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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01752
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 15, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01752
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







1'13'16 21013 1 ''
FL 0I
GA :. -I:.jFi36 1-2-i


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ty


Reporter


Sunday, January 15, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 297 E 75 cents


A voter looks to fill out early voting ballots at the Columbia County Supervisor of Elections office while voting in January 2008.



New rules for Republican



presidential primary Jan. 31


Federal lawsuit argues
new law harms low-income
and minority voters

Oy GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Registered Democrats can't vote in the Jan.
31 Florida Presidential Preference Primary
- Barack Obama faces no opposition for his
party's nomination.
But registered Republicans have lots of
choices on the ballot, including three people
who are no longer active Republican presi-
dential candidates Michelle Bachmann,
Herman Cain and Gary Johnson. That still
leaves six candidates for Republican


voters to consider.
Recent polls declare Mitt Romney is the
front-runner with primary wins in Iowa and
New Hampshire. But there are other high-
profile challengerswith name recognition and
a national support base including Ron Paul,
Newt Gingrich, Rick Perry, Jon Huntsman
and Rick Santorum.
Liz Home, Columbia County's supervisor
of elections, said she hasn't had any com-
plaints since new state election laws were
implemented last year.
One of the changes places extra responsi-
bility on volunteers participating in voter reg-
istration drives. The League of Women Voters
of Florida stopped holding voter registration
drives in May after more than 70 years in the
state as a result of the changes.
A federal lawsuit filed in December chal-


lenging the election laws argues the new law
harms low-income and minority voters who
sign up through voter registration drives
more than aiy other group. Nationwide, the
stricter standards in Florida and other states
could keep 5 million people,from voting this'
year, according to a study by the Brennan
Center for Justice.
Columbia County currently has 40,944 reg-
istered voters, but only 32,845 of those are on
the active voter list Voters get dropped from
the active list if they fail to participate in the
past two general elections.
Horne predicted a turnout as high as 29
percent of eligible voters for the presidential
primary elections.
Horne said some people will show up at
RULES continued on 3A


Races in

S.C. can

be nasty

State's reputation
for mudslinging
and brawling
is well-earned
By JEFFREY COLLINS
Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C. In mail-
boxes across South Carolina
in 2007, likely
Republican vot-
ers received a
Christmas card
signed by "The
Romney Family"
with a quotation
from a 19th cen-
tury Mormon
leader suggest- Atwater
ing God had sev-
eral wives.
Mitt Romney's campaign,
just a few weeks away from
the 2008 presidential ,primary
in a state where evangelicals
look skeptically on the former
Massachusetts governor's
Mormon faith, condemned the
bogus card as politics at its
worst. The sender never took
credit. And it was just another
anonymous shot in the endless
volleys of nasty campaigning in
South Carolina.
I While attack politics happen
reputation for electoral mud-
slinging and bare-knuckled
brawling is well-earned.
Why there? Largely because
of the high stakes. South
Carolina has always picked the
GOP's eventual nominee since
the primary's inception in 1980.
And money, nerves and time are
usually running out for almost
everyone but the front-runner
after Iowa and New Hampshire,
often leading challengers to go
for the jugular.
'The ghost of Lee Atwater
hangs over South Carolina like
a morning fog and permeates
every part of the state's pol-
itics," says Scott Huffmon, a
Winthrop University political
RACES continue on 3A


Conservation easement

will protect water resources


Purchase completed using
Florida Forever funding
From staff reports
LIVE OAK- The Suwannee'River Water
Management District purchased a conser-
vation easement on more than 167 acres
of land on the Aucilla River in Jefferson
County. The easement, purchased from
Chris and Kristine Layman, will require
the land to remain in its natural state
and condition in order to protect water
resources.
The conservation easement will pro-


vide 71.73 acres of springs protection,
90.5 acres of surfacewater protection, 167
acres of floodplain protection, and 3,085
feet of river frontage protection.
"We commend the Laymans for part-
nering with the district to protect our
natural resources," said Melanie Roberts,
the district's director of mission support
"Not only will this easement provide a
buffer for the Aucilla River, it will protect
a freshwater spring and floodplain and
wetland forests."
The purchase was completed using
Florida Forever funding in the amount of
$251,000, or $1,500 per acre.
EASEMENT continued on 3A


Sean Thomas (right), 16,
buys a cupcake from Joy
Rute at the Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market Saturday.
The morning's chilly tem-
peratures kept the vanilla
cupcakes with french butter-
cream frosting from melting,
said Ruhe, a regular market
vendor. The frosting is made
with "real butter, no Crisco,"
she said. The farmers market
is open every Saturday from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Wilson
Park along Lake DeSoto in
downtown Lake City.


Associated Press
In this image provided by the U.S. Coast Guard the Kigluaik Mountains are visible as the
Coast Guard Cutter Healy breaks ice for the Russian tanker Renda near Nome Friday. The
Healy has been escorting and breaking ice for the Russian tanker since Jan. 3 on its way to
Nome to deliver 1.3 million gallons of fuel. Now comes the tricky part: getting more than a mil-
lion gallons of diesel and gasoline to shore through a mile-long hose without a spill.

Tricky transfer awaits tanker


Vessel taking its time to
avoid gasoline, diesel spill
to iced-in Alaska town
MARY PEMBERTON
Associated Press
ANCHORAGE, Alaska A Russian
tanker is preparing to off-load more than
a million gallons of diesel and gasoline to
fuel-starved Nome, but first it must posi-
tion itself near the Alaska town's iced-in


harbor to send that cargo through a mile-
long hose without a spill.
Led by and a U.S. Coast Guard icebreak-
er, the vessel plowed through hundreds of
miles of Bering Sea ice to reach Nome. It
was holding steady about eight miles off
shore Friday night.
The problem is Nome's harbor is iced-in,
preventing the 370-foot tanker Renda from
getting to the city dock. It will have to moor
offshore to transfer its 1.3-million-gallon-
TANKER continued on 3A
.. .. ..


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Opinion ................ 4A
Business ................ IC
Obituaries .............. 5.
Advice ................. 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Bank bldg. gets
new occupant.


COMING
TUESDAY
Local. news
roundup


t
"r 1
f iI











LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY. JANUARY 15. 2012


Friday:
6-14-20-32 MB 12


#-.

Friday:
1-5-12-16-22


SH 3.

Saturday:
Afternoon: 9-3-3


i iav 4

Saturday:
Afternoon: 5-8-6-5


FLORIDA


Wednesday:
11-26-36-45-46-52


Wednesday:
5-19-29-45-47 PB 25


AROUND FLORIDA


1793 penny fetches $1.38M at auction


By The Associated Press
ORLANDO, Fla. A
once-cent copper coin
from the earliest days of
the U.S. Mint in 1793 has
sold for a record $1.38
million at a Florida auc-
tion.
James Halperin ofTexas-
based Heritage Auctions
told The Associated Press
on Saturday that the sale
was "the most a United
States copper coin has
ever sold for at auction."
The coin was made at the
Mint in Philadelphia in
1793, the first year that
the U.S. made its own
coins.
Heritage officials said
in a news release that the
name of the buyer was
not revealed but that he
was "a major collector."
One of the coin's earliest
owners was a well-known
Baltimore banker, Louis
E. Eliasberg, Sr.
"Mr. Eliasberg was nick-
named, 'the king of coins'
because before his death
in 1976 he assembled a
collection that consisted
of at least one example
of every coin ever made
at the United States
Mint, a feat never dupli-
cated," Halperin said in


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo provided by Heritage Auctions shows the front and back of one of the first pennies struck at the United
States Mint in Philadelphia. This 1793 "Chain Cent" sold for a record $1,380,000 in a public auction conducted by Heritage
Auctions at a coin collector's convention in Orlando, Fla. on Wednesday evening, Jan. 4, 2012. The linking rings on the
back of the coin were intended to represent the original 13 colonies, but critics claimed the chain was symbolic of slavery
and the design was quickly changed with a wreath replacing the chain.


the news release.
The final bid for the coin
last week was one of the
largest sales at the Florida
United Numismatists coin
show and annual conven-
tion, which runs. through
Sunday. Halperin said a
five-dollar gold piece from


1829 also was sold.
Halperin said there
remain a few hundred
1793 coins in different
condition, but that the one
auctioned off Wednesday
night is rare because it
wasn't in circulation.
Officials say it shows no


wear on its lettering, its
Lady Liberty face or the
chain of linking rings on
its back.
The news release said
the coin is known as a
"Chain Cent" because its
chain of linking rings was
supposed to represent the


solidarity of the states. The
design was changed to a
wreath after some critics
claimed it was symbolic of
slavery.
Halperin said the auction
had more than $64 million
in transactions. The show
,runs through Sunday.


Ul FSU

presidents

suggest higher

STEM tuition

By Bill Kaczor
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -
Presidents of Florida's two
leading research universi-
ties suggested Priday that
lawmakers let them pay for
expanding expensive science,
technology, engineering and
math programs by charging
those so-called STEM stu-
dents higher tuition.
University of Florida's
Bernie Machen and Florida
State University's Eric
Barron also told the House
Education Committee their
schools and possibly some
others should be allowed to
bring up tuition rates, now
among the lowest in the
nation, closer to the national
average. Current law lets
the Legislature and Board
of Governors approve annual
increases totaling no more
than 15 percent
Gov. Rick Scott, who has
made job creation his top
priority, has been pushing
universities to boost STEM
degree production because
there's greater demand for
those graduates in the mar-
ketplace.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Golden Globes get ball rolling toward Oscars


By David Germain
AP Movie Writer
LOS ANGELES Hollywood's first
big show on the road to the Academy
Awards will help determine if silence
is golden this season.
The black-and-white silent film "The
Artist" leads contenders for today's
Golden Globes with six nominations,
among them best musical or com-
edy, directing and writing honors for
Michel'Havanavicius and acting slots
for Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo.
Though still playing in narrow
release, the film has found enthusias-
tic audiences and has been a critical
darling since premiering at last May's
Cannes Film Festival, positioning it
as the first silent movie with serious
awards prospects since the first years
of the Oscars in the late 1920s.
In an age of elaborate computer
effects and digital 3-D projection, "The
Artist" is such a throwback to early
cinema that it comes off as something
entirely fresh.
"It's very relaxing for people to actu-
ally go to this movie," said Dujardin,
nominated for best actor in a musical
or comedy for his role as a silent-era
star whose career implodes when talk-
ies take over. "It's a new visual and
emotional experience for people....
It's really strange and rare to not hear
anything in the theater."
Tied for second-place at the Globes
with five nominations each are
George Clooney's family tale 'The
Descendants" and the literary adapta-
tion 'The Help," both competing for
best drama.
Also in the running for best drama:
Martin Scorsese's family adventure
"Hugo"; Clooney's political thriller
'The Ides of March"; Brad Pitt's
sports tale "Moneyball"; and Steven
Spielberg's World War I epic "War
Horse."
For best musical or comedy, 'The
Artist" is up against Joseph Gordon-
Levitt's cancer story "50/50"; Kristen
Wiig's wedding romp "Bridesmaids";
Woody Allen's romantic fantasy
"Midnight in Paris"; and Michelle
Williams' Marilyn Monroe tale "My
Week with Marilyn."
Alongwith honors from trade groups
such as the directors, actors and writ-
ers guilds, the Globes help sort out
key contenders for the Oscars, whose
nominations balloting closed Friday,
with nominees announced Jan. 24.
A win Sunday can firm up a film's
prospects to triumph at the Oscars on
Feb. 26, though the Globes have had
a bad track record predicting eventual


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file film publicity image released by Disney, Viola Davis is shown in a
scene from "The Help."


best-picture winners in recent years.
Over the last seven years, only one
Globe best-picture winner 2008's
"Slumdog Millionaire" has gone on
to claim the top honor at the Oscars.
Before that stretch, the Globes had
been on an eight-year streak in which
one of its two best-picture recipients
went on to become the Oscar champ.
Last year, "The Social Network"
won best-drama at the Globes and
looked like the early Oscar favorite.
But momentum later swung to even-
tual Oscar best-picture winner "The
King's Speech."
The Globes generally do a better
job predicting who might take home
the acting Oscars. A year ago, all
four actors who won Oscars earned
Globes first- lead players Colin Firth .
for 'The King's Speech" and Natalie
Portman for "Black Swan" and 'The
Fighter" supporting stars Christian
Bale and Melissa Leo.
Along with Clooney, Pitt and
Williams, other established stars
nominated for Globes include Meryl
Streep in the Margaret Thatcher tale
'The Iron Lady," Leonardo DiCaprio
in the J. Edgar Hoover saga "J. Edgar,"
Glenn Close in the Irish drama "Albert
Nobbs" and Kate Winslet in the stage
adaptation "Carnage."
The lineup also features many new-
comers to the awards scene, among
them Wiig for "Bridesmaids," Gordon-
Levitt for "50/50," Michael Fassbender
for the sex-addict drama "Shame,"
Rooney Mara for the thriller 'The Girl
with the Dragon Tattoo" and Brendan
Gleeson for the Irish crime tale 'The
Guard."
'The Help" picked up three acting
nominations: Viola Davis for dramat-
ic actress and Octavia Spencer and
Jessica Chastain for supporting actress.


Adapted from Kathryn Stockett's best-
seller about black maids speaking
out about their white employers dur-
ing the civil-rights movement, the hit
drama has been a career-maker for
many of its collaborators, including
first-time director Tate Taylor, a child-
hood friend of Stockett, and producer
Brunson Green.
"It's a testament to pulling yourself
up by your bootstraps and not taking
no for an answer," said Spencer, a long-
time friend of Tate who had been toil-
ing in small parts before 'The Help."
"Kathryn was an underdog, and Tate
and I and Brunson. ... They'd only
done independent films and shorts,
and now they're in the big leagues."
The Globes are presented by the
Hollywood Foreign Press Association,
a group of about 85 entertainment
reporters for overseas outlets.
The ceremony, carried live on NBC,
is a more laid-back affair than the
Oscars, with Globe guests sharing
dinner and drinks that can loosen up
stars' tongues when it comes to pre-
senting or accepting awards.
Ricky Gervais returns as host for
the third-straight year, despite uneasy
moments a year ago when he took
sharp swipes at celebrities and Golden
Globe organizers themselves. It paid
off with a boost in TV ratings for the
show, though, so the Globes invited
Gervais back.
Behind the scenes, the HFPA and
the Globes' longtime producers, dick
clark productions, continue to fight
in federal court over which entity has
the authority to negotiate multi-mil-
lion dollar broadcast rights to future
shows. Although this year's telecast
was never in serious jeopardy, the
HFPA is anxious to try to negotiate a
better deal with other networks.


Actress Margaret
O'Brien ("Meet Me in St.
Louis") is 75.
*Actress Andrea
.Martin is 65.,... .


Actor-director Mario
Van Peebles is 55.
Actor James Nesbitt
" (Waking Ned Devine") is
47.


Thought for Today

"A nation or civilization that
continues to produce soft-
minded men purchases its own
spiritual death on the install-
ment plan."
Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968).


Daily Scripture
"Whoever claims to love God
yet hates a brother or sister is a
liar. For whoever does not love
their brother and sister, whom
they have seen, cannot love
God, whom they have not seen.
And he has given us this com-
mand: Anyone who loves God
must also love their brother and


sister."


I John 4:20-21 NIV


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
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Fax number ............ .752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
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lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
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(twilson@lakedtyreporter.com)
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


,, "-" -
."_. . .
..: .~jI


Celebrity Birthdays









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY. JANUARY 15. 2012 3A


RACES: South Carolina can be nasty


Continued From Page 1A
fessor. Atwater, who died
20 years ago, was South
Carolina's most famous politi-
cal operative and a master of
slash-and-burn politics.
Given the dynamics of this
year's Republican presidential
race, its safe to expect under-
the-radar attacks over the next
week as challengers work to
derail front-runner Romney
before the Jan. 21 primary.
The rise of super PACs -,
outside groups aligned with
but independent from the can-
didates means some of the
attacks could be more public
this time, but still nasty.
"You've got four guys that
are make or break,' said
Warren Tompkins, a veteran
South Carolina political con-
sultant advising Romney.
"Desperate men do desperate
things."
. Romney says he's ready for
whatever comes his way.
"Politics ain't beanbags,
and I know its going to get
tough," the GOP front-runner
said as he headed south after
his New Hampshire victory.
"But I know that is sometimes
part of the underbelly of poli-
tics."


The lore of negative attacks
here includes a whisper cam-
paign against Republican John
McCain in 2000 that includ-
ed rumors that the daugh-
ter his family adopted from
Bangladesh was the Arizona
senator's illegitimate black
child.
Those were desperate
times for George W. Bush's
campaign. McCain had just
stunned the establishment's
choice with a blowout win in
New Hampshire, and Bush
had just 18 days to turn the
momentum around in South
Carolina. Publicly, Bush took
a few shots at McCain, but
mostly stressed he was the
true conservative. But plenty
of ugliness was happening
behind the scenes.
People who attended ral-
lies or debates found flyers on
their car windshields with the
accusations about McCain's
daughter and raising ques-
tions abouthis mental stability.
Callers, pretending to be poll-
sters, would ask loaded ques-
tions of voters about whether
they could support a man who
had homosexual experiences
or a Vietnam hero who was


really was a traitor. The spon-
sors of the false attacks were
careful to leave no trail.
Alone, none of the charg-
es was all that believable.
But their combined weight
dragged McCain down.
How careful were the folks
attacking McCain? Exit polls
after Bush won the 2000 pri-
mary with 53 percent of the
vote found that nearly half
of South Carolina voters felt
that McCain had made unfair
attacks, compared to only
about a third who felt Bush
was unfair.
McCain learned a lesson,
and in 2008 responded quick-
ly to almost every negative
attack, winning the state's pri-
mary.
That was the same year
that the bogus Mormon holi-
day card was sent to GOP
activists and that the web site
PhonyFred.org sprang up dur-
ing the GOP primary to anony-
mously attack Republican can-
didate Fred Thompson. There
also were automated phone
calls raising doubts about one
candidate or another. And, of
course, whisper campaigns
crop up every four years.


TANKER: Tricky fuel transfer awaits


Continued From Page 1A
payload across the ice and
to fuel headers that feed a
nearby tank farm..
The Coast Guard Cutter
Healy can only get so close
to shore because of shallow
waters.
Officials want to place the
Renda "where there's enough
water around it that the Healy
can then break the Renda free
once the delivery is done,"
Coast Guard spokesman
David Mosley said.
"Out of the safety of the
vessels, they're taking the
time they need to evaluate
where to put the Renda so
the operation to shore can be
done safely, but then so we
can.break them free-and get
thne'on their w6tyaftrw~id,"
he said. .1
For days, operations offi-
cials have looked at how best
to lay the segmented fuel
hose across the shore-fast ice


for the transfer. The idea is to
get the tanker as close to the
harbor as possible to reduce
the chance of a spill.
There has been a lot of anx-
ious waiting since the ship left
Russia in mid-December. It
picked up diesel fuel in South
Korea before traveling to
Dutch Harbor, Alaska, where
it took on unleaded gasoline.
Late Thursday, the vessels
stopped offshore and began
planning the transfer.
A fall storm prevented
Nomefromgettingafueldeliv-
ery by barge in November.
Without the tanker delivery,
supplies of diesel fuel, gaso-
line and home heating fuel
in Nome are expected to run
out in March and,'Aril, well
before a barge delivery again
in late May or June.
Nome Mayor Denise
Michels sat in her car Friday
morning in record-breaking


low temperatures and gazed
past the harbor entrance. Her
eyes focused on the lights
coming from the tanker and
the icebreaker just before
dawn.
"It is right out there. You
can see it," she said. "We are
pretty excited."
It wasn't immediately clear
when the fuel transfer would
begin, but University ofAlaska
Fairbanks researcher -Greg
Walker said a lot remains to
be done before it can occur.
Walker is in Nome provid-
ing information about ice
conditions near the harbor.
The tanker needs to get posi-
tioned securely in the ice and
moored so it won't move dur-
ing 'tie process. Crews also
need to finish removing large
boulders of ice in a rubble
field and leveling large pres-
sure ridges to create a flat
surface for the transfer hose.


EASEMENT: Protecting water resources


Continued From Page 1A
A conservation easement is
agreement that leaves the basic
and management of property wi
owner but permanently restric

We thefami .

of
Deacon Aaron
J. Sumpter I
Wish to take this
opportunity to thank
each and everyone of
you for your kind
acts shown during
this most difficult
hour in our lives.
Your heartfelt
expressions of
Christian love, has
helped to ease
ourpain.
The Sumpter Family
^ LL


a perpetual
ownership
.th the land
ts the use


and alteration of the land.
The district currently protects more
than 124,000 acres of water resource lands
using this tool.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A flamingo eats treats from a visitor's hand during the Flamingo Fest at Flamingo Gardens in
Pembroke Pines, Fla., Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012. Flamingo Gardens celebrates the great pink
bird with art and sculptures by local artists and food. The flamingo art was made with recycled
materials. Established in 1927, the Gardens is one of the oldest botanical gardens in South
Florida. The 60-acre contains 3000 tropical species of plants and trees, in addition to 83 spe-
cies of native birds and animals.



RULES: Republican primary changes


Continued From Page 1A
Horne said some people
will show up at the polls
and not know they were
dropped from the active
voter list. They will have
to fill out paperwork to be
returned to the active list
but it will be too late to
participate in the Jan. 31
primary. State law requires
voters to be registered no
later than 29 days before an
election.
Horne said she hasn't
noticed anything that indi-
cates how new election laws
are impacting Columbia
County.
"It hasn't affected us
that much," Home said.
"I haven't had any com-
plaints."
The new election laws
'reduce the early voting
period from 14 days to
eight days and require vot-
ers who move from another
county who provide a new
address to use a provisional
Ballot. -Horne urged new
county residents who are
already registered to vote in
Florida to contact her office
to ensure they don't have a
problem oh Election Day.
-Early voting is Jan. 21- 28
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
at two locations in Columbia
County: Supervisor of
Elections office, 971 W.
Duval St., Lake City; or at
the Fort White Branch,
17579 SW State Road 47.
Registered Republicans


can also request absen-
tee ballots before Jan. 25.
Absentee ballots can be
requested by letter, e-mail
or telephone to be mailed
to them.
Voters are not required
to give a reason for early
or absentee voting, Home
said.
For the traditional-
ists who like to wait until
Election Day to cast their
votes, 25 polling places are
open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
on Jan. 31.
She also encouraged any-


one who has not updated
his or her signature on file
at the voter registration
office for the past decade
to do so.
"You would not believe
how people's signatures
change over time," she
said.
Horne suggested vot-
ers go to the Supervisor of
Elections website to see a
sample ballot, find a polling
place or for more inforina-
tion. Call the Supervisor
of Elections office at (386)
758-1026 for information.


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Florida Tax Payers

please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous
fallacy of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word
of God. It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia
High School, Fort White High School and Challenge Learning Center
students and alumni. All of them are offspring of Adam and his female
wife Eve and therefore are created by God, in the image of God. (Compare
Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1 End-if-Course Assessment Test Items
Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1; page 52 SC.912.L.15.10

http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)

I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com
in The Year of our Lord 2012
Paid for by Kenny Merriken


I -













OPINION


Sunday, January 15, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


OUR
OPINION


Have


you had


The Talk


yet?


change the way they
think about death
and dying.
The United States
spends about $70 billion a year
one third of all Medicare
expenditures on medical care
for the elderly in the last months
of their lives. If money for health
care is going to be limited, and
we know it is, then we need to
think and talk about whether this
is the right place to be spending
so much of it
The Republican candidates for
president all are promising to
repeal President Barack Obama's
health care reforms, which may
or may not sit well with people
already benefiting from health
insurance because of them.
What the candidates and the
president should be talking
about instead is how to get medi-
cal costs under control so that
all Americans can receive better
care with the money available.
Part of that has to be a serious
exploration of what Americans at
the end of their lives really want
and need in the way of medical
treatment
And please, don't even breathe
the term "death panels." No one
in their right mind wants to kill
grandma and grandpa, certainly
not anyone running for public
office. But we do need a bet-.. ....;..
ter way to determine the right '
amount of testing and treatment
appropriate for elderly patients.
Research already shows that
elderly patients who fully engage
in end-of-life discussions with
their doctors and families choose
less aggressive treatment They
also experience less depression
and an improved quality of life
for them and their families.
The United States will spend
nearly $2 trillion on health care
this year, a level nearly double
the per-capita rate in Europe.
This is 17 percent of the U.S.
gross domestic produce and
growing. We cannot sustain it,
especially when our chief com-
petitors in the world economy
are spending considerably less
and in some cases getting better
overall results.
San Jose Mercury News

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to.
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.


BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


LETTERS TO



Are:



red

To the Editor:

In the Sunday, December
11, 2011 editorial of the Lake
City Reporter the editorial
spoke of the recent redistrict-
ing effort by the Board of
County Commissioners and
the subsequent investigation
that resulted from a complaint
filed by County Commissioner
Jody DuPree with the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office. The
editorial also stated "were pretty
well certain our readers would
like to know more about this
matter" and invited someone
to "speak up". Initially, my
intent was to let this issue pass;
however, a subsequent story
by the Lake City Reporter on
redistricting initiated by citizen
Matt Vann's comments during
the December 15, 2011 Board of
County Commissioners meeting
and County Commissioner Jody
DuPree's decision to vent on talk
radio have convinced me of the
need to comment
First, many people have
asked why redistrict at all. The
answer is simple; the county
was required to redistrict by
law. Florida Statute 124.01
requires the Board of County
Commissioners in odd num-
bered years to fix the boundaries
of the commission districts so as
to keep them as nearly equal in
proportion as possible. Further,
the Columbia County Home Rule
Charter requires that in the first
odd-numbered year.after each
decennial census, the Board of
County Commissioners shall
divide the county into-districts of
contiguous territory, following
the existing boundaries of munic-
ipalities where possible and as
nearly equal in population as pos
sible. An option to leave districts
the same did not exist.
Second, the editorial stated
"Supervisor of Elections Liz
Horne spent months creating
four district maps, all of which,
she says and she would know -
pass legal muster concerning fair
and equal representation". This
is what I know. No one from the
Supervisor of Elections office,
prior .to beginning the redistrict-
ing process, bothered to ask me
about my issues and concerns.
Furthermore, not once when
asked to meet to review map 1
(or other subsequent maps) did
I see or speak to Mrs. Home. I
Was told she was unavailable.
The only people I was able to
speak with were Mrs. Home's
staff and her hired "consultant".
Other commissioners have stat-
ed they were treated in the same
manner.
When my and other commis-
sioners concerns were voiced to
the consultant, we were invited
to submit our own proposal. It
was obvious that at least two
other commissioners had sug-
gestions for change as the
changes they and I submitted
became redistricting map pro-
posals 2, 3 and 4.
These were not the ideas of
the Supervisor of Elections and
therefore, did not take "months"
to create. I am at a loss to
explain why the suggested
changes, requested by the con-
sultant, were not incorporated
into map 1 as intended. I am of
the opinion the consultant had
no intention to amend "his" plan.
It should also be noted that
the consultant refused to allow
myself or other commissioners
to receive a copy of his work
product. The consultant stated
the work product was not a
public record. Imagine trying
to suggest map changes to a
map reduced to memory. This
became such an issue that sev-
eral commissioners complained
to the County Manager about the
process. The County Manager


forwarded the complaints to the
County Attorney and requested
that he review and discuss them
with the Supervisor of Elections.
It should also be noted that the
large, color, legible redistricting


THE EDITOR


sponse to Mr. Vann's



istricting complaint


maps displayed were not the
work product of the consultant
These maps were produced
from the work of the consultant
which had been forwarded to the
county office in an 8 X14 non
legible format The maps were
produced in a legible format by
county staff.
Due to the lack of requested
input from the consultant, the
refusal to provide a draft of the
consultants redistricting proposal
and the decision to produce


individual
redistricting
maps in lieu of
consolidating
all ideas into
a single map
I requested
the County
Manager to
ask other
commission-
ers if they
had concerns
and incor-
porate their


"Federal
ruled that
ing strength
be diluted i
efforts. E
occur in tw
first form
as 'packil
SOccurs wl:


comments the minoril
into a single
redistricting is placed in
proposal.This soasto dil
is the pro-
posal which is in other d
known as pro- second for
posal 5, which
represents to as 'crack
the population
percentages turning Cra
in each dis- tng minori
trict as fol-
lows: District into two c
1: 19.98%, tricts so.
District
2: 20.01%, influence in
District
3: 19.98%,
District 4:20.02%, and District
5: 20.01%. For the record, my
concern with the consultant's
proposal number l was the
consultant admitted he had not -
considered the implications of
the 1984 court case involving
the NAACP which ultimately
established single member vot-
ing districts in Columbia County
and which resulted in the court
adopting a "plan" to implement
such districts. In conferring with
the consultant, I was told he
had spoken to the Supervisor of
Elections legal counsel and the
Supervisor of Elections office did
not have to comply with the 1984
single member voting district
civil lawsuit final judgment of
which I knew this was incorrect.
Further, according to the consul-
tant, the only factors considered
in his proposal were the location
of residences for current county
commissioners and school board
members and population distri-
bution.
While not an expert in redis-
tricting, I am aware that the
federal courts have ruled that
minority voting strength should
not be diluted in redistricting
efforts. Dilution can occur
in two forms. The first form
is referred to as "packing".
Packing occurs when most of the
minority population is placed in
one district so as to dilute influ-
ence in other districts. The sec-
ond form is referred to as "crack-
ing" or "fracturing". Cracking
is splitting minority population
into two or more districts so
as to dilute influence in all dis-
tricts. Given the plan adopted
by the federal courts in 1984, I
was concerned that consultants
redistricting proposal 1 did not
consider the issue of "cracking".
On October 20, 2011, all
five (5) redistricting proposals
were presented to the Board of
County Commissioners. All five
proposals were remanded to the
School Board for review. On
November 3, 2011 in the regular
meeting of the Board of County
Commissioners the Board was
advised that the school board
indicated a preference for pro-
posals 3 and 5 with the stronger
preference for 3. The Board of
County Commissioners, by a 3-2
vote, elected proposal 5 as the
preferred redistricting proposal


and scheduled it for public hear-
ing on November 22, 2011.
My third point should be men-
tioned here. During discussions
in the November 3, 2011 Board
meeting pertaining to the merits
of each redistricting proposal I
responded to a question asked
of me by Commissioner DuPree
as to why I was opposed to the
original redistricting map (No.l).
I responded that I believed the
map unfairly eliminated certain
individuals who would seek


courts have
minority vot-
h should not
n redistricting
)ilution can
o forms. The
is referred to
ng.' Packing
ien most of
y population
n one district
ute influence
districts. The
m is referred
ing' or 'frac-
cking is split-
ty population
or more dis-
as to dilute
Small districts."


to run for
the District
3 County
Commission
seat Though
not stated in
the meeting,
I knew of two
individuals
who were con-
sidering the
seat and one
individual who
had ran for
the seat twice
that would
be eliminated
from District
3. Though
not discussed
in the meet-
ing it had also
been rumored
that through
the redistrict-
ing process
District 1
would be
"diluted" so as
to eliminate
my chances
for re-election:.-
After 28 years
as an elected


official I am not one to respond
to rumors; however, certain cir-
cumstances existed which had
. to be considered. I, like many
others had heard rumors that
individual commissionerswere
stating that two changes were
in the works. The first change
included amending the Columbia
County Charter to weaken the
powers of the County Manager
and to make it easier to ter-
minate. The second change
involved creating a redistricting
map that would weaken District
1 and affect my re-election
plans. In fact, the first suggested
change to the Columbia County
Charter, if passed, would revert
the county to the "good old
boy days" of politics whereby
Commissioners had authority
to oversee daily operations of
the county. Also, under the sug-
gested change, Commissioners
would have authority to hire and
fire Department Heads rather
than the County Manager hav-
ing this authority. I am against
both the above stated suggested
changes to the Columbia County
Charter and stated my opposi-
tion during an appearance before
the Columbia County Charter
Commission. I, too paid little
attention to this talk until I heard
certain commissioners speak at
the Columbia County Charter
Commission meeting and I saw
redistricting proposal No. 1. In
my opinion, the rumors now
held some truth; therefore, my
dissatisfaction was evident in
my response to Commissioner
DuPree.
It was due to my statements
and my statements only that
Commissioner DuPree requested
an investigation involving redis-
tricting. The requested inves-
tigation had absolutely nothing
to do with the claim by Matt
Vann that he had been inten-
tionally excluded from District
5 in the redistricting process
due to his political intentions.
The Sheriffs Office investiga-
tion request by Commissioner
DuPree occurred prior to the
redistricting map adoption by the
Board on November 22, 2011.
Commissioner DuPree sold both
Matt Vann and the Lake City
Reporter a "Pig-in-a-Poke" as to
the investigation claim. The inves-
tigation claim had more to do


with District 1 represented by me
rather than Matt Vann running for
District 5, County Commissioner
and redistricting as is reflected
in the excerpted questions below
asked by Commissioner DuPree
in a public records request to the.
Supervisor of Elections (SOE)
dated November 4, 2011 and
included as part of the investiga-
tion request to the Sheriff dated
November 8, 2011:
Question 3: "It has been stated*
that a court (Federal) order exists
stating a concern to race within
districts; does the court order'
require that a district be minor-
ity?"
SOE Answer: Since we do
not have an original of the court '
order, the County Attorney,
Marlin Feagle, will have to handle'
this issue.
Question 4: "Explain the coulL :
order and its intent"
SOE Answer Refer to Mr.
Feagle.
Question 5: "What was the
ratio of black to white in District
1 from 1980 to present by year if
possible?"
SOE Answer: The figures we
have are in real time. The SOE
cannot pull any reports from 1980'
to the present that reflect the
black and white ratio in District 1.
Question 6: "When was the last
two county-wide elections held
in Columbia County for County
Commissioner and who ran in
those elections"?
SOE Answer: The last two
county-wide commissioner races
were in 1982 and 1984; attached
are copies of the 1st and,2nd,
primaries and general for those
years. ., .: .
I think it goes without saying
that a majority of the Board of
County Commissioners chose
map.5 as the redistricting map
choice as it was the only map
produced that reflected the issues
and concerns expressed. As for
Matt Vann, I find it ironic that
he endorsed the original map
(proposal No. 1) though it would
have impacted three (3) indi-
viduals in the same manner he
alleges he was impacted. Map 5
was the best option available. It
addressed all issues and impacted
the existing district boundaries
the least I think it was unfortu-
natethatMr. Vann ended in a
commission district other than his
choice; however, I do not believe':
it was intentional.
As for all the commentary
about who knows what and when,
most of what I have read is trash.
Supervisor of Elections Home
had to have known that county
staff was preparing a redistricting
map. County staff met with her
staff to obtain the basic informa-
tion necessary to prepare the
map. County Commissioner Jody
DuPree had several weeks to
review the map before the final
vote was taken. Matt Vann filed
to run for office after Map 5 had
been presented.
As for the impacts to District
4 and the school board, I can
empathize with current school
board member Keith Hudson. I
understand his relationship with
the area of residents redistricted
to District 1. I only wish Keith
would understand that I, too
share that same relationship.
Many residents of the area have
told me that while they will miss
Keith, they welcome me as their
new County Commissioner.
It would be impossible to
redistrict and please everyone.
I stand behind my decision and
the reasons for it. I also under-
stand why two commissioners
did not have the same opinion.
I do not understand why one of
the commissioners with a dif-
fering opinion, Conmmissioner
DuPree, chose the actions
he did. He was simply in the
minority on the vote. No other
justification is needed.

Sincerely,
Ronald Williams
County Commissioner
District 1


4A


__










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY. JANUARY 15, 2012 5A




COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop
off at the Reporter office located at
180 E. Duval St., via fax to (386)
752-9400 or email Ihampson@lake-
cityreporter.com
ONGOING

Boys Cutwinter program
The Boys Club of Columbia
County is now registering for
its winter program, which runs
through March 1. Fees are $175,
which includes transportation from
all elementary and junior high
schools. For more information,
please call 752-4184 or visit the
club on Jones Way.
Art ahibit
The community is invited to
enjoy the art exhibit at the West
Branch of the
Public Library. Local artist Jim
Whiteside is displaying watercolor
paintings of scenes in North East
Florida, many around Lake City
and Columbia County.
Jan. 13

MLK Jr. ceremony
The Lake City VA Medical
Center will observe Martin Luther
King Jr.'s 83rd birthday with a
ceremony at 11 a.m. in the center's
auditorium. The keynote speaker
is Kevin W Thorpe, senior pas-
tor at Faith Missionary Baptist
Church and executive producer
of the Faith Church Television
Broadcast The event is open to
the public.
Revival
Revival at First Full Gospel
Church with Rev. Jay Walden Jan.
13, 14, 15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11 am., 6
p.m. U.S. 90 West to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.
Masonic banquet
Gold Standard Lodge #167 will
have their annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community Center on
Friday, Jan. 13 at 7 p.m. until. For
ticket info contact Chris Mirra at
386623-3611 or Dennis Murphy at
386-697-3739..
172nd church anniversary
Salem Primitive Baptist Church,
199 SW Salem Church Court, will
celebrate their 172nd Anniversary
and Annual Meeting beginning on
Friday at 6:30 p.m., and Saturday
and Sunday morning beginning
at 10:30 am. Guest ministers will
be Elder Charles Tyson, Tifton,
Georgia, Elder Gordon Smith,
Jacksonville, Florida, and Elder
Hulen Harvill of Plant City, Florida.
All descendants of Salem Primitive
Baptist Church and those who love
the original Baptist Doctrines are
cordially invited to attend these
services. For more information,
please call 7524198.
Jan. 14

Fanners.market
The Lake DeSoto Farmers
Market is Saturdays from 9am to
1pm (winter hours) in Wilson Park
located along Lake DeSotobetween
the Cblumbia County Courthouse
and Shands Lakeshore Hospital
in downtown Lake City. This
Saturday the Birds of Prey pro-
gram from live Oak will offer
a demonstration of birds in the
program and information about
their talents during normal market


hours. David Heringer Project will
rejoin the market again this week
For more information about the
Lake DeSoto Farmer Market call
386-719-5766 or visit marketlcfla.
com.
North Florida Writers
Group meets
Love to write? From novice
to published author, the North
Florida Writers Group (formerly
Lake City Writers Group) is the
place where local writers gather
to share information, to create, to
learn and to inspire. Writers of any
experience level from the area are
welcome to join us Saturday, Jan.
14 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., at the
Columbia County Public Library,
Main Branch, 308 NW Columbia
Ave. There are no fees to join the
group; however space is limited; so
please reserve your spot today. For
more information, please contact
Marley Andretti at (386) 438-3610.
Blood drive
There will be a LifeSouth blood
drive from noon to 8 p.m..at Moe's
Southwest Grill. Each donor
recieves $5 in Moe's Bucks and a
t-shirt or boxers.
Revival
Revival at First Full Gospel
Church with Rev. Jay Walden Jan.
13, 14, 15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11 am.,
6 p.m. U.S. 90 West to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.
Hospice Chili Cook-off
The Third Annual Branford
Chili Cook-Off to benefit children
and families served by Herry's
Kids Pediatric Services will be
held on Saturday, Jan 14 from 11
a.m. 2 p.m. at Hatch Park located
on Craven Dr. in Branford. The
event will include a silent auction,
games, a bounce house for the
kids, live DJ, door prizes, antique
car show, thrift store items for sale,
and all the chili you can eat There
will be a five dollar admission to
the event To learn more about
hospice services call 386-755-7714
or visit www.hospiceofthenature-
coastorg.
Jan.415- .-. .- -

Dr. Martin Luther King,.Jr.
Observance Program
On Sunday, Jan. 15 at 4p. m., the
Columbia County NAACP Branch
will host its 28th annual Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Observance'
Program at Trinity United
Methodist Church, on MLK, Jr.
Street, in Lake City. Speaker is
Bishop Russell Allen Wright of
Panama City, Florida.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parade
SThe Northeast Florida
Leadership Council presents the
Grand Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. Parade, Monday, Jan. 16 at 10
am. Line-up will begin at the DOT
office at 9 am. For participation
and information call (386)365-1470.


MLK worship service
The MLK Worship Service
will follow the parade at the New
Bethel Baptist Church at 12:30p.m.
Bishop Ron Williams, I is the
speaker, Rev. Alvin Baker, Pastor.
Call (386)344-9915 for more infor-
mation.
MLK Classic
The MLK Classic will feature


a re-match basketball game at the
Lake City Middle School at 3:30
p.m. featuring Alumni Women
and Men's players of CHS and
Suwannee. Call (386) 754-7095 for
details.
SAR meeting
The Sons of the American
Revolution, Lake City Chapter,
will meet on Monday at 6 p.m.
at the Guang Dong Restaurant
in the Lake City Mall, 2469 West
HIghway 90. Guests are always
welcome. Call 7524919 for infor-
mation.
Jan. 17

Art League meeting
The Art League of North
Florida will hold the first meet-
ing of the year Jan. 17 at the
First Presbyterian Church at 7
p.m. The main purpose is the
election of officers. Members
and the community are invited.
Traffic safety meeting
The Columbia Community
Traffic Safety will hold its first
meeting of the new year on
Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 10 a.m. at
the FDOT Operations Complex,
710 NW Lake Jeffery Road,
in the Crew Room. The Team
works on traffic hazards and
enforcement issues in Columbia
County and the public is wel-
come to attend. Issues can be
called in to the FDOT at 758-
3714. The team is made up of
members of law enforcement,
emergency services, engineer-
ing and education.
Jan. 18

Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army is meet-
ing 5:30 p.m. Jan. 18 at the
Central Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The building is
located at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics Center.
Blood drive
SLifeSouth will have a blood'
drive from noon to 7 p.m. at
S:Pizza'Boy Pizza.; Each donor
recieves a free large cheese
pizza and a t-shirt or boxers.

Jan. 19

Voices that Change
Vocal Impressionist Michael
Kelley presents Voices
that Change from Elvis to
SKermit the frog. A night of
fun Thursday, Jan.19 at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds
banquet facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. This
is a benefit for the Christian
Service Center and tickets are
available at the Center on Hilton
and Washington St.


Columbia County Retired
Educators meeting
The Columbia County Retired
Educators will meet Thursday,
January 19, at 1 p.m. in Room 120
at the School Board Adult Center.
Speakers will be Mrs. Kaeron
Robinson of the Guardian Ad Litem
and Mr. Paul Conley of Ocala, FL,
District H FREF Trustee. Retired
persons interested in education
may join us. For more information
call Will Brown at 752-2431.

Jan. 20

Community Concerts-
Mark & Clark perform 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 20 at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical twins Mark
& Clark play head to head on
identical custom-built baby grand
pianos. They have enthralled
audiences around the world with
everything from musical com-
edy to dramatic interpretation of
the classics all with the flash of
Liberace, a lot of Jerry Lee Lewis,
and the piano artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and member-
ship information is available at
www.communityconcerts.info.
Arbor Day planting
The Lake City/Columbia
County Beautification Committee
will honor Morris Williams by
planting a Palatka Holly in com-
memoration of the 2012 Arbor Day.
The ceremony will be held at 11
a.m. in front of the school admin-
istration building on Duval Street
The public is urged to attend.

Jan. 21

Spiritual retreat
A spiritual life enrichment
retreat and conference for
adults from 9:30 am. to 1 p.m. at
Epiphany Catholic Church, 1905
SW Epiphany Court The regis-
tration fee is $10 and theme is
improving and inspiring spiritual-
ity. Reserve your spot by Jan. 18 by
calling (386)752-5228.

Farmers market :-
The Lake DeSoto Farmers
Market is Saturdays from 9am to
1pm (winter hours) in Wilson Park
located along Lake DeSotobetween
the Columbia County Courthouse
and Shands Lakeshore Hospital
in downtown Lake City. The mar-
ket features locally grown fresh
produce, herbs, plants, cheese,
milk, eggs and local baked breads,
pies and other items. Vendors .
also sell homemade craft items
like jewelry, woodwork and other
handmade items. The 1st Annual
Chili Cook Off will be January 21
to benefit Relay for Life. For more
information about the Lake DeSoto
Farmer Market call 386-719-5766
or visit marketlcflacom.


Wedding Expo
Let the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park &
Campground help you plan
your special day. 2nd annual
Wedding Expo will be held
at Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Campground
on Saturday, Jan. 21from 1 to
5 p.m. Fashion Show by Glass
Slipper Bridal, Door Prizes,
Vendor Booths, Refreshments,
Taste Testing and more.
Vendors include: Melissa's
Antiques, Glass Slipper Bridal,
Scott Carroll DJ, Holiday
Inn, SOS Cafe & Restaurant,
Top Hat Limo, Cakes by Pat,
Uniquely Yours Wedding &
Event Planner, Hot Heads
Salon & Spa, Sea Creative/
Stacee Reveron Photo, Joy the
Cake Lady/Elite Photography
and more. Free Admission.
For more information contact
Sharyn at (386) 364-1683.
Jan. 22

Church anniversary
Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church, 948 Aberdeen Avenue,
will celebrate their 70th
Church Anniversary on Jan.
22 at 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Dr.'
Dwight Pollock in charge of the
11:30 a.m. service. Reverend
Isadore L. Williams and the
Philadelphia Missionary Baptist
Church is in charge of the 3
p.m. service. Please come out
and share with us.
Bridal show
The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal Show will
be from noon to 4 p.m. on
January 22 at the Holiday Inn
& Suites. Vendors include The
Rose Mary Catering Company,
David's Bridal, Belk, Lake
City Florist and Design, Glass
Slipper Bridal, The Grand
Event, Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND Escapes,
Spirit of the Suwannee Music
Park, and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food Tasting,
& Cash Bar. Advance Ticket
prices are $7.00 -Dhy of Event
$10.00. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the Holiday Inn &
Suites, 213 SW Commerce Dr.,
Lake City. For ticket sales or
vendor information, call Margie
Hicks at (386) 754-1411.

Riding club banquet
The Columbia County Riding
Club is having its annual ban-
quet Jan. 22 at 1p.m. at Mason
City Community Center. The
club will have its rides the 2nd
and 4th Sat. of each month. The
club will be hosting Pleasure
Shows this year. Check our
website for all information, www.
columbiacountyridingclub.com.


OBITUARIES


Lois J. Drake

Mrs. Lois J. Drake, 86, died
Thursday, January 12, 2012
at Shands .at the University of
Florida. Visitation will be held
SSunday, January 15, 2012 at Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home,
from 5 PM until 7 PM. Funeral ser-


vices will be conducted Monday,
January 16, 2012 at Bethel United
Methodist Church at 10:00 AM.
Interment will follow in church
cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, family asks
that donations be made to the
Pregnancy Care Center in Lake
City, at 399 SE Hernando Avenue


Lake City; FL, 32055. Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home is in charge
of all arrangements .(386) 752-
1234.
Obituaries are paid advertisements.
For details, call the Lake City
Reporter's classified department at
752-1293.


A


The Lake City Reporter

would like to congratulate



CommunityTa
on their January 10, 2012 ribbon cutting ceremony for
their new location at 2941 W US90, Suite 117.


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We strive to see you today or tomorrow!





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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY JANUARY 15. 2012


THE WEATHER
.- j- : -.- .


S MOSTLY PARTLY CHANCE CHANCE MOSTLY
SUNNY CLOUDY ',I OWNERS SHOWERS SUNNY

I) "I o o | j,,+

HI 3L? H6L70O I M72LO: H164LO ; HI163LO-






6/35 a City Monday Tuesday
60/35 asonvCe Cape Canaveral 70/57/pc 75/59/pc

allahassee Lake City 60/40 Daytona Beach 70/54/pc 75/57/sh
62/36 63/34 Ft. Lauderdale 74/64/pc 77/62/pc
SPesaola G e e Daytona Beach Fort Myers 77/54/s 80/58/pc
60/48 Paana City 63/37 62J46 Gainesville 71/46/pc 73/54/pc
62/43 Ocala Jacksonville 67/50/pc 70/55/pc
64/39 Cn Key West 73/67/pc 77/68/s
rando Cape Canaeral Lake City 70/44/pc 72/55/t
Miami 74/63/pc 79/65/pc I
Tampa Naples 77/55/s 77/59/pc
67/46 West Palm Beach Ocala 72/48/pc 74/56/pc
68/59 Orlando 72/54/pc 76/58/sh
Ft Lauderdale Panama City 60/56/pc 66/49/sh
Ft. Myers 70/58 Pensacola 66/58/pc 67/48/t
69/46 Naples Tallahassee 68/47/pc 71/53/sh
70/50 Miami Tampa 74/53/s 78/57/sh
70/59 Valdosta 68/46/pc 69/51/sh
KeyWest W. Palm Beach 73/63/pc 70/62/pc
70/63
.wL~-r~-ha ..;,..-a -s -..- .--. s .;. _--I- -- >


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


60
29
66
42
84 in 1947
22 in 1964



0.00"
0.08"
0.08"
1.49"
1.49"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset torm.

MOON
Moonrise.today
Moonset today
Moonrise torm.
Moonset torm.


7:28 a.m.
5:52 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5:53 p.m.




11:19 a.m.
12:43 a.m.
12:00 p.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan.
16 23 30
Last New First


7p Mla y 6a
Monday

'!


iemFrecastltemperature '- "Feels Eke" temperaure


Feb.
7
Full


i i ;i .r~.~ie
cw"-



5 I 3 : ff
;MODalmTl ,! j+ riF ieir'
i, m tes to umn

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4 radiation risk
i for ire r-7 : ,r- r '
'-,: e rro
0 '+e r.


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Forecasts, data and
graphics 2012 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpublisher.com


On rh -j.ar inr

:, re tr -ug .tr-e
tJrrr-rr Plains.
Oi nl', r n. :nn es J
41 nepr, in., Js, a l
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NATIONAL FORECAST: A iov, pressure system working its way across the Northwest will be
esoons'cbe foc scattered snow showers from the northern Pacific Coast to the Intermountain
',%es: --oaa. Snov, showers vwii be a possibility for portions of the Great Lakes as well.
Meanwhile. hign pressure building across the Atlantic Coast will promote sunny skies for
much of the eastern United S-ates.


t~l . .. ...


Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


High: 72". Phoenix, Anz. Low: -14", Pellstpn, Mich.


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
32/20/0 46/30/s Omaha
24/21/.01 28/24/pc Orlando
50/24/0 66/45/pc Philadelphia
-40/-47/0 -29/-35/s Phoenix
42/22/0 46/25/s Pittsburgh
35/28/0 25/11/s Portland ME
73/61/0 78/69/r Portland OR
62/31/0 65/61/sh Raleigh
23/16/0 34/29/pc Rapid City
61/25/0 62/49/pc Reno
55/29/0 60/40/s Richmond
40/26/0 59/40/s Sacramento
55/34/0 63/43/pc St. Louis
63/28/.01 61/46/s Salt Lake City
63/50/0 62/49/c San Antonio
55/27/0 53/45/s San Diego
65/54/0 70/59/pc San Francisco
18/5/.01 36/21/pc Seattle
59/25/0 61/47/s Spokane
64/32/0 62/53/s Tampa
32/28/0 28/21/s Tucson
57/29/0 64/48/pc Washington


Saturday Today'


HI/Lo/Pcp.
44/24/0
56/40/0
35/27/0
72/43/0
23/18/.01
32/26/0
45/33/0
45/23/0
46/16/0
43/17/0
42/27/0
58/30/0
35/13/0
42/16/0
62/30/0
61/46/0
53/40/0,
40/36/.16
36/25/0
56/43/0
67/38/0
38/27/0


HI/Lo/W
54/27/s
64/48/s;
32/22/s.
67/46/c:
25/21/pc-
16/4/s.
38/30/pn
46/25/p.
48/13/pc:
52/19/pc
39/22/s.
57/34/pc
48/39/s
49/31/pc
67/60/c
63/49/c
53/38/pc;
39/33/rs
30/17/sn
67/46/s ,
69/45/pc:
34/25/s


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY


29/21/0
47/23/0
4/-6/0
52/26/0
37/25/0
49/25/0
56/24/0
34/20/0
37/20/0
34/28/0
22/14/.01
53/32/0
32/22/.01
46/21/0
47/25/0
19/15/0
29/20/0
21/19/0
50/26/0
64/32/0
56/35/0
52/19/0


20/7/s
54/32/pc
11/-3/s
51/32/s
33/26/s
33/4/c
58/40/s
35/6/pc
37/20/pc
23/15/s
21/21/pc
55/32/s
34/22/pc
50/28/s
49/23/pc
32/29/pc
34/28/pc
28/27/pc
53/28/s
65/55/pc
62/46/s
58/29/s


Des Moines
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


.7
Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturoay loday J


CITY
Acapulco
AmSterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneia
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
86/72/0
45/34/0
60/39/.02
70/61/0
41/14/0
39/34/0
84/57/0
63/46/0
39/34/0
72/70/0
25/19/.11
66/61/0
86/73/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
89/73/pc
42/29/pc
48/37/s
71/64/sh
39/19/pc
36/30/pc
90/66/s
64/46/s
40/29/s
73/55/pc
22/17/pc
66/58/sh
86/75/pc


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
59/41/0
81/66/0
43/28/0
50/27/0
70/46/0
14/0/0
30/27/0
82/52/0
79/72/0
70/45/0
34/27/0
88/75/0
43/30/0


Today
Hi/Lo/W
58/39/sh
79/68/pc
43/34/pc
47/30/sh
70/44/pc
8/1/s
24/20/sn
84/65/pc
77/57/pc
68/53/pc
30/23/c
89/79/t
39/29/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
100/81/0
57/43/0
83/72/0
83/73/.03
82/59/0
37/12/0
88/77/0
72/64/0
55/48/.33
45/39/0
19/7/0
39/34/0
32/28/.13


Toaay |
HI/Lo/W
93/74/pc
56/37/pc
82/72/sh
83/73/sh
85/59/s
34/19/s
88/76/t
71/65/t
58/48/s
47/35/pc
19/15/s
34/28/s
31/25/pc


KEYTO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy, dr=drizzle, f=fair, fg=fog, h=hazy, i=ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s-sunny,
sh=siowers, sn=snow, ts=thunderstorms, w=windy.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
irf/Si c -e .,/re .'i. e


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, January 15,2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


Tigers rally against



Jackets in 74-65 win


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Javontae Foster dribbles to the hoop in a
win against Stanton Prep on Friday.


CHS comes back
from 10-points
down at half.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High took con-
trol of the district and has
control of its own destiny
after a 74-65 win against
St. Augustine High in Lake
City on Saturday.
Columbia got off to a slow
start with only 10 points in
the first quarter and trailed
by seven.
The second quarter saw
the Tigers fall behind by 10
points and Columbia went
into the locker room down


36-26.
Columbia exploded out
of the locker room, how-
ever, and made easy work
of the Yellow Jackets in the
second half.
With 20 points in the
third quarter, Columbia cut
the lead to 46-47 heading
into the final quarter.
Another 28 fourth-quar-
ter points and the Tigers
came away with a nine-point
victory after a slow start.
"The kids had to fight to
win this game," Columbia
headcoachHoraceJefferson
said. "Tre Simmons had a
couple of big three-pbint
shots for us and Javonta6
(Foster) had a big night."
Foster finished with a


career high in a Tiger uni-
form with 26 points in the
contest.
Simmons lived up to his
first name as he hit from
behind the three-point line
four times in the game to
finish with 12 points.
Marcus Amerson got off
to a slow start, but a strong
second half saw him finish
with 13 points.
Laremy Tunsil led on the
boards with nine rebounds
in the game. He added six
points.
Morris Marshall had
nine points, Nigel Atkinson
had six points and Monte
Tisdale had two points in
the contest.
Columbia (14-3) remains


undefeated with a 7-0 record
in the district.
"We didn't play smart in
the first half, but we played
hard," Jefferson said.
'There was no quit in us
tonight."
The Tigers now turn
their attention to Palatka
High, which reached last
year's Final 4.
"They're rolling right
now and coming off a big
win against Eastside,"
Jefferson said. "We have to
continue to do what we've
been doing and we should
be OK."
Columbia will host
Palatka in a 7:30 p.m.
game in Lake City on
Tuesday.


East takes


West,


14-7


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
LEFT: The West's Will Hill scores the on a sweep during the East's 14-7 win in the Columbia Youth and Lake City Pop Warner Football Association's 5th Annual East-West High School
Football All-Star Game at Memorial Stadium on Saturday. RIGHT: Bobby Williams (from left), Will Hill, Jared Lee, Jeremy Wannamaker and R.J. Buxton (not pictured) were named MVPs.



Allen guides Tigers, squad to victory


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
There wasn't a lot of
flash in the Columbia Youth
and Lake City Pop Warner
Football Association's 5th
Annual East-West High
School Football All-Star


Game, but the East had just
enough sizzle to pick up the
14-7 win over the West.
The East struck first off
a trick play when Jeremy
Wannamaker hit Malone
Hadley on a halfback
pass for 70 yards with
4:28 remaining in the first


quarter.
Hayden Lunde added the
extra point for the 7-0 lead.
After a fumble recov-
ery by Rickie Tharpe, RJ.
Buxton ran in a sneak
from four yards to take the
14-0 lead following the extra
point


From that point on, it was
about hanging on for the
East
Will Hill added a 15-yard
touchdown run for the West
with 3:03 remaining in the
first half to cut the lead to
14-7, but that was as close
as the West would get


After a punt late in
the fourth quarter, the
East only needed a couple
of first downs to kill the
clock.
Wannamaker converted
a first down with a 19-yard
run and Richard Tucker put
the bow on the game with a


26-yard run.
:"It was a short week,
but the kids came out and
executed," Columbia head
coach Brian Allen, who
coached the East team,
said after the game. "I'm
extremely proud of their
efforts."


Tigers drop two


Columbia falls to
Chiles, Lincoln in
district contests.
From staff reports

Columbia High dropped
two district road contests
this week in Tallahassee.
TheTigers fell, 3-1, against
Chiles on Wednesday with
Jimmy Blakely scoring
Columbia's only goal.
Lincoln shut out the
Tigers in a 1-0 game. on
Friday.
Columbia returns home
to host Suwannee High at
7 p.m. on Tuesday.
Fort White basketball
Fort White's boys bas-
ketball demolished host
Keystone Heights High 52-
9 on Thursday.
PREP continued on 2B


^- '^; -R - ;.
-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Travis Berry (19) keeps Fort White's
Colton Jones (17) at bay while attempting to make a goal in a
game on Dec. 6.


Gators dunk USC


Florida State
upsets No. 3
North Carolina.
Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C.
- Kenny Boynton had
15 points and hit four
of No. 19 Florida's 12
3-pointers in a 79-65 vic-
tory over South Carolina
on Saturday night
The Gators (14-
4, 2-1 Southeastern
Conference) came in
leading the league in 3-
pointers with nearly 11
per game. They reached
double figures- from
long range for the 13th
time this season but first
in SEC play against the
Gamecocks (8-9, 0-3).
Boynton wasn't alone in
hitting from outside.
Erving Walker added
three from long range,
while Bradley Beal and


ASSOCIATED PRESS
South Carolina's Bruce Ellington (23) drives to the basket
as Florida's Erik Murphy (33) and Erving Walker (11) defend
during the first half of their NCAA college basketball game,
Saturday.

Mike Rosario had two Florida St. 90,
apiece. No. 3 UNC 57
The Gators took control
with three 3s during a 19- TALLAHASSEE -
3 run to start the second
half. FSU continued on 2B













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. JANUARY 15, 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Joburg
Open, third round, at Johannesburg
(same-day tape)
7 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Sony Open, third
round, at Honolulu
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
IIan.
ESPN2 UConn at Notre Dame
Noon
ESPN Kentucky atTennessee
I p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas at Missouri
2 p.m.
ESPN North Carolina at Florida
St.
FSN UAB at Southern Miss.
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Oklahoma St at Baylor
3:30 p.m.
CBS Oregon atArizona
4 p.m.
FSN Colorado at Stanford
NBCSP UNLV at San Diego St.
MOTORSPORTS
9:30 pm.
SPEED AMA Supercross, at
Phoenix
1:30 am.
NBCSP Dakar Rally, Nasca to Pisco,
Peru (delayed tape) /
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
WGN -Toronto at Chicago
NFL FOOTBALL
4:30 p.m.
FOX NFC Divisional Playoffs, New
Orleans at San Francisco'
8 p.m.
CBS AFC Divisional Playoffs,
Denver at New-England
NHL HOCKEY
12:30 p.m.
NBC Chicago at Detroit
RUNNING
3 p.m.
NBC Olympic Marathon Trials, at
Houston (same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
FSN Oklahoma at Oklahoma St.

Sunday
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, loburg
Open, final round, at Johannesburg (same-
day tape)
7 p.m.
TGC -.PGA Tour, Sony Open, final
round, at Honolulu
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4:30 p.m.
CBS Indiana at Ohio St.
7 p.m.
FSN -Washington St. at Washington
9 p.m.
FSN UCLA at Southern Cal
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 am. ,
NBCSP Dakar Rally, final stage,
Pisco to Lima, Peru (delayed tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN Phoenix at San Antonio
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS AFC Divisional Playoffs,
Houston at Baltimore
4:30 p.m.
FOX NFC Divisional Playoffs, N.Y.
Giants at Green Bay
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
NBCSP.- N.Y. Rangers at Montreal
PREP BASKETBALL
4 p.m.
ESPN Brewster (N.H.) vs. Tilton


School (N.H.), at Springfield, Mass.
TENNIS
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2-Austalian Open,first round,
at Melbourne,Autralia
3 am.
ESPN2 -Australian Open, first round,
at Melbourne Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
1230 p.m.
FSN Kansas at Missouri
2 p.m.
ESPN2 -Temple at Dayton
2:30 p.m.
FSN Baylor atTexas
4 p.m.
ESPN2 Ohio St. at Michigan St
4:30 p.m.
FSN California at Utah

Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3:30 p.m.
ESPN Louisville at Marquette
5:30 p.m.
ESPN -Texas A&M at Missouri
7:30 p.m.
ESPN Pittsburgh at Syracuse
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Baylor at Kansas
NBA BASKETBALL
I p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Memphis
8 p.m.
TNT Oklahoma City at Boston
10:30 p.m.
TNT Dallas at LA. Lakers
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP Dallas at St. Louis
TENNIS
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Australian Open,first round,
at Melbourne,Australia
3 a.m.'
ESPN2 -Australian Open,first round,
at Melbourne,Australia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
7.p.m.
ESPN2 North Carolina at UConn

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Wild Card
Houston 31,Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
NewYork Giants 24,Atlanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
.Saturday
New Orleans at San Francisco
Denver at New England (n)
Sunday
Houston at Baltimore, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 22
Divisional winners
Pro Bowl
SSunday,Jan.9 .
At Honolulu -- :'
NFC vs.AFC
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
NFC vs.AFC, 6:20 p.m.

College all-star games
Saturday, Jan. 21
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs.West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Jan. 28
Senior Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Feb. 5
Texas vs. Nation


FSU: Knocks off UNC at home

Continued From Page 1B


Deividas Dulkys scored a
career-high 32 points and
Michael Snaer added 17 as
Florida State stunned No.
3 North Carolina 90-57 on
Saturday, snapping the Tar
Heels' nine-game winning
streak.
The Seminoles (11-6, 2-1
Atlantic Coast Conference)
started the second half on a
30-8 run to take a 66-36 lead
en route to handing North
Carolina its most lopsided
conference loss since a 104-
69 defeat to archrival Duke
in 1963.
It was the worst loss
for North Carolina under
coach Roy Williams.
Dulkys, whose previous
career-high was 22 points,
was 12 of 14 from the field
and 8 of 10 from 3-point
range. He added four steals
and a blocked shot. His 8
treys were a Florida State



PREP

From Page 1B

With the District 5-4A
win the Indians improved
to 8-4 overall and 5-3 in
district play.
Fort White's girls and
boys play at Williston High
on Monday. The district tri-
match begins at 4:30 p.m.
with the boys junior varsity
and is followed by the Lady
Indians at 6 p.m. and the
boys varsity at 7:30 p.m.


record in ACC play.
Harrison Barnes scored
15 points and Tyler Zeller
added 14 for North Carolina
(15-3, 2-1), which finished 4
of 21 from 3-point range.
Williams took his team
- except for five walk-ons
who finished the game -
from the court with 14.2
seconds left in expectation
of the court-storming by
the Florida State fans.
The Seminoles never
trailed after Dulkys' first 3-
pointer seconds after the
opening tip.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I COKBL I


It was an unexpected
turnabout for a Florida
State team. that suffered
a 79-59 defeat at Clemson
just a week ago and came
into Saturday's game with
the poorest 3-point shoot-
ing mark in the ACC at 30.2
percent.
But behind Dulkys, the
Seminoles hit 12 of 27 from
long distance while the Tar
Heels were simply off while
playing on the road for
the first time in six weeks.
North Carolina made only
9 of 20 free throws.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L.'Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


PRESIDING OVER
100 TRIALS WAS THI
FOR THE JUPGE.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer: A IITIIXIX
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: MUNCH IDIOT HEDGED UNWIND
Answer: Dr. Frankenstein put a faulty brain in his
monster, but the monster DIDNT MIND


SCOREBOARD


At San Antonio
Texas vs. Naicn, 2 p.m. (CBSSN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Thursday's Games
Atlana I I I, .Charlotte 81
Memphis 94, New York 83
Milwaukee 102, Detroit 93
Cleveland 101.Phoenix 90
Orlando 117, Golden State 109
Friday's Games
Detroit at Charlotte (n)
Indiana at Toronto (n)
Washington at Philadelphia (n)
Sacramento at Houston (n)
Minnesota at New Orleans (n)
Chicago at Boston (n)
Milwaukee at Dallas (n)
Pordand at San Antonio (n)
New Jersey at Phoenix (n)
Cleveland at LA Lakers (n)
Miami at Denver (n)
Saturday's Games
Minnesota at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8 p.m.
NewYork at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 9 p.m.
LA. Lakers at LA Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Today's Games
Golden State at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Utah at Denver, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at San Antonio, 9 p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 5 Ohio State vs. No. 7 Indiana,
4:30 p.m.
No. 8 Duke at Clemson, 6 p.m.
No. II Georgetown vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 23 Creighton vs. Southern Illinois,
7:05 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Detroit 3, Phoenix 2, SO
Dallas 5, Los Angeles 4, SO
Boston 2, Montreal I
Philadelphia 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 0
Carolina S,TampaBay' 2
Vancouver 3, St. Louis 2, OT
Nashville 3, Colorado 2, OT
San Jose 2,Winnipeg 0
Chicago 5, Minnesota 2
Calgary I,Anahieim 0, OT
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay at Washington (n)
Phoenix!at Columbus (n)
. T ro r t i [ EB u frjf i i r . .
"Pitburgh 3 Flordi (n)
An'eAhahneldm a mtEdmontcn (n) :'
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 3 p.m.
NewJersey at Winnipeg, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
SBuffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Boston at Carolina, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, ( p.m.
Carolina at Washington, 5 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Anaheim atVancouver, 9 p.m.


ML( DAY
Flag football at
Annie Mattox
The Martin Luther
King Jr. Day Battle of the
Classes flag football game
between Columbia High
alumni is noon Monday
at Annie Mattox Park.
Former Tigers from the
1990s and early 2000s will
play a tournament in a get-
together for players and
fans. Admission is free.
For details, call Michael
Dales at (678) 595-6769.


'The Rematch'
hoops at LCMS
The Lake City
Recreation Department
and Richardson
Community Center Annie
Mattox Park North, Inc.,
is hosting "The Rematch"
adult basketball games
between Lake City and
Live Oak players Monday
at the Lake City Middle
School gym. The women's
game will begin at 3:00
p.m.; the men's game will
begin promptly at 4:30
p.m. Admission is $5. All
proceeds from this event
will go to support youth
sports programs in both
communities. The Lake
City Middle School girls
basketball team will sell
concessions. The games
are a part of the Martin
Luther King Jr. weekend
activities sponsored by the
North Florida Leadership
Council and everyone is
invited to attend.
For details, call Mario
Coppock at 754-7095.

YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fort White
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White Girls
Softball Association has a
meeting for parents and
coaches to discuss the
upcoming season at 7:15
p.m. Tuesday at the Fort
White library.


BRIEFS

For details, call Nora
Harvey at 365-5688.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in
the teacher's lounge at the
high school. Preparations
will be discussed for the
football banquet, which is
6 p.m. Jan. 28 in the Fort
White High gym. Anyone
who would like to be a
part of the Quarterback
Club is encouraged to
attend.
For details, call club
president Shayne Morgan
at 397-4954.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Registration for
Boys Club hoops
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
Accepting registration for
its basketball program.
Cost is $45. Three leagues
are offered: Training,
ages 6-7-8; Jr. Varsity, ages
8-9-10;'Varsity, ages 11-12-
13-14. Practices are twice
weekly with games on
Saturday (except Training
League).
For details, call 752-
4184.


A golf practice group for
girls ages 9-17 is offered
from 4-5 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays at Quail
Heights Country Club.
The group is for girls
who want to learh the
game and to develop Lady
Tigers for the CHS golf
program. Fee of $45 will
include instruction, range
balls during practice, and a
monthly tournament.
For details, call Chet
Carter at 365-7097 or e-
mail carter4golf@hotmail.
con.


www.lakeoityreporter.com


IN


ACROSS
Brown of
renown
Part of MHz
LP
successors
Everyone
Seen less
Furniture
wood
Cooperate
(2 wds.)
Frazier foe
Chinese
temples
Totally dark
Boastful
knight
Maude
portrayer
Radio dial
Young frog
Dye-yielding
plant
Sardines
holder
Big ISP
Fix a fight
Antique
Moby' Dick's
fnn


35 Rubbing
alcohol
38 Dutch cheese
39 Old TV knob
40 Container
41 Stirs
44 Correspondence
48 Go on the -
49 Like Yale and
Harvard
(2 wds.)
51 Size above
med.
52 Hines'et al.
53 Stout
54 Long time
55 Hwys.
56 Bear's pad

DOWN
1 Reindeer
herder
2 Jazzy Fitzgerald
3 Ore-smelting
waste
4 One of
Singapore's
languages
5 Mythical
archer


Answer to Previous Puzzle


6 Pentagon VIP
7 Debated
8 Fossil fuel
9 Surrealist
painter
10 Mini-play


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


12 Speeder's
undoing
15 Rustic
19 Rug texture
21 Halftime
marchers
22 Container
weight
23 College credit
24 Almost, in
verse
25 Cash box
26 Waikiki's
island
27 Laundry
amount
28 Corsica
neighbor
30 File or chisel
34 Ventricle.
neighbor
36 Gladiator's
hello
37 Snoopier
38 Airport areas
40 Congeals
41 Fr. miss
42 "Othello"
villain
43 Comic book
heroes (hyph.)
44 Orpheus' harp
45 Hoople's
word
46 Wear the
crown
47 Observed
50 Wine cask


1-16 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


J.T. Clark at 365-1754

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Alumni game
planned Feb. 4
Former Fort White
High baseball players
are invited to play in an
alumni softball game at
11 am. Feb. 4 at the Fort
White baseball field. There
will be a home run derby
fundraiser following the
game, plus fish fry and
barbecue dinners will be
sold.
For details, call coach
Mike Rizzi at (386) 288-
8680.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
5-7 p.m. Friday, and 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at
Southside Sports Complex
with a cost of $80. Online
registration is available
at www.lcccyb.com for $75
plus a transaction fee.
For details, call'
president Tad Cervantes at
365-4810 or vice-president
David Williams at (386)
697-0764.


Tor Jan. 0
Columbia High
baseball's third annual -
alumni game is Jan.
28 at Tiger Stadium.
Registration begins at 10
a.m. and there is no fee
to participate. There will
be a home run derby at
11 a.m. with a $5 entry
fee. The Tigers will play
a Purple and Gold game
following the home run
derby. Admission is free.
TBarbecue dinners will'be
sold,
For details, call coach


YUUin GOLF
CHS BASEBALL Practice group
Alumni game set offered for girls
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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. JANUARY 15, 2012


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. JANUARY 15. 2012


Fisher to coach



St. Louis Rams


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cars led by Trevor Bayne (21) work on running in a pack on the track during NASCAR auto
racing testing at the Daytona International Speedway, Friday in Daytona Beach.


Speeds top 200 mph at


Daytona test session


By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH -
NASCAR is making gains
toward breaking up the
two-car tandem racing that
has taken over at Daytona
and Talladega, but the fix
sent speeds soaring over
200 mph Friday in a test
session.
Kurt Busch posted the
fastest lap of the day at
206.058 mph, but was being
pushed around Daytona
International Speedway in
a two-car tandem by Regan
Smith. Kyle Busch was
clocked at 205.813 while
pack racing.
NASCAR has tradition-
ally shied away from the
200 mph mark, and four-
time series champion Jeff
Gordon said he approached
series officials about the
speeds because he was
certain the cars would be
slowed. He said he was
surprised when NASCAR
indicated it was comfort-
able over 200 mph.
"It's embedded in our
minds we can't go out there
over 200 mph in race condi-
tions," he said. "Somehow
it's become accepted and
I think that's a good thing.
It's very comfortable. It's
extremely comfortable."
But it's unclear what
the racing will actually
look like when the season
opens with the Daytona
500 NASCAR's version
of the Super Bowl on
Feb. 26.
Fans are clear that
they want pack racing at
Daytona and Talladega,
NASCAR's two biggest and
fastest tracks. Drivers fig-
ured out about three.years
ago that hooking up in two-
car tandems was the fast-
est way around the track,
and the style evolved so
quickly, NASCAR couldn't
stop it.
The end result was a two-
car hookup in which the
trailing driver was push-
ing the lead car around
the track. Only ohe spot-


ter worked for both cars,
as the pushing driver was
unable to see anything
ahead. Overheating issues
forced the cars to swap
positions every few laps,
and that maneuver added
an element of danger
because separating slowed
the two cars dramatically.
NASCAR Chairman
Brian France vowed to
move away from the two-
car tandems in November,
and a series of aerodynam-
ic rules changes have done
just that.
NASCAR also banned
driver-to-driver commu-
nications over their scan-
ners.
It's all part of a continu-
ous process, that could
go all the way up to race
day. NASCAR has changed
specifications during each
of the first two days of
testing, and officials sum-
moned the drivers to a
Friday meeting during the
lunch break to strongly
urge them to pack race
during the afternoon ses-
sion. Based on the -data
gleaned from the two draft-
ing sessions, NASCAR
made yet another series of
technical changes that will
be applied Saturday in the
final day of testing.
Last year, NASCAR
made changes during actu-
al Speedweeks in an effort
to break up the tandems.
More changes were made
before the other three
restrictor-plate races on
the schedule, too.
Earlier Friday, NASCAR
President Mike Helton
indicated speeds will
likely be much different
when teams return for the
Daytona 500.
"(Speed) is one of those
things that we have to kind
of monitor," Helton said.
"It is a test, so we may
be a little bit more lenient
at a test than we would
be on race weekend. But
we'll see how everything
settles out and what kind
of rules package we come
back with ... 204 is OK for


a test. It's OK for now.
"But we'll have to take
back everything we learn
and then make a decision
after that"
But Sprint Cup Series
director John Darby said
after the drafting sessions
that the final product will
likely be right around the
200 mph mark.
"We'll still be over 200
mph. We'd like to stay as
close to that mark as we
can," said Darby, adding
that NASCAR's confidence
of keeping cars from going
airborne at those speed
has improved through
wind tunnel testing.
"If we were to put a tar-
get mark, it would be right
around 200, which the driv-
ers like, the excitement
level of 200 mph is always
present for the fans."
The drivers seemed
comfortable over 200 mph,
and most were thankful to
run in packs again. Gordon
said it was "just reminds
me of the good 'ol days."
But, most of the driv-
ers admitted the two-car
tandem will never go away
completely.
"Everybody was really
having a good time, and
trying to get everything
they could out of it before
we went back to push-
ing around each other,"
said Dale Earnhardt Jr.,
who pushed teammate
Jimmie Johnson to a win at
Talladega last year.
"Maybe, just maybe,
you don't have to be in
a two-car tandem to stay
with the lead pack. The
two-car tandem is prob-
ably the preferred way to
go as far as speed. But
maybe you don't have to
do it for 500 miles. Maybe
you can just kind of save
your car, save the tail and
the nose of your car and
yourself.
"That might be the way
to go just to get through
.the race, and be there at
the end. But that tandem
stuff is what is going to win
the race."


Stingy 49ers hold down

Drew Brees, Saints 36-32


By JANIE McCAULEY
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO -
What a way to celebrate
the 30-year anniversary of
"The Catch."
Joe Montana to Dwight
Clark then.
Alex Smith to Vernon
Davis now:
Smith completed a 14-
yard touchdown pass to
Davis with 9 seconds left
just after Drew Brees had
put the high-powered
Saints ahead, and resur-
gent San Francisco capital-
ized on five New Orleans
turnovers for a thrill-
ing 36-32 playoff victory
Saturday.
"This is big for us,"
Davis said. "It's history. It's
legendary."
Smith ran for a 28-yard
TD with 2:11 left and threw
another scoring pass to
Davis in the first quarter.


Coach Jim Harbaugh's
NFC West champions (14-
3) proved that a hard-hit-
ting, stingy defense can
still win in the modern,
wide-open NFL by holding
off one of league's most
dynamic offenses.
Brees completed a 66-
yard touchdown pass to
Jimmy Graham with 1:37
left and the Saints seemed
poised to rally from a 17-
point deficit when Smith
and Davis delivered once
more.
San Francisco triumphed
in its first playoff game in
nine years and will move
on to face the New York
Giants or defending cham-
pion Green Bay Packers,
who play Sunday. A win by
the Giants would give the
49ers the home field.
Brees came up big down
the stretch just as he did
throughout a record-set-
ting season, also hitting


Darren Sproles for a 44-
yard TD with 4:02 remain-
ing one of Sproles' 15
catches for 119 yards.
The 49ers also showed
that defense can still dom-
inate in the days of big
passers like Brees.
With Donte Whitner
bringing the bruising hits
and Dashon Goldson,
Patrick Willis and their
defensive mates pressur-
ing Brees and forcing turn-
overs from every angle,
surprising San Francisco
is a win away from return-
ing to the Super Bowl for
the first time since captur-
ing the proud franchise's
fifth championship after
the 1994 season.
Brees, whose team was
coming off consecutive
600-yard games, complet-
ed 40 of 63 passes for 462
yards and four touchdowns
and was sacked three
times.


By R.B. FALLSTROM
Associated Press

ST. LOUIS Jeff Fisher
spent exactly one season
out of the NFL He will have
a huge task in front of him
as he gets back to work.
Fisher has accepted an
offer to become coach of
the St Louis Rams. Fisher
chose the Rams over the
Miami Dolphins after sev-
eral days of deliberation,
and after he talked, with
both teams last week.
Fisher was widely con-
sidered the top prize in this
winter's coaching-search
sweepstakes. He led the
Titans franchise for 17
years and helped Tennessee
come within a yard of win-
ning the 2000 Super Bowl.
He stepped down a year
ago as the league's longest-
tenured coach, saying he
needed a break, and sat out
the 2011 season.
St. Louis' offer may have
trumped Miami's for several
reasons. The Rams have for-
mer No. 1 overall pick Sam
Bradford at quarterback,
the No. 2.overall pick in this
year's draft and a favorable
salary-cap situation. In addi-
tion, chief operating officer
is Kevin Demoff is the son
of Fisher's agent, Marvin
Demoff.
The Rams might offer
more power, too. The fran-
chise is replacing both
coach Steve Spagnuolo
and general manager Billy
Devaney.
"I'm pumped," full-
back Britt Miller told The
Associated Press. "I figured
that because he wanted
a little more control that
Miami was probably not the
place for.him. I'm really
pumped."
The Dolphins now will
turn to, other candidates.
They've interviewed Green
Bay Packers offensive
coordinator Joe Philbin,
Cincinnati Bengals defen-
sive coordinator Mike
Zimmer, Chicago Bears spe-
cial teams coordinator Dave
Toub, and Todd Bowles,
Miami's interim coach for
the final three games after
Tony Sparano was fired.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 10, 2011, file photo, former TennesseeaTitans
head coach Jeff Fisher watch the Detroit Lions practice at
NFL football training camp in Allen Park, Mich. A person
familiar with the decision says Jeff Fisher has accepted an
offer to coach the St. Louis Rams.


St. Louis opted for an
experienced hand after fail-
ing with Spagnuolo, a for-
mer defensive coordinator
who was just 10-38 in three
seasons. The Rams inter-
viewed several assistant
coaches, including Panthers
offensive coordinator Rob
Chudzinski on Thursday in
Denver.
St. Louis was considered
a franchise on the rise after
making a six-win improve-
ment in 2010 and playing
for the NFC West title in the
finale, but were a total flop
in 2011. The Rams haven't,
had a winning season since
2003, and they hadthe NFL's
worst offense last season.
Offensive coordinator Josh
McDaniels recently left to
return to the Patriots.
St. Louis was not compet-
itive early against a tough
slate of opponents and the
lineup was decimated by
injuries later, in the year.
Bradford got punished in a
scheme that featured long-


developing pass patterns,
and he missed six games
with a high left.ankle sprain.
Three offensive linemen
landed on injured reserve.
The defense, Spagnuolo's
calling card, was ranked
near the bottom against the
run.
For all his longevity in
Tennessee, Fisher had only
six winning seasons with
the Titans franchise, and
a succession of 8-8 finish-
es prompted detractors to
deride him as "Coach .500"
or "Coacho Ocho." His most
recent playoff victory came.
in January 2004, and his
most reerit'fswinmii record
was in 2008 when the Titans
squandered the No. 1 seed
in the AFC by losing in the
divisional round.
But Fisher led his team to
at least 12 wins four times,
and his career record is
142-120 (.542). He coached
more games for one fran-
chise than all but six'coach-
es, all Hall of Famers.


Dolphins to interview

more coaching candidates


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press

MIAMI Rejected by
Jeff Fisher, the Miami.
Dolphins plan to interview
several more candidates
before hiring a coach,
owner Stephen Ross said
Friday.
Fisher turned down the
Dolphins' offer and instead
accepted a job coaching the
St. Louis Rams, a person
familiar with the decision
said.
Ross and general manager
Jeff Ireland quickly hit the
reset button in their search,
but the rejection represent-
ed a major setback.
"Lol Damn Friday
the 13th strikes again!!"
Dolphins cornerback Sean
Smith tweeted.
Fisher's decision came 10
days after he interviewed
with Miami.
"It lasted a little longer
than I would have liked,"
Ross said with a chuckle in
a phone interview with the
AP. 'We did everything we
thought we could do. We
were stretching. We made
an offer better. We worked
hard at it"
Ross said he didn't
think Fisher was deterred
because the Dolphins,
unlike the Rams, have a gen-
eral manager in place. That
may mean more authority
over personnel decisions
for Fisher in St Louis.
"The organizational struc-
ture I don't believe was an
issue at all," Ross said. "I've
always thought the relation-


ship between the coach and
general manager is a part-
nership, and we felt Jeff was
fine with that"
Fisher, who coached
the Titans franchise for 17
years, was Miami's first
choice and widely consid-
ered the top prize on the
NFL coaching market. Ross
wanted to make a splash by
hiring a coach who would
reinvigorate the fan base,
and Fisher offered the best
chance to do that-
Among the other candi-
dates interviewed by the
Dolphins, the only one with
any NFL head coaching
experience is Todd Bowles,
thanks to his role as their
interim coach for the final
three games this season.
"Jeff was great he
had the experience that
the other ones might not
have," Ross said. "But it has
always been my philosophy
to hire young people who
have a real desire to suc-
ceed, and that's what's out
there. Hopefully there's a
Hall of Fame coach we'll be
talking to."
Other candidates inter-
viewed by Miami have
included Green Bay Packers
offensive coordinator Joe
Philbin, Cincinnati Bengals
defensive coordinator Mike
Zimmer and Chicago Bears
special teams coordinator
Dave Toub. The search will
now be expanded and may
include other coaches still
in the playoffs.
"We have continued to
evaluate candidates even
after we spoke with Jeff,"


Ross said. "We're excited
about the candidates we're
considering. They're out-
standing in theiirwn right.
We'll .continue with our
plan, which will include
interviewing several candi-
dates more. I'm confident
the process will result in the
choice of the right coach to
lead our tearh'"
Ross said he didn't know
why Fisher.. chose the
Rams, but their situation
might be considered more
appealing, than Miami's for
several reasons. The Rams
have former No. 1 overall
pick Sam Bradford at quar-
'terback and the No. 2 pick
in this year's draft, while
the Dolphins have endured
a revolving door at quarter-
back for years, and they'll
pick eighth or ninth in the
first round of the draft.
In addition, Rams chief
operating officer is Kevin
Demoff is the son of Fisher's
agent, Marvin Demoff.
The Dolphins fired Tony
Sparano last month with
three games to go in his
fourth season as their coach.
When the search for a new
coach began, Ross said he
would like to hire "a young
Don Shula" and give the fran-
chise much-needed stability.
But the state of the
Duiphins makes it harder to
attract top talent The same
franchise that successfully
courted Jimmy Johnson,
Nick Saban and Bill Parcells
has now lost out to a St.
Louis franchise dogged by
years of losing and specula-
tion about relocation.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











4B LAKE CITY REPORTER L RIl. I


SCENES FROM SATURDAY


3 SUNDAY. JANUAKY 15. 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
The East's Jeremy Wannamaker runs through a host of West defenders in the East 14-7 win at the Columbia Youth and Lake
City Pop Warner Football Association's 5th Annual East-West High School Football All-Star Game at Memorial Stadium on
Saturday.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Former Columbia High standout Timmy Jernigan (center)
stands with current Columbia players Darius Williams (left)
and Quaysean Monismith on Saturday.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
The East's R.J. BuIxtn throws a pass in the first half.
*h


C~~~~C


3 SUNDAY. JANUARY 15. 2012


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420












Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


Sunday, January 15, 2012


Bank building


Bank building




C sNew




Occupant


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


The Wolfson Children's
Specialty Center will spend
more than $166,000
to renovate the building's
second floor.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.cor

ing on NW Madison Street in
downtown Lake City will have
a new occupant after renova-
tions set to begin in coming
weeks are completed sometime this
spring.
The Wolfson Children's Specialty Center
will spend more than $166,000 to renovate
5,344 square feet of the building's second
floor Once renovations to transform the bank
offices to a medical facility are complete,
Wolfson will
hire up to 10. ....
e pleesto This building
work at the
center. important a1
As an within the cen
incentiveto business distri
estblihake is paramount 1
City, the strength c
Community City Manager
Redevel-
opment
Agency approved up to $32,000 in tax incre-
ment funds for parking lot improvements.
City Manager Wendell Johnson said


The second floor of the
Bank of America building in
downtown Lake City will be
leased to Wolfson Children's
Specialty Center. The cen-
ter will spend $166,000 for
renovations and will occupy
more than 5,300 square feet
that will be used for treatment
rooms, business offices and
patient waiting areas.

work on the parking lot will begin the
week after the Olustee Festival next month.
The work will be concurrent with improve-
ments on Franklin, Madison, Veterans,
Hernando and Leon streets.
"My understanding is that Wolfson will
retrofit the space into treatment rooms, along
with a business and patient waiting area and
that they are looking to start construction
quickly for operation by spring," Johnson
said. "As far as I know, they will be treating
patients."
.Johison
g is one of the :I- said thelease
anchor buildings to occupy the
second floor
ntral downtown was finalized
ct and occupancy Jan. 9andthe
to the economic dealhelps
bring stability
of the area.' to an impor-
Wendell Johnson tant building
downtown.
"'his build-
ing is one of the important anchor buildings
within the central downtown business district
and occupancy is paramount to the economic


strength of the area," he said. "And, among
all downtown buildings, this one is in really
good condition for full occupancy."
Wolfson will share the building with
the North Florida Broadband Authority
and the Columbia County Economic
Development Department, both of which
occupy space on the bank building's first
floor.
The Economic Development
Department has a month-to-month lease
for office space at the bank building and


it's uncertain how long the department will
remain there. Johnson predicted the broad-
band authority will be a long-term tenant
"I feel the NFBA will continue its pres-
ence in the building for an indefinite
period," he said.
Another tenant may also lease office
space in the building and others may fol-
low, Johnson said.
"I don't see the remaining building space
on the first floor would not be desirable
once Wolfson is in place," he said.


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2C LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY JANUARY 15. 2012
I


Explaining the
Prime Number
Q What's the prime rate? T W.,
Norwich, Conn.
A It's the interest rate that banks
charge their best(lowest-risk)
commercial customers. It matters
because many other interest rates,
such as those for mortgages, home
equity loans, credit cards and other
business loans, take their lead from.
the prime rate. A car loan rate, for
example, might be calculated by
taking the current prime rate and
adding a certain amount to it.
The prime rate doesn't change
every day. It stays put for a while
until major banks change their
rates, generally moving in step with
economic conditions; (That often
happens when the Federal Reserve
changes its discount rate, which is
what it charges banks that borrow
short-term money.)
There actually isn't a single
prime rate. Each bank may set its
own, but the major commercial
banks tend to use the same one
most of the time. You'll find the
prime rate in most newspapers'
business sections,
***
S Howcan Ifind out who's on a
S company's board of directors?
N.B., Ashland, Ky.
A You'll frequently find a list of
"a company's board members
on its website. Look for links
labeled something like "Corn- /
pany Information," "About .
Us," "Investor Relations" or
"Corporate Goemance." You can
also just call the company's investor
relations department and ask.
Most annual reports will list
the members of the board, often
with a glossy color photo of the
gang. Another option is to check
out the reports that the company
files with the Securities and
Exchange Commission (SEC).
The annual 10-K report is >our
best bet, and you can get it by
entering the company's name
or ncker symbol at http://lfiance.
)ahoo.com. It's a long and infor-
man\e document.
Got a quesinon fo i the Fool." Send a in
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Join a Club!
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Next week: tips on running a club.


Name That Company

S. Founded in 1865 and based in
". .... Minneapolis, I started as an Iowa
grain storage warehouse. Today I'm
Sa global giant in food, agricultural,
financial and industrial products and
S services. My offerings include grains,
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animal nutrition products. I'm versatile.
With corn alone, I've traded it, processed it
into ethanol and fructose, and created renew-
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it. I employ roughly 140,000 people and rake in
about $120 billion annually. You can't buy stock
in me, because I'm a privately held company -
America's largest one, in fact. Who am-l?


A Typo Tale
I asked my broker to buy me
100 shares of EnerNOC, whose
ticker symbol is ENOC or so
I thought. The order I actually
placed was for shares of ENCO.
That turned out to be a tiny biotech-
related company called Encorium
Group, not the much bigger
energy company. I figured
it out when he called to
ask why I wasn't buying
1,000 shares, since the stock sold
for about 54 cents. I finally sold my
ENCO shares for about 21 cents
each. D.L., Washington, D.C.
The Fool Responds: Encorium,
a penny stock, was recently trad-
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serving as a good reminder of how
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Intel's ticker to be INTL, but it's
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not CO or CC.
Be.careful and precise when plac-
ing trade orders. Online, a broker-
age will often show you a summary
of your order for you to check.
Look it over and make sure it's the
right company before confirming.
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the number of its radio frequency
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part of a breakup fee in the agree-
ment, AT&T will have to fork over
$3 billion worth of spectrum and
roaming agreements to T-Mobile,
along with $3 billion in cash.
So job No. 1 for AT&T in the
new year will be to gain additional
spectrum just to tread
water. It's waiting for the
FCC to OK its deal to buy
$1.9 billion worth of spec-
trum from Qualcomm.
The biggest reason AT&T is
going to need as much spectrum as
it can get is to catch up to Verizon
in the race to smother the country
with 4G LTE coverage. Verizon
seems to have quite a head start in
that regard. Its LTE network covers
179 cities across the country, vs.
just 15 cities for AT&T.
The coming year is definitely
going to be challenging for AT&T,
but it's certainly not in dire straits.
The company just upped its quarterly
dividend for the 28th year in a row.
Think twice before selling off
your AT&T shares in a panic. That
6 percent dividend yield can be
quite effective as an anti-anxiety
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* * * * * * * * * * *0a * * * * * * * *
LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Founded in 1906 and based in Virginia, I'm a media and marketing
company with a bunch of broadcast, digital, mobile and publishing com-
panies under my umbrella. My network of websites, including Career-
,Builder.com and HighSchoolSports.net, reach 52 million people monthly.
My Captivate network delivers news, entertainment and advertising to
9,500 elevators and hotel lobbies across America. I own 82 daily news-
papers, about 200 weekly publications and hundreds of others, along
with 23 TV stations. My USA Today has the country's largest print cir-
culation ant is a mobile force, too, with more than 7 million of its apps
downloaded. Who am I? (Answer: Gannett)

Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Cc Smartest) investment (un tn 1 0 wordAr) and ovnnr Trivia entries -


K* K," ll /t a's Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you 'II to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
N'0 &.,,, c '"l JI i', .' a Jawingfor a niftyprize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can'tprovide individualfinancial advice.
*. . 2012 TH0 MOT[L 0 0 D B UNVERSL, CLI *.,.RE EAS / /201
( 2012 THE MOTLEY FoOLfDJsr. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RLEASE 1/12/2012)


- C',


Yuengling

is largest

U.S.-owned

brewery
By Spencer Soper
Associated Press
POTTSVILLE, Pa. -
D.G. Yuengling and Son,
which proudly bills itself, as
America's oldest brewery,
has something new to brag
about ,
SThe Pottsville company,
:whose sales surged last year
when it entered Ohio, has
become the largestAmerican
beer-maker by surpassing
'Boston Beer in 2011 sales.
That's right. A beer
launched by a German immi-
grant in 1829 to quench the
thirst of Pennsylvania coal
ininers can claim a distinc-
tion once held by Anheuser-
'Busch, maker of the iconic
Budweiser brand, which got
gobbled up by a Belgian
company a few years ago.
It's a surprising story
about how an underdog
'prevailed while much larger
American brewers fell under
foreign ownership. Even
beer market experts could
not have foreseen such rapid
changes.
And Dick Yuengling, the
company's fifth-generation
owner who engineered a
slow-and-steady growth cam-
paign, is in disbelief. The com-
pany used to compete with
other small regional brewers.
Now it's banging elbows with
iuge, multinational conglom-
erates for cooler space and
beer-drinker-loyalty.
"It just floors me that so
Much of our beer industry is
owned by foreign concerns,"
he said. "We were not in any
race to be the largest domes-
tically owned brewer, but it's
a tremendous honor for us."
Beer industry changes
came suddenly in 2008, when
global consolidation stripped
the United States of domestic
ownership of its best-selling
brands.


After cancer hit, women




lobbied for a bald Barbie


By Christina Rexrode
Associated Press
NEW YORK Barbie has been an astro-
naut, an architect, a NASCAR driver, and a
news anchor.
Now, there's an online' movement to get her
to attempt what could be her biggest feat yet:
going bald to fight cancer.
A Facebook page titled "Beautiful and
Bald Barbie! Let's see if we can get it made"
was started a few days before Christmas. By
Wednesday afternoon, the page had more than
16,000 fans. The goal is to get toy maker Mattel
Inc. to create a bald Barbie in support of chil-
dren with cancer.
Friends Rebecca Sypin and Jane Bingham,
who live on opposite coasts but have both been
affected by the disease, hatched the idea to use
Barbie for the movement because she's such a
popular children's toy.
Bingham has lost her hair due to chemo-
therapy treatments to treat lymphoma. Sypin's
12-year-old daughter, Kin Inich, also lost her
hair this year in her own battle with leukemia.
Mattel didn't return calls on Wednesday
seeking comment, but the women said they
have contacted the company through some gen-
eral form letters. In return, they said, they've
received form letters that say Mattel doesn't
accept ideas from outside sources.
The women say a bald Barbie would provide
a huge platform to raise awareness for children
with cancer.
Barbie, all
11.5 inches of Friends Rebecca
her, is one of the and Jane Binghan
best-known toys live on opposite
of all time. She
can sell for- $10 but have both b
at Wal-Mart or affected by the di
$7,000 on eBay. hatched the idea
Barbie also Barbie for the n
has'taken on all ment because she
sorts of incarna-
tions throughout a popular children
her nearly 53
years of exis-
tence, crushing stereotypes and showing little
girls that they can be whatever they want to be.
There's been an elegant Grace Kelly Barbie;
a Barbie in thigh-high pink boots; a tattooed
Barbie; a pregnant Barbie friend, and another
Barbie friend in a wheelchair.


I
n


But Barbie has also been dissed for not being
as socially responsible as she could be. She's
best known for her curves, which long have
sparked complaints by women's groups that
say she imposes an unachievable
physical standard on young girls.
Sypin She also was lambasted when a
, who talking version uttered an excla-
_GaStS mation about math class being


Ieen hard.
eenThe friends who started the
disease, "Beautiful and Bald Barbie" move-
to use ment aren't natural activists.
love- Sypin, 32, is a special-education
!'s such teacher's aide in Lancaster, Calif.
's toy. Bingham, 41, is a photographer in
Sewell, N.J.
"We're not demanding that the
company do anything," Sypin said
Wednesday. "We're just hoping somebody sees
this and can help us make it happen."
Overall, Sypin said she's been pleased
with the response to the Facebook page. For
instance, one fan of the page wrote of Mattel:
"If they are making dolls that are inspiring


This undated photo provided by
Canturi Jewels shows a custom-
designed Barbie wearing a neck-
lace featuring a one-carat pink
diamond, which will make the doll
the world's most expensive Barbie
when it goes on the auction block.
Barbie has been an astronaut,
an architect, a Nascar driver, and
a news anchor. Now, there's an
online movement to get her to
attempt what could be her biggest
feat yet: going bald to fight cancer.
A Facebook page titled "Beautiful
and Bald Barbie! Let's see if we
can-get it made" was started a
few days before Christmas. By
Wednesday afternoon, the page
had more than 15,000 fans. The
goal is to get toy maker Mattel Inc.
to create a bald Barbie in support
of children with cancer,

ED PRESS

young girls with careers then why not make
a doll that would inspire young girls who are
dealing with Cancer."
Some commenters even suggested the
friends extend the movement to include a boys'
toy. So, over the weekend, the women started
an accompanying Facebook page, "Bald G.I.
Joe Movement"
Hasbro Inc., the maker of G.I. Joe, didn't
immediately return a call for comment.
The movement has its critics, too.
Some people have told the women to just
take a normal Barbie and shave her hair off to
make the same point Bingham posted photos
where she did just that resulting in patchy,
unattractive clumps on Barbie's head. She also
posted digitally doctored pictures of a bald
Barbie to show how beautiful the doll could
be.
And to people who say that it makes more
sense to just donate to cancer research rather
than to buy a bald Barbie?
"A lot of these people wouldn't have even
thought about doing that without this move-
ment," Bingham said.


Wmlll


~i~















LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY JANUARY 15, 2012 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


Weekly Stock ExchangeHighlights

SNYSE Amex Nsd

7,632.03 +74.35. 2,264.92 -30.19 2,710.67 +36.45


Gainers (s2or more) Gainers (2or more) Gainers (S2or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
GaGuf 32.93+11.45 +533 Golden/ W 8.39 +220 +35.5 Inhlbtex 24.55+14.68+148.7
IiPSXRIK 49.99+16.87 +50.9 !Quepasa 3.78 +.72 +23.5 IderixP 14.42 +7.37+104.5
TrmaSolar 9.57 +2.80 +41.4 DowSec 3.05 +.51 +20.1 Ac ion 12.37 +4.45 +56.2
HoWinE 2.35 +.6 +34.3 Caranstd 2.10 +.32 +18.0 Pansoft 3.12 +1.11 +55.2
ReneSoa 2.18 +.55 +33.7 OrionEngy 3.13 +.45 +16.8 ChCache 6.84 +229 +50.3
ProUS"ttNG89.08+21.90 +32.6 HatwdGp 10.19 +1.17 +13.0 GlobTcAdh 5.42 +1.71 +46.1
JinkoSoiar 6.65 +1.59 +31.4 BoweMed 280 +.31 +12.4 AcelRxn 2.92 +.89 +43.8
Suntech 2.96 +.66 +28.7 Medgenicn 3.19 +.35 +12.1 BroadVisn 17.57 +4.86 +38.2
HovnEntun 12.56 +2.73 +278 iOdenPap 3.62 +39 +12.1 Omeros 5.53 +1.43 +34.9
WestkChm 53.87+11.21 +26.3 UranirmEn 3.43 +35 +11.4 Telunirag 2.15'+.52 +31.9


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ProSUtNG 15.83 -5.74 -26.6
ChiMMrs 3.55 -1.28 -26.5
HIIMgmt 5.79 -1.70 -22.7
hhgregg 10.68 -3.13 -22.7
Cameinfo 2.18 -.62 -22.1
DrxDNGBuII33.90 -8.58 -202
ComstkRs 13.60 -3.33 -19.7
ECAMTrl 21.06 -5.18 -19.7
QkslvRes 5.79 -1.20 -17.2
CabotO&G 67.13-13.52 -16.8

Most Active (S1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 15922275 6.61 +.43
S&P500ETF5685094128.84+1.13
SPDR Fnd3352101 13.82 +.42
FordM 3313962 12.04 +.33
Ciigrprs 2748036 30.74+2.19
iShEMIds 2385728 39.29+1.07
GenElec 2334934 18.84 +.19
Alcoa 2118700 9.80 +.64
JPMorgCh1860263 35.92 +.56
iShR2K 1771205 76.39+1.60

Diary
Advanced 2,222
Declined 926
New Highs 277
New Lows 48
Totalissues 3,198
Unchanged 50
Volume 18,689,678,736


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
e 15.28-3.95 -20.5
Eag 6.10 -1.10 -15.3
AmBirt 4.52 -.80 -15.1
Gastargrs 2.87 -.44 -13.3
DGSE 6.56 -.71 -9.8
Pyramidil 3.85 -.37 -8.7
SamsO&G 2.26 -.16 -6.5
Bacter 2.30 -.15 -6.1
GoldRsvg 2.68 -.17 -6.0
Walterlnv 18.91 -1.20 -6.0

Most Active ($1 or more
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
CheniereEn234840 9.80 +.80
RareBeg 221634 5.87 +.11
NovaGidg 105303 8.97 +.15
AvalnRare 97445 2.90 +.06
NwGoldg 87066 10.52 -.24
Rentech 79130 1.52 +.02
GrtBasGg 74823 1.02 -.04
GoldStrg 67048 1.71 -.02
VantageDd 65853 1.03 -.02
BrigusGg 59636 1.24 +.22

Diary
Advanced 330
Declined 176
New Highs ,54
New Lows 14
Total issues 526
Unchanged 20
Volume 374,969,946


Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Metabolix 2.54 -2.60 -50.6
IPC 31.54-14.11 -30.9
UniTekGS 3.27 -1.25 -27.7
WebMD 27.76-10.14 -26.8
Summerinf 5.08 -1.82 -26.4
CmplGnom 2.86 -.85 -22.9
RexEnergy 11.10 -3.20 -22.4
Big SSprt 7.79 -2.24 -22.3
SuperMda 2.57 -.70 -21.4
TriusTher 5.33 -1.45 -21.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SiriusXM 3205903 2.14 +.14
Microsoft 2862465 28.25 +.14
Intel 2502702 25.14 -.11
Orade 1793839 27.34 +.41
Cisco 1773352 19.06 +.21
PwShsQQQ169005358.18 +.37
MicronT 1342420 7.23 +.03
Dndreon 1018555 14.03+1.68
ApldMati 884203 11.50 +.49
FronterCm 879378 5.09 -.01

Diary
Advanced 1,812
Defined 872
New Highs 150
New Lows 89
Total issues 2,745
Unchanged 61
Volume 8,732,750,399


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


WIty Wkiy YTD
Name Ex Div Last ChgChgS.Chg
AT&Tnc NY 1.76 30.07 +39 S -'3 -.6
Alcoa NY .12 9.80 +.6 T7.0 +13.3
AutoZ oe NY .. 3444 +40 1.9 +6.0
BkolAn NY 04 6.6 .43 -7.0 T18.9
BobEvansNasd !.00 34.93 +.31 +0.9 +4
CNBFnPANasd .66 15.63 -.1 -0.7 -1.0
CSXs NY .48 229 +.25 2 +1.1 +8.9
Cheon Y 3-24 106.09 -222 -20 -.3
Ciso Nasc 24 19.06 +-21 +!.1 +5.8
Citgprs NY 04 30.74 +219 +7.7 +16.8
CocaCola NY 1.88 66.99 -194 -2.8 -4.3
Delhaize NY 2.45 5296 4.53 -7.9 6.0
Dndreon Nasa .. 14.03+1.68 +136 +846
DrSCBrrs NY ... 23.81 -1.64 -6.4 -10.1
EMCCp NY .. 22.5 +.24 +1.1 +3.3
EKodak NY ... 52 +.15 +39.5 -20.2
FamityOr NY .72 53.79 +.16 +0.3 -6.7
FordM NY 20 12.04 +.33 +2.8 +11.9
GenElec NY .68 18.84 +.19 +1.0 +5.2
HItMgnt NY .. 5.79 -1.70 -22.7-21.4
HomeDp NY 1.16 43.51 +.31 +0.7 +3.5
iShJapn NY 20 9.15 +.08 +0.9 +.4
iShEMkts NY .81 3929 +1.07 +2.8 +3.6
iSlR2K NY 1.02 76.39 +1.60 +2.1 +3.6
Intel Nasd .84 25.14 -.11 -0.4 +3.7
JPMorgChtNY 1.00 35.92 +.56 +1.6 +8.0
Lowes NY .56 26.32 -.02 -0.1 +3.7
McDnlds NY 2.80 100.35 -.25 -02


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.025 0.015
6-month 0.05 0.05
5-year 0.79 0.86
10-year 1.87 1.96
30-year 2.91 3.02


IName Ex Div


rotecT Nasd ...
Ltesoft Nasc .80
MoroStan NY 20
NY Trnes NY
NexraEn NY 220
NoityHf Nasd ..
NokdCp NY .55
OcdPet NY 1.84
Orade Nasd .24
Pevney NY .80
PepsiC NY 2.06
Petobas NY 1.28
Pfizer NY .88
Potashs NY 28
PwS: Q 00Nasd .46
ReginsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.16
S&P5OOETFNY 2.58
SearsHidgsNasd .33
SiiusXM Nasd
SoumtCo NY 1.89
SpritNex NY
SPDRFndNY .22
TimeWamNY .94
US NGsrsNY
ValeSA NY 1.76
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48


Wiy Wtly YTD
Last Cho %O' Cho a


7.23 +.03 +0.4i +4.9
28.25 +.14 +0.5 +8.8
16.63 +.73 +4.6 +9.9
8.08 +.30 +3.9 +4.5
59.12 +20 0.3 -2.9
532 --22 -4.0 +.8
521 -.03 -0.6 +8.1
97.62 +1.85 +1.9 +4.2
2734 ,.41 +1.5 +6.6
33.74 -1.22 -3.5 .0
64.40 -.99 -1.5 -2.9
28.36 +2.67 +10.4 +14.1
21.84 +.27 +1.3 +.9
44.74 +2.97 +7.1 +8.4
58.18 +.37 +0.6 +42
4.79 +.38 +8.6 +11.4
55.05 +.40 +0.7 +3.6
128.84 +1.13 +0.9 +2.7
33.56 +4.36 +14.9 +5.6
2.14 +.14 +7.0 +17.6
45.27 +.79 +1.8 -2.2
2.31 +.12 +5.5 -1.3
13.82 +.42 +3.1 +6.3
37.27 +.72 +2.0 +3.1
5.67 -.97 -14.6 -12.2
22.61 +.25 +1.1 +5.4
59.54 +.54 +0.9 -.4
29.61 +.67 +2.3 +7.4


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9710 .9678
Britain 1.5304 1.5342
Canada 1.0237 1.0189
Euro .7893 .7796
Japan 76.96 76.76
Mexico 13.6176 13.5690
Switzerlnd .9537 .9438
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones industrials 327 6978 -1302 21.57 -48.96
Close: 12,422.06 1-week change: 62.14(0.5%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000

12,500




11,500

11,000

10,500_ A S . .... .. ...- .- -. .



MuTuAL FuNDis
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct MIn nit
Name Obj ($Mins) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt.
PIMCOTotRets Cl 144,428 10.99 +2.0 +5.0/0 +8.4/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotSfldx LB 62,667 32.17 +5.7 +1.5B +0.5/B NL 3,000
Vanguard Instldxl LB 58,398 118.01 +5.4 +2.5/A +0.1B NL 5,000,000
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 55,027 49.08 +2.5 +2.3/A +0.9/C 5.75 250
Fidelity Contra LG 54,719 68.75 +3.4 -0.2/B +2.7/A NL 2,500
American FundsGrthAmAm LG 53,225 29.74 +5.2 -3.21/D -0.1/D 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 52,517 16.87 +3.7 +5.4/A +1.8/C 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adm LB 51,925 118.79 +5.4 +2.5/A +0.1/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 49,496 32.18 +5.7 +1.7/8 +0.6/B NL 10,000
American Funds CpWIdGrlA m WS 44,528 32.59 +4.3 -7.4/C -0.6/B 5.75 250
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 42,643 27.81 +5.4 -0.6/C -0.41C 5.75 250
American Funds WAMutnvA m LV 38,129 28.88 +5.0 +7.6/A +0.4/B 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 36,562 105.32 +6.7 -3.2/D -3.6/E NL 2,500
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 35,923 29.46 +2.9 -16.81D -3.3/A NL 1 2,500
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 35,298 2.11 +3.5 +1.9/C +3.1/C 4.25 1,000
VanguardInstPlus LB 35,140 118.02 +5.4 +2.6/A +0.1/B NL 200,000,000
PIMCOTotRetAdm b Cl 31,439 10.99 +2.0 +4.8/E +8.1/A NL 1,000,000
VanguardTotBdAdml CI 31,366 11.03 +0.8 +8.0/A +6.6/8 NL 10,000
American Funds BalA m MA 30,715 18.60 +4.1 +4.5/A +2.7/A 5.75 258
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 30,175 36.43 +5.9 -0.5/C +1.1/A 5.75 250
Vanguard WelltnAdmn MA 30,138 55.18 +4.4 +4.5/A +4.0/A NL 50,000
Vanguard Totinto d FB 29,949 13.27 +3.5 -14.3/C -3.1/B NL 3,000
Vanguard TotStllns LB 29,467 32.18 +5.7 +1.7/B +0.7/A NL 5,000,009
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 29,035 35.62 +3.4 -13.5/B -1.1/A 5.75 250
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 27,706 26.72 +4.2 -6.4/B +1.1/A 5.75 250
PIMCOTotRetA m CI 26,135 10.99 +2.0 +4.6/E +7.9/A 3.75 1,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 25,966 118.78 +5.3 +2.4/A 0.0/B NL 3,000
CA Coserivat lcanlonCI Inltermete-Terl Bnd, ES -Eupe Sto. FB Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foregn LargeGrowth. FV
Value IH Wndsi Alkcato, LB Lige Blend, LT-Lare Growth, LV rge Value, MA Moderle Al+alion., MB 4C.A p Be
M Value, SH Spedoatyeatl, WS -Wo Stoc TiaRetum: Crg i NV ith diends reveted. Ran Howud pme
otherswithsameobjecive:A sin top20%, Ein bottom20%.M i ndt l mk m $ needed to Invest inlud. Souce: Momnigsta


Wkly YTD
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.32 3.1
AK Steel .20 2.2
AT&TInc 1.76 5.9
AbtLab 1.92 3.5
AberFdc .70 1.6
Accenture 1.35 2.5
AMD
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.2
Allstate .84 2.9
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.64 5.7
AMovilL s .28 1.3
AEagleOut .44 3.4
AEP 1.88 4.5
AmExp .72. 1.4
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower .35
Anadarko 36 .5
Annaly 2.43 14.8
Apache .60 .6
ArcelorMit .75 3.8.
ArchCoal .44 3.1
ArchDan .70 2.4
ArmourRsd .32-18.7
ATMOS 1.38 4.3
Avon .92 5.3
BB&TCp .64 2.4
BHP BilILt 2.02 2.7
BakrHu .60 1.2
BcoBrades .80 4.6
BcoSantSA .84 11.7
BcoSBrasil 1.50 17.2
BkofAm .04 .6
BkNYMel .52 2.4
Barclay .36 2.9
Bar iPVix ...
BarrickG .60 1.2
Baxter 1.34 2.6
BeazerHm ...
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .64 2.6
Boeing 1.76 2.4
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.36 4.0
CBREGrp ...
CBSB .40 1.4
CSXs .48 2.1
CVREngy ..
CVSCare .65 1.5
CblvsNY s .60 4.3
CabotO&G .16 .2
Camecog .40
Cameron
CdnNRsgs .36 ...
CapOne .20 .4
CapitlSrce .04 .6
CareFusion ...
Carnival 1.00 2.9
Caterpillar 1.84 1.8
Cemex .
Cntryink 2.90 7.9
ChesEng .35 1.6
Chevron 3.24 3.1
Chimera .51 18.5
Cigna .04 .1
Citigrprs .04 .1
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.6
Coach .90 1.5
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
ColgPal 2.32 2.6
Comerica .40 1.4
ConAgra .96 3.6
ConocPhil 2.64 3.8
ConsolEngy .40 1.2
ConEd 2.40 4.1
ConstellEn .96 2.6


20 +.42 +6.8
9 -1.06 -.2
... +.36 +10.3
15 +.39 -.6
19 +.05 -1.4
18 +.08 -7.9
16 +1.42
4 +.23 +4.8
14 +1.66 +11.8
... +.18 +11.5
14 +.64 +13.3
43 +.96 +5.7
47 -1.01 -1.2
18 +.24 -2.3
'10 -.34 -1.8
14 -.43 -15.2
11 +.58 +.1
13 +1.49 +5.5
...+1.41 -+7.5
90 +2.07 +3.8
.. -2.26 +2.2
8 +.34 +2.8
9 -4.20 +2.5
15 +.82 +7.1
12 -1.23 -2.6
9 +.10 +2.0
15-- -01 ...
14 -.36 -3.2
10 -.02 +.3
17 +1.44 +8.2
... 2.50 +6.1
13 -3.24 -1.3
+.44 +5.3
... +27 -4.5
.. +.57 +6.9
.. +.43 +18.9
10 +1.00 +7.7
... +.90 +12.6
... -.27 -11.4
11 +.80 +6.8
14 +1.16 +3.7
... +.16 +21.8
17 +1.38 +1.9
8 +.07 +3.9
15 +.62 +1.7
15 +.22 +3.4
17 -.42 -4.1
21 +.1.06 +11.8
16 -.04 +2.2
14 +.25 +8.9
7 +2.07 +23.1
17 +.69 +3.4
12 -.88 -1.8
57-13.52 -11.6
... +1.62 +11.8
21 +1.36 +4.1
... -1.04 -.9
7 +3.73 +15.6
35 +.18 +.6
19 -2.65 -10.2
14 +1.37 +5.0
16 +6.72 +13.1
.... +.21 +4.6
17 -.43 -1.6
6 -2.48 -3.9
8 -2.22 -.3
6 +.12 +10.0
10 +2.00 +8.6
8 +2.19 +16.8
5 +3.66 +12.7
21 -.62 +1.6
12 -1.94 -4.3
18 -1.28 -4.2
14 +1.52 +14.1
16 +.43 +1.7
9 -2.32 -3.5
12 -4.24 -6.5
16 +.08 -4.6
16 -1.34 -8.7


12.65
43.18
9.11
30.07
55.43
44.99
53.25
5.66
39.06
1.74
9.80
28.98
20.19
28.96
22.19
12.97
41.37
49.76
24.95
62.32
78.01
16.40
92.84
19.49
14.13
29.17
S705
32.29
17.52
27.23
74.95
48.02
17.56
7.18
8.70
6.61
21.45
12.37
31.49
48.34
51.30
3.02
77.77
24.29
74.60
5.52
33.80
17.02
27.75
22.94
23.05
42.15
13.97
67.13
20.18
51.23
37.04
48.89
6.74
22.83
34.28
102.48
5.64
36.59
21.41
106.09
2.76
45.61
30.74
70.25
62.02
66.99
88.52
29.44
26.85
70.34
34.33
59.18
36.23


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Coming .30
Covidien .90
CSVS2xVxS...
CSVellVSts...
DCTIndl .28
DDR Corp .48
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
DanaHldg ...
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir
DenburyR..
DeutschBk 1.07
DevonE .68
DicksSptg .50
DxFnBull rs...
DrSCBr rs ..
DirFnBrrs ...
DirxSCBull...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .40
Disney .60
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
E-CDang .
EMCCp
EQT Corp .88
Eaton s 1.36
EIPasoCp .04,
Elan
EldorGldg .18
EmersonEl 1.60
EnCanag .80
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FedExCp .52
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
FordM .20
ForestOils ...
FMCGs 1.00
Gafisa SA ..29
GameStop ...
Gannett .32
Gap .45
GenMills 1.22
GenMotors ...
GenOnEn.
Genworth
Gerdau .20
GlaxoSKIn 2.12
Goldcrp g .54
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear
HCA Hd n ...
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HltMgmt ...
HeclaM .02
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HollyFrt s .40
HomeDp 1.16
Honwlllnti 1.49
HostHotls .20
HovnanE
Huntsmn .40
ING
iShGold
iShBraz 1.50
iShGer .67
iShHK .41
iShJapn '.20
iSTaiwn .47
iShSilver
iShChina25 .77


7 +.49 +7.9 14.00
12 -.50 +1.1 45.50
... -.47 -22.3 24.83
+.04 +12.0 7.29
+.19 +5.1 5.38
+.49 +8.8 13.24
60 +.93 +10.3 13.91
13 -.04 -1.8 53.48
34 +1.60 +21:5 14.76
13 +2.36 +9.5 84.66
12 +.53 +9.4 8.85
13 -.20 +13.0 17.07
... +2.46 -3.0 36.72
6.-1.65 +1.8 63.10
21 +5.54 +8.9 40.18
... +5.76 +16.0 75.25
... -1.64 -10.1 23.81
...-2.81 -14.8 31.80
...+2.88 +10.3 49.44
... -2.01 +.7 47.17
7 +2.21 +10.5 26.51
15 -1.51 +2.4 38.40
17 -.83 -4.7 50.60
14 +1.70 +11.3 32.02
17 -.20 -3.1 21.31
... +.96 +34.8 5.93
22" +.24 +3.3 22.25
25 -6.99 -10.9 48.80
13 +3.42 +11.9 48.71
... +.59 +.6 26.73
13 +.89 +1.2 13.90
27 -.39 +2.1 14.00
15 +1.39 +4.2 48.54
31 -1.28 -5.6 17.49
93 -1.36 -19.7 8.39
10 -1.35 -8.4 39.74
10 -.24 +.1 84.88
16 +4.88 +8.2 90.37
36 +.16 +8.5 8.68
13 -.04 -4.8 42.17
7 +.33 +11.9 12.04
12 -.87 -2.2 13.25
7 +3.38 +14.2 42.00
.. -.03 +.9 4.64
9 -1.36 -2.6 23.51
7 +.94 +9.6 14.66
11 +.26 -1.6 18.26
17 +.57 +.6 40.64
5 +1.37 +19.8 24.29
... -.03 -6.1 2.45
+.74 +14.7 7.51
+.62 +16.6 9.11
... -2.05 -3.3 44.13
18 +1.43 +2.6 45.42
16 +5.54 +9.4 98.96
30-1.65 -4.7 13.50
... +1.56 +8.5 23.90
12 -1.04 -1.7 33.94
7 +1.45 +9.7 17.82
8 -1.70 -21.4 5.79
12 -.93 -9.8 4.72
15 +.65 +9.2 12.80
10 +.13 -.4 56.55
8 +.09 +2.8 26.49
5 +.49 +16.7 27.31
19 +.31 +3.5 43.51
15 +1.52 +4.3 56.70
+.57 +5.3 15.56
+.60 +62.1 2.35
8 +1.31 +12.1 11.21
+.75 +6.8 7.66
+.21 +4.9 15.97
... +2.83 +6.9 61.35
... +.32 +2.0 19.61
... +.18 +1.7 15.73
... +.08 +.4 9.15
... +.26 +3.2 12.08
+.91 +7.0. 28.82
.. +1.57 +5.4 36.74


New York Stock Exchange






Retirement May Be Far Off,

But i -
T 7. ,., .



You have only so many years to prepare for retirement
That's why contributing to your individual Retirement
Account (IRA) is so important. Fortunately, you still have
time to maximize your 2011 IRA contribution before the
April 17 deadline.

By contributing now,your retirement savings can have
more opportunity to grow. Even if you already have an
IRA elsewhere, it's easy to transfer it to an Edward Jones
IRA and begin receiving the face-to-face guidance
you deserve.

To learn~ more about the advantages of xan
Edward Jones IRA, or visit today.

Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847

www.edwardjones.com ,-co IC


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Cha %Cha Last


iSSPS00 2.60
iShEMkts .81
iShB20T 3.93
iSEafe 1.71
iShR2K 1.02
iShREst 2.17
IngerRd .64
IBM 3.00
IntlGame .24
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco .49
ItauUnibH .82
IvanhM g ...
JPMorgCh 1.00
JanusCap .20
Jefferies .30
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtl .72
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25
KeyEngy ...
Keycorp .12
Kimco .76
Kinross g .12
KodiakOg ...
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LDK Solar ...
LSI Corp ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16


... +1.23
..+1.07
... +2.15
+.45
... +160
+.86
... +1.92
14 -3.38
19 +.15
11 +.55
12 +.20
11 +.85
... +1.03'
... +1.27
8 +.56
7 +.26
12 +2.12
16 +.43
15 +1.88
22 +.62
... +1.63
11 -1.07
8 +.34
78 +.77
17 +.35
44 -.71
11 +.46
21 +.22
9 +.81
13 -.07
27 +3.88
46 +1.61


+2.8 129.50
+3.6 39.29
-.3 120.88
+.1' 49.60
+3.6 76.39
+1.5 57.69
+11.4 33.94
-2.6 179.16
+1.6 17.48
+6.4 31.49
+8.2 10.53
+7.6 21.62
+6.8 19.83
+12.0 19.84
+8.0 35.92
+8.7 6.86
+15.6 15.89
-.5 65.26
+12.1 35.05
+3.1 21.05
+31.4 8.83
-5.6 14.60
+8.1 8.31
+6.0 17.22
+11.0 12.65
-3.2 9.20
-4.8 46.97
+1.1 37.77
+21.5 5.09
+11.8 6.65
+7.8 46.05
+12.0 22.01


Name


Div YId PE


LillyEli 1.96 4.9
Limited .80 2.0
LincNat .32 1.5
UzClaib ...
LloydBkg ...
LyonBasA 1.00 2.6
MBIA
MEMC
MFAFncl 1.00 14.5
MGIC
MGM Rsts ... ...
Macys .80 2.3
MagHRes ...
ManpwrGp .80 2.1
MarathnO s .60 2.0
MarathP n 1.00 3.0
MktVGold .15 .3
MktVRus .58 2.1
MarlntA .40 1.2
MarshM .88 2.8
Masco .30 2.5
MedcoHh ...
Medtmic .97 2.5
Merck 1.68 4.4
Metife .74 2.1
MetroPCS ...
Molycorp
Monsanto 1.20 1.5
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MotrlaMob ...
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Cho %Chg Last


9 +.06 -3.9
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OfficeDpt ...
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PHHCorp ...
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Potash s .28 .6
PS USDBull...
ProShtS&P ... .
PrUShS&P ...
PrUShQQ rs...
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ProUShL20...
ProUSSP500...
ProUSSIv rs...
ProUShEuro...
ProgsvCp .40 2.1
Prudentl 1.45 2.6
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PulteGrp ..
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RiteAid
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Saks
Salesforce ...
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Wkly YTD
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg


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TenetHth ... ...
Teradyn
Ter.ex .. .........
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USG
UltraPt g
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WmsCos 1.00
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YingliGm
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Wkly YTD WIkly
Name Div Yid PE Cha %Cha Last


Achillion
AcmePkt
ActivsBliz .17 1.3
AdobeSy
AkamaiT
AlteraCp f .32 .9
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 19.8
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.44 2.1
A123 Sys ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32 2.8
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP
ArmHId .15 .6
Atmel
AvagoTch .48 1.5
BMC Sft ...
Baidu
BedBath ...
BioSante ...
Broadcom .36 1.1
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20 .9
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene ...
ChkPoint ...
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco .24 1.3
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .45 1.8
Comc spcl .45 1.8
Comverse .
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... +4.45
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Name


Cree Inc
Crocs
Ctrip.com ..
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips .12
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EngyCnvh ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedias ...
ExpScripts ...
Fastenal s .56
FifthThird .32
FstNiagara .64
FstSolar
Flextm
FocusMda ...
Fortinet s
FrontierCm .75
GileadSci
Google
GreenMtC ...
HanwhaSol ...
HercOffsh ...
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
IdenixPh .
Illumina
Infosys .75
Inhibitex
Intel .84
InterMune ...
JA Solar ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


... 25 +.45 +3.9 22.90
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3.3 11 -.11 +3.7 25.14
... 9 +.27 +21.6 15.32
... 4 +.50 +35.8 1.82


Name DIv
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.40
LamResrch ...
UbtylntA ...
UfeTech
LinearTch .96
LinnEngy 2.76
lululemngs ...
MarvellT
Mattel .92
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .80
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
Novlus
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OCZTech
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
PDL Bio .60
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .72
PacEth rs ...
PatUTI .20
Paychex 1.28
PeopUtdF .63
PerfectWd .
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQ .46
Qualcom 86
Questcor
RFMicD ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
41 +.35 +9.9 11.47
24 +.04 +5.6 5.49
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... 42 -2.47 -12.3 36.48
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Name Div
Regenm ..
RschMotn ...
Rovi Corp ...
SLM Cp .40
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
SearsHldgs .33
Sequenom ...
Sina
SiusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Spreadtrm .40
Staples .40
Starbucks .68
StiDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .24
TevaPhrm .90
Texlnst .68
TibcoSft
vTridentM ...
TriQuint
UrbanOut ..
VertxPh
ViacomB 1.00
VirgnMda h .16
Vivus
Vodafone 2.10
WebMD
Wendys Co .08
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
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Yahoo
ZionBcp .04
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,.

Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
......+13.13 +42.4 78.92
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AMEX Most Active


Name Div YId
AbdAsPac .42 5.6
AdeonaPh ...
Adventrx
AlexcoR g ...
AlldNevG ...
AmApparel ...
AntaresP ...
Aurizong ...
AvalnRare...
Banro g
BarcGSOil ...
BrigusG g ...
BritATob 3.86 4.2
CanoPet ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01 ...
CheniereEn...
ChiGengM ...
ChinaShen ...
CrSuiHiY .32 10.8
DejourEg ...
DenisnMg ...
EVLtdDur 1.25 8.1
FrkStPrp .76 7.9
GamGldNR1.68 11.0
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly
GoldenMin ..
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSiv g ...
Hemisphrx ...
HooperH ...
ImpOil gs .44 ...
InovioPhm ...
IntTowerq ...


Wly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last


... +.01
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Name Div YId
LucasEngy ...
MGTCap
MadCatzg ...
MdwGoldg ...
Minefnd g.
NeoStem
NBRESec .24 6.3
Nevsung .10 1.6
NwGold g
NAPallg
NthnO&G
NovaGdg ...
ParaG&S
PhrmAth
PionDill
Quepasa
QuestRMg ...
RareEleg .
Rentech
Rubicon g.
SamsO&G ..
TanzRyg
Taseko
TimbernR ..
TmsatlPet .
TnValley
TriangPet
USGeoth
Uranerz
UraniumEn ..
VantageDr ...
VinetX
VistaGold
Walternv .22
WFAdvlncol.02 10.1
WizzardSft ...
YM Bio q ...


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian doSars. h= Does not meet contised-isting standards.
If = Late fing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs= Stock has undergone a reverse stock spit
of at east 50 percent within the past year. rt= Right to buy security at a species price. s = Stock has spt by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When issued. wt= Warrants
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previousday's
net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners ad
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Wkly YTD
PE Cha %Chg


... -.05 -.9 10.09
... -.00 ... .13
. -.04 -1.2 1.62


i- ------ -------


---------------------,---x-----f-----












LAKE CITY REPORTER


BUSINESS & HOME


SUNDAY JANUARY 15. 2012


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For more information on how to reach readers in the Sunshine State, contact the Lake City Reporter at (386) 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. JANUARY 15. 2012


Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


i n a50 ence required. Apply in person.
4 das 50 120 Medical
3 days$'1d7 120 Employment
Includes 2 Signsi F ad dit nal ri 65E
05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Limited to service type advertis- Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
ing only. Aide. F/T or P/T.
4 lines, one month... .92.00 Hands-on training w/some exp.
$10.80 each additional line preferred. Personal training or
Includes an additional $2.00 per fitness background a plus. Basic
ad for each Wednesday insertion, knowledge of anatomy and


You can call us at 755-5440,
S Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





d s to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Mon., 1H00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon., 9:00 m.
Thursday Wd., 10:00 a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 am
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
S for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecitvreporter.coni


exercises are a MUST1.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resume to P.O. Box
805 Lake City, Florida 32056


- M a = ,1


One itm per ad y do
4 lines 6 days Each adds ona





hne $ 12 1


Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling 1500 or les.
pel merchandie totllng $4 or les.
This Ianos-refundable rate.
IM^O10
One t em per ad a p



4 lines 6 days f "a d1onal
Rate apples to private Individual ellng



p mro i nchnde to talking $00 or less.
Each Item must include a price
Th a no.reundable rate.




S ne days ch additional
Rate apples to private Individuals selling
personal ehandse totalling 1,000 or les
Each item most include a price.
This sla a nonrefundable rate.



One tem per ad
4 lines 6 days tahs iional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal mrane totalling 2,500 or less.
Each m mut include a price.
Thi ins anon-refundable rate.



One temn per ad -
4 lines 6 days Eahadiioa
Rate apple to private Individuals selling
parnoe i merchandise totalling $4,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This Is a non-relundable rate.



One Item per ad 330
4 lines a 6 days Eachsadditional
ate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandIse totalling S6,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a prime.
This Is a non-refundable rate.


IV.I755-HmB l j 430 Garage Sales


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Wed Sun. North 41 on Michelle
place. Just past I-10. Look for
signs. Appliances, furniture, AC's,
and Much much more!!!

440 Miscellaneous
7000 WATT Troybilt generator
10,000 watt surge. new in 2011
$750.00
386-205-7713


020 Lost & Found
Found 2 puppies near
Birley and Pinemount.
Call 561 312-5620

REWARD: Lost Eclectus Parrot.
Vibrant green, silky feathers,
Male. price Creek Rd & Peacock.
386-961-9188

100 Job
SOpportunities

05530107
Local and Regional
Opportunities Available!

TRhNSPORT1

WEEKLY PAY *
/ No pumps/Hoses
/ Direct Deposit
/ No Hazmat
/ Health Insurance/401K
Class A CDL lyr OTR req'd
Food Grade Tanker Carrier
CALL 800-877-2430
www.indianrivertransport.com
BOOKKEEPER NEEDED
Must know Quickbooks and taxes.
Call 386-854-0511
For interview.
GENERAL OFFICE/
BOOKKEEPING
Must know QuickBooks &
Microsoft Programs. Punctual.
PJease send resume: PO BOX 830,
Lake City, Florida 32056
MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
SMoore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Wee Care of Columbia City
is hiring CDA After school Teach-
ers. 20-35 hrs per week. Experi-


1 Medical
120 Employment
Madison County
Memorial Hospital
Now Hiring:
RN's. Full Time and as needed
Full Time Environmental
Services Supervisor -
Please contact Human Resources
(850)973-2271 ext. 1906

240 Schools &
240 Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

402 Appliances
4 BURNER stainless steel
gas range. Less than
3 yrs old. $400.
386-205-7713
Whirlpool, side by side,
refrigerator. Black with ice maker,
water & ice dispenser.
$300. obo. 386-365-5173

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

1 Musical
413 Merchandise
NEW Guitar Estaban
Small Amp. Hard case. Stand.
$200.00
386-719-4819

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


440 Miscellaneous
BLUE OX Tow Bar.
Like new. Used 2 years.
$175.00
386-752-9645

450 Good Things
45 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy. sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
2BR DW
Secluded
$500 mo
386-752-7887
3/2 SW MH on .5 acre lot of small
MHP. Superb Quality, Full Re-
model, 140 NW Reflections Gin.
Lake City, FL, No Pets. F, L&D
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

640 RMobile Homes
'640 ~ for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Beautiful Main-
tained DWMH, 5br/2ba on 1/2
acre. 12X24 workshop, fenced
.$105,000. MLS 77064
Hallmark Real Estate
4/3 DW w/14X76' porch on 5 ac.
in Ellisville area. 2 carports,
storage, fenced pasture. $99,900
#78295 Ginger Parker 365-2135
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737


Set your si hts

on something
"


Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH. .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS.78905 $120,000
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
S999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Mobile Home Dealer Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating Their Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574


confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


ImBI





[ S E iL L


Classified Department: 755-5440


Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


650 Mobile Home
650& Land
Affordable Lg. Home on 2 ac.,
being sold as is $59,900
MLS 74862 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618

705 Rooms for Rent
New :"umished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2br/lba duplex, NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi-
cient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. &up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups,
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Brandywine Apartments
Now Renting
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, CH/A.
386-752-3033 W. Grandview Ave.
Equal housing Opportunity
TDD Number 1-800-955-8771
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Rental in 55+ neighborhood.
2 bedroom/1 bath Duplex across
from Clubhouse. No Pets.
Call Denise.@ 386-752-5290
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-315-2509 or 965-5560
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.,
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
......- ----:-, Tn.:- T-


J..
i
r












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. JANUARY 15. 2012


71 0 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent
Move in Special from 5199-5399.
1.2 & 3 br apartment. Also. larg-
er 2/br. for 5495 mo. Incl after.
386-755-2423 nribvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtov, n. Remodeled
.1 bedroom. Kitchen. dining, living
room. S450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special S99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes.
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800 .. w i-.I 1i. ',-",
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. 'tui. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in )99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryr. Behind Kens off
Hwy90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! S99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Ap i.
I 0 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
S Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,l ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. i st, last, sec, ref. Lalke
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379


3/2 Brick Home, fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent w/option to
purchase available. 386-752-5035
X 3114 7 days 7-7 ABar Sales
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
4BR/2BA CH/A 1 miles
South of Kens BBQ on 245 (Price
Creek Rd). $700. mo $500 sec.
Ref. Req'd. 386-752-4597
4BR/2BA.
Lake Access.
$1,000 mo.
Call 386-752-3066
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
NICE 3BR/2.5BA in Russwood
S/D $995. mo. $750 security.
Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534 -

75 Business &
Office Rentals

055297S9
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq'$450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1100sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500


For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
S8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
REALTY, INC.
MLS#76668 Buildable lot.
High and dry.
Call Denise @386-752-5290


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate ad crui ing ih ,
new's paper is subject (i he fair
housing act h.ih make it illegal
to advcinir 'an% preference.
limitation. or discriminanon based
on race. color. religion. ex-.
disability. familial statu or nation-
al oriLgn: or ans intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination. Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living v. ith parents or legal
custodian,. pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the ae of 18. This
newspaper v ill not knowmingl
accept any ad ertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-8(X)-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate
A home for all seasons. Lg patio,
fireplace. 4/2 brick & cedar.
Just reduced $20,000 #71691
Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Just Listed. 3/2 on a Terraced hill.
Brick w/fenced yard. All applian-
ces. Owner Financed offered.
#79683 Janet Creel 386-719-0382
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
In town, 3/2 Concrete Block home,
fenced yard. $149, 900
MLS 71999, Elaine Tolar
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D.
$129,900 New AC in 2010.
Elaine K. Tolar. 755-6488
MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Wonderful home on Lake. 4/3
Fireplace, many upgrades. MLS
76085, Elaine Tolar 755-6488 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887


Close to town. 2br/2ba, wood lam-
inate floors. Vaulted ceilings.
MLS 76928 $59,900 ,
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.


Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & Tidy remodeled 2/2 open
floor plan. MLS# 77943
$94,500 Mary Brown Whitehurst
386-965-0887
Brittany.Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot.
on the Suwannee.
Well & anerobic septic system.
MLS 78842 $45,000
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/ist time b .'yer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 365-5146
Callaway S/D, 3br/2ba. Well
maintained. Fenced back yard &
double car garage. $175,000
MLS 79567 Century 21, The
Darby Rogers Co. 752-6575.
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in
High Springs. Real wood floors,
stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 79601 $178,000 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Immaculate home on 10 + acres in
Wellborn. Tile floors, fenced, barn
w/workshop. $309, 900 MLS
79650, Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent neighborhood. 4br/2ba.
2469 sqft on 1 + acres. $190,000
MLS 79654, Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 5br/4ba Custom
kitchen, screened inground pool.
Many upgrades on 5 ac. Many
extras. .$385,000. MLS 79688
COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence Vlg $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669
CYPRESS LANDING! 3BR/2BA
w/lg great room, split floor plan
& 2-car garage $105,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79634
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
Realty, Inc. 2 bedroom/2 bath.
I'car garage. Priced to sell.
Call Denise @386-752-5290

Contemporary Elegance.
MLS 79579 4br/3ba plush carpet
& so much more! $224,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 8.3 acres.
Has 14x30 workshop with electric.
MLS 79345 $199.900


810 Home for Sale

NICE ?BR. 2BA DWMH *A fenced
arid plus double c.-rpcn &
..kshop 539.9Xo DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY. INC.
-55-51 10 =790"tS

ONLY S38.5 ( for 4BRGBA
concrete block home: apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY.
INC. -55-5110 =79477
PRICE SLASHED' 3BRCBA
bnrck home newly renovated &
inground pool. fenced yard
S69.500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY. INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST' Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping 528.500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY. INC
755-5110 #77505

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 acres. Wellborn. New Well
installed. Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down. S39.900. S410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
wvw.LandOwnerFinancing.com

20 ac Wooded tract.
10 m iles from Cedar Key.
MLS 78886, $70,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
SProerty

Hallmark Real Estate
Rental Investment. 4 duplexes
(8 apartments) All units are rented
and in good shape.
#69380 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate Camp-
ground/RV Park w/67 pull thrus,
cabins & mobile home. Showers,
clubhouse +2 story owner home.
#78793 Janet Creel 719-0382

860 Investment
Property
Great Investment in city limits.
Both units occupied.
MLS 79206 $50,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT INVESTMENT
2 units w/ 2br/lba, 2 stories
w/balconies. MLS 79271,
$230,000., Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
,O8 U Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER


'


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386-754-54122
1137 W. U.S.
H ghway 90
Lake CityFl,
32055
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Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak



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& Value


MB 386-466-1888
. SW Main Blvd., (next to the Money Man)Lake City, FL 32055


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful
older home with mature land-
scaping and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5 .
baths, 3 fireplaces, private paved
drive. 39.7 acres of property in- t
eluded with home. $994,000 or .
$2,500 per mo. for rent or home :
plus 2 acres only $495,000. Call
for additional info and showings.

Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887
s:.,, or co-owner (386)397-5131


{ i a


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- 1" .1


I"











Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
1',= ; r :-' ,


LIFE


Sunday, January 15, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


TASTE BUDDIES









Genie Norman and
Mary Kay
Hollingsworth
TosteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com


Komer

Kitchen's

downhome

best
W e decided
it was time
to go back
to an old
favorite,
the Korner Kitchen. There
are more trendy, new res-
taurants in Lake City and
lots of fast food choices
but we feel that we all need
to support the tried and
true spots that have been
serving up delicious home
cooking' for more years than
we can remember.
The Korner Kitchen,
owned by Nella Durham,
has been at the same spot
for 27 years and it's by
no means a fancy place
nor should it be! Some
of the best meals around
are found in tucked away
corners or just off the main
drag. Back in the day, the
Korner Kitchen, located at-
the corner of County Road
100 and US Highway 441f
WAS on the main drag!
It truly is a family-run
operation, with her sister,
poris Godwin, helping out
just about every day since
her retirement from Florida
Gateway College. We
got to know Doris when
she helped us when we
co-chaired the Hospitality
Committee for the annual
Lake City Air Show.
On our "getting to know
you again" visit, we were
joined by Cindy Gaylord,
Tim Brock and former
County Commissioner
James Montgomery. The
good smells hit you the
minute you walk in the
door.. .fresh fried chicken
and fish. (Yep, we visited
on a Friday!)
We quickly gave our
drink order and took off
for the buffet. The choices
included were two kinds
of fried fish including mul-
let, fried chicken, rice,
big ol' lima beans, turnip
greens, potato salad, fries,
cheese grits, carrots, can-
died sweet potatoes, hot
cornbread and biscuits,
which are kept in a warm-
ing drawer. It didn't take
long to reach the push
away from the table stage
even though seconds
were a must for all of us.
Tip: make sure you get a
separate plate for your fried
chicken so you have room
for all the sides.
The group consensus
as to the best part of our
meal was the fried chicken
and the hot biscuits, which
we buttered and then
poured Welborn's Deese's
Pure Cane Syrup all over
them. (You'll want a sepa-
rate plate for those syrup
drenched biscuits, too!)
Boy is that a trip down
memory lane. Genie and
Tim recalled growing up
when they used to have
huge biscuits that you
would stick your thumb
into the middle and then
pour the hole full of syrup.
Genie said at her house
they called them cat-head
biscuits 'cause they were as
big as a cat's head. There
aren't too many eating


TASTE continued on 2D


Turning girls into


'By setting a positive
example and sharing
their time,
knowledge and
experience,
mentors play an
essential role in
preparing our
Nation's youth for a
bright future.'

President Barack Obama in the
proclamation for mentoring month.


Mentoring
program gives
local teens the
tools they need
to make it.


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com


of growing up
may be behind
them, but sev-
eral Columbia
County women are using
their experiences to take
local girls under their wing.
Growing Intelligent
Respectable Little Sisters,
or GIRLS, is a local mentor-
ing program that started
in October with six young
women in middle and high
schools. The goal is to pair
girls with adults who act as
older sisters, helping the
girls with life's problems
and opening their world to
new experiences.
*. January is'Natibnal
Mentoring Month, an
annual campaign to recruit
volunteer mentors for
young people. "By setting a
positive example and shar-
ing their time, knowledge
and experience, mentors
play an essential role in
preparing our Nation's
youth for a bright future,"
said President Barack
Obama in the proclamation
for mentoring month.
There are few mentor-
ing programs in Columbia
County. With the lack of
volunteers in the county,
Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Mid-Florida focuses mainly
on Alachua County.
Locally GIRLS hopes to
expand by offering men-
tors to more girls.
Mentors, called bigs,
meet at least once a week
face-to-face with a girl,
called a little. Many girls
and their mentors talk
several times a week. The
entire group meets month-
ly. This month's program
"Starting the New Me,"
teaches the girls how to set
attainable goals and keep
track of their goals, said
Elishaia Parker, program
director.


COURTESY


Girls meet with their mentors to
talk about what is going on in their
life, at school and at home, said
Parker. Academics for most of the
girls is not a problem. However, like
most teenagers life at home and
school can be rocky, she said.
With contacts in the school sys-
tem the program finds "girls that
have the drive to make it but don't
have the tools to make it," Parker


The girls' families are also
involved with the program. Mentors
talk to family members about their
goals for the girl and there is an
open line of communication, she
said.
"It's very important," said Parker
of mentoring programs. "Every
child should have somebody they
can talk to. They don't always talk
to their parents."
"There are so many people in the


COURTESY
Above: Lake City Police Chief Argatha
Gilmore speaks during the GIRLS
induction ceremony in November.

At left: GIRLS mentors Kem Higgins
(from left), Nakitha Ivery, Elishia
Parker, Nicole Smith and Terri Thomas
stand with Lake City Police Chief
Argatha Gilmore, who spoke to girls in
the mentoring program at their induc-
tion in November.



community with so much wisdom.
They should be able to pay it for-
ward."
Parker, who had her first child at
14, said she tries to be the mentor
she needed as a teen. "If I had a big
sister she would have protected me
and steered me" away from harmful
situations, she said.
With her mother's support,
Parker finished school as an "A/B"
student, earned a bachelor's degree
and is now working on a master's
degree.
"Not finishing school was never
an option," Parker said. Starting
a girls mentoring program was a
longtime dream for her.
Mentor Nicole Smith said the
GIRLS continued on 2D


Cabbage palm: Hardy tree is a Florida favorite


ne native
Southeastern US
palm tree is a com-
mon sight around
the state of Florida
and has served us well through-
out history. The Cabbage Palm
(Sabal palmetto) was adopted
as our official state tree in 1953.
In 1970, the Florida legislature
decided to replace the cocoa palm
on the state seal with this reliable
and lovely cabbage palm.
One reason for being a favorite
tree of Floridians is its ability to
withstand the tropical storms
and hurricane force winds.
Additionally, this tough tree is
amazingly resistant to fire, floods,
drought, salt spray and cold tem-
peratures. Hardy in zones 8a
through 11, cabbage palms have
withstood short durations of tem-
peratures as low as 7 degrees.
In the landscape, this palm will


GARDEN TALK







Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

reach heights up to 30 feet. Trees
in the wild usually attain much
loftier heights. The spread of the
crown is usually small, from 10 to
15 feet wide when grown in the
full sun. In part shade, however,
the crown will grow much wider.
The trunks are often an iden-
tifying feature, but even that can
be confusing. The base or 'boot'
of an old leaf stays attached to


the. trunk when the leaf falls.
This creates a criss-cross pattern
on the trunk. Some trees will
eventually lose the "boots" and
become smooth as they mature,
but not always. Trees that retain'
their "boots" may collect organic
matter in the crevices and sup-
port other plants such as ferns
and bromeliads.
The terminal bud, or 'palm
heart," resembles the bud tis-
sue of cabbage or artichoke
hearts, and was historically used
by Native Americans as a food
source. Occasionally you may
still find the rather intriguing
menu item 'hearts of palm' salad.
Palms have only one bud which
is located in the crown where
the leaves originate. The palm
dies when the terminal bud is
removed because no new leaves
can grow to replace old ones.
In mid-summer, creamy white


clusters of fragrant flowers droop
from the crown on 4 to 5 foot
stalks.
Many wildlife species await the
shiny black fruits that develop
and mature in the fall. If used for
food in wildlife habitats, several
good companion plants to use are
wax myrtle, yaupon and dahoon
holly, and rabbiteye blueberry.
For more information on
palms, go to www.solutionsfo-
ryourlife.com. Attend a work-
shop, 'Composting Our Wasted
Resources', presented by the
Master Gardeners this month.
Call the Extension Office for
more information. 752-5384.

SD. Nichelle Demorest is a
horticulture agent with the Columbia
County Extension of the University
of Florida Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.











2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY JANUARY 15. 2012



Topic: Would you like a cause?


re you adrift in
this big sea of
life, and find
yourself with
no rudder or
motor? Would you like to
find a direction? Now and
then we spot people who
seem to be dedicated to a
cause, who make a differ-
ence. I see where some
teens found out that it's
hard for troops serving in
combat zones to keep in
touch with their families.
They decided to collect
donated cell phones, and
mailed them to the troops.
Women in a local church
group knit lap blankets
for patients in nursing
homes or hospitals. A
pilot found out that dogs in
city shelters were typically


put to sleep when homes
couldn't be found, so he
formed "Pilots and Paws."
These pilots use their
planes to transport pets to
more rural settings, where
people are waiting to give
them a good home.
What is a "cause"?
Maybe it's when there are
people in need, and there
are other folks who have
some abilities to meet
those needs. When they
put their efforts into mak-
ing a difference, they have
a cause.
A teenager hooked up
with a doctor and traveled
throughout Africa, helping
administer de-worming
medication for infested and
malnourished children.
Other teens collected old


Robert Denny
Bob.Denn/ .a cc-


or junk bicycles, and made
"new bikes from old" for
kids who otherwise would
have no Christmas pres-
ents. My friend "Cowboy
Dave" brings classic
country and gospel music
with his band into nurs-
ing homes, assisted living
facilities, the VA hospital
and senior centers. Police


officers collect teddy
bears, and Marines con-
duct "Toys for Tots" at
Christmas. Our minister
works as a full-time drug
rehab counselor with the
VA hospital. Maybe your
own job gives you the
opportunity to make a dif-
ference, and help those in
need. You don't have to
be a volunteer to have a
cause.
A cause can start and
stop in the wink of an eye,
or it can last a lifetime.
Captain Sully was given a
cause: He had only sec-
onds to save his airline pas-
sengers from a sure death
by crash landing safely
in the Hudson Rivei. No
one panicked or was seri-
ously injured. On the other


hand: Gandhi spent his
lifetime working for world
peace. A scientist may
spend his entire life look-
ing for a cure for cancer,
but Tiger Woods and Phil
Mickelson can also make
a huge difference and
raise millions of dollars,
just by wearing pink shirts
to increase breast cancer
awareness, in one PGA golf
tournament.
Would you like to find
a cause? You'll need to
answer three questions.
Where's a need that I can
help with, and make a
difference? What skills,
knowledge, interests, and
traits can I bring to the
table to meet those needs?
What can I do to help? List
your talents, skills, abilities,


knowledge, character, and
interests. There are oppor-
tunities all around. Like
to write letters? The post
office gets too many Santa
letters each year, and letter
writers are always needed.
Many Americans sponsor
and support children in
impoverished countries.
What's an easy step ,
you could do today, right
now, to start the ball roll-
ing? Who needs your help
right away? What help or
resources do you think
you need? If you take that
first step, however small,
and feel some satisfaction,
you may want to do more.
If you do, whatever you
do, thanks for making the
world a little better because
you're here..


Spread rock on your garden to help feed soil


By Lee Reich
For The Associated Press
If you feel like getting out
in the garden, now is as good
a time as any to spread rock
on the ground.
Or not (more on that
later).
You say your ground
already has enough rocks in
it? True enough, but the rock
I'm talking about is a powder,
and is likely a different kind
of rock from what you already
have.
But why put down more
rock of any kind? The reason
is that rock powders sold for
garden use are particularly
high in minerals.
For example, rock phos-
phate is, as the name implies,
rich in phosphorous, one
of the "big three" nutrients
needed by plants. In fact, rock


phosphate is' the stuff, after
being treated with sulfuric
acid, that becomes the phos-
phorous in synthetic fertiliz-
ers.
Colloidal phosphate, also
known as soft phosphate, is
a similar product, this one
ground up finer than rock
phosphate.
Two other commonly used
* rock powders granite and
glauconite are rich sources
of potassium, another of the
"big three" nutrients needed
by plants. (The third, nitro-
gen, is not found in rocks.)
Glauconite is also called
greensand, or Jersey green-
sand if that's where it was
mined. And it is greenish.
Besides the major nutrients
phosphorous and potassium,
these rock powders are also
sources of micronutrients.
Micronutrients are needed in


only minuscule amounts by
plants, but nonetheless are
essential to their health. A soil
can be naturally deficient in
micronutrients: For example,
pockets of molybdenum defi-
ciency exist in Nevada soils;
natural cobalt deficiencies
exist over much of Iowa and
parts of the Northeast
Synthetic ("chemical") fer-
tilizers generally supply no
micronutrients at all.

APPLICATION FOR THE
LONG HAUL
Because they are merely
ground-up rocks, rock pow-
ders do not readily dissolve
in water to give up their good-
ness to plant roots. Release
of their nutritional goodness
takes time, as well as the
work of bacteria, fungi and
roots. Freezing and thawing


GIRLS: Program gives teens tools


Continued From Page 1D
idea isn't to get the girls to
be like their mentors, but
rather expose them to dif-
ferent jobs and outlooks.
"I can sense the need for
young ladies to have more
options," said Smith,,who
mentors a 13-year-old girl.
"I have a great relation-
ship with my little," she
said. "She relies on me as
a resource." Smith said
they talk about life and
problems her little is going
through as a teenager.
Smith tutors her little after
school and tries to be at
her sports events. Smith


said their relationship is
sisterly, not authoritative.
As the oldest sibling in
her family, Smith said she
wishes she had access to
a mentoring program as a
child.
To get a perspective on
what her little is going
through, Smith said she
thinks back to when she
was the same age. "This
is a passion of mine," she
said.
"It is a dedication of
time," said Smith who has
children of her own but
spends about four hours a


TASTE: Downhome best

Continued From Page 1D


spots that have cane syrup
as a regular condiment on
the tables but we're sure
glad they do.
The Korner Kitchen has
been a gathering place for
years and a favorite for.
County and City workers,
the Courthouse crowd,
Lake Shore staff and any-
one else that likes home
style cooking. Mr. Mont
says you can always find
someone you know to
eat with. He said that he
loved it when Maryann
Persons was there because
she would always buy his
lunch. (By the way, we got
permission to quote him.)

The menu changes every
day. Here is the weekly
schedule:
Monday Shrimp
Tuesday Fried pork
ribs
Wednesday Meat loaf
Thursday Pork chops
Friday Fish
Buffet price is $8.00 and
well worth it.
Although we have to
admit we've never even
considered ordering off the
menu, the Korner Kitchen
offers one for those not
ready for the buffet excess-
es.
They are also open for
breakfast and their break-


fast specials include 2
eggs, choice of grits, hash
browns or home fries,
choice of bacon, patties or
link sausage, choice of 1
biscuit, toast or hot cake,
coffee or tea and all for
$5.00. Other breakfast
items are available also.
Your Taste Buddies
enjoyed their meal so much
we went back the following
week on Wednesday for
Meatloaf Day and enjoyed
that, delicious country fried
steak and a whole host of
wonderful southern style
veggies. We even saved
enough room for a taste of
homemade bread pudding,
made by Doris' daughter,
that was moist and flavor-
ful.
We can't give you a bet-
ter endorsement than this.
So, drive to 441 and 100
and enjoy a true Southern
Style Hog Trough.
You can contact us at
www.tastebuddieslakecity@
gmail.com

* Genie Norman and Mary
Kay Hollingsworth are
Columbia County residents
who love good food and fun,
at home and out. Their col-
umn on area restaurants
appears twice monthly.
You can contact them at
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@
gmail.com.


week with her little. "It's
not a huge commitment but
it's making a difference."
.The program is always
looking for qualified men-
tors who can make a com-
mitment to the program
and pass a background
check. Several mentors are
school principals, but men-
tors can be from all' walks
of life.
With more mentors,
Parker hopes the program
will be able to help more
girls. After the girls gradu-
ate, she hopes they will
come back to mentor.
"We need more women
- to just reach out and lend
themselves to these ladies,"
Smith said.


.~ ',~


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts*
Couples registered:
Jazan Nabinger
Blaiyze Neeley
January 21, 2012

Jaci Chapman
Chris Ward.
April 14, 2012

Avery Crapps
Thomas Olmsted
May 27, 2012
We know exactly what they
want in a wedding or shower
gift. We update their list as gifts
are purchased, and gift wrap.

SWARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
S Downtown
752-5470


opens up cracks in the soil so
rock powders applied now at
least get into the soil, even if
they don't yet dissolve.
There's no rush, though, to
run outside and start spread-
ing. What rock powders lack
in quick action they make up
for in long-term effect; they
release their goodness over a
decade or so.
A typical application would
be about 10 pounds per 100
square feet


Spreading rock
on your garden
can help feed
soil


@body:This
undated photo
shows Jersey
greensand fertil-
izer, left, and
rock phosphate
in New Paltz,
N.Y. Rock pow-
ders sold for.
garden use are
particularly high
in minerals.


ARE GROUND ROCKS
REALLY NEEDED?
There's also no rush
because you might have no
reason to apply them in the
first place. Rock powders
are relatively expensive, for
the amount of -phosphorous
or potassium they offer. And
unless some local garden
store has rock powders for
sale, you could pay as much
or more for shipping as for


the material itself.
More to the point is wheth-
er rbck powders are superflu-
ous. If you constantly feed
your soil an abundance and
variety of compost, leaves and
other organic materials as
any good gardener does -
your soil already is rich in
phosphorous, potassium, and
micronutrients.
This is especially true if
you use plenty of compost
made from all sorts of materi-
als, including kitchen scraps.
Orange rinds from Florida,
old bread from Kansas-grown
wheat, and banana skins from
Costa Rica each contribute
to the smorgasbord of micro-
and macronutrients contained
in homemade compost
So, do I ever use rock pow-
ders? Yes, about every decade
or two, mostly as insurance
and to supply micronutrients
around trees and shrubs that
don't get annual dressings of
compost But I'm not saying
that using these rock pow-
ders is really necessary.

E Lee Reich, Ph.D. Come
visit my farmden at http://
leereich.blogspotcom/


59th anniversary

Wallaces
celebrate

Spencer and Vera Wallace,
pictured at left, celebrated
their 59th wedding anni-
versary Wednesday. The
couple have two children,
Tee and Wayne; a grand-
child, Tyler; and a great-
grandchild, Grady.


; ;














Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY. JANUARY 15. 2012


DEAR ABBY


HOROSCOPES


Man busy in retirement gets


no respect from working wife


DEAR ABBY: I retired
two years ago at age 50 after
working for 30 years. My
wife and I are financially
secure and I'm enjoying
every day of my retirement.
However, my wife who is
younger won't be eligible
to retire from her job for
another five years. She is
becoming more and more
abrasive toward me. I sus-
pect it's because she's jeal-
ous of my retirement status.
She constantly accuses
me of being lazy. Abby, I
don't sit around all day. In
addition to doing the yard
work, house upkeep, and
repair and maintaining our
cars, I do all the grocery
shopping, help with the laun-
dry, dishes, general cleanup
and take care of our pets.
Despite all this, my wife still
bemoans my sleeping late
in the morning (9 a.m.) and
not going to a regular job
like she does.
I'm still young enough
to get another job. Should
I go back to work until she
retires? SHOULD BE
HAPPY IN TAMPA
DEAR SHOULD BE
HAPPY: That's not a bad
idea, but don't start look-
ing until your wife has told
you plainly why she has
become "abrasive." Wouldn't
it be interesting if all she
wanted was for you to have
a cup of coffee with her in
the morning? It would be
a shame if you went back
to work only to realize that


Abigail Van Buren
,,ww.deorabbycom

something else was caus-
ing her change in attitude.
You deserve to know what's
going on because you do not
appear to be lazy quite the
contrary.

DEAR ABBY: I'm an adult
woman, working full time
for my parents as their store
manager. I do a lot of office
work for my dad, who hates
computer work. He has an
eBay business on the side,
which I manage for him.
My problem is, eBay
shows me what Dad has
shopped for every time I
log on. Some of the items
are of a personal, intimate
nature, and I'm not comfort-
able knowing about them.
I'm glad my parents have
a healthy marriage, but it's
WAY too much information
for me. As a family, we don't
communicate well, so I don't
know how to handle this.
My husband had no sug-
gestions, so I turn to you.
- REALLY DON'T WANT
TO KNOW
DEAR REALLY DON'T:
Try this:'Send your father


an email telling him that you
feel some of the items he is
buying online are not things
that a daughter should be
seeing. Include as an attach-
ment your letter to me. That
should do the trick.

DEAR ABBY: My grand-
mother recently bought me
a plane ticket to go visit her.
In the airport on the way
back home, the flight was
overbooked and I agreed to
be bumped to another flight
in exchange for a free ticket
to be used or given to some-
one else within a year.
My mother says the free
ticket belongs to my grand-
mother because she paid for
it. I say I should use it for
myself because it is com-
pensation for the lost time
and trouble of switching
flights. What do you think? -
MINNESOTA TRAVELER
DEAR TRAVELER: Your
mother has a point. Offer
the ticket to your grand-
mother. If you're lucky,
she'll tell you to keep and
enjoy it. If she doesn't, at
least you'll know you did
the right thing. (When you
give in the true spirit of
giving, it will come back
to you or so it implies in
Ecclesiastes.)



* Write Dear Abby-at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Listen carefully. Someone
trying to hide information
is likely to mislead you. Ask
questions and look for any
clues that will give you the
upper hand. Put in extra hours
working toward your profes-
sional goals. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Get involved in activities
you enjoy. You'll ease your
stress by searching for new
outlets to display your skills.
Opportunity will present
itself through an encounter
you have with someone expe-
rienced in marketing or who
has good connections.***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Try something new.
Take on a challenge that
will stimulate your mind and
body. Turn one of your hob-
bies into a viable commodity.
What you do with what you
have will determine how far
you will get in the future.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't let added respon-
sibilities get you down. Use
your imagination and you
will come up with a way to
get things done quickly.
Romance is on the rise, and

CELEBRITY
by Luli
Celebrity Cipher cryptograemsare created froi
E ach letter in the c
TODAY'S C
"UCTJ UT WFJL NwR
SX PZT, WVJ, FJGT
K R Z FJE, UT CPZT
VJFZTXNT." YPA
Previous Solution; "Anyyoe can be CO
confident bald man- there's your diary
2012 by NEA, Inc., dis


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

plans should be made to visit
or spend time with someone
you fancy. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Put
more effort into your home,
family and living quarters.
The changes you make will
enhance your relationships
with the people you love
most Helping an older or
younger family member will
be rewarding and bring you
closer together. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Kick back and have some
fun. Getting out with friends
and sharing with others
will lead to personal gain. A
change in the way you do
things personally or where
your beliefs are concerned
will lead to less stress and
greater understanding. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Listen carefully to someone
who is economically savvy.
A problem at home or with
your financial situation needs
to be addressed. You will feel
much better once you have a
plan in place and a goal set.
Progress can be made. ***


CIPHER
s Campos
rn cuotallon8 by famous people, past and present
ipher stand for another.
LUE: S equals B
YTRJT UCR FN
KKFETJG PJ L
GR GCPJ B GCT
P PJETKRV
nfident with a full head of hair. But a
nond in the rough." Larry David
t. by Universal Uclick 4-16"


SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Recognize your
strengths and weaknesses,
and make improvements that
will help you make better
choices. A valued relation-
ship will be enhanced if you
are open and honest about
the way you feel and how you
want to proceed. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Networking will pay
off. Your ability to be every-
one's best friend will bring
you the perks you are looking
for, along with a deal that can-
not be beaten. An emotional
problem with someone vying
for your attention can be
expected. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Stick to the facts
and don't let anyone use
emotional means to get you
to comply. Stand tall and con-
tinue to move in the direction
that suits you best. You will
reach your goal if you are
determined. Invest in your
abilities. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Everything is falling into
place. Look over personal
paperwork and formulate a
plan that will keep you mov-
ing in a positive direction.
Doing your own thing is what
you do best. Take your talent
and skills to the next level.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Focus on something
that reflects who you are and
what you stand for. Joining
a group you believe in will
allow you to develop relation-
ships with compatible people
who will offer you valuable
favors. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


DOING WITHOUT By Tony Orbach / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 4 61 7 10 11 12 13 1415 i 16 17 i 1 119 1


Across
1 A person can take
big strides with
this
,6 Hannibal's foil in
"The Silence of
the Lambs"
13 Museum piece
20 Forum fashions
21 Glade, e.g.
22 Hue akin to olive
23 ___-Itami
International
Airport
24 "Just do drills
for now"?
26 Undo
28 Back to
Brooklyn?
29 Slaughter
30 Disturb one's
neighbors at
night?
37 Comic strip "_
and Janis"
38 Inflation-fighting
W.W. II org.
39'A pop
40 Former bill
42 Handful
44 Table saver
47 Don Quixote's
love
52 Duffer's feeling
toward a putting
pro?
54 Meeting one's
soul mate,
perhaps?
56 Bogart's "High
Sierra" role
57 Clive Cussler
novel settings
59 Weight allowance
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


60 "Behold," to
Brutus
61 Represent with a
stick figure, say
.63,Words on a.,.
Wonderland cake
65 Nonentities
67 Successfully
perform a
download?
71 Who wrote "A
true German
can't stand the
French, / Yet'
willingly he
drinks their
wines"
75 Chamber exit
76 One who
discriminates?
81 Naysayer
82 Fr. title
83 Fen-___-(former
weight-loss
drug)
86 Grow dark
87 Applied foil at
'the Hershey's
factory?
91 One man's
declaration to an
upset party
planner?
93 Sewing aids
94 Rider on a
crowded bus,
maybe
96 "I knew it!"
97 Relations
98 Shoppe modifier
99 Foreign football
score
101 Blue shade
105 Drive by the
United Nations?
113 Ponders
115 Upton Sinclair
novel on which
"There Will Be
Blood" is based


116 Slum-clearing
project, say
117 Impostor's
excuse?
124."Me, Myself &

125 Tainted
126 Part of some Tin
Pan Alley music
127 Went into la-la
land, with "out"
128 Take control of
129 Original
130 Twisty curves

Down
1 Bundle bearer
2 "I'll have _"
3 Response to a
pledge-drive
request
4 Glen Canyon
reservoir
5 Get a bit misty
6 Academy enrollee
7 Constellation
whose brightest
star is Regulus
8 Prince Valiant's
eldest
9 Bunkum
10 EarthLink, e.g.,
for short
11 Actor Firth
12 Thrill
13 One may be
overhead
14 "Little" singer of
the '60s
15 Coll. elective
16 Capital city on
the Atlantic
17 Pundit Bill
18 Model
19 Vodka drink,
informally
25 "Definitely!"
27 Go into la-la
land, with "out"


31 Strong cast
32 2010 Emma
Stone comedy
set in high
school
33 Highway sign
abbr.
34 Was audibly
surprised, maybe
35 Shake
36 Holiday season
event
41 Loos
42 Animal house,
say
43 Creepy: Var.
45 Start
46 Hovel
47 Removal of
restrictions,
informally
48 Path of Caesar
49 One-named
singer for the
Velvet
Underground
50 Suffix with
depend
51 They might have
it
52 Some appliances
53 Nag's call
55 -shariter
58 Tarot user, maybe
62 New York's
Tappan ___
Bridge
64 Flat:,Abbr.
65 Kill quickly
66 "South Pacific"
herp
68 Diplomatic
efforts
69 Hindu spring
festival
70 French income
71 Exclaim
breathlessly
72 Ready for service


73 Conseil d'___
74 Sports contest
77 Men of La'
Mancha
78 4-Down locale
79 Actress Sofer
80 Goal
82 Food in Exodus
84 Language from
which
"bungalow" and
"jungle" come
85 Saxony seaport


88 Bad response
upon first seeing
one's new
haircut?
89 Insomnia cause
90 Adaptable
aircraft
92 From now on
95 Khan man?
100 Take charge?
101 Drivers of some
slow-moving
vehicles
102 Allotment


103 Kind of nerve
104 One way to go,
S. betting-wise
106 Word after an
ampersand,
maybe
107 Body cavity
108 Eccentric
109 What Oliver
asked for more
of
110 Berlin Olympics
star
111 Rajah's partner


112 Malamutes'
burdens
114 "Auld Lang

118 Musician
Montgomery
119 Things that may
be 65-Downed
120 Cadge
121 Inventor
Whitney
122 Itch
123 Motor finish?


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
P HIDIS SIA RA INR P B J A B E A M
SEE F IAR0U I FIGOLDA
H _PN 0iI C'TR GAINS o M A|J A I N
A J Ap|NjyTT R V Ell T A'Y E D

W?\U 0 S E|S^B S IS T E R S N S U
A A L OD I STAO EI D

C A P E I A IFIA X I M



BL L O L OL I VE



A LCH E FCOIR 0 U MI NXCV
E A T NI AR L E0 E D 0 M

S P END IRA iE A L SD E M




Ti _DO_ S I_- E L I N EM N YS E


2 5 4


3 8 9


8 6 4 5


83 6 7


2781


7 2 9 6


25 6


1 8 9 3


6 1 2


Z 6 81 9 LL 9 6


L C 91-6 Z 8 L i


S9 L98L 9Z 6


8 9 6 C 9 L /L


9 1 L8L 69


JLL69VS89_
LIZIL 6 9 17 8 8 9


C 9 L ZI__ 6 9 L 8


68 Z L S 9V9 L


9Ll79186SZ


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415


ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY. JANUARY 15. 2012










4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 15. 2012


From trash to





Treasures


Furniture, like
food, can be
'semi-homemade'

By Amanda Kwan
Associated Press
PHOENIX If you can
look at a dented, chipped,
dusty piece of furniture that's
been in someone's garage for
years and see potential and
beauty, then Debbie Nelson
is impressed.
"The average person has
a difficult time piecing it
together," says the Phoenix-
area furniture refinisher.
Nelson, a single mother of
seven, has made a living out
of finding treasure in other
people's trash. Her online
furniture store, Funky Junk
Restore, is half a year old,
and she already has so much
business that she's looking
for help beyond her current
work crew (her kids, ages 7
to 23).
She, works from home in
Mesa, a suburb where home
foreclosure rates are sky-
high and one in' five office
spaces sit empty. But Nelson
is among a growing num-
ber of stay-at-home moms
in Phoenix and around the


ASSOCIATED I
Natalie Cox, owner of "Natty By Design," and mother of four children, sits at a dining room set ii
this Friday, Nov. 11, 2011 photo, she refurbished in the garage of her home in Gilbert, Ariz. Cox
started Natty By Design in January 2011 in the garage of her home to supplement her husband'
salary while he worked on his MBA at Arizona State University.


what She and other furniture-
refurbishing moms have
done with pieces bought
from estate sales, yard sales,


country who have turned Craigslist or secondhand
years of do-it-yourself expe- shops. She looks for second-
rience into successful busi- hand pieces from well-known
nesses. .furniture makers, and uses
The idea is similar to TV paint, wood finishes and new
cook Sandra Lee's "semi- hardware to make them look
homemade" philosophy in and feel new for the same
cooking. Lee has built a cook- price as a new piece made of
ing-show empire on the idea flimsier materials like par-
that mostly ready-made food tide board or wood veneers.
plus some fresh ingredients
can result in "food that looks "I'm about value and
and tastes from scratch." money," Nelson says. "I want
Nelson likes the parallel to to give you the most couture


look as possible."
The style she favors is
mostly "shabby chic," with
some "industrial" as well.
Pieces have a carefully
wrought weathered look
made popular by stores
like Anthropologie and
Pottery Barn. Shabby chic-
ing involves buying vintage


wood pieces with ornate
details like curved legs.
Industrial requires a mind
for repurposing rusty metal
commercial equipment for
home use.
What's required, Nelson
says, is knowing enough
about furniture to see "good
bones."


Many people who
come to semi-home-
made furniture sellers
like herself she says,
know what they want
but lack the creativity or
time to execute it And,
she adds, they probably
shouldn't, given the cost
of materials, labor and
->: time needed for a DIY
project "I don't think
it's necessarily worth it
for just one item."
In the Phoenix area,
a two-day, DIY home-
decor seminar with a
$150 admission fee
attracted more than a
dozen women. It drew
so much positive feed-
back that organizers
plan to host the "Hello
There! House" semi-
nars twice a year.
Many semi-home-
made businesswomen
PRESS learned their trade
n through trial and error
as they redecorated
's their own homes.
Natalie Cox of Natty
By Design says the
shabby chic style in par-
ticular lends itself to eas-
ier and faster projects, since
wear and tear is part of the
charm. A 28-year-old mother
of four children under 7 years
old, Cox sells what she calls
"more modern furniture" -
pieces that might take inspi-
ration from high-end stores
like Horchow. She says she
would have time for more


custom projects if she went
the shabby chic route, but
she prefers the other style.
"I have to stay true to
myself," says Cox.
Cox started Natty By
Design in January 2011 in
the garage of her home in the
Phoenix suburb of Gilbert
to supplement her husband's
salary while he works on
his MBA at Arizona State
University. She had been
refurbishing furniture for her
family for years and "had all
the equipment already," she
says. "The furniture allowed
me to stay at home and be
with my kids."
A steady stream of busi-
ness, mostly from refer-
rals or Craigslist posts, has
allowed her to be picky with
projects and to raise prices.
Now she schedules the semi-
custom requests around her
children's schedules.
Nelson spent a recent
Saturday meeting with cli-
ents in the front room of her
house, a large former music
room that now serves as
office and showroom. And
she's interviewing furniture
painters "who can, you know,
do the base coats so that it
frees up my time" for the rest
of her business buying,
refinishing, sanding, staging
photo shoots, listing online
and meetings with clients.
"People become over-
whelmed that the economy
is bad. But business is thriv-
ing," she says.


2nd Annual


j


Sunday, January 22, 2012

12 Noon until 4:00 p.m.
at the Holiday Inn & Suites
213 SW Commerce Dr., Lake City, FL 32025


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AIRMA


The
Heritage


And More!


Natalie
Cox paints
an end
table for
a client
in the
garage of
her home
in Gilbert,
Ariz.


-i ~44





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1 ...'- i r
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