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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01753
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 17, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01753
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text











Reporter


Tuesday, January 17, 2012


ecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 298 75 cents


The dream lives on here


Local folks gather
to celebrate the
legacy of Dr. King.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. corn
When an assassin's bul-
let struck down Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. on the bal-
cony of a Memphis motel
on April 4, 1968, his legacy
had already been firmly
established.
His passionate speeches
calling for racial equality
and as end to segregation
changed the way people of
different races perceived
each other and led to laws
protecting ,the rights of
minorities and women.
King's death at St.
Joseph's Hospital at 7:06
p.m., 65 minutes after he
was shot, silenced the 39-
year-old civil rights leader's
voice forever. But the bullet
filed from assassin James
Earl Ray's rifle failed to kill
the dream.
For thousands of people
who lined the Lake City


parade route


honoring


DREAM continued on 3A


... but for

some it's

a 'blurred'

vision


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
More than four decades
ago, Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. gave a speech that shook
the conscience of the world.
King's "I Have A Dream"
speech is. tied to his legacy
as much as his organized bus
boycott, civil rights battles
and belief in faith.
Sunday afternoon, former
Columbia County resident
Bishop Russell Allen Wright
Jr., spoke of the importance
of reaffirming the dream as
part of his "A Blurry Dream"
address during the NAACP
King celebration program.
The Columbia County
NAACP Branch 28th Annual
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Observance took place
VISION continued on 3A


Early voting begins

in 5 Florida counties


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press
TAMPA Charles
Gibson didn't have to wait
long to cast his ballot for
Republican presidential
candidate Mitt Romney 6n
Monday.
He took the elevator to
the 26th floor of a down-
town county office building,
walked past a sign that said
he had a 0-minute wait to
vote and into a room where
election workers were stand-
ing around waiting for him.
In hour seven of the first
day for early voting, he and
his wife were the 21st and
22nd people to walk in.
"He's the only candi-
date that can beat Barack
Obama," said Gibson, 69, a
commercial real estate bro-
ker. "He is a Christian and
I think looks like the presi-
dent of the United States.
He has a lot of floor pres-
ence, as they would say in
basketball."
In person early vot-
ing began Monday in
Hillsborough, Hardy,


Hendry, Monroe and Collier
counties, five days ahead of
the South Carolina primary.
And while the downtown
Location was slow, more
than 1,125 people cast bal-
lots in Hillsborough on
the first day, said Travis
Abercrombie, a spokesman
for the county supervisor of
elections.
"Everything's going
extremely well,"
Abercrombie said. "We real-
ly couldn't ask for a better
opening."
A new state law shortens
the number of days early vot-
ing is allowed in Florida, but
the law isn't being applied in
five counties because of prior
racial discrimination. A fed-
eral court is deciding wheth-
er the election law changes
should be implemented state-
wide. That's why five counties
began voting and the other 62
Florida counties begin early
voting on,Saturday.
While Monday was the
first day votes were being
cast in person, thousands
of absentee ballots have
already been turned in.


Close call as tree crashes into home


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Wayne Hudson recounts how fortunate he was after a live oak tree, measuring at least 50 feet in height, split into pieces
that crashed to the ground Sunday but caused minimal damage to his home. Hudson believes tree rot weakened the
40-year-old oak. 'I'm thankful that God spared my home,' Hudson said. 'My wife and I look at it as Him showing us a sign
that He's protecting us from all dangers.'


Study: Babies try lip-reading in learning to talk


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON Babies
don't learn to talk just
from hearing sounds. New
research suggests they're
lip-readers too.
It happens during that
magical stage when a baby's
babbling gradually changes
from gibberish into syllables
and eventually into that first
"mama" or "dada."
Florida scientists discov-
ered that starting around age
6 months, babies begin shift-
ing from the intent eye gaze
of early infancy to studying
mouths when people talk to
them.
"The baby in order to imi-
tate you has to figure out
how to shape their lips to


make that particular sound
they're hearing," explains
developmental psychologist
David Lewkowicz of Florida
Atlantic University, who led
the study being published
Monday. "It's an incredibly
complex process."
Apparently it doesn't take
them too long to absorb the
movements that match basic
sounds. By their first birth-
days, babies start shifting
back to look you in the eye
again unless they hear
the unfamiliar sounds of a
foreign language. Then, they
stick with lip-reading a bit
longer.
"It's a pretty intriguing
finding," says University of
Iowa psychology professor
BABIES continued on 3A


!~-r7'- ~'a


V.-..


This undated handout photo
shows a baby, looking at a
monitor, wearing a band that
contains a little magnet that
the head-tracker, under the
monitor uses to determine
head position which, in turn,
enables the eye tracker to
find the eye and the pupil.
New research suggests
babies don't learn to talk
just from hearing sounds
- they're lip-readers, too. It
happens during that magical
stage when a baby's bab-
bling gradually changes
from gibberish into syllables
and eventually into that first
"mama" or "dada."


ASSOCIATED PRESS


CALL US:
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 4;, I 1 Fax: 752-9400
K''~s~i~~fi a wa.Sta -ias"'r~~~f'


72
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 2A


i,_ f l > O pinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
V, )0 Obituaries .............. 5A
. Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Eventful first
year for Morgan.


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Local news
roundup.


N)


12943


-










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


Celebrity Birthdays


FLORIDA"
T Saturday: IA$HI3,
9-12 17-29 3-50
x4


S 4.4


Monday:
Afternoon: 4-8-2
Evening: N/A


Monday:
Afternoon: 3-6-7-3
Evening: N/A


eznatch.
Sunday:
2-8-12-13-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Morgan has eventful 1st year at CNN


BEVERLY HILLS
After replacing Larry
King last January, it took
only 11 days for Piers
Morgan's vision of his
show to collide with real-
ity.
He was on a plane to Los Angeles
with producer Jonathan Wald and
as soon as they landed, both cell
phones were buzzing with 'news of
political upheaval in Egypt. Wald
turned to Morgan and said, "You
know, we were wondering when we
were first going to go live. Tonight's
the night"
So began an eventful year that
saw Morgan revise the format of
his prime-time show on the fly to
emphasize more live interviews,
sweat while waiting for Charlie
Sheen to arrive for a live show,'quit
"America's Got Talent" and see his
reputation dragged into a phone
hacking scandal by journalists in his.
native Britain.
Through it all, he survived.
Morgan may not have lived up to his
initial brash boasts about burying
the competition, buit he didn't fail,
either. "Piers Morgan Tonight" view-
ership was up 9 percent over King's
final year, even more among youthful,
viewers. He marks his first anniver-
sary this week with appearances by
Chelsea Handler, Rosie O'Donnell
and former President Jimmy Carter.
"It isn't as successful as I'd like it
to be," he said in a recent interview.
"I'd like to get the ratings signifi-
cantly higher, and we believe there
is a real opportunity this year to put
the foot on the gas. But am I pleased
with where we ended up after the
first year? Yeah, actually, I am."

Christie's to sell Liz
Taylor art collection
LONDON A Vincent van Gogh
landscape and other paintings 'from
the collection of Elizabeth Taylor
are up for auction in London next


ILEl


* Actress Betty White is 90.
* Hairdresser Vidal Sassoon
is 84.
* Actor James Earl Jones is
81.
* Talk show host Maury
Povich is 73.
* International Boxing Hall of
Famer Muhammad Ali is 70.
* Singer Paul Young is 56.
* Actor-comedian Steve
Harvey is 55.


* Actor-comedian Jim Carrey
is 50.
* First Lady Michelle Obama
is 48.
* Actor Naveen Andrews is
43.
* Rapper Kid Rock is 41.
* Actor Freddy Rodriguez is
37.
* Actress Zooey Deschanel
is 32.
* Singer Ray J is 31.


Daily Scripture
"So I say, walk by the Spirit, and
you will not gratify the desires
of the flesh."
Galatians 5:16


Piers Morgan, host of CNN's 'Piers Morgan Tonight,' poses for a portrait on Jan
6, 2011, in Pasadena, Calif. Morgan spoke about his former job as editor of one
of Britain's troubled tabloids at a judge-led inquiry in London into the practices of
Britain's scandal-tarred press.


month.
Christie's auc-
tion' house said 38
Works belonging

will be included in
Impressionist and
Taylor modern sales Feb. 7
and 8.
They include,van. Gogh's autumn
landscape "Vue de l'Asile et de la
Chapelle de Saint-Remy," estimated
at 5 million to 7 million pounds ($7.6
million to $11 million).


for foreclosure
'in September.
Simpson's attorneys
j .] have since filed a
motion to dismiss

Simpson bought
Simpson the four-bedroom,
Simpson four-bath house
south of downtown Miami in 2000
for $575,000. Its current assessed
value is $478,4 01.

Marvel head: Creativity


Bank foreclosing on .1. will drive comics in 201:


Simpson's Florida house
MIAMI A bank is foreclosing
on the Florida home of O.J. Simpson,
who is serving time in a Nevada pris-
on for kidnapping, armed robbery -
and other- charges. '
Miami-Dade Circuit Court records
show that JPMorgan Chase filed


PHILADELPHIA The industry
which reported modest increases
during the recent recession, is
still growing, though the level'has
tapered off, Buckley said. But it.still
remains vibrant because of the cre-
ativity engendered by new charac-
ters, reboots and a total relaunch..
' Associated Press


Thought for Today
"The only thing wrong with
immortality is that it tends to
go on forever.'!
Herb Caen,
American newspaper columnist (1916-1997)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
SS 'Circulation ........ ........755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATION '
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run.
in this space. And thanks for reading.:


Woman allegedly
strangled by child
NEW PORT RICHEY -
A Pasco County woman is
in jail on a battery charge
after police said she tried
to strangle her 71-year-old
mother. '
Jail records show
31-year-old' Kendall Gross
was being held in the. Land
O'Lakes Jail Monday on
$10,000 bond. She was
charged with battery by'
strangulation and abuse
of the elderly. It was not
immediately known if she
has an attorney.
Gross was in the.bath-.
room of the apartment
both women shared
Friday afternoon when her
mother told her several
times she needed to use
the bathroom. The ai-rest
report said her mother
opened the bathroom door
and Gross grabbed her.by
the throat. A deputy later
reported seeing red marks
on the woman's throat..

Teen critical after
being shot by boy
' EATONVILLE A
16-year-old is in critical
condition in a central
Florida hospital after
police said he was acciden-
tally shot by a 6-year-old
child.
Police said the teen was
at home playing video
games Sunday night when
he was injured. Detectives
said the boy picked up a
small handgun from the
floor because he thought it
Was a toy.
The teen was struck
in the head and taken to
Orlando Regional Medical
Center where he is on life
support

Bodies of 3 found


STHE WEATHER


PARTLY.
CLOUDY


HI LO


Playing politics in the sandbox
Mark Mason, of Team Sandtastic of Sarasota, makes final
touches to the 2012 Republication Primary Debate 'Mount
Myrtle' sand feature, located across the street from the
Sheraton Myrtle Beach Hotel and Convention Center on
Sunday in Myrtle Beach, S.C.


and two women whose
bodies were found in a
South Florida apartment.
The sheriff's office iden-
tified the victims Monday
as Natasha Plummer, 25,
and her 6-month-old son
Carlton Stringer, Jr., and
their roommate Octavia
Barnett, 21.
The three were found
dead Sunday in their apart-
ment in Lauderdale Lakes.
Barnett's 11-month-old
son was in the apartment
at'the time but was not
injured.

Child accidentally
shoots himself
JACKSONVILLE The
parents of a 3-year-old
boy who accidentally shot
himself in the shoulder
are being questioned by
Jacksonville authorities.
Authorities said the boy
got the gun from under his
parents' mattress Monday
morning. The boy was
taken to the hospital. The
extent of his injuries has
not yet been released.-


in home identified Released dolphin
LAUDERDALE LAS washes up dead
- Theo Broward Qhrifeaf'ea


Office has released the
identities of the baby boy


SANTA ROSA BEACH
- A dolphin that marine


officials said beached
itself in northwest Florida
and was later released by
bystanders washed up
dead on shore days later.
The spotted dolphin
beached itself Jan. 7 in
Santa Rosa Beach. Two
men spotted the dolphin
floating upside down in
shallow waters and guided
it back out into the Gulf of
Mexico.
Marine officials said
the dolphin washed up
in a state of advanced
decomposition on Friday.
They said dolphins end
up on a beach when they
are seriously ill or injured
and their chances of sur-
vival are slim .unless given
medical care.

4th panther found
dead this year
NAPLES A fourth
Florida panther that was
raised in captivity has died.
The panther died Friday
after being badly injured
by. another panther.
Officials said the leading
causes of panther deaths
are fights and being hit by
a car. Officials said 24 pan-
thers died last year, nine of
them by vehicles.
* Associated Press


Pensacola
71 5.0














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OF SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY
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Tallahassee Lake City. 2 55 Daytona Beach 74 52 :,r 69 J S pc
71-55 Ft. Lauderdale 79 61 pC 78 62. p:
SGCainesville Daytona Beacl Fort Myers 78 59 p: ,7 56 pc
Panama City Gainesville 7i. 42.sr, 6; J14-s
68.'56 ocala Jacksonville 6E8 sth 63 -16 .J
53 ando Cape Canaeral Key West 77 66 P.. 76 66., I,.
7 a no Cape aaeralLake City 66 3~ ',n .66-41 -
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Tampa Naples f 6 ,. p: 77 6.' pc
West Palm Beach Ocala 71 J7 sr. 69 11 -
26 60 Orlando 77 5.'r, 72,53 p.
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City 62. 4,- 'h 61 9
Ft Myers 77 Pensacola 60 37. pc 61 51 .
0 Naples Tallahassee 641 34 sn 61 JO s
76 56 Miami Tampa 5.5 12 52 s
77 64 Valdosta 6 .,6 1 h 6b 3 J
Key West, w. Palm Beach i .. pr: i5 62 pj
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JRES SUN
4 Surinse tledi, 7.27 a.n
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PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total '
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


366
42
.4 rn 15'5
20 in 1927


0.00"
0.08"
9.08"
1.71"
1.71"'


Sunnr,: I-n,


.:27 a.m
'5 ',5 o n


MOON
Moonrise today 1:48 a.m.
Moonset today 12:45 p.m.:
Moonrise tom. 2:54 a.m.
Moonset tom. 1:35 p.m.


Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb.
23 30 7 14
New First Full Last


7. I Ip 7p la 6a
Thursday Wednesday


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HIGt
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An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


V'VE, Forecasts, data and
,e h e graphics 2012 Weather
YIJl V Central, UP, Madison, WIs.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


feels hke' temperatiire
.- 'C..-. ,_-- .


AROUND FLORIDA


08 ) 7 i-5M 4


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430















BABIES: Study indicates they try lip-reading in learning to talk
Continued From Page 1A


Bob McMurray, who also
studies speech develop-
ment. The babies "know
what they need to know
about, and' they're able to
deploy their attention to
what's important at that
point in development."
The new research
appears in this week's
issue of the Proceedings
of the National Academy
of Sciences. It offers more
evidence that quality face-
time with your tot is very
important for speech devel-
opment more than, say,
turning on the latest baby
DVD.
It also begs the ques-
tion of whether babies who
turn out to have develop-
mental disorders, including
autism, learn to speak the
same way, or if they show
differences that just might
provide an early warning
sign.
Unraveling how babies
learn to speak isn't merely
a curiosity. Neuroscientists
want to know how to
encourage that process,
especially if it doesn't seem
to be happening on time.
Plus, it helps them under-
stand how the braih wires
itself early in life for learn-
ing all kinds of things.
Those coos of early infan-
cy start changing around
age 6 months, growing into
the syllables of the baby's
native language until the
first word emerges, usually


just before age 1.
A lot of research has cen-
tered on the audio side.
That sing-song speech that
parents intuitively use?
Scientists know *the pitch
attracts babies' attention,
and the rhythm exagger-
ates key sounds. Other
studies have shown that
babies who are best at dis-
tinguishing between vowel
sounds like "ah" and "ee"
shortly before their first
birthday wind up with bet-
ter vocabularies and pre-
reading skills by kinder-
garten.
But scientists have l9ng
known that babies also
look to speakers' faces for
important social cues about,
what they're hearing. Just
like adults, they're drawn
to the eyes, which convey
important nonverbal mes-
sages like the emotion con-
nected to words and where
to direct attention.
Lewkowicz went a step
further, wondering wheth-
er babies look to the lips
for cues as well, sort of
like how adults lip-read to
decipher. what someone's
saying at a noisy party.
So he and doctoral stu-
dent Amy Hansen-Tift
tested nearly 180 babies,
groups of them at ages 4, 6,
8, 10 and 12 months.
How? They shoved vid-
eos of a woman speaking
in English or Spanish to
babies of English speakers.


A gadget mounted on a soft
headband tracked where
each baby was focusing his
or her gaze and for how
long.
They found a dramatic
shift in attention: When the
speaker used English, the
4-month-olds gazed mostly
into her eyes. The 6-month-
olds spent equal amounts
of time looking at the eyes
and the mouth. The 8- and
10-month-olds studied
mostly the mouth.
At 12 months, atten-
tion started shifting back
toward the speaker's eyes.
It makes sense that at
6 months, babies begin
observing lip movement,
Lewkowicz says, because
that's about the time
babies' brains gain the abil-
ity to control their attention
rather than automatically
look toward noise.
But what happened when
these babies accustomed
to English heard Spanish?
The 12-month-olds stud-
ied the mouth longer, just
like younger babies. They
needed the extra informa-
tion to decipher the unfa-
miliar sounds.
That. fits with research
into bilingualism that
shows babies' brains fine-
tune themselves to start
distinguishing the sounds
of their native language
over other languages in the
first year of life. That's one
reason it's easier for babies


to become bilingual than
older children or adults.
But the continued lip-
reading shows the 1-year-


olds clearly still "are primed
for learning," McMurray
says.
Babies are so hard to


study that this is "a fairly
heroic data set," says Duke
University cognitive neuro-
scientist Greg Appelbaum.


DREAM: Lake City celebrates
Continued From Page 1A


King on Monday, it was an
opportunity to remember
his legacy.
The parade began
at the Department of
Transportation office on
South Marion Avenue, led
by two Lake City Police
patrol cars with sirens blar-
ing and lights flashing.
Hundreds participated in
the march along the more
than a mile-long parade
route, including public offi-
cials, bands from both high
schools and Richardson
Middle School, junior
ROTC units and church
groups from the area.
Floats were filled with
children waving signs such
as "We are the Future,"
"From the Outhouse to the
White House. The Power
of a Dream," and "We
Remember Your Labor of
Love."
Watis McNeil, of
Lake City, said Monday
was a paid holiday from
his job at the Veteran's
Administration Hospital
but he chose to watch the
parade as it passed in front


VISION: For some, the dreamhas become 'blurred'
Continued From Page 1A


of his workplace as a way to
pay tribute to King.
"I came here because of
history and pride," McNeil
said. "If we forget our her-
itage, we'll lose our soul
and what we can be in the
future."
McNeil said he has seen
great improvements since
King's death.
'We have evolved as a
society," he said. "You get
God to lead you and you'll
get to where you need to
be."
Mike Goodyear, of Lake
City, said he was watch-
ing the parade for the sec-
ond time. But it was the
first time for his 6-year-old
daughter, Nicole.
"It"s a good thing for


people to do," he said of the
parade. "It reminds every-
one what Martin Luther
King Jr. stood for."
Daphne Jones, of High
Springs, said she was happy
so many youths participat-
ed in the parade or stood
on the parade route.
She believes King, who
died when she was 2 years
old, helped people realize
that everyone, regardless
of race, has much in com-
mon.
"You take away the skin.
color and we're all the
same," Jones said. "It [the
parade] makes me think of
the entire struggle every-
one went through."


TO NN B RIT i.II. -, .i,.:.''" ,
Former Columbia County resident Bishop Russell Allen
Wright Jr. speaking Sunday on the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr.


Sunday at Trinity United
Methodist Church with
Wright, of First Providence
Community Church in
Panama City as the event's
keynote speaker.
The event, which lasted
close to two hours, was
attended by several hun-
dred people, including local
elected and appointed offi-
cials, as well as community
members and county resi-
dents.
Wright's address focused
on King's "I Have a Dream"
speech as he asked whether
it is now a blurry dream,
some 49 years after King
delivered his address in
the shadow of the Lincoln
Memorial.
"That speech challenged,
America," Wright said. "That
speech inspires not just black
people, but all people."
Wright's address fea-
tured a mixture of educa-
tion and entertainment as
he sprinkled some of his
former memories of grow-
ing up in Lake City, getting
into college and later life
experiences in his message
to the audience regarding
the importance of keeping
King's dream relevant in
today's society.
Wright said for several
weeks after he was invited
to come, he thought about
how his address to the audi-
ence would be relative to a
2012 Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. celebration.
"Dr. King's message and
his dream are just as rel-
evant today as before it's
49 years later and times
and people have changed,"
Wright said, noting there
is a generation of people
who didn't know Dr. King


or many of the other civil
rights leaders and they can't
identify with the struggle for
civil rights. "The message
for our people is that we
are not supposed to let this
dream become blurred."
Wright said the dream
fostered by Dr. King is
becoming blurred because
of the generation that did
not know the struggle, don't
know the man, his message,
his ministry or anything
about the "I Have a Dream"
speech.
"The second touch is to
go back and reaffirm the
dream so the dream can
really be effective in all of
us, the old timers and the
younger set, people that
remember Dr. King's min-
istry and those who don't
remember," he said.
Wright's older sister,
Rhonda Wright, who now
lives in Jacksonville, was
also pleased with her
brother having the honor
of coming back to the com-
munity where they grew up


and serving as the keynote
speaker for the annual MLK
celebration event
"It was an awesome expe-
rience," she said of attending
Sunday's event "Every time
I've seen him preach, he
goes just as hard on his pul-
pit as he goes on anyone's
pulpit He's a great speaker.
Our mother always told us
that we were of mixed-race,
but always know that regard-
less of what you are, you are
someone special, you can
always do something spe-
cial and I'm going to see to.
it that you'll be something
special. Those words stuck
with me."
Linda Thomas, Columbia
County NAACP first vice
president, said she liked
Wright's address with its
mixture of education .and
entertainment.
"I thought that was
great," she said. "One
thing in messages, you can


always mix entertainment
with the meat. He had a lot
of meat as far as Biblical
and expressions from
Dr. King, but the enter-
tainTent part was one of
those things that brought
the message to light. We
really appreciate him com-
ing and thank him."
Wright said it was an
extreme honor to have the
opportunity to return to
Lake City and be the key-
note speaker in the annual
NAACP event.
"It's an extreme honor
for me because anytime
your home community
invites you to come back
they have made an impact
on you," he said. "Of
course, you have made
an impact on them. That's
something more valuable
than any money that could
be given."


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----


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428














OPINION


Tuesday, January 17, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


A lean,

but not

mean,

gov't.

president Barack
Obama has glad-
dened hearts all
along Massachusetts
Avenue,
Washington's Think Tank Row,
where shelves bulge with pro-
posals and white papers, most
of them rather well thought
out, for streamlining the federal
government and making it, as
Obama says he wants, effective
and lean.
Obama says he will ask
Congress to give him author-
ity to consolidate government
agencies, with the prerequisite
that resulting mergers would
save money and shrink the gov-
ernment.
President Ronald Reagan
had this authority, but the
Democrats controlling
Congress didn't trust him
to use it and the authority
was allowed to lapse. House
Republicans are unlikely to
restore the same authority to a
Democratic president.
Obama's initial proposal
would be to consolidate into
one agency Commerce's busi-
ness and trade functions,
the Office of the U.S. Trade
Representative, the Small .
Business Administration,
the Export-Import Bank, the
Overseas Private Investment
Corporation and the.Trade and
Development Agency.
Doing so, the president said,
would i'ave $3 billion over 10
years and trim 1,000 to 2,000
jobs through attrition. On
paper, the idea makes sense
because the targeted agencies
have overlapping functions, but
a common goal of improving
business here and abroad.
Obama's biggest obstacle is
not likely to be partisanship but
a simple question of perks and
.power: Each one of those agen-
cies represents the domain of a
congressional committee, and
each one of their various units
and administrations the domain
of a subcommittee.
Presidents mess with con-
gressional prerogatives at their
peril. Plenty of think tanks will
attest to that.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission 'will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilsbn, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should riot exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
arid guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


e hear a lot
about farmwork-
ers' low wages,
their poor hous-
ing and the
anti-immigrant movement that
has frightened many. But we
rarely hear about another seri-
ous problem farmworkers face;
widespread exposure to pesti-
cides on the job.
Jeannie Economos, the
pesticide coordinator for the
Farmworker Association of
Florida in Apopka, sees this
problem firsthand every day. She
told me about a Mexican woman
who walked into the association's
office one recent afternoon. Her
entire face was swollen, her eyes
almost shut The woman was
certain she had been exposed to
pesticides in the plant nursery
where she worked.
She said a doctor had pre-
scribed a steroid-based cream
for her face, but she did not
want to use a steroid for what
she believed was pesticide
exposure. Economos, who has
handled such cases for 11 years,
asked the woman to file an offi-
cial complaint about.the incident
with the Florida Department
. of Agriculture and Consumer
Services.
The woman did not file the
complaint because she was
afraid of being labeled a trouble-
maker and losing her job even
though she was a legal U.S.
resident. Instead, she bought
an over-the-counter cream that
gave some relief. She returned
to work without receiving prop-
er medical treatment.
Her predicament is all too
familiar to farmworker advo-
cates in Florida, which has a
year-round average of 300,000
agricultural workers.
'There are significant and
very disturbing problems
related to farmworkers and
pesticide exposure," Economos
said. "One problem is that the
current harsh and ugly anti-
immigrant sentiment around
the country and the severe
anti-immigrant laws recently
enacted in Georgia and Alabama


LETTERS


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.comrn


have made farmworkers more
afraid than ever to come for-
ward when there are violations
of regulations in the workplace
and/or when they are experi-
encing symptoms of pesticide
exposure."
Economos said Florida's
heavy use of certain toxic chem-
icals puts farmworkers at high
risk of exposure. The state's hot
and humid climate and the long
nine-month growing season
make working conditions in the
fields and greenhouses especial-
ly dangerous. Several studies
have linked specific pesticides
to thyroid cancer, attention
deficit hyperactivity disorder in
children and birth defects.'
In 2002 and 2003, -for exam-
ple, three children of farmwork-
ers were born with severe birth
defects in Immokalee. The
births occurred about six weeks
apart and in the same area.
Evidence showed the parents
had been exposed to newly
sprayed pesticides. Plant City-
based Ag-Mart, the employer
involved, settled out of court
with,the couple whose baby was
born with no limbs. The amount
was said to be in the millions.
Few such dramatic cases have
been in the news since, but the
.dangers have not gone away.
Florida's lax enforcement of
federal pesticide regulations
greatly concerns farmworker
advocates. "By last count, there
were over 40,000 agricultural
operations in Florida and only
40 inspectors statewide to moni-
tor and enforce' regulations on
all the agricultural operations
in the state," Economos said.
"More inspectors are needed to
do better monitoring, inspection
and enforcement Even on farms


where there is enforcement when
violations are fund, the penalty
is often just a warning."
Another problem is that few
laborers are trained to under-
stand the effects of the pesti-
cides in their workplaces. The
major reason: Farmworkers
are not covered under ftle
National Labor Relations Act.
And because Florida is a right-
to-work state, farmworkers have
difficulty forming unions to
protect their interests. As such,
they lack a legal right to know
which pesticides they come in
contact with.
"The Worker Protection
Standards require that work;
ers receive a pesticide training
every five years," Economos said.
"We feel that workers should be
trained every year to impress
upon them the seriousness of the
conditions in which they work.
We have had workers tell us that
a crew leader will ask them to
sign or initial a paper to show that
they had received the training
without actually giving the trainm-
ing to them."
Growers also are required to
train workers within the first
five days of beginning the job.
This is a dangerous practice,
because laborers can be on the
job for up to five days before
learning how to protect them-
selves from pesticide exposure,
Economos said.
Advocates argue that because
farmworkers do not have politi-
cal and economic clout in state-
houses and the nation's capit,1,.
they remain invisible in spite
of the essential work they do -
work that no one else will do.
"Unless you are able to be
totally self-sufficient and grow
your own food, you are probably
dependent on farmworkers for
the food you eat," Economos
said. "How many people realize
that? Farmworkers deserve the
same rights and protections the
rest of us take for granted."

* Bill Maxwell is a columnist
and editorial writer for the
St. Petersburg Times.


TO THE EDITOR


Thanks for doing the right thing


To the Editor:

We all hope that we would do
the 'right' thing when faced with
an issue. Ms. Heather Jones
from Ft. White proved she will.
Lake City/Ft. White and
Columbia County are lucky to
have such a wonderful person
as a resident After spend-
ing the night at my parents'
house in Ft. White on the 29th
of December, I drove away
accidentally leaving my iPad
on top my car. It wasn't until
I was almost home before I
realized my mistake and sent
my mother scrambling to SR47
to see if she could locate the
iPad. Unfortunately, all she


cound find were thousands of
plastic pieces and no iPad. I'
had accepted the fact that my
carelessness had led to a disas-
terous end.
It was much to my surprise
and excitement to receive a
phone call two weeks later from
Ms. Heather Jones stating that
while she was riding her horse
down SR47 she had located my
iPad and that she would like
to make sure it got back to its
owner! I am amazed that the
iPad could survive such a fall
(Otter Box is worth the cost!),
but I am even more appreciative
that a young lady would be so
. honest and kind as to go out of
her her way to make sure this


item was returned!
It would have been so easy
to have done a number of
other things with my iPad, but.
Heather chose to do the 'right'
,thing and the thing we all 'hope'
we would do.
Good things happen to good
people and Heather proved that
she is one of the good people.
I hope that life has a way of
repaying her for her actions.
Thank you Ms. Heather
Jones. You are a fanastic person
and Lake City/Ft. White and
Columbia County are lucky to
have you.

David Rudenborg
Tallahassee


4


shouldn't endow magic shows
and preserve Pac Man for the
ages, our economy will have
little hope of true recovery.

* Washington Times


ANOTHER
VIEW


However

humble,

each cut

counts

F federal spend-
ing continues to
increase, despite
Washington's talk of
"trillion-dollar cuts."
That's because politicians
refuse to kick their expensive
habit. Perhaps the best way to
change the culture of spending
is to dismantle one piece of our
$3.6 trillion federal budget at
a time.
To be sure, Congress
has put the largest share of
that amount, $2 trillion in
entitlements, off-limits. That
shouldn't be taken as an
excuse to allow self-serving
bureaucrats to continue blow-
ing the rest on pointless proj-
ects just because the cost may
only be measured in the thou-
sands or millions. If Capitol
Hill doesn't have the guts to
make cuts when the price tag
is low, it'll never be able to
work up the courage to tackle
the big ones.
Sen. Tom Coburn's latest
edition of the Wastebook offers
100 outrageous programs
that serve as a great place to
start cutting. The Oklahoma
Republican listed $113,277 in
federal grant money poured
into a video game museum.
That industry generated an
estimated $69 billion in hard-
ware and software sales last.
year; it can afford to build
its own memorials without
picking the public's pockets.
The same is true of the feder-
ally funded 'tributes to magic,
horsedrawn carriages, pup-
petry and the history of skiing.
Likewise, it makes no sense
for Uncle Sam to send $17.8,
million in foreign aid to China,
a country to which we are $1.1
trillion in debt Worse, the
money is meant to bribe China
into adopting the same left-
wing social engineering poli-
cies that are bankrupting our
own nation.
House Republicans had
the right idea when they cre-
ated YouCut, which enlisted
the public's help each week
in selecting a preposterous
prograni deserving of the ax.
Early last year, the House
- often by overwhelming mar-
gins voted to force the gov-
ernment to provide more docu-
ments electronically (reducing
printing costs), to terminate
the Presidential Election
Campaign Fund that subsidiz-
es politicians, to stop the feder-
al government from spending
$1 billion in buying foreclosed
homes and to repeal $17 billion
for media campaigns autho-
rized by Obamacare.
Momentum for the effort
has been lost Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid has predict-
ably blocked these measures in
the upper chamber, although
a few ideas have been pushed
through the Nevada Democrat's
roadblock on "must pass" legis-
lation. Even so, the House needs
to reinvigorate YouCut and force
Mr. Reid to defend each silly
program, one-by-one.
House MajorityLeader Eric
Cantor's office promised more
YouCut votes in the weeks
ahead now that committees
have finished work on a hand-
ful of bills. One would stop
the U.S. from bankrolling the
United Nations Population
Fund, which is used to pay for
abortions.
Washington needs to get
serious about treating every
dollar of the public's money
with care and respect. Until
Congress and the administra-
tion can admit that Uncle Sam


4A


Pesticides put


farmworkers at risk











Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER


LOCAL


TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Jan. 17

Art League meeting

The.Art League of North
Florida will hold the first
meeting of the year Jan. 17
at the First Presbyterian
Church at 7 p.m. The main
purpose is the election of
officers. Members and the
community are invited.-


Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
Jan.19 at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds ban-
quet facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.
This is a benefit for the
Christian Service Center
and tickets are available at
the Center on Hilton and
Washington St.


Traffic safety meeting Columbia County Re-
tired Educators meeting


The-Columbia Community
Traffic Safety will hold its
first meeting of the new
year on Tuesday, Jan. 17
at 10 a.m. at the FDOT
Operations Complex, 710
NW Lake Jeffery Road; in
the Crew Room. The Team
works on traffic hazards
and enforcement issues in
Columbia County and the
public is welcome to at-
tend. Issues can be called
in to the FDOT at 758-
3714. The team is made up
of members of law enforce-
ment, emergency services,
engineering and education.

Jan. 18

Olustee meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Jan. 18
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.

Blood drive

LifeSouth will have a blood
drive from noon to 7 p.m.
at Pizza Boy Pizza. Each
donor recieves a free large
cheese pizza and a t-shirt
or boxers.

Jan. 19

Voices that Change

Vocal Impressionist


ii OiL'


The Columbia County
Retired Educators will
meet Thursday, January
19, at 1 p.m. in Room 120
at the School Board Adult
Center. Speakers will be
Mrs. Kaeron Robinson of
the Guardian Ad Litem
and Mr. Paul Conley of
Ocala, Fl., District H FREF
Trustee. Retired persons
interested in education
may join us. For more in-
formation call Will Brown
at 752-2431.

Healthy Start board
meeting

Healthy Start of North
Central Florida Coalition
Board Meeting, Thurs-
day, January 19th at 2:00
p.m., Well Florida Council,
Gainesville, Fla. The public
is invited.
Please call Heather Hol-
liingsworth at 352-313-6500
ext 119 if you need more
information.

Jan. 20

Community Concerts

Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. Identical twins
Mark & Clark play head to
head on identical custom-
built baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the


world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation of
the classics all with the
flash of Liberace, a lot of
Jerry Lee Lewis, and the
piano artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information is
available at www.communi-
tyconcerts.info.

Arbor Day planting

The Lake City/Columbia
County Beautification
Committee will honor Mor-
ris Williams by planting
a Palatka Holly in com-
memoration of the 2012
Arbor Day. The ceremony
will be held at 11 a.m. in
front of the school admin-
istration building on Duval
Street. The public is urged
to. attend.

Jan. 21

Spiritual retreat

A.spiritual life enrichment
retreat and conference for
adults from 9:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. at Epiphany Catholic
Church, 1905 SW Epipha-
ny Court. The registration
fee is $10 and theme is
improving and inspiring
spirituality. Reserve your
spot by Jan. 18 by calling
(386)752-5228.,

Farmers market

The Lake DeSoto Farm-
ers Market is Saturdays
from 9am to 1pm (winter
hours) in Wilson Park
located along Lake DeSo-
tobetween the Columbia
County Courthouse and
Shands Lakeshore Hospi-
tal in downtown Lake City.
The market features lo-
cally grown fresh produce,
herbs, plants, cheese,
milk, eggs and local baked
breads, pies and other.,
items. Vendors also sell
homemade craft items like
jewelry, woodwork and


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other handmade items.
The 1st Annual Chili Cook
Off will be January 21 to
benefit Relay for Life. For
more information about
the Lake DeSoto Farmer
Market call 386-719-5766
or visit marketlcfla.com.

Wedding Expo

Let the Spirit of the Suwan-
nee Music Park & Camp-
ground help you plan your
special day. 2nd annual
Wedding Expo will be held
at Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Camp-
ground on Saturday, Jan.
21from 1 to 5 p.m. Fashion
Show by Glass Slipper
Bridal, Door Prizes, Ven-
dor Booths, Refreshments,
Taste Testing and more.
Vendors include: Melissa's
Antiques, Glass Slipper
Bridal, Scott Carroll DJ,
Holiday Inn, SOS Cafe &
Restaurant, Top Hat Limo,
Cakes by Pat, Uniquely
Yours Wedding & Event
Planner, Hot Heads Salon
& Spa, Sea Creative/Sta-
cee Reveron Photo, Joy the
Cake Lady/Elite Photogra-
phy and more. Free Admis-
sion. For more information
contact Sharyn at (386)
364-1683.

Mid Year Winter
Education School

First Central Missionary
Baptist Association will
start its Mid Year Winter
Education School on Jan.
21, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at
Springfield Missionary
-Baptist Church in Live
Oak, Fla.
There will be classes on
Public Speaking, Survey
of Revelation, Baptist
Doctrine, and Doctrine of
Prayer.
The cost is $35 per person
which includes book, pa-


per, pencil, breakfast, and
snack. Lunch by the host.
church for a low fee.
Rev.Joseph Francis, Mod-
erator and Mrs. Shirley,
Franklin, Women's Presi-
dent.

Jan. 22

Church anniversary

Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church, 948 Aberdeen Av-
enue, will celebrate their
70th Church Anniversary
on Jan. 22 at 11:30 a.m. and
3 p.m. Dr. Dwight Pollock
in charge of the 11:30 a.m.
service. Reverend Isadore
L. Williams and the Phila-
delphia Missionary Baptist
Church is in charge of
the 3 p.m. service. Please
come out and share with
us.

Bridal show

The 2nd Annual Your Per-
fect Day Bridal Show will
be from,noon to 4 p.m. on
January 22 at the Holi-
day Inn & Suites. Vendors
include The Rose Mary
Catering Company, David's
Bridal, Belk, Lake City
Florist and Design, Glass
Slipper Bridal, The Grand
Event, Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND Es-
capes, Spirit of the Suwan-
nee Music Park, and;More!
Door Prizes, Complimen-
tary Food Tasting, & Cash
Bar. Advance Ticket prices
are $7.00; Day of Event
$10.00. Tickets can be
purchased at the Holiday
Inn & Suites, 213 SW Com-
merce Dr., Lake City. For
ticket sales or vendor infor-
mation, call Margie Hicks
at (386) 754-1411.

Riding club banquet

The Columbia County


Riding Club is having its
annual banquet Jan. 22 at
1p.m. at Mason City Com-
munity Center. The club
will have its rides the 2nd
and 4th Sat of each month.
The club will be hosting
Pleasure Shows this year.
Check our website for all
information, www.columbia-
countyridingclub.com.
-CALENDAR con't. on 6A


OBITUARIES

Joseph Stanley Stelmach
Mr. Joseph Stanley Stelmach, 69,
died Saturday January 14, 2012,
at the Lake City Medical Center,
surrounded by .,
his family. Bornm
in,Buffalo, New ?
York, he was the ..
son of the late -
Stanley and Mary Cegielski Stel-
mach. Mr. Stelmach was a mem-
ber of the United States Air Force
and a proud American. After
moving from North Carolina, he
made Lake City his home for the'
past eighteen years. He was an
active member of the Lake City
Moose Lodge # 624, the Ameri-
can Legion, and the AARP. He
was a'very charitable man who en-
joyed cooking and playing poker.
Mr. Stelmach is survived by.
his son Anthony Stelmach, At-
lanta, GA; two daughters, Lisa
Fore (David) Smyrna, GA, and
Angie Elliott (Kenneth) Wood-,
stock GA; two grandchildren,
Joshua Fore and Meghan Elliott;
one brother and three sisters.
A memorial service will be con-
ducted Tuesday January 17, 2012'
at the Lake City Moose Lodge #'
624 at 12:00 p.m., and is open
for the public to attend. Mr. Stel-
mach's final resting place will be a
National Cemetery in Georgia. In
lieu of flowers family ask that do-
nations be made to the Lake City
VA Medical Center in his honot.
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME is in charge
of cremation arrangements. 458
South Marion Avenue Lake
City, Fl. 32025. (386) 752-1234.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


CALENDAR from 5A



Jan. 24


1 to 4 p.m. Learn how to
create backyard wildlife
habitat for a variety of
wildlife, in particular birds,
bats, and butterflies.


Friends of the Library Feb. 1'
Author Proeram


Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 7
p.m. at the Main Library,
sponsored by Save Our Su-
wannee will host Cynthia
Barnett, author of Mirage:
Florida and the Vanishing
Water of-the Eastern U.S.
Barnett is an award-win-
ning journalist and senior
writer for Florida Trend
magazine. She will discuss
Florida's water crisis and
look at solutions that have
found success in commu-
nities around the world.
Don't miss this timely
program on a topic so
very relevant to Columbia
County and North Central
Florida.

Jan. 25

Builders Assn. lunch

The Columbia County
Builders Association will
hold a General Council
lunch at Guang Dong start-
ing at 11:30 a. m. on Jan.
25. Cost of lunch is $10 for
members and $15 for non-
members. Speaker is Dale
Williams. After the lunch
an attorney from Tritt/An-
derson in Jacksonville will
hold a short seminar. Res-
ervations are preferred,
call: 386-867-1998 or e-mail:
colcountybuild@comcast.
net

Jan. 28

Illusionist Jason Bishop

Illusionist Jason Bishop
will perform as part of
Florida Gateway College's
FGC Entertainment series
on Jan. 28. Bishop, the
2006 APCA Performing
Artist of the Year, will
amaze you with his stun-
ning and original state-of-
the-art magic, including
his breathtaking Double
Levitation trick. For more
information or for tickets,
call (386) 754-4340 or visit
www.fgcentertainment
com.

Women's retreat

New Dayspring Baptist
Church, 709 NW Long
Street, Shepherd's Care
Ministry will be hosting
a Women's Retreat on
Jan. 28th from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Registration and
breakfast beginning at 7:30
a.m. Inspirational topics
will be presented along
with lunch. Tickets are
available or you may pay at
the door for a donation of
$10. For more information
please contact Sis. Linda
Timmons at 386-438-7974.

Jan. 29

Friends of the Library
Author Program

Sunday, January 29, 2012
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library: Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita Nights
and Champagne for Buz-
zards. Phyllis Smallman is
a Canadian who has spent
a lot of time in Florida,
the setting for her award-
winning mystery series
featuring
sassy bartender, Sherri
Travis. A former potter
with a lifelong love of mys-
teries, Phyllis divides her
time between her native
Ontario and Sarasota. She
will join us live via Skype
for this program.

Jan. 30

Wildlife class

The Columbia County
Extension office, 164 SW
Mary Ethal Lane, will host
Creating Backyard Wildlife
Habitat on Jan. 30 from


Black History Month
Opening Ceremony

, Black History Month
Opening Ceremony, 6 pm,
Richardson Comm. Center.

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.

Feb. 3

Gospel concert

Southern Gospel soloist
Ann Downing, a popular
performer on the Gaither
Gospel Homecoming video
series, will be in concert
at the Wellborn United
Methodist Church, 12005
County Road 137, at 7
p.m. on Friday, Feb. 3. For
information call (386)754-
8524.

Hyssongs in concert

The Hyssongs will be
presenting a concert of
Gospel Music at The Hys-
songs located at 254 SE
Gillen Terrace in Lulu on.
Feb. 3 at 7 p.m.
The Hyssongs travel
full-time throughout the
United States and Canada
using the powerful me-
dium of music. Dell, Susan,
and Richard Hyssong
encourage and delight au-
diences wherever they ap-
pear with their family vocal
harmony, lively energetic
style, humor; and brass
instruments (trumpet and
trombone). This awad win-
ning trio consistently has
top 40 songs on the radio
charges. I
They perform more than
250 times each year in
church, auditoriums,
gospel cruises, (as well as
television and radio). Dur-
ing the last two years, they
have sung more than 12
times at Dollywood, have
been featured in the Sing-
ing News, and appeared
on the cover of Christian
Voice Magazine.

Feb. 4

West Virginia Day

The West Virginia Annual
Reunion will be held on
Feb. 4 starting at 11:30
a.m. Please bring a cov-
ered dish to share for
the luncheon. The event
will be held at Epiphany
Church, 1905 SW Epiph-
anty Court. For questions,
information, or reserva-
tions please call 386-755-
4937.

Olustee Festival
Pageant

The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, Feb.4. Ages 3-12
mos, 13mo-23 mo, 2-4,
5-6 and 7-9 will be held
at 4 p.m. at the Columbia
County School Administra-
tive Complex Auditorium.
Ages 10-12, 13-15 and 16-20
will be held at 7 p.m. Win-
ners in each division will
receive a $50 savings bond,
crown, banner and ride in
the Olustee parade on Feb.
14. The pageant is open to
the public with admission
at the door: $5.00 adults
and students. Applica-
tions are available at the
Columbia County Library
or Chamber of Commerce.
Deadline for entries is 1-
23-2012. For more infor-
mation you may contact
pageant director, Elaine
Owens at 386-965-2787.


Black History Movie


Festival

Black History Movie Festi-
val, 4-8pm Olustee Park.


Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.

Feb. 10

Friends of. Music

The Friends of Music
Concert Series will present
its second concert of the
season
on Friday, Feb. 10 at 7:30
p.m. at First Presbyterian
Church, 697 SW Baya Dr.
Dr. Laura Ellis, organ-
ist/harpsichordist, and Dr.
Steven Thomas, cellist,
will perform. Both musi-
cians are professors at
the University of Florida.
The concert is free, and a
reception will follow. For
more information call Bill
Poplin at 365-4932.

Feb., 11

Bus trip

"What Freedom Looked
Like" a bus trip to Ft
Mose, St. Augustine,
Florida Florida's all free
black settlement, 7am
- 6pm; meet at Richard-
son Gym. $25 per person
includes lunch.

Zumba fundraiser for
Habitat for Humanity

All proceeds go to Habi-
tat forHumanity of Lake
City/Columbia County Inc.
for one hour long Zumba
class facilitated by Ameri-
can Family Fitness, 4578
Sw Heritage Oaks Circle,
Suite 102 on Feb. 11 at 11
a.m. The donation cost
is $10 per person. A fire
truck and bloodmobile will
be on site too.

Founder's Day Program

Merry Christmas and a
Happy New Year from
Columbia County Chapter
Bethune-Cookman Univer-
sity Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President of
Bethune-Bookman Univer-
sity will be our speaker.
Dress attire is semi-formal
or church attire.

Valentine's Day Ball

The 1st annual Valentine's
Day Ball, presented by the
Rotary Club of Lake City,
will be Saturday, Feb. 11
from 6 tol0 p.'m. atThe
Country Club of Lake City.
Dress is Black-Tie option-
al. Tickets are $50 each
and are available at the
Lake City Reporter, The
Wheeler Agency, Hunter
Printing, First Street Mu-
sic, Parks-Johnson Agency
on Hwy 90 West or call
752-0812. Gentlemen...BE
A HERO...bring her to the
Valentine's Day Ball!

Feb. 14

Speed dating

Singles Valentine Day
Speed dating (National
HIV Day),5pm-10pm, El
Potro.


Feb. 17

Golden Dragon
Acrobats

Direct from Hibei, China,


the Golden Dragon
Acrobats are the reigning
National Association of
Campus Activities enter-
tainers of the year and will
perform at Florida Gate-
way College on Feb. 17.
Their performance com-
bines award-winning acro-
batics, traditional dance,
spectacular costumes,
ancient and contemporary
music and theatrical tech-
niques to present a show
of breathtaking skill and
spellbinding beauty. For
more information or for
tickets, call (386) 754-4340
or visit www.fgcentertain-
ment.com.

Feb. 18

70's Party

70's Party, 4-8pm, Annie
Mattox.

Feb. 20

Teen summit

Teen Summit,.3 p.m.-mid-
night, Florida Gateway
College.


Feb. 25

Community Concerts

The UNF Chamber Sing-
ers perform 3 p.m. Feb.
25 at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. This elite
singing ensemble from
the University of North
Florida performs world
music, vocal jazz, and
other choral gems. Ticket
and membership informa-
tion is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.

Banquet

The 7th Annual Fundrais-
ing Banquet will be held
on Saturday, Feb. 25 at the
Great Lake City Commu-
nity Development Corpo-
ration. This'is a "Black Tie
Affair". Hope to see you
there.
Tickets are $30. For
tickets and information
contact CDC 386-752-
9785, Betty Powell 386-
755-7377, David Turner
386-6974752, or Marlette
Robinson 386-288-1856.

Feb. 29

Elders Banquet

Elders Banquet, Black
History Month Closing
Ceremony, 6 pm, Richard-
son Comin. Center..

March 2

Barrage

A high-octane fiddle-fest
that features an interna-
tional, multi-talented cast
performing an eclectic,
mix of music, song and
dance, Barrage will per-
form at Florida Gateway
College on March 2. This
is their last tour before a
multi-year stop in Las Ve-
gas. For more information
or for tickets, call (386)
754-4340 or visit www.
fgcentertainment.com.


March 3-4

Home & Patio Show

The Rotary Club of Lake
City Downtown's 9th Annu-
al North Florida Home &
Patio Show at the Colum-
bia County Fairgrounds is
March 3rd & 4th. Inter-
ested businesses wishing
to participate should call
(386) 623-6049, or go to
rotarydowntown.com.
Parking and admission is
free to the public. This is
the ONLY Home Show in
the North Florida area this
weekend!

March 7

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
having a Wrap-up meeting
5:30 p.m. March 7 at the
Central Building for the
Olustee Festival 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.

March 9

Community Concerts


Carpe Diem String Quartet
performs 7:30 pm March
9 at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Carpe Diem
plays their classical string
quartet repertoire as well
as Gypsy, tango, folk, pop,
rock & jazz. Their 2009
album was Grammy listed
for Best Classical Album,
Best Chamber Music Per-
formance, Best New Artist,
and Best Engineered Al-
bum-Classical. Ticket and
membership information is
available at www.communi-
tyconcerts.info.

April 14

Loveloud

A Wellborn-based alterna-
tive rock/group, Loveloud
is the final performance
in this season's FGC
Entertainment series.
The group, most recently
seen on the Warped Tour
and has opened for Red
Jumpsuit Apparatus, will
perform on April 14th at
Florida Gateway College.
For more information or
for tickets, call (386) 754-
4340 or visit www.fgcenter-
tainment.com.


"If you go to jail, give
me a call. I can get
you out."

Office: (386) 208-0645 LTD Sur ent ye
Cell: (386) 344-2233 '-- -.,.
24/7
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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


BulletinBoard

Bul,


COURTESY PHOTO
CHS students place in statewide Stock Market Game
Kelly Pearce (left to right), Allison Keys, Skyler Manning, Sierra Steward, and Jasmine Rowe, Information Technology students
at Columbia High School, placed first and second in the fall 2011 Stock Market Games in Florida. Kelly, Skyler and Jasmine
placed first out of 419 other teams. Sierra and Allison placed second out of 419 other teams. The first place.CHS team began
with $100,000 to invest. Ten weeks later their total equity was $125,762.78. Their growth was 16.0599 percent above S&P
500. The second place CHS team began with $100,000 to invest and had a total equity of $119,511.49. Their growth was
9.8086 percent above S&P 500.


CAMPUS

NEWS



Home Educators'
Home Education students
are eligible to take state
mandated assessment tests
with the.Columbia County
School District at no charge..
If you are interested in hav-
ing your Home Educated
child, grades 3rd 12th
participate in FCAT Testing,
please notify the office of
Alex Carswell, Assistant
Superintendent, by phone
- 386-758-4935 or by email
at simmonsm@firn.edu. The
deadline to sign-up for the
FCAT Writing test (grades
4th, 8th, 10th) is February
13, 2012 and FCAT Reading,
Math & Science is March .
26,-2012 Reminder... FCAT Ric
Test results will be accepted "
as a form of yearly evalua- Dalton
tion for the Home Educationh. smile
Student. respect

Five Points Colum
auditor
Elementary a
semes
Five Points Elementary learnir
would like to extend special of a st
congratulations to the follow- inform
ing Science Fair Project win- ing wi
ners: Third Grade: 1st Place with ac
- Chelsea Prince, 2nd Place to 3-di
- Jayla Simmons, 3rd Place tract
Obie Smith, 4th Place Josef earn
Walker, 5th Place Ben of mat
Gieger. around(
Forth Grade: 1st Place around
Victoria Thomas,.2nd Grade ning o
- Kaylin Hall, 3rd Place off to
Molly Tomlinson, 4th Grade -
Jade Bell, 5th Grade Leslie Third
Hatch.
Fifth Grade: 1st Grade Thir
- Kellen Fortner, 2nd Place Park E
- Josh Oates, 3rd Place gently
- John Breitburg, 4th Place that gi
- Trey Raulerson, 5th Grade are lea
- Brock Spradley. and cc
to fully
Melrose Park chara(
out a t
Elementary about
reason
Second grade text. T
Second graders at reading
Melrose Park Elementary at psch
are gearing up for the next ors
of stori


Lake City Reporter


Alternative Fla.

teacher programs

called a success


TALLAHASSEE--Anew
report concludes Florida's
alternative teacher prepara-
tion programs are succeed-
ing.
A survey of principals
and teachers found few.
differences in prepared-
ness between teachers
with education degrees and
those who went through
the alternative programs in
2009-2010.
Florida State University
researchers surveyed 854
teachers and 476 princi-
pals. ; .
The alternative programs
for those with non-educa-


tion degrees are offered by,
school districts, Florida's
28 state and community col-
leges, four state universities
and one private university.
The survey found higher
percentages of men and,
people over 30 years old
completed the alternative
programs.
The alternative programs
also produced higher per-
centages of teachers in
critical need areas such
as math and science than
did the traditional teacher
preparation' : 'programs.
* Assoi6tedPress '" '


COURTESY PHOTO
hardson Middle Spelling Bee winners
Davis, 13, and Eva Kirby, 12, both seventh-graders at Richardson Middle School,
with certificates they were awarded after being named runner-up and champion,
actively, of the RMS Spelling Bee Dec. 9. As RMS champion, Kirby will compete in the
bia County Spelling Bee at the Columbia County School Board Administrative Complex
rium Thursday.


ster of school. We are
ig about the setting
ory and how to locate
ation. We are continu-
th 3 -digit numbers
addition and moving on
igit numbers with sub-
n. In Science we are
ig about the properties
ter and how it is all
d us. We are also plan-
ur trip to Silver Springs
We hope your year is
a great start!
grade
d graders at Melrose
Elementary are dill-
working on strategies
ood readers use. We
warning how to compare
contrast characters
y understand how a
cter develops through-
text. We are learning
author's purpose, the
n an author writes a
hird graders should be
g at home everyday
ctice the skills learned
ool. Through the study
ies, we are also learn-


ing how to write awesome
stories. In math we are learn-
ing about division and how
to work our way through
a problem. In science we
are learning about the solar
system. We will conclude
our study with a trip to the
Museum of Science and
History in Jacksonville on
Friday, Feb. 3. We work hard
in third grade because we
know that it will pay off one
day!

Westside
Elementary
Talent search qualifiers
Twenty of Westside stu-
dents are qualified to take
part in the Duke University
Talent Search. To qualify a
,student, must be in 4th or
5th grade and needed to
score a high level five on the
Reading and / or Math por-
tion of the 2011 FCAT, The
twenty Westside students
who qualify are: Hunter
Ragsdale, James Minchin,


William Burns, Daniel Burns,
William Thompson, Owen
Sims, Tyler Roach, Gaven
McGee, Mikayla Collins,
Kylie Casazza, Seth
Ziegaus, Lance Minson,
Jeremiah Erickson, Jenna
Burns, Lauren Wilson,
Lexie Trussell, Isabella
Park, Caroline Lewis,
Eliana Duarte, and Breanna
Byington. Congratulations to
these students in reaching
this honor!
Honors
Congratulations to
Mrs. Sue Williamson, our
Westside Teacher of the
Year! Congratulations to
Mrs. Kelly Erkinger, our
Westside Noninstructional
Employee of the Year! Miss
Valerie Moreau is Westside
Youth Volunteer of the Year,
Mrs. Miriam Hannigan is our
Adult Volunteer of the Year
and Mrs. Peggy Dyson is
our Senior Volunteer of the
Year. Congratulations you all
are the best.


CALENDAR


Today, Jan. 17
Summers Elementary -
FAIR Test grades 3 5
Pinemount Elementary -
School Mall Fund-raiser
Fort White High Indian
JV/V Girls Basketball vs
Keystone Heights at home,
6/7:30 p.m.
Lake City Middle FFA
Chapter meeting at 3 p.m.
Fort White Elementary
- Family Reading Night in
Media Center from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan, 18
Lake City Middle School
Advisory Council meeting in
Guidance at 9:00 a.m.
Eastside Elementary -
Learning Communities meet-
ing at 2:30 p.m.


Fort White Elementary
- Math Book Study in Media
Center at 2:30 p.m.
Five Points Elementary -
Literacy Leadership meeting
at 2:30 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 19
Columbia County Spelligg
Bee -- School District
Auditorium at 10 a.m.
Adult Eduoetion Student
meeting at CCSD Central
Building, room 130 from 9 to
10:30 a.m.
Summers Elementary -
FAIR Test grades 3 to 5
Pinemount Elementary
- School Advisory Council
meeting in Media Center
'from 5 to 6 p.m.
Fort White High Indian
Boys Varsity Soccer vs


Hamilton at Home, 6 p.m.;
Indian Girls JV/V Basketball
at Bradford, 6/7:30 p.m.;
Indian JV/V Boys Basketball
vs Bradford at home, 6/7:30
p.m.
Lake City Middle Falcon
Basketball Championship
Richardson Middle
Wolf Girls Basketball
Championship Game, away
Eastside Elementary
Science Fair Awards
Ceremony in cafeteria at
8:30 a.m,
Fort White Elementary
School Advisory Council
meeting in Media Center at
6:00 p.m.; PTO meeting in
auditorium at 7 p.m.; FAIR
Testing
Westside Elementary
School Advisory Council
meeting at 5:30 p.m.


Five Points Elementary
- Family Reading Night at
5 p.m.; School Advisory
Council meeting at 6 p.m.;
PTO meeting at 7 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 20
Fort White High Indian
Middle School Girls/Boys
Basketball vs Ruth Raines
at home,5/6:30 p.m.
Lake City Middle -
Wrestling Team to Syrup
Maker Wrestling Tournament
in Cairo, GA

Saturday, Jan. 21
Lake City Middle Falcon
Wrestling Championships at
Live Oak
Pinemount Elementary
- PTO Bowling at Lake City
Bowl from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.


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Page Ecitor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427








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Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Tuesday, January 17, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
GATORS
Gator Club
meeting today
The North Florida
Gator club has a
meeting/social at 6 p.m.
today at Beef O'Brady's
on Main Boulevard in
Lake City. The senior
scholarship program will
be discussed.
For details, call Diane
McManus at 752-3333.
YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fort White
meeting today
The Fort White Girls
Softball Association has a
meeting for parents and
coaches to discuss the
upcoming season at
7:15 p.m. today at the
Fort White library.
For details, call Nora
Harvey at 365-5688.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting today
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. today in
the teacher's lounge
at the high school.
Preparations will be
discussed for the football
banquet, which is 6 p.m.
Jan. 28 in the Fort White
High gym. Anyone who
would like to be a part of
the Quarterback Club is
encouraged to attend.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954:
YOUTH BASKETBALr
Registration for
Boys Club hoops
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
accepting registration
for its basketball
program. Cost is $45.
Three leagues are
offered: Training, ages
6-7-8; Jr. Varsity, ages
8-9-10; Varsity, ages
11-12-13-14.
For details, call
752-4184.
From staff reports

GAMES
Today
Fort White High girls
weightlifting vs. Union
County High, 4 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Keystone
Heights High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Suwannee
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Palatka
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Columbia High boys
soccer at Vanguard High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Thursday
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Columbia High
girls basketball at
St. Augustine High,
7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Fort White High girls
basketball at Bradford
High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Columbia High
.wrestling at Brandon
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
basketball at Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Brandon
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Wolfson,


7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Lady Indians soccer advances


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's girls soccer had a successful Senior Night with a win over Oak Hall School on Friday. Seniors who were
honored are Alison Wrench (from left), Virginia Vasquez, Rebecca Onorati, Amy Mathews, Deanna Hart and Caitlin Congi.


L


Day


FortWhite scores
winning goal in
second overtime.
From staff reports

Fort White High's girls
soccer team put in extra time
to beat Newberry High, 1-0,
in Monday's opening round
of the District 5-2A tourna-
ment in Alachua.
The Lady Indians had lost
both regular season game
to the Panthers by one goal.
This time, the teams played
through a 10-minute sud-
den death period and Fort
White won it 7 minutes into
the second overtime.
Lynce Stalnaker crossed
the ball in front of the
Newberry goal. The keep-
er fumbled it and Danielle
Wooley was there to follow
up and score the goal.
"I can't talk enough about
how our defense played
tonight," coach Perry Sauls
said. "Newberry only had
four legitimate shots.
Fort White plays .Santa
Fe High or Bradford High
at 5 p.m. Wednesday.


sports


Sports played its part in the Martin Luther King Jr. Day
festivities on Monday. The Lake City Recreation Department
and Richardson Community Center Annie Mattox Park North,
Inc. hosted 'The Rematch' basketball games between women
and men from Lake City and Live Oak. The first game of
this season was played over Thanksgiving weekend and the
vanquished Live Oak teams demanded another shot. The
game was at the Lake City Middle School gym. The 'Battle of
the Classes' was a flag football tournament among Columbia
High alumni from the mid-90s and early 2000s. The games
were played at Annie Mattox Park.

ABOVE: LaQuez Combs (left) attempts to rip the flag off
Leo Robinson as he runs on a quarterback keeper during
the 'Battle of the Classes' flag football game.
LEFT: Live Oak's Sophia Adams (10) attempts to deflect a
pass made by Lake City's Danielle Marshall (25) during 'The
Rematch' basketball game.

Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/
Lake City Reporter











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Michigan St. at Michigan
ESPN2 Georgetown at DePaul
9 p.m.
ESPN -Arkansas at Kentucky
NHL
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP Nashville at N.Y Rangers
TENNIS
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, second
round, at Melbourne,Australia
3 a.m.
ESPN2 Australian Open, second
round, at Melbourne,Australia

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Divisional Playoffs
Saturday
San Francisco 36, New Orleans 32
New England 45, Denver 10
Sunday
Baltimore 20, Houston 13
N.Y. Giants 37, Green Bay 20
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan.22
Baltimore at New England, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 6:30 p.m.

College all-star games

Saturday
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs.West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Sunday's Games
Golden State 99, Detroit 91
Utah 106, Denver 96
San Antonio 102, Phoenix 91
Monday's Games
Memphis 102, Chicago 86
Orlando 102, NewYork 93
Cleveland 102, Charlotte 94
Houston 114,Washington 106
Philadelphia 94, Milwaukee 82
Portland 84, New Orleans 77
L.A. Clippers 101, New Jersey 91
Atlanta 93,Toronto 84
Sacramento at Minnesota (n)
Oklahoma City at Boston (n)
Dallas at LA. Lakers (n) '
Today's Games
Golden State at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Orlando, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Houston, 8 p.m.
Denver at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
L.AXClippers at Utah; 9 p:m: '
Wednesday's Games ,
San Antonio at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Oklahoma City atWashington, 7 p.m.
Denver at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Golden State at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Portland atAtlanta, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press' college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Jan. 15, total points and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Prv
SI. Syracuse (60) 19-0 1,619 I
2. Kentucky (4) -17-1 1,558 2
3. Baylor (I) 17-0 1,503 4
4. Duke 15-2 1,380, 8
5. Missouri 16-1 1,335 9
6. Ohio St. 16-3 1,312 5
7. Kansas 14-3 1,218 10
8. North Carolina 15-3 1,172 3
9. Michigan St. 15-3 1,119 6
10. Georgetown 14-3 884 II
11. Indiana 15-3 858 7
12. Murray St. 18-0 825 15
13. UConn 14-3 807 17
'14.UNLV 16-3 651 12
I 5.Virginia 14-2 649 16
16. San Diego St. 15-2 621 22
17. Florida 14-4 596 19
18. Mississippi St. 15-3 590 20
19. Creighton 16-2 471 23
20.Michigan 14-4 461 13
21. Marquette 14-4 278 25
22. Illinois 15-3 257 -
23. Louisville 14-4 208 14
24. Saint Mary's (Cal) 17-2 167 -
25.Kansas St. 12-4 102 18
Others receiving votes:Vanderbilt 101,
Wisconsin 90, Seton Hall 79, Gonzaga 64,
New Mexico 61, Harvard 22, Cincinnati
17, Stanford 16,WestVirginia 16,Alabama
10,Wichita St. 3, lona 2, Florida St. I,
Northwestern I.Wagner I.

Top 25 results

I. Syracuse (19-0) beat Villanova
79-66; beat Providence 78-55.
2.Kentucky (17-1) beat Auburn 68-53;
beat Tennessee 65-62.
3. North Carolina (15-3) beat
Miami 73-56; lost to Florida State
90-57.
4. Baylor (17-0) beat No. 1 8 Kansas
State 75-73; beat "Oklahoma State
106-65.
5. Ohio State (16-3) lost to-Illinois
79-74; beat No. 7 Indiana 80-63.
6. Michigan State (15-3) beat Iowa
95-61; lost to Northwestern 81-74.
7. Indiana (15-3) lost to Minnesota


77-74; lost to No. 5 Ohio State 80-63.
8. Duke (15-2) beat No. 16 Virginia
61-58; beat Clemson 73-66.
9. Missouri (16-1) beat Iowa State
76-69; beat Texas 84-73.
10. Kansas (14-3) beat Texas Tech
81-46; beat Iowa State 82-73.
II. Georgetown (14-3) lost to
Cincinnati 68-64; beat St. John's 69-49.
12. UNLV (16-3) lost to No. 22 San
Diego State 69-67.
13. Michigan (14-4) beat Northwestern
66-64, OT; lost to Iowa 75-59.


14. Louisville (14-4) lost to Providence
90-59; beat DePaul 76-59.
15. Murray State (18-0) beat
Jacksonville State 66-55; beat Tennessee
Tech 82-74.
16.Virginia (14-2) lost to No. 8 Duke
61-58.
17. UConn (14-3) beat West Virginia
64-57; beat Notre Dame 67-53.
18. Kansas State (12-4) lost to No. 4
Baylor 75-73; lost to Oklahoma 82-73.
19. Florida (14-4) beat Georgia
70-48; beat South Carolina 79-65.
20. Mississippi State (15-3) beat
Tennessee 62-58; beat Alabama 56-52.
21. Gonzaga (14-3) lost to Saint Mary's
(Cal.) 83-62; beat Loyola Marymount
62-58.
22. San Diego State (15-2) beat
Chicago State 73-65; beat No. 12 UNLV
69-67.
23. Creighton (16-2) beat Northern
Iowa 63-60; beat Illinois State 87-78; beat
Southern Illinois 90-71.
24. Seton Hall (15-3) beat DePaul 94-
73; lost to South Florida 56-55.
25. Marquette (14-4) beat St. John's
83-64; beat Pittsburgh 62-57.

USA Today/ESPN Top 25

The top 25 teams in the USA Today-
ESPN men's college basketball poll:
Record Pts Pvs
I. Syracuse (31) 19-0 775 I
2. Kentucky 17-I 742 2
3. Baylor 17-0 714 4
4. Duke 15-2 654 6
5. Missouri 16-1 629 9
6. Ohio State 16-3 619 5
7. Kansas 14-3 591 10
8. North Carolina 15-3 569 3
9. Michigan State 15-3 509 7
10. Murray State 18-0 449 14
11. Connecticut 14-3 416 16
12. Georgetown 14-3 410 II
13. Indiana 15-3 358 8
14. Florida 14-4 304 19
15. Mississippi State 15-3 288 20
16. San Diego State 15-2 282 22
17.Virginia 14-2 269 17
18. Creighton 16-2 260 21
19. Michigan 14-4 259 13
20. UNLV 16-3 252 12
21. Louisville 14-4 130 15
22. Marquette 14-4 119 24
23. Saint Mary's 17-2 100 -
24. Harvard 15-2 61 25
25. Illinois 15-3 58 -
Others receiving votes: Vanderbilt
47, Kansas State 46, New Mexico 41,
Wisconsin 27, Gonzaga 21, Middle
Tennessee 21, Seton Hall 16,WestVirginia
I 3,Wichita State 13,Alabama 7, Nevada 3,
California 2, BYU I.

AP Top 25, schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Kentucky vs.Arkansas, 9 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State at No. 20
Michigan, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Georgetown at DePaul, 7 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
No. II Indiapa.at Nebraska, 7 p.m.
- No. 12. MIrray: State at- Morehead
State, 7 :, .
No. 13 UCohin vs. Cincinnati, 7 p.m.
No. 14 UNLV vs.TCU, 10:30 p.m.
No. 16 San Diego State at New
Mexico, 10 p.m.
No. 18 Mississippi State at Mississippi,
9 p.m.
No. 19 Creighton at Missouri State,
8:05 p.m.
No. 25 Kansas State vs.Texas, 9 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 4 Duke vs.Wake Forest, 7 p.m.
No. 8 North Carolina at Virginia Tech,
9 p.m.
No. 15 Virginia at Georgia Tech, 8 p.m.
No. 22 Illinois at Penn State, 9 p.m.
No. 24 Saint Mary's (Cal) vs.
Pepperdine, .10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I .Syracuse at Notre Dame,
6 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky vs. Alabama at
Kentucky, Noon
No. 3 Baylor vs. No. 5 Missouri, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Duke vs. Florida State,
4 p.m.
No. 6 Ohio State at Nebraska, 8 p.m.
No. 7 Kansas atTexas, 4 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State vs. Purdue,
Noon
No. 10 Georgetown vs. Rutgers,
Noon '
No. 12 Murray State at SIU-
Edwardsville, 8 p.m.
No. 13 UConn at Tennessee, 4 p.m.
No.. 14 UNLV vs. New Mexico, 10
p.m.
No. 16 San Diego State vs. Air Force,
10p.m.
No. 17 Florida vs. LSU, 6 p.m.
No. 18 Mississippi State at Vanderbilt,
7 p.m.
No. 19 Creighton vs. Indiana State,
3 p.m.
No.20 Michigan atArkansas, 2 p.m.
-No. 21 Marquette at Providence,
7 p.m.
No. 23 Louisville at Pittsburgh, 9 p.m.
No. 24 Saint Mary's (Cal) at Santa
Clara, II p.m.
No. 25 Kansas State at Oklahoma
State, 1:30 p.m.

TENNIS

Australian Open singles

At Melbourne Park
Melbourne,Australia
Monday
Men
First Round
Kevin Anderson (30), South Africa, def.
Frederik Nielsen, Denmark, 6-1, 6-2, 6-4.
Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, def. James Ward,
Britain, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4.
NicolasAlmagro (10), Spain,def. Lukasz
Kubot, Poland, 1-6,7-5,6-3,7-5.
Juan Martin del Potro (1 I),Argentina,


def. Adrian Mannarino, France, 2-6, 6-1,
7-5, 6-4.
Pere Riba, Spain, def.Albert Montanes,
Spain, 7-6 (2), 2-6, 6-4,7-6 (5).
Flavio Cipolla, Italy, def. Nikolay
Davydenko, Russia, 6-4, 4-6, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1.
Feliciano Lopez (18). Spain, def.
Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 7-6 (5), 6-3,
7-6 (2).
Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Jurgen
Melzer (3 l),Austria, 7-6 (3), 7-5,6-3.
Tobias Kamke, Germany, def. Victor
Hanescu, Romania, 6-2, 6-1, 6-2.
Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic,


def.Albert Ramos, Spain, 7-5, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3.
Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Illya
Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-7 (9), 4-6,
6-3, 7-5.
Mardy Fish (8), United States, def.
Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, 6-4. 6-4, 6-2.
Sam Querrey, United States, def. Kenny
de Schepper, France, 6-3,.6-2, 6-2.
Stanislas Wawrinka (21), Switzerland,
def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-1, 6-1, 7-5.
Bernard.Tomic,Australia; def. Fernando
Verdasco (22), Spain, 4-6, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 6-2,
7-5.
Florent Serra, France, def. Steve Darcis,
Belgium, 6-7 (3), 3-6, 5-4 retired.
Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Bjorn
Phau, Germany, 6-1, 6-4,6-0.
Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, def. Jesse
Huta Galung, Netherlands, 2-6, 6-3, 7-6
(3),6-3. ,,
Alejandro Falla, Colombia, def. Fabio
Fognini, Italy, 6-3, 6-2, 3-6, 6-I.
Tommy Haas, Germany, def. Denis
Kudla, United States, 7-6 (5), 3-6, 6-0, 7-5.
Donald Young, United States, def. Peter
Gojowczyk, Germany, 6-1, 6-2, 4-6, 1-6,
6-2.
Alexandr Dolgopolov (13), Ukraine,
def. Greg Jones, Australia, 1-6, 4-6, 6-1,
6-1,6-2,
Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, def. Ivan Ljubicic
(28), Croatia; 3-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4.
Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def.
Juan Monaco (25),Argentina,7-5,4-6, 6-3,
6-7 (4), 6-0.
Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def.
Benjamin Becker, Germany, 6-1, 7-6 (5),
6-2.
Grigbr Dimitrov, Bulgaria, def.Jeremy
Chardy, France, 4-6, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Alex'
Kuznetsov, United States, 6-4, 6-1, 6-1.
John Isner (16), United States, def.
Benjamin Mitchell, Australia, 6-4, 6-4, 7-
6 (1).,
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def.
Alexander Kudryavtsev, Russia, 7-5, 6-2,
6-2.
David Nalbandian, Argentina, def.
Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 6-4,4-2, retired.
Yen-hsun Lu,Taiwan, def. Rik de Voest;
South Africa, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3.
Andreas Beck, Germany, def. Eric
Prodon, France, 6-4, 6-2, 4-6, 7-5.
Women
First Round
Victoria Azarenka (3), Belarus, def.
Heather Watson, Britain, 6-1, 6-0.
Casey Dellacqua, Australia, def. Bojana
Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-3, 6-2.
Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, def.,Kimiko"
Date-Krumm, Japan, 6-3, 6-2.
Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, def. Arantxa
Rus, Netherlands, 7-6 (4), 6-1.
Anabel Medina Garrigues (26), Spain,
def. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic,
6-3, 6-3.
Daniela Hantuchova (20), Slovakia, def.
Varvara Lepchenko,. United States, 4-6,
6-3, 6-2.
Paula Ormaechea, Argentina, def.
Simona Halep, Romania, 6-1, 3-6,7-5.
Agnieszka Radwanska (8), Poland, def.
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-7,
(10), 6-4, 6-2.
Julia Goerges (22), Germany, def.
Polona Hercog,.Slovenia, 6-3, 7-6 (3).
Nina Bratchikova, Russia, def. Flavia
Pennetta (19), Italy, 6-3, 1-6, 6-2.
Petra Cetkovska (32), Czech Republic,
def.Ayumi Morita, Japan, 3-6,6-1,7-5.
Li Na (5). China, def. Ksenia Pervak,
Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-I.
Romina Oprandi, Italy, def. Anastasiya
Yakimova, Belarus, 6-4, 6-1.
Christina McHale, United States, def.
Lucie Safarova (24), Czech Republic,
6-2, 6-4.
Peng Shuai (16), China, def. Aravane
Rezai,.France, 6-3, 6-4.
Olga Govortsova, Belarus, def. Patricia
Mayr-Achleitner, Austria, 6-2, 6-4.
Francesca Schiavone (10), Italy, def.
Laura Pous, Spain, 6-1,6-3.
Kim Clijsters (II), Belgium, def. Maria
Joao Koehler, Portugal, 7-5,6-1I.
Alberta Brianti, Italy, def. Irina Falconi,
United States, 6-2, 7-5..
Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, def.
Elena Baltatha, Britain, 6-2, 6-4.
Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def.
YaninaWickmayer (28), Belgium, 7-5,6-2.
Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, def. Petra
Martic, Croatia, 6-4, 6-2.
Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria. def. Sania
Mirza, India, 6-4,6-2.
Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, def. Ashleigh
Barty, Australia, 6-2,7-6 (4).
Olivia Rogowska, Australia, def. Sofia
Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-3, 6-I.
Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Anne
Keothavong, Britain, 6-0, retired.
Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, def.
Mathilde Johansson, France, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4.
Jelena Jankovic (13), Serbia, def. Laura
Robson, Britain, 62, 6-0.
Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Alla
Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3.
Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, def.
Irena Pavlovic, France, 7-5,7-6 (4).
Caroline Wozniacki (I), Denmark, def.
Anastasia Rodionova, Austialia, 6-2, 6-1.
Monica Niculescu (31), Romania, def.
Alize Cornet, France, 5-7, 6-0, 6-3.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Sunday's Games
Pittsburgh 6,Tampa Bay 3
Washington 2, Carolina I
Montreal 4, N.Y. Rangers I
Chicago 4, San Jose 3 ,
Edmonton 2, Los Angeles I, OT
Anaheim 4,Vancouver 2
Monday's Games
Nashville 3, N.Y. Islanders I
Phoenix 6, Colorado I
Winnipeg at Ottawa (n)
Boston at Florida (n)
Buffalo at Detroit (n)
Dallas at St. Louis (n)
Today's Games
Ottawa at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at New Jersey, 7 p.m.


Minnesota at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Nashville at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Boston atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Vancouver. 10 p.m.
Calgary at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Washington at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Florida at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Anaheim, 10 p.m.


Australian Open




gets under way


By DENNIS PASSA
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia
Rafael Nadal's trouble-
some left shoulder and
Kim Clijsters' sore left hip
passed their first major
tests Monday when both
players advanced to the
second round of the
SAustralian Open.
Nadal, the 2009 cham-
pion at Melbourne Park,
beat Alex Kuznetsov 6-4,
6-1, 6-1. He played with his
right knee heavily taped,
but the shoulder that
hampered his play in the
latter part of 2011 appeared
to not trouble him.
"Thafs in the past," Nadal
said when asked about
his injuries in a postmatch
television interview.
Defending champion
Clijsters opened with a 7-5,
6-1 win over Portuguese
qualifier Maria Joao
Koehler, showing no signs
of the hip spasms that
forced her to withdraw from
a tuneup event in Brisbane:
10 day ago.
Four-time champion
Roger Federer and women's
No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki
joined them in the second
round in. matches played
later Monday at Rod Laver
Arena.
Li Na, who lost the
Australian final to Clijsters
last year, had a .6-3, 6-1
win over Ksenia Pervak of
Kazakhstan. In the first fea-
tured match of the tourna-
ment, third-seeded Victoria
Azarenka won 12 straight
games to finish off Heather
Watson. 6-1, 6-0 .in 67
minutes in the opening
match on center court. ,
The Hisense Arena
crowd was solidly behind
Nadal. He didn't give them
a chance to cheer for long,
needing only about 30 min-
utes each to win the final
two sets.
Clijsters similarly had an
easy time in the second
half of her match, break-
ing Koehler's serve in
the deciding game of the
first set and reeling off 13
straight points to start the
second,
She claimed later that


ACROSS
1 Hare's hair
4 Plant parasite
8 Rocket
housing
12 Gotcha!
13 PC symbol
14 Charles Lamb
15 Novice
swimmer
17 Cot locale
18 Luster
19 Ivory sources
20 Born as
22 Atomize
23 Verve
26 In of
28 Mark of Zorro
31 Synthetic
fabric, for
short
32 Strike caller
33 Peoria's st.
34 S&L offering
35 Morse syllable
36 They need a
PIN
37 Nero's 102
38 Not admit to
39 "Mona -"


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christina McHale makes a return during her match against
24th-seed Lucie Safarova of the Czech Republic at the
Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne,
Australia. McHale was the only United States woman to win
in; Monday's first round.


the win wasn't as easy as
it looked.
"It was hard to really get
a good rhythm out there,"
Clijsters said. "I did feel
like I was seeing the ball
probably not always as
good as I would like to."
Of the six women who
can reach the top ranking,
eighth-ranked Agnieszka
Radwanska had a battle on
her hands just to make the
second round, fending off
American Bethanie Mattek-
Sands 6-7 (10), 6-4, 6-2 in a
three-hour match on Slhow
Court 2.
Other women advanc-
ing were No. 16-seeded
Peng Shuai of China,
No. 20 Daniela Hantuchova
of Slovakia, No. 22 Julia
Goerges of Germany, No. 26
Anabel Medina Garrigues of
Spain and Eleni Daniilidou
of Greece beat 41-year-old
Kimiko Date-Krumm of
Japan 6-3, 6-2.
Local attention Monday


40 Tack on
41 CSA defender
43 Splice, in
botany
46 Desist
50 Maine, from
Utah
51 Aims carefully
(2 wds.)
54 Fit to -
55 Elvis, to some
56 NFL player
57 Caboose's
place
58 Absent
59 Fix a seam

DOWN
1 Temporary
trends
2 Slangy refusal
(hvoh.)


was on 19-year-old Bernard
Tomic, who rallied from
two sets down to beat
No. 22-seeded Fernando
Verdasco 4-6, 6-7 (3),
6-4, 6-2, 7-5. The win over
the 2009 semifinalist will
give. Tomic 'a confidence
boost as he attempts to
become the first Australian
man since 1976 to win the
national title.
Eighth-seeded Mardy
Fish, the highest ranked
U.S. male, had a 6-4, 6-4,
6-2 win over Gilles Muller
to progress along with
2009 Li.S. Open champion
Juan Martin del Potro,
No. 7 Tomas Berdych,
No. 10 Nicolas Almagro,
No. 13AlexandrDolgopolov,
No. 18 Feliciano Lopez,
No. 21 Stanislas Wawrinka
and No. 30 Kevin
Anderson.
No. 25 Juan Monaco,
No. 28 Ivan Ljubicic and
No. 31 Jurgen Melzer were
seeded players who lost.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


Marathon 8 Organize
Pooh creator (2 wds.)
Here, for 9 Dots in "la
monsieur mer"
Freight weight 10 Chain unit
High school 11 Horse feed
subj.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" hooks
at QuillDriverBooks.com
2 3, 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

13 14





20- 21 22


11 I


16 Singer -
Rogers
19 Frat letter
21 Escaped
22 Soft breeze
23 Hero's tale
24 Petty of
"Free Willy"
25 Jai -
27 "- Old
Cowhand"
28' Tubular pasta
29 Endangered
trees
30 Movie lioness
36 "Tiny Alice"'
penner
38 Banned bug
spray
40 Later
42 Pierre's
school
43 Forward or
reverse
44 Loan figure
45 Between ports
47 Serpents
48 King's
address
49 Enough,
formerly
51 Sharp turn
52 Tokyo,
formerly
53 Reagan
nickname


1-17 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


LE"S M-EG"A CDS G-
ALL ARER OAK
PL A YALON LlI



A AYmm BL E

ANI L TIN AOL
R I O LID AH B
E HANOLU GD UA

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LAM~ I YLE G U E
L G E PERILS ALE
EON TEIS DEN


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


L
F-














Hawks' victory


oi over Raptors is


__ third straight


~
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r


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High wrestler Cole Schreiber goes to work on an opponent from Fort Walton Beach High. Schreiber scored six pins
in winning the 106-pound weight class at the Billy Saylor Invitational at Suwannee High.


Schreiber, Allen lead CHS


wrestlers in Billy Saylor event


From staff reports

Columbia High wres-
tlers Cole Schreiber and
Monterance Allen each
added another tournament
win in their impressive
2011-12 season.
The event was the
Billy Saylor Invitational at
Suwannee High on Friday
and Saturday. Seven Tigers
placed in the 14-team event,


but Columbia could not
crack the top four.
Clay High won the tourna-
ment, followed by Fleming
Island High, Lincoln High
and Key West High.
Schreiber (106-pound
weight class) and Allen (195-
pound weight class) both
swept their matches with
all pins. Schreiber went 6-0
with five of the pins coming
in the first period and one


in the second period. Allen
pinned all five of his oppo-
nents in the first round.
Daniel Devers was 5-1 in
the 160-pound weight class
and placed third. Joe Fields
also placed third, going
4-2 in the 182-pound weight
class.
Ethan Trevarrow and
Trey Allen were 3-2 and
placed fifth in the 113-pound
and 285-pound weight


Columbia's Monterance Allen (rght) is on the way to pinning his opponent from Lincoln High.


classes, respectively. Kaleb
Warner also went 3-2, which
was good for sixth place in
the 120-pound weight class.
Both Dustin Regar and
Dylan Regar went 1-3 in the
126-pound weight class and
220-pound weight class,
respectively.
Columbia returns to
action this week in a Friday-
Saturday tournament at
Brandon High.


COURTESY PHOTO


Giants stun Packers


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

The New York Giants
became the only road
team to win in this month's
NFL playoffs, stunning the
Green Bay Packers 37-20
Sunday to advance to the
NFC championship game.
With huge plays from
their offense and defense,
plus plenty of help from the
mistake-plagued Packers,
the Giants got their second
consecutive playoff victory
at Lambeau Field. The pre-
vious win, in 2008, lifted
them into the Super Bowl.
This one got them a trip to
San Francisco for the NFC
championship game next
weekend.
'This team knows how to
win on the road," defensive
end Justin Tuck said. "It
seems like right now it's
our time."
Eli Manning threw for
three touchdowns for the
second straight week,
Hakeem Nicks caught two
of his scoring throws one
a 37-yard desperation pass


i.4


IN'


.. .; , . ,..
_. .


-A.-


-






*^i
2 i .< ;- ..


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning looks for a receiver
during the NFL divisional playoff game against the Green Bay
Packers in Green Bay, Wis., on Sunday.


at the end of the first half
- and the Giants (11-7)
forced four turnovers from
the usually precise defend-


ing Super Bowl champions
and had four sacks.
The Packers were sloppy,
rusty and perhaps dispir-


ited by the shocking death
of offensive coordinator Joe
Philbin's 21-year-old son.
There were the turnovers,
dropped passes, poor tack-
ling and indecisive pass
coverage things that
didn't damage them in a
15-1 regular season that
included a 38-35 win at the
Giants.


Ravens 20, Texans 13
Baltimore forced four
turnovers and beat the
Houston Texans in the
AFC divisional round. The
Ravens are 9-0 at home this
season.
Ed Reed's interception
late in the fourth quarter
sealed it, and the Ravens
(13-4) didn't commit a pen-
alty or have a turnover.
The Texans (11-7) had
five sacks and held the
Ravens to 227 yards. But
Joe Flacco's TD passes of
1 yard to Kris Wilson and
10 to Anquan Boldin, plus
Cundiff's field goals of 48
and 44 yards were enough
offense for Baltimore.


Associated Press

ATLANTA Josh
Smith scored 28 points
and pulled down a season-
high 15 rebounds and Joe
Johnson added 27 points
to help the Atlanta Hawks
win their third straight
game with a 93-84 victory
over the Toronto Raptors
on Monday.
Leandro Barbosa fin-
ished with 22 points in a
reserve role for Toronto.


assists to lead the Cleveland
Cavaliers to a win over the
Charlotte Bobcats.
The Bobcats led 94-93
with less than two minutes
to play, but the Cavaliers
closed out the game by
scoring the final nine
points.
Antawn Jamison added
20 points and seven
rebounds for the Cavs.
D.J. Augustin led the
Bobcats with 24 points and
eight assists.


LOS ANGELES Blake
Griffin had 23 points and
14. rebounds and the Los
Angeles Clippers beat the
New Jersey Nets without
injured point guard Chris
Paul.
Trailing by 13 after a
three-point play by Reggie
Evans with 10 minutes
remaining, the Nets tied
it at 81 with 6:46 to play.
But the Clippers outscored
them 20-10 the rest of the
way, as Chauncey Billups
scored nine of his 20 points
in the final 4:23.


WASHINGTON -
Kevin Martin scored 25
points, Samuel Dalembert
added 20 and the Houston
Rockets broke away in the
third quarter to beat John
Wall and the Washington
Wizards.
Wall scored a career-
high 38 points on 13 of
22 shooting. He began the
game making under 35
percent this season.
Luis Scola had 18 and
Kyle Lowry had 16 for the
Rockets.


Blazers 84, Hornets 77 Grizzlies 102, Bulls 86


NEW ORLEANS
LaMarcus Aldridge scored
22 points and the Portland
Trail Blazers snapped a
three-game skid with a vic-
tory over the New Orleans
Hornets.
Nicolas Batum add 19
points and Gerald Wallace
14 for Portland.
Jarrett Jack scored 21,
while Emeka Okafor added
12 points and 10 rebounds
for the Hornets.

Cavs 102, Bobcats 94
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
- Kyrie Irving scored
25 points and had seven


MEMPHIS, Tenn. -
Rudy Gay scored 24 points
and Mike Conley added 20
points and eight assists,
leading the Memphis
Grizzlies past Chicago.
The Bulls played with-
out leading scorer Derrick
Rose, who missed his sec-
ond game in the last four
with a left toe sprain.
Marc Gasol had 19
points and 10 rebounds
while Marreese Speights
finished with 16 points and
12 rebounds for Merhphis.
Luol Deng led the Bulls,
with 20 points and C.J.
Watson finished with 17
* points.


Memphis Grizzlies forward Rudy Gay (22) dunks as
Chicago Bulls guard Ronnie Brewer (11) looks on in
an NBA game in Memphis, Tenn., on Monday.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek.


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SLIOP


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: ( I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BLOCK RANCH NEARLY WISDOM
I Answer: Presiding over 100 trials was this for the
judge A BENCHMARK


Clippers 101, Nets 91 Rockets 114,
Wizards 106


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


NATDEN



YCUDOL
-M i
_ ^/\ / /^ _










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH.


ZITS
SI N'TF N KNO- TWH
GA FIELDN lN E.
IT4






GARFIELD


B.C.


DEAR ABBY


Daughter could use counseling

to cope with controlling mom


DEAR ABBY: I'm 23, the
only child of a controlling,
paranoid, hermit-like and
hyper-religious mother
and a peace-loving, passive
father. I graduated from
college last year. Shortly
after, my boyfriend and I
accepted dream jobs in the
same town several hours
away from my parents.
Mom was appalled.
She "warned" me that I
wouldn't last and would
come home. Instead, I
have embraced my new
city and job. Mom is at her
wits' end. When I men-
tioned that my boyfriend
had recorded a movie for
me, she said he was con-
trolling me via technology.
If I tell her about a project
I initiated at work, she
says my employer is taking
advantage of me.
Mom pays for a landline
in my apartment that I
don't want, but she insists
because she's convinced
that cellphones cause can-,
cer. She calls me constantly,-
and if I don't answer she
leaves frantic messages
about how "disrespectful" I
am, and how she and Dad
are "praying for my soul."
This has gotten out of
control. I try talking to her,
but she won't listen and
laughs at the idea of coun-
seling. She says it's her
"job" to tell me what to do.
My father agrees that her
behavior and approach are
wrong, but says she has
good intentions and I need
to "work with her."


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
Abby, I don't know
what to do. She's becom-
ing increasingly control-
ling and worried about
my soul. I'm worried
that my distance is
affecting her health.
Some'advice, please!
- WANTS HEALTHY
RELATIONSHIP WITH
MOM
DEAR WANTS: If you
return home because you're
afraid having moved away
and asserting your indepen-
dence is negatively affect-
ing your mother's health,
you will never have a life
of your own. Because she
laughs at the idea of coun-
seling doesn't mean that
YOU shouldn't get some in
order to help you separate
yourself from her constant -
efforts to manipulate you.
Her dependence on you
is not normal. That's why
you should enlist the help
of a mental health profes-
sional. If you try to "work
with her" without that
help, she will suck you in
and you will never be free.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I have very
nice neighbors who believe
in leaving the wild and natu-
ral growth on their property.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Re-evaluate your rela-
tionships. Once you get a
better sense of who has
purpose in your life and
who, drags you down, you.
will be better equipped to
schedule your time based
on what's best for you and
who contributes the most.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Organization will
help you get the most
out of your day. Schedule
meetings or a talk with
someone who can offer
you information or help
you achieve your goals.
Romance is in the stars
and will enhance your love
life. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Keep moving. The
more time spent doing and
the less time spent talk-
ing about what you intend
to do, the better. Time
is money, so don't miss
a moment of time that
should be spent getting
ahead financially. Progress
takes precedence. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Put more effort
into your relationships
with your lover, partners,
friends and the youngsters
in your life. What you offer
others will determine what
you get in return. .Love is
in the stars, and situations
conducive to romance will
pay off. *****


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't wait around for some-
one else to flake responsibil-
ity. Jump at any chance you
get to show how capable
and valuable you are. Don't
let a change of plans stand
in your way. Readjust your
plans to compensate and
keep moving. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Relationships will
take an interesting turn.
Dealing with friends, lov-
ers or colleagues person-
ally will enhance what you
do next and how it will
affect your future. Take
steps to make things hap-
pen to your specifications.
If you want something, ask
for it. ****
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Impulsiveness will
backfire. Bide your time
and keep a close eye on
what others do, A partner
will lead you in the right
direction, as long as you
don't put up a fuss. A cre-
ative project will require
greater discipline and
detail. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Getting together with
people you find inspiring
will lead to a plan that will
benefit you. An opportu-
nity will have a direct link
to something you offer


someone out of generosity.
Romance is highlighted.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21) Don't worry
about what others do or
say. Base your-decisions
on what you feel will bene-
fit everyone and contribute
to the end result. Anger or
thoughtless actions will be
your downfall. Stay calm
and be thoughtful. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Your ideas
will lead to advancement.
Whether you are self-
employed or working for
someone else, you will
prosper if you project what
you know and do well.
Interest will mount in your
potential, both personally
and professionally. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Don't let your emotions
fester, or you will make
mistakes. Double-check
any information you receive
before you use it openly.
Too much of anything will
lead to mistakes that will be
difficult to fix. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your kindness will
help pave the way to your
advancement. Help will be
offered and favors granted
if you have been generous
in the past with your skills,
talent and know-how.
Someone from your past
will resurface. Love is in
the stars. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
Mom'. MOM'. o.0lCsR& TFHTS NICE-You'LL
SGET-s1- To Tour TI GEET-TO SE- P I TITc
RITGqfLLEf-Rvy ND SCULPTURES
TOMORROW! PND MN





5SSi^ss e ^ '


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M equals G
"X CF V E RXTH Z L Z V E F G H E F F

HUUXYXHVE. PH'A RXTHRB EF GH

VFE PJLZV HVFJMIP." U HRXK

UDZVTUJDE HD

Previous Solution: "When we find someone who is brave, fun, intelligent and
loving, we have to thank the universe." Maya Angelou
@2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-17


CLASSIC PEANUTS


F-OP TH6 MARKET WITH TH1I, FLOOD
TH MARKET vWITH THAT---IT'S Ai-L
SL .YOU VER 506665T!
r, *


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


They have posted a sign that
claims it to be a "certified
natural habitat" They never
weed or cut anything back.
At first, it was cared for, but
now it has become an eye-
sore, and people who visit our
house have made comments.
I have tried to grow bor-
der plants to hide the mess,
but nothing seems to help.
I believe it affects the value
of our home. My husband
doesn't want me to say
anything for fear of hurting
their feelings. They're nice
people, but we don't'live
in a rural area where this
might be more acceptable.
Have you any suggestions?
THORN IN OUR SIDE
DEAR THORN: Yes.
Who certified your neigh-
bors' yard as a "natural
habitat"? The city? If so,
call City Hall and find out
if their yard still qualifies.
What you have described
may be a fire hazard, so.
some investigation mat
be in order. If there is a
homeowners association
in your neighborhood, it
should also be contacted
to ensure their house is in
compliance with the codes,
covenants and restrictions.
If necessary, someone who
is close to these neighbors
should volunteer to "help"
them with their yard. A
natural landscape can be
beautiful, but only if it's
properly maintained.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.














Classified Department: 755-5440


U-
BUYZIT


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012

Lake City Reporter





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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 12-2011-CA-000398
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCES-
SOR IN INTEREST TO WACHO-
. VIA BANK N.A. (FORMERLY
KNOWN AS FIRST UNION NA-
TIONAL BANK) AS TRUSTEE
FOR HOME LOAN MORTGAGE
TRUST 1999-A, ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 1999-A;
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHARON A. JONES; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SHARON A. JONES;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UN-
KNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s):
SHARON A. JONES
Last Known Address
ROUTE 2, BOX 7180
FORT WHITE, FL 32038
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHAR-
ON A. JONES
Last Known Address
ROUTE 2, BOX 7180
FORT WHITE, FL 32038
CASE NO.: 12-2001-CA-000398
Our File Number: 11-04403
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 1, BLOCK, 2, UNIT 23,
THREE RIVERS ESTATES, A
SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RECORD-
ED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 80-
80A, PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH AN AFFIXED
MOBILE HOME 1997
GMHGA1269717264A/B title
73705611 AND 73705612.
a/k/a ROUTE 2, BOX 7180, FORT
WHITE, FL 32038
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Marinosci Law group, P.C., Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 100
W. Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 on or
before February 6, 2012, a date
which is within thirty (30) days after
the first publication of this Notice in
the LAKE CITY REPORTER and
file the original with the Clerk of this
Court, either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
This notice is provided pursuant to
Administrative Order No. 2.065.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who need any accommoda-
tion to participate should call the
ADA Coordinator, Jacquetta Brad-
ley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL
32056, 386-719-7428, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing impaired
call (800) 955-8771; if you are voice
impaired call (800) 955-8770.
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and
correct copy of the foregoing Notice
of Filing was mailed to all the parties
in the attached mailing list.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 6th day of January,
2012.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By: -s- B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
SEAL

05530041
January 17, 24, 2012


INi THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2011-315-CA
C9LUMBIA BANK, a Florida
banking corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ROBERTA. JONES,
Defendant.
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accord-
ance with the Summary Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated January 5,
2012, in the above-styled cause, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the Columbia 'County
Courthouse, Courtroom 1, 173
Northeast Hemrnando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055 at 11:00 a.m. on
February 15, 2012, the following de-
scribed .property:
Lots 2 and 3, and the West 5 feet of
Lots 10 and 11, Block 7, MOR-
NINGSIDE HEIGHTS, a subdivi-
sion according to the map or plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3,
Page 1, of the public records of Co-
lumbia County, Florida.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE ,LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated: January 9, 2012 .
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of Court
By: -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL

05530105
January 17, 24, 2012


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 2011-268-129
Division:
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARGIE D.
BUIE
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration for the 'estate of
MARGIE D.. BUIE, deceased, File
Number 2011-268-CP, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Columbia
,County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below:
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the Becedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against Decedent's estate on
whom this notice are required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the Decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is January 17, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representa-'
tives:
MARSHALL E. WOOD, P.A.
Marshall E. Wood, Esquire
Florida Bar No. 170052
303 Centre Street, Suite 100
Fernandina Beach, FL 32034
'Telephone (904)277-4666
Personal Representatives:
JULIA B. BRANCH
2090 W. 1st Street
Apartment #1007
Ft. Meyers, FL 33901
05530036
January 17, 24, 2012


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL- CIRCUIT- IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
'CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000671
DIVISION:
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP F/K/A COUNTRY WIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GABRIEL HERREARA, et al, De-
fendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated December
.21, 2011 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000671 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
' Florida wherein BAC HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS
SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff
and GABRIEL HERRERA; CARO-
LINA HERRERA; OAK MEADOW
PLANTATION AND FOREST
PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC.; are the Defendants,
The Clerk of the Court will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at FRONT STEPS OF THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 25th
day of January, 2012, the following
described property as set forth on
said Final Judgment:
LOT 32 OAK MEADOW PLANTA-
TION UNIT ONE A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 164 AND
165 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
A/K/A 4294 NW SAVANNAH
LOOP, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus form the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on December 28, 2011.
P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Publish in The Lake City Reporter
Invoice To: Florida Default Law,
Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa. Florida 33622-5018
F09096144 COUNTRYCAL-
SPECFHLMC---Team 2
,**See Americans with Disabilities
Act NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.

05529858
January 10, 17, 2012


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT; THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 11-646-CA
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPOR-
TATION,
Petitioner,
Vs.
STAFFORD L. SCAFF, JR., ANNE
C. SCAFF; and RONNIE BRAN-
NON, Columbia County Tax Collec-
tor
Defendants.
NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE AND
NOTICE OF SUIT
STATE OF FLORIDA TO:
To all said defendants who are liv-
ing, and if any or all defendants are
deceased, the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, lienors,
or other parties claiming by, through,
under or against any such deceased
defendant or defendants, if alive,
and, if dead, their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees,
creditors, lienors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under, or
against any such deceased defendant
or defendants, and: all other parties
having or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in and to the property
described in the Petition, to-wit:
Item #2083732
Parcels 712 and 723
SR 10 (US 90) DUVAL COUNTY
PARCELS 712 AND PARCEL 723
STAFFORD L. SCAFF, JR.
134 S.E. Colbum Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025
ANN C. SCAFF
134 S.E. Colburun Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025
ALL PARCELS
RONNIE BRANNON
Columbia County Tax Collector
135 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Suite
125
Lake City, Florida 32055
.You are hereby notified that the Peti-
tioner filed its Petition and its Decla-
ration of Taking in this Court against
you as defendants, seeking to con-
demn by eminent domain proceed-
ings the above described property lo-
cated in the State of Florida, County
of Duval.
You are further notified that the Peti-
tioner will apply to The Honorable
Paul s. Bryan, one of the judges of
this Court, on the 27th day of Febru-
ary, 2012, at 10:00 a.m., in the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, for an Order of Taking
in this cause. All defendants to this
suit may request a hearing at the time
,and place designated and be heard.
Any defendant failing to file a re-
quest for hearing shall waive any
right to object to the Order of Tak-
ing.
AND
. Each deifeianit s hereby required to
serve rmlen defenes,if any, and re-
quest i hearing, it desired, to said
Petition on:
DAVID M. ROBERTSON, ES-
QUIRE
Eminent Domain Department
Department of Transportation
1109 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025-5874
(386) 758-3727
on or before, February 6, 2012, and
file the originals with the Clerk of
this Court on that date, to show cause
what right, title, interest, or lien you
or any of you have in and to the
property described in the Petiti6n
and to show cause, if.any you have,
why the property should not be con-
demned for the uses and purposes set
forth in the Petition. If you fail to an-
swer, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Petition. If you fail to request a
hearing on the Petition for Order of
taking, you shall waive any right to
object to said Order of Taking.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL
of this Court on the 6th day of Jan'u-
ary, 2012.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
SEAL
By -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk

05530095
January 17, 2012


We will sell the following tenants
units on a new day and time at Com-
munity. Self Storage 814 SW State
Road 247/Branford Hwy., on Janu-
ary 30, 2012 at 9:00 AM
WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY
386-961-9926
DEBRA GRIFFIS
Personal Property

SHEILA CRAWFORD
Household/Furniture/Clothes

DARRELL MORRELL
Household Goods

LARONDA ROGERS
Furniture and appliances

MELISSA WILLIAMS
Household Goods

KATRINA LANCASTER (2 units)
Household Goods

MICHAEL ANGLIN
Furniture and household

ANNIE CALHOUN
Furniture and clothes

WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REFUSE ALL BIDS.
Cash only, 10% Buyers premium,
Jerry Duncan #AU527

05529818
January 10, 17, 2012


RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 11-645-CA
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPOR-
TATION,
Petitioner,
Vs.
COLUMBIA BANK f/k/a COLUM-
BIA BANK, a Florida Corporation;
and RONNIE BRANNON, Colum-
bia County-Tax Collector,
Defendants.
NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE AND
NOTICE OF SUIT
STATE OF FLORIDA TO:
To all said defendants who are liv-
ing, and if any .or all defendants are
deceased, the unknown spouse, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, lienors,
or other parties claiming by, through,
under or against any such deceased
defendant or defendants, if alive,
and, if dead, their unknown spouse,
heirs, devisees, legatees, grantees,
creditors, lienors, or other parties
claiming by, through, under, or
against any such deceased defendant
or defendants, and all other parties
having or claiming to have any right,
title or interest in and to the property
described in the Petition, to-wit:
Item #2083732
Parcel 710
SR 10 (US 90) DUVAL COUNTY
PARCELS 710
COLUMBIA BANK f/k/a COLUM-
BIA BANK, a Florida Corporation
Bruce A. Naylor, Registered Agent
173 N.W. Hillsboro Street
Lake City, Florida 32055
ALL PARCELS
RONNIE BRANNON
Columbia County Tax Collector
135 N.E. Hernando Avenue, Suite
125
Lake City, Florida 32055
You are hereby notified that the Peti-
tioner filed its Petition and its Decla-
ration of Taking in this Court against
you as defendants, seeking to con-
demn by eminent domain proceed-
ings the above described property lo-
cated in the State of Florida, County
of Duval.
You are further notified that the Peti-
tioner, will apply to The Honorable
Paul S. Bryan, one of the judges of
this Court, on the 27th day of Febru-
ary, 2012, at 10:30 a.m., in the Co-
lumbia County Courthouse, Lake
City, Florida, for an Order of Taking
in this cause. All defendants to this
suit may request a hearing at the time
and place designated and be heard.
Any defendant failing to file a re-
quest for hearing shall waive any
right to object to the Order of Tak-
ing.
AND
Each defendant is hereby required to
serve written defenses, if any, and re-,
quest a hearing, if desired, to said
P e ti tio n -o n : ' . ...
DAVID M. ROBERTSON, ES-
QUIRE
Eminent Domain Department
Department of Transportation
1109 South Marion Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025-5874
(386) 758-3727
on or before, February 6, 2012, and
file the originals with the Clerk of
this Court on that date, to show cause
what right, title, interest, or lien you
or any of you have in and to the
property described in the Petition
and to show cause, if any you have,
why the property should not be con-
demned for the uses and purposes set.
forth in the Petition. If you fail to
answer, a default to request a hearing
on the Petition for Order of Taking,
you shall waive any right to object to
said Order of Taking.
WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL
of this Court on the 6tH day of Janu-
ary, 2012.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
SEAL
By -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05530097
January 17, 2012


020 Lost & Found

REWARD: Lost Eclectus Parrot.
Vibrant green, silky feathers,
Male. price Creek Rd & Peacock.
386-961-9188

100 Job
100U Opportunities

BOOKKEEPER NEEDED
Must know Quickbooks and taxes.
Call 386-854-0511
For interview.
18 Temp Farmworkers needed
2/15/12-12/15/12. Workers will
plant, cultivate, & harvest
soybeans, corn, cotton, pecans &
peanuts. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools, supplies,
equip, provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate $9.30/hr for MS $9.39/hr
for AL depending on location of
crop activity. Subject to random.
drug testing at employer's
expense. Worksites in George Co.
MS & Mobile Co. AL. Report or
send a resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & ref. job order #AL758627
or call 850-921-3466. Driskell
Cotton Farm Grand Bay, AL

MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
Needed: Commercial Cloth cutter
for gun cases, related items &
other miscellaneous work.
Hafners 386-755-6481


Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


100 Job
Opportunities

Wee Care of Columbia City
is hiring CDA After school Teach-
ers. 20-35.hrs per week. Experi-
ence required. Apply in person.

4 Temporary Farm Workers
Needed. William L. Folz -
Hopkinsville, KY. Perform all
duties of Straw/Hay and Row
Crop Production & Alternative
Work. Employment Dates:
03/07/2012 12/15/2012. Wage of
$9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0442744.

1 A Medical
12 -Employment

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resume to P.O. Box
805 Lake City, Florida 32056

Madison County
Memorial Hospital
Now Hiring:
RN's, Full Time and as needed
Full Time Environmental
Services Supervisor
Please contact Human Resources
(850)973-2271 ext. 1906

A Schools &
240 Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?,
Express Training-offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

4 BURNER stainless steel
gas range. Less than
3 yrs old. $400.
386-205-7713

Whirlpool, side by side,
refrigerator. Black with ice maker,
water & ice dispenser.
$300. obo. 386-365-5173

407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

41 Musical
413 Merchandise

NEW Guitar Estaban
Small Amp. Hard case. Stand.
$200.00
386-719-4819







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
rakine, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Connected www.lakecityreporter.com

,J 0 r
U lter ~_ '^^yw --IR- --l


I~r~All~




. I * I


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012


Classified Department: 755-5440


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

7000 WATT Troybilt generator
10,000 watt surge, new in 2011
$750.00
386-205-7713
Total Gym
with attachments
$250.00
call 386-623-3202

450 Good Things -
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties. *
386-752-6896


460 Firewood
FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771

$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
2BR DW
Secluded
$500 mo
386-752-7887
3/2 SW MH on .5 acre lot of small
MHP. Superb Quality, Full Re-
model, 140 NW Reflections Gin.
Lake City, FL, No Pets. F, L&D
3/2 SW, justrenovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841


4 Mobile Homes
6-4 ,for Sale
2011 Blowout
S4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Beautiful Main-
tained DWMH, 5br/2ba on 1/2
acre. 12X24 workshop, fenced
.$105,000. MLS 77064
Hallmark Real Estate
4/3 DW w/14X76' porch on 5 ac.
in Ellisville area. 2 carports,
storage, fenced pasture. $99,900
S#78295 Ginger Parker 365-2135
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.

E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?

We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Dealer in NW Florida Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating THEIR Entire
Inventory!.Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64,4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR

$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go

800-622-2832 ext210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


f650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
Affordable Lg. Home on 2 ac.,
being sold as is $59,900
MLS 74862 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

055007
WINSN APTS


2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2br/lba duplex, NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi-
cient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo.
$300-Dep. 386-755-1937
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800, wwwmyflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652,
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Rental in 55+ neighborhood.
2 bedroom/I bath Duplex across
from Clubhouse. No Pets.
Call Denise.@ 386-752-5290
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-315-2509 or 965-5560
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Pwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-295.1
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br'
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


Jasmine

iho. I', .:r. : .nir
1.i .,.I Lal:.
Nu: 1 i.1l v.cr Dr,.,c
Mil.dJl Hours
I,.e Ffda, 12-5
Sit 10.4
Sun 1-ipn
Sll lBrn n Z'chu
1386) "'52-8653


71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
S/J Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
2BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$450 mo.
386-752-0335
Monday -Friday 8A-4P
3/2 Brick Home, fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent w/option to
purchase available. 386-752-5035
X 3114 7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit'
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
4 BR/2BA in towonon cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
4BR/2BA.
Lake Access.
$1,000 mo.
Call 386-752-3066
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
NICE 3BR/2.5BA in Russwood
S/D $995. mo. $750 security.
Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
,$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
Office Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1100sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500








ON WHlELS& aTi.flISAFT' '









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!

Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. condo.


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



To Ge You


750 Business &
SOffice Rentals

For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762

Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale

EASTSIDE VILLAGE
REALTY, INC.
MLS#76668 Buildable lot.
High and dry.
Call Denise @386-752-5290

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will notrknowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

Hallmark Real Estate
A home for all seasons. Lg patio,
fireplace. 4/2 brick & cedar.
Just reduced $20,000 #71691
Janet Creel 386-719-0382

Hallmark Real Estate
Just Listed. 3/2 on a Terraced hill.
Brick w/fenced yard. All applian-
ces. Owner Financed offered.
#79683 Janet Creel 386-719-0382
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
In town, 3/2 Concrete Block home,
fenced yard. $149, 900
MLS 71999, Elaine Tolar
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D.
S$129,900 NewAC in 2010.
Elaine K. Tolar. 755-6488
MLS# 75198


810 Home for Sale
Coidwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Wonderful home on Lake. 4/3
Fireplace, many upgrades. MLS
76085, Elaine Tolar 755-6488 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Close to town. 2br/2ba, wood lam-
inate floors. Vaulted ceilings.
MLS 76928 $59,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & Tidy remodeled 2/2 open
floor plan. MLS# 77943
$94,500 Mary Brown Whitehurst
386-965-0887
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot.
on the Suwannee.
Well & anerobic septic system.
MLS 78842 $45,000
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/Ist time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 365-5146
Callaway S/D, 3br/2ba. Well
maintained. Fenced back yard &
double car garage. $175,000
MLS 79567 Century 21, The
Darby Rogers Co. 752-6575.
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in
High Springs. Real wood floors,
stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 79601 $178,000 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Immaculate home on 10 + acres in
Wellborn. Tile floors, fenced, barn
w/workshop. $309, 900 MLS
79650, Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent neighborhood. 4br/2ba.
2469 sqft on 1 + acres. $190,000
MLS 79654, Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 5br/4ba Custom
kitchen, screened inground pool.
Many upgrades on 5 ac. Many
extras. .$385,000. MLS 79688
COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence V1g $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669
CYPRESS LANDING! 3BR/2BA
w/lg great room, split floor plan
& 2-car garage $105,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79634
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom/2 bath.
1 car garage. Priced to sell.
Call Denise @386-752-5290

Contemporary Elegance.
MLS 79579 4br/3ba plush carpet
& so much more! $224,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 8.3 acres.
Has 14x30 workshop with electric.
MLS 79345 $199,900

NICE 3BR/2BA DWMH w/fenced
yard plus double carport &
wkshop $39,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #79078


Announcements


Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites,
25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your
advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida
(866)742-1373


Auctions


BANKRUPTCY AUCTION. CASE#3:09-BK-
35259. 2 Adjacent Acreage Tracts, Pigeon Forge,
TN. 82 Acres & 43.9 Acres. Sat., Jan. 21, .10:30
AM. (800)4-FURROW. TN Lic. #62

FORECLOSURE AUCTION. 35 Residential
Lots, Mountain Shadows Resort, Gatlinburg,
TN near Great Smoky Mtns., Wed., Jan. 25,
12:00 Noon. WWW.FURROW.COM (800)4-
FURROW. TN Lic. #62


'Education


ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend
college 100% online. Job ,placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.
CenturaOnline.com


Financial Services


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-
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Help Wanted


A Better Career With Melton Great Equipment
& Benefits 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp
(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com

Driver- Start out the year with Daily Pay and
Weekly Home Time! Single Source Dispatch.
Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A, 3 months recent
experience required. (800)414-9569. www.
driveknight.com

HIRING EXPERIENCED/
INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS!
Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo
Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training
Available. Call Today: (877)882-6537 www.
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Drivers: RUN 5 STATE REGIONAL! Get
Home Weekends, Earn Up to 39/mi, 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. req'd. SUNBELT TRANSPORT,
LLC (800)572-5489 ext. 227


810 Home for Sale
ONLY $38,500 for 4BR/2BA
concrete block home; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
brick home newly renovated &
inground pool, fenced yard
$69,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST! Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505

820 Farms &
A Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

20 ac Wooded tract.
10 m iles from Cedar Key.
MLS 78886, $70,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
83 Property
Hallmark Real Estate
Rental Investment. 4 duplexes
(8 apartments) All units are rented
and in good shape.
#69380 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate Carfip-
ground/RV Park w/67 pull thrus,
cabins & mobile home. Showers,
clubhouse +2 story owner home.
#78793 Janet Creel 719-0382

860 Investment
Property
Great Investment in city limits.
Both units occupied.
MLS 79206 $50,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT INVESTMENT
2 units w/ 2br/lba, 2 stories
w/balconies. MLS 79271,
$230,000., Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
80 1V Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price '
386-269-0605

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2009 39 Foot Travel Trailer,
Self Contained, 2 slides, Awning,
W/D, many extras. $23,500 OBO
Call 443-306-8710 Cell


Land For Sale


20 Acres-Live On Land NOW!! Only $99/
mo. $0 Down, Owner Financing, NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful
Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. (800)755-
8953 www.sunsetranches.com

Mid Winter Land Sale! Sat, Jan 21st 6+ AC w/
WATERFRONT only $34,900 Gorgeous wooded
setting with dockable lake frontage out your back
door! Paved rds, power, phone, Boat, ski, fish,
camp/RV, more. Excellent financing. Won't last,
call now (866)952-5302, x 116


Miscellaneous


EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call
(877)206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands
on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid if qualified Housing
available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769


Real Estate


Mobile Home with land, ready to move in, great
value. Approx 1500 sq ft, 3Br 2Ba serious offers
only, no renters. Call (850)308-6473


RVs for Sale


SELL YOUR RV FAST! Online at RVT.com
Millions of RV Shoppers Thousands of RVs
SOLD Serving RV traders since 1999 www.
RVT.com or Call (888)752-1344

Schools & Instruction

Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! (877)359-1690




AN F

ADVERTISING' 1 O FFIORIDA

W ...e o J-, nu ry.1 ,. 1



( Week of January 16, 2012 )


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Corial Homes
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