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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01750
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 13, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01750
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text









*HST P 22


I


Reporter


Friday, January 13, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 295 E 75 cents





Lake City market survives cut


Food Lion will
remain open
as Harveys.


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. corn
The international corpo-
ration that owns the Food
Lion supermarket chain is
closing 113 underperform-
ing stores, including all its
Florida locations.
But as soon as the Food
Lion sign is removed at the
Lake City location on U.S.
90 west of Interstate 75, a
new sign will be erected
and the store will be con-
verted to a Harveys, one
of the other supermarket
chains owned by Delhaize
America.
The store's conversion
from Food Lion to Harveys
will begin immediately,
according to a corporate
statement.
The Lake City store is
the only one in Florida
selected to remain open
as a Harveys. All other


Food Lion stores in the
state, including 20 in the
Jacksonville area, will
close permanently within
30 days, according to a
corporate release.
Delhaize American, a
Belgium-based corpora-
tion, operates more than
1,600 stores in 16 eastern
states under the names
Bottom Dollar Food, Food
Lion, Harveys, Hannaford
Supermarkets, Reid's and
Sweetbay.
The move to close' 113
stores will cost an estimat-
ed 4,900 employees their
jobs. The company will
provide severance to eli-
gible employees and work
with government officials
to assist with transition
support. Employees are
also encouraged to apply
for open positions within
the company.
Employees at the Food
Lion in Lake City said
Thursday that they were
not authorized to comment
about the store closings or
why their store was cho-
sen to continue operating JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
FOOD UON continued on 3A Although Food Lion in Florida will be soon be closed, the Lake City store will remain open under a new name Harveys.


Florida

falls in

school

ranking

State drops from
5th to llth amid
spending cuts.

By CHRISTINE ARMARIO
Associated Press
MIAMI After years
of soaring toward the top,
Florida fell from fifth to
11th in a nationwide educa-
tion ranking, a drop driven
largely by weaker student
performance and spending
cuts.
Education Week's annual
"Quality Counts" report
gave the state a C-plus over-
all, down from a B-minus
the year before. The study
grades states based on six
indicators, including K-12
achievement, standards,
assessment and account-
ability, and school finance.
The nationwide average
was a C.
The .biggest drops in
Florida were seen in ele-
mentary and secondary
education performance,
where the state's score
declined in all three areas
measured achievement
levels, gains and the pov-
erty gap. Thirty-seven
percent of fourth graders
scored as proficient in math
on the National Assessment
of Educational Progress in
2011, three points lower than
the previous year, bringing
the state's ranking from 26
down to 33. Meanwhile, the
gap between low-income
and more affluent students
grew.
Florida's overall academ-
ic achievement score fell by
more than 5 points, a bigger
decline than in other states.
State education spending
also got poor marks, going
from an A last year to a D-plus
in the 2012 report Nearly 98
percent of students in Florida
SCHOOLS continued on 3A
con iue o


Weekend events honor

Martin Luther King Jr.


FILE
Members of the Compassion Love Center Choir perform a
musical selection last year during the MLK celebration ser-
vice at New Mt. Pisgah AME Church.


Monday is the official observance of
the 83rd birthday of the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. However, events are
planned throughout the weekend.

Today, Jan. 13
SMLKJr. ceremony 11 a.m. at the Lake
City VA Medical Center auditorium.
Keynote speaker is Kevin W. Thorpe,
senior pastor at Faith Missionary Baptist
Church.

Sunday, Jan. 15
28th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Observance Program 4 p.m. at Trinity
United Methodist Church, 248 NE MLK
St.
Hosted by Columbia County NAACP
Branch -
Speaker is Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City

Monday, Jan. 16
Public schools, government offices and
banks are closed.


Grand Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Parade
Line-up is a 9 am. at the DOT office, 1109
South Marion Ave.
Parade starts at10 a.m.
Organized by Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
Call (386)365-1470 for details and partici-
pation.

MLK.Worship Service
12:30 p.m. at New Bethel Baptist Church,
550 NE MLK St
Speaker is Bishop Ron Williams II H
Call (386)344-9915 for information.

MLK Classic
3 p.m. at Lake City Middle School
Basketball game between Columbia High
School and Suwannee High School alumni.
Call (386)754-7095 for information.

Battle of the Classes
Noon at Annie Mattox Park, flag football
tournament for former CHS players.


POLICE



Citizen thwarts alleged thief


Pinellas Park man accused
of stealing quarters from
apartment's laundry.


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A concerned citizen played a key role in-the
Wednesday morning arrest of a Pinellas Park
man accused of stealing money from washers
and dryers at a local, apartment complex.
Jared K. Joiner, 21, 4065 N. 69th Ave.,
Pinellas Park, was arrested and charged with
larceny, possession of a controlled substance
without a prescription, burglary of an unoc-
cupied structure, possession of drug para-
phernalia and possession of burglary tools.
He was booked into the Columbia County
Detention Facility on $17,000 bond.
According to Columbia County Sheriff's
Office reports, around 7:30 p.m. Tuesday,


41


deputy William Busby
was dispatched to Sundial i
Apartments in reference to
a suspicious person. Upon
arrival Busby spoke to a citi-
zen who said he saw an unfa-
miliar man and woman in the
apartment complex laundry
room and the man kept walk-
ing from the laundry room to
his vehicle and back. Joiner
The citizen, who said the
man appeared to be trying
to break into a dryer and steal quarters, was
able to give Busby a description and license
plate number of the vehicle the suspect was
driving.
Another deputy spotted the vehicle at a local
convenience store and identified the vehicle's
driver as Joiner.
Joiner told the deputy he was at the Sundial
Apartments with his girlfriend washing and
drying some clothes. Joiner told authorities
that he did not live in the Sundial Apartments.
'. "'--'--- ... :--- ." r-- 7." -- "'- 1..;. ._ ." __.- ZZ "


Opinion ......
People...
Obicu3ries
Ad,\ce & Comics
Puzzles


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5A
4B
2B


A database search revealed Joiner's license
was suspended, reports say. Joiner gave the
deputy permission to search his vehicle and
the deputy found a gold and silver case hid-
den inside the vehicle's passenger door. The
case reportedly contained tools used to pick
locks. The deputy reported finding other bur-
glary tools in the vehicle, as well as a beanie
hat with a large number of quarters.
When the deputy searched the vehicle's
trunk, he reportedly found a syringe under
the spare tire and a spoon containing an
unknown residue.
Joiner said the items belonged to him and
was then taken into custody. Authorities
then spoke to a Sundial Apartment employ-
ee who checked eight of the machines,
four of which were empty. She said all the
machines should contain around the same
number of quarters.
After he was read his Miranda rights,
Joiner reportedly told the deputies that he
bought the lock picking kit on-line and it
came with a DVD on how to pick locks.
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TODAY IN
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COMING
SATURDAY
Loc:al rie.-.
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(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER: Partly Cloudy
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, JANUARY 13. 2012
Celebrity Birthdays
Celebrity Birthdavs


FLORIDA0
0r0o Wednesday:
11-26-36-45-46-62
x4


.AntH 3. Thursday:
%\ j Afternoon: 9-5-7


.4E Thursday:
Aftemoon: 5-6-8-1


Wednesday:
3-7-8-12-30


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Scorsese documentary nominated


NEW YORK Martin Scorsese
isn't just nominated for a Directors
Guild Award for "Hugo," but also
for his documentary "George
Harrison: Living in the Material
World."
The Directors Guild of America
announced its documentary nomi-
nees for the 64th annual Directors
Guild Awards on Thursday.
Also nominated
are Steve James for
the Chicago anti-vi-
olence documentary
"The Interrupters";
Joe Berlinger and
Bruce Sinofsky for
the West Memphis
Three documentary
"Paradise Lost 3: Scorsese
Purgatory"; James
Marsh for the chimpanzee rearing
film "Project Nim"; and Richard
Press for the fashion photographer
documentary "Bill Cunningham
New York."
Two of the selections "The
Interrupters" and "George
Harrison" were not among the
Oscars' documentary short list of
15, from which it chooses five.
On Thursday, the academy
announced that it has overhauled its
often criticized documentary selec-
tion process. Beginning next year,
the entire documentary branch
within the academy will be able to
vote on nominees, rather than just a
selection committee.

2 bands, celebrity chef
highlight Bowl bash
INDIANAPOLIS Jane's
Addiction and The Roots will head-
line the third Rock & Roll Super
SBowl Fan Tailgate Party on Feb. 5 in
Indianapolis.
Rolling Stone magazine


announced the acts Thursday.
Music begins at 1 p.m., a little
more than five hours before the
Super Bowl kickoff.
Jane's Addiction, an alternative
rock band, has sold more seven
million records in the U.S. since
forming in 1985. Hip-hop artists The
Roots are the house band on "Late
Night with Jimmy Fallen," which
will broadcast from Indianapolis that
week.
Peter Wentz, the bassist for
Grammy-nominated band Fall Out
Boy, will be the disc jockey, and
celebrity chef John Besh will cook
food.


Van Halen gives guitars
to L.A.-area schools
LOS ANGELES Rocker Eddie Van
Halen has donated 75 electric guitars
to Los Angeles-area high schools as a
way to inspire music in kids.
Tricia Steel of the Mr. Holland's
Opus Foundation says the Van Halen
lead-guitarist came with the brand-new
guitars this week, saying he wanted
them used in schools and not sold.
The non-profit Los Angeles foun-
dation has distributed the guitars to
seven schools serving mostly low-
income students that needed them to
replace broken instruments or build
music enrollment


Ringtone halts N.Y.
Philharmonic Orchestra Moyers returning to TV
..-.- L ....I 1-.-- --L ....


NEW YORK It's the dreaded
sound at any live performance a
ringing cellphone.
That's what happened Tuesday
night at Lincoln Center's Avery
Fisher Hall during the final move-
ment of Gustav Mahler's Ninth
Symphony by the New York
Philharmonic.
Music Director Alan Gilbert
stopped the.orchestra until the
phone was silenced.
When the iPhone's ringtone
initially went off, the conductor
turned his head to signal his dis-
pleasure. But the ringing from the
first row persisted.
Gilbert asked that the offend-
ing noise be turned off and finally
stopped the orchestra until it was.
Betsy Vorce, speaking for
Lincoln Center, says an announce-
ment is made before every perfor-
mance telling audience members
to turn off their phones. If a device
does go off, ushers are directed to
discreetly ask the owner to turn it
off.


wiTn weeKly snOW
NEW YORK Wearing what is
meant to be a sheepish smile, Bill
Moyers greets. a reporter by acknowl-
edging that, yes, twice before just
in the past decade, he has launched
a much-acclaimed public affairs TV
series, then called it quits, profess-
ing to be done with television only
to launch yet another such show a
couple of years later.
He is doing it again. At age 77, this
self-proclaimed "citizen journalist"
re-engages with his audience when
"Moyers & Company" premieres on
public television stations across the
country this weekend (check listings
for time, day and channel).
This brand-new weekly hour prom-
ises to be no less important, thought-
ful and far-flung in its interests than
his past TV projects; addressing
subjects that range from politics to
poetry, and with a nuanced approach
that defies the polarization endemic
to most TV interview programs.
(AP)


Actress Frances
Sternhagen is 82.
TV personality Nick
Clooney is 78.
Comedian Rip Taylor
is 78.
Actress Julia Louis-
Dreyfus is 51.


Country singer Trace
Adkins is 50.
Actress Penelope Ann
Miller is 48.
Actor Patrick
Dempsey is 46.
Actor Orlando Bloom
is 35.


Daily Scrioture


"So in Christ Jesus you are all
children of God through faith,
for all of you who were bap-
tized into Christ have clothed
yourselves with Christ. There is
neither Jew nor Gentile, neither
slave nor free, nor is there male
and female, for you are all one
in Christ Jesus."

-Galatians 3:26-28 NIV


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number.......(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Cirbulaton ...............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
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(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks-.............. $26.32
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
aexecutive,,pditor..C Qrretions and clarifications will run in this
space.And thanks a..readingi, j ...


Timeshare mogul
sues Sundance
ORLANDO A Florida
timeshare mogul who com-
missioned the building of
one of the largest homes in
America is suing filmmak-
ers and the Sundance Film
Festival over materials used
to promote a documentary
about his family's struggle
to construct the 90,000-
square-foot mansion during
the recent economic crisis.
David Siegel says in a
lawsuit filed in Orlando
federal court Tuesday that
press releases used to
promote the documentary,
"The Queen of Versailles,"
are defamatory. Siegel says
the false statements claim
his timeshare empire col-
lapsed, his mansion is in
foreclosure and that he and
his wife, Jackie, have expe-
rienced a "rags-to-riches-to-
rags story."
Siegel says none of that '
is true. The documentary's
filmmakers had no com-
ment, and a Sundance
spokeswoman didn't return
a call.

'Caylee's Law' bill
passes panel
TALIAHASSEE A
bill inspired by-the Caylee
Anthony case is advancing
in the Florida Legislature,
just don't call it "Caylee's
Law."
The Senate Criminal
Justice Committee on
Thursday unanimously
approved the measure that
would make it a felony to
knowingly and willingly
give police false informa-
tion about a missing child
16 or under who dies or
is seriously injured. The
maximum penalty would be
five years in prison for each
false statement.
Sen. Joe Negron,
R-Stuart, said his bill
would avoid unintended
consequences that could
result from most of at
least eight other measures


filed in response to Casey
Anthony's acquittal of mur-
dering Caylee, her 2-year-
old daughter, in Orlando.
Most of those bills would.
set deadlines for parents to
report missing or deceased
children
Negron, though, won't
even mention the toddler
or her mother. He simply
refers to Caylee's death as
"the Orlando case."
The bill would make
"Florida a safer place
for children everywhere
unrelated to any particular
case," Negron said. He
acknowledged, though, it
grew out of the verdict that
stirred anger and resent-
ment among many in the
public and Legislature who
disagreed with it.
The bill (SB 858) was
drafted by a select com-
mittee on child safety
chaired by Negron that
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island, appointed shortly
after Anthony's acquittal.
She was convicted, though,
on four counts of giving
police false information
and sentenced to the maxi-
mum under current law of
one year for each offense.
Anthony served the sen-
tence while in jail awaiting
her murder trial.
Under Negron's bill she
could have received up to
20 years.

Quake anniversary
creates concerns
On the surface, Ernst
Leo rebuilt a life devastated
by Haiti's earthquake tto
years ago.
He lives in a small North
Miami apartment with
his daughter, 9-year-old
Therissa. She lost part
of her right arm when it
was pinned for nearly two
days in the rubble that
entombed her mother and
older sister, and now she is
writing left-handed. After a
few months of unemploy-
ment, Leo recently started


a new pharmacy job. He is
also taking English classes.
But there's a pain
around his heart, and
doctors are running tests
to see what's behind his
high blood pressure. Leo,
36, worries about causing
more stress for Therissa,
who tells him she's still
not ready to talk about her
mother's death.
"You can see I can
smile," Leo says, "but
inside is very bad."
Leo is hoping to find a
job with insurance that will
allow him and his daughter
to get mental health care.
"The important thing is
to survive and have some
stability in this country,
study to get a good job and
pay for a house, that kind
of thing," he said.
The ongoing struggles
of thousands of earthquake
survivors who came to the
U.S. for medical care after
the Jan. 12, 2010, earth-
quake led about a dozen
groups to make recommen-
dations about how to better
respond should Haiti be
struck again by a disaster.
Suggestions include per-
manent housing options,
job training and mental
health care.

Plant opponents
voice worries
CRYSTAL RIVER -
Opponents bf the two
nuclear reactors proposed
for west-central Florida say
the units could upset the
balance of the rural area's
delicate water system.
A panel of three adminis-
trative judges heard public
comment on the issue
Thursday in Crystal River.
The hearing was triggered
by a legal challenge to
Progress Energy's plans
to build the electricity-
generating reactors about
10 miles northeast of an
existing nuclear plant in
Crystal River about 90
miles north of Tampa.
(AP)


THE WEATHER

A .' ~ .Y ~ .

PARTLY MOSTLY SUNNY MOSTLY ISO.
CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY SHOWERS
:. I lATE

SHIi LO HI LO .: HI LO 2 H168 L043 HI 73L52
..--e ., -- HL ,:.LO-- 1.4- I


1Tallahassee
53 28
SPensacola 0
52/34 Panama City
52'35


* Vdosta City
52127 iCity
52127 acksonvie Cape Canaveral
Lake City, 55/33 Daytona Beach
551 28 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
56/30 58e3' Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
'57 3- Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
60 43 61/42 Lake ty
Miami
Tampa Naples
61/41 West Palm Beach Ocala
70 50 Orlando
S FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 70/51 0 Pensacola
68'45 Maples Tallahassee
70, 50 Miami Tampa
741/54 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
7,1 uF


Saturday
61. 41, pc
59'38/s
69 52 pc
67. 40. s
58/31/pc
57; 35 s
70 '6 p.:
58,29/pc
70 54 pc
67 4tI pc
59,32/pc
60 42 .
57 42 s
5i7,40/s
64 37 :
56'32..pc
67 5') p,


Sunday
66. 5, .
64,42's
73 53 S
70. 44 s
64/33's
60 39 ,
;I 60 pc
64/32.'s
73 54 i
;0 49 s
64. 36' s
65 46 s
6.2 42 .
61.41, 's
62 33 3
67 40
62.'33..s
70 51 s


(4 *4 b,
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TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


89
50
66
42
83 in 1993
18 in 1982


0.00"
0.08"
0.08"
1.27"
1.27"


;73 lp 7p la 6a
Friday Saturday







,- rFrecastedtemerate 'Feesie"tempratr


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:28 a.m.
5:51 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:51 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 10:35 p.m.
Moonset today 10:05 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 11:39 p.m.
Moonset tom. 10:41 a.m.

(30C0
Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb.
16 23 30 7
Last New First Full


On this date in
1988, winds
along a cold fror
gusted to 63 mp
at Rochester, Ne
York. Snow, slee
and wind gusts
62 mph were als
seen in Buffalo,
New York.


5
MODOBIE
30niutes bhn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


I weatner.com


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY. JANUARY 13. 2012 3A


FOOD UON: Lake City

market survives cut ' :

Continued From Page 1A


under a new name.
Corporate spokeswom-
an Tenisha Waldo said
the Lake City store will
remain open because it
fits with the chain's oper-
ating philosophy of being
a hometown grocery. The
big difference will be an
expanded fresh produce
department and bakery,
Waldo said.
"Harveys is a home-
town grocer," she said.
"Customers will be able to
get the same products at
Harveys as they could at
Food Lion."
Waldo said all of the
employees or managers at
the Lake City store will
keep their jobs. Each store
typically employs 35 to 40
people, according to a cor-
porate news release.
Business owners at
the shopping center next
to the Food Lion store
expressed relief when they
learned the supermarket


will remain open, even if
it's under a new name.
Andy Tong, owner of
Happy Nails #2 next to the
Food Lion store, said if
the supermarket closed
it would have hurt every
business operating at the
strip mall.
"I think it would hurt
a lot if Food Lion closed
because this is the only
traffic we get," Tong said.
"If Food Lion closed, this
store would close, then the
next store would be closed
and we'd lose the whole
plaza."
Dean Jarvenpaa, assis-
tant manager at the Family
Dollar store next to Happy
Nails #2, said he was
relieved when he learned a
supermarket will continue
as the strip mall's anchor
store.
"I think it would have
hurt our business tremen-
dously," he said. "I actually
shop over there a lot."


SCHOOLS: Florida falls

in national ranking

Continued From Page 1A


attend school in districts
where per pupil spending
is less than the nationwide
average. Those numbers are
based on 2009 figures, and
education spending has only
declined in the years since.
"You see a spending pic-
ture that is really of concern
to those interested in public
education in Florida," said
Sterling Lloyd, project man-
ager for "Quality Counts."
Lawmakers in Florida cut
education spending last year
by $1.35 billion, or nearly
8 percent This year Gov.
Rick Scott's recommended
budget includes a $1 billion
increase.
"Florida's education sys-
tem ranks among the best
in the nation, but we still face
some challenges," Scott said
in a statement "I'm confident
we will continue to improve."
Education Commissioner
Gerard Robinson said results
from any additional spending
won't show up immediately
but will be a factor in future
success.
'We know that our edu-
cational system has been
strained by the economic
downturn," Robinson said.
Florida did receive praise
for its standards, assessment
and accountability practices,
which include rating school
performance, sanctioning
those schools with the low-
est achievement levels and
providing them assistance.
The state was given an A
in this category and ranked
fifth nationwide.
The discordant results
- strong accountability but
weak student performance
- show how complicated it
is to improve achievement,
Lloyd said.
"What it really tells us is
that student achievement is
not driven by a particular set
of policy but affected by a
range of factors," he said. "It


helps to have strong account-
ability policies, but you have
to have a system that is func-
tioning well as a whole."
Nationwide, Maryland was
ranked first for the fourth
year in a row, followed by
Massachusetts, New York
and Virginia.
Florida's performance in
the nationwide rankings had
improved dramatically in
recent years and the drop is
likely to bring new questions
into the ongoing debate about
how to boost student perfor-
mance. Lawmakers approved
sweeping changes last year,
getting rid of tenure for new
teachers and creating a new
teacher evaluation system ihat
heavily depends on student
test scores.
"Last year Florida was rec-
ognized for its historic climb
from 31st to fifth place in
just four years," said Patricia
Levesque, executive director
ofthe Foundationfor Florida's
Future, which is chaired
by former Florida Gov. Jeb
Bush. "But this year's lower
ranking is a reminder that
success is never final, and
reform is never finished."
The "Quality Counts"
report also looked at how
the nation's education per-
formance compares interna-
tionally, a subject of increas-
ing concern in Washington
as studies show U.S. student
achievement flagging while
other countries advance
more rapidly.
"Despite some bright
spots over the years,
Americans remain rightly
concerned that the nation's
pace of improvement is
simply too slow, at a time
when our global peers and
competitors may be rocket-
ing ahead," said Christopher
B. Swanson, vice president
of Editorial Projects in
Education, which publishes
Education Week.


Area band to perform

Suwannee concert


LIVE OAK- McKinley and
Beggs, a country duo get-
ting rave reviews through-
out Florida and Georgia,
will headline at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park
Saturday.
This country duo com-
bines the songwriting,
singing and talent of both
Ronny McKinley of Lake
City and formerly of Live
Oak along with Jody Beggs
of Gainesville. Both have
lived in Nashville, Tenn.
and worked for and written
with the legendary Hank
Cochran.
McKinley and Beggs have
been recently referred to
as a "superstar duo," "pure
grassroots country" and
compared to Brooks and
Dunn in media reports on
their performances. Florida


Magazine rated McKinley
and Beggs one of the top
three entertaining bands
that originated from Florida.
Accompanying McKinley
and Beggs is their band,
The Florida Crackers.
Taking the stage Friday
night to kick the weekend
into high gear is the Justin
Case Band, the local group
that has taken North Florida
by storm with country and
Southern rock music.
The Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park is
located at 3076 95th Drive
4.5 miles north of Live Oak
off US 129 at the Suwannee
River. The park is 4.5 miles
south of Interstate 75 and
4.5 miles north of Interstate
10 off US 129. Keep an eye
out for the SOSMP sign and
white painted board fence.


- |.. \ .-. - .










ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney waves after a campaign stop in West Palm Beach on Thursday.



Romney, Paul court state's voters


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE --The Florida
presidential primary is on.
SVoting is already well under way
even though Florida doesn't hold its
GOP nominating contest until Jan.
31. And both Mitt Romney, coming
off of back-to-back victories in Iowa
and New Hampshire, and Ron Paul
are aggressively reaching out to vot-
ers who have requested ballots.
None of their competitors has been
nearly as active even though the vic-
tor in Florida would get a huge boost
of momentum and all of the state's 50
delegates to the national nominating
convention.
As of Tuesday, 424,000 Republican
absentee ballots had been mailed
- to military personnel, overseas


residents and other Floridians -
and about 84,000 had been returned
in a state that has 4 million regis-
tered Republican voters. Early vot-
ing in Hillsborough, Hardy, Hendry,
Monroe and Collier counties begins
Monday and runs through Jan. 29.
Florida's other 62 counties will hold
early voting Jan. 21-28.
Republican insiders expect as
many as a third of the GOP ballots to
be cast early in the effort to choose a
nominee to oppose President Barack
Obama.
"It's pointing towards record turn-
out," said state GOP spokesman Brian
Hughes, adding that the number of
Republican absentee ballots request-
ed is more than 200,000 ahead of the
2008 pace at the same point before
the election. "We're seeing an enthu-
siasm not only around being involved


in picking our nominee, but beyond
that, making sure we beat Obama."
Of all the candidates, Romney had
the biggest jump on early voters,
who started receiving ballots before
he notched his first win at the Jan. 3
Iowa caucuses.
The former Massachusetts gover-
nor's campaign is better organized in
Florida than any other. And it imme-
diately sent out literature to court
voters as soon as ballots were sent in
December. That meant some people
opened their mailboxes to find both a
ballot and an appeal frbm Romney.
At the same time, an outside group
supportive of Romney the Restore
Our Future super PAC went on the
.ait with TV ads backing him in mid-
December, the ads timed to coincide
with the delivery of ballots. It has spent
more than $750,000 on TV ads.


Experts predict modest Florida growth


By GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE State
economists expect modest
growth in tax collections in
the coming year.
Preliminary estimates
Thursday show economists
expect state taxes to grow
in the next 18 months,.but
not enough to make a large
dent in the state's nearly $2
billion budget shortfall.
"I wouldn't expect it to
help the Legislature in hav-
ing a lot of new money," said
Amy Baker, coordinator of
the Office of Economic and
Demographic Research.
Economists will meet all

r JA








-

t."


day to come up with a final
figure. State lawmakers will
use the estimates to draw up
a new budget
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos, however, has
suggested that legislators
may want to wait until later in
the year before starting work
on the budget
The state's fiscal year
starts July 1 and usually leg-
islators wait until early May
before passing the annual


budget Lawmakers started
their annual session early
this year in, order to deal
with the once-a-decade"job
of drawing new maps for
congressional and legislative
districts.
Sen. Jack Latvala,
R-Clearwater, said many sen-
ators agree with Haridopolos
about postponing any work
on the budget until later in
the year.
That attitude has not


been shared by leading
House Republicans who
say, there's no reason that
ulegislitdrs can't finish all
their work within their nor-
mal 60-day calendar.
House Speaker Dean
Cannon, R-Winter Park, said
that getting the budget done
will help send the right mes-
sage to Floridians.
Gov. Rick Scott also said
he would like to see legisla-
tors finish on time.


SAccepting New Patients
Specializing in aduit medical care including:
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-.... V- .b* Women's Health Loss System


Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation







NOTICE OF MEETING CANCELLATION

FOR THE JANUARY 17, 2012 CITY COUNCIL MEETING.


THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
WILL NOT MEET ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2012 AT 7:00
P.M. THE NEXT MEETING WILL BE HELD ON MONDAY,
JANUARY 23, 2012 AT 7:00 PM IN THE CITY COUNCIL
CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY
HALL, 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.


AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk















OPINION


Friday, january 13, 2012


ANOHE


ONE
OPINION


Fewer

young

Americans

interested

in driving

Here's an alarming
development that
strikes at the heart
of American values:
Young Americans
are less and less interested in
driving and cars.
This indifference among the
age group 16 to 29 has auto-
makers worried. "Many of their
potential customers couldn't
care less about owning a car in
the first place," report the trend
watchers at The Wall Street
Journal.
According to a 2011
University of Michigan study
cited by the Journal, less than
a third of 16-year-olds had driv-
er's licenses in 2008 compared
to nearly half 25 years ago. And
the figures are only moderately
less grim ivith age: less than
two-thirds of 18-year-olds had
licenses in 2008 compared to 80
percent in 1983.
What's the matter with these
kids? Getting one's learner's
permit used to be a life land-
mark along with going to col-
lege, getting married, having
a baby and receiving that first
Social Security check. Earlier
generations are appalled.
Cars aren't so much dis-
dained as ignored by a gen-
eration that stays indoors, con-
nects with each other through
social media ancgravitatesto, -
cities with good public trans-
portation.
Typically, the automakers
think this problem would be
solved if they could only build
the right kind of cars.
A GM marketing executive
quizzed 16- to 30-year-olds on
what they wanted in a car. What
he learned is that we're evolving
into a nation of goody two-shoes.
He told the Journal, "Young
buyers want cars that are safe,
affordable, compatible with the
latest high-tech gadgetry and
good for the environment."
It's well within modern mem-
ory that young car buyers, real-
izing that GTOs, Camaros and
Mustangs were financially out
of reach, had only one criterion
for their first car: It had to run.
Maybe we are turning into
Europe.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


or a wealthy man with
a beautiful, happy
wife and successful,
handsome children,
Mitt Romney seems
to go out of his way to make his
life more difficult
Forget the video assaults of
Newt "I'm-tired-of-playing-nice"
Gingrich and the Mitt-as-worst-
governor-in-America pabulum
spewed by Rick Santorum.
When 66 percent of
Americans perceive conflict
between the rich and the poor,
according to the Pew Research
Center, why would Romney say
he enjoys firing people who
provide him with service?
When the Occupy Wall Street
protest movement was in full
flower, with millions blaming
corporate greed for their finan-
cial woes, why would Romney
defend corporations as "people"?
Why would a man whose
landscaping was tended by ille-
gal immigrants be so virulently
anti-immigrant?
As governor, Romney
proudly provided health insur-


www.lakecityreporter.com


When is it going to get better?


en is it going
to get better?
The economy,
unemployment,
involvement
in two ongoing wars, medical
costs... Our great country is
facing some of the worst prob-
lems it's ever had. Can we
identify the problems, and do
something about them? They
say that to keep doing the same
thing, but expect different
results, is a definition of insan-
ity. If change is to happen, we
need to make some changes.
How can we do that? You have
an opportunity to vote this
month.
It seems'to me that if we
look for the causes of our prob-
lems, we can discover some
basic underlying principles.
Historically, the United States
has been the most advanced
nation in technology, educa-
tion, invention, manufacturing,
and production. Statistically,
we're now losing ground to
other countries. We buy more
from other countries thanwe
produce to sell to them. We've
become more of a consumer
nation than a producer nation.
Many of our corporations have
relocated overseas. When you
spend more than you produce,
your financial situation suffers.
Corporate taxes in the U.S.
are some of the highest in
the world. Corporate execu-
tives make millions each year.
Foreign labor is cheaper than
American labor. These factors
influence corporations to move
to other countries. We end up
with loss of domestic jobs.


N

-` aboi



Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com

We're involved in foreign
wars that may pose little direct
threat to our national security.
Surely there are better ways to
protect ourselves from terror-
ism than deploying hundreds of
thousands of troops into foreign.
nations.
Our system, which responds
heavily to lobbying influences
and huge legal suits, has some
of the highest medical costs in
the world.
What can we do? The follow-
ing aren't the best or only solu-
tions, but we can uncover some
principles that fall short in
common sense, and make some
changes. Instead of spending
more than we produce, why
can't we support the principles
of living within our means?,
How about producing as much
as we consume, thereby balanc-
ing the national budget? If we
want jobs for our unemployed
folks, why don't we legislate
competitive corporate taxes,
encouraging corporations to
bring manufacturing back to
America?
Should we become more
energy independent? If we pro-
duced more of our own energy,
we wouldn't buy it from the
Middle East. If other countries


can produce and market afford-
able electric vehicles, why don't
we?
Could we cap medical suit
settlements with more reason-
able limits, rather than paying
for them by high legal costs
and medical insurance premi-
ums?
These ideas are oversimpli-
fied, but it's a start. I believe
that if we can identify a prob-
lem, we can fix it.
How about our own lives?
How can we build even better
lives for ourselves? Look at our
basic principles, and see how:
they're.working. Remember,, ,,
to keep doing the same thing
and expect different results is
one definition of insanity. How
about living within our means?
Making the most of what we've
got to work with? Supporting
local businesses? The best
offense is a good defense. Hire
locals, who you can trust and
are more directly responsible.
Keep lawsuits and penalties
fair. Live green; recycle, be
sustainable. Be a volunteer:
Give something back. Don't
keep doing the same thing and
expect change.
Most of all, stay optimistic.
It all starts with knowing that
things can get better. It's up
to us.


* Bob Denny has counseled
troubled youth and families in
Florida for 15 years, and teaches
psychology at Florida Gateway
College. Your comments and
ideas are appreciated at Bob.
Denny@gmail.com.


Ann McFeatters
omcfeotters@notionalpress.org
ance to his fellow citizens in
Massachusetts. Why does he
constantly assail Obama for
providing the same benefits to
all Americans?
As a campaigner, Romney
is often awkward and sloppy.
Instead of laying out what
he would do as president, he
just keeps attacking Obama.
Romney's ad hominem dia-
tribes against Obama are
annoying and usually non-
factual: Obama is anti-business.
(No evidence for that one.)
Obama doesn't have America's
best interests at heart (What?)
Obama destroys jobs. (Job cre-
ation is improving.)
If Romney wins the GOP


nomination, he will have a 50-50
chance of becoming president
Desperate Americans upset by
lost jobs, low wages, foreclosed
houses and lack of opportuni-
ties for their children may vote
Romney into office out of sheer
frustration. The economy is
improving but perhaps not fast
enough to help Obama, no mat-
ter how personally popular he is.
Also, the primaries toughen
up candidates for the general
election. Romney will be a better
candidate in September than he
is now, especially if he listens to
his advisers and stops speaking
off the cuff On the other hand,
isn't it sad that the possible next
president has to be careful not
to speak off the cuff to avoid
sticking his foot in his mouth?
And isn't it sad that we're going
to have another election where
mud is flung instead of one where
serious questions about the size
and role of government and taxes
are debated seriously?
* Ann McFeatters is a columnist
for Scripps Howard News Service.


4A


vatives' last chance to stop
Romney, and if he wins there,
the nomination is effectively
- well, you get the picture.

* Scripps Howard News Service


&jreil '12
UMNtERSAL UCLiCK
EPSTEiThJ K, CO


Romney makes life difficult


with many flubs


ANOTHER
VIEW



GOP


voters


have


spoken-


sort of

f we are to believe the
pundits, the voters have
spoken, and a number
of them approxi-
mately equivalent to the
population of Murfreesboro,
Tenn. have anointed Mitt
Romney as the all-but-certain
Republican nominee. Given
Barack Obama's mediocre
approval ratings, he has a
good chance of being our
next president.
It is a bizarre process by
which we choose our presi-
dential candidates, in the
dead of winter in two small
states wildly unrepresentative
of the nation as a whole and
where the populace seems to
spend most of its time sitting
around diners.
The Iowa caucuses don't
actually pick the delegates to
the national convention, but
pick the people who will pick
the people who do pick the
delegates. But this is justi-
fied as an intimate winnowing
process.
Iowa succeeded in winnow-
ing only one: native daughter
and early favorite Michele
Bachmann. She dropped out
after winning less than 5
.percent of.the,vote. Herman
"9-9-9" Cain was winnowed
out, not by the Iowans, but.
by his ex-girlfriends, whose
numbers seemed to grow
daily.
New Hampshire, whose
primary'actually means some-
thing, is supposed to serve
something of the same func-
tion. But Rick Perry felt that,
according to a count three
hours after the polls closed,
0.7 percent of the vote was
enough of a mandate to push
on to South Carolina.
Unlike in Iowa, where
he won by eight votes,
Romney cleaned up in New
Hampshire with almost 40
percent of the vote, 15 points
better than libertarian Ron
Paul, whose loyal followers
just seem to like him without
studying his political prin-
ciples too closely. (Really,
abolish the Fed and return to
the gold standard?)
Jon Huntsman finished a
respectable third, leaving him
well placed for 2016, assum-
ing that Obama can contrive
another term.
Newt Gingrich, the ver-
bally impetuous former House
speaker, finished with just
under 10 percent. Although
his campaign is going down in
flames, he's sticking around in
hopes of taking somebody else
with him, preferably Romney.
Right behind Gingrich was
Rick Santorum, the second-
place finisher in Iowa, who now
hopes that the evangelicals
and social conservatives of
South Carolina will save his
campaign. But early polls in the
Palmetto State show a strong
lead for Romney.
Political handicappers early
on declared that if Romney
won both Iowa and New
Hampshire, becoming the first
non-incumbent GOP presi-
dential candidate to do so, the
nomination was effectively his.
But then the pundits real-
ized that if they turned out
the lights too soon, the party
. would be over and they would
have to disband and go home.
Now South Carolina is being
pitched as hard-core conser-


~-~---~











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY. JANUARY 13, 2012 5A


* Submit Community
Calendar announcements
by mail or drop off at the
Reporter office located at 180
E. Duval St., via fax to (386)
752-9400 or email Ihamp-
son @ lakecityreporter.com

Jan. 13
MLK Jr. ceremony
The Lake City VA Medical
Center will observe Martin
Luther King Jr.'s 83rd
birthday with a ceremony
at 11 am. in the center's
auditorium. The keynote
speaker is Kevin W. Thorpe,
senior pastor at Faith
Missionary Baptist Church
and executive producer of
the Faith Church Television
Broadcast The event is
open to the public.

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14, 15, 7
p.m. Sunday, 11 am., 6 p.m.
U.S. 90 West to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan. 13
at 7 p.m. until. For ticket
info contact Chris Mirra
at 386-623-3611 or Dennis
Murphy at 386-697-3739.

172nd church
anniversary
Salem Primitive Baptist
Church, 199 SW Salem
Church Court, will celebrate
their 172nd Anniversary
and Annual Meeting begin-
ning on Friday at 6:30 p.m.,
and Saturday and Sunday-, -
morning beginning at 10:30
a.m. Guest ministers will
be Elder Charles Tyson,
Tifton, Georgia, Elder
Gordon Smith, Jacksonville,
Florida, and Elder Hulen
Harvill of Plant City, Florida.
All descendants of Salem
Primitive Baptist Church
and those who love the origi-
nal Baptist Doctrines are
cordially invited to attend
these services. For more
information, please call 752-
4198.

Jan. 14
Farmers market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is
Saturday from 9am to


Buford James Edwards
Mr. Buford James Edwards, 90
of Lake City passed away on
Wednesday, January 11, 2012 at
the Malcolm Randall VA Medi-
cal Center in Gainesville. He
was a native of Crawford, Geor-
gia and son to the late Ernest
James and Clara Pope Edwards.
Mr. Edwards was a veteran of
the United States Army serving
during World War II in the Euro-
pean Theatre. He retired in 1978
from the City of Lake Worth Fire
Department as a Captain with 25
years of service and then became
a painting contractor in the Lake
Worth area for 25 years. He was
of the Baptist faith and mem-
ber of the First Baptist Church
of Lake Worth and shared the
love of Jesus with everyone.
He enjoyed deer and duck hunt-
ing, was an avid outdoorsman
and loved his Labrador's. Mr.
Edwards was preceded in death
by his wife of 68 years, Mrs.
Oma Lee Edwards, in 2011.
Survivors include two sons and
daughter-in-laws. John and
Donna Edwards, West Palm
Beach and Danny and Suzanne
Edwards, Lake City, two sisters.
Renee Edwards. Paso Robles.
CA and Martha Rice, Lakeland,
FL, two granddaughters, Sta-
cey Brewster and Cherie Castle
and five great grandchildren.
Funeral services for Mr. Ed-
wards will be conducted on Sat-
urday, January 14, 2012 at 2:30
PM in the Chapel of Guerry
Funeral Home with Rev. John
Harrison officiating. Interment
will follow at Salem Primitive
Baptist Church Cemetery with
military honors. Visitation with
the family will be from 1:30 PM


1pm (winter hours) in
Wilson Park located along
Lake DeSotobetween
the Columbia County
Courthouse and Shands
Lakeshore Hospital in
downtown Lake City. The
market features locally
grown fresh produce,
herbs, plants, cheese,
milk, eggs and local baked
breads, pies and other
items. Vendors also sell
homemade craft items like
jewelry, woodwork and
other handmade items.
Upcoming events include
the 1st Annual Chili Cook
Off on January 21st to ben-
efit Relay for Life. For more
information about the Lake
DeSoto Farmer Market call
386-719-5766 or visit mar-
ket.lcfla.com.

North Florida Writers
Group meets
Love to write? From
novice to published author,
the North Florida Writers
Group (formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is the place
where local writers gather
to share information, to
create, to learn and to
inspire.
Writers of any experi-
ence level from the area
are welcome to join us
Saturday, January 14,
2012, 2pm 4pm, at the
ColumbiaCounty Public
Library, Main Branch, 308
NW Columbia Avenue,
Lake City, FL 32055. Join
us Saturday and see what
we are all about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so please
reserve your spot today!
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Lader, '
'(386); 438-3610 "; -.... ;.-. .
Email inquiries to: edi-
tor@afinaldraft.com

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14, 15,
7 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m., 6
p.m. U.S. 90 West to Jones
Way. Pastor Stan Ellis.

Hospice Chili Cook-off
The Third Annual
Branford Chili Cook-Off
to benefit children and
families served by Herry's
Kids Pediatric Services
will be held on Saturday,
January 14 from 11 a.m. 2
p.m. at Hatch Park located
on Craven Dr. in Branford.



OBITUARIES


to 2:30 PM, one hour prior to
the service on Saturday. Dona-
tions may be made in memory
of Mr. Edwards to the Lake
City Animal Hospital at 170
SW Professional Glen, Lake
City, FL 32025 for the benefit
of senior adults pets and flowers
will also be accepted. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME, Lake City. Please
sign the guestbook at www.
g u erryfuneralhome. net

Baby Boy Harris
Kendall Javawn Harris is an angel
that God called to Heaven before
he took his first breath on Tues-
day, January 10, 2012 at Shands
of Lake Shore in Lake City, Flor-
ida. Here on Earth, he leaves to
cherish his memory: his mother,
Kaci Harris and father, .John
Harris. He also leaves behind
his maternal grandparents, En-
nis and Dorothy Harris; paternal
grandparents, Anthony and Joyce
Copeland; six siblings; one aunt,
Kayla Harris; three uncles, Der-
rick Timmons (Karen), Anthony
Harris (Celeste), Paul Harris; and
a host of loving great aunts, great
uncles, cousins, and friends.
Kendall's celebration will be held
2':00 PM, Saturday, January 14,
2012 at New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church. 550 NE Martin
LutherKing Street, Lake City, FL.
Arrangements entrusted to
Combs Funeral Home. 292
NE Washington Street. Lake
City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"


The event will include
a silent auction, games,
a bounce house for the
kids, live DJ, door prizes,
antique car show, thrift
store items for sale, and all
the chili you can eat There
will be a five dollar admis-
sion to the event In order
to register to be a con-
testant call 386755-7714.
Hospice of the Nature
Coast, is a program of
Hospice of Citrus County,
Inc., licensed in 1985. To
learn more about hospice
services call 386-755-7714
or visit www.hospiceofth-
enaturecoastorg.

Jan. 15
Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. Observance Program
On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m., the
Columbia County NAACP
Branch will host its 28th
annual Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Observance
Program at Trinity United
Methodist Church, located
on MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this memo-
rable occasion is Bishop
Russell Allen Wright of
Panama City, Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially invited
to attend this historical
occasion honoring a man
who lives forever in our
hearts. Remember, that's
the Third Sunday, January
15th 4 p.m, at Trinity
United Methodist Church.
Glynnell Presley,
Secretary
John F Mayo, NAACP-
President/CEO

Revival
- Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14, 15;
7 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m., 6
p.m. U.S. 90 West to Jones
Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Jan. 16
Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. Parade
The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
presents the Grand Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Parade, Monday, January
16, 2012 at 10am. Line-
up will begin at the DOT
office at 9:00am. For par-
ticipation and information

CALENDAR continued on 6A


Gwendolyn Lorene Miller
Gwendolyn Lorene Miller, me-
morial services will be held
Saturday at -2:00 P.M. at For-
est Lawn Memorial Gardens
Cemetery. With Reverend
Cagney Tanner officiating
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, Lake
City, FL. 458 South Mar-
ion Avenue Lake -City, FL
32025. 1( 386) 752-1234."

Jack Mosley
Mr. Jack Mosley of Ft. White,
Florida born January 30, 1946
in Columbia County, passed
from this earthly walk of life
Sunday, January 08, 2012 at the
Haven Hospice in Lake City,
Florida. Home going services
for Mr. Mosley will be 11:00
A.M. Saturday, January 14, 2012
at Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church in Ft. White, Florida
Rev. Donnell Sanders is the pas-
tor and will officiate. Following
the Home going service for Mr.
Mosley. his earthen vessel along
with family members and friends
will be escorted to the Heavenly
Rest Cemetery in Ft. White,
Florida. A time to visit with Mr.
Mosley and his family, will be
Friday, January 13, 2012 from
6:00 to 8:00 P.M., at Antioch
Missionary Baptist Church. Pro-
fessional Mortuary services en-
trusted to ERIC A. BROWN &
SON FUNERAL HOME, INC.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


ADVERTISEMENT


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'I


COMMUNITY




CALENDAR











3A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY. JANUARY 13. 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


CALENDAR con't from 5A
call Anthony Newton at
386.365.1470.
The MLK Worship
Service will follow the
parade at the New Bethel
Baptist Church at 12:30p,
Bishop Ron Williams, II
is the speaker, Rev. Alvin
Baker, Pastor. Call Audre'
Washington at 386.344.9915
for more information.
The MLK Classic will
feature a re-match basket-
ball game at the Lake City
Middle School at 3:30pm
featuring Alumni Women
and Men's players of CHS
and Suwannee. Call Mario
Coppock for details at
386.754.7095.

SAR meeting
The Sons of the
American Revolution, Lake
City Chapter, will meet on
Monday at 6 p.m. at the
Guang Dong Restaurant in
the Lake City Mall, 2469
West Highway 90. Guests
are always welcome. Call
752-4919 for information.

Jan. 17
Loss workshop
Eight Critical Questions,
an educational workshop
offering practical tips to help
cope and move forward
during the new year will be
January 4 at 2 p.m. located
at the Wings Education
Center, 857 SW Main Blyd,
(Lake City Plaza). There
is no cost For information
or to register, contact Vicki
Myers at 755-7714 Ext 2411
or 866-642-0962. The Wings
Education Center is a pro-
gram of Hospice of Citrus
County, Inc./Hospice of
the Nature Coast licensed
1985, serving north central
Florida. Visit www.hospi-
ceofthenaturecoastorg for
more information.

Traffic safety-meeting
The Columbia
Community Traffic Safety
will hold its first meeting of
the new year on Tuesday,
January 17 at 10 a.m. at
the FDOT Operations
Complex, 710 NW Lake
Jeffery Road, in the Crew
Room. The Team works on
traffic hazards and enforce-
ment issues in Columbia
County and the public
is welcome to attend.
Issues can be called in to
the FDOT at 758-3714 or
e-mailed to Tres Atkinson,
team chair, at tres.atkin-
son@columbiacountyfla.
com or to Gina Busscher,
team secretary, at gina.
busscher@dot.state.fl.us
The team is made up of
members of law enforce-
ment, emergency services,
engineering and education.

Art League Meeting
The Art League of North
Florida will hold the first
meeting of the year Jan. 17
at the First Presbyterian
Church at 7 p.m. The main
purpose is the election of
officers. Members, and the
community is invited and
encouraged to attend.

Jan. 18
Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Jan. 18
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The


building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.

Jan. 19
Voices that Change
Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet facil-
ity. Showtime is at 6:30
p.m. Refreshments will be
served. Tickets are $10.
This is a benefit for the
Christian Service Center
and tickets are available
at the Center Hilton and
Washington St.

Columbia County Retired
Educators meeting
The Columbia County
Retired Educators will
meet Thursday, January
19, at 1 p.m. in Room 120
at the School Board Adult
Center.
Speakers will be Mrs.
Kaeron Robinson of the
Guardian Ad Litem and Mr.
Paul Conley of Ocala, Fl.,
District H FREF Trustee.
Retired persons inter-
ested in education may join
us. For more information
call Will Brown at 752-2431.

Jan. 20
Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. Identical twins
Mark & Clark play head to
head on identical custom-
built baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled audi-
ences around the world
with everything from musi-
cal comedy to dramatic
interpretation of the clas-
sics all with the flash of
Liberace, a lot of Jerry Lee-
Lewis, and the piano artist-
ry of Ferrante and Teicher.
Ticket and membership
information is av9lable at
www.communityconcerts.
info.

Jan. 21
Farmers market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is
Saturday from 9am to
1pm (winter hours) in
Wilson Park located along
Lake DeSotobetween
the Columbia County
Courthouse and Shands
Lakeshore Hospital in
downtown Lake City. The
market features locally
grown fresh produce,
herbs, plants, cheese,
milk, eggs and local baked
breads, pies and other
items. Vendors also sell
homemade craft items like
jewelry, woodwork and
other handmade items.
Upcoming events include
the 1st Annual Chili Cook
Off on January 21st to ben-


efit Relay for Life. For more
information about the Lake
DeSoto Farmer Market call
386-719-5766 or visit mar-
ket.lcflacom.

Jan. 22
Bridal show
The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's Bridal,
Belk, Lake City Florist
and Design, Glass Slipper
Bridal, The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices are
$7.00; Day of Event $10.00.
Tickets can be purchased
at the Holiday Inn & Suites,
213 SW Commerce Dr.,
Lake City. For ticket sales
or vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386) 754-
1411.

Riding club banquet
The Columbia County
Riding Club is having
its annual banquet Jan
22,2012, @lpm,@Mason
City Community Center.
The club will have its rides
the 2nd and 4th Sat of each
month. The club will be
hosting Pleasure Shows this
year. Check our website for
all information. www.colum-
biacountyridingclub.com.

Jan. 24
Friends of the Library
Author Program
Tuesday, January 24,
2012 at 7:00 pm at the Main
Library, sponsored by Save
Our Suwannee:
Cynthia Barnett, author
of Mirage: Florida and
the Vanishing Water of
the Eastern U.S. and Blue
Revolution: Unmaking
America's Water Crisis,
Cynthia Barnett is an
award-winning journal-
ist and senior writer for
Florida Trend magazine.
She has a special interest
in environmental history
and in 2004, spent a year at
the University of Michigan
as a Knight-Wallace Fellow
studying freshwater supply.
Ms. Barnett will discuss
Florida's water crisis
and look at solutions
that have found success
in communities around
the world. Don't miss
this timely program on
a topic so very relevant
to Columbia County and
North Central Florida.
Thank you to Save Our
Suwannee and Florida's
Eden for working with the
Friends of the Library to
bring you this program.
http://www.cynthiabar-
nett.net/


Jan. 25
Building Assn. lunch
The Columbia County
Builders Association will
hold a General Council
lunch at Guang Dong
starting at 11:30 a. m. on
January 25. Cost of lunch
is $10 for members and $15
for non-members and pric-
es include tax and gratuity.
Speaker is Dale Williams.
After the lunch an attor-
ney from Tritt/Anderson
in Jacksonville will hold a
short seminar (about 45
minutes) and he will go
over numerous contracts,
their wording, etc. There
is no charge for this if you
have attended the CCBA
lunch. Reservations are
preferred call: 386-867-
1998 or e-mail: colcounty-
build@comcast.net.


Jan. 29
Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 29, 2012
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library:
Phyllis Smallman, author
of Margarita Nights and
Champagne for Buzzards
Phyllis Smallman is a
Canadian who has spent a
lot of time in Florida, the set-
ting for her award-winning
mystery series featuring
sassy bartender, Sherri
Travis.
A former potter with a
lifelong love of mysteries,
Phyllis divides her time
between her native Ontario
and Sarasota. She will join
us live via Skype for this
program, http://www.phyl-
lissmallman.com/


Feb. 1
Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.


Feb. 4
West Virginia Day
The West Virginia Annual
Reunion will be held on
February 4 starting at 11:30
a-m. Please bring a covered
dish to share for the lun-
cheon.
The event will be held at
Epiphany Church, 1905 SW
Epiphanty Ct, Lake City. For
questions, information, or
reservations please call 386-
7554937 or 386-754-1760.

Olustee Festival
Pageant
The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, February 4.
Ages 3-12 mos, 13mo-23
mo, 2-4, 5-6 and 7-9 will
be held at 4:00 pm at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be held
at 7:00pm. Winners in each
division will receive a $50
savings bond, crown, ban-
ner and ride in the Olustee
parade on February 14.
The runners up in each
division will receive a large
trophy and all contestants
will receive a trophy for
their participation. The
winner of the Miss Olustee
title (age 16-20) will receive
a $500 educational scholar-
ship, 1st runner up a $300
scholarship and the 2nd
runner up a $200 scholar-
ship. Entertainment will be
provided by The pageant
is open to the public with
admission at the door:
$5.00 adults and students.
Pre-schoolers are free.
Applications are available
at the Columbia County
Library or Chamber of
Commerce. Deadline for
entries is 1-23-2012. For
more information you may
contact pageant director,
Elaine Owens at 386-965-
2787.

Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building to


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
email Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com


plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.

Feb. 11

Founder's Day Program
Merry Christmas
and a Happy New Year
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-Cookman
University Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.

Valentine's Day Ball
1st Annual "Valentine's
Day Ball" presented by the
Rotary Club of Lake City.
Saturday, February 11,
2012 6pm-10pm.
The Country Club, of
Lake City Cocktails, Dinner,
Dancing with entertainment
by "Harry, Sally & Billy"
Cash Bar.
Dress is Black-Tie optional.
Tickets are $50 each
($100 per couple) and are
available at the Lake City
Reporter, The Wheeler
Agency, Hunter Printing,
First Street Music, Parks-
Johnson Agency on Hwy
90 West or call 752-0812 or
965-0298
Gentlemen...BE A
HERO...bring her to the
"Valentine's Day Ball!"

Feb. 25
Community Concerts
The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3 p.m.
Feb. 25 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
This elite singing ensemble
from the University of
North Florida performs
world music, vocal jazz,
and other choral gems.
Ticket and membership
information is available at
www. communityconcerts.
info.


is pleased to announce the addition of

Dr. Aria Murphy
to our practice


Upon graduating from Columbia
High School, Dr. Murphy continued
her education, attending Florida
State University receiving a degree
in inibiochemistry followed by
completing the Doctor of Optometry
program at Nova Southern University
College of Optometry in Davie.
She performed graduatework at
the Eye Care Institute in Davis, the
Filutowski Eye Institute in Lake Mary
as well as the VA Hospitals in both
Gainesville and Lake City.


OPTOMETRISTS
Dr. Ronald R. Foreman
Dr. Frank A Broome, II
Dr. Kimberly M. Broome
Dr. Julie Owens


Providing Comprehensive Vision Care OPHTHALMOLOGIST
Dr. Greg Snodgrass


* General Eye Care
* Complete Optical Department
* On Site Optical Laboratory


* Contact Lenses
* Advance Cataract Surgery
* Glaucoma & Diabetes


AllDoctorsareBoar rtif JiMost nsuranceAccepted
763 SWOain-lLaeCt 97212


I vvvw~mylaptscom












Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042
tkJrby /okeo.yrepIrorer.rom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, january 13. 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS



(b


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom

Carter

on UFL

champs

Columbia High
graduate
Jerome Carter
is keeping
his football
playing career alive. The
former Florida State and
NFL player, recently
completed his third
season in the United
Football League.
Carter's Florida
Tuskers team was
suspended by the league
and moved from Orlando
to Virginia Beach, Va.
Carter decided to stick
it out only to discover
his new head coach
was NFL legend Marty
Schottenheimer.
After consecutive
losses in the league
championship game with
the Tuskers, Carter got
his championship when
the Virginia Destroyers
defeated the Las Vegas
Locomotives, 17-3.
Carter is.in Lake City...
and sponsoring the MLK
Battle of the Classes flag
football on Monday at
Annie Mattox Park.
He and Sheena
Wright are expecting a
daughter in February to
join Jerome III, 6, and
Jermon6, 2.
"I'm playing football
and taking care of my
family," Carter said. "I
am always hungry and
humble and still doing
what I love to do."
Carter said he and
Schottenheimer hit it off
and, with the 68-year-old
coach interviewing with
Tampa Bay, Carter might
get that return shot to
the NFL.

Fort White High
graduate Victor Gonzalez
is going to see the New
England-Denver playoff
game, courtesy of Chad
Ochocinco.
A report on the CBS
Boston website said
Ochocinco extended the
offer after Gonzalez
chided his Tweeter pal
for never responding
after two years.
Ochocinco asked if
Gonzalez would like
to come to the game
Saturday, then offered a
flight ticket, hotel room
and ducat for the game.
My request for former
Columbia High athletes
who went to LSU or
Alabama was rewarded.
A couple of calls noted
that 1953 graduates
Lynwood "Pee Wee"
Burns and John Wood
played football at LSU.
Burns was a four-year
varsity player for CHS
and senior class
vice-president. He was
co-captain on the football
team and All-Northeast
Conference.
Wood was All-NEC in
football and basketball as
a senior and an ace
pitcher for the Tigers.
He holds the CHS record
for scoring 49 points in a
basketball game.

* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter.


Columbia, Fort White come =

together for All-Star Game


Alien coaching
East with help
from Indians.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Players won't be the only
familiar faces on the side-
line of the Columbia Youth
and Lake City Pop Warner
Football Association's 5th
Annual East-West High
School Football All-Star
Game.
Columbia head coach
Brian Allen will lead the
East squad in Saturday's
4 p.m. kickoff at Memorial
Stadium.
Allen brought in assistant
coaches Quinton Callum
and Vernon Amerson along
with a couple of coaches
from the Fort White staff


including head coach
Demetric Jackson and Ken
Snider.
It hasn't been a tough
mix of minds as the staffs
have blended throughout
the four days of practice
leading up to the game.
"It's always fun to see how
different coaches approach
the game," Jackson said.
"It's always unique to see
how they can put this thing
together in three or four
days. It's a community com-
ing together."
Although the game will
require both teams to run a
4-3 defense, both Columbia
and Fort White use similar
defenses based around the
3-4 technique.
For Allen, it hasn't been
hard to translate what other
staffs are doing into this
game.


"Football is football,"
Allen said. "I think they're
a 3-4 package like we are.
We're coming on short
notice, but football is
football.".
A host of local faces
will compete in the game
on Saturday including
Austin Reiter, Quaysean
Monismith, DariusWiliams,
Koran Amerson and Hayden
Lunde for Columbia.
Fort White's Soron
Williams, Jonathan Dupree,
Wesley Pitts, Dalton O'Dell
and George Fulton will
compete.
Jackson is anxious to see
some of his players com-
pete at different positions.
"I'm ready to see Soron
at safety," Jackson said.
"He's a physical kid like an
FOOTBALL continued on 2B


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Quaysean Monismith works through a drill
during practice on Wednesday.


Raiders



stay on top



of district


Lady Indians can't
match firepower
of Santa Fe, 50-30.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Santa
Fe High's girls basket-
ball solidified its district
lead with a 50-30 win over
host Fort White on
Thursday.
Playing without leading
scorer Tosha Robinson,
the Lady Indians hung
tough in the first, third and
fourth quarters. However,
the Raiders went 19-4 in
the crucial second quarter
to build a 34-15 halftime
lead.
Cenise Armstrong fired,
in nine points in the first
quarter and finished with
a game-high 19. Rykia
Jackson added eight points"
and Lisa Glenn scored
three.
Glenn and Armstrong


staked Fort White to a 4-0
lead and Armstrong canned
a late 3-pointer to pulled
the Lady Indians to within
15-11 at the end of the first
quarter.
Santa Fe had a pair of 7-0
runs in the second quarter
and closed with a 6-0 run to
make it 34-15.
Jackson scored six of her
eight points in the fourth
quarter. Fort White ended
the game on a 6-0 run
to make the score more
respectable.
Tyra Carter led Santa
Fe (9-9, 8-1). with 18 points
and Dymeria Clayton also
was in double figures with
14. Algeria Terry came
close with nine points.
Fort White (3-11, 2-5)
returns to action at 6 p.m.
Williston when Fort White
plays a district tri-match at
Williston High.
The boys junior
varsity starts at 4:30 p.m.
and the boys varsity plays at
7:30 p.m.


L VAFa a am- N O wr wr .I' -.--m :- w I I
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Khadijah Ingram (1) attempts to win a rebound against Bradford's Jasmine Portis
(22) on Monday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Marcus Amerson (11) and Monte Tisdale (15) reach up for a rebound in a
game against Robert E. Lee High on Dec. 9.


Tigers ready


for weekend


showcase


Columbia plays
host to two
district teams.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High coach
Horace Jefferson said
coming into the season
that the Tigers' basketball
team is playing for one
thing and that's a district
championship.
To the second-year
Columbia coach, it's not
about winning rivalry
games, its about making it
to the state tournament
He gave his players 24
hours to get over Saturday's
loss to Suwannee High
Before the Tigers began a
work week that includes
three games.


Columbia got off to a good
start with a dominating 68-
47 win against Robert E.
Lee High, which knocked
the Tigers out of the district
tournament last year.
Morris Marshall led with
20 points on a night that
saw him connect with five
three-point shots.
Tre Simmons also hit five
from beyond the arc in the
game and finished with 19
points and six rebounds.
Marcus Amerson had a
double-double in the con-
test with 10 points and 15
rebounds.
Other scorers for the
Tigers include: Monte
Tisdale, 4; Wayne Broom,
4; Javonta6 Foster, 2; David
Morse, 2; and Laremy
Tunsil with two.


CHS continued on 2B


I -












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2012


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Junior featherweights,
Teon Kennedy (17-1-0) vs. Chris Martin
(23-1-2), at LasVegas
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, joburg
Open, second round, at Johannesburg
(same-day tape)
7 p.m.
TGC PGATour,Sony Open,second
round, at Honolulu
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP Minnesota-Duluth at
Nebraska-Omaha,
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally, Arequipa to
Nasca, Peru (delayed tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Boston
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Miami at Denver

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
New York Giants 24,Adanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday
New Orleans at San Francisco,
4:30 p.m.
Denver at New England, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Houston at Baltimore, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 22
Divisional winners
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan.29
At Honolulu
NFC vs.AFC
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
NFC vs.AFC, 6:20 p.m.

College all-star games

Saturday,Jan. 21
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs.West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)


Saturday,Jan. 28
Senior Bowl
At Mobile.Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Feb. 5
Texas vs. Nation
At San Antonio
Texas vs. Nation, 2 p.m. (CBSSN)

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
Indiana 96,Atlanta 84
Sacramento 98,Toronto 91
New York 85, Philadelphia 79
Chicago 78,Washington 64
Oklahoma City 95, New Orleans 85
Dallas 90, Boston 85
San Antonio 101, Houston 95, OT
Denver 123, New Jersey 115
LA. Lakers 90, Utah 87, OT
Orlando 107, Portland 104
LA. Clippers 95, Miami 89, OT
Thursday's Games
Charlotte at Adanta (n)
NewYork at Memphis (n)
Detroit at Milwaukee (n)
Cleveland at Phoenix (n)
Orlando at.Golden State (n)
Today's Games
Detroit at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Houston, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Boston, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Portland at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Cleveland at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Miami at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Minnesota at Atlanta, 7p.m.
Golden State at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boston at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia atWashington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Portland at Houston, 8 p.m.
New.York at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Memphis, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Utah, 9 p.m.
Sacramento at Dallas, 9 p.m.
LA. Lakers at LA Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Game
No. 24 Seton Hall at South Florida,
7 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Syracuse vs. Providence, 6 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky at Tennessee, Noon
No. 3 North Carolina at Florida
State, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Baylor vs. Oklahoma State,


3p.m.
No. 6 Michigan State at Northwestern
3 p.m.
No. 9 Missouri vs.Texas, I pm-
No. 10 Kansas vs. Iowa Stae, 4 pm.
No. 12 UNLV at No. 22 San Diego
State, 4 p.m
No. 13 Michigan at Iowa, I p-m-
No. 14 Louisville vs. DePaul, 4 pm.
No. 15 Murray State vs. Tennessee
Tech, 6 pnm.
No. 17 Connecticut at Notre Dame,
II am.
No. 18 Kansas State at Oklahoma,
1:30 p.m.
No. 19 Florida at South Carolina,
7 p.m.
No. 20 Mississippi State vs. Alabama,
4 p.m.
No. 21 Gonzaga at Loyola Marymount,
8 p.m.
No. 25 Marquette vs. Pittsburgh,
2 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 5 Ohio State vs. No. 7 Indiana,
4:30 p.m.
No. 8 Duke at Clemson, 6 p.m.
No. II Georgetown vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 23 Creighton vs. Southern Illinois,
7:05 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Washington I, Pittsburgh 0
New Jersey 2, Edmonton I, OT
Thursday's Games
Montreal at Boston (n)
Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Ottawa at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Carolina at Tampa Bay (n)
Phoenix at Detroit (n)
Vancouver at St. Louis (n)
Colorado at Nashville (n)
San Jose at Winnipeg (n)
Minnesota at Chicago (n)
Anaheim at Calgary (n)
Dallas at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Washington, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Colorado at Dallas, 3 p.m.
New Jersey atWinnipeg, 3 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Boston at Carolina, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Calgary, 10 p.m.


BRIEFS


YOUTH SOFTBALL
Fort White
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White Girls'
Softball Association has a
meeting for parents and
coaches to discuss the
upcoming season at
7:15 p.m. Tuesday at the
Fort White library.
For details, call Nora
Harvey at 365-5688.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
5-7 p.m. today and
Jan. 20, and 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday and
Jan. 21 at Southside Sports
Complex with a cost of $80.
Online registration is
available at www.lcccyb.com
for $75 plus transaction fee.
For details, call president
Tad Cervantes at 365-4810
or vice-president David
Williams at (386) 697-0764.-


North Florida
Rays tryouts
The North Florida Rays
9-under travel baseball
team has a second tryout
at 10 a.m. Saturday at
Southside Sports Complex.
For details, call Todd
Green at 365-5161 or
Leonard Johnson at
867-6655.

FLAG FOOTBALL
Christ Central
registration open
Registration for Christ
Central Sports flag football
for ages 5-12 continues
through today. Cost is $40.
For details, call 365-2128.


..are offered: Training, ages
6-7-8; Jr. Varsity, ages
8-9-10; Varsity, ages
11-12-13-14.
For details, call 752-4184.


free. Barbecue dinners will
be sold.
For details, call coach
J.T. Clark at 365-1754

FORT WHITE BASEBALL


Former Fort White High
baseball players are invited
to play in an alumni softball
game at 11 a.m. Feb. 4 at
the Fort White baseball
field.There will be a home
run derby fundraiser
following the game, plus
fish fry and barbecue
dinners will be sold.
For details, call coach
Mike Rizzi at 288-8680.


A golf practice group for
girls ages 9-17 is offered
from 4-5 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays at Quail
Heights Country Club.
The group is for girls who
want to learn the game and
to develop players for the
CHS program. Fee is $45.
For details, call Chet
Carter at 365-7097.

From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 216; 2. Lorrie Geiger 208;
3. Lorie Niquette 205. 1. Bill Price
236; 2. Willie Frazier 222; 3. (tie) Mark
Davis, Jim Lobaugh 208.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 585; 2. Lore Geiger 569;
3. Chrissy Fancy 530. 1. Tom Sewejkis
599; 2. (tie) Mark Davis, Bill Dolly 577;
4. Willie Frazier 570.
High handicap game: 1. Lorrie
Niquette 255; 2. (tie) Mary Lobaugh,
Lorre Geiger 238; 4. Staci Greaves
229. 1. Bill Price 264; 2. Michael
Mclnally 238; 3. Jim Lobaugh 233.
High handicap series: 1. Carla
Nyssen 682; 2. Chrissy Fancy 662;
3. Pat Fennell 646. 1. Willie Frazier
660; 2. Tom Sewejkis 638; 3. Dess
Fennell 629.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 183,
Mark Davis 195.


mum rm WMuuny *nu
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in
the teacher's lounge at the
high school. Preparations
will be discussed for the
football banquet, which is
6 p.m. Jan. 28 in the Fort
White High gym.
For details, call club
president Shayne Morgan
at 397-4954.


Columbia High
baseball's third annual
alumni game is Jan. 28 at
Tiger Stadium. Registration
begins at 10 a.m. and there
is no fee to participate.
There will be a home run
derby at 11 a:m. with a $5
entry fee. The Tigers will
play. a Purple and Gold
game following the home
run derby. Admission is



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

TUETR


1Ge, THEY F-OUN A |
YOUTH BASKETBALL YPIRUF ( GE l TYF )A-- J
Regitration for Now arrange the circled letters
Register ion for to form the surprise answer, as
Boys Club hoops -suggested by the above cartoon.
The Boys Club of Ans: L 'T I TT
Columbia County is (Answers tomorrow)
accepting registration for yesterday's Jumbles: EVOKE QUOTA ZENITH COPPER
its basketball program. Answer: Curious about his dad's childhood, junior gave
Cost is $45. Three leagues his father A POP QUIZ


BOWLING

(results from Jan. 3)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Legal Ladies
(4-0,562 average); 2.TheSandbaggers
(4-0, 560 average); 3. Alley Oops (4-0,
507 average).
High handicap game: 1. Sandra
Peterson 241; 2. Karen Clampett 229;
3. Cathy Pelley 222.
High handicap series: 1. Ruth
Helms 654; 2. Judy Daniels 636; 3.
(tie) Linda Hemdon, Vicki Baker 613.
(results from Jan. 10)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
STeam standings: 1. McGhghy's
Navy (49-23); 2. Grady's Automotive
(43-29); 3. TAZ (41.5-30.5).
High scratch game: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 212; 2. Di Drehoff 194;
3. Cheryl Jacks 190. 1. Tim Carberry
234; 2. A.J. Dariano 232; 3. Leonard
Randall 230.
High scratch series: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 547; 2. Di Drehoff 522;
3. Norma Yeingst 503. 1. Mark Moore
629; 2. A.J. Dariano 595; 3. Leonard
Randall 591.


High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169.74; 2. Cheryl Jacks 159.93;
3. Jennifer Freeman 152.37. 1. Dan
McNair 200.81; 2. A.J. Dariano
194.56; 3. Mark Moore 192.93.
(results from Jan. 8)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. The Move
Connection (26.5-3.5); 2. Rountree-
Moore (24-6); 3. Team 5 (23-7).
High scratch game: 1. J.J. Hilbert
247; 2. David Adel 246; 3. Zech Strohl
245.
High scratch series: 1. Brian
Meek 668; 2. Teo Parra 649; 3. Dave
Duncan 636.
High handicap game: 1. Brian
Freeman 281; 2. Aaron Byme 265;
3. (tie) David Adel, John McFeely III,
Rick Cahill 254.
High handicap series: 1. (tie) Rick
Cahill, Richard Hillyard 708; 3. Brian
Freeman 704; 4. Brian Meek 701.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
222.32; 2. Dale Coleman 218.76;
3. Robert Stone 216.94.
(results from Jan. 2)


CHS: Ready for district double dip


Continued From Page 11

"We came out and
shot the ball pretty well,"
Jefferson said. "We gradu-
ally took the lead and con-
trolled the game."
The Tigers will get
a chance to take a com-
manding lead in the race
for the district's top seed
as Columbia hosts Stanton
Prep at 7:30 p.m. tonight
and St. Augustine High at
6:30 p.m. on Saturday.
St Augustine is currently
one game behind Columbia
in a tie for second in the
district with only one loss.'
Wolfson also has one loss
for the season.
"We can take control of


our own destiny," Jefferson
said. "A lot of times teams
that control their own des-
tiny say that because they
don't want to get buried.
We can bury people and
what I mean by that is just
winning games and staying
on top."
Stanton Prep will try to
play a ball-control style.
of basketball against the
Tigers.
'They want to slow it
down abit," Jefferson said.
"They've got some youth
and that's why they have
struggled some. However,
on any given night, any-
thing can happen like it


did in our recent shooting
exhibition. This is a team
we are suppose to win and
I'll let my guys know that
We have to go for the jugu-
lar and not let' them stick
around."
St. Augustine will bring
in a running style that com-
pares to that of Columbia.
"What concerns me is
they play with such inten-
sity," Jefferson said. "It's
crazy the way they push
the ball. They play hard and
I've told my players that St.
Augustine is pretty good."
The Yellow Jackets enter
at 13-4 with a 5-1 district
mark.


FOOTBALL: Dupree getting notice


Continued From Page 11

outside linebacker at safe-
ty. The upside is that he's
played corner so he can
easily cover a slot receiver.
He's got to be a little cau-
tious playing the ball deep.
He's got to be able to see
the entire field." 1
Jackson said fatigue won't
be an issue for his players
after most of the Indians
played on both sides of the
ball last season.
'They'll go both ways as
it's been a struggle since
we don't have enough play-
ers," Jackson said. "Dupree
has a chance to do that
and it's something that he's
used to."


ACROSS
1 Mal de --
4 Broad bean
8 Chaney of "The
Wolf Man"
11 Expert
12 Joie devivre
13 Hail, to
Caesar
14 Battery
chemical
15 Zither
17 Math
statement
19 Cache
20 Deli salmon
21 "Garfield" guy
22 Enlighten
25 While
28 Help out
29 Risked a
ticket
31 Sorority
member
33 Oboe feature
35 Alan or Cheryl
37 British rule in
India
38 Damsel


Allen was also impressed
with what he's seen out of
Dupree.
"He's a big physical kid,"
Allen said. "He's got bas-
ketball going' on, but he's
a big offensive, defensive
line kind of guy. Film,will
be big for him and all of
these kids to help get more
exposure."
Both coaches have
also been impressed with
Kendall Wright from Union
County. He will line up with
the East team.
"I talked to Dennis
(Dotson). after the first
day and told him we had
a good looking kid from


Century units
Turf strip
Quagmire
Small lizard
Bleak
Goes to bed
(2 wds.)
Travel choice
Home page
addr.
Cosmetics
brand
- spumante
Moray
Actress
Tyne -
Kiddie's
ammo

DOWN
A great deal
Toledo's lake
Ballet's
- Nureyev
UPS
competitor
Styptic
Comic strip
prince


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Union County," Allen said.
"He knew it was Kendall
Wright. He's a good look-
ing son of a buck. He's a
heck of a player. He's got
the body of a free safety or
'sftng safety. He's' a guy
that I tell some of the guys
on the road that they might
need to look at"
Jackson had a chance
to coach him at an all-star
game earlier this year.
"I know about Wright,"
he said.
Wright will have one
final chance to make an
impression at Memorial
Stadium against the best of
his piers.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


Q7U7EEN WAR Y
URA NI US DO GIES
NIT A C SFRC LE

FATE DOES
DEW IRE NEST
UTAIH AA H WOOD
ECRU FLA NUDE
HEMS I LL SAN
EYYES EBIAIY
TUB MAMMAL

POIROT SEDATE
HEEL DE K ES


11 B-movie
pistol
16 Kind of
column
18 Clark and
Orbison
21 Wynonna or
Naomi
22 Corn serving
23 Per (daily)
24 Suggestion
25 Faculty head
26 Ibsen woman
27 Toothed
wheel
30 Implored
32 Radio VIPs
34 Floppies
36 Textile
colorers
39 Gadget
41 Snare
43 Amusing
44 Bookbinder's
need
45 Limerick
locale
46 Amoebas
have one
47 MP prey
48 Soothe
49 Hayworth of
old movies
50 Cotton gin
name
52 Future fish


1-13 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL -Alumni game
Q-back Club planned Feb. 4
maetinor Tuesdav


YOUTH GOLF
CHS BASEBALL Practice group
Alumni game set offered for girls
for Jan. 28


7 Popeye's
tattoo
8 Dalai -
9 Walkie-talkie
word
10 Teen outcast


7


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


-----


1I~


-----















Different road for Packers, Rodgers '


Associated Press

A wild card winning the
Super Bowl hardly is unique
anymore, as the Steelers,
Giants and Packers proved
in the last six seasons. It
won't happen this year with
only division winners alive
heading into this weekend.
For the defending cham-
pion Green Bay Packers,
lessons from their run to
the title a year ago have
helped them not only in
going 15-1 during the regu-
lar season, but in preparing
for the playoffs.
"I think we learned a lot
last year being a six seed
and having to go on the
road," star quarterback
Aaron Rodgers said. "You
take on a different attitude
as a team as the road team
going into a hostile environ-
ment. I think that prepares
us for the mindset that the
opposing team is going to
have. It is a different feeling
and last year we just got in
and this year we had a run
and got a bye. So it is a dif-
ferent feeling but last year
really helped.
"I think it helps us.
because we made the run,
we know what it is like and
we know the pressure that
we are going to be under.
It is a little different feel
because we were the big
underdog starting in the
postseasonlast year and we
made a run. We are the No.
1 seed now, so it is a differ-
ent feeling."


In their last home playoff
game, though; the Packers
were beaten 23-20 in over-
time by the Giants for the
2007 NFC championship.
Guess who comes calling at
Lambeau Field on Sunday.
Regardless, there's only
one place Rodgers and his
teammates want to be this
weekend.
"There is something
about having a home
playoff game, having our
crowd here with their noise
and the way they can be,"
Rodgers said. "We have a
great opponent this week,
so we know we are going to
have a tough challenge and
we.are looking forward to a
home playoff game."

On the fly
Turns out, the play that
sprung Demaryius Thomas,
for his garhe-winning TD
last Sunday was hatched at
halftime.
Noticing the Pittsburgh
Steelers were bringing their
safeties down low on first
down when the Broncos
presented a certain look,
offensive coordinator Mike
McCoy drew up a play to
attack that tendency.
He thenwaited forjustthe
right moment to unleash it.
When the Broncos
received the ball first in
overtime, McCoy dialed up
the route he diagrammed
on the drawing board.
Thomas' eyes lit up as
he went out wide because


it was just as McCoy had
envisioned. Thomas flew
off the line of scrimmage.
cut into the middle of the
field and Tim Tebow hit
him in stride.
Thomas stiff-armed cor-
nerback Ike Taylor and was
gone, beating safety Ryan
Mundy for an 80-yard score
that took-all of 11 seconds.
"We said it might come
to this play," Thomas said.
"That's exactly how it hap-
pened."
The Broncos had shown
that formation on several
occasions, with Eddie Royal
usually going in motion
before Tebow handed the
ball to Willis McGahee up
the middle.
This was just a little wrin-
kle on the fly. Actually, a big
wrinkle.
"I was talking to
Demaryius before the
series," McCoy explained.
"I said, 'If we win the toss,
this is what we're going to
go to. If they play the right
coverage we could end in a
hurry."'

Top seeds
If you are a No. 1 seed,
history says it's better to be
an NFC team in the second
round of the playoffs.
Since the NFL moved to
a 12-team playoff format in
1990, No. 1 seeds in the NFC
are 18-3 (.857) in the divi-
sional round. In the AFC, the
No. 1 seed is 12-9 (.571).
Recently, leading either


standings has been a dan-
gerous spot. In four of the
last six years, the AFC's
No. 1 seed lost after sitting
out the wild-card weekend.
In the NFC, it's three of the
last four seasons after never
happening before.
Last year, the Patriots fell
to the Jets. In 2008, the
Titans lost to the Ravens. In
2006, New England knocked
off San Diego, and the pre-
vious year, Pittsburgh won
at Indianapolis.
Of those four AFC win-
ners, only the Steelers went
on to the Super Bowl, win-
ning it against Seattle.
In the NFC, Green Bay
beat Atlanta last year,
Philadelphia defeated the
New York Giants in 2008,
and Dallas lost to the Giants
in 2007.
The Packers and Giants
both went on to win the
Super Bowl those seasons.

Healthy Crabtree

Call him a diva, show-'
boat or big-timer, Michael
Crabtree doesn't much
care. He has heard it all
over the years.
San Francisco's third-
year wide receiver is finally
fully healthy he says he
has been for the past six
games or so from a sur-
gically repaired left foot that
slowed him for much of the
season, and determined to
keep San Francisco's spe-
cial 2011 run going well
into 2012.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 25 file photo, Green Bay Packers' Aaron Rodgers
looks for a receiver to make a pass during the second half
of an NFL football game against the Chicago Bears in Green
Bay, Wis. The last time the Packers faced the New York
Giants in the playoffs, Brett Favre ended his Packers career
with an interception in the NFC Championship game. Now
the Packers boast one of the most accurate quarterbacks in
the game with Rodgers, who will need to continue to avoid
interceptions with the weather turning bad for the divisional
playoff game scheduled for Jan. 15 against the Giants.


Champs have three leave early -


By JOHN ZENOR
Associated Press

TUSCALOOSA, Ala.
- Alabama All-Americans
Trent Richardson, Donfa
Hightower and Dre
Kirkpatrick have declared
for the NFL draft.
SRichardson- and
Kirkpatrick announced
their decisions Thursday
to skip their senior sea-
sons with the national
champions. Alabama
spokesman Jeff Purinton
said Hightower also 'isn't
returning.
Richardson and
Kirkpatrick are both pro-
jected as potential Top 10
picks while Hightower is
regarded as a potential
first-rounder.
Richardson won the
Doak Walker Award as
the nation's top running
back and was third in the
Heisman voting. He set
school single-season rush-
ing records with 1,679
yards and 21 touchdowns.
He and Hightower were
first-team AP All-America
selectionswhile Kirkpatrick
was a second-teamer.
The Tide lost three
underclassmen to the
NFL last year, but wound
up beating LSU 21-0 in
Monday night's national
title game. Kirkpatrick and
Richardson were part of
two national championship
teams.
Richardson said he made
the decision Wednesday
night. He went home to
Pensacola, from the national
championship game in New
Orleans to discuss his future
with family.
He said he wanted to
be able to take care of his
mother who he says has
Lupus and two young
daughters.
"This place has changed


Alabama running back Trent Richardson (3) runs against LSU defensive end
Barkevious Mingo (49) during the second half of the BCS National Championship college
football game Monday in New Orleans.


my life," Richardson said.
"It really turned me from
a teenager to a man, and a
grown man at that."
Hightower was eligible
for a fifth year of eligibility
after missing most of the
2009 national champion-
ship season with a knee
injury. He wasn't present
at the news conference,
and Saban only talked
about Richardson and
Kirkpatrick.
'These two young men
have done a fabulous job of
representing the University
of Alabama, their family,
themselves," Saban said.
"Both guys have done


a really good job academi-
cally."
He said both play-
ers pledged to complete
their degrees and are'
about 20 credit hours shy.
Hightower, a team captain,
graduated in December.
The trio were part of two
national championships dur-
ing their careers, though
Hightower missed the first
championship game.
"These are the things
that we always dreamed
of," Kirkpatrick said.
"Playing for two national
champions is something
that's unheard of.
"Coach Saban has taught


me pretty much everything.
I call him my father."
Outland Trophy
Award-winning left tack-
le Barrett Jones had
already announced he's
returning for his senior
season.
Alabama had a school-
record four first-round
selections last year, includ-
ing underclassmen Marcell
Dareus, Julio Jones and
Mark Ingram.
Two seniors, safety
Mark Barron and lineback-
er Courtney Upshaw, are
also considered likely first-
rounders'from the nation's
top defense.


AP Sources: LSU CB Claiborne turning pro


By BRETT MARTEL
Associated Press

LSU All-American cor-
nerback Morris Claiborne
has decided to leave
school a year early to enter
the NFL draft, said two
people familiar with the
decision.
The people spoke to The
Associated Press on condi-
tion of anonymity because
LSU has not announced
Claiborne's decision. LSU
has scheduled a press con-


ferenceThursday afternoon
with coach Les Miles.
Claiborne, who led LSU
with six interceptions this
season and returned one
for a touchdown, also won
the Jim Thorpe Award
as the nation's top defen-
sive back. In addition,
Claiborne was LSU's top
kickoff returned, averaging
25 yards per return with
one touchdown that went
99 yards at West Virginia.
He is projected to be a
potential top 10 pick in the


draft.
Claiborne, who is
from Shreveport, initially
came to LSU expecting
to play wide receiver but
was quickly converted
to defensive back and
played in seven games in a
reserve role as a true fresh-
man.
He started 12 games
as a sophomore opposite
2010 Thorpe Award win-
ner and current Arizona
Cardinal Patrick Peterson.
With teams often avoid-


ing throwing to Peterson's
side of the field, Claiborne
saw a lot of balls come his
way and responded with a
team-leading five intercep-
tions and also recovered a
fumble.
This season, he was part
of a defensive backfield
that included fellow All-
American Tyrann Mathieu.
Claiborne's 11 career
interceptions places him
in a tie with several other
players for sixth all-time
at LSU.


S- --* "- i
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Jeff Demps (28) loses his helmet after running a
play against Vanderbilt on Nov. 5.


Florida's Demps

picks track career

over football


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Florida
running back Jeff Demps is
giving up his football career
to focus on track and the
2012 Olympics.
Demps wants to vie for
a spot on the U.S. track
and field team. So he won't
attend any college foot-
ball all-star games or take
part in any NFL draft work-
outs.
"I can have the mindset of
a full-time track guy now,"
Demps said.
The senior started train-
ing with Florida's track
team this week and hopes
to return to competition
at the Virginia Tech Elite
Meet next month. He plans
to lose about 15 pounds
off his 190-pound playing
weight.
Demps finished his career
with 2,470 yards rushing
and 23 touchdowns. He had
569 yards rushing and six
touchdowns this past sea-
son. He also was a danger-
ous kickoff returned, aver-
aging 28.8 yards a return in
his four-year career.
On the track, Demps is


a four-time national cham-
pion. Demps is the two-time
defending NCAA Indoor
60-meter champion. He
showed Olympic potential
when he set a 100-meter
junior world record (10.01
seconds) at the 2008
Olympic Trials, challenging
Olympian Tyson Gay stride
for stride in the heat.
Training with Florida this
season should help Demps'
Olympic chances, especial-
ly working with head coach
Mike Holloway. Holloway
is an assistant coach for
the U.S. Olympic Team and
mainly works with sprinters
and hurdlers.
"What has made Jeff
unique is that Jeff has
always done very, very
good things in track and
field while doing lifting and
other things that football
players do," Holloway said.
"What that tells me is that
Jeff is a very special guy.
If you can run 9.9 (in the
100 meters) and run 6.5 (in
the 60 meters) and do the
things he has done, training
as a football-slash-track guy,
what happens when he is
just a track guy?"


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY. JANUARY 13. 2012


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY. JANUARY 13, 2012 4B


DILBERT
I CANT GIVE YOU
A RAISE BECAUSE THE
ELBONIAN DEBT CRISIS
HAS CREATED ECONOMIC
UNCERTAINTY.

r-f .-.


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
O MeTIE, L-A= WAT r4AUr 7EiT i JE I ...A4
AT NIG67T, X AK Po Z 14AVE R EA 1MM ANl LOOTING
MY'-ELF T7Yt -TO5cK MYmeL.F... 16 MY
QueiToN,., ANP LOOT L BIN rI
c LAATLEANP


DEAR ABBY


Sororoty sisters who support

paddling are behind the times


T~iT~


DEAR ABBY: I have
been accepted to a school
that's the alma mater of
several of my relatives. My
mother, several aunts and
other family members all
belonged to one sorority at
this college. They are urg-
ing me to pledge there and
uphold the family tradition.
They say they had
some of the best times of
their lives as members of
that sorority chapter The
members do well academi-
cally, as the sorority insists
on it They made lifelong
friends, and their soror-
ity contacts have been
extremely helpful person-
ally and professionally.
Although this chapter is
very exclusive and accepts
only the best-of-the-best, I
will have no problems get-
ting in, not only because
of my academic record but
also because I'm a "legacy."
So what's the problem?
This sorority chapter
still uses the paddle.
Technically they don't
haze that is, have any
initiation stunts but they
do use the paddle for dis-
ciplinary purposes. When
I mention my concerns
about the paddling to my
mother and aunts, they say
I should suck it up, as the
advantages far outweigh
the disadvantages. One of
my aunts said she thinks
the rules and discipline
would be beneficial for me
because she considers me


a moderately functioning
child with autism, ADHD
and behavioral issues.
I know my son's behav-
ior can be childish, rude
or inappropriate at times. I
have been fighting this bat-
tle every day since he was
2. I have seen every doctor
and therapist available and
exhausted every resource
I could find, and now we
have either aged out or my
son isn't "bad enough" to
be eligible.
However, he is still dif-
ficult to handle, and I still
need to buy groceries and
run errands. Sometimes
that parent you are giv-
ing the dirty looks to is
near the end of her rope
and could use a little
compassion or at least
silence from the peanut
gallery. What you see
isn't always what you get
- STRUGGLING MOM IN
LONG BEACH, MISS.
DEAR STRUGGLING
MOM: Please accept my
sympathy. As you and
other parents of children
,with disabilities deal with
the realities of daily liv-
ing, the last thing you (or
they) need is criticism
from strangers. If someone
makes a comment or gives
you a look, you should say,
"My son can't help himself;
he's autistic." It's the truth.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


p.- ~BL---F
FINANCIAL FPAUP
IWVESTIGATION K



-.


TH, ACCOUNTANT PASS D HIS LI
/ '/ ETeCTO gTEST.
'E WOULD I
\FILt T12f RE f T?


SIN ACCOUNTSS

lh - 4


13


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Give everything
you've got to your pro-
fessional plans. You can
impress someone with
your responsible attitude
and your. drive toget --,,
things done. Look for a
partnership that'can help
you explore new avenues.
Express what you want.

TAURUS (April 20-
May 20): Plan to attend
a conference, tradeshow
or anything that will help
increase your'earning
potential or expand your
mind. Openness to differ-
ent cultures, religions or
philosophy will help your
realize what you want to
accomplish. -*****k
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't let anyone take
advantage of you financial-
ly or emotionally. Expect
to face opposition and
prepare to protect your
reputation. Jealousy will
be behind any personal
affront you face. Stand
tall and stay close to the
people you can trust **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Home is your safe
haven, where you should
be putting your time and
effort. Fix up your digs
and work at improving any
personal relationships you
may have been neglecting
lately. Good fortune will
come from helping others.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Discuss your plans for the
future. Whatyo.yrg, try-
ing to accomplish is likely
to fit nicely with something
you are already doing.
Opportunity is present;
all you have to do is plant
a seed and help it grow.
Express the changes you
envision. ***-
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Pay more attention to
your image and how you
present yourself to others.
Sprucing up your looks
or broadening your inter-
ests will help you expand
friendships and connect
with people who have simi-
lar goals. Travel will bring
positive results. ***r
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
Work quietly behind the
scenes. A past partner will
want to reunite. Before you
decide to forgive and for-
get, establish some ground
rules. Love is in the stars,
and a romantic evening will
ease your stress and boost
your confidence. c***
SCORPIO (Oct.'23-Nov.
21): Lend a helping hand.
Your kindness will be
appreciated. A lead you
get will be helpful and will
bring an unfinished proj-
ect back to the forefront
A partnership will bring
renewed vision and inter-
est to your plans. ****


SAGITTARIUS '(Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Avoid a battle
you cannot win. An emo-
tional struggle is apparent,
and a problem with author-
ity figures will arise if you
aren't careful how you con-
duct yourself. Self-improve-
ment should be your goal,
not emotional negativity.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): An investment
will b'e successful. Doing
the work yourself will save
you money and ensure
the job gets done prop-
erly. Time is money, and
working to enhance your
surroundings or to buy or
sell something you own
will pay off handsomely.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): If you need help,
ask for it. Partnering with
someone will lower your
costs and help you get
twice as much done in half
the time. Someone from
your past will weigh heav-
ily on your mind and fit
into your plans extremely
well. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't sit back and
wait for someone else to
do the work. Size up your
situation and focus on get-
ting ahead on your own.
An interesting partnership
will develop due to your
ability to carry on regard-
less of who helps and who
doesn't ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: T equals R
"Y BKLRH OJ 'Y JEYEOV ENOBD ENYE
KBR GK L R J ENTKPDN; Y CH Y X OJ Y
SXBYGOV ENOBD ENYE GKLRJ CYJE
KBR." ARBBREN EXBYB

Previous Solution: "I've been trying for some time to develop a lifestyle that
doesn't require my presence." Garry B. Trudeau
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-13
CLASSIC PEANUTS


LUCKILY FOR US, OUR
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
GRANTED OUR CEO MORE
I STOCK OPTIONS SO HE
W ONT LEAVE DURING
UNCERTAIN TIMES.
^ ';K-I


WHAT
HAPPENS
JHEN THE
UNCER-
TAINTY
ENDS?


THEN HELL
EXERCISE
HIS STOCK
OPTIONS.


I


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


oe"


r5


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
kind of a "wild child."
Abby, I don't know if
you know anything about
sororities, but I'm asking
for an objective opinion
from someone not directly
involved. POSSIBLY
PADDLED PLEDGE
DEAR P.P.P: I joined a
sorority in college, and I
NEVER heard of a sorority
hitting pledges or active
members. Some fraterni-
ties may have allowed it,
but certainly not sororities.
Whether your aunt
thinks you could use the
discipline is beside the
point. Striking someone
with a paddle is assault
with a weapon. A young
man died a short time ago
in Florida because of the
kind of hazing this national
organization is winking
at. Are young women who
behave that way really the
kind of people you would
like to be lifelong friends?
If not, then pass on that
sorority!
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My son is
chronologically 12 and the
size of an adult, but emo-
tionally he is age 5. He's












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY. JANUARY 13, 2012


Lake City Reporter




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In Print and Online
vww.lakelityreporter.coni


Legal

PUBLIC NOTICE
A SPECIAL MEETING OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD'
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
HAS BEEN SCHEDULED ON
MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2012
COMMENCING AT 6:00 P.M. IN
THE AUDITORIUM OF THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE
COMPLEX LOCATED AT 372
WEST DUVAL STREET, LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA 32055. THE PUR--
POSE OF THE MEETING IS TO
DISCUSS FINANCIAL ISSUES
RELATED TO SUWANNEE VAL-
LEY TRANSIT AUTHORITY AND
TO ALLOW PRESENTATION OF
THE SAME.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS DISABILITIES
ACT, A PERSON NEEDING SPE-
CIAL ACCOMMODATIONS OR
AN INTERPRETER TO PARTICI-
PATE IN THIS MEETING
SHOULD CONTACT LISA K.B.
ROBERTS, 386-758-1006 OR
T.D.D. SERVICES 386-758-2139,
AT LEAST SEVEN DAYS PRIOR
TO THE MEETING.
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS
RELATED TO THE ABOVE
STATED MEETING, PLEASE
CONTACT THE BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AT 386-758-1005.
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Scarlet Frisina, Chairperson
ATTEST:
P. DeWitt Cason, Clerk of Court
(SEAL)
05529932
January 13, 20, 2012


020 Lost & Found

Found 2 puppies near
Birley and Pinemount.
Call 561 312-5620


Lost Eclectus Parrot. Vibrant
green, silky feathers, Male. price
Creek Rd & Peacock.
386-961-9188

100 Job
Opportunities

05530008
Housekeeper
On-call to fill in when needed.
Must be able to work evenings
or weekends.
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing. & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City,
Fl 32025 EOE/DFWP

05530066
Food service
professionals wanted.
Experienced Banquet Cook
Dishwashers
Banquet Servers
Must have a positive attitude,
ability to work well with people,
eagerness to learn, dedication to
quality, and have an eye for
detail and a willingness
to do what ever it takes to get
the job done.
Background Check Mandatory.
Application available at
Camp Weed, 11057 Camp
Weed Place, Live Oak


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation.,Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
Opportunities
BOOKKEEPER NEEDED
Must know Quickbooks and taxes.
Call 386-854-0511
For interview.

Child care center looking for
qualified and experienced
Director. Apply in person at Wee
Care in Columbia City.
S15 Temp Farmworkers 2/14/12-
12/14/12. Workers will plant,
cultivate, thin, harvest, grade &
pack fruit & vegetables. Subject to
random drug testing at employer's
expense. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Work tools,
supplies and equipment provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
for non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract, or
earlier, if appropriate. Worksite in
George CO, MS. $9.30/hr.
Applicants report or send a resume
to the nearest FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job #44684 or call
850-921-3466. Courtney Farms -
Lucedale, MS
GENERAL OFFICE/
BOOKKEEPING
Must know QuickBooks &
Microsoft Programs. Punctual.
Please send resume: PO BOX 830,
Lake City, Florida 32056
MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
386-752-9754
RECEPTIONIST/CLERK.
Part-time to full-time. Position is
part time to mid-April. Candidate
must be able to work evenings and
Saturday. After tax season
position will go to full-time
Monday Friday, Candidate must
be dependable, able to multi-task,
be proficient in QuickBooks,
Word and Excel, 10 key by touch,
know general office skills as well
as have excellent telephone eti-
quette and people skills. Salary
based on skills and experience.
Fax resume with references to
386-755-7331
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Wanted: mature person to live in
and care for elderly woman must
cook clean and give meds. Day#'s
386-75515099"of 288-1078" '

120 Medical
1 U Employment

05530049
Physical Thrapy Center hiring a
Physical Therapist/Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. F/T or P/T.
Hands-on training w/some exp.
preferred. Personal training or
fitness background a plus. Basic
knowledge of anatomy and
exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills,
great attitude and be willing to
learn. Extreme motivation
promotes rapid growth. Send
resume'to: pta714@hotmail.comn
or fax to 386-755-3165.
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


240 Schools &
240 Education

05529 83
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-01/23/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances
4 BURNER stainless steel
gas range. Less than
3 yrs old. $400.
386-205-7713

407 Computers

DELL Computer,
S$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Antique round side table.
Dark wood.94" around,
29" tall. $50.
386-754 4094

420 Wanted to Buy
,K&H TIMBER
SWe Buy Pine Hardwood &, ,,
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
S Call'386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales
Church Yard Sale. Sat. 8-?,256
NW Carol Place. 90 W right on
Turner Rd., left on Carol P Fur-
niture, collectibles, clothes, more
HUGH SALE Sat. 8 -3 On
Branford Hwy right before S&S
and B&B. Movies, clothes, shoes,
purses, comforters, lots more.
MOVING SALE Fri & Sat.
8am-? 965 Savannah Cr.
Plantation S/D. Fur., bowflex,
books, clothes yard tools & more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Wed Sun. North 41 on Michelle
place. Just past 1-10. Look for
signs. Appliances, furniture, AC's,
and Much much more!!!


MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resume to P.O. Box 440 Miscellaneous
805 Lake City, Florida 32056
IM IT REPORT[ 7000 WATT Troybilt generator
.. T p TE 10,000 watt surge. new in 2011
SB tv S $750.00
I 386-205-7713
S BLUE OX Tow Bar.
Like new. Used 2 years.
386-752-9645

REPORTER Classifieds

..... .In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


450 GoodThings
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy. sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

6 0 Mobile Homes
V 30 for Rent
1 BR/1 BA Furnished, all utilities
included + satellite,
$125 week, $125 deposit.
Call 386-758-6939
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3/2 SW MH on .5 acre lot of small
SMHP. Superb Quality, Full Re-
model, 140 NW Reflections Gin.
Lake City, FL, No Pets. F, L&D


3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between I-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

64 Mobile Homes
640 for Salew
2011 Blowout
'4/2 Doublqwide only $34,995
On your land or mine
Call John T 386-752-1452

4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
Hallmark Real Estate
4/3 DW w/14X76' porch on 5 ac.
in Ellisville area. 2 carports,
storage, fenced pasture. $99,900
#78295 Ginger Parker 365-2135
S2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake'City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Bank Repo!! 3br/2ba Triplewide
$999 Down $377 month.
Call Paula 386-292-6290
E-mail
ammonspaula@yahoo.com
Beautiful, Brand new 4/2
manufac-
tured home on 5 acres in Lake
City, Fl. $9,900.00 down, $995.00
per month. Easy Qualifying**
Owner Financing**
Ready to move in. Call Today!!
512-663-0065.
COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
Scan send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.
NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743


640 MobileHomes
640 for Sale
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Mobile Home Dealer Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating Their Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 4/2, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8 to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
ONLY $59,995
New 2012 4br/2ba 28X80 Inc.
Delivery, set up, A/C,
skirting & steps.
Call 386-752-1452
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
.North Pointe Homes., .--
Gainesville, (352)872-5566
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


650 Mobile Home
650 & &Land
Affordable Lg. Home on 2 ac.,
being sold as is $59,900
MLS 74862 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

S710 Unfurnished Apt
7 For Rent
0 5 3 0 7 W I D O G % T

Voe etO heBs kan

2/ $49


----




confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


iBUYIj



FIDIT


rjSEm


Classified Department: 755-5440










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY. JANUARY13. 2012


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Rental in 55+ neighborhood.
2 bedroom/I bath Duplek across
from Clubhouse. No Pets.
Call Denise.@ 386-752-5290
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-315-2509 or 965-5560
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626


750 Business &
5J Office Rentals
2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1 lOOsq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fiGe Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. S750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office. Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
REALTY, INC.
MLS#76668 Buildable lot.
High and dry.
Call Denise @386-752-5290
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Hallmark Real Estate
A home for all seasons. Lg patio,
fireplace. 4/2 brick & cedar.
Just reduced $20,000 #71691
Janet Creel 386-719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Just Listed. 3/2 on a Terraced hill.
Brick w/fenced yard. All applian-
ces. Owner Financed offered.
#79683 Janet Creel 386-719-0382
3/2 Brick Home, fireplace, fenced
back yard, great room & in quiet
area. No pets. Rent k/option to
purchase available. 386-752-5035
X 3114 7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-21-72


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
In town. 3/2 Concrete Block home.
fenced ard. 5$149. 900
NLS 71999. Elaine Tolar
386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D.
5129,900 New AC in 2010.
Elaine K. Tolar. 755-6488
MLS= 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Wonderful home on Lake. 4/3
Fireplace. many upgrades. MLS
76085, Elaine Tolar 755-6488 or
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Neat & Tidy remodeled 2/2 open
floor plan. MLS# 77943
$94.500 Mary Brown Whitehurst
386-965-0887
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot.
on the Suwannee.
Well & anerobic septic system.
MLS 78842 $45,000
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/lst time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only S57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 365-5146
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in
High Springs. Real wood floors,
stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS #79601 $178,000 623-6896
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Immaculate home on 10 + acres in
Wellborn. Tile floors, fenced, barn
w/workshop. $309, 900 MLS
79650, Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent neighborhood. 4br/2ba.
2469 sqft on 1 plus acres.
MLS 79654, Lori Giebeig
Simpson 386-365-5678
COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence Vlg $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669
CYPRESS LANDING! 3BR/2BA
w/lg great room, split floor plan
& 2-car garage $105,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79634


810 Homefor Sale
EASTSIDE VILLAGE
Realt\. Inc. 2 bedroom 2 bath.
1 ar ar-iae. Priced to sell.
Call Denise C 386-~2-5290

NICE BR.2BA D\VMH a fenced
'.ard plus double carport &
wkkshop S39.900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY. LNC.
755-5110 ='9078
ONLY S38.500 for 4BR/2BA
concrete block home: apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
LNC. 755-5110 =79477
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
brick home newly reno\ ated &
ineround pool. fenced \ard
S69.500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY. INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST! Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping S28.500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505

820 Farms&
Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn. New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site. owner fin,
no down, $39.900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
20 ac Wooded tract.
10 m iles from Cedar Key.
MLS 78886, $70,000.
Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
To place your
classified ad call
755-5440


830 Commercial
8 Property-
Hallmark Real Estate
Rental Investment- 4 duplexes
(S apartments) All units are rented
and in good shape.
#69380 Janet Creel 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate Camp-
eround/RV Park \/67 pull thrus.
cabins & mobile home. Showers.
clubhouse +2 storv owner home.
#78793 Janet Creel 719-0382

A860 Investment
86 Property
Great Investment in city limits.
Both units occupied.
MLS 79206 $50.000.
Brittanv Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
GREAT INVESTMENT
S2 units w/ 2br/lba, 2 stories
w/balconies. MLS 79271.
$230,000., Brittany Stoeckert at
Results Realty. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


Lake City Reporter


Contact us


at the paper,


CLASSIFIED ADS -

386-755-5440



SUBSCRIPTION

386-755-5445



ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

386-752-1293



ElCTRONIC ADS SEND T8

ads@lakecityrepot.W


Mon-Fr: a.8m.-t spi







-MEastDuiSl^
Lake tyFLoRida32055


720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, 1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
No Pets!! 386-752-3225
3br/2ba Split floor plan, 1850sf +
garage. Quiet Cul-de-sac, 4 mi SW
of Hwy 90. Privacy fence, Lg
rooms, Jacuzzi tub in Master BR.
$1195mo $800.dep. 386-984-5872
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard,-fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
4BR/2BA CH/A 1 miles
South of Kens BBQ on 245 (Price
Creek Rd). $700. mo $500 sec.
Ref. Req'd. 386-752-4597
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
NICE 3BR/2.5BA in Russwood
S/D $995. mo. $750 security.
Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
S Office Rentals
05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' S600/mth
3568 sq' 52973/mth
8300 sq' S5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle. GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor


Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT "'









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-623-9026
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


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SSIFIEDS


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