heavier. We are
trying to get our hands on
that" an unfortunate choice
of words, but you see what he
means "and figure out what is
the best average weight to use."
Indeed, the feds are consid-
ering raising the standard pas-
senger weight for bus testing
from 150 pounds to 175 pounds.
A walk down the streets of any
American city shows that the
feds may be a little late to that
party. A lot of American males
would be delighted to see 175
pounds again and be able to fit
in a standard mass-transit seat
without the problem of flab
overlap.
The mandate is there. It's not
called the seat of government
for nothing.

Dale McFeatters is a columnist
for Scrips Howard News Service.


4A


needs to come to an end, and
grounding electric-car subsi-
dies would be a great start.

* The Washington Times


? ,/ < ; ," '[- - - -

" '.--"--
A. .A




TR TV40-PARN Y 9(IN\


More Americans growing

too big for their seats


ANOTHER
VIEW



Unplug


the


Chevy


Volt
Wealthy liberals
love nothing
better than
flaunting their
enlightened
attitudes. They see the selec-
tion of a trendy set of wheels
as a great way to advertise
their concern for the survival
of polar bears. At the top of
the must-have list for the self-
enlightened is the Chevy Volt.
This $40,000 plug-in hybrid
can travel 35 miles on battery
power, a feat enabling smug
owners their average annual
salary is $175,000 to pretend
that their emissions are pure.
Of course, instead of coming
out the tailpipe, the unwanted
carbon-dioxide molecules are
instead released at the power
plant, which is generally coal-
fired well outside their view.
The well-heeled also enjoy the
belief that their plug-in technol-
ogy is modernly superior to
anything else on the road, even
though companies like Waverly
Electric Motor Vehicles and
Columbia Electric Vehicles pro-
duced cars with better range
than the Volt in the year 1901.
It didn't catch on then, and
it won't catch on now because
electric cars makes zero eco-
nomic sense. Car & Driver
Tested the Volt's capabilities
against the Chevy Cruze, a gas-
powered car built on the same
platform. The magazine found
a Volt buyer would save $8,089
on gasoline over the vehicle's
lifetime, but only after paying
$23,000 extra for the privilege
of wearing a green halo. That
figure doesn't take into account
up to $11,000 in incentives
kicked in by state and federal
taxpayers. It also doesn't count
the billions Uncle Sam has
thrown to Government Motors
in bailouts and manufacturing
grants.
All of that cash is being
poured into something poten-
tially hazardous. On May 12,
the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration per-
formed a side-impact crash test
on a Volt. Three weeks later,
.the damaged test car not only
burned to the ground, but it
took three nearby vehicles with
it
Mark Reuss, president
of GM North America, told
reporters earlier this month
that the company wasn't back-
ing down. 'This remains a halo
car for us," said Mr. Reuss. "It
is a breakthrough." If it's such
a breakthrough, consumers
would be flocking to it. But
they aren't, despite the govern-
ment's throwing five-figure
bribes at potential buyers.
Rep. Mike Kelly filed a bill last
month to put a stop to those
taxpayer subsidies for trendy
hybrid and electric vehicles. "It
isn't 'government' money,' it's
taxpayer money," Mr. Kelly told
The Washington Times.
Mr. Kelly knows first-hand
how much dust a Volt gathers
sitting unwanted on the lot
because he owns a Chevrolet
dealership. 'There's no pub-
lic demand for the Volt," the
Pennsylvania Republican
explained. 'This is the admin-
istration's demand to the auto
company they bailed out to pro-
duce something."
The federal government has
no business using tax dollars
to decide which products the
public should or should not be
allowed to buy. Washington's
culture of crony capitalism











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & OBITUARIES THURSDAY, JANAURY 19, 2012 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com


Today, Jan. 19

Voices that Change
Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
Jan.19 at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds ban-
quet facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.
This is a benefit for the
Christian Service Center
and tickets are available at
the Center on Hilton and
Washington St.

Columbia County Retired
Educators meeting
The Columbia County
Retired Educators will meet
Thursday, January 19, at
1 p.m. in Room 120:at the .
School Board Adult Center.
Speakers will be Mrs.
Kaeron Robinson of the
Guardian Ad Litem and Mr.
Paul Conley of Ocala, Fl.,
District H FREF Trustee.
Retired persons interested
in education may join us.
For more information call
Will Brown at 752-2431.

Healthy Start board
meeting
Healthy Start of North
Central Florida Coalition
Board Meeting, Thursday,
January 19th at 2:00 p.m.,
Well Florida Council,
Gainesville, Fla. The pub-
lic is invited. Please call
Heather Holliingsworth at
352-313-6500 ext. 119 if you
need more information.
Photography exhibit
The Art League Of
North Florida and the
Friends Of The Library
invite the community to
the photography exhibit of
Local photographer Herb
Ellis at the Main branch
of the Columbia County
Public Library, 308 NW
Columbia Ave.

Jan. 20

Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. Identical twins
Mark & Clark play head to
head on identical custom-
built baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled audi-
ences around the world
with everything from musi-
cal comedy to dramatic
interpretation of the clas-
sics all with the flash of


OBITUARIES

Paul J. Ciuros
Paul J. Ciuros, 73, died Saturday,
December 24, 2011 at the V. A.
Medical Center in Lake City,
Florida after an extended illness.
He was the son of the late Wil-
liam & Jennie
Pallone Ciuros.
He was born in
Elmira, New
York but had
moved to Houston, Texas where
he was in the construction busi-
ness, building houses. After
retiring, he moved to Florida,
and has been a part of our com-
munity for the past 18 years. He
was a loving husband, father, and
grandfather that enjoyed fishing,
bowling, watching football, golf
and was a fan of Tiger Woods.
He is survived by his loving wife
of 30 years, Eleanor Ciuros of
Lake City, FL; sons, Randy Ci-
uros and Scott Ciuros both of
Wellborn, FL, step children, Mike
Deatherage of Houston, TX &
Jason Deatherage of Las Vegas,
NV; daughter, Christeen Death-
erage of Lake City, FL; brother,
Bill Ciuros of Atlanta, GA; sister,
Marie Girardi of Geneva, FL;
brother in law, Michael Ballash
of Portland, OR; grandchildren,
Britani Wehling and Blake Cas-
tanie .both of Texas & numerous
nieces and nephews also survive.
Memorial services will held at
11:00 a.m., on Saturday, Janu-
ary 21, 2012 at the New Life
Christian Fellowship Church on
Baya Avenue with an interment
service in Forest Lawn Memorial
Gardens to follow. GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL


HOME, 3596 South U.S. Hwy
441, Lake City, FL, 32025 (386)
752-1954 is in charge of arrange-
ments. Please leave words of
love & comfort for the family at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Liberace, a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano artist-
ry of Ferrante and Teicher.
Ticket and membership
information is available at
www.communityconcerts.
info.
Arbor Day planting
The Lake City/Columbia
County Beautification
Committee will honor
Morris Williams by plant-
ing a Palatka Holly in com-
memoration of the 2012
Arbor Day. The ceremony
will be held at 11 a.m. in
front of the school admin-
istration building on Duval
Street The public is urged
to attend.
Jan. 21

Southside Idol
The Lake City Recreation
Department 2nd Annual
Southside Idol will be
Saturday at 7 p.m. ih the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative
Complex Auditorium, 372
W. Duval St. Admission
is $5 to see 14 talented
local singers in middle and
high school compete to
be Southside's Idol. The
winner takes home $1,000.
Special guest Keisha
Jackson, an R&B singer,
will perform with other
local talents.
Spiritual retreat
A spiritual life enrich-
ment retreat and confer-
ence for adults from 9:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Epiphany
Catholic Church, 1905 SW
Epiphany Court The regis-
tration fee is $10 and theme
is improving and inspiring
spirituality. Reserve your'
spot by Jan. 18 by calling
(386)752-5228.
Farmers market
There will be a Chili
Cook Off and live music '
this week at the Lake ,,
DeSoto Farmers Market
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in
Wilson Park located along
Lake DeSoto in downtown
Lake City. The cook off
will benefit Relay for Life.
The market features locally
grown fresh produce,
herbs, plants, cheese,
milk, eggs and local baked
breads, pies and other
items. Vendors also sell
homemade craft items like
jewelry, woodwork and
other handmade items. For


more information about
the Lake DeSoto Farmer
Market call 386-719-5766 or
visit market.lcfla.com.
Wedding Expo
Let the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park &
Campground help you
plan your special day. 2nd
annual Wedding Expo
will be held at Spirit of
the Suwannee Music -
Park & Campground on
Saturday, Jan. 21from 1
to 5 p.m. Fashion Show
by Glass Slipper Bridal,
Door Prizes, Vendor
Booths, Refreshments,
Taste Testing and more.
Vendors include: Melissa's
Antiques, Glass Slipper
Bridal, Scott Carroll DJ,
Holiday Inn, SOS Cafe &'
Restaurant, Top Hat Limo,
Cakes by Pat, Uniquely
Yours Wedding & Event
Planner, Hot Heads Salon
& Spa, Sea Creative/
Stacee Reveron Photo,
Joy the Cake Lady/Elite
Photography and more.
Free Admission. For more
information contact Sharyn
at (386) 364-1683.
Baptist school
First Central Missionary
Baptist Association will
start its Mid Year Winter
Education School on
Jan. 21, from 7:30 a.m. to
5:30 p.m. at Springfield
Missionary Baptist Church
in Live Oak. There will be
classes on Public Speaking,
Survey of Revelation,
Baptist Doctrine, and
Doctrine of Prayer. The
cost is $35 per person
and includes materials.
Lunch by the host church
for a low fee. RevJoseph
Francis, Moderator and
Mrs. Shirley, Fraiklin,
Women's President.
Jan. 22

Church anniversary
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church, 948
Aberdeen Avenue, will
celebrate their 70th
Church Anniversary on
Jan. 22 at 11:30 a.m. and
3 p.m. Dr. Dwight Pollock
in charge of the 11:30
a.m. service. Reverend
Isadore L. Williams and the
Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church is in charge
of the 3 p.m. service.
Please come out and share
with us.


r


II* ~t A-


Bridal show
The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's Bridal,
Belk, Lake City Florist
and Design, Glass Slipper
Bridal, The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices are
$7.00; Day of Event $10.00.
Tickets. can be purchased
at the Holiday Inn & Suites,
213 SW Commerce Dr.,
Lake City. For ticket sales
or vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386) 754-
1411.
Riding club banquet
The Columbia County
Riding Club is having its
annual banquet Jan. 22
at 1p.m. at Mason City
Community Center. The
club will have its rides the
2nd and 4th Sat. of each
month. The club will be
hosting Pleasure Shows
this year. Check our web-
site for all information, www.
columbiacountyridingclub.
com.

Jan. 24
Friends of the Library
Author Program
Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 7
p.m. at the Main Library,
sponsored by Save Our
Suwannee will host Cynthia
Barnett, author of Mirage:
Florida and the Vanishing
Water of the Eastern U.S.
Barnett is an award-win-
ning journalist and senior
writer for Florida Trend
magazine. She will discuss
Florida's water crisis and
look at solutions that have
found success in commu-
nities around the world.
Don't miss this timely pro-
gram on a topic so very rel-
evant to Columbia County
and North Central Florida.
Jan. 26

Landlords' meeting
There will be a lanlords'
meeting Thursday, Jan.
26 at 6 p.m. in the Shands


LakeShore Medical, Center
conference room. Florida
Gateway College profes-
sor Sherri Carder will
speak about applications
and agreements. All rental
agents and owners are
invited. For information call
755-0110'
Jan. 25

Building Assn. lunch:
The Columbia County
Builders Association will
hold a General Council
lunch at Guang Dong start-
ing at 11:30 a. m. on Jan.
25. Cost of lunch is $10 for
members and $15 for non-
members. Speaker is Dale
Williams. After the lunch
an attorney from Tritt/
Anderson in Jacksonville
will hold a short seminar.
Reservations are preferred,
call: 386-867-1998 or e-mail:
colcountybuild@comcast.
net.
Jan. 28

Illusionist Jason Bishop
Illusionist Jason Bishop
will perform as part of
Florida Gateway College's
FGC Entertainment series
on Jan. 28. Bishop, the
2006 APCA Performing
Artist of the Year, will
amaze you with his stun-
ning and original state-of-
the-art magic, including
his breathtaking Double
Levitation trick. For more
information or for tickets,
call (386) 754-4340 or visit
www.fgcentertainment.
com.
Women's retreat
New Dayspring Baptist,
Church, 709 NW Long
Street, Shephlerd's Care
Ministry will be hosting a
Women's Retreat on Jan.
28th from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Registration and break-
fast beginning at 7:30
a.m."Inspirational topics
will be presented along
with lunch. Tickets are
available or. you may pay
at the door for a donation
of $10. For more informa-
tion please contact Sis.
Linda Timmons at 386-,
438-7974.


Jan. 29

Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 29, 2012
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library: Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita Nights
and Champagne for
Buzzards. Phyllis Smallman
is a Canadian who has spent
a lot of time in Florida, the
setting for her award-win-
ning mystery series featur-
Sing sassy bartender, Sherri
Travis. A former potter with
a lifelong love of myster-
ies, Phyllis divides her time
between her native Ontario
and Sarasota. She will join
us live via Skype for this
program.
Jan. 30

Wildlife class
The Columbia County
Extension office, 164 SW
Mary Ethal Lane, will host
Creating Backyard Wildlife
Habitat on Jan. 30 from 1 to
4 p.m. Learn how to create
backyard wildlife habitat
for a variety of wildlife, in
particular birds, bats, and
butterflies.
Feb. 1

Black History Month
SOpening Ceremony
Black History Month
Opening Ceremony, 6 pm,
* Richardson Comm. Center.
Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1 at
the Central Building to plan
for Olustee 2012 at 409 SW
St. Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.
Feb. 3

Gospel concert
Southern Gospel soloist
Ann Do owning. a popular
performer on the Gaither
Gospel Homecoming video
series, will be in concert
at the Wellborn United
Methodist Church, 12005
County Road 137, at 7 p.m.
on Friday, Feb. 3. For infor-
mation call (386)754-8524.


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would like to congratulate

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_r~a~s~anass~


Ar-IL


A











6A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012



Health overhaul


termed on track


By Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
President Barack Obama's
health care overhaul is on
track in many states, the
White House asserted
Wednesday. But officials
said the administration is
preparing a federal back-
stop anyway for states in
which opposition to the new
law has blocked planning.
The law calls for states to
build new health insurance
markets called exchanges,
so 'that millions of middle-
class people who are cur-
rently uninsured can buy
taxpayer-subsidized private
coverage. It also expands
eligibility for 'Medicaid so
low-income adults who have
no dependent children can
get government insurance.
Putting the two approaches
together, more than 30 mil-
lion Americans are expect-
ed to gain coverage starting
in 2014.
But 26 states are asking
the Supreme Court to over-
turn the health care law,
and many of those have
made little progress in plan-
ning their exchanges, even
though the deadline clock is
ticking. The law says state
plans must be approved by


Jan. 1, 2013 a year in
advance of the program's
launch or the federal
government will step in and
run things.
"No matter where you
live, on Jan. 1, 2014, an
exchange will be up and
running," deputy chief of
staff Nancy-Ann DeParle
said on the White House
blog.
An accompanying prog-
ress report said 28 states
and Washington, D.C.,
are "on their way" toward
establish exchanges, widely
considered the operational
linchpin of:the health care
law.
With a presidential elec-
tion and Supreme Court
decision on the fate the
health care law coming first
this year, 2014 seems like a
long way off even if Obama's'
signature domestic accom-
plishment is upheld. But to
federal and state officials
planning for exchanges,
time is short. A totally new
marketplace must be cre-
ated, along with systems for
verifying and safeguarding
confidential personal infor-
mation used to determine
eligibility.
"Exchanges will offer
consumers the same kinds
of health insurance choices


that members of Congress
now have," DeParle said.
But the White House
report put a rosy outlook
on the progress in some
states.
For example, Idaho
was among the states
highlighted as advancing.
Republican Gov. Butch
Otter strongly supports a
state-run exchange, and his
administration has received
a $20 million federal grant
to start work. But the leg-
islature has to approve
the actual spending of the
money, and Republican foes
of the federal health care
overhaul are trying to block
Otter from moving ahead.
The standoff is one of the
hottest issues in this year's
legislative, session.
"It seems that the White
House is desperate to
show progress and is selec-
tively searching for any
evidence that states are.
taking action," said Mike
Schrimpf, spokesman for
the Republican Governors
Association. "Many of the
states that have started
action are doing so primar-
ily as a defensive maneuver
to keep the federal govern-
ment from having even
greater control over their
health care markets."


America's obesity epidemic

shows no hint of shrinking


By Lindsey Tanner Those numbers are stag-
Associated Press gering, and' while they
haven't increased in recent
CHICAGO America's years, "we're plateauing at
obesity epidemic is prov- an unacceptably high prev-
ing to be as stubborn as alence rate," said Dr. David
those maddening love han- Ludwig, director of an obe-
dies, and shows no sign of sity prevention center at
reversing course. Children's Hospital Boston,
More than one-third He was not involved in the
of adults and' lnio 17" reports.
percent of children were The CDC reports sum-
obese -in 2009-2010, echo- marize results of. national
ing results since 2003, the health surveys in children
Centers for Disease Control and adults, which are con-
and Prevention reported ducted every two years.
Tuesday. I The nationally represen-
"It's good that we didn't tative surveys include in-
see increases. On the other 'person weight and height
hand, 'we didn't see any measurements. The 2009-
decreases in any group," 2010 reports involved near-
said CDC researcher ly 6,000 adults and about
Cynthia Ogden.. 4,000 children, from infan-
Early in the decade, cy through age 19.
slight increases were seen The results were released
among white, black and online in the Journal of
Hispanic men, and among the American Medical
Hispanic and black women. Association.
These changes may be lev- Dr. Elbert Huang, an
eling off, but the authors associate professor of med-
said they "found no indica- icine at the University of
tion that the prevalence of Chicago who studies health
obesity is decliningin any care policy issues, said his
group." research shows that even
In 2009-2010, more than if obesify rates continue to
78 million adults and almost remain stable, there will be
13 million children aged dramatic increases down
2-19 were obese, the CDC. the road in diabetes and in
researchers reported, costs linked with that dis-


E EYE CENTER of Nonh Forda
kJ General Eye Care & Surgery
I ~-r Ir ss ,: ----a: ,


ease. That's because Type
2 diabetes, among many-
diseases linked with obesi-
ty, becomes more prevalent
as people age.
The latest reports one
on -children and the other
on adults focused, on
obesity, meaning a body-
mass index pf at least 30.,
But the numbers of adults
and children who were
overweight, with a BMI of
between' 25 and 29, also
remained high.
Overall, 33 percent of
adults were overweight but
not obese, versus about
15 percent of children and
teens.


IICVIVI
K PRIMARY
CARE
MEDICINE
Preventative Care


* Physical
SGeriatric Care
* Women's Health


is pleased to announce the addition of
Dr. Aria Murphy
to our practice


* /


OPTOMETRISTS Providing Comprehensive Vision Care
Dr, Roiald R. Foreman '
' r. Frank A Bro6me, I'; A iGeneral Eye Care Contact rtLiSes iL
Dr. Kimberly M. Broome C6implete Optical qepatrmenti4 Advance C as r a,.r Surgery
D: Or. Julie Owens .... OnSite Optical-Laboratory. ..- -* Glaucoma & Qiabetes


Upon graduating from Columbia
High School, Dr. Murphy continued
her.education, attending Florida
State University receiving a degree
in inibiochemistry followed by
completing the Doctor of Optometry
program at Nova Southern University
College of Optometry in Davie.
She performed graduate work at
the Eye Care Institute in Davis, the
Filutowski Eye Institute in Lake Mary
as'well as the VA.Hospitals in both
Gainesville and Lake City.


Subscribe to the Lake City Reporter.

To find out how, call (386) 755-5445


Best of
the Best
5 Years


* Diabetes Management
.386-;754.DOC(S (3627)
: www.primarycaremedic.com


PHYSICIANS
IMAGING




LAKE CITY


*MRI
* Ultrasound
* X-Ray
* CT-64- Slice Scanner
* Digital Mammography
* Bone Density
386.487.3970


AiTION



* Physical Therapy
* Hand Therapy/
Splinting
* Osteoporosis Program
* Balance Disorders


386.755.3164


I Most.appintentswiti n24hou


2nd Annual



Presented by
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I & i'f TlERING COMPAf
r A-au CATERING 0 COMPANY


Sunday, January 22, 2012

12 Noon until 4:00 p.m.
at the Holdlij Inn & SuIire,'
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OPHTHALMOLOGIST I
[, Lrc Sno, ayiij.











Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor,
754-0421
tkrby@lakectyreportercom


Thursday, lanuarv


SPORTS


19.2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
5-7 p.m. Friday, and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex with a
cost of $80. Online
registration is available
at www.lcccyb.com for $75
plus a transaction fee.
For details, call
president Tad Cervantes
at 365-4810 or
vice-president David
Williams at
(386) 697-0764.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Alumni game
planned Feb. 4
SFormer Fort White
High baseball players
are invited to play in an
alumni softball game
at 11 a.m. Feb. 4 at the
Fort White baseball field.
There will be a home run
Derby fundraiser ($10 for
non-players) following
the game, plus fish fry
and barbecue dinners
will be sold for $6 each.
There will be kid friendly
booths for a small fee.
For details, call
coach Mike Rizzi at
(386) 288-8680.
CHS BASEBALL
Alumni game
set for Jan. 28
Columbia High
baseball's third annual
alumni game is
Jan. 28 at.Tiger Stadium.
Registration begins at
10 a.m. and there is no
fee to participate. There
will be a home run derby
at 11 a;m. with a $5 entry
fee. The Tigers will play
a Purple and Gold game
following the home run
derby. Admission is free.
Barbecue dinners will be
sold.
For details, call coach
J.T. Clark at 365-1754.
N From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High
girls basketball at
St. Augustine High,
7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High girls
basketball at Bradford
High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Brandon
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
basketball at Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Brandon
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Wolfson,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Thrilling victories


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
LEFT: Columbia High's Hollianne Dohrn looks for an open teammate during a game earlier this season. RIGHT: Columbia High's Bryce McCarthy (14)
scrambles to get the ball to Hunter Grow (6) while playing against Fort White High on Dec. 6.


From staff reports

Columbia High picked up a vic-
tory against rival Suwannee High
at Tiger Stadium in Lake City. on
Tuesday.
The Tigers received a final-min-
ute penalty kick to take home the
2-1 victory against the Bulldogs.
Suwannee struck first in the
fourth minute of the game when
former Columbia player Cooper
Hall found Justin Shirah for a goal
in the opening minutes of the
contest
Columbia wouldn't trail long as
Jimmy Blakely found space and
converted a goal for the Tigers in
the seventh minute to tie the game
up at 1-1.
The score would remain the
same for the next 72 minutes.
In the closing minutes of the
contest, Columbia had two chanc-


es to win. On the second chance,
Blakely would convert on a pen-
alty kick to pick up the win in the
grudge match.
"We actually had one hit off the
bar right before that," Columbia
High coach Trevor Tyler said. "It
was a pretty exciting finish."
Cody Beadles hit the bar with his
attempt with four minutes remain-
ing in the contest
Columbia (9-12-1) returns
to action in the District 2-4A
tournament beginning with
Panama City Mosely at 6 p.m. on
Monday in Tallahassee. The Tigers
will play host Chiles High at 7 p.m.
on Wednesday pending victory.
Suwannee falls to 11-7-2 for the
season.

Lady Tigers basketball
Columbia High has started to


hit its stride toward the end of
first-year coach Tera Perry's first
season. The Lady Tigers picked up
victories in two of their last three
contest to improve to 9-7 on the
season.,
Despite a 1-4 district mark, the
future is bright for the Lady Tigers
with a group full of underclassmen.
Columbia will only graduate one
senior, Melissa Randall, who will be
honored during Columbia's game
against Stanton Prep at 7:30 p.m.
on Tuesday.
Columbia will try to continue its
recent hot streak which saw the
Lady Tigers defeat Suwannee High
42-21 on Jan 10., fall to district pow-
erhouse Wolfson High, 60-27, on
Jan. 12 and rebounded for a 42-41
win against Union County High on
Jan. 14.
Justice Campbell dropped in 19
points against Union County.


"She's really stepping up and
becoming a tougher player," Perry
said. "She's driving the ball and
dbing an excellent job."
As a team, Perry is excited about
the gro ,th. ,
"We're growing together as a
team," Perry said. "Our scores are
showing that. It's something that
we need to continue to build on
next year."
As far as next season goes, Perry
feels that the foundation is there
for the Lady Tigers to continue
growing.
"We'll have about 99 percent of
our team back while some of the
other teams are losing their studs,"
Perry said.
Still, there's a chance the Lady
Tigers can surprise in the District
4-6A tournament which takes place
at Wolfson High beginning on
Jan. 30.


From staff reports

Fort White High's girls
basketball team lost 63-38
to Keystone Heights High
at home on Tuesday.
Most of the Lady Indians
got in on the scoring, led
by Kayshanique Cook with
10 points.
Other scorers were:
Khadijah Ingram, 8, Desma
Blake, 7, Shenia Pelham,
4, Cenise Armstrong, 4,
Rykia Jackson, 2, Daisha
Rossin, 2, and Tabresha
Cannon, 1.
Meghan Zinkel 'and


Caiylen Gonzales led the
visiting Indians (10-9, 6-3)
with 13 points apiece.
Fort White (3-13, 2-7)
wraps up district play at
6 p.m. Thursday against
Bradford High in Starke.

Lady Tigers soccer
Columbia High's Lady
Tigers soccer team had its
season come to a close in the
District 24A tournament
The Lady Tigers fell in
their first match against
Leon High in a 1-0 contest
.at Chiles High.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Daisha Rossin (30) races to recover a rebound while playing against Bradford
in a game on Jan. 9.


Blue Bell
Ice Cream

2/$11


At OR B"O 0
r Regular Size San
Candy Bars Cra
FOOD STORES 2/51.50 2/
>_EILU- Iii * U L _. IIU fqI Gin I^


Coca-Cola Products
12 Pack Cans
3/$12 or $4.29 ea.
2 Liter
2/$3 or $1.69 eo.


Pabst Beer
(PBR)
12 Pack Cans/NR

s7.99


S: .: 1 Lay's, Doritos,
Laft~ or
dwich Ruffles Snacks -
ickers x_ XXL size
c kers^ 2/$7
1or 59cea. 2/s7

Rolling Rock i 18 Pack Beer
Beer Bud Light -
12 Pack NR G CooIr UgM -
9.99 Miller 4.4ght
$9099 $14.49


Section B


And the



agony of



defeat...


Half-Gallon
Assorted


-- --r~r--- I


- --- - - -


1m l I ~ l lI I I 1


n is ecirP effec 2


D














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today,
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Volvo
Champions, first round, at George, South
Africa (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC PGATour, Humana Challenge,
First round, at La Quinta, Calif.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN -Wake Forest at Duke
ESPN2 -Vanderbilt atAlabama
9 p.m.
ESPN North Carolina at Virginia
STech
ESPN2 Illinois at Penn St.
10:30 p.m.
FSN UCLA atOregon St
NBA
8 p.m.
TNT LA. Lakers at Miami
10:30 p.m.
TNT Dallas at Utah
TENNIS
II p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, third
round, at Melbourne,Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, third
round, at Melbourne,Australia

FOOTBALL,

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10 i
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
NewYork Giants 24,Atlanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
San Francisco 36, New Orleans 32
New England 45, Denver 10
Baltimore 20, Houston 1,3.
N.Y. Giants 37, Green Bay 20
Conference Championships :
Sunday
Baltimore at New England, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 6:30 p.m.
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 29
At Honolulu
NFC vs.AFC
., Super Bowl -
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
NFC vs.AFC, 6:20 p.m.

College all-star games

Saturday
East-West Shrine Classic
At St Petersburg
East vs.West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Jan.28
... ...i.. ..SeniorBowl ...
At MobileAla.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Feb. 5
Texas vs. Nation
At San Antonio
Texas vs. Nation, 2 p.m. (CBSSN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Golden State 105, Cleveland 95
Orlando 96, Charlotte 89
Miami 120, San Antonio 98
Chicago 118, Phoenix 97
Houston 97, Detroit 80
Denver 105, Milwvaukee 95
Utah 108, LA. Clippers 79
Wednesday's Games
SSan Antonio at Orlando (n)
Oklahoma City at'Washington (ri).
Denver at Philadelphia (n)
Toronto at Boston (n)
Golden State at New Jerse.y (n)
Phoenix at New York (n)
Memphis at New Orleans (n)
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
Portland atAtdanta (n)
Indiana at Sacramento (n)
Dallas at LA: Clippers (n)
Today's Games
New Orleans at Houston, 8 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Miami, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Utah, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Portland at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Denver atWashington, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at New York, 7:30 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at San Antonio, 8:30 p.mn.
Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

Top .25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 4 Duke vs.Wake Forest, 7 p.m.
No. 8 North.Carolina at Virginia Tpch,
9 p.m.
No, 15Virginia at Georgia Tech, 8 p.m.
No.22 Illinois at Penn State, 9 p.m.
No. 24 Saint Mary's (Cal) vs.
Pepperdine, 10 p.m.'
Saturday's Games
No. I Syracuse at Notre Dame,
6 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky vs. Alabama at
Kentucky, Noon
No. 3 Baylor vs. No. 5 Missouri, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Duke vs. Florida State,
4 p.m.
No. 6 Ohio State at Nebraska, 8 p.m.
No. 7 Kansas at Texas,4 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State vs. Purdue,
Noon


-No. 10 Georgetown vs. Rutgers,
Noon
No. 12 Murray State at SIU-
Edwardsville, 8 p.m.
No. 13 UConn atTennessee,4 p.m.
No. 14 UNLV vs. New Mexico, 10
p.m.
No. 16'San Diego State vs.Air Force,
10 p.m.
No. 17 Florida vs. LSU, 6 p.m.
No. 18 Mississippi State atVanderbilt,
7 p.m.
No. 19 Creighton vs. Indiana State,


3 p.m.
No. 20 Michigan at Arkansas, 2 p.m.
No. 21 Marquette at Providence, 7
p.m.
No. 23 Louisville at Pittsburgh, 9 p.m.
No. 24 Saint Mary's (Cal) at Santa
Clara, II p.m.
No. 25 Kansas State at Oklahoma
State, 1:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. II Indiana vs. Penn State, Noon
No. 15 Virginia vs.Virginia Tech, 6 p.m.
No. 22 Illinois vs.Wisconsin, 2 p.m.

Florida State 84,
Maryland 70

At Tallahassee
MARYLAND (12-5)
Padgett 3-4 2-4 8, Len 1-2 1-2' 3,
Stoglin 8-17 7-8 27. Mosley 1-3 0-1 3,
Howard 1-4 2-2 4, Faust 4-8 2-4 10;Weijs
2-20-24, Parker 2-5 2-2 6, Pankey 2-3 1-2
S.Totals 24-48 i7-27 70.
FLORIDA ST. (12-6) '
Gibson 1-2 0-0 2.James 8-13 I-1 I17,
Loucks 4-9 0-0 9. Dulkys 2-5 0-0 6,;Snaer
6-14 6-8 19.White 4-7 5-5 13, Peterson
0-I 0-0 0. Space 0-1 0-0 0, Miller 4-7 8-8
18,Whlsnant II 0-0 6-0 0, Moreau 0-0 0-0
60,Kreft 0-2 0-1 .ITotals 29-61 20-23 84..
Halftime-Florida St. 36-33. 3-
Point Goals-Maryland 5-15 (Stoglin
4-9, Mosley 1-2, Howard 0-1, Faust 0-3),
Florida St. 6-13 (Dulkys 2-3, Miller.2-3,
Loucks 1-3, Snaer 1-4). Fouled Out-
Dulkys, Gibson. Rebounds-Maryland
29 (Parker 7), Florida St 33 (Jfaes 6).'
Assists-Maryland 10 (Howard, Stoglin
4), Florida St. 12 (Loucks 6).Total Fouls-
Maryland 19, Florida St. 20. A-8,853.

700 coaching victories

Through Monday
Coaches with 700 victories who have
spent a minimum of 10 seasons in Division
I with last school listed (x-active):
I. x-Mike Krzyzewski, Duke 915
2. Bob, KnightTexasTech 902
3. Dean Smith, North Carolina 879
4.x-Jim Boeheim, Syracuse 876
4.Adolph Rupp, Kehtucky 876
6.x,y-Jim Calhoun, Connecticut 866
7.Jim Phelan, Mt.St. Mary's, Md.: 830.
8. Eddie Sutton, San Francisco 804
9. LeftylDriesell, Georgia State 786
10. Lute Olson,Arizona 780'
II. Lou Henson, New Mexico St. 779
12. Henry Iba, Oklahoma State 764
13. Ed Diddle,Western Kentucky 759
14. Phog Allen, Kansas 746
15.John Chaney,Temple 741
16.JerryTarkanian, Fresno State 729
17. Norm Stewart, Missouri 728
18. Ray Meyer, DePaul 724
19. Don Haskins, UTEP 719
y-The NCAA's Committee on
Infractions ruled Calhoun won't get credit
for the 2-1 record his team compiled
while he was serving a suspension for
recruiting violations.

TENNIS,

Australian Open singles

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne,Australia
Wednesday
Men
Second Round
Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic,
def. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 6-1, 6-0,
7-6 (4).
Yen-hsun Lu,Taiwan, del. Florent Serra,
France, 7-5, 6-2, 6-2.
Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def.
Pere Riba, Spain, 6-0,4-0, retired..
Kevin Anderson (30), South' Africa,
def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 3-6, 6-1,
7-6 (3), 6-3.
Alejandro Falla, Colombia def. Mardy
Fish (8), United States, 7-6 (4), 6-3, 7-6
(6).
Juan Martin del Potro (I 1),Argentina,
def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 64, 7-5, 6-3.
Feliciano Lopez (18), Spain, def. Flavio
Clpolla. Italy. 7.5.7-6 (4), 6-2.
Rafael Nadhl (2), Spain, def. Tommy
Haas. Germany. 6-4, 6-3, 6-4.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland def.
Andreas Beck. Germany, walkover.
Lukas' Lacko, Slovakia, def. Donald
'Young, United States, 6-3 6-1 3-6 6-3.
*John Isner (16), United States, def.
David Nalbandian, Argentina, 4-6, 6-3,2-6
,7-6 (5), 10-8.
Nicolas Almagro (10), Spain, def.
Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 4-6, 6-3, 6-7
(4),6-4,6-0. .
Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Sam
Querrey, United States, 3-6, 6-3, 7-6 (3),
6-3.
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Carlos
Berlocq,Argentina, 7-6 (4), 3-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (13), Ukraine,
def. Tobias Kamke. Germany, 6, 6-1, 6-1,
3-6, 8-6. '
Stanislas Wawrinka t21). Swltzerland.
def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 7-6 (3),




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square.
to form four ordinary words.'


6-4,5-7,6-1.
Women
Second Round
U Na (5), China, def. Olivia Rogowska,
Australia, 6-2, 6-2.
Anabel Medina Garrigues (26), Spain,
def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-1, 6-0.
Iveta Benesova, Czech Republid def.
Peng Shuai (16), China, 6-2, 6-4.
Kim Clijsters (II), Belgium, deft
Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, 6-0, 6-1.
Daniela Hantuchova (20), Slovakia, def.
LesiaTsurenko, Ukraine, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3.
Nina Bratchikova, Russia, def. Alberta
Brianti, Italy, 6-2. 6-1.
Jelena Jankovic (13), Serbia, def. Chang
Kai-chen,Taiwan, 6-4,6-2.
Romina Oprandi, Italy, def. Francesca
Schiavone (10), Italy, 6-4, 6-3.
Julia Goerges (22), Germany, def. Eleni
Daniilidou, Greece, 6-2, 2-0, retired.
Christina McHale, United States, def.
Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, 3-6, 7-6
(4), 6-3.
SGalina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def.
Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-4.
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
: Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, 6-1,7-6 (4).
Monica Niculescu (31). Romaili. def.
Pauline Parmentier, France, 4-6, 6-4, 6-I.
Agnieszka Radwanska (8), Poland, def.
Paula'Ormaechea,Argentjna, 6-3, 6-1.
Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Petra
Cetkovska (32). Czech Republic, 7-5, 6-3.
Victoria Azarenka (3), Belarus, def.
Casey Dellacqua,Australia, 6-I, 6-0.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
HUMANA.CHALLENGE
I Site: La Quinta, Calif.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.'
Courses: PGA West, Arnold Palmer
Private Course (6,930 yards, par 72); PGA
West,Jack Nicklaus Private Course (6,951..
yards, par 72); La Quinta Country.Club
(7,060 yards, par 72).
Purse: $5.6 million. Winner's share.
$1,008,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Toda--Friday.
3-6 p.m.,9 p.m.-midnight; Saturday-Sunday,
4-7 p.m., 10 p.m.-I a.m.);
CHAMPIONSTOUR
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
CHAMPIONSHIP l
Site: Kaupulehu-Kona, Hawaii. :
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Hualalai Resort Golf Club
(7,107 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.8 million. Winner's share:
$305,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 6:30-
9 p.m.; Saturday, 12:30-3 a.m., 7:30-10 p.m.;
Sunday, 1:30-4 a.m., 7:30-10 p.m.; Monday,
1:30-4 a.m.).
EUROPEAN TOUR
VOLVO'GOLF CHAMPIONS
Site: George; South Africa.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course:The Links at Fancourt (7,271
"yards; par '73). ......'
Purse: $2.53 million. Winner's share:
$442,540.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Friday, 9 a.m.-I p.m.; Saturday-Sunday,
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.).

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Pittsburgh 2, Carolina I, SO
petroit 3, Dallas 2, SO
Los Angeles 3,Vancouver 2, SO
San Jose 2, Calgary I, SO
Ottawa 3,Toronto 2
New Jersey 5,Winnipeg I
Philadelphia'5, Minnesota I
N.Y. Islanders 3,Washington 0
Columbus 4, Edmonton 2
N.Y. Rangers 3, Nashville 0
Tampa Bay 5, Boston 3
Wednesday's Games,
Washington at Montreal (n)
Buffalo at Chicago (n)
Florida at Colorado (n)
.Phoenix atAnaheim (n)
.Today's Games
Minnesota atToronto, 7 p.m.
Boston at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Ottawa at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Montreal at Pittsburgh,-7 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7 p.m.,
S,Florida at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. .
Tampa Bay at Dallas,;8:30 p.m. :

Jan. 26-30 --All-Star break
Jan. 29 -All-Star game, Ottawa.
Feb. 27-Trade deadline, 3 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
: by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

S..-,. Better than
How do -- .' you did
Look? d' "., i sweeping the
S 1 i i Ibathrooms tmns


CRIBEK AI R NA5 THS5
-Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
S suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: HIS

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday Jumbles: VOCAL SORRY METRIC TRIPLE
Answer: Getting a cardio workout by dancing to disco
made them RETRO-ACTIVE


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark returns a ball to Georgia's Anna Tatishvili during their
second round match at the Australian Open tennis championship, in Melbourne, Australia,
Wednesday. ,



Wozniacki advised on how


to win majors, from a pro


By JOHN PYE
associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia
- Just the mention of
Rory Mcllroy's name elic-
ited a smile from Caroline
Wozniacki.
The top-ranked Dane
advanced to the third round
at the Australian Open on
Wednesday. and there were
still three women in the
field who had a chance of
replacing her at the top
of 'the women's rankings.'
But instead of the usual
questions about how she
plans to end her drought at
Grand Slam tournaments,
she was asked if her boy-
friend might be able to help
her win her first major.. ,.
She smiled, paused, then
relayed some of the advice
Mcllroy offered that helped
him overcome similar pres-
sure and win a golf major.
"Well, it's just about you
can't really do anything
about the past," Wozniacki
said. "You just need to look
forward. You have a tourna-
ment now, and you want to
do the best you can. That's
it.
'"Then if it goes well, it's


ACROSS
1 Tooth-fillers'
org.
4 Pitcher
8 Bonny miss .
12 Felt boot
13 El -, Texas
14 Rainbow
goddess
15 To the point
17 Air duct
18 Slow to
understand
19 "Alfie" star
21 Drapery
supports
23 Make like a
beaver
24 Made cookies
27 Type of
synthesizer
29 Rink surface
30 Sevareid of
the news
32 Prune
36 Block
brand
38 Low voice
40 APB datum
41 fixe


great. If not, you have the
next one. It's like tennis.",
Also Wednesday, sec-
ond-ranked Rafael Nadal
advanced without much
trouble from his injured
right knee or from German
veteran Tommy Haas in a
6-4, 6-3, 6-4 win. Four-time:
champion Roger Federer
didn't even need to pick up
a racket because Andreas
Beck withdrew from their
second-round match.
The top-ranked American
man bowed out when No. 8
Mardy Fish lost to Alejandro
Falla of Colombia 7-6 (4),
6-3, 7-6 (6). But No. 16 John
Isner survived a five-setter
to beat former Wimbledon
finalist David Nalbandian.
.who was enraged by an.
umpire who didn't allow
him to challenge a disputed
line call because he took too
long to ask for a review.
Mclroy was considered a
major golf talent on the cusp
of a breakthrough when he
blew a four-stroke lead and
lost last year's Masters. He
handled it with such humility
that it didn't surprise anyone"
when he rebounded to win
the U.S. Open two months
later, when he was 22.


43 Written in the
stars
45 Mr. Lugosi
47 Foolish ,
49 Arrowhead
material
51 Crystal-filled
rocks
55 -eyed
56 Forever
58 Seance
sounds
59 Compos
mentis
60 FedEx truck
61 Proofreading
'mark -
62 Warty critter
63 Stopped for
lunch

DOWN
1 Lhasa -
2 Paint hastily
3 CPA's record
4 Part of a
serial
5 Ebbed
6 PC button


Wozniacki has been on
the precipice, losing the
2009 U.S. Open final. Since
then, she's held the year-
end No. 1 ranking twice but
never returned to a champi-
onship match. Meanwhile,
she's struck up a relation-
ship with the golfer from
Northern Ireland.
The 21-year-old Dane has
taken up golf, to learn more
about the game that she
says is more about beat-
ing the course than other
players.
"Of course, you can learn
a lot, because when you're
leading or if you have a
putt, you know, you make
it nine out of 10 times in
practice, but it can be really
, difficult" she said. "It's just
a good way to learn the
mental' state of things in
their game as well, and in a
way to also,try to get some
of it over to the tennis."
After racing through the
first set in 28 minutes, she
had some tough moments
in a second-set battle but
remained composed. to
beat Anna Tatishvili 6-1,
7-6 (4). Because of the heat,
Wozniacki sat with a bag of
ice on her head to cool off.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


U FF FIMO P AS T
SHUI AGA LAOS
TOM E iNESTEGGS






IAN WEIS ABOS


ER NE

MT SREMB LE TAS L
E | A T. MED ESTA
SMS WE EDEEP


Cadet's org.
Occupations
Place for a
rodeo
Tendon
Former JFK
arrival


16 Antidote
20 Historian's
word
22 Seemed
pleased
24 Keane of
"The Family
Circus"
25 Poker card
26 Beer barrel
28 Autumn mo.
31 Charlotte -
of "Bananas"
33 "Unforgettable"
singer
34 1950s prez
35 Water lily leaf
37 Most
unctuous
39 Volunteered
42 Mr. Rather
44 Like - of
bricks
45 Musical key
(2 wds.)
46 Wed on the
run
S48 Booster
rocket
50 Semester
ender
52 Prima donna
53 Coup d'-
54 New Year's
Eve word
55 Almost grads
57 Chinese
"way"


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012 3B


DILBERT


I EXPECTED YOU TO
QUIT AFTER YOU GOT
YOUR BILLION-DOLLAR
DISCRIMINATION
SETTLEMENT.


BLONDIE
NOLO ON, I/" ALL PIGiT,
I'M GOING BUT HURRY,
TO PUT D\ AEAR,
YOU ON TOOTSIE'S
SPEAKEPPHONE WAITING
FOR ME







BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Woman who needs a hug

urged to reach out to others


i JUST BECAUSE I'M LAZY
AND UNSCRUPULOUS,
WHY WOULD YOU
S ASSUME ITM ALSO A
. OUTTTER?


. OF_

2 imii


I DON'T
I... KNOW HOW
UMA... YOU LOOK AT
YOURSELF IN
THE MIRROR.
-f --_


m


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Pick your battles. Stay
active and p'turue your,
goals. A challenge will help
you redirect your energy
and focus on something
worthwhile. Arguing will be
a wasteof time. Offer your
experience and know-how
to those in need. ***** .
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Invest in you and your
goals, not in someone else
or in something that will
not benefit you person-
ally. Be careful not to let
anyone take advantage of
you emotionally or finan-
cially. Put your energy into
advancement and recogni-
tion. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Look over your person-
al papers and take care of
important correspondence.
Learning a new skill or
expanding your knowledge
will help you get ahead.
Discipline will enable you
to complete an unfinished
project. Relationship prob-
lems will surface. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't mix business with
pleasure. Someone you like
will try to use you to get
ahead. Offer suggestions,
but don't promote some-
one or something unless
you truly believe in the out-
come. Conversations can
lead to good fortune. Focus
on home and family. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (Jtuly 23-Aug. 22):
You willa~~spireF t great
heights if you change your
environment. A short trip
or visiting someone who
has something to offer you
will give you a different per-
spective regarding the pos-
sibilities that exist. Think
big, but don't overstep your
financial limits. *****
VIRGO. (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Get out and try some-
-thing new. Surround your-
self with people who share
your curiosity. Avoid emo-
tional situations at home or
with a partner who doesn't
see things your way. You
might want to re-evaluate
your life and relationships.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Enjoy the company of
friends who like to try new
things. A little adventure or
a. trip will keep you away
from-the responsibilities at
home that are getting you
down. Take a break from
your everyday routine.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): The time and effortyou
put into helping someone
will lead to knowledge that
will allow advancement in
other ways. Working elec-
tronically to reach a wider
variety of clients is appar-


ent. Expand your business
interests. ***
SAGITIARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Emotional' mat-
terswill escilate.!Av6id any
sort of situation that might
lead to verbal or physi-
cal abuse. Know when to
step back and move on. A
change at home will do you
good and help you consider
better options. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Someone from
your past may cause a prob-
lem for you now. Don't give
in to threats or blackmail.
Back away from anyone
trying to get something
from you. Take control and
you will avoid a situation
that could turn ugly. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): A change of plans will
work in your favor. Look at
job opportunities and how
you can tie in what you
know and the experience
you have in other fields
that interest you. Raising
your income should be the
deciding factor. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Stick to what you can
do, not what you cannot
Worry will only lead to
emotional turmoil and poor
judgment. Offer assistance
to someone who can con-
tribute to your future goals.
What you put in, you will
get back. **


CELEBRITY'CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY Y'S CLUE: Z equals A
"MSR WZJY YGYLFYD? ESST,. KWZK

LYZGD MSR'JY DKSST RO CSV

DSLYKWFGE, DSLYKFLY FG MSRV

AFCY." BFGDKSG HWRVHWFAA

Previous Solution: "Arguably, no artist grows up: If he sheds the perceptions of
childhood, he ceases being an artist." Ned Rorem
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-19


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


DEAR ABBY: May I
respond to "Iowa Reader"
(Nov. 10), the older woman
who asked you where to
turn when she needed to
be hugged and listened to?
I'm guessing she was mar-
ried a long time and doesn't
have any real friends just
people from her married
days.
I suggest she get a dog.
While dogs can't hug or
hold, they do love uncon-
ditionally. A dog is always
happy to be with you, and
will listen even though it
can't talk back. I would
have died of loneliness
had it not been for mine.
Through her, I have met
other older single people
on walks and at the dog
park. She has given me a
way to make new friends
and find some company. -
- MARCY IN OAKLAND,
CALIE
DEAR MARCY: Thanks
for your suggestion. I
promised "Iowa Reader"
that if other readers shared
ideas I would pass them
along. Because of you and
other compassionate read-
ers, I received a wide range
of heartfelt, helpful advice.
My newspaper readers
comment*
DEAR ABBY: I discov-
ered a wonderful way to
receive much-needed
human contact partner
dancing. I started with the
Argentine tango, which
might be a bit too much
for some folks, but I have
learned to absolutely love
it. It's a safe way to enjoy
an.intimate connection with


be touched, nurtured and
encouraged to speak about
anything on her mind. It's
my job to not only make
her feel safe and healthy
physically; but emotionally
as well. HUGS FROM
MAINE
. DEAR ABBY:
Volunteering to rock and
cuddle low-birth-weight
babies puts one in an envi-
ronment where personal
problems matter less.
Brushing and petting dogs
and cats at the SPCA can
provide meaningful interac-
tion because socialized ani-
mals are more likely to be
adopted. There are poetry
and writing groups, peer-to-
peer counseling at her Area
Agency on Aging, and "con-
tact" sports like pingpong.
Abby, I once read in your
column, "The best way to
have a friend is to be one."
To not overburden any one
friend, some conversations
are best done with God. -
RACHELL.
DEAR ABBY: I encour-
age her to offer to tutor or
read to kids at her local ele-
mentary school, visit resi-
dents at a nursing home or
work at a homeless shelter.
There are 16ts of others
out there who need hugs
and attention. Volunteers
receive far more than
they give. DIANNE IN
GAINESVILLE, FLA.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


AlISY, HONEY,
EAT VOUR (. ...
DINNER FOR
MOMMYY! c T'
YUM! VUM!



ro
ji


HERE YA GO, MISTOPHER, HAVE
S NE'A'MINE !! HECK, TAKE A


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
a member of the opposite
sex, no strings attached.
It takes time to master
the skills, but if you stick
with it you'll find a commu-
nity that shares a passion
for a skill .that's challeng-
ing and rewarding. Less-
intimate forms of partner
dance include swing, salsa
and country dancing. If'
you love music and move-
ment, and could use some
exercise, I highly recom-
mend it. CATHERINE IN
HAWAII
DEAR ABBY: I was faced
with the same situation
when my husband passed
away. I joined a Sunday
school and found what I
needed. Often, the only
hugs I get are from people
in our.group.
Others have also utilized
their hobbies to reach out
to people. We go on' out-
ings, and I have made many
"huggable" friends. I urge
"Iowa Reader" to visit plac-
es of worship and find one
that has an active senior
adult ministry. JO ANN
IN ARLINGTON, TEXAS
DEAR ABBY: I have
been a licensed massage
therapist for 20 years. I sug-
gest "Iowa Reader" seek out
one. During her hour on
the massage table she will














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advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws'
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.


www.akeityrcreportcr.com


One tHem pi ad )
4 lines 6 days! ':' .1"""'

%;




One ilem per ad
4 lines 6 days,

\^~~ ~ .-'1'^^^';':: ^


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 11-258-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF ROGER K.
SESSLER
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ROGER K. SESSLER, deceased,
whose date of death was October 22,
2011, is pending in the circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is Post Office Box 2069, Lake City,
Florida 32056-2069. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attomey are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is January 10, 2012.
By:/s/ H. Adam Airth, Jr., LL.M.
Attorney for Personal Representative
Florida Bar No. 0097640
Putnam, Creighton & Airth, P.A.
500 South Florida Avenue, Suite 300
Lakeland, Florida 33801
Telephone: (863)682-1178
By:/s/ LISBETH S. TUGGLE, Per-
sonal Representative
'435 SW Ridge Street
Lake City, Florida 32024

05529901
January 12, 19, 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.: 11-248-CP
Division:
IN RE: ESTATE OF KELTON
FICKLIN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
KELTON FICKLIN, deceased,
whose date of death was July 9,
2011; is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division; File Number 11-248-
CP; the mailing address of which is
P.O. Box 2069, Lake City, Florida
32056. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate and
other persons, who have claims or
demands against decedent's estate,-
including unmatured or unliquidated
claims, and who have been served a
copy of this notice, must file their
claims with this court ON OR BE-
FORE THE LATER OF THE DATE
THAT IS THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
A PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons who have claims
or demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS JANU-
ARY 19, 2012
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ MARLA E. CHAVERNAY,
ESQ.
Law Office of George R, Brezina, Jr.
PA.
1915 N. Dald Mabry Highway Suite
300
TAMPA, FL 33607
Telephone: (813)870-0500
Facsimile: (913)873-0500
Florida Bar No.: 143138
Personal Representative
By:/s/JOYCE FICKLIN
184 S.W. TALL PINE COURT "
LAKE CITY, FL 32024

05528862
January 19, 26, 2012




386.755.5W


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO; 11-312-CA
DIVISION:
21ST MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION, etc.,
Plaintiff
Vs.
JOSE TRIGUEIRO, et al.,
Defendants
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION
45.031(1), FLORIDA STATUTES
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE is hereby given that pur-
suant to the Final Judgment entered
on January 3, 2012, in Case No: 11-
312-CA of the Circuit Court, Colum-
bia County, Florida, in which 21st
Mortgage Corporation is Plhintiff
and Jose Trigueiro et al.1 are the de-
fendants, the Clerk of this Court will
sell at public sale the following de-
scribed real property:
Exhibit A
Parcel 21A, Pine Acres, an unrecord-
ed subdivision in Section 31, Town-
ship 5 South, Range 16 East, Colum-
bia County, Florida, being more par-
ticularly described as follows:
Commence at the Southeast comer
of the West 1/2 of Section 31, Town-
ship 5 South, Range 16 East, Colum-
bia County, Florida, and run thence
North 89"18'21" East, along the
South line of said Section 31, 248.36
feet; thence North 00'24'47" West,
2855.45 feet; thence South
89*19'13" West, 678.94 feet to the
Point of Beginning; thence South
00'24'47" East, 685:42 feet; thence
South 89'19'13" West, 543.39 feet;
thence North 08'00'23" West, 488.72
feet; thence North 00'.24'47" West,
317.20 feet; thence South 79'49'18"
East, 618.50 feet to the Point of Be-
ginning.
Said lands being subject to an ease-
ment for ingress and egress 60 feet
East and West in the Northeast cor-
ner thereof, being more particularly
described as follows: A strip of land
60 feet in width being 30 feet each
side of a centerline described as fol-
lows:
Commence at the Southwest comer
of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 31,
Township 5 South, Range 16 East,
Columbia County, Florida, and run
thence North 89"18'21" East, along
the South line of said Section 31,
248.36 feet; thence North 00'24'47"
West, 45.30 feet to the North right-
of-way line of Faulkner Road and to
the Point of Beginning; thence con-
tinue North 00"24'47" West, 995.51
feet to Reference Point "A"; thence
continue North 00'24'47" West,
382.03 feet to Reference Point "B";
thence continue North 00'24'47"
West, 654.42 feet to Reference Point
"C"; thence -continue North
00"24'47"'Wesi,52t.44: feet 'to Ref-'
erence Point "D"; thence continue
North 00'24'47" West, 257.74 feet
to Reference Point "E"; thence con-
tinue Northr 00'24'47" West, 582.65
feet to the South line of Pine Haven
Subdivision, a subdivision according
to the plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 6, Pages 138 and 139, of the
Public Records of Columbia County,
Florida, and to the Point of Termina-
tion. Said Point of Termination being
also the Southerly terminus of Pine
Haven Lane in said subdivision. Al-
so, begin at Reference Point "A" and
run thence North 89'18'56" East,
873.80 feet to the Point of Termina-
tion. Also, begin at Reference Point
"B" and run thence South 89'19'13"
West, 648.40 feet to the Point of Ter-
mination. Also, begin at Reference
Point "C" and thence run North
8918'56" East, 869.03 feet to the
Point of Termination. Also begin at
Reference Point "D" and run thence
North 89"18'56" East, 690.60 feet to
the Point pf Termination. Also, begin
at Reference Point "E" and run
thence South 89"19'13" West,
738.94 feet to the Point of Termina-
tion.
TOGETHER WITH a 1999 SOUT
mobile home, title nos. 75334671,
75334665 and 75334668.
These Mobile Home titles will be re-
tired with the Florida Dept. of Motor
Vehicles according to Florida Statute
Section 319.261 and hereafter al-
ways a part of this real property.

The sale will be held on February 8,
2012, at 11:00' a.m. to the highest
and best bidder for cash, at the front
steps of the Columbia County Court-
house, 173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake'
City, Florida, in accordance with
Chapter 45, Florida Statutes.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation to
participate in this proceeding, you
are entitled at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance.
Please contact ADA Coordinator,
173 NE Hernando Ave., Lake City,
Florida 32055 (386) 719-7428 at
least 7 days before you scheduled
court appearance, or immediately
upon receiving this notification if the
time before the scheduled appear-
ance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
Dated this 4th day of January 2012.
P. DeWITY CASON
CLERK OF SAID COURT
By: -s- B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
SEAL
Lance P. Cohen
1912 Hamilton St., Suite 206
Jacksonville, FL 32210
904/388-6500
Attorney for Plaintiff

05530015
January 19, 26, 2012


0 f-^ .,, C


8771(TDD) or 1-800-955-8770(V),
via Florida Relay Service.

05530136
January 19. 26, 2012
February 2, 9, 2012


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO: 12-08-DR
Norman Banks Ducre, Sr.
AND
Carol Ducre
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSO-
LUTION OF MARRIAGE
TO: Carol Ducre
ADDRESS: 196 Lily Street, Sacra-
mento, California
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
has been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
Norman Banks Ducre, Sr. whose ad-
dress is 428 NW Columbia Avenue,
Lake City, Florida 32055 on or be-
fore 02-13-2012, and file the original
with the clerk of'this Court at 173
NE Hemando, Lake City, FL 32055
before service on Petitioner or imme-
diately thereafter. If you fail to do so,
default may be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion.
The action is asking the court to de-
cide how the following real or per-
sonal property should be divided:
NONE
Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's of-
fice. You may review these docu-
ments upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of Court's
office notified of your current ad-
dress. (You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit
will be mailed to the address on re-
cord at the clerk's office.

WARNING:
Rule 12..285, Florida Family Law
Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents
and information. Failure to comply
can result in sanctions, including dis-
missal or striking of pleadings.

Dated January 9, 2012
By:/s/ Sol. S. Rodriguez, Deputy
Clerk

05530002
January 12, 19, 26, 2012,
February 2, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NUMBER: 11-309-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF ESTATE OF
S. AUSTIN PEELE
ALSO KNOWN AS SHULER AUS-
TIN PEELE,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The name of the Decedent, the desig-
nation of the court in which adminis-
tration of this estate ii pending, and
the file number are indicated above.
The address of the court is Post Of-
fice Box 2069, Lake City, Florida
32056-2069. The name and address
of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are
indicated below.
If you have been served with a copy
of this notice and you have any claim
or demand against the Decedent's es-
tate, even if that claim is unmatured,
contingent, or unliquidated, you must
file your claim with the court ON
OR BEFORE THE LATER OF A
DATE THAT IS 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER YOU RE-
CEIVE A COPY OF THIS NOTICE.
All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons who have claims or de-
mands against the Decedent's estate,
including-unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
EVEN IF A CLAIM IS NOT BAR-
RED BY THE LIMITATIONS DE-
SCRIBED ABOVE, ALL CLAIMS
WHICH HAVE NOT BEEN FILED
WILL BE BARRED TWO YEARS
AFTER DECEDENT'S DEATH.
The date of death of the Decedent is
November 20, 2011.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: January 12, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representative
DARBY & PEELE
HERBERT F. DARBY
Florida Bar No. 0017901
285 Northeast Hemando Avenue
Post Office Drawer 1707
Lake City, Florida 32056-1707
Telephone: 1-386-752-4120
Personal Representative
BY:/S/ FREDDA T. PEELE
1500 SE Valencia Drive
Lake City, Florida 32025

05530025
January 12, 19, 2012
NOTICE OF ACTION
BEFORE THE BOARD OF NURS-
ING
IN RE: The license to practice nurs-
ing of
Johnathan Ivan Lynn, R.N.
4299 SW Carpenter Road
Lake City, Florida 32024
CASE NO.: 2011-13951
LICENSE NO.: RN 9235701
The Department of Health has filed
an Administrative Complaint against
you, a copy of which may be ob-
tained by contacting, Casey Cowan,
Assistant General Counsel, Prosecu-
tion Services Unit, 4052 Bald Cy-
press Way, Bin #C65, Tallahassee
Florida 32399-3265, (850) 245-4640
If no contact has been made by you
concerning the above by March 1,
2012, the matter of the Administra-
tive Complaint will be presented at
an ensuing meeting of the Board of
Nursing an informal proceeding.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the individual or agency
sending this notice not later than sev-
en days prior to the proceeding at the
address given on the notice. Tele-
phone: (850) 245-4640, 1-800-955-


Legal

Public Auction
Lake Jeffery U-Store-It
Auction for Friday Jan. 27, 2012 at
9:00 am
Location: 1433 NW Lake Jeffery Rd
Lake City, Fl 32055
386 365-4091
386 397-3306
Quentin Brunell E-2
Pebbles Young C-18, 19
Lashelle Young C-10
Bemice Young A-26 & C-23
Tiesha Williams D-7 & D-9
Ariel Walker F-3
Edith Tucker D-12 D-13
Josephine Cristiano A-27
Donnie Jemigan B-12
Tashisha Jones A-28
Brian Cribbs D-11

05530141
January 19, 21, 24, 2012


020 Lost & Found

Lost small 6-year old beagle,
responds to Maggie. Went missing
from Defender Dr in Lake City on
1/14/2012. She is tri-colored, but
is mostly black, has a lazy left eye
and a small cyst on her right rear
hip. Reward offered, please call
386-752-5773.

100 Job
Opportunities

05530168
Field Equipment Mechanic
Anderson Columbia is accepting
applications for a field
equipment mechanic. Prefer
someone with own tools. A
valid drivers license is required.
Please apply in person at
Anderson Columbia, 871 NW
Guerdon Road, Lake City, FL
32055. Please call 386-752-7585
for directions if needed.
We are an Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

Gateway Baptist Church is
accepting apps for paid nursery.
workers. Must be at least 18 yoa &
pass a background ck. Must be
available Sun mornings & eve-
nings, Wed. evenings & for other
events as needed. Aps available at
3252 SW ST Rd. 247, LC or email
gatewaychurch@bellsouth.net.
Janitorial Service needs
responsible person to work
nights. Must have own
transportation references and clean
background. 386-984-0530
12 Temporary Farm W..,rl .r,
Needtid Mahan Farms -
Lexington, KY. Perform all duties
of Tobacco, Straw/Hay, Row
Crop, and Sod Production &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/07/2012 12/31/2012.
Wage of $9.38/hr. Worker
guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to non
commuting workers. Transporta-
tion & subsistence reimbursed
when 50% of contract is met.
Apply for this job at the nearest
Florida One Stop Career Center or
call 386-755-9026 and reference
job order #KY0442743.
MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
Needed: Commercial Cloth cutter
for gun cases, related items &
other miscellaneous work.
Hafners 386-755-6481
OTR Class A driver wanted.
Good pay, Volvo trucks. Go to
www.TravaBros.com under
section drivers and submit your
info. No calls please.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Wee Care of Columbia City
is hiring CDA After school Teach-
ers. 20-35 hrs per week. Experi-
ence required. Apply in person.
4 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. Wilsons Cedar Point
Farms, LLC Nancy, KY.
Perform all duties of Vegetable
Production including Plant, Set,
Weed, Harvest, & Pack &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/12/2012- 11/30/2012.
Wage of $9.38/hr. Worker guaran-
teed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided to non commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed when 50%
of contract is met. Apply for this
job at the nearest Florida One Stop
Career Center or call
386-755-9026 and reference job
order #KY0443767.

120 Medical
Employment

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.


0553---0 460 Firewood
Medical Assistant
Several years of exp as a FIREWOO
medical assistant required. Cut to order and d
Email: mafaisal05(@)yahoo.com 1/2 cord $75
or fax to: 386-758-5987 386-243-1977 or 7


D:
delivered.
.00
'52-3771


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Lake City Reporter


FIDl~llll


I


J .' -__.7-~I


120 Medical
120 dEmployment

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resume to P.O. Box
805 Lake City, Florida 32056

240 Schools &
240 Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

2 FEMALE 8 moth old
Rottweiler/Bullmastiff pups.
CKC. Parent on site. FREE to
Good Home. 386-984-6796
German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

4 BURNER stainless steel
gas range. Less than
3 yrs old. $400.
386-205-7713
Whirlpool, side by side,
refrigerator. Black with ice maker,
water & ice dispenser.
-$-300e-obo-386-365-5173 -


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Brown Resin Wicker
Glider & Chair with cushions.
Steel frame. Like new. $125.
386-754-4094
Swivel Patio chair
$25.00
386-344-4987


413 Musical
4 Merchandise

NEW Guitar Estaban
Small Amp. Hard case. Stand.
$200.00
386-719-4819


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. Jan 21 8-1. 247 to Upchurch,
follow signs. TV, DVD player,
shelves, collectible tins, computer
and much more.


440 Miscellaneous

7000 WATT Troybilt generator
10,000 watt surge. new in 2011
$750.00
386-205-7713
Total Gym
with attachments
$250.00
call 386-623-3202

450 Good Things
to Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896













LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012


460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.


463 Building
Materials
4 sheets 1/2" plywood
12 pcs. 2"x 4"
$50.00 takes all.'
386-344-4987

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3/2 partially furnished MH
fenced 15 ac. in Suwannee Coun-
ty. SOme farm and animal main-
tance exp, desirable. Terms neg.
386-454-7139 or 305-216-9893
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
3BR/2BA SWMH on 1 acre in
Ellisville. Private lot
$460. mo 1st, last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452.

4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Beautiful Main-
tained DWMH, 5br/2ba on 1/2
acre. 12X24 workshop, fenced
.$105,000. MLS 77064
Hallmark Real Estate
4/3 DW w/14X76' porch on 5 ac.
in Ellisville area. 2 carports,
storage, fenced pasture. $99,900
#78295 Ginger Parker 365-2135
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Bank Repol! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Dealer in NW Florida Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating THEIR Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived inr 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, l.st Serve.
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery,' set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737


ROYALS HOMES I
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Affordable Lg. Home on 2 ac.,
being sold as is $59,900
MLS 74862 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent









2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2br/lba duplex, NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi-
cient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
Sewer. 1/1 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave..
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt; located 1/2
mi from V.A.,& Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Rental in 55+ neighborhood.
2 bedroom/1 bath Duplex across
from Clubhouse. No Pets.
Call Denise.@ 386-752-5290
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-315-2509 or 965-5560
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99.-Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
"we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. PetFriendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

S72 Furnished Apts:
I7v For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135;
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
J Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
2BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$450 mo.
386-752-0335
Monday -Friday 8A-4P


3/2 Brick Home, fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent w/option tb
purchase available. 386-752-5035
*X 3114 7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225


4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
4BR/2BA. Lake Access.
on 8 acres
$1,000 mo.
Call 386-752-3066
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494


730 fHUnfurnished
730 Home For Rent
NICE 3BR/2.5BA in Russwood
S/D $995. mo. $750 security.
Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locatidns
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1100sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya-Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
REALTY, INC.
MLS#76668 Buildable lot.
High and dry.
Call Denise @386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

Hallmark Real Estate
A home for all seasons. Lg patio,
fireplace. 4/2 brick & cedar.
Just reduced $20,000 #71691
Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Just Listed. 3/2 on a Terraced hill.
Brick w/fenced yard. All applian-
ces. Owner Financed offered.
'#79683 Janet Creel 386-719-0382
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
In town, 3/2 Concrete Block home,
fenced yard. $149, 900
MLS 71999, Elaine Tolar
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D.
$129,900 New AC in 2010.
Elaine K. Tolar. 755-6488'
MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Wonderful home on Lake. 4/3
Fireplace, many upgrades. MLS
76085, Elaine Tolar 755-6488 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Close to town. 2br/2ba, wood lam-
inate floors. Vaulted ceilings.
MLS 76928 $59,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & Tidy remodeled 2/2 open
floor plan. MLS# 77943
$94,500 MaryiBrown Whitehurst
386-965-0887 .
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot.
on the Suwannee.
Well & anerobic septic system.
MLS 78842 $45,000
Hallmark Real Estate '
Investor/ist time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 365-5146
Callaway S/D, 3br/2ba. Well
maintained. Fenced back yard &
double car garage. $175,000
MLS 79567 Century 21, The
Darby Rogers Co. 752-6575.
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in


High Springs. Real wood floors,
stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 79601 $178,000 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Immaculate home on 10 + acres in
Wellborn. Tile floors, fenced, barn
w/workshop. $309, 900 MLS
79650, Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent neighborhood. 4br/2ba.
2469 sqft on 1 + acres. $190,000
MLS 79654, Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 5br/4ba Custom
kitchen, screened inground pool.
Many upgrades on 5 ac. Many
extras..$385,000. MLS 79688


810 Home for Sale
COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence Vlg $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669
CYPRESS LANDING! 3BR/2BA
w/lg great room, split floor plan
& 2-car garage $105,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79634
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom/2 bath.
I car garage. Priced to sell.
Call Denise @386-752-5290

Contemporary Elegance.
MLS 79579 4br/3ba plush carpet
& so much more! 224,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 8.3 acres.
Has 14x30 workshop with electric.
MLS 79345 $199,900

NICE 3BR/2BA DWMH w/fenced
yard plus double carport &
wkshop $39,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #79078
ONLY $38,500 for 4BR/2BA
concrete block home; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
brick home newly renovated &
inground pool, fenced yard
$69,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST! Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505

820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded.
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
20 ac Wooded tract.
10 m iles from Cedar Key.
MLS 78886, $70,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
J Property
Hallmark Real Estate
Rental Investment. 4 duplexes
(8 apartments) All units are rented
and in good shape.
#69380 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate Camp-
ground/RV Park w/67 pull thrus,
cabins & mobile home. Showers,
clubhouse +2 story owner home.
#78793 Janet Creel 719-0382

860 VInvestment
OUU Property
Great Investment in city limits.
Both units occupied.
MLS 79206 $50,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT INVESTMENT
2 units w/ 2br/lba,.2 stories
w/balconies. MLS 79271,
$230,000., Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty. 386-397-3473

QOT Real Estate
870 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

951 Recreational
Vehicles
2009 39 Foot Travel Trailer,
Self Contained, 2 slides, Awning,
W/D, many extras. $23,500 OBO
Call 443-306-8710 Cell





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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 2012


Look for a Super Bowl rematch


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

Get ready for the rematch.
The Super Bowl rematch,
not the Harbaugh coaching
family reunion.
For a Super Bowl redux
to happen, the New York
Giants will need another
huge road win, this time at
San Francisco. And when
they get it Sunday, will they
face the Baltimore Ravens,
who routed them in the
2001 Super Bowl? Or New
England, which had its per-
fect record shattered by the
Giants in the big game four
years ago?

New York Giants (plus
2%) at San Francisco
It's hard to say who had
the more impressive vic-
tory last weekend. The
Giants (11-7) outplayed,
outcoached and outworked
the defending champion
Packers at Lambeau Field,
where Green Bay hadn't lost
since early last season. The
49ers showed more passing
offense than anyone imag-
ined and won a shootout
with one of the league's
most prolific offenses, the
Saints.
New York forced four
turnovers, one fewer than
San Francisco, a major fac-
tor in their games.
"We always talk about
the turnover margin and,
of course, that was huge,"
Giants coach Tom Coughlin
said. 'We were plus-3. And
we felt very much so for a
team that only had 14 turn-
overs over the course of
the entire season, that was
exceptional. They were a


team with plus-24 and really
had played from the other
side of it all year long."
The 49ers (14-3) have
played from the positive
side of it all season, too.
They were plus-28, with
a miniscule 10 giveaways
during the regular season.
So whoever protects the
ball will move closer to that
trip to Indianapolis.
These rivals have a long
history of postseason meet-
ings, including New York's
15-13 win in 1990. Most
memorable might be San
Francisco's wild 39-38 vic-
tory nine years ago after
which the league apolo-
gized to the Giants for a
botched officiating call on
the last play.
Their most recent match-
up was the 49ers' 27-20 win
at Candlestick Park on Nov.
13, the first of four straight
losses for the Giants. New
York turned it around by
winning three of its last
four regular-season games
to take the NFC East and
has gotten healthy.
"I think it probably sur-
prised a lot of people that
the Giants and the 49ers
are in the NFC champion-
ship game," Niners first-
year coach Jim Harbaugh
said. "In October and
November and September,
we were trying to win the
next game. That's where
our focus was."
The Giants nearly
pulled out that November
game, and they are vastly
improved now. With more
balance than the 49ers can
muster, they will head to
Indy.

GIANTS, 24-13


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 6, 2011 file photo, New York Giants' Eli Manning (right) is congratulated by
New England Patriots' Tom Brady after the Giants' 24-20 win in an NFL football game in
Foxborough, Mass. Brady has three Super Bowl rings, with another taken away by Manning
and the Giants in 2008. Both have their teams on course for a reprise of that memorable title
game.


Baltimore (plus 7%) at
New England

The AFC title game
shapes up as a classic match-
up of imposing offense and
immovable defense. In the


current NFL atmosphere,
with all kinds of points and
yardage records being set,
the offense has had the
edge.
That hardly means the
Ravens are incapable of


going to Foxborough and
repeating their playoff vic-
tory there in 2010. That
game was decided early
when Ray Rice burst
through a hole the size of
Cape Cod and sprinted 83


yards for a touchdown on
Baltimore's first offensive
play. The Ravens quickly
got another TD, making it
14-0 just five minutes in,
and New England never got
back in it.
Baltimore didn't get to
the Super Bowl that year
and has not despite making
the playoffs in each of Johri
Harbaugh's four seasons as
coach. Harbaugh likes the
fact that as a wild card the
last three years, the Ravens
(13-4) are no strangers to
road playoff games. j
"It helps, just by thd
fact that we've done it,'.
Harbaugh said. "Most of ou
team has been there before-
and then those young guys
can relate to the older guys
and the older guys can
share some wisdom. Bu|
it's not going to impact nec-
essarily this game, except
to the extent that our guys
have been there before and
it's certainly not going to b(
anything new for them. An
that's a good thing."
A very good thing is th
way Tom Brady played thi
season for New England (14
3). He comes off a six-touch
down passing performance
against Denver, but compare|
ing the Broncos' defense td
Baltimore's is ludicrous.
Still, Brady has a versatile
cast, led by All-Pros at tight
end (Rob Gronkowski) anq
receiver (Wes Welker), ani
his offensive line is solil
- a key against Terrell
Suggs, Haloti Ngata, RaY
Lewis and Ed Reed. The
Patriots' defensive weak-
ness is against the pass, not
an area the Ravens neces-
sarily excel at.
PATRIOTS, 27-16


Tebow played through



injuries in playoff loss


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- Tim Tebow needs more
R&R than anyone thought.
The Broncos quarterback
played through rib, lung
and chest injuries he sus-
tained in Denver's 45-10
loss at New England in the
AFC divisional playoffs last
weekend.
He won't need surgery,
is expected to make a full
recovery with some down
time and his offseason
training program shouldn't
be affected in any way.
ESPN first reported
Wednesday that Tebow got
hurt on a third-quarter tack-
le, then had trouble sleep-
ing because of the pain and
underwent an MRI on his
chest Monday.
Team spokesman Patrick
Smyth said that while he
couldn't confirm the exact
extent or nature of the inju-
ries due to team policy, he


acknowledged that Tebow
finished the game in con-
siderable pain.
Backup Brady Quinn
quickly got ready to go into
the game after Tebow was
hit by Vince Wilfork and
Rob Ninkovich, but Tebow
stayed in and finished up.
"It's just the physicality of
playing football. Sometimes
you get hit and it can hurt
a little bit. But, I wanted
to play a lot of the game,"
Tebow said after the game.
The outcome had long
been decided by the time
Tebow got hurt.
"I just wanted to show
character. You just contin-
ue to fight and it doesn't
change who you are, how
you play, how you go out
there, you should be the
same at all times," Tebow
said. "That's what I wanted
to show, it didn't matter if
it was the first play or the
last play or you were down
by 42. I was going to be the
same player."


Manning misses

practice with

stomach illness


From staff reports

EAST RUTHERFORD,
N.J. New York Giants
quarterback Eli Manning
missed part of Wednesday's
practice with an illness that
coach Tom Coughlin called
"a stomach bug, hopefully
a 24-hour deal."
Manning was placed on
the Giants' injury report
for the first time this sea-
son as a limited partici-
pant in practice, though
he missed the majority of
it. The team is preparing
to play the San Francisco


49ers on Sunday for the
NFC championship.
"If there is one guy
who can miss a practice
Wednesday mentally, it's
No. 10," guard Chris Snee
said of, Manning, who has
had his best pro season;
"He was probably in here
on Monday and Tuesday
looking at film."
Tight end Jake Ballard
figured Manning headed
right home to recuperate
- and watch film.
"He's probably going td
spend the rest of the day
doing that," Ballard said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow takes his helmet
off following an NFL divisional playoff dame against the New
England Patriots Saturday in Foxborough, Mass.


* Partnerships Income Tax Preparations
* Corporate E-file
[,,_hl~b ,,: N-J. r.['.IlI Lh -\-ciate
Frir V ai- ir; A. i ,:,I







Individual Taxes 0 Bookkeeping
Partnerships 0 Income Tax Preparations
Corporate e E-file
V 1, J, ItA k t A,




2812 South Marion Avenue
(Located across from Columbia High School)

(386) 758-9808


We Buy:
a Broken & Unwanted Gold, Silver,
and Platinum Jewelry
* Sterling Flatware & Serving Sets
a Gold & Silver Coins
* Dental Gold r' ,
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i.-iv a n 1 We Really Do

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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420