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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01751
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 14, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01751
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








0 1-6 120312 *** ...
sO--7 T-
z:..


Reporter


Saturday, January 14, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 296 0 75 cents


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Pastor Kevin Thorpe, of Faith Missionary Baptist Church in Gainesville, delivers an impassioned speech during the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., 83rd
birthday celebration at the Lake City VA Medical Center on Friday.




MLK observations under way


'Duty to country knows
only three colors: Red, white
and blue,' locals told.

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com

instead of treating Martin Luther King
Jr. Day as a day off, speakers at
a Friday celebration of King's life
urged community members to make
it a day of service.
"When was the last time you got your
hands dirty to do something for someone
else?" said Kevin W. Thorpe, keynote speak-
er and senior pastor of Faith Missionary
Baptist Church in Gainesville.
The Lake City VA Medical Center hosted
the program as a service to the commu-
nity and those the VA serves and employs.


Knox Gilmore, acting associate director at
the medical center, said "duty to country
knows only three colors: red, white and
blue."
The federal ,holiday marking the civil
rights leader's birthday was signed into
law in 1983. In 1994 Congress designated
the holiday as a national day of service.
Community service transforms King's life
and teachings into action, according to the
Corporation for National and Community
Service, a federal agency.
Thorpe, a coordinator for Gainesville's
three City Wide Revivals, said strengthening
a community involves working together, try-
ing new things and crossing uncomfortable
boundaries.
"A lot of us wouldn't be here today if Dr.
Martin Luther King wasn't willing to go
somewhere that others weren't willing to
go," he said. Most of Thorpe's speech drew
"Amen" and "Uh-huh" from the crowd of
about 75 people.


Lisa Harmon, a VA nurse practitioner,
said Thorpe is "an outstanding speaker."
A 15- year VA employee, Harmon said she
always tries to attend the VA's programs,
but came especially because she recently
started attending Thorpe's Bible study in
.Gainesville.
TTid pe said the nation and the commu-
nity still has a way to go to bridge dispari-
ties in housing, education and incarceration
rates.
He encouraged children especially to,
learn about King's beliefs and work. "If
that legacy is forgotten it's doomed to be
repeated," he said.
Even those who cannot service the com-
munity,themselves for various reasons, can
help someone else do so. "Pray for those
doing the work," he said.
'The next time you turn on the news,
before you talk about how bad it is ask
yourself: What am I doing to make things
better?"


1-75


lanes


to close

Crews set to repave
northbound section
in Columbia.
From staff reports
Colder temperatures at night
are preventing the comple-
tion of a resurfacing project in
southern Columbia County so
paving crews will be allowed
by the Florida Department of
Transportation to close two of
the three northbound lanes on
Interstate 75 next week during
the daytime, say officials.
Just before the Alachua/
Columbia County line and head-
ing north for about a mile, two
northbound lanes will be closed
beginning Tuesday morning
after 8 a.m. in order to place
the final layer of asphalt on the
center lane. The double lane clo-
sure will only be allowed until
2 p.m. If there are no severe
traffic problems on Tuesday,
then the work will continue
Wednesday and Thursday, also
in the northbound direction,
moving north toward the U.S.
41/441 interchange (Exit 414),
south of Lake City.
Off duty law enforcement
will be hired by the contractor
to assist with the double lane
closures, which are generally
allowed at night between 9 p.m.
and 6 a.m. because of traffic
volumes. Message boards will
be placed on.,I-75 prior to the
County Road"236 interchange
(Exit 404)' in Alachua County
advising of the lane closures in
case motorists want to exit 1-75
and use U.S. 41/441 as an alter-
nate route.
At the same time, another
paving crew will be closing a
single southbound lane from
just north of U.S. 41/441 (Exit
414) south to place the final
layer of asphalt on the outside
lane. Traffic will be directed to
use the center and inside lanes.
1-75 continued on 3A


Two arrested on drug


charges after dispute


Authorities say
woman kicked,
spit on officer.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Branford man and
Deland woman were arrest-
ed Thursday night after
authorities found illegal
narcotics in their posses-
sion, according to reports.
Gregory Scott Williams,
31, 7189 284th St.,
Branford, was charged
with possession of a con-
trolled substance without
a prescription and posses-
sion of a synthetic narcotic
with intent to sell, manu-
facture or deliver. He was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $20,000 bond.
Traci Paulette Mortberg,
26, 524 E. Church St.,
Deland, was charged with
battery, resisting an offi-
cer, possession of drug
paraphernalia, possession
of drugs and smuggling
contraband into a cor-
rectional facility. She was


ll CALL US:
1 (386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice:755-5445
S8,264 0002 1 Fax: 752-9400


booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility
on $18,000 bond.
Columbia County
Sheriff's Office deputies
were dispatched to The
Internet Cafe, 2240 U.S.
Highway 90 in reference to
a suspicious person.
Deputy
Patrick
Smyth
reported
that when
he arrived
he spoke
to a witness
who said
Williams Mortberg
a n d
Mortberg A
were hang-
ing around
inside the
establish-
ment but
they were
not playing
any games. Williams
When
authori-
ties arrived they spoke
to Williams who said he
came to the establishment
to pickup up Mortberg and
that Mortberg went there


after they had gotten into
an argument The deputy
asked Mortberg to stand
at the front of his patrol
vehicle two times as she
attempted to walk away.
When the deputy noticed
Mortberg trying to walk
away from his vehicle the
third time, he put her in
handcuffs and placed her
in back of his patrol car.
Williams gave the
deputy consent to search
his vehicle and the offi-
cer reportedly found 12
small round blue pills in
the ash tray which were
identified as Oxycodone.
Williams was arrested and
placed in the back of the
patrol car with Mortberg.
While in the patrol car,
the deputy reported that
Mortberg began arguing
with Williams about the
incident and later spat in
his face and kicked him in
the leg.
Williams was then taken
out the vehicle and put in
back of another deputy's
car. On the way to the jail,
the deputy reported that

DRUGS continued on 3A


57 3
Mostly Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


TIP mascot Bellamy Beaver congratulates Montine Humphries and Drew Minson, winners
of best water quality and best water conservation projects at the 2012 Columbia County
Secondary Science Fair. Also pictured, from left: Joel Foreman, TIP chairman; John Wheeler,
TIP education/outreach chair; and School Superintendent Michael Millikin.


Projects net students $50


Middle schoolers take
up water problem
at science fair.
From staff reports
Two middle-school students were award-
ed $50 cash prizes and framed certificates
for their winning projects in a special "Water
Issues and Solutions" category sponsored
by The Ichetucknee Partnership at the


Opinion.... ............ 4A
Faith &Values............. 5A
Obituaries .............. 6A
Advice & Comics......... 7A
Obituaries .............. 6A


2012 Columbia County Secondary Science
and Engineering Fair this week.
Presenting the special awards were Joel
Foreman, chairman of The Ichetucknee
Partnership (TIP), and special guest
Bellamy Beaver, TIP's mascot
Montine Humphries, an 8th grader at
Fort White Middle School, took home
the prize in the water quality category for
her project, "Water, Water Everywhere,
But Is There a Drop to Drink?" Her proj-
WATER continued on 3A


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
"ren H-.jA injar,
Ir luirJ in I I- -


COMING
SUNDAY
L, ..: I ne .. :,
',", r plJ _F,


I











2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 2012


Celebrity Birthdays


FLOOR iDA' A
OTIO Wednesday: c H 3. Friday: ,4-
11-26-36-45-46-52 \ Afternoon: 7-0-6
x4


Friday:
Afternoon: 3-4-3-4


Thursday:
1-2-13-20-26


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Hackman injured riding bicycle


MIAMI Gene Hackman's publi-
cist says the veteran Oscar-winning
actor was briefly hospitalized after
a truck bumped him from behind
while he was riding a bicycle in the
Florida Keys.
Susan Madore says the 81-year-old
Hackman was airlifted to a Miami
hospital Friday afternoon.
She characterized his injuries as
minor bumps and bruises. She says
he was released from
the hospital several
hours later after rou-
tine tests. ,
SThe Florida t
Highway Patrol
reports that
SHackman was riding
on an Islamorada
street around 3 p.m. Hackman
when the pickup hit
the back of his bicycle, throwing him
onto the grassy shoulder. No charg-
es were immediately reported.
Hackman won an Academy Award
for "The French Connection" in
1971 and another for "Unforgiven"
in 1992. He received Oscar nomina-
tions for three other films.

Palin'film not part of a
political agenda, HBO says
-ASADENA, Calif. In a politically
Polarized country, the people behind
SHBO's upcoming movie on Sarah
Palin's vice presidential campaign
are being careful not to take one side
- or the other.
Danny Strong, writer of thefilm
: "Game Change," said at a news
conference Friday that "there is no
agenda here."
"Game Change" debuts March 10.
It is based on John Heilemann and
Mark Halperin's book about the 2008
presidential campaign, but focuses
specifically on Palin. Director Jay


Roach said he sought Palin's input
for the film but was rebuffed.
Actress Julianne Moore looks
strikingly like Palin in her depiction
of the former Alaska governor.

Gore: Olbermann
committed to Current show
PASADENA, Calif. Former
Vice President Al Gore says Keith
Olbermann remains committed
to Current TV, despite his recent
absence from political coverage.
Gore said Friday that Olbermann
is "fine." Gore is the chairman of the
left-leaning political TV network.
He is in Pasadena
to promote Current's
prime-time lineup.
that, starting this
month, is including
former Michigan Gov.
Jennifer Granholm .
Olbermann is
Current's most
popular personality. Olbermann
He didn't participate
in Iowa and New
Hampshire political coverage, report-
edly because he was upset over pro-,
duction problems at the network.
'Gore says he's been having fun
as a Current commentator on politi-
cal nights but doesn't want his own
show.

British crime writer Hill
passes away at 75
LONDON A British liter-
ary association says crime writer
*Reginald Hill, famed for his Dalziel
and Pascoe series of detective nov-
els, has died. He was 75.
Britain's Crime Writers'
Association said Friday that Hill,
awarded a lifetime contribution
award by the organization in 1995,


had died.following a struggle with
cancer.
Hill, the author of more than 40
books, first worked as a teacher until
the publication of his first novel "A
Clubbable Woman" in 1970.
His work came to international
attention when his Dalziel and
Pascoe series was dramatized for
television by the BBC from 1996.
Fellow crime writer Ian Rankin
paid tribute in a message posted to
Twitter. Hill was a "lovely man, fine
writer, great wit," Rankin wrote.
Hill is survived by his wife of 51
years, Pat


Newsman Threlkeld dies
in car accident at 74
NEW YORK Richard Threlkeld,
a far-ranging and award-winning
correspondent who worked for both
CBS and ABC News during a long
career, has been killed in a car crash
in New York's Long Island.
The 74-year-old Threlkeld.died
Friday morning in Amagansett, N.Y.,
when his car collided with a propane
tanker. He was pronounced dead at
Southampton Hospital, according.
to the East Hampton, N.Y., Police.
Department He lived in nearby East
Hampton.
The driver of the tanker, Earl
Fryberger Jr., of Coatesville, Penn.,
was not injured, said police, who are
investigating the accident
Threlkeld spent more than 25.
years at CBS News before retiring
in 1998. He was a reporter, anchor
and bureau chief who covered the
Persian Gulf War and the Vietnam
War, the Patty Hearst kidnapping
and trial, the assassination of Robert
F Kennedy, and the execution of
Gary Gilmore.
(AP)


a Blues singer Clarence
Carter is 76.
Singer Jack Jones is
74.
Singer-songwriter
Allen Toussaint is 74.


Former NAACP
Chairman Julian Bond is 72.
Actress Faye
Dunaway is 71.
Rapper-actor LL Cool
J is 44.


Daily Scripture

"that God was reconciling the
world to himself in Christ, not
counting people's sins against
them. And he has committed
to us the message of reconcilia-
tion. We are therefore Christ's
ambassadors, as though God
were making his appeal through
us. We implore you on Christ's
behalf: Be reconciled to God."

-2 Corinthians 5:19-20 NIV


[ Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval, St.; Lake City, Fla. 32055..
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake .
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER; Send address changes *
,to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home deliveryof the Lake Ciy Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m.on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
.call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error fbr same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery oi ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................ $26.32
24 Weeks.................$48.79
52 Weeks ............... $83.46
Rates indude 7%sales tax
Mall rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ..................$82.80
52 Weeks ...............$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact,in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA

Man sentenced in tant in the Grand Jury Suite. in 1994 but lost to former TH E W EATH ER
killing of wife, friend U.S. Rep. Pete Peterson of i. !,
kig Man gets life for Marianna.
PANAMA CITY A
PANAMA CIT A killing truck guard Wemi i .ik MOSTLY SUNNY? MO STLYs
Florida Panhandle man has ling r a Woman, 70, spends MOSTLY SUNN

prison for killing his wife A man convicted of kill- s u uU NY N
and her friend. ing a guard during a South VERO BEACH H H
As part of deal with Florida armored truck rob- Officials say a 70-year-old I HI L :H 0 3 H H71L0 46
Rav Conintv nrosecu- ber qtr htcq ctq d- rnr rI -- to wr -ntr r n l nit ^ l -. .*


tors, 49-year-old Delbert
Campbell pleaded no con-
test Thursday to two counts
of second-degree murder
with a firearm. He received
two life sentences, rather
than a possible death sen-
tence if.convicted at trial.
Authorities say Campbell
went to the home of 56-year-
old Richard Gioseffi in
October. Campbell shot
Gioseffi and 45-year-old
Thelma Campbell each in
the head with a shotgun.
Delbert Campbell then
Sent to a nearby rest stop'
and turned himself in to a
deputy.
SThe Panama City News-
SHerald reports that Gioseffi
Swas dead by the time rescue
crews arrived, and Thelma
Campbell died hours later at
a hospital.

9 charged in drug
trafficking ring
PENSACOIA-
Authorities say an employee
Sof the U.S. Attorney's Office
Sin Miami and eight others
have been arrested for par-
Sticipating in a South Florida
cocaine and oxycodone traf-
ficking ring.
Federal prosecutors say
the suspects were arrested
Friday morning. Authorities
say the group was involved
in a conspiracy to distribute
large amounts cocaine and
oxycodone. The indictment
also charges the nine sus-
pects with conspiring to use
telephone facilities to carry
out the drug trafficking
offense.
SThe U.S. Attorney's
Office employee faces
.an additional charge of
Obstructing justice during a
Federal grand jury proceed-
Sing. She was a legal assis-


ere y as 1u.Oeen sen Vlw Oec.A o
life in prison.
A federal judge in Fort
Lauderdale sentenced
33-year-old Nathaniel Moss
on Friday. He had pleaded
guilty in October to three
charges related to the fatal
robbery as part of a deal to
avoid the death penalty.
The South Florida Sun
Sentinel reports that Moss
admittedto fatally shooting:
Brink's guard Alejandro
Nodarse Arencibia during
the October 2010 heist
outside a Miramar Bank of
America branch.
Moss has also given
authorities information that
led to additional arrests.

Conservative
activist Griffin dies'
TALLAHASSEE -
Longtime conservative
activist and lobbyist Carole
Griffin has died. She was
73.
SA Bevis Funeral Home
spokesman said Griffin
died last week. Her funeral
is scheduled for Monday.
The Tallahassee
Democrat reports that
Griffin spent two decades
in the Capitol opposing
abortion and pornography.
She also worked against
tax increases and ratifica-
tion of the Equal Rights
Amendment.
Her political activism
included co-founding
the Ax the Tax organiza-
tion and working with
Florida Right To Life and
the American Family,
Association.
Democratic Gov. Bob
Graham appointed her to
the Commission on the
Status of Women in the
early 1980s. She ran for
Congress as a Republican


wYoLU1Mn Jspell a COut IllnI1L
pinned on the ground after
her SUV rolled onto her
legs as she opened her.'.
frontgate; .
The Vero Beach News-
Press reports Elisa
SMcLaughlin told deputies
she thought she had put
her Toyota in park when,
she stopped to open the
front gate outside her rural
home about 11 p.m. on
Jan. 5..
When she stepped out,
the vehicle rolled onto her
foot She fell to the ground
and it rolled onto her legs
and stopped.
Deputies say tempera-
tures fell into the 40s and
that no one heard her cries
for help. A neighbor found
her the next morning and
used a jack to raise the car
off of her.
She was taken to a hos-
pital for treatment

Pensacola Beach
property is taxable
TALLAHASSEE An
appellate court has upheld
a trial judge's decision
that said Escambia County
could collect property tax
on certain beachfront con-
dominiums but at a lower
amount.
The 1st District Court of
Appeal ruled Friday over
property taxes collected
on Pensacola Beach's
Portofino Condominiums
from 2004-09. The county
taxed the buildings but
not the land. A judge later
reduced the amount.
The latest decision by a
three-judge panel is one of
many tax rulings affecting
leased property on Santa
Rosa Island. Prior deci-
sions approved taxation.
(AP)


Pensacola
59/39


Vddt Cit
S Sl iacksonvilety
6135 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee Lake City 57'32 Daytona Beach
65'35 31 Ft. Lauderdale
0 Cainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
Panama City 58 31 37 Gainesvllle
63 45 Ocala Jacksonville
58 33 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
S 60/39 60/41 Lake y
Miami


Taminpa
60/434


Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
67/47 0 Orlando


Ft Lauderdale Panama City.
Ft Myers, 69/52 Pensacola
66/41 Naples Tallahassee
64/43 Miami Tampa
Key.West 6/52 Valdosta
s* 'I:-." W. Palm Beach
.68/58


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-o-date
Normal year-to-date


54
43
66
42
86 in 1932
14 in 1981

0.00"
0.08"
0.08"
1.38"
1.38"


7a Ip 7p la 6a
Saturday Sunday







o recasteIrtiaren *Ft& iemprabr


'SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.


7:28 a.m.
5:51 p.m.
7:28 am.
5:52 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 11-39 p.m.
Moonset today 10:41 a.m.
Moonrise tom..
Moonsettom. 11:19 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb.
16 23 30 .7
Last New First Full


5
MODE
30 aues to bu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Sunday
64 53 -
6i.'J5 i
72 63 s
71 47 ,
65 38 s
62 39 ,
70 63 i
64 35,
73/60/s
72/50/s
66/40/s
65/45/s
61/54/s
62/48/s
68/47/s
66/49/s
68/47/pc
70/57/s


Monday
70 58 pC
70 55 p:
74 67 pc
77 57 s
71 48'pc
?9 Jc, p:
73 67 p.:
71, 46/pc
75/65/s
78/58/pc
71/50/pc
72/55/pc
66/49/pc
66/58/pc
71/50/pc
74/57/s
69/50/s
73/63/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


J Forecasts, data and
Graphics 2012 Weather
' t4 Central, LP, Madison, Wls.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.con


In
. I . . .....


wwwsakecitreoreicm
Lak Ciy epote


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rr ci rJ" JI
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & POLITICS SATURDAY. JANUARY 14. 2012 3A



State officials halt funding for school projects


By GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Florida's
schools, community colleges and
state universities could be forced
to halt, or put off for years, scores
of new construction projects,
including repairs on roofs and
air-conditioners due to a dramatic
drop in available state money.
State officials are so worried
about the decline that they took
the unusual step Thursday of stop-
ping payments to some projects,


including some that may only be
halfway completed. Officials were
gathering information on which
projects need to cease.
On top of that, Gov. Rick Scott
has asked that schools and col-
leges return as much as S250 mil-
lion to the state.
Scott made the request because
a new forecast shows the state
will have zero new .construction
dollars available for schools and
colleges for the next two years. In
order to cover projects that were
already approved, the governor


wants to use money that may be
left over from other construction
jobs.
"Due to this significant shortfall,
it has become necessary for diffi-
cult decisions to be made on which
projects may be funded and which
must be discontinued at this point
in time," Scott wrote in a letter that
he sent out to top education offi-
cials this past Tuesday.
The governor made the request
for schools to give him back con-
struction money on the same day
that he publicly urged lawmakers


to increase spending on day-to-day
operations for schools by $1 bil-
lion.
Scott said he wants to work
with state lawmakers to deal with
the construction money shortfall,
but it comes at a time when top
Republican legislators are at already
odds over the state budget
Legislators are already being
confronted with a nearly $2 bil-
lion shortfall. A majority of state
senators have signed a letter saying
they are willing to wait until later
in the year before passing a bud-


get If the economy improves then
lawmakers can avoid making deep
budget cuts. The state's fiscal year
doesn't start until July and usually
the Legislature does not pass its
annual budget until early May.
But House Republicans want to
work on the state budget during
the regular session that started
on Tuesday instead of waiting. A
spokeswoman for House Speaker
Dean Cannon said Friday that the
House budget will include a "solu-
tion" to the school construction
money shortfall.


Republican presidential candidate, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich meets with county chairs from his campaign
before addressing supporters during the opening of his Florida campaign headquarters in Orlando on Friday.

0

Gingrich meets with


voters in Miami, Orlando


By CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press
MIAMI Before a crowd of exiles
and immigrants, Republican, presi-
dential candidate Newt Gingrich said
Friday that the United States needs
an immigration policy that is humane
and gets the country to a point where
"we no longer ever again have people
hiding in the shadows."
Gingrich, stopping at the Versailles
Restaurant in Miami's Little Havana,
defended his viewpoint that illegal
immigrants who have been in the
U.S. for decades, paid their bills and
been good citizens should be able to
get a residency permit.
"What if you've been here 25
years? What if you're an abuelo or
an abuela?" Gingrich said, using
the Spanish word for grandparent.
"We're not gonna give you amnesty,
you're not gonna have a road to citi-
zenship directly, but we will give you
a residency permit so you never, ever
again have to live in fear and you and
your family can relax."
Gingrich was flanked by support-
ers and journalists as he arrived at
the restaurant and then went to the
take-out window to order a Cuban
coffee. Many waved signs that said,
"Newt Con Nosotros" or "Newt With
Us." Volunteers also distributed fly-


ers titled "10 Reasons Why Latinos
Should Support Newt Gingrich for
President," which'highlighted the
candidate's conservative values, eco-
nomic policies and record with the
Hispanic community.
As the primary battles move from
Iowa and New Hampshire to South
Carolina and Florida, the Latino vote
- and how Republican candidates
might be able to capture it after
President Barack Obama's over-
whelming success in 2008 is start-
ing to get more attention.
Gingrich said he was surprised
that he had been attacked for his
viewpoint on immigration and urged
the crowd to be tough on other can-
didates.
"Do they seriously mean they
would deport grandmothers and
grandfathers?" he asked. "Are they
really going to go in and break up
families? I think that's not a very
conservative policy. Frankly, that's
not a very pro-family policy if you
ask me."
Gingrich's immigration policy reso-
nated with Alma Aguilera, who voted
for Obama in 2008 but said she would
not support him in the next election.
Aguilera said she is unhappy Obama
has not fulfilled his promise on immi-
gration reform.
"The Latino community is very


upset," she said.
At a campaign gathering in support
of front-runner Mitt Romney, immi-
gration again came to the forefront.
As Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart delivered
a stump speech on behalf of Romney
at a Latino restaurant in Doral, home
to many of Miami's more recently
arrived immigrants, he was inter-
rupted by about half a dozen young
illegal immigrants and their support-
ers.
The group wanted to know how
Diaz-Balart could support Romney
when the candidate opposes the
Dream Act. The proposal would cre-
ate a path to citizenship for qualified
minors and young adults living in the
country illegally who attend college
or join the military.
The mostly older Cuban-American
audience did not take kindly to
the question, yelling for a young
Colombian native who came to the
U.S. at age 6 to get out. Diaz-Balart
quieted the angry crowd and calmly
told the students that although he
disagrees with his candidate on the
Dream Act, Romney is the only one
who can get the country's economy
back on track.
The exchange highlighted the dif-
ferences within the Hispanic com-
munity, even within Florida, when it
comes to immigration.


DRUGS: Two arrested on

drug. charges

Continued From Page 1A

Williams said the pills were his and he was selling them to
make money because he had no job.
Mortberg was also taken to the jail, but a search of her
purse at the scene yielded 12 hypodermic syringes, a pill
crusher and a pill cutter. While she was being booked
into the jail, authorities reportedly found a small, blue pill
taped to her right breast. The pill was later identified as
Alprazolam, reports show.



1-75: Highway down to

one lane next week

Continued From Page 1A


When the outside lane
is being paved, semi-trucks
are encouraged to use the
inside lane, which they are
normally prohibited from
using, in order to provide
additional safety to work-
ers.
No lane closures are
allowed Friday from 6 a.m.
until late Sunday night
because of the increase
in traffic using 1-75 on the


weekends.
1-75 south of U.S. 41/441
in Columbia County cur-
rently averages about 45,000
vehicles a day and about 25
percent of those vehicles
are large trucks.
The speed limit is reduced
to 60 mph during lane clo-
sures and speeding fines
are doubled in construction,
zones when workers are
present.


WATER: Student science

projects commended

Continued From Page 1A


ect compared the taste and
color of drinking water
from various sources
in the Fort White area.
Her project also won first
place in the science fair's
Environmental Division.
Drew Minson, a 6th
grader at Lake City Middle
School, took home the
TIP award in the water
conservation category for
his project, "Going Grey,
Saving Blue." His proj-
ect examined what if any
effects the reuse of grey
(recycled) water might
have on soils and plants.
His project alsp received


honorable mention in
the fair's Environmental
Division.
Both students and their
projects will advance to the
multi-county Suwannee
Valley Regional Fair that
will be held February
14-15 at Florida Gateway
College in Lake City.
TIP also will sponsor
special awards for the
best water conservation
and best water quality
projects at the Columbia
County Elementary
Science Fair scheduled
in May for students in
grades 4-5.


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GOP candidates fail to get

on some primary ballots


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Many
of Mitt Romney's presiden-
tial challengers are having
trouble fulfilling a funda-
mental requirement of run-
ning for public office: get-
ting on the ballot.
Rick Santorum, Newt
Gingrich, Rick Perry and
Jon Huntsman have all
failed to qualify for the bal-
lot in at least one upcom-
ing GOP primary. In other
states, they have failed
to file full slates of dele-
gates with state or party
officials, raising questions
about whether these can-
didates have the resources
to wage effective national
campaigns.
And if one of them were


Republican presidential can-
didate Mitt Romney greets
supporters in West Palm
Beach on Thursday.

able to marshal enough
anti-Romney forces to chal-
lenge the front-runner, the
ballot blunders could limit


their ability to win delegates
in key states.
The exception: Ron Paul,
who appears to have avoid-
ed such pitfalls so far.
'This is why you need a
real-life, no-kidding-around
campaign," said Rich Galen,
a GOP strategist and former
Gingrich aide who is neutral
in the 2012 race. "All these
guys who have been crow-
ing that they found a new
way to run for president,
it's like saying I'm inventing
a new airplane, and it has
only one wing."
Romney, the former
Massachusetts governor,
won the first two contests, in
Iowa and New Hampshire,
and he is leading in the
polls in South Carolina and
Florida, the next two states
to have primaries.


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OPINION


Saturday, January 14, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


ONE


ONE
OPINION


U.S.

undone

again by

rogue video


photos surfaced
of Iraqi pris-
oners at Abu
Ghraib being
abused and humiliated by their
U.S. military captors, a ranking
Army officer said, "You're look-
ing at the idiots who could cost
us this war."
In the end, that particular
embarrassment didn't cost
us the war, but it arguably
made it more difficult and it
was one of a series of mis-
steps where we strayed from
our principles torture (the
euphemism "enhanced inter-
rogation techniques" fooled no
one); the punitive detentions at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, with-
out trial; the seemingly casual
U.S. attitude toward civilian
casualties that cost us the
moral high ground.
Now, in time for the 10th
anniversary of the arrival of
hooded and shackled prisoners
at Guantanamo Bay, comes a
video purporting to show four
Marines, members of a sniper
team from a unit based at Camp
Lejeune, N.C., urinating on the
corpses of three Taliban fight-
ers.
Nothing has surfaced to sug-
gest that the video is anything
but authentic, and it quickly
appeared on YouTube and the
Web.'If ithasn't already, the
video will also receive promi-
nent play on the websites of
Islamic radicals as proof of
their point that regardless of
what the U.S. says, this is a war
against Islam and Muslims.
Copies are likely already for
sale in Pakistani bazaars.
Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta condemned the action,
calling it utterly deplorable and
pledged that those who perpe-
trated it "will be held account-
able to the fullest extent."
The U.S. military has been
aggressive and effective in
prosecuting atrocities by its
soldiers, but the verdicts come
long after the damage is done.
The timing of this episode
could be especially unfortunate
because the U.S. is engaged in
delicate preliminaries leading to
peace talks with the Taliban.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
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LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
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approaches
a podium to
speak, you can
almost hear
the Looney Tunes merriment
music at the start of a cartoon
- tra, la, la, tra, la, la, la, ding,
da, ding, ding, ding. The antics
seldom disappoint, but you
have to grant the fellow has his
serious side, too. -
This physician from Texas,
this congressman, this GOP
candidate for president seems
honest about at least much of
what he thinks. He's not scan-
ning the polls to figure out
what the popular position might
be. He has his beliefs, his con-
victions, a cause he wants to
further, and it is not the "me,
myself and I" crusade that
drives so many politicians.
The cause is libertarianism,
an understanding, in part, that
laissez-faire economics under
the rule of law produces far
better results than central plan-
ners who promise beneficent
outcomes while throwing you
down on the ground, rifling
your pockets and kicking you
in the head.
Libertarianism is not just
about free markets, but about
free people, a political phi-
losophy positing you cannot
have one without the other.
It preaches that regulation
of the citizenry should end
where regulation of big gov-
ernment should begin with
a Constitution limiting powers
and spelling out rights.
Great, wonderful, but listen
- there's that tune. And look,
here comes Bugs Bunny, ask-
ing, "What's up, doc?"


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojoy@aol.com


Dr. Paul says, well, he is not
going to tell you. Least of all
is he going to discuss those
racially tinged newsletters that
went out under his name years
ago. He did not write them,
and does not know who did
and did not know what was in
them at the time, only maybe
he did, but should he get angry
and walk out of the room now?
Please shut up, he says.
I'd like more clarification,
but Paul would rather get back
to some other themes, such
as getting rid of paper money
and the Federal Reserve.
Interesting, huh? Even when
you grant there are powerful
arguments for curbing what
some see as a dollar-destabi-
lizing monetary recklessness,
this Paul position is itself a
destabilizing overreach. It dis-
covers mystical meanings in
the Constitution not available to
ordinary rationality and confers
magical qualities on gold and
silver.
Then we come to the man's
foreign policies. He sees the
United States as an evil force
in the world and 9/11 as a self-
inflicted wound. He thinks Iran
wants nuclear energy, not a
nuclear bomb, and sees little
if any risk in an increasingly
isolated, militarily retreating


America.
Focus on just one of these
questions Iran's ambitions
- and ask yourself what you
would say if you were stand-
ing in a bank, saw some men
pull masks over their faces and
yank out revolvers and heard
the guy next to you,remark,
"Don't get upset. They're just
going to make withdrawals
through the same procedures
as the rest of us."
You might remark that there
are plenty of ways for those
men to make such withdrawals
short of masks and guns, and
you might'also want to note to
Paul that there are plenty of
ways for Iranians to get nuclear
power for energy without risk-
ing sanctions and bombs
Libertarians like to think of
themselves as always the voice
of sweet reason, but like adher-
ents of any other ideology,
some of them some of the time
can be caught trying to squeeze
facts and common sense into
their prejudgments when there
is clearly no fit, thereby captur-
ing the enthusiasm of others
with like prejudices.
Paul has a following mainly
young, independent idealists-
though not enough to get him
the Republican nomination.
There may be enough for him
to run as a third party candi-
date and get President Barack
Obama reelected.
Tra, la, la, la, la, la, la, ding,
da, ding, ding, ding.
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso and Denver, is a colum-
nist living in Colorado.


Senate abuses president's right


to make recess appointments


Whatever the,
founding
fathers had in
mind about
the advise and
consent function of the Senate
besides a reasonable check on
the power of the presidency,
it's a good bet they didn't mean
for it to unreasonably deny the
executive branch the right to
carry out the nation's business.
But that certainly has been
happening through the last two
administrations when mem-
bers of the opposition party
in Congress have managed a
dubious method of keeping the
Senate in a pro forma slumber
over holidays with one thing in
mind preventing the White
House from making recess
appointments allowed under the
Constitution. Nearby lawmakers
take turns gaveling the Senate
in session each day to an empty


IV,




Dan K. Thomasson
chamber. Within seconds they
have gaveled it closed. Through
this method and the regular
blocks on appointees, congres-
sional opponents of both George
W. Bush and now Barack Obama
have successfully sidetracked a
healthy number of nominations
to key administration positions,
including many to the judiciary.
While the Democrats came up
with this strategy under major-
ity leader Harry Reid, some 75
percent of Bush's appointments
still won confirmation. Barack


Obama's nominees haven't fared
that well. Only about 57 percent
of the president's appointments
have won Senate favor, prompt-
ing Obama to challenge the
constitutionality of the concept
by filling the directorship of
the newly created Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau with-
out Senate approval. Republicans
have strenuously opposed the
creation of the CFPB. Obama's
action has resulted in another
confrontation with Republican
lawmakers.
lit is obvious that thwarting
the efforts by a president to
administer through the appoint-
ment of qualified persons is
not terribly good business and
just more evidence of the dys-
functional nature of this hyper-
partisan government

* Dan K. Thomasson is a columnist
for Scripps Howard News Service.


ANO
VI


HER
W


Job


advice


for


Obama


brainstormed at
the White House
Wednesday at a
forum on "insourcing
American jobs." The admin-
istration's greatest political
vulnerability is sky-high unem-
ployment. The basic idea that
trickled out of the session was
America must "bring back"
jobs from overseas by raising
taxes on companies that invest
abroad. That's a bad idea.
The president's economic
advisers think they can wave
their legislative wands to
make bad news disappear.
They give no thought to
the consequences of having
bureaucrats select winners
and losers in the market.
They don't consider the
downside of layering more
red tape around an already
complex tax system. If Mr.
Obama were serious about
bringing down the unemploy-
ment rate from its current 8.5
percent level, he would work
on reducing the regulatory
and tax burden so industry
could spend more time cre-
ating wealth and less filling
out paperwork. Mr. Obama's
'selective tax incentives will be
as useless as his Keynesian
stimulus spending binge that
left the country a trillion dol-
lars poorer.
The left refuses to move
away from the tired, discred-
ited ideas of the British econ-
omist who inspired FDR and
Jimmy Carter. Contrary to the
main premise of Mr. Obama's
forum, jobs aren't something
bureaucrats can "bring back."
A market system is dynamic;
the number of jobs isn't fixed.
Investment shouldn't be made
to go backward toward type-
writers and horse-driven car-
riages, having moved to cloud
computing and automobiles.
When government attempts
to create jobs or redirect the
market, it fails. Government
isn't the channel for job cre-
ation the private sector is.
The proper function of
government is to provide a
legal framework that allows
for peaceful, orderly private
exchange to take place.
These market exchanges
are what enhance both wel-
fare and wealth and create
gainful employment. Private
investment will only take
place when property rights
are respected, the regula-
tory environment is fair and
transparent and tax rates are
reasonable. All of these condi-
tions are increasingly hard to
find in the United States.
This country continues
to hold the dubious distinc-
tion of having the highest
corporate tax rate in the
34-member Organization for
Economic Cooperation and
Development. Cutting this
burden will do more to attract
U.S. capital back home than
any industry-specific tax
incentive and it would be far
less distortionary overall.
The United States continues
to fall in the annual rank-
ings in the Fraser Institute's
"Economic Freedom of the
World" report. Attempts at
micromanaging the economy
will push us further down this
path, and we'll have no new
jobs to show for it. It's time
to step back and realize once
again what the proper role
^ of government is and isn't
- when it comes to creating


jobs. Washington needs to just
get out of the way.
* Washington Times


4A


Ron Paul is


a cartoonish character

















FAITH &


VALUES


2 011 was a very perplexing
year to me. It was a year
that saw so many unbiblical
books published; so many
people, even pastors and
so called theologians, writing about
things that the Bible clearly teaches
on or teaches against. Rob Bell, a
pastor of a 10,000 member church
wrote a book that states "The Bible
does not teach there is a Hell.".
Many join in with him in this belief.
Books have been written downplay-
ing the foundation of the Christian
faith. Some question the death and
resurrection of Jesus. Another pas-
tor who says we should stop using
the word "saved" to describe our
salvation experience. Never mind
Jesus said in Matt. 18:11 "For the
Son of Man came to save that which
was lost". He also said he did not
like the term "born again". Jesus
said in John 3:3 "I say unto thee,
except a man be born again, he can-
not see the kingdom of God".
Dr. David Jeremiah stated in a
recent message that "there is a
growing movement to water down
the word of God to make it more
palatable". We must remember, God
and His word is the same "yester-
day, and today, and forever" (Heb.
13:8).
Much. more has been in the spot-
light in both the religious world and
the political word: like same sex
marriage, evolution, and homosexu-
ality. I believe that it is time for the
Church to re-evalulate itself. It's
time to take a stand-against these
things. It's time for the Church to
be separate. II Corinthians 6:17
says "Therefore come out from them
and be separate says the Lord. Do
not touch what is unclean, and I
will receive you". Jesus Christ is
still the rejected.one of the world.
Hebrews 13:13 says,"Thergfpref


let us go forth to Him, outside the
camp, bearing His reproach". If the
church is going to follow Him we
must be willing to stand up for Him
and His word. We must bear His
"reproach". We must be separate
from the world and all the unbibli-
cal teachings. If we are involved in
a teaching or a congregation that is
not following God's word, we are to
speak against it and separate our-
selves
from it. BIBLE STUDIES
Being
separate .
does not
mean a
"holier
than
thou"
attitude.
We must
remember Hugh Sherrill Jr.
to "Let ems-hugh43@comcostnet
brotherly
love con-
tinue" (Heb. 13:1).
We are living in a day when we
hear very little about the truth of
personal separation from the world
and things of the .flesh. The Bible
is clear in its admonition. "Let
everyone that nameth the name
of Christ depart from iniquity" (II
Timothy 2:19). In I Thessalonians
5:22 we are admonished to. "abstain
from all appearances of evil". There
are some things that are not evil in
themselves but may become so if we
permit them to become a stumbling
block to others. We, the Church,
must remember it is never a ques-
tion only of "is it right or wrong"
but is this pleasing to God.
So, we should ask the question:
How separated is our life?

,, Hugh Sherill is a Bible teacher at
Eastside Baptist Church.


hat images come to
mind at the thought
of discipline? Perhaps
you have memories of
"meetings" with your
Dad behind the woodshed, or strict
teachers doling out smacks on the
hand with a ruler, or seemingly endless
weekends with no car keys. Maybe as
adults we have faced discipline at work
or just with our own conscience. No
doubt our
HEART MATTERS memories
are all
di differ-
ent...but
I wonder
if we have
some-
thing in
common.
When I
Angie Land recall epi-
angieland3@windstream.net sodes of
discipline,
some from
my childhood, and some I have experi-
enced as an adult, I still feel a sense of
humility and even embarrassment. I am
convinced this is because even though
I hated the discipline at the time, there
was no doubt that I deserved it. If this
rings a bell with you, I have good news!
In Hebrews 12:5-7, The Message
Bible has this to say:
"So don't feel sorry for yourselves.
Or have you forgotten how good par-
ents treat children, and that God treats
you as his children? My dear child,
don't shrug off God's discipline, but
don't be crushed by it either. It's the
child he loves that he disciplines; the
child he embraces, he also corrects.
God is educating you; that's why you
must never drop out. He's treating you
as dear children. The trouble you're
in isn't punishment; it's training; the
normal experience of children. Only
irresponsible parents leave children to .


fend for themselves."
These verses presuppose that every
child requires discipline, and notice
how clearly we are reminded, it's not
mean and horrible Moms and Dads,
but "good" parents who discipline
their children; those who refuse to
undertake this responsibility are, in
fact, irresponsible. It is interesting
that the Greek word for chastening is
defined not only as "chastisement" and
"instruction," but also as "nurture."
The fact is, when we are disciplined, it
is proof that we are loved! So, not only
can we apply this easily to our task as
parents, it also should influence our
perspective on struggles that we face
as adults. "The trouble you're in isn't
punishment; it's training." Perhaps
instead of asking, "When will this be
over?" a better question might be:
"What am I to learn from this trouble?"
The payoff from our training is
explained a few verses later in Hebrews
12:ll:"At the time discipline isn't much
fun. It always feels like it's going
against the grain. Later, of course, it
pays off handsomely, for it's the well-
trained who find themselves mature in
their relationship with God."Did you
recognize it? The payoff that comes
only through discipline is maturity:
being well-trained to make good deci-
sions that will lead to fulfilling relation-
ships with others, and with our Father
in heaven...because every heart mat-
ters!

Blessings, Angie

Heart Matters is a weekly column writ-
ten by Angie Land, Director of the Family
Life Ministries of the Lafayette Baptist
Association, where she teaches Bible stud-
ies, leads marriage and family confer-
ences and offers Biblical counseling to
individuals, couples and families. Contact
Angie with questions.or comments at angi-
eland3@windstream.net


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BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47S* 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday W:r :iJip 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
nrierIm Pai~irr Ken itn Elenf ed

FIRST SAPTIST IRHUCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunidy W)rsnip 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422 -

OLIVET MI jl Si)NO BAPF1T CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386)752-1990
:1coild V Wafltrs P,.'r
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday fkIIiln Wvorihrp 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
'In God's Word, Will & Way"

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1 i' iS N LIS H'.y 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship' 11AM &6PM
Wed Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson






Iay Eectfc Cooperative. Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit.
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


SALEM PRIMIrIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10 :0 .M
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198

SOUrHSIDE BAPTIS ICHIURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evf ing Viryiiop
Wedr.laIA
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
11)0 :AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCHH
InderlendiriA B apis4
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun Mom Vior:hip
Sunday Eve.
Vied PrJyer Mte:rng
'aSstr MlkP Ioumllar

THE VINEYARD
Sunday School
S:.ur ndy Wrihtip
Sunday Night


1832 SW Tomaka Terrace
(off SW Bascom Norris Dr.)
!?Rn alOflr 'I Ijj


10AM
11AM
6PM
7:30 PM



9:30AM
10:30AM
6:00 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIFPAVY CATHOUL CHURCH
I'i. Sl'I Eppray Coul 752-4470
.irutday igJI Mois 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15AM. 10:30 AM,
12 30 P'M I(Span.r.iO'g 1rli
iunildy Si hojixilRgiou(i E:u:31i:,n
9:00 AM-10:15AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM

LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7PM


CHURCH OF CHRIST
SNEW HORIZON
[I'u'vn n' tn.h
Directions& Ti,' 1866 623 J43 .
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

CHURCH OF GOD
-iE OF, CHURCHLIH CF I:il)D
167 Ermine St 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship -0 30(IAi.l 6 00P
'3t Family Niight 7PM
Wed. Youth Service 7PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
;I: Sl. Mnlriir Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunriay WrrW.ri ir. 50 6 30i
d~-r3 Sp.rn'al E-rir:hiTi'anl 7PM
i.h, '/un CinLrTh"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
51 JAMES EPiSCOPAL CHURCH
2]': SW i3,3'Com N rr Dr
Lake City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
''eba~i. wa,, sr]tmesl31i:rty o:rg
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sunday 8:00& 10:00AM
Wednesday 5:15PM
Priest The Rev. Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Chisian Education Hour
Foa all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90, 1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worsnip 9:30AM
NurseryAvail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Pastor/Reverend John David Bryant


,>--:- -


M orrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
Sw PuJ ln |.vc i',,,La ie p r ,.m11 Rd ,
;" 410 r i- W 5 ,-
M%,n Sax

METHODIST
F7l 1UrKSi Ie ,~At iih Crurrih
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday t.'lrning Worhip
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
q'iJram oppoilunite:, '3 rale in jli areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at

-irlilTf UNITED E EIhlDSr CHURCH
'Surii O.i'knu'l 9 4AiM Worship 11:00AM
'i- Ed l Sud 7:;00PM Mon. Prayer Noon
Friday Prayer 6:00-7:00PM
Pastor Rev. Fatha M. DeSue

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarIane 752-3513
Ajslj:Ent n r Summirs Srio)
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Fidase & I wqruip 6:00PM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Awana (ages 3-18) 5:30-7:30PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHO[iiT CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM&6PM
Wed.Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
LAKE CIY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
iundily ',,rsnip 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Tr.i 'iniir;, Childrens Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Proided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
'lE .I.)es ,a, & 1A V. irh;v~lrgn '.
Sunday School 10-00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Ej,i.\-v ,,,:e S6:00 PM


kNDERSON COL MBIA CO.. INC.
ASPH.UJ PAYIiG
COMMERCIAL .- PNDLS RIAL
Site 1repranioni Rrid Builndming Parking Lots
Grading & Druraiite
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St. Lake City


YouthServices-Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service -Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info ii 375i 3i' Eerieflie Wirce .t
Pastor: Rev.Stan Ellis

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sun. School 10AM Sun. Worship 9AM
Contemporary 9AM
Traditional 11AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Or Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Celebration Service 9:30 & 11:15 AM
'Aeinesday Serviie 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sa]leSs Wielcome Ro. go 5 milri Stulh
church on left* 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road* 755-0580
First andThird Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 PM.
Pastor Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:0OAM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197













S HARRY'S
,,,, Heatg & A. Cond&itog Inc.
Hairy- Mosly~ Presiden

P' 752-2308 s' 1


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarers
FEED PET SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
I ANIMAL HIIALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKEL'S POWER EQUIPMEFf, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY. FL.
386-752-8098




LAKE CITY
1701 &. I at,
.-t 755-7050


BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Roidentlit & commercial
755-6142


North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


GW Hunter, Inc.
JobSupercener
"LOW PRICES ElVERYDAr










"Quality ork at reasonable prie
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944
GW Hunter, Inc.












FOo STORES
OpChen 7 dA a Wek
106 E. Dural St.. L[ke Ciy FL


To Advertise in
this Church Directory
cal l
755-5440.
755-5440.


Saturday, January 14, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


The call to be separate


II Corinthians 6:17


From discipline


comes maturity


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054












6A LAKE CITY REPORTER COMMUNITY CALENDAR & OBITUARIES SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email lhampson@lakecityreporter.com


ONGOING
Boys Club winter program
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program, which runs
through March 1. Fees
are $175, which includes
transportation from all
elementary and junior high
schools. For more informa-
tion, please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones Way.

Art exhibit
The community is invited
to enjoy the art exhibit at
the West Branch of the
Public Library. Local art-
ist Jim Whiteside is display-
ing watercolor paintings
of scenes in North East
Florida, many around Lake
City and Columbia County.

Jan. 13
MLK Jr. ceremony
The Lake City VA
Medical Center will
observe Martin Luther
King Jr.'s 83rd birthday
with a ceremony at 11 am.
in the center's auditorium.
The keynote speaker is
Kevin W. Thorpe, senior
pastor at Faith Missionary
Baptist Church and
executive producer of the
Faith Church Television
Broadcast. The event is
open to the public.

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14, 15,
7-p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m., 6
p.m. U.S. 90 West to Jones
Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet
Gold Standard Lodge
#167will have their ,
ann_' ,Miasonii banquet
at Wj.~ ,Cnmt unity, ,....
Center on Friday, Jan. 13
at 7 p.m. until. For ticket
info contact Chris Mirra
at 386-623-3611 or Dennis
Murphy at 386-697-3739.

172nd church anniversary
Salem Primitive Baptist
Church, 199 SW Salem
Church Court, will
celebrate their 172nd
Anniversary and Annual
Meeting beginning on
Friday at 6:30 p.m., and
Saturday and Sunday
morning beginning at
10:30 a.m. Guest minis-
ters will be Elder Charles
Tyson, Tifton, Georgia,
Elder Gordon Smith,
Jacksonville, Florida, and
Elder Hulen Harvill of
Plant City, Florida. All
descendants of Salem
Primitive Baptist Church
and those who love the
original Baptist Doctrines
are cordially invited to
attend these services. For
more information, please
call 752-4198.

Jan. 14
Farmers market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is
Saturday from 9am to


1pm (winter hours) in
Wilson Park located along
Lake DeSotobetween
the Columbia County
Courthouse and Shands
Lakeshore Hospital in
downtown Lake City. This
Saturday the Birds of Prey
program from Live Oak will
offer a demonstration of
birds in the program and
information about their
talents during normal mar-
ket hours. David Heringer
Project will rejoin the mar-
ket again this week. For
more information about
the Lake DeSoto Farmer
Market call 386-719-5766 or
visit marketlcflacom.

North Florida Writers
Group meets
Love to write? From nov-
ice to published author, the
North Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City Writers
Group) is the place where
local writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire. Writers
of any experience level
from the area are welcome
to join us Saturday, Jan. 14
from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., at the
Columbia County Public
Library, Main Branch, 308
NW Columbia Ave. There
are no fees to join the group;
however space is limited,
so please reserve your spot
today. For more informa-
tion, please contact Marley
Andretti at (386) 438-3610.

Blood drive
There will be a LifeSouth
blood drive from noon to
8 p.m. at Moe's Southwest
Grill. Each donor recieves
$5 in Moe's Bucks and a
t-shirt or boxers.

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14, 15,
7 p:m. Sunday;:11 a.m'., 6
p.m. U.S..90 West to Jones
Way. Pastor Stan Ellis.

Hospice Chili Cook-off
The Third Annual
Branford Chili Cook-Off
to benefit children and
families served by Herry's
Kids Pediatric Services
will be held on Saturday,
Jab 14 from 11 a.m. 2 p.m.
at Hatch Park located on
Craven Dr. in Branford.
The event will include
a silent auction, games,
a bounce house for the
kids, live DJ, door prizes,
antique car show, thrift
store items for sale, and
all the chili you can eat
There will be a five dollar
admission to the event To
learn more about hospice
services call 386-755-7714
or visit www.hospiceofth-
enaturecoastorg.

Jan. 15
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program
On Sunday, Jan. 15
at 4p. m., the Columbia
County NAACP Branch
will host its 28th annual
Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, on MLK, Jr. Street,


in Lake City. Speaker is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Parade
The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council pres-
ents the Grand Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Parade,
Monday, Jan. 16 at 10 am.
Line-up will begin at the
DOT office at 9 am. For
participation and informa-
tion call (386)365-1470.

MLK worship service
The MLK Worship
Service will follow the
parade at the New Bethel
Baptist Church at 12:30p.m.
Bishop Ron Williams,
II is the speaker, Rev.
Alvin Baker, Pastor. Call
(386)344-9915 for more
information.

MLK Classic
The MLK Classic will
feature a re-match basket-
ball game at the Lake City
Middle School at 3:30 p.m.
featuring Alumni Women
and Men's players of
CHS and Suwannee. Call
(386)754-7095 for details.

SAR meeting
The Sons of the
American Revolution, Lake
City Chapter, will meet on
Monday at 6 p.m. at the
Guang Dong Restaurant in
the Lake City Mall, 2469
West HIghway 90. Guests
are always welcome. Call
752-4919 for information.

Jan. 17
Art League meeting
The Art League of North
Florida will hold the first
meeting of the year Jan. 17
at the First Presbyterian
Church at 7 p.m. The main
- purpose is the election of
officers. Members and the
community are invited.

Traffic safety meeting
The Columbia
Community Traffic Safety
will hold its first meet-
ing of the new year on
Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 10 a.m.
at the FDOT Operations
Complex, 710 NW Lake
Jeffery Road, in the Crew
Room. The Team works on
traffic hazards and enforce-
ment issues in Columbia
County and the public is
welcome to attend. Issues
can be called in to the
FDOT at 758-3714. The
team is made up of mem-
bers of law enforcement,
emergency services, engi-
neering and education.

Jan. 18
Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Jan. 18
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St Johns St across
from Aquatics Center.

Blood drive
LifeSouth will have a


blood drive from noon to
7 p.m. at Pizza Boy Pizza.
Each donor recieves a free
large cheese pizza and a
t-shirt or boxers.

Jan. 19
Voices that .Change
Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
Jan.19 at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds ban-
quet facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Tickets are $10.
This is a benefit for the
Christian Service Center
and tickets are available at
the Center on Hilton and
Washington St


The Columbia County
Retired Educators will meet
Thursday, January 19, at
1 p.m. in Room 120 at the
School Board Adult Center.
Speakers will be Mrs.
Kaeron Robinson of the
Guardian Ad Litem and Mr.
Paul Conley of Ocala, Fl.,
District H FREF Trustee.
Retired persons interested
in education may join us.
For more information call
Will Brown at 752-2431.

Jan. 20
Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at the
Levy Peiforming Arts
Center. Identical twins
Mark & Clark play head to
head on identical custom-
built baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled audi-
ences around the world
with everything from musi-
cal comedy to dramatic
interpretation of the clas-
sics all with the flash of
Liberace, a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano artist-
ry of Ferrante and Teicher.
Ticket and membership
information is available at
www.communityconcerts.
info.

Arbor Day planting
SThe Lake City/Columbia
County Beautification
Committee will honor
Morris Williams by plant-
ing a Palatka Holly in com-
memoration of the 2012
Arbor Day. The ceremony
will be held at 11 a.m. in
front of the school admin-
istration building on Duval
Street. The public is urged
to attend.

Jan. 21
Spiritual retreat
A spiritual life enrich-
ment retreat and confer-
ence for adults from 9:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Epiphany
Catholic Church, 1905 SW
Epiphany Court The regis-
tration fee is $10 and theme
is improving and inspiring
spirituality. Reserve your
spot by Jan. 18 by calling
(386)752-5228.

Farmers market
The Lake DeSoto


Farmers Market is
Saturday from 9am to
1pm (winter hours) in
Wilson Park located along
Lake DeSotobetween
the Columbia County
Courthouse and Shands
Lakeshore Hospital in down-
town Lake City. The market
features locally grown fresh
produce, herbs, plants,
cheese, milk, eggs and local
baked breads, pies and
other items. Vendors also
sell homemade craft iteins
like jewelry, woodwork and
other handmade items. The
1st Annual Chili Cook Off
will be January 21 to benefit
Relay for Life. For more
information about the Lake
DeSoto Farmer Market call
386-719-5766 or visit market
lcflacom.


Let the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park &
Campground help you plan
your special day. 2nd annual
Wedding Expo will be held
at Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park & Campground
on Saturday, Jan. 21from 1
to 5 p.m. Fashion Show by
Glass Slipper Bridal, Door
Prizes, Vendor Booths,
Refreshments, Taste Testing
and more. Vendors include:
Melissa's Antiques, Glass
Slipper Bridal, Scott Carroll
DJ, Holiday Inn, SOS Cafe &
Restaurant, Top Hat Limo,
Cakes by Pat, Uniquely
Yours Wedding & Event
Planner, Hot Heads Salon
& Spa, Sea Creative/Stacee
Reveron Photo, Joy the Cake
Lady/Elite Photography and
more. Free Admission. For
more information contact
Sharyn at (386) 364-1683.

Jan. 22
Church anniversary
Shiloh Missionary
Baptist Church, 948
Aberdeen Avenue; will
celebrate their 70th
Church Anniversary on
Jan. 22 at 11:30 a.m. and
3 p.m. Dr. Dwight Pollock
in charge of the 11:30
a.m. service. Reverend
Isadore L. Williams and the
Philadelphia Missionary
Baptist Church is in charge
of the 3 p.m. service.
Please come out and share
with us.

Bridal show
The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's Bridal,
Belk, Lake City Florist
and Design, Glass Slipper
Bridal, The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes &
Sugar Art, DND Escapes,
Spirit of the Suwannee
Music Park, and More!
Door Prizes, Complimentary
Food Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices are
$7.00; Day of Event $10.00.
Tickets can be purchased
at the Holiday Inn & Suites,
213 SW Commerce Dr.,
Lake City. For ticket sales
or vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386) 754-


1411.

Riding club banquet
The Columbia County
Riding Club is having its
annual banquet Jan. 22
at 1p.m. at Mason City
Community Center. The
club will have its rides the
2nd and 4th Sat. of each
month. The club will be
hosting Pleasure Shows
this year. Check our web-
site for all information, www.
columbiacountyridingclub.
corn.

Jan. 24
Friends of the Library
Author Program
Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 7
p.m. at the Main Library,
sponsored by Save Our
Suwannee will host Cynthia
Barnett, author of Mirage:
Florida and the Vanishing
Water of the Eastern U.S.
Barnett is an award-win-
ning journalist and senior
writer for Florida Trend
magazine. She will discuss
Florida's water crisis and
look at solutions that have
found success in commu-
nities around the world.
Don't miss this timely pro-
gram on a topic so very rel-
evant to Columbia County
and North Central Florida.

Jan. 25
Building Assn. lunch
The Columbia County
Builders Association will
hold a General Council
lunch at Guang Dong start-
ing at 11:30 a. m. on Jan.
25. Cost of lunch is $10 for
members and $15 for non-
members. Speaker is Dale
Williams. After the lunch
an attorney from Tritt/
Anderson in Jacksonville *
will hold a short seminar.
Reservations are preferred,,
Scall 386-867-1998 or e-mail:
colcountybuild@comcast: .
net

Jan. 28
Illusionist Jason Bishop
Illusionist Jason Bishop j
will perform as part of
Florida Gateway College's X
FGC Entertainment series
on Jan. 28. Bishop, the 2006
APCA Performing Artist 4
of the Year, will amaze you
with his stunning and origi-
nal state-of-the-art magic,
including his breathtaking
Double Levitation trick. Foro,
more information or for
tickets, call (386) 754-4340
or visit www.fgcentertain-
mentcom.

Women's retreat
New Dayspring Baptist
Church, 709 NW Long
Street, Shepherd's Care
Ministry will be hosting a
Women's Retreat on Jan.
28th from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Registration and breakfast
beginning at 7:30 am.
Inspirational topics will be
presented along with lunch.
Tickets are available or you
may pay at the door for a
donation of $10. For more
information please contact
Sis. Linda Timmons at 386-
438-7974.


OBITUARIES


Buford James Edwards
Mr. Buford James Edwards, 90
of Lake City passed away on
Wednesday, January 11, 2012 at
the Malcolm Randall VA Medi-
cal Center in Gainesville. He
was a native of Crawford, Geor-
gia and son to the late Ernest
James and Clara Pope Edwards.
Mr. Edwards was a veteran of
the United States Army serving
during World War II in the Euro-
pean Theatre. He retired in 1978
from the City of Lake Worth Fire
Department as a Captain with 25
years of service and then became
a painting contractor in the Lake
Worth area for 25 years. He was
of the Baptist faith and mem-
ber of the First Baptist Church
of Lake Worth and shared the
love of Jesus with everyone.
He enjoyed deer and duck hunt-
ing, was an avid outdoorsman
and loved his Labrador's. Mr.
Edwards was preceded in death
by his wife of 68 years, Mrs.
Oma Lee Edwards, in 2011.
Survivors include two sons


and daughter-in-laws, John and
Donna Edwards, West Palm
Beach and Danny and Suzanne
Edwards, Lake City, two sisters,
Renee Edwards, Paso Robles,
CA and Martha Rice, Lakeland,
FL, two granddaughters, Sta-
cey Brewster and Cherie Castle
and five great grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mr. Ed-
wards will be conducted on Sat-
urday, January 14, 2012 at 2:30
PM in the Chapel of Guerry
Funeral Home with Rev. John
Harrison officiating. Interment
will follow at Salem Primitive
Baptist Church Cemetery with
military honors. Visitation with
the family will be from 1:30 PM
to 2:30 PM, one hour prior to
the service on Saturday. Dona-
tions may be made in memory
of Mr. Edwards to the Lake
City Animal Hospital at 170
SW Professional Glen, Lake
City, FL 32025 for the benefit
of senior adults pets and flowers
will also be accepted. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of


GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME, Lake City. Please
sign the guestbook at www.
g u er ryfu neralhome. net

H. "Dwayne" Moates
Mr. H. "Dwayne" Moates, 50,
died unexpectedly at the Lake
Shore Shands Hospital Wednes-
day January
11, 2012 after
a sudden ill-
ness. He was
the son of the
late Martha
Fay Thomas
and Har-
old loates.
Dwayne had made Lake City
his home all of his life. He was
a member of the Elks Lodge,
Moose Lodge, and the Lake City
Bass Buster's fishing club. He
was of the Baptist faith and at-
tended the Deep Creek Advent
Christian Church. He enjoyed
fishing, bowling and watching
NASCAR racing, especially


the Earnhardt's, and he also en-
joyed the chickens and feathered
friends he raised with his wife.
He is survived by his wife of
eighteen years, Susie Simmons
Moates Lake City, FL; his father
Harold Moates (SueAnn) Lake
City, FL; two sons Dillon Pitts
(Shanna) Lake City, FL; Jared
Moates (Samantha) Worthing-
ton Springs, FL; two daughters
Stephanie Brown Lane (Jared)
Thomasville, GA; and Jenna
Moates, Lake City, FL; three
brothers Wade Moates ( Mary-
Ann) White Springs, FL; Scott
Moates ( Laura) Lake City, FL;
Curtis Moates(Nancy) Lake City,
FL; six grandchildren Kassidy,
Karis, and Kooper Lane, Skyler,
Jaylynn Moates and Kelee Pitts.
A host of nieces and nephews and
extended family also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Moates
will be conducted Monday Janu-
ary 16, 2012 at the Deep Creek
Advent Christian Church, with
Reverend Howard Thomas and
Michael Alvarez officiating.
Visitation with the family will


be held Sunday January 15,
2012 at the Deep Creek Com-
munity Center from 5 P.M. Un-
til 8 P.M. DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
is in charge of all arrangements.
458 South Marion Avenue Lake
City, FL. 32025. (386) 752-
1234. Please sign guess book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. com.

Johnny Edward Wood
Johnny Edward Wood, 72 of
Branford, Florida, passed away
January 10, 2012, at the V.A.
Medical Center of Lake City
following an extended illness.
Born February 24, 1939 in
Douglas, Ga., to the late J.W.
Wood and Thelma Jean Da-
vis Wood. He served in the
Navy during the Vietnam War.
He loved his family and en-
joyed fishing and traveling.
Mr. Wood was preceded in death
by one son Steve Wood and
his brother Howard L. Wood.


Survivors include one son Scott
Wood, of Alabama, three daugh-
ters; Tiffany Ann Wood, of Lake
Alfred, Fl., Susan Wood, of Ala-
bama, Sheryl Wood, ofAlabama,
one sister; Ola Ruth Isaac, of
Lake City, seven grandchildren,
eight nieces and nephews, five
great nephews, four great niec-
es and two great-great nieces.
A family memorial will be
held on Sunday, January 15,
2012 from 1:00 PM to 5:00
PM at the home of Ruth Isaac,
386-623-3546. Arrangements
are under the direction of
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 386-
752-1954, 3596 S.US Hwy
441. Please leave words love
and comfort for the family at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Columbia County Retired Wedding Expo
Edunctnrs meeting













PageEdior:EmoeneGraam,7540415 LAK CIY RPORER DVIE &COMIS STURAY.JANARY14,201


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Boyfriend tugs at heartstrings

from a very long distance


CATBERT: EVIL DIRECTOR 5
OF HUMAN RESOURCES IT'S NOT MY
FAULT. I WAS
MY BOSS DISCRIM- BORN THIS (AY.
INMATES AGAINST ME o
BECAUSE I'M SHORT,
BALD, AND NEAR-
SIGHTED.

E-m


DEAR ABBY: My boy-
friend, "Cole," and I have
been together since college
- several years now. We
have a loving relationship,
but the problem is distance.
My job sometimes requires
me to take short-term (two-
to five-month) contracts in
other cities and overseas.
Even though it is difficult
to be apart, I handle long-
distance relationships rela-
tively well while Cole does
not. This legan in college
when I studied abroad for
a semester. Cole tries to be
supportive and wants me to
be successful, but he takes
it personally when I have to
leave. For me, it's just about
a job, but Cole doesn't see it
that way.
I would support Cole
wherever and in what-
ever he needed. Although
it would be ideal to be
together all the time, I
realize that sometimes it
isn't possible. Am I being
selfish, or do we simply
need different things
out of a relationship? -
- GLOBE-TROTTER IN
DES MOINES.
DEAR GLOBE-
TROTTER: Are you being
selfish, or is Cole being
selfish? Are you willing to
give up a career.you have
prepared for and work in
so that he will no longer
suffer separation anxiety?
While your relationship
is a loving one, the two
of you have serious dif-
ferences, and you must
rationally decide which is


mother. We just want to
bring both families together.
Abby, your opinion, please.
- WELLMEANING DAD
ON THE EAST COAST
DEAR DAD: Its a shame.
that your son feels unable
to support you as you enter
this new phase of your life.
If he is offended at the.idea
that after nine years you
would want to remarry, the
problem is his. Do not make
it yours. I'm sure your late
wife would want your life
to be fulfilling. Ask your
daughter or a close friend
to stand up with you and
let nothing spoil your day.
You and Lucille have earned
your happiness. Bless you
both.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: Please tell
me the proper etiquette '
for gift-giving. My in-
laws often leave the price
tags on gifts, especially if
the gift was expensive. I
believe price tags should
be removed. Shouldn't a
gift come from the heart
and not be a monetary
statement? OFFENDED
IN WISCONSIN
DEAR OFFENDED: Yes,
it should. Leaving a price
tag on a gift iniplies that
the giver is also "giving"
the recipient a burden of
gratitude. And the burden of
gratitude can weigh so heav-
ily that it diminishes the
pleasure of receiving a gift
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): You'll be prone to
making impulsive deci-
sions that will be detrimen-
tal to your future. Don't let
anyone force:you out of a
position or convince you
to take on something that
is riddled with uncertainty.
Do your research. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll be in the right
place at the right time.
Your desire to help oth-
ers will bring you added
benefits. Travel if it will
help you develop or gain
knowledge imperative to
something you want to
accomplish. Expand your
horizons. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't get angry, get
moving. You have every-
thing to gain by keeping a
sound mind and an active
body. Your ability to adapt
to adversity will help you
bypass obstacles that
a competitor or jealous
acquaintance throws at
you.****-*
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Get whatever you
need to finish out of the
way. Complaints will be
voiced if you neglect your
chores or you aren't atten-
tive to the needs of others.
Avoid emotional outbursts
by being attentive and
focusing on love, romance
and family. **
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Spice things up. Do some-
thing unique. Venture into
unfamiliar territory. The
more you do to stimulate
your mind and to chal-
lenge yourself physically,
the better you will feel. Let
your heart lead the way
and you will reach per-
sonal goals. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't sit around wait-
ing for others to make
plans for you. Step up and
be the one to get things
started. Networking, travel
and interacting with people
who share your interests
will lead to an interesting
turn of events. Love is
highlighted. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Proceed with caution,
.especially with home and
family matters. An oppor-
tunity is likely to upset
someone you care about
Be diplomatic and gentle
in the way you handle
others to avoid unwanted
turmoil. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Share your experienc-
es with friends, relatives or
neighbors. What you learn
in the process will come in
handy when you want to
ask for favors. A plan you
have can expand your pro-
'fessional future. Love is in


the stars, and romance is
highlighted. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Get together with
peer or people Who can help
' you flush out amoneymak-
ing idea you want to pursue.
Getting a conservative view
will help you scale down and
perfect your strategy, helping
you find a successful way to
move forward. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Whatever you
touch will turn to gold.
Invest in you and your
property. A fortunate situ-
ation will develop that will
enhance your chance to
monopolize something you
have to offer. Share your
success with the ones you
love. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You will reach
your goal, slowly but
surely. A plan to alter your
residence will pay off and
aid you in getting some of
your other dreams, hopes
and wishes off the ground.
You'll gain greater secu-
rity and support by taking
action. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Tale care of your
physical and mental well-
being. Enhance your look
or take on a creative proj-
ect to boost your reputa-
tion or to win favors from
someone who can help
you get a dream off the
ground. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: F equals G
"JRZNRG KJR SG KNRYAXGRM VAML
J YWPP LGJX NY LJAH. SWM J
KNRYAXGRM SJPX OJR MLGHG'C
ZNWH XAJONRX AR MLG HNWFL."
- PJHHZ XJUAX

Previous Solution: "A novel is a static thing that one moves through; a play is a
dynamic thing that moves past one." Kenneth Tynan
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-14


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
more important to you.
After that, everything will
fall into place.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My wife
died nine years ago after
a long illness. We have a
son, a daughter and seven
grandchildren.
I met "Lucille" two
years ago at a basketball
game that involved both
our grandsons. Slowly, we
began dating. Lucille has
been a widow for many
years and has five chil-
dren. We are now engaged
and planning a wedding
for about 60 people after
Lucille retires next year.
We want to include our
families in the ceremony.
Lucille's two eldest sons
plan to give her away. Two
of her granddaughters will
be flower girls. I asked
my son to be my best man
and he refused. He said
he is happy for us and will
attend the wedding, but
he prefers not to stand up
for me. He feels it would
be disloyal to his mother's
memory. He is adamant
I never imagined my son
would act this way. I didn't
mean to offend him. I'm
not trying to replace his


HOROSCOPES


--


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY. JANUARY 14, 2012


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY. JANUARY 14. 2012

Lake City Reporter





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meant. Our office is located at 180
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Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
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appropriate headings. Copy should
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lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
Wvnvw.likecityreporter.conl


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY CIVIL DI-
VISION
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
Vs.
CHARLES FRANKLIN RUSH
AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
Case No. 12-2010-CA-000766
Division
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on Jan-
uary 5, 2012, in the Circuit Court of
Columbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Columbia
County, Florida described as:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
EAST QUARTER'(SE 1/4) OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER (NW
1/4) OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 6
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES
06'56" WEST ALONG THE
SOUTH LINE OF THE NW 1/4 A
DISTANCE OF 1127.83 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 88
DEGREES 06'56" WEST ALONG
SAID SOUTH LINE 210 FEET TO
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
SAID SE 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4;
THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREES
48'07" WEST ALONG THE WEST
LINE OF SAID SE 1/4 OF THE NW
1/4 A DISTANCE OF 315 FEET:
THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES
06'56" EAST 210 FEET; THENCE
SOUTH 1 DEGREES 48'07"
EAST, A DISTANCE OF 315 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN 1997 GRANT DOUBLE-
WIDE MOBILE HOME Mobile
VIN GAGMTD2156A &
GAGMTD2156B
and commonly known as: 656 SW
JUNCTION RD, FORT WHITE, FL
32038; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash. AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on Febru-
ary 8, 2012 at 11:00 a.m..
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 5th day of January, 2012..
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL

05530043
January 14, 21, 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.
12-2011-CP-000314-XXX-XX
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF NATHANIEL
THOMAS, SR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Nathaniel Thomas, Sr., deceased,
whose date of death was April 14,
2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for COLUMBIA County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemando Ave.,
#225, Lake City, FL 32055-4000.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE .AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is January 7, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ D. Craig Calley, Esq.
Attorney for Nathaniel Thomas, Jr.
Florida Bar No. 0990991
David Craig Calley, P.A.
2518 Park Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32204-4518
Telephone: (904)388-4567







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer. Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services


Legal

Fax: (904)388-3887
Personal Representative:
By:/s/ Nathanel Thomas. Jr.
250 NE Alpha Terrace
Lake City, Florida 32055

05529900
January 7. 14. 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2011-185CA
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
acting through the United States De-
partment of Agriculture, Rural De-
velopment, f/k/a Farmers Home Ad-
ministration, a/k/a Rural Housing
Service,
Plaintiff.
Vs.
KEVIN McGUFFY, heir and lineal
descendant of JOYCE A. BAILEY,
a/k/a JOYCE ANN BAILEY, De-
ceased; VICKI BANKS, heir and lin-
eal descendant of JOYCE A BAI-
LEY, a/k/a JOYCE ANN BAILEY,
Deceased; REBECCA DOLL, heir
and lineal descendant of JOYCE A.
BAILEY, a/k/a/ JOYCE ANN BAI-
LEY, Deceased; et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
TO; CAROLYN RIDGE, heir and
lineal descendent of LILLIAN M.
CLAYTON, a/k/a LILLIAN
LOUISE CLAYTON, Deceased,
whose last known address is 9098
Salmon Falls Drive, Sacramento, CA
95826; Any and all unknown minors,
heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees,
trustees, or other claimants by,
through, under, or against the Estate
of JOYCE A. BAILEY, a/k/a
JOYCE ANN BAILEY, Deceased;
and any and all unknown minors,
heirs, deviseaes, grantees, assignees,
trustees, or other claimants by,
through, under, or against the Estate
of LILLIAN M. CLAYTON, a/k/a
LILLIAN LOUISE CLAYTON, De-
ceased.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage regarding the
following property in COLUMBIA
County, Florida:
Lot 6, 341 Estates, a subdivision ac-
cording to plat thereof recorded in
Plat Book 6, Pages 34/34A, Public
Records of Columbia County, Flori-
da
Has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on:
FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., Es-
quire, Attorney for Plaintiff, Boswell
& Dunlap LLP, 245 South Central
Avenue, Post Office Drawer 30, Bar-
tow, FL 33831, within thirty (30)
days after the first publication of this
Notice of Action, and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court ei-
ther before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint or Petition.
DATED on this 6th day of January,
2012.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING A SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PARTIC-
IPATE IN TI-IS PROCEEDING
SHOULD CONTACT FREDERICK
J.MURPHY, JR., ESQUIRE; 245
SOUTH CENTRAL AVENUE,
BARTOW, FLORIDA 33830, TEL-
EPHONE (863) 533-7117, WITHIN
TWO. (2) WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NO-
TICE. IF HEARING IMPAIRED,
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, OR VOICE
(V) 1-800-955-8770, VIA FLORIDA
RELAY SERVICE.
P. DeWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY: -s- B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL

05530051
January 14, 21, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-418-CA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA
Plaintiff(s),
v.
PHILLIP A. HENDON and
CHRYSANNE HENDON, a/k/a/
CHRYSANNE C. HENDON, ET
AL,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-
ida, will on the 8th day of February,
2012 at 11:00 a.m. in the Columbia
County Courthouse, Courtroom 1,
173 N.E. Hemando Avenue, in the
City of Lake City, Florida 32055, of-
fer for sale and sell at public outcry
to the highest and best bidder for
cash, the following described proper-
ty situated in Columbia County,
Florida, to-wit:
Lot 89 of Callaway, Unit Three, ac-
cording to the plat thereof as record-
ed in Plat Book 7, Pages 145-146,
public records of Columbia County,
Florida.
Pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 11-418-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, this 6th day of
January. 2012.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
-s- B. Scippio


By: Deputy Clerk
SEAL
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA
c/o PAUL V. SMITH. ESQ.


Legal

P. O. BOX 2029
4705 U.S. Highv.ay 990 West
Lake City. FL 32056

05530052
January 14.21. 2012





020 Lost & Found

Found 2 puppies near
Birley and Pinemount.
Call 561 312-5620


REWARD: Lost Eclectus Parrot.
Vibrant green, silky feathers,
Male. price Creek Rd & Peacock.
386-961-9188

00 J10b
1 Opportunities

05530066
Food service
professionals wanted.
Experienced Banquet Cook
Dishwashers
Banquet Servers
Must have a positive attitude,
ability to work well with people,
eagerness to learn, dedication to
quality, and have an eye for
detail and a willingness
to do what ever it takes to get
the job done.
Background Check Mandatory.
Application available at
Camp Weed, 11057 Camp
Weed Place, Live Oak

23 Temporary Nursery Workers
Needed. Employer: Bluegrass
Nursery, Inc Shelbyville, KY.
Job duties include all horticulture
and nursery work activities &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/07/2012 09/07/2012.
12 Months of Verifiable Work
Experience Required. Wage of
$9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center or call 386-755-9026 and
reference job order #KY0442742.
BOOKKEEPER NEEDED
Must know Quickbooks and taxes.
Call 386-854-0511
For interview.
GENERAL OFFICE/
BOOKKEEPING
Must know QuickBooks &
Microsoft Programs. Punctual.
Please send resume: PO BOX 830,
Lake City, Florida 32056
MECHANIC for'busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid,
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


ACROSS
1 Bump on a
frog
5 V.J. employer
8 Retired
12 Pre-college
13 So!
14 Dry
watercourse
15 Prize fight
16 Arduous
18 Wild shrub
20 Moose kin.
21 Refrain
syllables
22 Jots down
25 Consumer
org.
28 Wine casks
29 "Dancing
Queen" band
33 On cloud nine
35 Sci-fi thriller
36 Composer
Anderson
37 Damaged by
hail
38 Freeway
clogger


120 Medical
120 Employment


Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills.
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume to: pta714@hotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resume to P.O. Box
805 Lake City, Florida 32056
Madison County
Memorial Hospital
Now Hiring:
RN's, Full Time and as needed
Full Time Environmental
Services Supervisor
Please contact Human Resources
(850)973-2271 ext. 1906

1







Lake City Reporter





Unscramble. these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


CMHUN |


@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. -
All Rights Reserved.

DOITI




,DDEEGH' _




WINNUD
~ L~- ^- ;
__ / 1_ \_ __ ^


5 Kiosk buy,
slangily
6 Danger
7 Bank features
8 Hole puncher
9 Kettle handle
10 Ms. Ferber


240 Schools &
240u Education

055208'30
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-01/23/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion. $800 next class-03/12/12

Continuing education
Fees incl books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament.superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

4 BURNER stainless steel
gas range. Less than
3 yrs old. $400.
386-205-7713

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


PR. FRANKENSTEIN PUT
A FAULTY BRAIN IN H5IS
MONSTER, BUT THE
MONSTER ---
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer. L I I 'KL


Yesterday's Jumbles:
y Answer:


39 German
industrial
region
41 Dirty place
42 Started a fire
45 Overhang
48 Basketball
hoop
49 Urbane
53 Sweet-
smelling
56 Picnic fare
57 Hill opposite
58 -Magnon
59 Numbers
game
60 Raines of
1940s films
61 Chick's
parent
62 Try to find


DOWN
Fly catchers
Diamond
surname
Baba au -
Powerful
magnate


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


(Answers Monday)
UTTER ANNOY MELLOW PURIFY
When they cast a co-star for Richard Gere,
they found a PRETTY WOMAN


Answer to Previous Puzzle


11 Excavates
17 Barely
make do
19 Quail family
23 Minuscule
amount
24 Ocean tang
25 Mr. Lugosi
26 Roquefort hue
27 SF transit
system
30 Bridle parts
31 Purple
vegetable
32 Capp or
Gump
34 Grabbed
35 Buenos -,
Argentina
37 Confidant
39 Tattle
40 Compliment
43 S&L offering
44 Twilight times
45 Valuable
figurine
46 Eurasian
range
47 Phone charge
50 Toward
shelter
51 Barn topper
52 Jedi ally
54 Drop
- line
55 Swindle


1-14 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


MU R FLIAINIA LON
G URU ELAN AVE
ACID DULC IMER



EDIOF URING
A ID EIDICIOE
EAIDIDIRN YA





LI ESDO WNIRIA L
UR L A VOIN IAS T


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


MMMI


BUY IT


SELL1


FINDT














LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY. JANUARY 14. 2012


402 Appliances
Whirlpool. side by side.
refrigerator. Black with ice maker.
water & ice dispenser.
S300. obo. 386-365-5173


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
S 100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

413 Musical
413 Merchandise
NEW Guitar Estaban,
Small Amp. Hard case. Stand.
S200.00
386-719-4819


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy'Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$300 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Church Yard Sale. Sat. 8-? 256
NW Carol Place. 90 W right on
Turner Rd., left on Carol P1. Fur-
niture, collectibles, clothes, more
MOVING SALE Fri & Sat.
8am-? 965 Savannah Cr.
Plantation S/D. Fum., bowflex,
books, clothes yard tools & more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Wed Sun. North 41 on Michelle
place. Just past 1-10. Look for
signs. Appliances, furniture, AC's,
and Much much more!!!


440 Miscellaneous

7000 WATT Troybilt generator
10,000 watt surge. new in 2011
$750.00 '
386-205-7713
BLUE OX Tow Bar.
Like new. Used 2 years.
$175.00
386-752-9645

4 0 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood

FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
30 ~ for Rent

2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
2BR DW
Secluded
$500mo
386-752-7887
3/2 SW MH on .5 acre lot of small
MHP. Superb Quality, Full Re-
model, 140 NW Reflections Gln.
Lake City, FL, No Pets. F, L&D
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec.' NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
2011 Blowout
4/2 Doublewide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61.900
Call 386-752-3743
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Beautiful Main-
tained DWMH. 5br/2ba on 1/2
acre. 12X24 workshop, fenced
.$105,000. MLS 77064
Hallmark Real Estate
4/3 DW w/14X76' porch on 5 ac.
in Ellisville area. 2 carports.
storage, fenced pasture. $99,900
#78295 Ginger Parker 365-2135
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of


Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72.500'623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH. .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 S120.000
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39.900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Beautiful. Brand new 4/2
manufac-
tured home on 5 acres in Lake
City. Fl. 9.900.00 down. S995.00
per month. Easy Qualifying*
Owner FinancingE"
Ready to move in. Call Today!!
512-663-0065.
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Mobile Home Dealer Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating Their Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
ThinklOutside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


Mobile Home
& Land

Affordable Lg. Home on 2 ac.,
being sold as is $59,900
MLS 74862 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473 ,
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618


705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710l Unfurnished Apt.
iv For Rent








2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2br/lba duplex, NW Georgia
Ave. Renovated & energy effi-
cient. Tile floors, W/D, $475/Mo.
$300 Dep. 386-755-1937
2BRl/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty de'p. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great


area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421


Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com


Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Great location W of 1-75. spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage. W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec. 386-315-2509 or 965-5560


Classified Department: 755-5440


75O Business &
75 Office Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately ll00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086. DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale

EASTSIDE VILLAGE
REALTY, INC.
MLS#76668 Buildable lot.
High and dry.
Call Denise @386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race. color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference. limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

Eastside Village Realty. Inc.
Rental in 55-- neighborhood.
2 bedroom/I bath Duplex across
from Clubhouse. No Pets.
Call Denise.(a 386-752-5290
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1. 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hswy 90.
386-754-1800 vw wwmvflapts.com
Move in Special from S199-S399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also. larg-
er 2/br. for S495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rinsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen. dining, living
room. S450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com -
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Rooms forRent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3/2 Brick Home, fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent w/option to
purchase available. 386-752-5035
X 3114 7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
4BR/2BA CH/A 1 miles
South of Kens BBQ on 245 (Price
Creek Rd). $700. mo $500 sec.
Ref. Req'd. 386-752-4597
4BR/2BA.
Lake Access.
$1,000 mo.
Call 386-752-3066
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
NICE 3BR/2.5BA in Russwood
S/D $995. mo. $750 security.
Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


iToIeY I
Vehicle Sold

Ca-ll


805 Lots for Sale
lay. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this ness spaper are av aila-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HLD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate
A home for all seasons. Lg patio,
fireplace. 4/2 brick & cedar.
Just reduced $20,000 #71691
Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Just Listed. 3/2 on a Terraced hill.
Brick w/fenced yard. All applian-
ces. Owner Financed offered.
#79683 Janet Creel 386-719-0382
3br/2ba DW. 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
In town, 3/2 Concrete Block home,
fenced yard. $149, 900
MLS 71999, Elaine Tolar
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D.-
$129,900 New AC in 2010.
Elaine K: Tolar. 755-6488
MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Wonderful home on Lake. 4/3
Fireplace, many upgrades. MLS
76085, Elaine Tolar 755-6488 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Close to town. 2br/2ba, wood lam-
inate floors. Vaulted ceilings.
MLS 76928 $59,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & Tidy remodeled 2/2 open
floor plan. MLS# 77943
$94,500 Mary Brown Whitehurst
386-965-0887
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473 ,
Results Realty. Beautiful lot.
on the Suwannee.
Well & anerobic septic system.
MLS 78842 $45,000
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/lst time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 365-5146
Callaway S/D, 3br/2ba. Well
maintained. Fenced back yard &
double car garage. $175,000
MLS 79567 Century 21, The
Darby Rogers Co. 752-6575.
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in
High Springs. Real wood floors,
stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
ivILS # 79601f $178,000 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Immaculate home on 10 + acres in
Wellborn. Tile floors, fenced, barn
w/workshop. $309, 900 MLS
79650, Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488'
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent neighborhood. 4br/2ba.
2469 sqft on 1 + acres. $190,000
MLS 79654, Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 5br/4ba Custom
kitchen, screened inground pool.
Many upgrades'on 5 ac. Many
extras. .$385,000. MLS 79688
COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence Vlg $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669


*
I


Corial Homes
t,' iIhui Rul t .- ]


810 Home for Sale
CYPRESS LANDING' 3BR/2BA
w;.g great room. split floor plan
& 2-car garage S105.000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. -55-5110 #79634
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
Realt\. Inc. 2 bedroom/2 bath.
1 car garage. Priced to sell.
Call Denise @ 386-752-5290

Contemporary Elegance.
MLS 79579 4br/3ba plush carpet
& so much more! S224.900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 8.3 acres.
Has 14x30 workshop with electric.
MLS 79345 $199,900

NICE 3BR/2BA DWMH w/fenced'
yard plus double carport &
wkshop S39,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
755-5110 #79078
ONLY $38,500 for 4BR/2BA
concrete block home; apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
brick home newly renovated &
inground pool, fenced yard
$69,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST! Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping $28,500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
-755-5110 #77505


820 Farms &
SAcreage

4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
20 ac Wooded tract.
10 m iles from Cedar Key.
MLS 78886, $70,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200


Lake City Reporter


Jasnirne
\ i rt i i, i .I:l tr
rh I, 1 r.c .

22- ;r,..llll,.,.,.;r r. .
Moe] How.
r' ie-Jd v-Frndai 1 2.I ,
SjI. 10-i
Sun l..-pm
'il Br,'an Z-cher
(38b6) 53-86i3


820 Farms &
S Acreage

Ov ner Financed land with only
S300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 ww w.\andnfl.com

830 Commercial
Property
Hallmark Real Estate
Rental Investment. 4 duplexes
(8 apartments) All units are rehted
and in good shape.
#69380 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate Camp-
ground/RV Park w/67 pull thrus.
cabins & mobile home. Showers.
clubhouse +2 story owner home.
#78793 Janet Creel 719-0382

86O Investment
Property
Great Investment in city limits.
Both units occupied.
MLS 79206 $50,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT INVESTMENT
2 units w/ 2br/lba, 2 stories
w/balconies. MLS 79271,
$230,000.. Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
78 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605












Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Saturday, January 14,2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page I OA


SCOREBOARD

TV.sports
Today
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour,. oburg
Open, third round, at Johannesburg (tape)
7 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Sony Open, third
round, at Honolulu
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
II a.m.
ESPN2 UCon% at Notre Dame
Noon
ESPN Kentucky atTennessee
I p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas at Missouri
2 p.m.
ESPN North Carolina at Florida St.
FSN UAB at Southern Miss.
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Oklahoma St. at Baylor
3:30 p.m.
CBS Oregon at Arizona
4p.m.
FSN Colorado at Stanford
NBCSP UNLV at San Diego St.
MOTORSPORTS
9:30 p.m.
SPEED AMA Supercross, at
Phoenix 1 m.
1:30a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally, Nasca to Pisco,
Peru delayedd tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
WGN -Toronto at Chicago
'FL FOOTBALL
4:30 p.m.
FOX NFC Divisional Playoffs, New
Orleans at San Francisco
8 p.m.
CBS -AFC Divisional Playoffs, Denver
at New England
NHL HOCKEY .
12:30 p.m.
NBC Chicago at Detroit
RUNNING
3 p.m.
NBC Olympic Marathon Trials, at
Houston (same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
Noon
FSN Oklahoma at Oklahoma St

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Divisional Playoffs
Today
N. Orleans at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m.
Denver at New England, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Houston at Baltimore, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Thursday's Games
Atlanta I II,Charlotte 81
Memphis 94, New York 83
Milwaukee 102, Detroit 93
Cleveland 101, Phoenix 90
Orlando 117, Golden State 109
Friday's Games
Detroit at Charlotte (n)
Indiana at Toronto (n)
Washington at Philadelphia (n)
Sacramento at Houston (n) .
Minnesota at New Orleans (n)
Chicago at Boston (n)
Milwaukee at D4s (n)
Portland at San Antonio (n)
New Jersey at Phoenix (n)
Cleveland at LA. Lakers (n)
Miami at Denver (n)
Today's Games
Minnesota at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boston at Indiana. 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8 p.m.
New York at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis. 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 9 p.m.
LA Lakers at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. I Syracuse vs. Providence, 6 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky at Tennessee, Noon
No. 3 North Carolina at Florida
State, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Baylor vs. Oklahoma State, 3
p.m.
No. 6 Michigan State at Northwestern.
3 p.m.
No. 9 Missouri vs.Texas, I p.m.
No. 10 Kansas vs. Iowa State, 4 p.m.
No. 12 UNLV at No. 22 San Diego
State. 4 p.m.
No. 13 Michigan at Iowa, I p.m.
No. 14 Louisville vs. DePaul. 4 p.m.
No. 15 Murray State vs. Tennessee
Tech, 6 p.m.
No. 17 Connecticut at Notre Dame,
II am.
No. 18 Kansas State at Oklahoma.
1:30 p.m.
No. 19 Florida at South Carolina,
7 p.m.
No. 20 Mississippi State vs. Alabama,
4 p.m.
No. 21 Gonzaga at Loyola Marymount,
8 p.m.
No. 25 Marquette vs. Pittsburgh,
2 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 5 Ohio State vs. No. 7 Indiana,
4:30 pm.
No. 8 Duke at Clemson, 6 p.m.
No. II Georgetown vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 23 Creighton vs. Southern Illinois,


7:05 p.m.


Senior night for

Fort White girls


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Lynce Stalnaker (2) launches the ball away from Columbia's Michaela Burton
(28) in a game on Dec. 6.


Lady Indians win
4-0, Boys fall 9-3
to Oak Hall.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE It was
senior night for Fort White
High girls soccer and the
Lady Indians spread the
wealth in a 4-0 win over Oak
Hall School.
The Lady Indians
(11-7-2) honored seniors
Deanna Hart, Rebecca
Onarati, Ali Wrench, Caitlin
Congi, Amy Mathews and
Virginia Vasquez.
Onarati and Wrench
scored goals. It was the first
of the season for Wrench
who came out of her goal-
keeper spot to play up
front.


The other goals were
scored by Kimmie Congi
and Alexa Hatcher.
The Lady Indians also
got assists from Kasey
Blanchard, Cheyenne
Patterson, Caitlin Congi
and Lync6 Stalnaker.
Fort White used the vic-
tory as a tune-up for the
start of the district tourna-
ment on Monday. The Lady
Indians play Newberry High
at 4 p.m. Santa Fe High is
hosting the tournament.
The boys trailed 5-0 at
halftime then scored three
goals after intermission.
Anthony Gonzalez scored
two goals and Colton Jones
also scored.
The Fort White boys
will hold their senior night
at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday
against Hamilton County
High.


Dunking district foe


CHS makes easy


work of Stanton


Prep, Yellow


Jackets up next


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High only
needed one quarter to take
control of Friday's district
contest against Stanton
Prep in a 66-47 win.
The Tigers jumped out
to a 24-7 lead as offen-
sive rebounds converted
into easy shots for
Columbia.
Laremy Tunsil grabbed
most of his nine rebounds
early, including three on
the offensive end to help
the Tigers get off to their
quick start. Tunsil finished
with eight points in the
game.
"What really helped us
was (Marcus) Amerson's
nine points in the first
half," Columbia.- head
coach Horace Jefferson
said. "Laremy was a beast
on the inside and we really
set a tone early."
Amerson finished with
14 points in the contest.


FROM THE SIDELINE








Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinlj)tloake'tyreporter.com

IAt this point in
time can you
turn anywhere
without
hearing
something you don't
already know about Tim
Tebow?
Well, here's your
chance.
Ifts a long shot, but
Tebow could become the
first person in history to
accomplish this feat.
Tebow has already
claimed championships in
high school and college.
The Jacksonville
product claimed a state
championship during his


Tre Simmons had 11
points as the only other
Tiger in double figures.
Nigel Atkinson scored
seven, Taylor Veins had
six, Javonta6 Foster had
five and Monte Tisdale
had four points.
Wayne Broom and
David Morse each scored
three points. Broom added
seven rebounds all com-
ing in the fourth quarter.
Shaq Johnson had two
points.
The Tigers (14-3, 6-0)
welcome in St. Augustine
High at 6:30 p.m. tonight.
Columbia looks to stay
on top,, of the district
againstfthe one-loss Yellow
Jackets.
'Tonight was a game
we were supposed to win,"
Jefferson said. "We're the
king of the mountain right
now. Everyone else is com-
ing to knock us off. It's
our job to make sure that
we keep defending the
mountain."


# JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Javontae Foster (5) plays defense against a Robert E. Lee player on Dec. 9.


Tebow could be first


senior season at Nease
under former Columbia
High coach Craig Howard
before his time with the
Tigers.
At Florida, Tehow
captured two national
titles. He also won a
Heisman Trophy.
One championship is
still his for the taking. Hell
have a tough road leading
his team to the finish line
with the New England
Patriots next up.
If Tebow can guide
the Broncos to three
more wins, however, he
will be the first person
in history to win a state
championship, national
championship, Heisman
Trophy and Super Bowl
Championship.
Four players have won
national titles, a Heisman
Trophy and Super Bowl
ring.


Tony Dorsett was the
first to complete the task
with the Dallas Cowboys
in 1977. He was the first
player to win a national
championship one year
and follow it up with a
Super Bowl.
Marcus Allen completed
the task with the Los
Angeles Raiders as he
broke off the longest run
in Super Bowl history
in 1984 with a 74-yard
scamper against the
Washington Redskins.
Allen's record would
hold until Willy Parker
broke it by a single yard
with the Pittsburgh
Steelers in Super Bowl XL.
In recent years, two
more players were added
to the prestigious club.
Reggie Bush joined with
the New Orleans Saints
two years ago as part of
their magical run.


Just last year Charles
Woodson became the first
player on the defensive
side of the ball to join the
club. Woodson won the
Heisman as a defensive
back over Peyton Manning
in 1997 at Michigan during
his senior season.
But after a little
research, it looks like
Tebow could be the first to
add state champion to that
list of accomplishments.
Many think he's
already received divine
intervention during his
playoff run.
There are more than a
few bizarre instances to
show that he could have
God on his side.
Last week marked the
three-year anniversary
of wearing eye black
on his face against the
University of Oklahoma in
the national championship


game that pointed out one
of the Bible's most famous
verses.
The verse was John 3:16.
Is it coincidence or divine
intervention that Tebow's
316 passing yards came
three years to the date of
Tebow honoring God?
In my belief, God has
more important things
to worry about than the
outcome of a football
game, but if Tebow's
success brings more to his
faith, could God be helping
Tebow?
To become the first
to accomplish the
championship (and
Heisman) feat on three
levels, Tebow might could
use a little help from the
man upstairs.

Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


I" '