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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01748
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 11, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01748
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






- 12- 2 ,

A05 SMIA L -. -


Y


Reporter


Wednesday, January I I, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 293 E 75 cents


Water outlook




'pretty grim'

Suwannee's average
flow is lowest since
'27 at some points.

By GORDON JACKSON
gackson@lakecityreporter.com
ALACHUA Residents
in the 14-county Suwannee
River Water Management
District are concerned
about Jacksonville Electric
Authority's permit to draw
up to 155 million gallons
of water a day from the
Floridan aquifer.
But there is another
major factor impacting sur-
face and groundwater lev-
els in North Florida, said
Megan Wetherington, the
water district's senior pro-
fessional engineer.
The region's average
rainfall deficit for the past
year is approaching eight
and a half inches and the
prevailing La Nina weath- TOP: Motorists near Branford travel along the Frank R. Norr
expect dryer than average systematically drying up. ABOVE: Columbia High School stL
weather through at least 16, wade through the dried out vegetation of Alligator Lake c
mile through the dried lake without getting wet.'It's just horr
WATER continued on 3A fishing here.'


rPiuout uy .AiSfun nmAlT In I .fnri.vFlvc UtlL y n wcpulnc
is Bridge over the Suwannee River, which has been
dents Austin Bacon (left), 16, and Jacob Wheeler,
on Monday. Bacon said that he could easily walk a
ible,' Bacon said. 'This lake used to have such good


83-year-old woman in golf cart


survives run-in with tractor-trailer


From staff reports

An 83-year-old O'Brien woman with a
revoked license drove a golf cart into
the path of a tractor-trailer and survived
Monday afternoon.
Margaret Lee Ward was taken to Shands
at Live Oak with minor injuries, according


CRA master

plan approved

for council

consideration

By GORDON JACKSON
giackson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Community Redevelopment
Advisory Committee approved a master plan
Tuesday that will determine the way areas of the
city grow in the future.
The plan is designed to promote education,
culture and the arts as key economic drivers,
encourage the use of underutilized and vacant
structures, and prevent commercial encroachment
and strengthen connections in residential neighbor-
hoods.
In the historic downtown district, the plan
addresses mixed use overlay and redevelopment
of cultural landmarks such as the Blanche Hotel, as
well as ways to find uses for vacant and underuti-
lized buildings, properties and parking lots.
The plan addresses hospital expansion, wetlands
conservation, infrastructure improvements and
economic development Improvements are planned
to the Lake Desoto area, neighborhoods in historic
and downtown areas, and commercial corridors
such as Duval Street, SW Main Boulevard and
Bascom Norris Drive.
The intent of Tuesday's meeting was for the plan
to be approved by the city Planning and Zoning
Board, followed by a vote by the CRA advisory com-
mittee. Both groups approved the master plan by
unanimous votes. Both boards had to approve the
plan to ensure there were no conflicts between the
master plan and the city's comprehensive plan.
The next step is for the plan to be considered by
the city council at an upcoming meeting.
Committee chairwoman, Lake City Council mem-
ber Melinda Moses, said it's important that the
CRA continued on 3A


to Florida Highway Patrol reports.
Ward was driving a Carryall 6 golf cart
west on East C.R 349 in O'Brien. Despite a
stop sign and red flashing light, she did not
stop and crossed U.S. 129, traveling into
the path of a northbound tractor trailer,
according to police.
The truck driver, William N. Bradshaw,


of Live Oak, swerved to the left to avoid
hitting the golf cart although the golf cart's
right side struck the tractor trailer's left
front
Ward was charged with driving with a
revoked license and violation of traffic con-
trol devices.


In honor of Dr. King


LAURA HAMPSONILake City Reporter
Columbia City Elementary Student Council members spoke about Martin Luther
King Jr.'s life and work Tuesday night at the Columbia County School District meet-
ing. Pictured are Sarah Griffin, council secretary (left to right); Tyler Yaxley, public-
ity chair; Colin Broome, president; and Seth Rutledge, vice president, speaking at
the microphone. Martin Luther King Jr. Day is Monday, Jan. 16.


NEW HAMPSHIRE


Romney

cements

top status

with win


By DAVID ESPO and
STEVE PEOPLES
Associated Press
CONCORD, N.H. Mitt
Romney cruised to a solid victory
in the New Hampshire primary
Tuesday night, picking up steam
from his first-place finish in the
lead-off Iowa caucuses and firmly
establishing himself as the man
to beat for the Republican presi-
dential nomination.
"Tonight we made history,"
Romney told cheering support-
ers before pivoting to a stinging
denunciation of President Barack
Obama. "The middle class has been


crushed,"
in the past
three years,
he said, "our
debt is too
high and our
opportuni-
ties too few"
- remarks
that made
clear -he
intends to
be viewed as
the party's
nominee in
waiting after
only two con-
tests.
His rivals
said other-
wise, look-
ing ahead
to South
Carolina on


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presi-
dential candidate-
Mitt Romney gives
a thumbs up as
he campaigns in
Manchester, N.H. on
Tuesday.

Jan. 21 as the


best place to stop the former
Massachusetts governor. Already,
several contenders and commit-
tees supporting them. had put
down heavy money to reserve
time for television advertising
there.
Even so, the order of finish -
Ron Paul second, followed by Jon
Huntsman, Newt Gingrich and
Rick Santorum scrambled the
field and prolonged the increas-
ingly desperate competition to
emerge as the true conservative
rival to Romney.
Romney fashioned his victory
despite a sustained assault by
rivals eager to undermine his
claim as the contender best situ-
ated to beat Obama and help
reduce the nation's painfully high
unemployment. Gingrich led the
way, suggesting at one point that
Romney was a corporate raider,
rhetoric that the front-runner's
defenders said was more suitable
to a Democratic opponent than a
conservative Republican.
Returns from 52 percent of New
Hampshire precincts showed
Romney with 37 percent of the
vote, followed by Texas Rep Paul
with 23 percent, former Utah Gov.
Huntsman with 17 percent and
former House Speaker Gingrich
and former Pennsylvania Sen.
Santorum with 10 percent each.
With his victory, Romney became
the first Republican to sweep the
first two contests in competitive
races since Iowa gained the lead-
off spot in presidential campaigns
in 1976.
Romney won in Iowa by a scant
eight votes over Santorum; and
gained barely a quarter of the
vote there.
On Tuesday, he battled not only
his rivals but also high expecta-
tions as the ballots were count-
ed, particularly since his pursu-
ers had virtually conceded New
Hampshire, next-door to the state
Romney governed for four years.
Seeking to undercut Romney's
victory, Gingrich and others sug-


ROMNEY continued on 3A


1 III
1 8426 0002


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Chance of storms
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ....... ..
People........
Obituaries . ..
Advice & Comics
Puzzles ........


4A
2A
5A
4B
. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
CD gives Sagal
music outlet.


COMING
THURSDAY
Local news
roundup.


I


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11. 2012

Celebrity Birthdays


Tuesday: A I Tuesday:- Tuesday:
N/A Afternoon: 0-9-9 Afternoon: 2-2-2-2
Night: 1-7-4 Nigh: 9-9-3-4


Monday:
2-4-12-29-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



CD gives Sagal her musical outlet


NEW YORK Somebody get
Katey Sagal a record deal no
really.
Although she's happy with her
day job on the successful F/X series
"Sons of Anarchy," in her heart,
she's a singer and she gets a
chance to show it.as part of a new
collection of songs from the show's
first four seasons.
"I love being an actor, but there's
something about playing music
that's a gift," the 57-year-old Sagal
admits.
In the past, Sagal recorded
on Elektra and
Casablanca Records.
But times have
changed in the music
business for her, and
she paid to record
her last album. Sagal
yearns to record
again in a more tradi-
tional manner. Sagal
"I'm still old
school. I have to go in the studio
with a producer."
"Music From Sons of Anarchy:
Season 14" features three songs by
Sagal, and represents a return to her
main love. Though Sagal gained her
fame as an actress, her first big break
in show business was in music.
Sagal sang with everyone from
Gene Simmons to Bob Dylan to
Etta James. She toured as a backup
vocalist with Bette Midler. She was
enjoying moderate success when a
friend persuaded her to go for an
acting job. By that time Sagal, the
daughter of director Boris Sagal and
who had acted briefly in her teens
on television, was in her late twen-
ties.
"I didn't realize until someone said
that I should audition for a play, and
I did, and I got it, and all of a sudden
I was an actor," Sagal says.


Sagal's success began with her
role as the tartish Peg Bundy in the
sitcom "Married With Children,"
which ran from 1987 to 1997.
Another series, "Eight Rules for
Dating My Teenage Daughter,"
and her role as the voice of Leela
in Matt Groening's animated series
"Futurama" sealed her fate as sitcom
royalty. But she has never stopped
playing music.

LA. council tentatively
OKs porn condoms rule
LOS ANGELES An ordinance
that would require porn actors to
wear condoms during film shoots
was tentatively approved by the City
Council on Tuesday.
The council voted 11-1 for the pro-
posal. The ordinance still requires
a second vote next week for final
approval.
Under the ordinance, porn pro-
ducers would have to provide and
require the use of condoms on set in
order to obtain permits to film in the
nation's second-largest city.
The council also agreed to form a
group made up of law enforcement
and state occupational safety regula-
tors that will hammer out how to
enforce the new rules.
Several members of the AIDS
Healthcare Foundation, which has
long advocated for mandatory con-
dom use in adult films, urged council
members to approve the ordinance.
The group last month said it gath-
ered enough signatures to put the
issue on the June ballot.

Show's gay character
acceptance stuns creator
PASADENA, Calif. One of the
biggest surprises for the creator of


"Modern Family" is how Cameron
and Mitchell, the gay parents who
are among the show's lead charac-
ters, are accepted by the audience.
Steven Levitan said Tuesday that
it's not just America: The Emmy-
winning comedy is shown around
the world, including in Vatican City.
He said it's unusual for him to
hear any objections to Mitchell and
Cameron, portrayed by actors Jesse
Tyler Ferguson and Eric Stonestreet.
He said at a news conference that
it's easy for people to object to gay
parents in concept
"When you make it personal and
show the people have.good hearts
and are extremely committed, loving
Parents, it's hard not to love them,"'
he said. "I'm pleasantly surprised
with the world's reaction to that par-
ticular part of our modern family."
Levitan said he and his staff
impose a lot of pressure on them-
selves to keep standards up, even
though creative ups and downs are
almost unavoidable for long-running
TV series.

'Wolf Hall' publication
sequel moved up to May
NEW YORK U.S. publication
of the sequel to Hilary Mantel's
Booker Prize-winning best-seller
"Wolf Hall" has been moved from
November to May.
Publisher Henry Holt and Co.
announced Tuesday that "Bring Up
the Bodies" will now come out May
22, three days after the British edi-.
tion of Mantel's latest nofel about
the Tudor court in the 16th century.
The release on both sides of the
Atlantic marks a macabre anniver-
sary: 476 years since the beheading
of Anne Boleyn, the second wife of
Henry VIII.
(AP)


Producer Grant Tinker
is 87.
Actor Rod Taylor is 82.
The former prime
minister of Canada, Jean
Chretien, is 78.
Actor Mitchell Ryan
is 78.
Country singer Naomi
Judd is 66.
World Golf Hall of
Famer Ben Crenshaw is 60.
Musician Vicki
Peterson (The Bangles) is
54.
Actress Kim Coles is


50.
Christian musician
Jim Bryson (MercyMe)
is 44.
Rock musician Tom
Dumont (No Doubt) is 44.
Singer Mary J. Blige
is 41.
Actress Amanda Peet
is 40.
Actor Rockmond
Dunbar is 39.
Reality TV star Jason
Wahler (TV: "Laguna
Beach"; "The Hills") is
25.


Daily Scripture
"But just as he who called you is
holy, so be holy in all you do; for
it is written: 'Be holy, because I
am holy."'


- 1 Peter 1:15-16 NIV


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .................755-5445
(circulation @lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .............. $26.32
24 Weeks ................. $48.79
52 Weeks ................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax
Mail rates
12 Weeks................. $41.40
24 Weeks ............... $82.80
52 Weeks ............... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections.and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


GOP raises ne
$7.5M at ses
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Republicans
keeping their large f
raising advantage ov
rival Democrats.
Campaign reports
Tuesday showed tha
the Republican Party
Florida raised nearly
million in the final th
months of 2011. Tha
the best fundraising
ter the party had las
The Florida Demo
Party, by contrast, ra
just over $1.78 million
Republicans, who
trol state government
received donations f
those deeply involve
the fight over casino
just started in the Fl
Legislature. A subsidy
of Genting, the com-
pany that wants to bt
casino in Miami, dor
$200,000 while an ar
casino opponent Dis
also donated $165,00
Seminole Tribe of Fl
gave the party $175,
'Another large chu
money came from B
Cross and Blue Shie
Florida.

Anthony claim
computer hac
ORLANDO Case
Anthony says in her
tion report that her (
puter was recently h
The probation rep
released by the Flor
Department of Corr
on Tuesday shows
Anthony told her pr
officer that her com]
had private videos th
had recorded.
The probation offi
describes Anthony a
upset that the videos
downloaded from he
puter and put on Yot
Video clips surface
online last week of
Anthony talking to a
era in what she desc
as her video diary.


early
sion

are
und-
er

filed
It
y of
'$7.5


Casey Anthony is serv-
ing a year of probation at
an undisclosed location in
Florida on a check fraud
charge. The 25-year-old
was acquitted last July
of killing her 2-year-old
daughter, Caylee.

Scott struggling
with low numbers


iree TALLAHASSEE Gov.
t was Rick Scott remains pretty
quar- much under water with
t year. Florida voters.
icratic A new poll released
ised Tuesday by Quinnipiac
in. University showed 38 per-
con- cent of the 1,412 registered
it, voters responding on a
rom random telephone survey
d in taken between Jan. 4-8 gave
s that the first-term Republican a
orida positive job approval com-
diary pared to 50 percent who
rated Scott's job perfor-
uild a mance negatively. The poll
nated has a margin of error of
m of plus or minus 2.6 percent-
ney age points.,
)0. The The 38 percent approval
lorida rating though was the best
000. Scott has received since
nk of taking office a year ago and
lue better than the Legislature,
ld of which was seen positively
by a third of respoAdents
compared to 49 percent
IS negative.
Scott delivered his
ked second State of the State
address Tuesday as Florida
pby lawmakers kicked off the
proba-
rom- 2012 legislative session.
backed.
ort Poll: Residents
ida OK with gambling
sections
TALLAHASSEE A new
obation poll shows Florida voters
puter approve of bringing Las
hat she Vegas style casinos to the
state by a small margin
cer and nearly three-fourths
is say gambling is not mor-
s were ally wrong.
r com- Independents,
uTube. Democrats and men most
ed strongly supported the
idea of having casinos in
cam- Florida while Republicans
:ribed and women were nearly
evenly divided on the sub-


ject.
A random telephone
survey of 1,412 registered
voters taken from Jan. 4-8
by Quinnipiac University
showed 48 percent in favor
of casino gambling in the
state compared to 43 per-
cent who were opposed.
,However, 61 percent said
they believed casinos
would be good for the
state's economy to 33 per-
cent who disagreed. The
survey has a margin of
error of plus or minus 2.6
percentage points.

Couple found dead
in Tampa home
TAMPA- Deputies say
a man and a woman were
found dead in an exclusive
north Tampa neighborhood.
Hillsborough County
Sheriffs spokeswoman .
Debbie Carter says the
bodies of 76-year-old Hector
Rivera and 55-year-old
Debra Rivera were discov-
ered Monday night inside a
home in the Avila subdivi-
sion.
Carter says the sheriffs
office received a call just
before 8 p.m. Monday.
Responding deputies found
two bodies at the home.
Deputies obtained a
search warrant around 3
a.m. Tuesday and began
processing the scene.

Woman dies in
golf cart crash
MELBOURNE The
Florida Highway Patrol
says a central Florida
woman has died from inju-
ries sustained in a golf cart
crash.
Troopers say 75-year-
old Elizabeth Sherman
lost control of her golf
cart Sunday afternoon as
she drove, along a road
in her Melbourne golf
course community. She
died Monday at Holmes
Regional Medical Center
in Melbourne.
(AP)


THE WEATHER


,CHANCE MOSTLY. i PARTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
TORMS SUNNY CLOUDY SUNNY SUNNY


11 69 145 HI 70m L42 HI 5 LO I HI59 LO 31 HI 63 L 33


I


S- 69/47, a City
SJ69/ lacksonille Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee* .Lake City ill, 4' Daytona Beach
69/46 69/4 D na Bea Ft. Lauderdale
...Pensacola Gainesl 7 aaBeae Fort Myers
63/48 ,Pat7a city 70/48. 75J53 Gainesvllle
68/50 Ocala Jacksonville
'72/49 * vI, W t


Tampa
73/58/


Ft.Myei
79/60


K
I


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low.
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


72
50
66
42
85 in 1937
19 in 2010

0.00"
0.06"
0.06"
1.05"
1.05"


Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
77/53 75/58 Miamke
Miami
Naples
West Palm Bead Ocala
77/60 Orlando
1" Ft Lauderdale Panama City
fS. 79/64 0 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
76/61 Miami Tampa
7/ W7/63 Valdosta
. West. W. Palm Beach


79/70


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.


7:28 a.m.
5:49 p.m.
7:28 am.
5:50 p.m.

8:31 p.m.
8:52 a.m.
9:33 p.m.
9:29 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb.
16 23 30 7
Last New First Full


On this date in
1988, snow and
high winds in Ut
resulted in a rift
car pile-up along
Interstate 15. W
in Wyoming gus
to 115 mph at
Rendezvous Pea


1
umnlm
60 iulesto bun
Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Thursday
;1 58 3
71/54/s
79/62/pc
78/56/s
71/46/pc
70/44/pc
78/67/sh
70/42/pc
79/64/pc
75/59/pc
72/46/pc
75/55/s
69/41/pc
67/31/pc
71/39/pc
73/54/s
71/39/s
77/61/pc


Friday
67 47 s
64/41/pc
77/59/pc
73/46/pc
58/34/pc
60/33/pc
76/66/pc
58/31/pc
77/59/pc
72/51/pc
61/37/pc
68/45/pc
53/36/s
52/32/s
55/29/pc
64/44/pc
54/29/s
74/54/pc


p-
An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com
weather.com


Forecasts, data and
graphics 0 2012 Weather
'I^ V' Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weatherJ www.weatherpublisher.com




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FLORIDA

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Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
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Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
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lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11. 2012 3A


ROMNEY: Solidifies status as Republican front-runner with N.H. victory
Continued From Page 1A


gested in advance that
anything below 40 percent
or so would indicate weak-
ness by the nomination
front-runner.
They didn't mention
that Sen. John McCain's
winning percentage in the
2008 primary was 37 per-
cent.
Romney's win was worth
at least four delegates to
the Republican National
Convention next summer.
Paul earned at least two
delegates and Huntsman
at least one. Another four
remained to be awarded,
based on final vote totals.
'-Tonight we celebrate,"
Romney told his support-
ers. 'Tomorrow we go
back to work."
Rightly so. Already,
candidates and political
action committees aligned
with them were reserving
enormous amounts of tele-
vision time for the first-in-
the-South primary in little
more than a week.
Unlike Iowa and New
Hampshire, where unem-
ployment is well below the
national average, jobless-
ness is far higher in South
Carolina. That creates a
different political environ-
ment for the race.
Texas Gov. Rick
Perry, who skipped New
Hampshire to get a head
start in South Carolina,
said Tuesday's results
showed "the race for a
conservative alternative
to Mitt Romney remains
wide open."
Huntsman had staked
his candidacy on a
strong showing in New
Hampshire, and he
announced after the polls
closed that he had passed
his own test. "Where we
stand is a solid position
and we go south from
here," he said.
About one-third of
Republican" voters inter-
viewed as they left their
polling places said the
most important factor
in choosing a candidate


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former Massachusetts Gpv. Mitt Romney waves to supporters at the Romney for President New Hampshire primary night rally at Southern New Hampshire
University in Manchester, N.H., Tuesday. Behind Romney are his sons Tagg and Craig and his wife Ann.


was finding someone who
could defeat Obama in the
fall. Romney won their
support overwhelmingly.
He ran even with
Huntsman among the one-
quarter of the voters who
cited experience as the
most important factor in
selecting a candidate to
support.
Paul ran first among
voters who cited moral
character or true conser-
vatism.
As was the case last
week in Iowa, the economy
was the issue that mattered
most to voters, 61 percent
of those surveyed. Another
24 percent cited record fed-
eral deficits.


Romney carried the first
group and split the second
with Paul.
The survey results came
from interviews conducted
for The Associated Press
and the television networks
with 2,636 voters across
the state. It had a margin
of sampling error of plus or
minus 3 percentage points.
New Hampshire has a
rich history of humbling
favorites, front-runners and
even an occasional incum-
bent.
The state's Republican
voters embarrassed
President George H.W.
Bush in 1992, when he won
but was held to 53 per-
cent of the vote against Pat


Buchanan, running as an
insurgent in difficult eco-
nomic times. Buchanan,
who never held public
office, won the primary
four years later over Sen.
Bob Dole of Kansas, who
was the nominee in the
fall.
'In 2000, national front-
runner George W. Bush-
rolled into the state after
a convincing first-place'fin-
ish in Iowa but wound up
a distant second behind
McCain. Bush later won
the GOP nomination and
then the presidency.
Twelve Republican
National Convention del-
egates were at stake on
Tuesday, out of 1,144 need-


WATER: Surface levels have reached record lows
Continued From Page 1A


March, Wetherington told
board members Tuesday at
the agency's monthly meet-
ing in Alachua City Hall.
A water shortage adviso-
ry is in effect in the district,
meaning people are urged
to eliminate unnecessary
water use. The district's
advisory limits landscape
irrigation to once day a
week between November
and March.
"Overall, the story is
pretty grim," Wetherington
told the audience of about
50 people.
Gauges at all Suwannee
River and tributary loca-
tions, with the exception
of one at the Alapaha River
near Statenville, were show-
ing extremely low flows.
Average daily flows for the
past 60- and 180-day peri-
ods near Branford were
the lowest taken on the
river since gauging began
in 1931, Wetherington's
report said.
Sixty- and 180-day flows
on the Suwannee River


near Ellaville were the low-'
est since 1927, when gaug-
ing began there, the report
said.
Groundwater levels in
86 percent of the monitor-
ing wells in the 14-county
region were in the bottom
10 percent of all recorded
levels and 72 percent of
those wells were in the bot-
tom five percent, according
to the report.
"If we do get some
rain, it will help a lot,"
Wetherington said.
Board members also dis-
cussed concerns expressed
by public officials, environ-
mental groups, business
leaders about the St. Johns
River Water Management
District's permit allowing
the Jacksonville Electric
Authority to pump up to
155 million gallons a day
from the aquifer. A meet-
ing on Nov. 29 in Lake
City attracted nearly 500
people.
District chairman Don
Quincey Jr. said he plans


to attend the next meeting,
which will be held to create
a working group composed
of representatives through-
out the water district. The
meeting is scheduled at
6 p.m. on Jan. 23 at the
Columbia County School
Board Administrative
Complex in Lake City.
Quincey said he is
"encouraged" by an agree-
ment the Suwannee water
district reached with the
St. Johns River Water
Management District
to study the causes and
effects of the shift in the
groundwater divide and
lower water levels.
The board voted unani-
mously to approve $187,500
to fund a study as part of
the interagency agreement
between the two water dis-
tricts.
'This is the direction we
want to go with St. Johns,"
Quincey said.
Suwannee water district
executive director David
Still told board members


he is pleased with the
response he's received
from the St. Johns water
district.
The two. water districts
have been at odds over
conflicting studies with
different conclusions
about how pumping large
amounts of water from
the aquifer impacts the
region.
Still, said he expected
confrontations and conflict
during discussions, but the
talks have been less adver-
sarial than he expected.
"I think we're in a
process that has moved
along farther than I
thought originally," 'Still
said. "I just feel comfort-
able where we are today.
I'm encouraged."


ed to win the nomination.
Obama was unopposed
in the Democratic primary.
The state has about
232,000 registered
Republicans, 223,000
Democrats and 313,000 vot-
ers who are undeclared or
independent .
In his first presidential


run in 2008, Romney fin-
ished second in the state to
McCain. This time, he cam-
paigned with the Arizona
senator's endorsement, as
well as backing from Sen.
Kelly Ayotte and numer-
ous other members of the
state's Republican estab-
lishment.


CRA: Master plan ready

Continued From Page 1A


master plan and the city's
comprehensive plan don't
conflict with each other.
City manager Wendell
Johnson said the process of
creating a master plan took
longer than he expected
but he is happy with the
result.
Johnson said input from
community and business
leaders is important to
move forward with the goal
of improving the city.
"It's going to be a learn-
ing process for all of us,"
he. said. "We've got lots of
work to do."
The city will have to be
careful choosing projects
because some of those
proposed in the plan may
not be affordable with the


limited amount of money
available.
"Money will be tight,"
Johnson said. "Its some-
thing the committee will
have to be very wise and
thoughtful with."
Johnson said he plans to
prepare an ordinance sup-
porting the master plan
that the city council will
consider at the Feb. 6 meet-
ing.
Mayor Stephen Witt
praised everyone on the
committee for creating the
master plan.
"I really appreciate
everyone who services on
this committee," he said.
"I think it's'a good docu-
ment."


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Samuel Franklin
Crews
DOB: 12/21/82
Height: 5' 8"
Weight: 150 Ibs.
Hair: Blonde
Eyes: Blue
Wanted For: Passing a
Worthless Check
WANTED AS


Demarcus Ronterryeous
Henry
DOB: 4/4/93
Height: 6' 1"-Weight: 180 lbs.
Hair: Black Eyes: Brown
Tattoo: Left Arm
Wanted For: Burglary of a Dwelling,
Criminal Mischief, Grand Theft III
Specified Property; Order to Take
S.. .. :'. Into Custody Absconding Probation.
O F 10 .1 .. Lewd Battery
OF 1/9/2012


ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COLUMBIA COUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney Generat


Li


Accepting New Patients
Specializing in adult medical care including:
* Primary Care Arthritis
* High Blood Pressure Low Back Probe
* Heart Disease Full Dizziness,
" Lung Disease vertigo and bala
* Gastrointestinal diagnosis and
* High Cholesterol treatment


* Diabetes Optifast WeiI
* Women's Health Loss System
Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation


LKQ has the largest inventory of
OEM Recycled Auto Parts &
Aftermarket Parts by Keystone

.i r


Please call us at
I 386-755-0013 or 888-849-7887
WlBaL K _4686 E. US Hwy 90
OEM Recycled Aftermarket by Keystone Lake City, Florida


ems

nce


L adnhL ei- Bii

40 NWHalofFmeDrv, ae iyF


?~RN

INTERAL MEICIN
isplaedt anuneth ddtono


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


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OPINION


Wednesday, January I1,2012


OUR
OPINION


Public


outrage

City manager Wendell
Johnson chided
councilman Jake Hill
at Monday night's
city council meeting,
not so much for what he said,
as where he said it.
Hill complained it was unfair
for LCPD officer Kevin Johns to
receive only a written reprimand
for his role in the death of K-9
officer Trooper when, he said,
Capt Robert Smith would likely
be fired for complaining about
the way the department is run.
Johnson's response?
Mentioning such matters in
public was inappropriate, he
said. They should be discussed
in private, behind closed doors
in Johnson's office.
A remarkable sentiment, in
our view.
First, as city manager,
Johnson works for the council,
not the other way around. It's
not his place to tell any council
member what he or she ought
not say, either in public or pri-
vate.
Second, and far more impor-
tant, is the question of open-
ness in government.
Was the conversation
Johnson envisioned one that
could have taken place in
private with no harm done to
Florida's sterling tradition of
government in the sunshine?
Probably.
However, to suggest Hill
ought not air his outrage in
public was nothing less than.
offensive.
The right to air our griev-
ances out loud, where anyone
can hear, is one of the basic
principles on which our nation
was founded. It surely holds
true for an elected official at a
public meeting.
Democracy is a messy thing,
Mr. Johnson. And it is to be
conducted in public, not behind
closed doors, in your office or
anyone else's.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Wednesday,
January 11, the 11th day of
2012. On this date:
In 1943, the United,States
and Britain signed treaties
relinquishing extraterritorial
rights in China.
Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
SWe believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
-publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
,This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
SLetters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
,verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
(he Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


An appreciation of Byron


Donzis, longtime friend


H
gone?


ow will you be
remembered?
What do you want
people to say about
you when you're


I recently lost a longtime
friend, a man with a larger-than-
life personality and a heart, soul
and mind to match.
I met Byron Donzis more
than 25 years ago through my
friend, Martha, who was work-
ing as his assistant. I liked him
from the start. Their relation-
ship was clearly professional,
but it was no surprise some
years later when Martha called-
to say they were getting mar-
ried. My only question was,
what took so long?
Martha and I had been
friends since we were 8 years
old. We had gone to the same
college. She'd been a brides-
maid in my wedding. I loved
her like a sister, wanted noth-
ing for her but the best. That is
what she found in Byron, and
he found in her their one best
match.
Much has been written about
Byron. He was an inventor, an
entrepreneur, the most creative,
innovative thinker and doer I
ever rode a mule with. (That
would be his prized Kawasaki.)
Others could tell you about
his accomplishments; his
invention of the flak jacket, a
protective vest widely used
in the NFL; his work with the


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com
Sunshine Kids Foundation,
helping fulfill wishes of children
battling cancer; all the fortunes
he made or lost; all the dreams
he dreamed, big and small, to
make the world a better place.
. But those are not the things
I'll remember him for. I will tell
you two stories, maybe three.
Once, on my way to visit
Martha and Byron at their
home in the Texas Hill
Country, I got as far as San
Antonio, before I heard that the
Guadalupe River had flooded
and turned their ranch into an
island prison.
When I called to say I was
going back to California, Byron
wouldn't hear of it. He knew
how much Martha and I were
looking forward to the visit.
"Girl," he said, "give me 15
minutes and I'll call you back."
Fifteen minutes later, he
called back with a plan. Next
thing I knew, I was in a helicop-
ter the size of a phone booth,
flying over floodwaters and land-
ing in a soggy orchard where
I spotted Martha and Byron


waving flashlights in the rain.
During that visit, Byron men-
tioned a memorial service he'd
attended for a friend.
"People talked a lot about the
things he did," he said. "I just
wanted to hear somebody say
he had made them happy."
Years later, when they heard
I had lost my job, Byron and
Martha called right away.
"We're not going to let you
lose your health insurance,"
Byron said. "We're going to
cover it for you."
I couldn't allow them to do
that. But I will never forget they
offered. Sometimes, just the
. offer of kindness is enough.
In August, the lasttiie I was'
in Landrum, I'd promised to
stop by to see him, but had to
fly back sooner than expected.
I thought of that promise last
week when Martha called to tell
me that Byron had suffered a
stroke and died.
There's a lot I could say about
him, but I.will just say this:
He was smart, he was funny
and he was good.
He loved life and his wife, his
dogs and his cats, figuring stuff
out and lively conversation.
And, yes, he made a lot of
people happy including me.


Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


Did Brit hackers


target 9/11 families?


n the "good old days"
of American journalism,
reporters were encour-
aged to get the news any-
way they could by hook
or crook at whatever expense
to those about whom they were
writing. If things got out of
hand now and then, it was just
chalked up to being part of the
game in the highly competitive,
rough and tumble world of early
20th century newspapering.
Ethics in journalism was an
oxymoron. Those who overly
subscribed to ethical behavior
were likely to be out of a job
sooner than later in a culture
that thrived on "scoop" report-
ing and myriad editions each
more sensational than the
other. Yellow became the color
of choice for some of our most
prominent journals.
But somewhere between
1900 and 1940, newspapers
grew up and responsibility and
integrity became bywords for a
new era, at least in this country.
The lofty ideals often stated in
a sentence on the front of the
evening or morning papers took
on a new meaning. Beating the
competition was still important
but there was a new recognition
that the First Amendment assur-


, .. -,,-
Dan K.Thomasson
ance of a free press carried
with it a responsibility for fair
and accurate reporting of the
public's affairs.
In Mother England, however,
where national tabloids are
dependent on street sales, sen-
sationalism was uninterrupted,
that is until last summer when
revelations of the electronic
keyhole peeping in the tabloid
world threatened to bring down
a hunk of Rupert Murdoch's big
News Corporation right on top
of his head. The Press Lord's
peepers had gone a bit too far
even for a populace weaned on
prurient reporting.
So far the scandal has been
confined to Britain but the ques-
tion remains whether some 10
years ago following the hor-
rendous Sept 11. 2001, terrorist
attack on America, survivors
of the victims might have been
subjected to the same sort of


telephone hacking that forced the
closing of the News of the World
and so scandalized Britons.
Some of the 9/11 family mem-
bers believe that is the case, cit-
ing a string of strange incidents
involving their telephones and
answering systems that are too
similar to those experienced
by British victims to be coinci-
dental. The Justice Department
doesn't seem all that convinced.
Attorney General Eric Holder
met with a delegation from the
9/11 families and their lawyer
last August, but nothing has
been forthcoming so far, leaving
most observers doubtful that
what is said to be a continuing
investigation by the FBI is going
to turn up much.
Every society at every time is
vulnerable to the kind of abuses
the British hackers perpetrated.
Most of the British press is as
responsible as its American
counterparts. It would be a trag-
edy if those who were blatantly
not so in England violated our
laws too. Finding out shouldn't
be that difficult.


* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A


ANOTHER


VNIERiAUCLKk IC REMEMBER,
SWEETIE,.
",',') J tIF YOU CAN'T
SAY ANYTHING
NICEAROUT
S/MEONEI
1OU SHOULD
RUN FOR
S POLITICAL
OFFICE.


many faults, but being suicid-
ally stupid does not seem to
be one of them.

* Scripps Howard News Service


ANOTHER
VIEW


Iran takes

aim at its

own foot

with Gulf

threats

ran's parliamentary
elections are March 2,.
and this week the slate"
of candidates will be
announced, after the
Council of Guardians prunes
it of serious political oppo-
nents.
This election will be as
rigged as the 2009 presi-
dential election, and the
increasingly embattled cleri-
cal regime is bracing for the
same kind of mass antigov-
ernment demonstrations that
followed the fixed ballot.
And that is one key reason
why Iran has stepped up it
threats to close the Strait
of Hormuz, the bottleneck
exit from the Persian Gulf
through which flows one-
sixth of the world's oil.
The Strait is international
waters, and free passage,
including of warships, is
guaranteed by international
law. Nonetheless, following
a visit to the Gulf by the U.S.
Navy carrier Stennis, Iran's
military chief warned that
the American warship should,
not returfi to the Gulf. "The
Islamic Republic will not
repeat its warning," he said.
That w duld be a nice
change since Iran is continu-
>-. ally making threats --so far
idle ones and it almost
guarantees that at some stage,
we'll have to send a carrier
into the Gulf if only to assert
our right to do so.
However, the fact of the
threat is extremely revealing,
a demonstration that for the
first time the clerical regime
is genuinely alarmed, both by
its own people,made restive
by the ayatollahs' repressive
ways and the nation's tanking'
economy.
Now, for the first time,
the regime faces sanctions,
in response to its stepped-
up nuclear program, which
will genuinely bite. The U.S.
would punish companies
and countries that finance
oil purchases through the
Iranian Central Bank, the
customary means of pay-
ing for such transactions.
And the European Union is
now threatening to cut off
Iranian oil purchases alto-
gether.
Iran, U.S. military plan-
ners concede, has the capa-
bilities to close off the Strait
for a while using mines,
missiles and torpedoes.
But, Gen. Martin Dempsey,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs"
of Staff, said, "We've invest-;
ed in the capabilities to
ensure if that happens, we
can defeat that."
Not only would the U.S.
force Iran to reopen the
Strait, but the simple act of
closing it in the first place
would cost the Iranians
their traditional support
from China and Russia. And
it would give the West the
opportunity to go after Iran's
nuclear facilities, much to
the relief of the other Gulf
nations.
Oil sales account for 80
percent of Iran's revenues. In
the event of an embargo, Iran
would suffer far more than
any of its customers, who in
any case have increasingly
sought backup suppliers else-
where.
As a member of the inter-
national community, Iran has












Page EdItor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Today

Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon
The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends will be
held at 11:00 a.m. on
Wednesday, Jan. 11th
at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a fun
day.

Jan. 12

Lake City Garden
Club
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its
monthly meeting at
10 a.m. on Thursday,
January 12 at the Club
House (formerly the
Woman's Club). Coffee
will be served at 9:30.
The program will be
"History of Alligator
Lake Park" by James
Montgomery. Visitors
are welcome to attend.

Free real estate
seminar
Strategies for Home
buyers and Sellers in
Today's Market,
A Free Seminar by
VyStar Real Estate
Services.
Call the Lake City
Branch Receptionist
at (904) 594-5498 to
reserve your space.
Light refreshments will
be served.
When: Thursday,
January 12th, 2012 at
6:30pm.
Where: VyStar Credit
Union Lake City Branch
411 NW Commons Loop
Lake City, Florida 32055.

'Preserving Traditions
of DAR'


The Edward Rutledge
Chapter, Daughters
of the American
Revolution, will meet
on Thursday, January
12, 2011, 10:30 a. m.,
at the Senior Service
Center, 28 SE Allison
Court. Beth Wilson
will be speaking on
"Preserving Traditions
of DAR". Guests are
always welcome. For
further information, call
752-2903.


Jan. 13

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan.
13 at 7 p.m. until. For
ticket info contact Chris
Mirra at 386-623-3611 or
Dennis Murphy at 386-
697-3739.


Jan. 14

Farmers market
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market
is Saturday from
9am to 1pm (winter
hours) in Wilson Park
located along Lake
DeSotobetween the
Columbia County
Courthouse and Shands
Lakeshore Hospital in
downtown Lake City.
The market features
Locally grown fresh
produce herbs,' p'aits,
cheese, milk, eggs and
local baked breads,
pies and other items.
Vendors also sell


homemade craft items
like jewelry, woodwork
and other handmade
items. Upcoming events
include the 1st Annual
Chili Cook Off on
January 21st to benefit
Relay for Life. For more
information about the
Lake DeSoto Farmer
Market call 386-719-5766
or visit market.lcfla.com.

North Florida Writers
Group meets

Love to write? From
novice to published
author, the North
Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is
the place where local
writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire.
Writers of any
experience level from
the area are welcome
to join us Saturday,
January 14, 2012,
2pm 4pm, at the
ColumbiaCounty Public
Library, Main Branch,
308 NW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City, FL
32055. Join us Saturday
and see what we are all
about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so
please reserve your spot
today!'
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Leader,
(386) 438-3610.
Email inquiries to:
editor@afinaldraft.com

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
:to Jones Way. .
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Hospice Chili Cook-
off


The Third Annual
Branford Chili Cook-
Off to benefit children
and families served by
Herry's Kids Pediatric
Services will be held on
Saturday, January 14
from 11 a.m. 2 p.m. at
Hatch Park located on
Craven Dr. in Branford.
The event will include
a silent auction, games,
a bounce house for the
kids, live DJ, door prizes,
antique car show, thrift
store items for sale,
and all the chili you can
eat. There will be a five
dollar admission to the
event. In order to register
to be a contestant call
386-755-7714. Hospice
of the Nature Coast, is
a program of Hospice
of Citrus County, Inc.,
licensed in 1985. To
learn more about hospice
services call 386-755-
7714 or visit www.
-hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org.


Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program
On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this
memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
', lives forever, in our,,.
hearts. .Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 p.
m, at Trinity United
Methodist Church.


Glynnell Presley,
Secretary
John F. Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO


Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.



Jan. 16


Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade

The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
presents the Grand
Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Parade,
Monday, January 16,
2012 at 10am. Line-
up will begin at the
DOT office at 9:00am.
For participation and
information call Anthony
Newton at 386.365.1470.
The MLK Worship
Service will follow
the parade at the New
Bethel Baptist Church
at 12:30p, Bishop Ron
Williams, II is the
speaker, Rev. Alvin
Baker, Pastor. Call
Audre' Washington at
386.344.9915 for more
information.
The MLK Classic will
feature a re-match
basketball game at
the Lake City Middle
School at 3:30pm
featuring Alumni
Women and Men's
players of CHS and
Suwannee. Call Mario
Coppock for details at
386.754.7095.


Jan. 17


Loss workshop


Eight Critical Questions,
an educational workshop
offering practical
tips to help cope and
move forward during
the new year will be
January 4 at 2 p.m.
located at the Wings
Education Center, 857
SW Main Blvd, (Lake
City Plaza). There is
no cost. For information
or to register, contact
Vicki Myers at 755-
7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-
642-0962. The Wings
Education Center is a
program of Hospice of
Citrus County, Inc./
Hospice of the Nature
Coast licensed 1985,
serving north central
Florida. Visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org for more
information.


Traffic safety meeting
The Columbia
Community Traffic
Safety will hold its first
meeting of the new year
on Tuesday, January 17
at 10 a.m. at the FDOT
Operations Complex,
710 NW Lake Jeffery
Road, in the Crew
Room. The Team works
on traffic hazards and
enforcement issues in
Columbia County and
the public is welcome
to attend. Issues can be
called in to the FDOT
at 758-3714 or e-mailed
to Tres Atkinson, team
chair, at tres.atkinson@
columbiacountyfla.com
or to Gina Busscher,
team secretary, at gina.
busscher@ dot. state.
fl.us The team is made
up of members of law
enforcement, emergency
services,' engineering
and education.



Jan. 18

CALENDAR con't on 6A


OBITUARIES


Terry Lee Curl
Terry Lee Curl, "Big Red", 60, of
Ft. White Fl., passed away Jan. 4
in Gainesville Regional Hospital.
Terry was born Dec. 27, 1951 in
Sioux City Iowa Terry attended
school in S. Sioux City, NE. He
was born and raised on the Curl
Amusement Carnival and in later
years traveled as an independent
ride owner on many shows. Ter-
ry made his home in Ft. White
FL. Since 1995. He also had a
welding business and built fun
houses and other amusement
rides until his retirement in 2010.
He enjoyed his companion-
ships of his dogs aid loved to
play pool. Terry was a APA pool
league member and a Moose
Lodge member, from Lake
City Fl. Terry also belonged
to 'Masonic Lodge, Riverview
Fl., Showmen's 'Shiner from
Tampa FL., the IISA from
Gibsonton Fl, OABA, and the
IIPA. Terry had many friends
and family that loved him
dearly and will miss him great-
ly. He was the "Fun Uncle".
Survivors include his son Chris-
topher Boland, a daughter Teresa
Franks and seven grandchildren.
A brother Joe Curl.and wife
Lesa of Houston TX., and sister,
Mary Lou Gengler and husband
Bob "Beto" of Sioux City IA., a
brother in law Larry "Bo" Sutton
of Yankton SD. A niece Becki
Curl Pugh of Wellborn FL. and
many other nieces and nephews.
Terry was proceeded in death
by his wife, Cindy Koenen
Curl, his parents Floyd Curl
and Edna Mae "Toots" Ray
Curl and brothers Jim and wife
Pearl Curl, Bill and wife Connie
Curl and a sister Janet Sutton.
Cremation by ICS and Me-
morial service, at the United
Methodist Church in Wellborn
Fl on Friday 13th at 12:30 pm
with a dinner immediately fol-
lowing. Interment at the Santa
Fe Cemetery in .Ft. White Fl.
Arrangements made by
ICS CREMATION AND
FUNERAL HOME 357 N.
W. Wilks Lane Lake City,
Florida 32055 (386)752-3436

Alma Mae Carter Dees
Alma Mae Carter Dees, 83, went
home to be the Lord on Monday,
January 9, 2012. Alma was born
January 17, 1928 in Jackson-
ville, Florida to the late John J.
and Jennie Barber Carter. Af-
ter marriage in 1949, Alma and


B. W. Dees
moved to the
.Dees family
farm in Union
County. Alma
retired from
the VA Medi-
cal Center in
Lake City in,
1982 where she was employed
as an Administrative Assistant.
As a faithful member of Provi-
dence Village Baptist Church
for over 50 years she served in
many capacities, including Sun-
day School teacher and church
clerk. In 2003, Alma. moved to
Lake City and became a mem-
ber of The Orchard Community
Church and attended services at
Southside Baptist Church. She
was a loving mother, grand-
mother and great-grandmother
whose greatest 'pleasure was
devoting tine and spoiling her
children and grandchildren. She
was an avid reader and collec-
tor of books as well as an ac-
complished genealogist. She
traced numerous family origins
and lineages and wrote humor-
ous stories of previous genera-
tions. Alma was a member of
the Edward Rutledge Chapter of
the Daughters of the American
Revolution. She is preceded in
death by her parents, her broth-
er, Ted E. Carter; sisters, Vir-
ginia Smith. and Mary Murphy;
and her loving husband of 57
years, Bryant Walter Dees who
passed away in April of 2007.
Survivors include her daugh-
ters, Cheryl Dees Cox (Raldy)
of Lake City, FL and Jan Dees
Philpot (Stephen) of Ocala, FL;
brothers, James Alvin Carter
(Jean) ofJasper, FL, and Jack L.
Carter (Flora) of Callahan, FL;
grandchildren, Kyle Tyler, Amy
Tyler Reed (Jeremy), Casey
Cox Owens (Josh), Lindsey
Cox, Lesley Cox and Stephanie
Philpot; great-grandchildren,
Destiny and Jason Tyler; and
sisters-in-law, DeLon Carter
and Marjorie Alligood. Funeral
services will be conducted at
3:00 p.m., on Thursday, January
12, 2012 at Southside Baptist
Church with Pastor Eddie Blay-
lock, Pastor Bo Hammock, and
Dr. Ralph A. Rodriguez officiat-
ing. Interment will follow at Fort
Call Cemetery in Unidn County.
The family will receive friends
Wednesday, January 11, 2012
from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 South
U.S. HWY 441, Lake City, Flori-
da32025, (386) 752-1954. Please


leave messages of love and en-
couragement for the family at
www. gatewayforestlawn. corn

Myrtle E. Hyde
Mrs. Myrtle E. Hyde, 91, died.
Sunday, January 8, 2012 in
Jacksonville. Mrs. Hyde was
born in Lake City the daughter
of the late John Quincy and An-
nis Ann Adams. She has lived
in the Jacksonville area most of
her life and retired in 1985 with
30 years service at King Edward
Cigar Factory. She enjoyed out-
door activities in her yard, sew-
ing and cooking. Mrs. Hyde is
survived by 3 daughters: Gail
Tucker, Elaine M. Kantack and
Barbara A. Rowback (Mike);
6 grandchildren; great grand-
children and several nieces
and nephews. Graveside ser-
vices will be held at 1:00 PM
on Thursday, January 12, 2012
at Scott Cemetery near Lake
City. Her family will receive
friends from 5:00 PM to. 7:00
PM on Wednesday (TODAY) at
PEEPLES FAMILY FUNEAL
HOMES, North Jacksonville
Chapel, 2220 Soutel Drive.

Georgina Myers
Georgina Myers, 71, passed
away in St. Petersburg, FL on
January 9, 2012 after a long ill-
ness. Georgina
was born in
Portugal, but
spent most
of her life qn
Lake City,
Florida where
she was known
for her kind
spirit and love for others. Geor-
gina loved to garden and was
once awarded the Lake City Gar-
den Clubs "Lawn of the Month".
She had a love for fine, spicy
food and was known to carry a
bottle of"Tobasco" sauce wher-
ever she went. She was a be-
loved mother and grandmother.
Her life was devoted to ensuring
the success and happiness of her
family and friends. Her selfless-
ness is rare and will be missed.
Georgina is survived by her four
children: Gina Cabino (Tim)
Tusing of Gainesville, FL, Jo-
seph Cabino (Lydia) of Fred-
ricksburg, VA, Christina Cabino
(Dan) Weldon of Tampa, FL.
Linda Cabino (Chris) Lamott of
Nashville, TN. She is also sur-
vived by eleven grandchildren.


Tim, Joseph, Christian, Isaiah,
Isaac, Danny, Sabrina, So-
phia, Gabe, Caleb and Andrew.
Funeral services for Mrs. Myers
will be conducted Friday, Janu-
ary 13, 2012 at 11:00 A.M. in
the Epiphany Catholic Church


with Father Robert Trujillo, of-
ficiating. Interment will fol-
low in the Forest Lawn Cem-
etery. GUERRY FUNERAL
HOME, 2659 SW. Main Blvd.
Lake City is in charge of all ar-
rangements. Please sign guest-


book at guerryfuneralhome.net.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11, 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11. 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


CALENDAR con'tfrom 5A

Olustee meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.


Jan. 19


Voices that Change
Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet
facility. Showtime is at 6:30
p.m. Refreshments will be
served. Tickets are $10.
This is a benefit for the
Christian Service Center
and tickets are available
at the Center Hilton and
Washington St.


Columbia County
Retired Educators
meeting

The Columbia County
Retired Educators will
meet Thursday, January
19, at 1 p.m. in Room
120 at the School Board
Adult Center.
Speakers will be Mrs.
Kaeron Robinson of
the Guardian Ad Litem
and Mr. Paul Conley of
Ocala, Fl., District H
FREF Trustee.
Retired persons
interested in education
may join us. For more
information call Will
Brown at 752-2431.


Jan. 20

Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
.the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.

communityconcerts.info.


Jan. 22


Bridal show

The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's
Bridal, Belk, Lake City
Florist and Design,
Glass Slipper Bridal,
The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices
are $7.00; Day of Event
$10.00. Tickets can be
purchased at the Holiday
Inn & Suites, 213 SW
Commerce Dr., Lake
City. For ticket sales or
vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386)
754-1411.


Riding club banquet
The Columbia County
Riding Club is having
its annual banquet Jan
22,2012, @lpm,@Mason
City Community Center.
The club will have its
rides the 2nd and 4th
Sat. of each month. The
club will be hosting
Pleasure Shows this
year. Check our website
for all information. www.
columbiacountyriding
club.com.


Jan. 24

Friends of the Library
Author Program
Tuesday, January 24,
2012 at 7:00 pm at the
Main Library, sponsored
by Save Our Suwannee:
Cynthia Barnett, author
of Mirage: Florida and
the Vanishing Water of
the Eastern U.S.
and Blue Revolution:
Unmaking America's
Water Crisis
Cynthia Barnett is an
award-winning journalist
and senior writer for
Florida Trend magazine.
She has a special
interest in
environmental history
and in 2004, spent a year
at the University
of Michigan as a Knight-
Wallace Fellow studying
freshwater supply. Ms.
Barnett will discuss
Florida's water crisis
and look at solutions
that have found success
in communities around
the
world. Don't miss this
timely program on a
topic so very relevant to
Columbia County and
North Central Florida.
Thank you to Save Our
Suwannee and Florida's
Eden for working with
the Friends of the
Library to bring you this
program.
http://www.
cynthiabarnett.net/



Jan. 25

Building Assn. lunch
The Columbia County
Builders Association
will hold a General
Council lunch at Guang
Dong starting at 11:30
a. m. on January 25.
Cost of lunch is $10
for members and $15
for non-members and
prices include tax and
gratuity. Speaker is
Dale Williams. After
the lunch an attorney
from Tritt/Anderson in
Jacksonville will hold
a short seminar (about
45 minutes) and he
will go over numerous
contracts, their wording,
etc. There is no charge
for this if you have
attended the CCBA
lunch. Reservations
are preferred call:
386-867-1998 or e-
mail: colcountybuild@
comcast.net.


Jan. 29


Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 29,
2012 at 2:00 pm at the
Main Library:
Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita
Nights and
Champagne
for Buzzards
Phyllis Smallman is
a Canadian who has
spent a lot of time in
Florida, the setting
for her award-winning
mystery series


featuring
sassy bartender,
Sherri Travis. A
former potter with a
lifelong love
of mysteries, Phyllis
divides her time
between her native


Ontario and
Sarasota. She will
join us live via Skype
for this program.
http://www.
phyllissmallman.com/


Feb. 1

Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.

Feb. 4
Olustee Festival
Pageant


The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, February 4.
Ages 3-12 mos, 13mo-23
mo, 2-4, 5-6 and 7-9 will
be held at 4:00 pm at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be
held at 7:00pm. Winners in
each division will receive
a $50 savings bond,
crown, banner and ride
in the Olustee parade on
February 14. The runners
up in each division will
receive a large trophy
and all contestants will
receive a trophy for their
participation. The winner
of the Miss Olustee title
(age 16-20) will receive
a $500 educational
scholarship, 1st runner
up a $300 scholarship


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Oaks Mall
6201 Newberry Rd.

352-331-5040
M-F 10-5
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and the 2nd runner
up a $200 scholarship.
Entertainment will be
provided by The pageant
is open to the public with
admission at the door:
$5.00 adults and students.
Pre-schoolers are free.
Applications are available
at the Columbia County
Library or Chamber of
Commerce. Deadline for
entries is 1-23-2012. For
more information you may
contact pageant director,
Elaine Owens at 386-965-
2787.

Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409


Lake City
Miracle-Ear
Gateway Center
1077 US Hwy. 90 W.

386-466-0902
M-F 9-4
Sat. By Appointment


mm
rI I re c l


SW St Johns St across
from Aquatics Center.

Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program
Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year'
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby(lakectyreportercorn


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday, January I1, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
North Florida
Rays tryout
The North Florida
Rays 9-under travel
baseball team has a
second tryout at 10 a.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call
Leonard Johnson at
867-6655.

Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
5-7 p.m. Friday and
Jan. 20, and 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday and
Jan. 21 at Southside
Sports Complex with a
cost of $80. Online
registration is available
at www.lcccyb.com for $75
plus a transaction fee.
For details, call David
Williams at
(386) 697-0764.

YOUTH GOLF
Practice group
offered for girls
A golf practice group
for girls ages 9-17 is
offered from 4-5 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays
at Quail Heights Country
Club. The group is for
girls who want to learn
the game and to develop
Lady Tigers for the CHS
golf program. Fee is $45.,
' For details, call Chet
Carter at 365-7097 or '
e-mail
carter4golf@hotmail. corn.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Christ Central
registration open
Registration for Christ
Central Sports flag
football for ages 5-12
continues through
Friday. Cost is $40.
For details, call
365-2128.

* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High girls
weightlifting at Santa Fe
High, 4 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Santa Fe
High, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Wolfson
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Keystone
Heights High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Billy Saylor
Invitational in Live Oak,
TBA
Columbia High boys
soccer vs Lincoln High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer vs. Oak Hall
School, 7 p.m. (boys-5)
Columbia High boys.
basketball vs. Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Billy Saylor
Invitational in Live Oak,
TBA
Columbia High
girls basketball at Union
County High, 5:30 p.m.
(JV-3)
Columbia High
boys basketball vs.
St. Augustine High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Monday
Fort White High
basketball at Williston
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,


JV-4:30)


Indians win in OT


Fort White takes
down district.
opponent 59-55.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High tightened up
the District 5-4A standings
with a 59-55 overtime win
over visiting Santa Fe High
on Tuesday.
Both the Indians (7-4)
and Raiders (6-11) are 4-3
in district play.
The game was tied a
50-all at the end of regula-
tion and Fort White trailed
by one point late in the over-
time period after a steal and
basket by AJ. Legree.
Raul Colon leaped for a
rebound and threw it back
in the basket while falling
out of bounds to give the
Indians the lead. Nick Butler
then made a steal and hit


one free throw. When Trey
Phillips rebounded the sec-
ond attempt and put it in,
Fort White had all the mar-
gin it needed.
Fort White trailed 17-11
at the end of the first quar-
ter, but quickly made that
up on a basket and free
throw by Melton Sanders
and a 3-pointer by Phillips.
It was nip-and-tuck the rest
of the way.
The Indians built a six-
point lead with 2:26 left in
the game, but could not
hold it
Sanders finished with
24 points, including 10 in
the fourth,quarter with the
game on the line. Colon
scored 12 points and Phillips
scored 11. Jonathan Dupree
added six second-half points
and Legree finished with
five points.
Fort White travels to
Keystone Heights High for
a 7:30 p.m. game Thursday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's A.J. Legree (10) drives down the court as he steals a rebound while playing
against Keystone Heights on Dec. 16.


as


CHS boys beat
FortWhite, girls
tie on Tuesday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
. ,nuey n .ie .,: ,(1re ,:rter

FORT .WHITE It
was a county collision as
Columbia High traveled to
Fort White High for a dou-
bleheader of boys and girls
soccer on Tuesday.
The Tigers took the open-
ing game on the boys' side
as Columbia came away
with a 6-0 victory.
Columbia scored five
goals in the first half before
adding a final goal in the
opening minutes of the sec-
ond half.
Jimmy Blakely scored
first on an assist from Cody
Beadles and added a sec-
ond goal off a penalty kick
to make the score 2-0.
Beadles scored two goals
of his own off assists by
Blakely and Tyler Rix.
Alex Rhea scored the
final goal of the first half off
an assist by Anthony Picklo.
Nigel Merricks scored
Columbia's final goal off an
assist by Blakely.
The Tigers fell in a
2-1 loss at St. Francis on
Monday with Travis Berry
scoring the only goal off an
assist by Dakota Waters.
In the girls' game, the
two teams played to a score-
less 0-0 tie.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Kaitlyn Daniel (4) keeps the ball away from Fort White's Ashley Beckman (16) on Dec. 6.


Columbia had chance and passed really well, but
after chance on corner their keeper played awe-
kicks, but Ali Wrench didn't some," Columbia coach
allow the Lady Tigers to Ashley Brown said.
convert. Fort White coach Perry
"We played really well Sauls echoed the thoughts


on his keeper.
"She's had seven or eight
shutouts for us this sea-
son," Sauls said. "She had
four or five last season so
moving her there this year


was a no-brainer."
The Lady Tigers are
4-12-1 after the game. Fort
White is 10-7-2.
Fort White beat Lafayette
2-0 on Monday.


Florida ends slump against

Georgia in 70-48 victory


Seminoles pull
out win over
Virginia Tech.
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE -
Bradley Beal broke out of
his shooting slump, scoring
17 points and leading No.
19 Florida to a 70-48 victory
over Georgia on Tuesday
night.
Beal was 4 of 6 from
3-poing range, making
more shots from behind the
arc than he did in the last
four games combined, and
added 10 rebounds for the
Gators.
Kenny Boynton scored
17 for the Gators (13-4, 1-1
Southeastern Conference),


who extended their home
winning streak to 15
games.
Georgia (9-7, 0-2) lost to
Florida for the 15th time
in the last 17 meetings.
The Bulldogs have
dropped 10 in a row in
Gainesville.
Nemanja Djurisic led
Georgia with 14 points.
Gerald Robinson Jr. added
eight points, six rebounds
and five assists.

Florida St. 63,
Virginia Tech 59
BLACKSBURG, Va.
- Bernard James had 18
points and 14 rebounds
and Florida State survived
a furious comeback by
Virginia Tech to win 63-59


on Tuesday night.
Ian Miller added 15 points
for the Seminoles (10-6, 1-1
Atlantic Coast Conference),
who rebounded from a
20-point loss at Clemson in
their ACC opener.
The Hokies (11-5, 0-2)
lost their first two games
in league play for the first
time since the 2005-06
season. They trailed most
of the game against the
Seminoles' ACC-best field
goal defense before rallying
behind Erick Green, who
scored 19 of his 21 after
halftime.
In the closing minutes,
James had two huge put-
back dunks and Okaro
White hit a pair of clinching
free throws with 5.5 sec-
onds to play.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Kenny Boynton (1) draws a foul made by Georgia's
Nemanja Djurisic (42) during the Gators' 70-48 win.


I













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11, 2012


SCOREBOARD


GOLF REPORTS


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Syracuse atVillanova
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Texas A&M at Texas
MOTORSPORTS
1:30a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally, Iquique to
Arica, Chile (delayed tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Dallas at Boston
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Miami at LA Clippers
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP Pittsburgh at Washington

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
NewYork Giants 24,Atlanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday
New Orleans at San Francisco,
4:30 p.m.
Denver at New England, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Houston at Baltimore, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay,4:30 p.m.
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 22
Divisional winners
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 29
At Honolulu
NFC vs.AFC
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
NFC vs.AFC, 6:20 p.m.

College bowl final

New Mexico Bowl
Temple 37,Wyoming 15
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Ohio 24, Utah St. 23
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 32, San Diego
State 30
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20, FlU 10
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU 31, LouisianaTech 24
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 56,Arizona State 24
Hawaii Bowl
Southern Mississippi 24, Nevada 17
Independence Bowl
Missouri 41, North Carolina 24
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
Purdue 37,Western Michigan 32
Belk Bowl
North Carolina State 31, Louisville 24
Military Bowl
Toledo 42,Air Force 41
Holiday Bowl
Texas 21, California 10
Champs Sports Bowl
SFlorida State 18, Notre Dame 14
Alamo Bowl
Baylor 67,Washington 56
Armed Forces Bowl
BYU 24,Tulsa 21
Pinstripe Bowl .
Rutgers 27, Iowa State 13
Music City Bowl
Mississippi State 23,Wake Forest 17
Insight Bowl
Oklahoma 31, Iowa 14
Meinke Car Care Bowl
Texas A&M 33, Northwestern 22
Sun Bowl
Utah 30, Georgia Tech 27, OT
Liberty Bowl
Cincinnati 3 ,Vanderbilt 24
Fight Hunger Bowl
Illinois 20, UCLA 14
Chick-fil-A Bowl
Auburn 43,Virginia 24
TicketCity Bowl
Houston 30, Penn State 14
Capital One Bowl
South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
Outback Bowl
Michigan State 33, Georgia 30, 30T
Gator Bowl
Florida 24, Ohio State 17
Rose Bowl
Oregon 45,Wisconsin 38
Fiesta Bowl
Oklahoma State 41, Stanford 38, OT
Sugar Bowl
Michigan 23,Virginia Tech 20, OT
Orange Bowl
WestVirginia 70, Clemson 33
Cotton Bowl
Arkansas 29, Kansas State 16
BBVA Compass Bowl
SMU 28, Pittsburgh 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
Northern Illinois 38,Arkansas St. 20
BCS National Championship
Alabama 21, LSU 0

Conference records


Conference
Conference USA
Mid-American
Big 12
Southeastern
Big East
Independents
Big Ten
Mountain West
Sun Belt
Pac-12
Atlantic Coast
Western Athletic


APTop 25

The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, final records, total
points and previous ranking:


Record
I.Alabama (55) 12-1
2. LSU (I) 13-1
3. Oklahoma St. (4) 12-1
4. Oregon 12-2
5.Arkansas 11-2
6. Southern Cal 10-2
7.Stanford 11-2


Pts Pv
1,495 2
1,425 I
1,399 3
1,250 6
1,198 7
1,181 5
1,167 4


8.BoiseSt 12-1 1,127 8
9.SouthCarolina 11-2 1,013 10
I0.Wisconsin 11-3 905 9
1. Michigan St. 11-3. 873 12
12 Michigan 11-2 839 13
13. Baylor 10-3 780 15
14.TCU 11-2 653 16
15. Kansas St. 10-3 621 II
16. Oklahoma 10-3 572 19
17.WestVirginia 10-3 547 23
18. Houston 13-1 518 20
19. Georgia 10-4 439 18
20. Southern Miss. 12-2 411 22
21.Virginia Tech 11-3 329 17
22. Clemson 10-4 188 14
23. Florida St. 9-4 154 25
24. Nebraska 9-4 143 21
25. Cincinnati 10-3 103 NR
Others receiving votes: BYU 51,
Auburn 40, N. Illinois 33, Missouri 23,
Texas 15, Rutgers 3, N. Dakota St.2, Penn
St 2,Virginia I.

USA Today Top 25

The USA TodayTop 25 football coaches
poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
final records, total points and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
I.Alabama (59) 12-I 1,475 2
2.LSU 13-1 1,404 I
3.Oklahoma State 12-1 1,367 3
4. Oregon 12-2 1,290 5
5.Arkansas 11-2 1,188 7
6. Boise State 12-1 1,162 6
7.Stanford 11-2 1,106 4
8. South Carolina 11-2 1,084 9
9. Michigan 11-2 925 12
10. Michigan State 11-3 912 13
II.Wisconsin 11-3 911 8
12.Baylor 10-3 775 16
13.TCU 11-2 710 15
14. Houston 13-1 673 17
15.Oklahoma 10-3 610 19
16. Kansas State 10-3 602 10
17.VirginiaTech 11-3 574 II
18.WestVirginia 10-3 554 22
19. Southern Miss 12-2 429 21
20. Georgia 10-4 345 18
21.Cincinnati 10-3 248 24
22. Clemson 10-4 237 14
23. Florida State 9-4 205 25
24. Nebraska 9-4 144 20
25. Brigham Young 10-3 79 NR
Others receiving votes: Northern
Illinois 36; Missouri 33; Texas 29; Auburn
28; Rutgers II; Penn State 10; Texas
A&M 5; Virginia 4; Temple 2; Washington
2;Arkansas State I; Florida I; Louisiana-
Lafayette I; Mississippi State I; Notre
Dame I; Ohio 1.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
Toronto 97, Minnesota 87
Philadelphia 96, Indiana 86
Atlanta 106, New Jersey 101
NewYork 91, Charlotte 87
Chicago 92, Detroit 68
New Orleans 94, Denver 81
Tuesday's Games
Houston at Charlotte (n)
Toronto atWashington (n)
Sacramento at Philadelphia (n)
Dallas at Detroit (n)
Chicago at Minnesota (n)
Oklahoma City at Memphis (n)
San Antonio at Milwaukee (n)
Cleveland at Utah (n)
LA. Clippers at Portland (n)
Miami at Golden State (n)
Phoenix at L.A. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m,
Sacramento atToronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Orleans,
8 p.m.
Dallas at Boston, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Denver, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Orlando at Portland, 10 p.m.
Miami at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Charlotte atAtlanta, 7:30 p.m.
NewYork at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Orlando at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Syracuse atVillanova, 7 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky at Auburn, 8 p.m.
No. 9 Missouri at Iowa State, 8 p.m.
No. 10 Kansas atTexas Tech, 9 p.m.
No. 13 Michigan vs. Northwestern,
6:30 p.m.
No. 25 Marquette vs. St. John's, 7 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 7 Indiana vs. Minnesota, 8 p.m.
No. 8 Duke vs. No. 16Virginia, 9 p.m.
No. IS Murray State vs. Jacksonville
State, 8 p.m.
No. 20 Mississippi State vs.Tennessee,
9 p.m.
No. 21 Gonzaga at Saint Mary's (Cal),



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I SKIRM I


@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

MUTPH I




FTEESW




CITTEK

L / L / _a_


11 p.m-
Friday's Game
No. 24 Seton Hall at South Rorida.
7 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Syracuse vs. Providence. 6 p.m
No. 2 Kentucky at Tennessee. Noon
No. 3 North Carolina at Florida
State, 2 p.m.
No. 4 Baylo vs. Oklahoma State,
3 p.m.
No.6 Michigan State at Northwestern,
3 p.m.
No. 9 Missouri vs.Texas. I p.m.
No. 10 Kansas vs. Iowa State, 4 p.m.
No. 12 UNLV at No. 22 San Diego
State, 4 p.m.
No. 13 Michigan at Iowa, I p.m.
No. 14 Louisville vs. DePaul, 4 p.m.
No. 15 Murray State vs. Tennessee
Tech, 6 p.m.
No. 17 Connecticut at Notre Dame.
I a.m.
No. 18 Kansas State at Oklahoma,
30I p.m-
No. 19 Florida at South Carolina,
7 p.m.
No. 20 Mississippi State vs. Alabama,
4 p.m.
No.21 Gonzaga at Loyola Marymount,
8 p.m.
No. 25 Marquette vs. Pittsburgh,
2 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 5 Ohio State vs. No. 7 Indiana,
4:30 p.m.
No. 8 Duke at Clemson, 6 p.m.
No. II Georgetown vs. St. John's at
Madison Square Garden, Noon
No. 23 Creighton vs. Southern Illinois,
7:05 p.m.


BASEBALL

MLB calendar

Today-Thursday Owners' meetings,
Scottsdale,Ariz.
Friday Salary arbitration filing.
Tuesday Exchange of salary
arbitration figures.


GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
SONY OPEN IN HAWAII
Site: Honolulu.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course:Waialae Country Club (7,044
yards, par 70).
Purse: $5.5 million. Winner's share:
$990,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
7-10:30 p.m., II p.m.-2:30 a.m.; Friday-
Saturday, 3-6:30 p.m.; 7-10:30 p.m.,
I1 p.m.-2:30 a.m.; Sunday, 3-6:30 p.m.;
7-10 p.m., I I p.m.-2 a.m.)
Online: http-J/www.pgatour.com
EUROPEAN TOUR
SUNSHINE TOUR
JOBURG OPEN
Site: Johannesburg.
Schddule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Royal Johannesburg and
Kensington Golf Club, East Course (7,592
yards, par 71),West Course (7,237 yards,
par 71).
Purse: $1.66 million. Winner's share:
$263,640.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-.
Sunday, 9 a.m.-I p.m.).
Online: http://www.europeontour.com
Sunshine Tour site: http://www.
sunshinetour.com


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Florida 2,Vancouver I
Los Angeles 5,Washington 2
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 2, Phoenix I,SO
Boston 5,Winnipeg 3
Toronto 2, Buffalo 0
N.Y. Islanders 5, Detroit I
Ottawa 5, Pittsburgh I
Philadelphia 2, Carolina I
St. Louis at Montreal (n)
Vancouver at Tampa Bay (n)
San Jose at Minnesota (n)
Columbus at Chicago (n)
Nashville at Colorado (n)
New Jersey at Calgary (n)
Dallas at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh atWashington, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Edmonton, 9 p.m.
Thursday's Games
SMontreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Carolina atTampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Dallas at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: GROUP NAVAL BALLET DEFECT
SAnswer: The flag store looked a lot like this -
"POLE-LAND"


Friday Dog Fight started


We started Friday Dog
Fight play and the inaugu-
ral event was a success.
I was pleased with the
turnout and look forward
to growing the number of
participants every week.
Everyone is invited and
the blitz format allows all to
have a chance to compete
each week, regardless of
skill level. Closest to the pin
on par threes and a skins
game, as well as the blitz
competition is offered.
Cost is $15 plus cart fee;
sign up by noon on Friday.
* Week one results had
Chet Carter birdieing three
of the last four holes to
come away with first-place
honors, followed by Larry


QUAIL HEIGHTS
COUNTRY CLUB
Pete Sands


Boone in second, Garrett
Shay in third and Wallace
Christie in fourth.
Closest to the pin win-
ners were Joe Herring,
Pete Skantzos, Jim Munns
and Randy Heavrin.
Wednesday blitz win-
ners: Keith Denmark, first;
Terry Mick, second; Mike
Kahlich and Jack Tuggle,
tied for third.
Top of the Hill results:
Emerson Darst and Gerald
Smithy, tied for first; Randy
Heavrin, third.
Sunday Scramble win-


ners: Bob Wheary, Keith
Hudson and Dennis
Reynolds, first; Philip
Russell, Terry Mick and
Michael Harris, second.
There was no pot win-
ner; it will roll over to next
week.
In juniors news, congrat-
ulations to Brooke Russell
for scoring a 42 on the
Creeks for her best nine
ever.
Girls group winners:
short game chips
- Gillian Norris, first;
Rachal Blanton and Rebeka
Blanton, tied for second;
putting for distance -
Anna Grace Blanton, first;
Gillian Norris and Rachal
Blanton, tied for second.


Hole-in-one finally happens


"Finally! After all these
years."
That was Dan Stephens'
comment about his first
hole-in-one. He used a
9-wood to ace No. 7.
However, his shot wasn't
enough for his group to
take the three-team Good
Old Boys match.
- Marc Risk, Jim Bell, Jim
McGriff and Paul Davis
-posted 8 points for the win.
Stephens, Ed Snow,-
Dave Cannon and Merle
Hibbard were in- second
with 5 points.
Jerry West, Eli Witt,
Bobby Simmons and Nick
Whitehurst finished third.
In match two, Dennis
Hendershot, Howard
Whitaker, Bill Wheeler, Joe
Persons and Carl Wilson
toppedMontyMontgomery,
Stan Woolbert,. Mike
Spencer and Tom Elmore,
5-2.
Snow and Risk posted


Champions Tour


201 I leaders final


Points
I.Tom Lehman 2,422 $2
2. Mark.Calcavecchia2;348 $1
3. Peter Senior 1,874 $1
4.Jay Don Blake 1,803 $1
5.John Cook 1,798. $1
6. Russ Cochran 1,678 $1
7.Olin Browne 1,572 $1
8. Fred Couples 1,458 $1
9. Mark O'Meara 1,447 $1
10.Nick Price 1,354 $1
II.MichaelAllen 1,346 $1

ACROSS
1 Rash
6 Outspoken,
as a critic
11 Parlor piece
12 Soft wool
13 Jeweled
coronets
14 Thais and'
Koreans
15 Loafer
16 Evening out
17 Peeve
18 Lose
brightness
19 Shipshape
23 Type of bed
25 Chopin opus
26 Tummy
muscles
29 Furious
31 Dawn
Chong
32 Wham!
33 Speeder's
nemesis
34 Mantra chants
35 Drink noisily


Money
.081,
1,867
,434,
,531,
,747,
,503;
,251,
,042,
,237,
,300,
,16 1,

3

3
4
4
4

.4
4
5
5
5

5
5


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


identical rounds of 39-38-
77 to tie for scoring hon-
ors. Whitaker (39-40),
Montgomery (40-39).and
Stephens (38-41) all posted
79.
McGriff had the only
nine hole win with. 39 on
the front side.
Any player with a plus
score got a piece of the
Wednesday blitz.
Chad Hunter led the
way with +5 to finish first
Buddy Slay was in second
place with +2. Roger Mitzel
and Mickey Wilcox shared
third at +1.
Keith Shaw picked up
two skins. Steve Patterson
and Hunter each had one
skin.
Both pot holes carried
over again.


12.Jeff Sluman I
13.Tom Watson I
14.Jay Haas 1
15. Kenny Perry I
iy 16. David Eger 1
,526 17.John Huston
991 18. Corey Pavin
,19 19.Loren Roberts
,877 20. MarkWiebe
,075 21.Joey Sindelar
,090 22. Hale Irwin
,473 23. David Frost
,953 24. Bernhard Langer
,797 .25.Tom Pernice,Jr.
,443 26. Chip Beck
,306 27. Chien Soon Lu

17 Eclipse, to an
ancient
19 A Muppet
10 TLC providers
,1 Cato's route
t5 Folk dancer's
shoe
[7 Look happy
[8 Willow bloom
1 Yellow pad
i2 Fits in-
i3 Assert
without proof
i4 Places
i5 Flat broke

DOWN
1 Alpine
moppet
2 To any degree
(2 wds.)
3 Main drag
4 Natural
eyewash
5 Oui, in Boston
6 Waistcoat
7 Use a
compass
8 Spy org.


,343
,181
,127
,041
,032
973
911
893
793
747
714
700
620
559
529
456


$1,493,672
$815,675
$1,067,467
$964,851
$982,904
$866,290
$848,252
$762,265
$931,652
$708,337
$624,811
$802,019
$678,769
$611,724
$636,833
$702,597


Joe Paul was at the top
of his game in the Saturday
blitz. His score of +11 was
the only double digit round
of the day. Dennis Crawford
and Steve Thomas shared
second place at +6.
Michael Yacovelli and
Larry Ross traded the
lead often in B flight, until
Yacovelli pulled ahead for
the win. His +9 bested Ross
by a stroke. Bob Randall
was in third place at +5.
Six players split the
skins pot Ron Bennett, Al
Alvarado, Ken Radcliffe,
Greg Lyon, Don Combs
and Randal each took home
one.
The LGA match was can-
celed due to cold weather.
Upcoming events:
Sunday, Mixed pairs
event;
SJan. 21, MGA four-man
All For One Tournament;
Jan. 27, Chamber of
Commerce scramble.


28.Tommy Armour 111449
29. Rod Spittle 446
30. Eduardo Rtmero 426
31. Bob Gilder 400
31. Fred Funk 400
33. Brad Bryant 344
34.Joe Ozaki 341
35. Hal Sutton 295
36. Mark McNulty 281
37. Steve Pate 279
38. Kiyoshi Murota 272
39. Brad Faxon 255
40. Mike Goodes 245
41. Larry Mize 231
42. Mark Brooks 211
43. Lee Rinker 193


$614,392
$731,144
$394,123
$534,146
$494,758
$590,087
$493,242
$457,062
$510,307
$310,593
$173,463
$331,711
$493,703
$455,014
$422,884
$223,536


Answer to Previous Puzzle


K OI DAH FARE
UMA ELIA AVOW
DIE TED J I VE
IUT P IAIVES



AR CH MEE K RPM







ELLE TINT ARI

VOLT PAS WET


9 -Margret
10 Part of UCLA
11 Mix together
12 Polite address
16 Bell sound
(hyph.)
18 Ms. Merrill


Want more puzzles?
Check oul the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


20 EEC currency
21 Rodin
sculpture
22 Football
stands
24 Buckle, as
lumber
25 Fictional
governess
26 Nave
neighbor
27 Cotton pod
28 Dog-paddled
30 Plows into
36 Coach
Knute -
38 Spry
40 Howard and
Perlman
42 Like some
showers
43 Mournful
poem
44 Solar plexus,
e.g.
46 Pot covers
47 Red-tag event
48 Big rigs'
radios
49 Cassius Clay
50 Lunar New
Year
51 Catch some
rays


1-11 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


i











LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11, 2012


No doubt about it: Bama the best after BCS


By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS As
required, Alabama's play-
ers whooped it up amid
the confetti and fireworks,
yet there was something
muted about this champi-
onship celebration.
Turns out, these guys
knew the ending to the
sequel before they even got
to the Big Easy.
For two months, the
Crimson Tide stewed over
its first meeting with top-
.ranked LSU. By the time
the team touched down in
New Orleans, there was lit-
tle doubt in anyone's mind
about the outcome. Not just
win, but dominate.
Boy, did they ever.
With a smothering dis-
play of old-school foot-
ball, No. 2 Alabama blew
out the Tigers 21-0 in the
BCS championship game
Monday night, celebrated
a bit and-headed back to
Tuscaloosa with its second
national title in three years.
Straight-laced coach
Nick Saban accepted the
trophies Tuesday morn-
ing and confessed that he
might have savored it more
than the title two years ago
in Pasadena, Calif.
'To be honest with you,
I think I maybe did," said
Saban, sporting a black
sweater with patches of
crimson on the shoulders
and flanked by the 'hard-
ware. "This team was a
special team, not*that the
2009 team was any differ-
ent It's certainly an honor
and privilege to be with a
group that made the kind of
commitment that you look
for from a competitive char-
acter standpoint"
The Crimson Tide also
claimed the top spot in the
final Associated Press poll
for the eighth time, tying
Notre Dame for the most
of any team in college foot-
ball. Alabama was an over-
whelming choice with 55 of
60 first-place votes.
"We knew what we were
capable of," offensive line-
man Barrett Jones said. "I
guess that's kind of arro-
gant, but it's the way we
felt We felt like we were
capable of dominating, and
we did that"
Credit one of the great-
est defenses in college
football history, a bunch
of NFLready players such
as Courtney Upshaw and
Dont'a Hightower who
made sure LSU (13-1) never
had a chance.
When Jordan Jefferson
dropped back to pass, he


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama head coach Nick Saban celebrates with his team after the BCS National Championship college football game
against LSU on Monday in New Orleans. Alabama won 21-0.


was swept under by a tide
of crimson. When the LSU
quarterback took off run-
ning, he must've felt like
Alabama had a few extra
players on the field. It sure
seemed that way.
"It feels like a night-
mare," Jefferson said. 'We
just didn't get it done on
offense. Some defenses
have your number, and
Alabama had our number."
'LSU beat the Crimson
Tide (12-1) in overtime on
Nov.' 5, a so-called Game
of the Century that was
roundly criticized as a
dud because neither team
scored a touchdown.
The Rematch of the
Century was next, after
Alabama worked its way
back up to second in the
rankings to claim a spot in
the BCS title game. Turns
out, it was even less of a
classic than the first meet-
ing, much closer to "Speed
2" than the "Godfather II."
But the Alabama defense
was a thing of beauty, put-
ting its own spin on this
postseason of high-scoring
shootouts.
'They are unbelievable,"
said Jones, relieved that he
only has to go against them
in practice. "That defense is
as good as any defense I've
ever seen. They rush the
passer, they have awesome
linebackers and they're
great in coverage. They
really don't have any weak-
nesses. They have to be as


good as any defense ever."
LSU didn't cross midfield
until there were less than
8 minutes remaining in the
game. The Tigers finished
with just 92 yards and five
first downs, on the wrong
end of the first shutout in
the BCS' 14-year history.
'This defense is built on
stopping them, and that's
what we did," said Upshaw,
the game's defensive MVP.
"We wanted to come out
and show the world we beat
ourselves the -first game.
'We wanted to come out
and dominate from start to
finish, and that's what we
did."
The Crimson Tide, pil-
ing up 384 yards and 21
first downs, spent much of
the night in LSU's end of
the field, setting up Jeremy
Shelley to attempt a bowl-
record seven field goals. He'
made five of-them, match-
ing a bowl record. Then,
as if responding to all the
critics who complained that
an offensive powerhouse
such as Oklahoma State or
Stanford should've gotten
Sa shot in the title game,
Alabama finally made a
long-overdue trip to the end
zone.
With 4:36 remaining,
Heisman finalist Trent
Richardson broke off a 34-
yard touchdown run.
It was the lone TD that
either of the Southeastern
Conference powerhouses
managed over two games,


plus that overtime period
back in November.
"It felt so good to get that
touchdown against LSU,"
lineman D.J. Fluker said.
"That's all we talked about
We said we were going to
get (Richardson) a touch-
down, and we did it."
On LSU's one and only
trip into Alabama territory,
the Tigers quickly, went
back, back, back the
last gasp ending appropri-
ately with the beleaguered
Jefferson getting the ball'
jarred from his hand before
he could even get off a
fourth-and-forever pass.
"We didn't do a lot dif-
ferent," Saban said. 'We
did some things on offense
formationally. Our offen-
sive team did a great job.
Defensively, we just played
well, played the box. Our
special teams did a. great
job."
The coach has now
won a pair of BCS titles
at Alabama, plus another
at LSU in 2003. He's the
first coach to win three BCS
.titles, denying LSU's Les
Miles his second champion-
ship. The Tigers will have
to settle for the SEC title,
but that's not likely to ease
the sting of this ugly perfor-
mance.
"I told my team that it
should hurt," Miles said.
"We finished second. It's
supposed to hurt"
LSU simply couldn't do
anything running or pass-


ing. Kenny Hilliard led the
Tigers with 16 yards rush-
ing, while Jefferson was 11
of 17 passing for 53 yards,
usually hurrying away
passes before he 'was sent
tumbling to the Superdome
turf. He was sacked four
times and threw a mystify-
ing interception when he
attempted to flip away a
desperation pass, only to
have it picked off because
his intended receiver had
already turned upfield look-
ing to block.
AJ. McCarron was the
offensive MVP, complet-
ing 23 of 34 passes for 234
yards. Richardson added 96
yards on 20 carries. But an
even bigger, cheer went up
when the defensive award
was presented to Upshaw,
who had seven tackles,
includirig a-sack, and spent,
a good'`arf of his night in'
the LStU lackield.
'The whole defense is the
MVP," Upshaw said. "The
whole defense. Roll Tide,
baby. Roll Tide!"
With the way his defense
was playing, McCarron sim-
ply had to avoid mistakes
and guide the offense into.
field-goal range. He did that
to perfection.
"When you have a great
offensive line like I have,
and great players around
you,-it makes your job easy
as quarterback," McCarron
said. "I've got to give all
the credit to them. I wish I
could have the whole team


up here."
While LSU was used
to getting big plays from
its Honey Badger, corner-
back and return specialist
Tyrann Mathieu, Marquis
Maze dealt the first big
blow for the Crimson Tide
with a 49-yard punt return
midway through the open-
ing quarter. He might've
gone all the way to the end
zone if not for a leg injury
that forced him to pull up.
Punter Brad Wing was the
only defender left to beat,
but Maze had to hobble out
of bounds.
McCarron completed
a 16-yard pass to Darius
Hanks at the LSU 10, set-
ting up Shelley for a 23-
yard chip shot field goal.
If nothing else, Alabama
had accomplished one of
its goals coming into the
game: to at least get close
enough to the end zone
for its embattled kickers to
have a better chance of con-
verting.
In the first meeting,
Shelley and Cade Foster
combined to miss four field
goals all of them from
at least 44 yards. In the do-
over, Foster-handled kick-
offs while Shelley also con-
nected from 34, 41, 35 and
44 yards. Not that it was
a flawless kicking perfor-
mance. Shelley had another
kick blocked and pushed
another wide right. In addi-
tion, he clanged the extra
point off the upright after
Richardson's touchdown.
SIt didn't matter.
SLSU's best weapon was
Wing, who averaged near-
ly 46 yards on nine punts.
That was about the only
highlight for the purple
and gold, which failed to
match its BCS title game
victories in 2003 and 2007,
the last two times the game
was played in New Orleans,
about 80 miles from its
Baton Rouge campus.
"We couldn't sustain any
consistency," Miles said.
Miest i vP^'.cninf6 dred
switching to- backup quar-
terback Jarrett Lee, who
started the first eight games
for the Tigers four of
those while Jefferson was
serving a suspension for his
involvement in a bar fight
In all. likelihood, it
wouldn't have mattered.
Not against an Alabama
team that was determined
to write a different ending.
"We fell short the first
time and we didn't play
well," safety Mark Barren
said, "but we showed that
we were the better team
tonight. We shut them
out."


Not everyone has Tide at No. 1


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS -
Alabama's convincing vic-
tory in the BCS champi-
onship wasn't enough to
convince all 60 Associated
Press college football poll
voters that the Crimson
Tide is No. 1.
Four. members of
the media panel had
Oklahoma State at No. 1,
and Erik Gee, of KNML-
AM in Albuquerque, N.M.,
picked LSU as he said
he would before the game.
"I was a'lot closer than
I thought I would be to
changing my mind," Gee
said during a telephone
interview Tuesday. "I
don't think I necessar-
ily felt good about voting
for LSU. But I also didn't
feel good about voting for
Alabama. I stared at
the computer for 10 min-
utes. It wasn't an easy
decision."
Alabama (12-1) was an
overwhelming No. 1 in
the final Top 25, receiv-
ing 55 votes. LSU (13-1),
which beat Alabama 9-6
in overtime on the road
in November and played
a much tougher schedule
than the Tide, finished sec-
ond and Oklahoma State
(12-1) was third.
The USA Today coach-
es' poll had the same top


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma State's Brandon Weeden runs past Stanford during the Fiesta Bowl NCAA col-
lege football game Jan. 2 in Glendale, Ariz.


three, but those voters are
contractually, obligated
to put the winner of the
BCS title game No. 1 on
their ballots. While there
have been occasions when
coaches have ignored
the rule, it was not the
case this season. Alabama
received all 59 first-place
votes.
Only once in the last five
years has the finalAPNo. 1
been unanimous. Unbeaten
Alabama received all 60
first-place votes after the
2009 season.


The Crimson Tide's 21-0
victory Monday night at
the Superdome didn't sway
Gee, but it did persuade
two other AP voters who
had said they expected to
vote LSU (13-1) No. 1 even
if the Tigers lost.
"The score says it all,"
Joe Giglio, of the News &
Observer in Raleigh, N.C.,
said in an email early
Tuesday morning.
Giglio ended up voting
Alabama No. 1.
Seth Emerson, of The
Macon Telegraph in


Georgia, was also leaning
hard toward keeping LSU
in the top spot.
"My thinking was I was
going to keep the Tigers
No. 1 unless they got
trounced and they did,"
he said.
Emerson, however,
ended up giving Oklahoma
State his first-place vote,
along with Matt Markey,
of The Toledo Blade in
Ohio, Steve Conroy, of the
Boston Herald, and Scott
Wolf, of the Los Angeles
Daily News.


AP Source:


Raiders fire


coach Jackson


By JOSH DUBOW
Associated Press
ALAMEDA, Calif. -The
Oakland Raiders fired coach
Hue Jackson on Tuesday
after just one season at the
helm in the first major move
since Reggie McKenzie was
hired as general manager.
The decision to get rid
of Jackson came four days
after the team announced
the hiring of McKenzie
as the team's first general
manager since the death of
longtime owner Al Davis in
October. McKenzie was to
be formally introduced later
Tuesday.
The firing was confirmed
by a person with knowledge
of the situation. It was first
reported by ESPN.
The move marks a rapid
fall for Jackson, who was in
charge of personnel deci-
sions and coaching after
Davis died of heart failure
on Oct 8.
Jackson made the trade
for quarterback Carson
Palmer after starter Jason
Campbell broke his collar-
bone, costing the Raiders a
2012 first-round draft pick
and a conditional 2013 sec-


ond-rounder.
While Palmer showed
signs of giving the Raiders
a big-time quarterback, he
was unable to get Oakland
to the playoffs for the first
time since 2002, raising
questions about how effec-
tive that trade was.
After starting the season
7-4, the Raiders lost four
of their final five games to
mark their ninth straight
season without a winning
record or a playoff berth. A
late-game collapse at home
to Detroit on Dec. 18 and a
38-26 loss to San Diego at
home in the season finale
did in the Raiders and ulti-
mately Jackson.
Owner Mark Davis, Al's
son, made the decision to
bring in McKenzie last wee!.
and gave him the author-
ity over the coaching staff.
McKenzie will now get to
pick a new head coach, pro-
viding the Raiders a fresh
start in their first full season
without Al Davis involved
since 1962.
Jackson talked at the end
of the season about having
more involvement in 2012,
but instead he will have
none.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11. 2012


DILBERT

GOOD NEWS I SIGNED
UP TO RECEIVE A FREE
LEADERSHIP NEWS-
LETTER BY E-MAIL.
I n


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


STOP MAKING
EVERYTHING I SAY
SOUND STUPID!
C- \
G ;- "---

Sir s .%"


DEAR ABBY


Addiction to porn dangerous

for teen and his girlfriend


DEAR ABBY: I have
been dating "Kyle" for
more than six months,
but I have loved him for
more than two years. I
always thought we had
a wonderful relationship
and that Kyle was a sweet,
innocent guy. Well, he just
confided to me that he has
an Internet porn addiction!
I'm very hurt by this and
don't want to lose him.
What should I do? (By
the way, we're both 14.)
INNOCENT TEEN IN
MICHIGAN
DEAR INNOCENT
TEEN: You should urge
Kyle to get help for his
addiction. Addiction, by
definition, is behavior that
is compulsive and out of
control.
The problem with teen-
age boys getting involved
with Internet porn is it
gives them an unrealistic
expectation of how regular,
normal women look and
act. Although you don't
want to lose him, becom-
ing more involved could
lead to his wanting to try
out his sexual fantasies
with you and if you go
along with it, it will land
you in a world of trouble.
The smart thing to do is
end this relationship NOW.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My daugh-
ter "Denise's" fiance is 12
years older than she is and
still lives with his parents.
"Leo" is turning Denise
into his mother.
I first noticed it when she


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
cut her beautiful long hair
short and in the same style
as his mother: Now her
lipstick shade is the same
as Leo's mother's as well as
her glasses and clothing.
At a recent gathering I
remarked to Leo, "Wow,
Denise looks more like
YOUR mother than she
does me." After that,
our relationship soured.
Apparently, he didn't like
my observation. Was I
wrong? CREEPED OUT
IN CALIFORNIA
DEAR CREEPED OUT:
No. But you may have said
it to the wrong person.
You should have said it to
your daughter, who may
be doing it because she
thinks Leo's mother has
great taste. Denise could
also be consciously or
unconsciously doing this
to please him.
There's an old song, "I
Want a Girl Just Like the
Girl That Married Dear
Old Dad." Many men ideal-
ize their mothers, and it
may be a reason why Leo
still lives with his parents.

DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I are empty
nesters. We both work and


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Someone will try to
make you look bad or
unnerve you about the way.
you do things. Get your
work done rather than
retaliate. Spending time
with someone you love will
ease your stress and make
you realize what's impor-
tant. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't allow an emo-
tional situation to stand in
the way of your ability to
learn, communicate and
forge ahead educationally,
professionally or where
your philosophic beliefs
are concerned. Stick to
your ethical standards and
values: **
GEMINI (May 21-Jupe
20): Use your imagination
and you will find a way to
get ahead professionally and
stabilize your personal life
as well. Hard work will pay
off, and showing respon-
sibility will put you in a
controlling position. Love is
highlighted. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Steer clear of unpre-
dictable people. You have
to avoid letting anyone
push you around. Stick
close to home and finish
any unfinished chores or
projects. Accomplishment
will be your guide to a
better future. Learn from
experience. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Keep your life simple and
your costs down. Don't feel
obligated to pay for others
or to show your love lav-
ishly. Moderation and hon-
esty will buy you respect
and lead to opportunities.
Domestic uncertainty will
create an additional bur-
den. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Share what you know
and you'll be offered some-
Sthing special in return. A
change of plans can result
in a financial loss if you
aren't willing to carry on
regardless of what some-
one else decides to do.
Don't give in to emotional
blackmail. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Your peacemaking
ability will come in handy.
Get involved in a cause
and you will be given
the green light to move
forward with an idea you
suggest. Your confidence
and courage will bring you
support. Romance is in the
stars. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Stick to what you do
best. Keep watch over
your home, family and pos-
sessions. You can make
great strides if you make
a commitment to someone
you love. Sort out your


personal paperwork and
move forward. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You'll be tempted
to take on too much. Run
your ideas by someone
you trust before making a
move or signing a contract
that could become a bur-
den. A change is needed,
but it has to be within your
means. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You've got
greater control than you
realize, Speak up and you'll
be given the go-ahead to
pursue your plans. A mon-
eymaking deal is apparent,
and a good investment will
pay off. Keep the momen-
tum going and you will
succeed. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Good fortune will
come to you in a mysteri-
ous way. A partnership
will help you finally get
over something you've
been fighting. Romance
is favored, and a serious
promise will seal a deal
that leads to greater happi-
ness. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): What you do to help
others will also help you. A
partnership will help you
infiltrate groups that have
the potential to raise your
profile. Opportunity will be
the result of a good plan
being expressed well and
executed masterfully. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY Y'S CLUE. E equals B
S"PZH RAMP RHBWCNST PZCDF CD PZH
YABTO ... CM PZH CDVECTCPL AN PZH
ZSRVD RCDO PA WABBHTVPH VTT CPM
WADPHDPM." Z.K. TAJHWBVNP

Previous Solution: "The common argument that crime is caused by poverty is a
kind of slander on the poor." H.L. Mencken
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-11


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


I KNOW IT'S GOOD
BECAUSE IT'S WRITTEN
BY SOME GUY WHO USED
TO HAVE A TOB.
iC-


HOROSCOPES


TlIS 15 A VY ATTRACTIVE MODbl..
/ ..-$'? 4 rlCT a C9A


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


live far from our kids and
grandkids. I have wanted
to move closer to them,
but I also understand we
need to meet our goals for
a secure retirement.
The problem is, I'm
lonely and I think my hus-
Sband is, too. We work long
hours and spend our week-
ends doing chores.'My
solution to help myself feel
better is to get a dog. My
husband, however, doesn't
want one. He wants to wait
until "later" whenever
that is. I'd appreciate some
advice. PINING FOR A
PUPPY IN TEXAS
DEAR PINING: Before
embarking on a "pet".
project, don't you think
you should first find out
what may be causing your
husband's behavior? While
a dog could work wonders
and help you both be more
active, between his job and
the weekend chores, tak-
ing a puppy to obedience
training may be too much
for him. If he's not up to
it, would YOU be willing
to shoulder that task -
and the walking, feeding,
grooming and cleaning up?
Would you consider
adopting an older dog, or
fostering one that needs a
temporary home? I don't
recommend bringing a dog
into you; lives unless your
husband agrees.

I Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com 'or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


CLASSIC PEANUTS









0



oum ia

Your marketplace sourcefor Lake City


and


Colm

Columbia County


WFDNFRDAY JANUARY 11. 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Valentine's Day Ball coming soon


From staff reports


The community of Lake
City is invited to come
out and have a fun,
"lovely" evening in
honor of Valentine's
Day.
The Rotary Club of Lake
City is sponsoring its inaugural
Valentine's Day Ball from 6 p.m.
to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11
at The Country Club of Lake
City.
Billy Aldrich, chairman of the
Valentine's Day Ball, said that
preparation began in September
and the ball was originally set
for New Year's, but the date was
changed in October to have a ball
for Valentine's Day.
The Club has sponsored other
parties in the past, but this is the
first year they are having a party
for Valentine's Day.
"I'm pumped," he said.
"Everyone's excited about the ball
being for Valentine's Day."
According to Aldrich, he was
chosen as chairman because he
had many ideas for the event.
'The secret for a successful
event is to start early and sur-
round yourself with a motivated,
excited committee," Aldrich said.
He mentioned that the venue
was chosen because The Country
Club of Lake City is teriffic and
very accommodating. "They make it
a real pleasure," he said.
At the Ball, guests will have the
opportunity to enjoy cocktails, din-
ner, dancing, a cash bar and live


entertainment by the band Harry,
Sally & Billy.
Aldrich, who is a member of the
band said that Harry, Sally & Billy
began performing 25 years ago
and has performed at various par-
ties in Lake City for the past seven
years. The band plays a little bit
of everything from rock music to
Motown.
The attire for the evening is
black tie optional.
"Dress her up and take her to
the ball," he said.
Since it is Valentine's Day,
Aldrich said that all of the ladies
will receive a rose as a special
treat.
Tickets for the extravaganza
are $50 per person and $100 per
couple.
The event is a fundraiser and
proceeds from the Ball will help
the Rotary Club of Lake City per-
form acts of service both within
the community and internationally.
"Service above self is our motto
for the Rotary Club," Aldrich said.
The event will give gentle-
men an opportunity to be a
hero and bring their sweeties
to the Valentine's Day Ball, said
Aldrich.
"We're going to sell this thing
out," said Aldrich. "It's going to
sell out quickly, so if you want to
come, then you should buy your
tickets fast."
Tickets are available at The
Wheeler Agency, Hunter Printing,
Lake City Reporter, First Street
Music and Park Johnson Agency
on U.S. Hwy 90, or call Aldrich at
752-0812.


Members of the band Harry, Sally & Billy, will be performing live at the Valentine's Day Ball. The Rotary
Club of Lake City is sponsoring its inaugural Valentine's Day Ball from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Feb. 11 at The
Country Club of Lake City.


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In Print and Online
vww.hiaklecitvreporter.com


INVITATION TO BID
BID NO. 2012-A
SALE OF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept bids on var-
ious pieces of surplus equipment.
Bids will be accepted through 2:00
P.M. on February 2, 2012. All bids
submitted shall be on the form pro-
vided.
Instructions and bid forms may be
obtained by visiting the Purchasing
Tab on the Columbia County Flori-
da web site or by calling (386) 719-
2028. Columbia County reserves the
right to reject any and/or all bids and
to accept the bid in the County's best
interest.
Dated this 11th day of, January 2012.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Scarlet Frisina, Chairperson
05529972
January 11, 18, 2012

SALES OF SURPLUS PROPERTY
The Columbia County School Dis-
trict will be holding a Public Auction
on certain material and equipment
and vehicles that have been declared
surplus property. This public auction
will be held Saturday, January 28,
2012 beginning at 9:00 a.m., at the
Support Services -Complex located
off U.S. 441 and CR 25A.
All sales are subject to state and lo-
cal sales tax laws. If exempt from
these taxes a sales tax exemption cer-
tificate must be presented at the time
,of the sale or you will be required to
$pay such taxes. "NO EXCEP-
TIONS."
1. All bidders are required to register
prior to the auction. The Auctioneer
reserves the right to reject bid of
anyone who is not a registered bid-
der.
2. At the time of sale, the buyer's
number and prices of item sold is an-
nounced by the Auctioneer. No
changes in price or quantity can be
made by anyone but the Auctioneer
and at that time only. In any dispute
, over price, quantity, or'between bid-
ders, the Auctioneer reserves the
right to settle anyr and all such dis-
putes and his decision shill be final.
3. Announcements made by the Auc-
tioneer on the day of the-sale take
precedence over any printed matter
pertaining to this auction. DESPITE
EFFORTS TO AVOID WITH-
DRAWAL OF ITEMS FROM THE
SALE LIST, .IT MAY SOMETIMES
BE NECESSARY; THEREFORE
THE SCHOOL DISTRICT RE-
SERVES THE RIGHT TO DO SO.
4..ALL ITEMS ARE SOLD AS IS,
WHERE IS, WITHOUT EXCEP-
TION FOR KNOWN OR UN-'
KNOWN DEFECTS, AND WITH-
OUT ANY GUARANTEES OR
WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR
IMPLIED. The item(s) purchased
immediately become the responsibil-
ity of the purch:.;cr at the time it is
"Knocked Down" by the Auctioneer
The surplus property can be inspect-
ed from 8:00 to 3:30 at the Support
'Services Complex on January 27,
2012 and until time of sale on Janu-
ary 28, 2012. For additional infor-
mation you may contact Mr. Bill El-
rod at (904) 699-7067. A list of sur-
plus material is available upon re-
quest. Elrod Auctions, A.B. #1698,
Auctioneer, Bill Elrod, A.U. 2214
will conduct auction. www.elro-:
dauctions.com
COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL.
BOARD
MICHAEL E MILLIKIN
By: R.M. "Mike" Null
Director of Purchasing
05529902
January 11, 18, 2012


020' Lost & Found


Found 2 puppies near
Birley and Pinemount.
Call 561 312-5620


100 Job
0 Opportunities

BOOKKEEPER NEEDED
Must know Quickbooks and taxes.
Call 386-854-0511
For interview.


05529964
Food service
professionals wanted.
Experienced Banquet Cook
Dishwashers
Banquet Servers
Must have a positive attitude,
ability to work well with people,
eagerness to learn, dedication to
quality, and have an eye for
detail and a willingness
to do what ever it takes to get
the job done.
Background Check Mandatory.
Application available at
Camp Weed, 11057 Camp
Weed Place, Live Oak
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
Opportunities


0552:93-
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBLA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a 911 Public
Safety Telecommunicator I or II
(depending upon qualifications).
Position is responsible for call
taking and dispatching for law
enforcement, fire, and medical
emergency calls, as well as
certain non-emergency
functions. Minimum
requirements: At least 18 years
old, possess high school
diploma/GED and for Telecom-
municator I at least one year
continuous work experience in a
busy and/or high stress environ-
ment. Experience requirement
for Telecommunicator II two
years of recent communications
dispatching experience with
demonstrated proficiency in the
essential functions and must
possess State of FL NCIC/FCIC
certification & a current
Emergency Medical Dispatch
certification. Successful
applicant must pass pre-employ-
ment physical, drug screen, and
criminal history check to satisfy
FL Dept of Law Enforcement
standards for NCIC/FCIC opera-
tors. Salary based on qualifica-
tions (Telcommunicator I -
$20,842 annually, Telecommu-
nicator II $22,963 annually).
Excellent benefits. Applications
available at Human Resources&
Office, Board of County Com-
missioners, 135 NE Hernando
Ave, Suite 203, Lake City, FL
or www.columbiacountyfla.com
com>. (386)719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139. Deadline for
apps: 01/20/12. An
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

05529880
VyStar Credit Union Seeking
Member Relationship .
Specialist Supervisor
Location: Lake City Branch
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS:
Trains, monitors, coaches and
develops member service and
teller staff on a daily basis.
Provides on-going training for
all member service and teller
staff as changes are
implemented' and other duties
JOB KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS
& ABILITIES:
A minimum of three years of
experience with a financial
institutiorl.
A minimum of two years in a
leadership or supervisory'
position is preferred.
Knowledge of Microsoft Word
and Excel are required.
EDUCATION:
An Associate. Degree is required
and a four-year undergraduate
degree is preferred. Work and/or
supervisory experience may be
substituted for the Associates
Degree.
Please visit
www.vystarcu.org/home/careers
to apply.
VyStar Credit Union is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

03530008
Housekeeper
On-call to fill in when needed.
Must be able to work evenings
or weekends.
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City,
Fl 32025 EOE/DFWP

Child care center looking for
qualified and experienced
Director. Apply in person at Wee
Care in Columbia City.

MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
Trucks. 386-752-9754


RECEPTIONIST/CLERK.
Part-time to full-time. Position is
part time to mid-April. Candidate
must be able to work evenings and
Saturday. After tax season
position will go to full-time
Monday Friday, Candidate must
be dependable, able to multi-task,
be proficient in QuickBooks,
Word and Excel, 10 key by touch,
know general office skills as well
as have excellent telephone eti-
quette and people skills. Salary
based on skills and experience.
Fax resume with references to
386-755-7331

Stacy's Greenhouses in York, SC
is currently recruiting 42
Temporary Supervisors to direct
the work of farm workers in
growing plants. Position requires a
minimum of 6 months experience
supervising production workers in
agriculture. Must be bilingual
(50%) in English/Spanish read,
write, speak and able to do basic
arithmetic, geometry, algebra.
Will keep records and produce
written reports. May apply crop
protection chemicals and operate
farm/nursery/greenhouse specific
equipment. Work will begin
02/03/2012 and will end
10/31/2012. The pay is $9.39 per
hour. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Free housing provided for
non-commuting worker.
Conditional transportation/
subsistence reimbursed at 50% of
the contract, or sooner, if


100 Job
1 Opportunities

appropriate for eligible workers.
Work tools/equipment/supplies
provided at no cost. Stacy's is an
equal opportunity employer. For
full disclosure and to apply.
contact the nearest state
Employment Service (in FL call
850.231.3466) and inquire about
job order SC 518142.

0 Medical
1 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529923
Admission Director
Avalon Healthcare is currently
accepting applications for
the full time position of
Admissions Director.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent Benefit package.
Please send resume to:
Tony Anderson, Administrator
admin@avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


MA CNA Medical office.
2 years exp. required! Phlebotomy
required! Send resume to P.O. Box
.805 Lake City, Florida 32056

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


120 Medical
120 Employment


Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupation Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as a sign on bonus is being
offered. Please contact Jenhie
Cruce Director of Rehab
doriiavalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE


170 Business
Opportunities

Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

240 Schools &
24 Education


05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/23/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440
nans-seeo ~ma


310 Pets & Supplies

German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament.superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. S575
(352)486-1205

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be it least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


403 Auctions

4 BURNER stainless steel
gas range. Less than
3 yrs old. $400.
386-205-7713


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Antique round side table.
Dark wood.94" around,
29" tall. $50.
386-754 4094


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


Set Yo-









Apply in person or online


Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!


Cli^'ll^
IBUYfIli

ss^UK^^^^ ", T S


FIN I I


14.


MONDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY
Karaoke Karaoke L MS
w/Teddy Mac w/Teddy Mac e i
Doors Open 5pm U Doors Open 5pm 8p










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2012


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Wed Sun. North 41 on Michelle
place. Just past 1-10. Look for
signs. Appliances, furniture, AC's,
and Much much more!!!


440 Miscellaneous

7000 WATT Troybilt generator
10 watt surge. new in 2011
$750.00
386-205-7713

BEER KEG Refrigerator for sale.
38' cold always. $200 obo.
386-758-1991


BLUE OX Tow Bar.
Like new. Used 2 years.
$175.00
386-752-9645


440 Miscellaneous
Glock 27.40 cal. Pistol. w/2 clips.
one double stacked w/laser site.
W/Paddle type. lock down holster.
Exc. Cond. $475. FIRM. Excellent
for concealed carry
*****SOLD****
PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control.
in original box. $270.
386-984-7510
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
**SOLD**

450 GoodThings
5 to Eat ,
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties:
386-752-6896


460 Firewood
FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered-
1/2 cord S75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
S100 per load. Over 20 mi 5120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
1 BR/1 BA Furnished, all utilities
included + satellite.
5125 week, $125.deposit.
Call 386-758-6939


2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3/2 DWMH, CH/A
$450. mo. plus
$200. dep
386-752-2254


630 MobileHomes 40 Mobile Homes
for Rent 60U for Sale


?32 SW. just renovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75.
S550 mo. S500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Country Living
2&3bdrm. 5500-5550.
Verv clean. NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs. & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
S$625 mo. plus 625 dep.
954-258-8841
640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Beautiful, Brand new 4/2
mantifac-
tured home on 5 acres in Lake
City, Fl. $9,900.00 down, $995.00
per month. Easy Qualifying**
Owner Financing**
Ready to move in. Call Today!!
512-663-0065.


COMING SOON!
4 used homes. We have pics and
can send. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville. (352)872-5566
WE ALSO BUY USED HOMES!
NOT A MISPRINT!
Large Mobile Home Dealer Shut
Their doors and we are
Liquidating Their Entire
Inventory! Example New & Never
lived in 2011, 32X64 Jacobson,
32X64, 42, WAS $89,788 NOW
Only $68,799. Including Free
Furniture, Full 5 year Warranty
and delivery & set up with Air.
8"to choose from like this!
North Pointe Homes,
Gainesville (352)872-5566.
Hurry 1st Come, 1st Serve.
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210


R1 II II


Browse Search
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REPORTER Classifieds In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


51 i


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*II


640 Mobile Homes
640- for Sale
UNHEARD OF!
New 2012 Jacobson's Start at
$39,900 including del-set-AC-
skirting and steps. NO GAMES!
North Pointe Homes.
Gainesville, (352)872-5566

60n Mobile Home
650 &Land
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. no $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath. in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City


Classified Department: 755-5440


SW1









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 11. 2012


710 AUnfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent






2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/1BA DUPLEX. $300 securi-
ty dep. $500. mo $150. Pet Depos-
it. Available now! 386-752-5389
or after 4:30p 386-752-6138
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-315-2509 or 965-5560
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
I bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
QUAIL HEIGHTS. 2br/lba
Duplex. Washer/dryer hook up.
Private, safe, secluded, $750 mo
$500 sec. 386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
720 Furnished Apts.
272 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
STUDIO APT. FOR RENT
All utilities included & Cable,
$500 month + $300 sec. deposit.
Call 386-697-9950
730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, 1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379


7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/IBA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. S500 Deposit
386-752-3225
3br/2ba Split floor plan. 1850sf +
garage. Quiet Cul-de-sac, 4 mi SW
of Hwy 90. Privacy fence, Lg
rooms, Jacuzzi tub in Master BR.
$1195mo S800.dep. 386-984-5872
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac.
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534
750 Business &
SOffice Rentals
(05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor
2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1100sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
Scustodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the

To place your
classified ad call
755-5440
^_s^^^^_^^^^^^^


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are as aila-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3bri2ba DW. 10.16 acres S of
Columbia Cirt.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well. tank.
& pole on site. (727)289-2172

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed. Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, S39,900, S410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
o Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
& Supplies
TOW HITCH
All Ford Pickups and
maybe others. $100.
386-758-1991

We're on target!


-iiS'^^ ^ .O -.... ...... tJi- *AdA&81 "~ B i *
P- 0-ik.P <. u-' Au "'1 "' "' M

t d4O0t%4I


1n. NW '. ^O

Highway 90
Lake City,Fi,
32055


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Exam and Necessary X-rays
Do s 10. D 33,tr ne ".


patient
Reg. 13 SAINGS OF $107
Expire Januar) 31, 2012
... -penlak-ty.
- -.. -'www.aspenlakecity.com


Lake City Reporter


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS imagine
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


SO I D




FRISTIN THE




CLASSIFIED


Selling your stuff is simple with a little help

from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds.

Let our sales team help you place

an ad today, in print and online!


Call 386-755-5448o sr go ts wwwlakcltyresprter.coM



Lake City Reporter

lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


Women's ceteoeiF a oidda

Obstetrics and Gynecology
Chandler Mohan, MD Emad Atta, MD
S e Annmarie Fenn, CNM, MS
Weight Loss/ Hair Removal/ Chemical Peels/ 4D Baby Ultrasounds
ALL $69
Accepting all Insurance. No Ins visit $50


(386) 466-1106
1" Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak


--,
ki -^ ub


---