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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01747
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 10, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01747
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








-;


Reporter


Tuesday, January 10, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No.292 0 75 cents


Home LCPD discipline


leaves


1 hurt

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityrepor ter. com
Several men, at least one
of them armed with a pistol,
forced their way into a Lake
City home Sunday morn-
ing, holding the occupants
at bay while they found
items to steal before fleeing
the scene.
An occupant confronted
one of the thieves and was
hit with the pistol.
According to Lake City
Police Department reports,
officers were called to a
Congress Street address
around 2:30 a.m. Sunday in
reference to a burglary in
progress and spoke to two
victims who said several
black men forced their way
into the home and ordered
them to the ground. The
men then began to search
the home.
"We're still not sure
how many suspects there
were," said Capt. John
Blanchard, Lake City
Police Department public
information officer. "We're
still speaking to the vic-
tims."
Authorities have not
been able to determine how
many of the intruders were
armed.
"We only know of one
gun at this time," Blanchard
said.
Blanchard said the sus-
pects forced their way into
the home through the resi-
dence's front door.
"They did damage to the
front door when they came
in," he said.
A third victim, sleeping
in another room, awoke
and began to fight with one
of the suspects and was
struck with the pistol. He
was treated at a local hospi-
tal and released.
"A neighbor drove the
victim to the hospital,".
Blanchard said.
Investigators are trying
to determine whether the
ROBBERY continued on 3A


Motorcycle

accident

leaves one

dead in LO

From staff reports

A Live Oak motorcyclist
was killed Sunday afternoon
when he lost control of the
machine and struck a fence
post, according to Florida
Highway Patrol reports.
Dale Clifford Staats, 49,
died in the crash, which
occurred around 4 p.m.
Sunday at Bass Road and
121st Road in Suwannee
County.
According to FHP
reports, Staats, traveling
west on a Bass Road on
a 2001 Harley Davidson,
failed to negotiate a curve
and drove onto the grassy
shoulder.
The motorcycle slid to
the right and struck a fence
post causing, sending it left
and throwing Staats off the
machine, which came to
rest facing west.
Staats, who was not wear-
ing a helmet, was transport-
ed to Shands at Live Oak.


unfair, says Hill


Councilman claims captain will be
fired, while death of K-9 officer only
resulted in reprimand for handler,

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City Councilman Jake Hill questioned at
Monday's meeting the fairness of city police officer
reprimands.
He asked why it is fair for officer Kevin Johns to


receive a written reprimand for his role in allowing
his K-9 dog Trooper to die of heat stroke last summer,
while it's likely Capt. Robert Smith will be fired for
questioning how the department is run and express-
ing concerns to City Manager Wendell Johnson about
conflicts within the department's command staff.
"Capt Smith has not been dismissed yet, but he's
on the way out," Hill said at the end of Monday's
meeting. "There's something wrong with the police
department."
Smith has been on paid administrative leave since
LCPD continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Lake City resident Leslie White (left), explains to her daughter Anniece, 24, how she survived a fire that engulfed most
of her three-bedroom, two-bqth home located at 186 Northeast Anderson Terrace. White said that as she slept on a
coach in the living room, a crack in the fireplace most likely ignited the fire. 'I'm grateful that God woke me up,' White
said.

'An angel woke me,' says woman

who fled fire with life, little else


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com

After a long day of cleaning on Jan. 3,
Leslie White fell asleep on the couch of
her Lake City home.
Just after midnight she woke up to
flames licking the ceiling as her home
filled with smoke.
"An angel from heaven woke me up," said White of
that night.
When White called 911 after running out of the
house, White said all she could tell the operator was
"My house is on fire, my house is on fire."
With it went priceless photos of White's two


deceased children, one of whom she buried exactly
eight years before at age 13."
When the fear and panic slightly subsided, White
said she was able to give her address, 186 Northeast
Anderson Terrace.
Wearing only a nightgown and flip-flops, White
watched as firefighters extinguished the fire that tore
through her home of six years.
A neighbor brought her a blanket to wrap herself in
as the night's temperatures dipped into the 20s.
White said firefighters tried to get her to sit down
but she couldn't as she watched flames eat up irre-
placeable photos and belongings.
After the fire, White saw a chunk of ceiling cover-

FIRE continued on 3A


Just right for Barbie


Arianna Clay,
4, fixes a toy
bicycle Monday
after falling off of
her first 'big girl'
Barbie bicycle
that she got for
Christmas.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERfLa'e C"ty Repc'e-,


Sitel


to add


200


jobs


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. com
Local customer call cen-
ter Sitel is looking to add
more than 200 employees
to its Lake City call center
staff.
Steven Tye, site director
of the Lake City branch,
said the company is looking
to hire roughly 210 full-time
employees as sales assis-
tants.
"We start the first train-
ing class with 50 people
tomorrow (Tuesday)," he
said. "These are contract
positions that are annual-
ized."
The associates will be
sales assistants who oper-
ate online.
"Instead of talking to
people on the telephone,
they're going to be talking
in a chat," he said.
Sitel is a global company
that offers support for other
global firms in product cus-
tomer service.
"We, as a corporation,
won this business and have
decided to place it in the
Lake City office," Tye said.
Tye said he was not ready
to release salary informa-
tion about the positions, but
did offer other details about
the financial compensation.
"We are going to pay a
comparable wage and.in the
sales campaign there will
be some additional incen-
tives," he said.
Sitel currently employs
about 800 workers. ,
Tye said he is looking
for qualified candidates
to apply for the positions
at www.Sitel.com or drop
by the facility at 1152 SW
Business Point Drive.
Sitel has been in Columbia
County since 2000.


3 face

burglary

charges

From staff reports

Three Columbia County
men were taken into custo-
, dy Sunday night when Lake
City Police Department
officers responded to a
burglar-in-progress call at a
vacant home.
Lawrence Avenger,
20, 3757 NW Huntsboro
St.; Antonio D. Baker, 18,
770 NW Dixie Ave., and
Alfred Johnson III, 18,
474 SW Sunview Road,
Fort White were booked
into the Columbia County
Detention Facility for bur-
glary. Johnson, however,
was not listed as a current
inmate on the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office web
site Monday night.
According to LCPD
reports, around 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, officers were
dispatched to 603 NE
Aberdeen St in reference
to a burglary.
Officer Brian Bruenger
located a suspect, later
identified as Baker, com-
ing out the rear of 603 NE
BURGLARY continued on 3A


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TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Hanks'Web
seriess on Yahoo.


COMING
WEDNESDAY
Local news
roundup.










LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY. JANUARY 10, 2012


FLORIDA

jj 8-14-18 29-33-37
X 2 '


Monday:
Afternoon: 6-4-4
Evening: N/A


Pay4, Monday:
Afternoon: 3-1-2-7
Evening: N/A


ezmatdz.


Sunday:
1-5-7-11-23


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Hanks' Web series to stream on Yahoo


NEW YORK
Tom Hanks' long gestating
Web series is coming to
Yahoo.
"Electric City," an ani-
mated futuristic series
Hanks has been developing for
years, will premiere on Yahoo this
spring. The series includes 20 epi-
sodes, each three- or four-minutes
long.
Yahoo, along with Hanks and
production partners Playtone and
Reliance Entertainment, are set to
formally announce plans for the
series Tuesday at the International
Consumer Electronics Show in Las
Vegas.
For Hanks, the release of "Electric
City" caps the actor's efforts to find
the right avenue for the project He
first tried to make the series using
puppets. He earlier announced it
would be released in early 2011.
The series is set in a seemingly
peaceful city situated in a post-apoca-
lyptic world. Many of its themes are
socially conscious topics relevant to
today, including energy consump-
tion.
"It was always our intent to have
this project live and breathe online,
and we felt Yahoo would be the per-
fect home," said Gary Goetzman, co-
founder of Playtone, Hanks' produc-
tion company.
For Yahoo, "Electric City" is its
first entry into scripted original pro-
gramming. Yahoo has been beefing
up its online video with reality'series
and wrap-up news shows, many of
which rank among the most-viewed
series online.

'24' movie to begin
shooting this spring
PASADENA Fans of Jack Bauer
have'something to look forward to.
A movie based on the old Fox series
"24" is scheduled to begin shooting
this spring.
Actor Kiefer Sutherland said


Actors Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson attend the premiere of 'Extremely Loud &
Incredibly Close' at the Ziegfeld Theater on Dec. 15 in New York.


Sunday that he
expects to go to
work on the movie
in late April or
May. Sutherland
played Bauer, the
centerpiece on the
Sutherland pulse-quickening
adventure series that
ended its television run in 2010.
Even with the movie ahead of him,
Sutherland is already working on
a new Fox series. 'Touch" features
him as the father of a super-intel-
ligent son able to understand odd
connections in the world and even
predict the future.

'Forrest' Gump' actor
Sinise to raise money
TEMECUIA, California Gary
Sinise, known for playing a sol-
dier who loses his legs in the film
"Forrest Gump," wants to stage
a benefit concert to raise money
to build a home in Temecula,
California, for a Marine who lost his
limbs in Afghanistan.


Sinise, now
starring in TV's
"CSI New York,"
is expected to ask
the Temecula City
Council on Tuesday
if he can hold a con-
Sinise cert tentatively on
March 1.
Sinise's Lt. Dan Band, named for
his movie character, would perform
and raise money for Marine Lance
Cpl. Juan Dominguez, who lost his
legs and right arm in 2010.

Fans celebrate Elvis
Presley's 77th birthday
MEMPHIS Fans-of Elvis
Presley's are celebrating what would
have been his 77th birthday with a
cake-cutting ceremony and guitar-
ist Jose Feliciano singing "Happy
Birthday."
The gathering at Graceland on
Sunday morning also featured a
proclamation honoring Elvis by local
dignitaries.
Associated Press. ,.. .


Celebrity Birthdays


* Opera singer Sherrill
Milnes is 77.
M Blues artist Eddy
Clearwater is 77.
* Rock singer-musician
Ronnie Hawkins is 77.
* Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Willie McCovey is 74.
* Singer Frank Sinatra Jr. is
68.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ............... 755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla.32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


* International Boxing Hall
of Famer and entrepreneur
George Foreman is 63.
* Singer Pat Benatar is 59.
* Hall of Fame race car
driver and team owner Bobby
Rahal is 59.
* Rock musician Michael
Schenker is 57.
* Singer Shawn Colvin is 56.


BUSINESS'
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks.................$48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.48
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the.executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in thi' p,~d'. And thanks for reading.


3 panther deaths
recorded so far
NAPLES Wildlife
officials said three Florida
panthers have been killed
-so far this.year.
Dave Onorato of the
Florida Panther Project
said that one of the endan-
gered panthers was found
dead Saturday in Collier
County.
Onorato said a vehicle
fatally struck the 4-year-old
female panther.
The animal's carcass will
be sent to a state wildlife
research lab in Gainesville
for a necropsy. The
remains will be archived
at the Florida Museum of
Natural History.
Two male panthers
have been found dead in
separate parts of Collier
County since Jan. 1.

Human trafficking
events hosted
MIAMI Government
and law enforcement agen-
cies around the state are
holding meetings this
month to raise awareness
about human trafficking.
Welfare officials said
Florida is the third most
popular trafficking destina-
tion in the country. Half of
all trafficking victims are
children.
The Florida Department
of Children and Families
developed a task force and
is working on several ini-
tiatives to abolish human
trafficking.
Victims from human
trafficking are forced
into labor, debt bondage,
involuntary servitude and
commercial sexual exploi-
tation.

Abuse survivor to
strengthen laws
TALLAHASSEE -
A sexual abuse survivor
is pushing to broaden
responsibilities for report-
ing child abuse and pun-


im


"* : -' ;?' C ..


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ASSOCIATED PRESS ,
- ,T -_ : ,


ASSOCIATED PRESS


Presenting the best in show
Judge Gary Powell examines a Siamese cat during the judg-
ing process for the breed at a cat show, presented by the
Cat Fanciers Association Sunday at the Morocco Shrine


Auditorium in Jacksonville.

ish universities if officials
don't report abuse on
campus.
Lauren Book has helped
pass at least a dozen laws
to help victims, prevent
abuse and punish abus-
ers. She announced
Monday details of two
new bills (HB 1355 and
SB 1816) filed in Florida's
Legislature.
If they pass, anyone
who suspects child abuse
by anyone would have to
report it.

Man shot, retired
deputy suspected
MIAMI Authorities
are investigating after a
retired Broward Sheriff's
deputy allegedly shot a
man he said was threaten-.
ing his children.
Former deputy Maury
Hernandez was at a Miami
Lakes ice cream store with
his fiancie, mother and
three children Saturday
when police said the
man began swinging at
Hernandez and then the
children.
Miami-Dade Police
said Monday that Alain
Romero, 33, was hospital-
ized in stable condition
with multiple gunshot
wounds.


According to Miami-
Dade Police, Hernandez
had the legal right to use a
gun if he felt his life was in
danger.

Suit claims ex-
execs stole money
MIAMI A lawsuit
filed in Florida by the
parent of CompUSA and
Circuit City claims former
executives and vendors
stole millions of dollars
from the company.
The lawsuit was filed
by Systemax Inc. against
former executives Carl and
Patrick Fiorentino and oth-
ers. It includes allegations
they stole electronics, took
kickbacks from vendors
who charged excessive
prices and wrongly inflated
their salaries.
The lawsuit filed Friday
seeks unspecified dam-
ages. Attorneys for the
Fiorentino brothers did
not immediately respond
Monday to emails seeking
comment.
A third former execu-
tive, Gilbert Fiorentino,
was not named in the law-
suit In April he resigned
and surrendered cash and
stock after similar allega-
tions surfaced.
* Associated Press


THE WEATHER


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MOSTLY
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77,61


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City Wednesday Thursday


isonviiie Cape Canaveral
3 5' Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
,tona Beach Fort Myers
Gainesville
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do Cape Canaveral Key West
,` 74 z. Lake City
Miami
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West Palm Beach Ocala
,, '-,; Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
;7 ,r,. Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
,, ., Miami Tampa
7.- r7 Valdosta


Key West


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


78
46
66
42
83 in 1989
19 in 1958


0.00"
0.06"
0.06"
0.94"
0.94"


SUN
Sunnse today
Sunset today
Sunrise tornm.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tornm.


7:28 a.m.
5:48 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:49 p.m.


7:29 p.m.
8:13 a.m.
8:31 p.m.
8:52 a.m.


4

45 nictesto buInn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


.7a Ip 7p la 6a On this date in
Tuesday Wednesday 1995, record rain-

and caused exten-
Stime 24-hour rainfall
records were set,
Including 7.10
inches of rain o"or

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Daily Scripture
"Do not store up for yourselves
treasures on earth, where
moths and vermin destroy, and
where thieves break in and
steal."
Matthew 6:19
Thought for Today
"I know that I don't know what
I don't know."
Marguerite Youcenar,
French author (1903-1987)

Lake City Reporter


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weather.com


Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. i Forecasts, data and
16 23 30 7 4101 graphics 2012 Weather
Last New First Full m Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com


(386) 755-544


Celebrity Birthdays


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


..... :11-


(lb~ r


I















6 hurt, 5 seriously, injured in 1-75 crash


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Six South Bend, Indianapolis, residents
were injured five seriously when the
vehicle they were traveling in hit the guard-
rail and overturned Saturday afternoon on
Interstate 75. Three of the vehicle's passen-
gers were flown to area hospitals because of
the severity of their injuries.
Patricia M. Grogan, 50, suffered minor


injuries in the crash, while Janne Grogan.
79; Traci Foster, 19; Thomas G. Foster,
20; Kailyn Meiszberg, 18: and Adam
Kanczuzewski, 18. were seriously hurt-
The crash occurred around 2:28 p.m.
Saturday on 1-75 at mile maker 439 north-
bound, just yards away from the Columbia
County border.
According to Florida Highway Patrol
reports, Patricia Grogan was driving a 2005


Honda van north on 1-75 with the others as
her passengers. They were traveling in the
outside lane of the roadway. The van trav-
eled into the outside emergency lane and
Grogan steered the van back to the outside
lane, but the vehicle spun counter-clockwise
and went northwest across the northbound
lanes of the roadway. The van then traveled
into the median, struck the guardrail with its
right front ahd overturned.


Patricia Grogan was taken to Shands
LakeShore Regional Medical Center.
Traci Foster and Adam Kanczuzewski
were taken to Lake City Medical Center for
treatment
Janne Grogan, Thomas G. Foster
and Meiszberg were flown to Shands in
Gainesville by helicopter.
Patricia M. Grogan was charged with
careless driving, FHP said.


LCPD: Councilman says captain, on administrative leave, will be fired
Continued From Page 1A


filing a complaint against another LCPD
captain and detailing conflicts between
himself and Chief Argatha Gilmore.
Johnson told Hill his comments at a
public meeting were inappropriate and the
issue should have been discussed between
the two of them in his office.
"I have no response to that," Johnson
said. "We follow the rules."
No other council members commented
on Hill's remarks.
After the meeting, Hill said he "doesn't
have a problem" with Johns' discipline
for the K-9's death but he questioned
why Smith is likely being fired for keep-
ing records about activities that occurred
within the department.
"I don't have a problem with the rep-
rimand, but a dog died and he's [Johns]
got a job," Hill said. "I got the word Capt.
Smith's on his way out. They don't know
what to do with him. I want what's right
for everybodyY'
Smith said it appears that Gilmore, who
is African-American, is targeting black


officers to fire.
"We need to do some house cleaning
besides black officers," he said.
Hill said he doesn't plan to put his
concerns on the agenda for an upcoming
meeting but he would vote to fire Gilmore
if given the opportunity.
"If it comes before me, my vote is to go,"
he said.
In other business at the meeting, council
members voted unanimously to endorse
City Clerk Audrey Sikes for the position
of second vice president of the Florida
Association of City Clerks.
She currently serves as the associa-
tion's Northeast District director. The
district covers Alachua, Baker, Bradford,
Clay, Columbia, Dixie, Duval, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Nassau,
Putnam, St Johns, Suwannee, Taylor and
Union counties.
If Sikes wins the nomination, she
will serve as president of the Florida
Association of City Clerks in two years.
"This position would allow me to serve


in a leadership role, administer a budget
for 585 members, problem. solve on a
larger level, run executive board meetings
and would significantly expand my circle
of relationships," Sikes wrote in her letter
to the city asking for support.
Sikes said she would have to take short
periods of time off her city job to fulfill the
responsibilities of her appointment if she
gets the job. A final decision will be made
in June, she said.
"I just think it's a great opportunity,"


Aberdeen St, reports indicate. Baker was
.detained and placed in a patrol vehicle.
Officer Joe Moody and Bruenger then
searched the home and reportedly found
Johnson hiding in an upstairs bedroom.
He was also taken into custody.


she said.
Council members also voted to set cor-
porate rates to rent hangars at the Lake
City Airport at 15.5 cents a square foot.
The rate ensures all three commercial
hangars will be rented, airport manager
Nick Harwell said.
Rates for other hangars will be frozen at
existing levels.


Officer Michael DelCastillo found
Avenger hiding on the roof outside a sec-
ond story window, reports show.
Authorities contacted the owner of the
home who told them no one was currently
living there.


FIRE: Woman loses everything
Continued From Page 1A


ing the couch she had been sleeping on
just hours before. The fireplace, where
the fire started, was less than six feet,
away from where she slept.
Between smoke, fire and water damage,
the home and nearly all of White's belong-
ings were ruined. The roof had a gaping
hole from the fire that raged through the
attic. "I'm really homeless," said White,
who did not have insurance on the home,
The American Red Cross provided
White with three nights in a hotel and
vouchers for food and clothing. She
is now renting at Sundial Efficiency
Apartments, where the Columbia County
Fire Department Auxiliary paid her first
month's rent.
White returned to work shortly after
the fire. "I'd rather be working than sit-
ting in my room going crazy," she said.
White is.a certified nursing assistant
and works for CMS Professional Staffing
in Lake City. She said her goal is to
become a nurse practitioner in 10 years.
White will still need help tearing down
and rebuilding the house. "I know I
can't totally depend one someone else to
rebuild," she said. "God gave me strength
to go back. I've got to do what I can do."
White has already overcome tragedies.
She lost two children to car wrecks. Her
13-year-old daughter Jamellia White was
buried on Jan, 3, .2004, eight years to the
day before the fire, and son Kelvin Taylor
was 25 when he was killed on Mother's
Day in 2009.
Obituaries and pictures of her deceased
children are gone, said White, who has


lived in Columbia County for more than
20 years.
White has five children who don't live
with her but lost belongings they stored
at their mother's house. Christmas pres-
ents White had not yet given her young-
est grandchild were destroyed, in the fire.
The fire in White's home started in the
attic after flames escaped from the chim-
ney, said Hank Rossell, battalion chief for
the Lake City Fire Department. White
was lucky to wake up before smoke and
carbon monoxide overtook her, he said.
Her home did not have smoke detectors.
Fire can escape if the fireplace over-
heats.or through cracks in the brick mor-
tar, he said.
Periodic maintenance can prevent such
fires as a chimney sweep can look for
cracks, buildup of soot or animal nests,
especially if fireplaces aren't used regu-
larly, he said. Space heaters can also be
dangerous if used close to furniture and
fabrics. Rossell said residents should
make sure heating appliances are in work-
ing order, maintained and cleaned.
All homes should have smoke detectors
with working batteries, he said.
Rossell said the fire department pro-
vides and installs free smoke detectors to
low income, disabled and senior citizens
of Lake City and Columbia County. Those
interested can call (386) 752-3312.
Those wishing to help White rebuild
can make donations for Leslie White at
Vystar Credit Union locations.


ROBBERY: One victim injured
Continued From Page 1A


suspects fled on foot or in
a vehicle.
'There was no vehicle
description at the time of
the incident," Blanchard
said.
Blanchard said the inci-
dent occurred in a matter
of minutes.
Authorities were able to
gather some evidence from
the crime scene, though he
would not elaborate.
Blanchard said the evi-
dence will be sent to the
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement for testing.
Blanchard said LCPD
investigator Paul Kash is
working with the victims
to get a description of the
suspects. For now the sus-
pects are only described as
wearing ski masks.
Police did not say wheth-
er the victims were related
or whether that home that
was burglarized is where
they all normally live.
"I'm not sure if they all
lived there all the time, but
they were staying there that
night," Blanchard said.
He said authorities were
notified about the incident
from several people who


Anyone having informa-
tion about this incident is
asked to contact the Lake


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Bus: 386-752-7521


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HEALTH NOTIFICATION



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If you wish to participate in this in-office trial, you will be required to have your
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BURGLARY: 3 face charges
Continued From Page 1A


CALL NOW 'IF YOUISH O B
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ear estone
'Beltone-


OP


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY. JANUARY 10. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


IN















OPINION


Tuesday, January 10, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


0NE


0



'Yes,


NE
NIO


we


scan' save

historical

riches


the moon, why can't we
launch the Library of
Congress into cyber-
space? That's the ques-
tion a "Yes, We Scan" initiative
launched Dec. 21 is asking.
Such a project would be the
public equivalent of the Google
Books Library Project which
is digitizing books in the world's
great libraries and offering them
online creating access to our
nation's cultural, scientific, educa-
tional and historical resources.
- Taking advantage of the
White House '"We, the People"
petition website, open govern-
ment advocate Carl Malamud
and John Podesta of the Center
for American Progress are ask-
ing-people to sign a petition.
It requests that the president
establish a commission to out-
line a national strategy within a
year for scanning the holdings
of the Library of Congress,
Smithsonian Institution,
National Archives and other
federal institutions.
The petition has to get 25,000
signatures within 30 days (by
Jan. 20). White House staff will
then review it and issue an offi-
cial response. As of Friday, it
had 414 signatures.
This task is as important as
when President Franklin D.
Roosevelt formed the National
Archives Council to figure out
how better to preserve the
records of government.
The aim now, as Podesta and
Malamud have said, is "to lay
the cornerstone for our own
era, to anchor our digital age
with the vast holdings of our
government so that we may
promote the useful arts and the
progress of science."
The European Union's
Europeana Libraries Project
is ahead of the United States.
From Spanish Civil War photo-
graphs to handwritten letters
from philosopher Immanuel
Kant to Ottoman manuscripts,
Europe is digitizing and mak-
ing its heritage accessible. The
United States should, too.
Find more information and a
link to the "Yes, We Scan" peti-
tion, at: yeswescan.org
Sacramento Bee

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get thipgs done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be-accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
SBY E-MAIL:
.. news@lakecityreporter.com


A pleasant surprise


from the jobs front


Finally, we have a
monthly jobs report
with no holes in
it. The December
figures are almost
entirely good news.
Usually there's been a catch
in the statistics, typically a
jobless percentage that looks
better than it really is because
so many otherwise employable
people have simply given up
looking for work, and if you're
not trying, the feds don't count
you.
But the number of discour-
aged workers dropped below 1
million, to 945,000, down from
1.3 million a year ago.
. Thus, the "underemployment
rate," those out of work and
those who can only find part-
time employment, dropped from
15.6 percent to 15.2 percent, the
lowest since February 2009.
The two most politically sensi-
tive figures were also good:
An overall 8.5 percent job-
less rate, also the lowest since
February 2009, down from 8.6
percent in November, and the
fourth straight month it has


LETTERS


.
-'I
i" .]

Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
fallen.
Importantly, the economy
added a net of 200,000 jobs,
with gains across the board,
in manufacturing, health care,
transportation and retail, and
even the hard-hit construction
industry added 17,000 workers.
Only state and local govern-
ments reported jobs losses. The
federal government actually
added 2,000 employees.
The economy has gener-
ated in excess of 100,000 jobs a
month for four straight months
for the first time since April
2006, and the rate of growth
appears to be accelerating.
The Obama administration
had to be delighted, even a little
surprised by the new numbers.


Analysts had been predicting
that the unemployment rate
would actually rise to 8.7 per-
cent and job creation would be
an anemic 155,000. The presi-
dent was his usual restrained
self: "We are moving in the right
direction."
That direction is important to
his political hopes. No president
since World War II has been
re-elected amid a jobless rate
of more than 8 percent. But it's
been close. At this point in his
first term, President Ronald
Reagan faced an 8.3 percent
rate.
If the public senses that the
economy is moving in the right
direction, it may be inclined
to forgive Obama and buy his
explanation, which is largely
true, that he inherited the reces-
sion from his predecessor.
To paraphrase the title of the
'60s novel, "Been down so long
anything under 8 percent looks
up to me."
M Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


TO THE EDITOR


To the Editor:

Cynics/critics and most
Republicans continue to decry
the Affordable Care Act; land-
mark health care reform that
improves health care access,
affordability and the quality of
well-being for all Americans.
Despite the blatant lies told,
the scare tactics used, the
attempted and intended slander
and denigration of the President
of the United States, the law is
well on its way to helping fami-
lies in spite of the opposition'
claims. In Florida, and in spite
of Governor Scott's intense
opposition to the law through
litigation, refusal to accept fed-
eral funds or prepare to imple-
ment its upcoming provisions,
we continue to see incontestable
results.
Many of the opponents of
health care reform in Congress
want to take away most or all
of the provisions mentioned
in the law, but only from us.
These protections are still good
enough to keep for themselves
as members of Congress. To
Congress healthcare is a privi-
lege, not a basic need.
Remember, Social Security
and Medicare went through
the same growing pains and
Supreme Court challenges
to become the important and
highly valued services they are
today.
The Affordable Care Act
protects Medicare for current
seniors and strengthens it for
future generations by focusing
on the provisions of free preven-
tive care, reducing medication
cost, and cracking down on


waste, fraud and abuse, ending
handouts to insurance, medical
device and pharmaceutical com-
panies.
More than 100,000 Florida
seniors have benefited from
the prescription coverage gap
discount last year, saving nearly
$52 million. Seniors will receive
bigger discounts in the years
ahead.
Thanks to the Affordable
Care Act, 2.5 million more
young adults had health insur-
ance coverage in 2011. An esti-
mated 78,000 young adults in
Florida will gain coverage this
year because of this provision.
Nationwide, 24 million people,
or approximately half of those
who have traditional Medicare
have taken advantage of free
preventative health benefits,
including an annual evaluation,
and/or other free screening ser-
vices, such as mammography,
colonoscopy, and immuniza-
tions.
Through, 2011, the preven-
tion and Public Health Fund has
already provided a total of $23.3
million to Florida to support
the critical work of State and
local health departments. Even
though Governor Scott has
turned away many ACA related
funds, there is still a financial
lifeline to help enact its provi-
sions.
It will be much harder to
bilk Medicare and Medicaid.
In a sweeping effort to restore
accountability, the Affordable
Care Act returned $5.6 billion
back to Medicare by cutting
waste, fraud and abuse.
The Affordable Care Act pro-
tects 960,000 children in Florida


with pre-existing conditions
right now. In 2014, under the
ACA, no person can be denied
insurance coverage for pre-exist-
ing medical conditions, and they
will pay the same premiums as
those without such conditions.
Within one year of the pas-
sage of the Affordable Care Act,
1.4 million jobs have been cre-
ated. 235,000 of those jobs are
in healthcare, a growth sector.
The ACA strengthens a
longtime program that allows
medical graduates to get up to
$175,000 in loans paid off in
return for five years of medical
service to underserved com-
munities.
In Florida, $2.6 for school
based health centers will help
clinics expand and provide more
health care services directly to
communities.
The Affordable Care Act is
well on its way to both protect
more American working fami-
lies and middle class families to
fix a badly broken health care
system. Don't allow prevarica-
tors, critics, haters, and cynics
to cloud your vision; read, study
and think for yourself'
The American people are
being fed negative information
about the perceived negatives
of the Affordable Health Care
Act. Too many people remain
ignorant of the Affordable
Health Care Act But as more
people learn of this legislation,
they'll recognize that this Act
will improve the quality of life
for ALL AMERICANS.

Glynnell Presley
Lake City


Phil Hudgins
phudgihs@cninewspopers.com


Unplug,

stay home

save a

bundle

Maybe you've
Heard of the lat-
est luxury gim-
mick of the 21st
century. It's
called the "black hole resort."
The deal is this: You check into
this resort to get away from the
Internet, television and the tele-
phone-and you pay extra for
the privilege. *
Deprived customers must
subsist on the simpler things of
life, things like Sleep Number
beds, bathrooms the size of
Rhode Island, baskets of toilet-
ries, fluffy towels and a four-
course breakfast.
Actually, I'm about knee-deep
in a black hole right now; my
computer is on the fritz. And
newspaper folks are like every-
body else when it comes to tech-
nology. They're lost without it.
I'm not yearning for the
good ol' days, but I remember
many times decades ago when
the power went out at the
office, but failed to stop prog-
ress. Each reporter had in his
desk drawer a candle that pro-
vided enough light for turning
out stories on a typewriter that
required no electricity. I still
have my candle.
A lot of other things have
changed, too. For starters,
reporters back then knew to
keep their opinions to them-
selves; we were never to be part
of the story. (Political bumper
stickers were forbidden.) But
now, with blogs and social
media, some reporters obliter-
ate the wall between the objec-
tive and the subjective, writing
straight news for print and then
commenting in their blogs on
what they wrote. Fortunately,
some newspaper companies,
including the one I work for, do
not allow such shenanigans.
Some of the stuff that passes
for news on television is sick-
ening. Even legitimate news.
this Christmas season-when
real news was slow-was
regurgitated so much, especial-
ly on the 24-hour news chan-
nels, that viewers awoke with
sugar plums and Wolf Blitzer
dancing in their heads. It was
hard to tell if The Biggest
Loser was on a diet or running
for president in Iowa.
So now some people with
more money than sense have
decided to high-tail it to resorts
where even the walls are imper-
vious to wireless signals. No
Facebook, no Twitter, no blogs,
no e-mails, no phone calls, no
Wolf Blitzer. You pay more to
get less. What a wonderful con-
cept.
I guess no one thought of
staying at home, unplugging the
laptop and the television, putting
cellphones in the sock drawer and
saving thousands of dollars. Too
much temptation for some. One
of the technology addicts surely
would sneak a peek at Facebook,
and then therapy would have to
start all over.
So we've come to a place
where we're over-connected to
the world. We have no more
surprises nowadays; somebody
has analyzed the situation and
projected the outcome on a digi-
tally operated screen that can be
changed by the flick of a finger.
For just once, I'd like to wait
until the election is over to find
out the results. And if the power
goes out in the meantime, I still
have my candle.
Maybe I am yearning for the
good ol' days, after all.


* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


4A


Affordable Healthcare Act (Obama.

Care) good for members of Congress













Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY. JANUARY 10, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Today

Historical Society
meeting
The Columbia County
Historical Society will
have its quarterly
meeting on Tuesday,
January 10 at. 7:00 p.m.
at the downtown library.
Guest speaker will be
Olustee re-enactor Cody
Gray. The meeting is
free and open to the
public. For details
contact Sean McMahon
at 754-4293

FFA alumni meeting

The Fort White FFA
Alumni will hold its
monthly meeting
todayat 7:00 pm in the
Fort White Agriscience
classroom. This group
provides many services
to the Fort White
FFA chapters and we
are looking for past
members of the Fort
White FFA or any other
persons interested in
being part of our Alumni
organization:


Jan. 11

Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon
The regular meeting
of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be held at 11:00
a.m. on Wednesday, Jan.
11th at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a
fun day.

Jan. 12

Lake City Garden
Club
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its
monthly meeting at
10 a.m. on Thursday,
January 12 at the Club
House (formerly the
Woman's Club). Coffee
will be served at 9:30.


The program will be
"History of Alligator
Lake Park" by James
Montgomery. Visitors
are welcome to attend.

Free real estate
seminar

Strategies for Home
buyers and Sellers in
Today's Market,
A Free Seminar by
VyStar Real Estate
Services.
Call the Lake City
Branch Receptionist
at (904) 594-5498 to
reserve your space.
Light refreshments will
be served.
When: Thursday,
January 12th, 2012 at
6:30pm.
Where: VyStar Credit
Union Lake City Branch
411 NW Commons Loop
Lake City, Florida 32055.

'Preserving Traditions
of DAR'

The Edward Rutledge
Chapter, Daughters
of the American
Revolution, will meet
on Thursday, January
12, 2011, 10:30 a. m.,
at the Senior Service
Center, 28 SE Allison
Court. Beth Wilson
will be speaking on
"Preserving Traditions
of DAR". Guests are
always welcome. For
further information, call
752-2903.



Jan. 13

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden.Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan.
13 at 7 p.m. until. For


ticket info contact Chris
Mirra at 386-623-3611 or
Dennis Murphy at 386-
697-3739.
Jan. 14
North Florida Writers
Group meets

Love to write? From
novice to published
author, the North
Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is
the place where local
writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire.
Writers of any
experience level from
the .area .are welcome
to join us Saturday,
January 14, 2012,
2pm 4pm, at the
ColumbiaCounty Public
Library, Main Branch,
308 NW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City, FL
32055. Join us Saturday
and see what we are all
about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so
please reserve your spot
today!
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Leader,
(386) 438-3610.
Email inquiries to:
editor@afinaldraft.com

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Hospice Chili Cook-
off
The Third Annual
Branford Chili Cook-
Off to. benefit children
and families served by
Herry's Kids Pediatric
'Services will be held
on Saturday, January 14
from 11 a.m. 2 p.m. at
Hatch Park located on
.Craven Dr. in Branford.
The event will include
a silent auction, games,
a bounce house for
the kids, live DJ,.door
prizes, antique car show,


thrift store items for
sale, and all the chili
you can eat. There
will be a five dollar
admission to the event.
In order to register
to be a contestant
call 386-755-7714.
Hospice of the Nature
Coast, is a program
of Hospice of Citrus
County, Inc., licensed
in 1985. To learn
more about hospice
services call 386-755-
7714 or visit www.
ho spiceofthenatureco ast.
org.

Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program

On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this
memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
lives forever in our
hearts. Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 p.
m, at Trinity United
Methodist Church.
Glynnell,Presley,
Secretary'
John F Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO


Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.



Jan. 16


Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade

The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
presents the Grand
Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Parade,
Monday, January 16,
2012 at 10am. Line-
up will begin at the
DOT office at 9:00am.
For participation and
information call Anthony
Newton at 386.365.1470.
The MLK Worship
Service will follow
the parade at the New
Bethel Baptist Church
at 12:30p, Bishop Ron
Williams, II is the
speaker, Rev. Alvin
Baker, Pastor. Call
Audre' Washington at
386.344.9915 for more
information.
The MLK Classic will
feature a re-match
basketball game at
the Lake City Middle
School at 3:30pm
featuring Alumni
Women and Men's
players of CHS and
Suwannee. Call Mario
Coppock for details at
386.754.7095.



Jan. 17

Loss workshop
Eight Critical Questions,
an educational workshop
offering practical
tips to help cope and
move forward during
the new year will be
January. 4 at 2 p.m.
located at the Wings
Education Center, 857
SW Main Blvd, (Lake
City Plaza). There is
no cost. For information
, or to register, contact
Vicki Myers at 755-
7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-
642-0962. The Wings
Education Center is a.
program of Hospice of
Citrus County, Inc./
Hospice of the Nature
.Coast licensed 1985,
serving north central'
Florida. Visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org for more
information.


Traffic safety meeting

The Columbia
.Community Traffic
Safety will hold its first
meeting of the new year
on Tuesday, January 17
at 10 a.m. at the FDOT
Operations Complex,
710 NW Lake Jeffery
Road, in the Crew
Room. The Team works
on traffic hazards and
enforcement issues in
Columbia County and
the public is welcome
to attend. Issues can be
called in to the FDOT
at 758-3714 or e-mailed
to Tres Atkinson, team
chair, at tres.atkinson@
columbiacountyfla.com
or to Gina Busscher,
team secretary, at gina.
busscher@dot.state.
fl.us The team is made
up of members of law
enforcement, emergency
services, engineering
and education.



Jan. 18

Olustee meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
. building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.



Jan. 19


Voices that Change
Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012-at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds 'banquet
facility. Showtime is at ,
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit
for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.


OBITUARIES


Alma Carter Dees
Alma Carter Dees, 83, died,
Monday, January 9, 2012 at
Lake City Medical Center. Fu-
neral arrangements are incom-
plete but should be available
by 12:00 p.m. today, 1/10/2012
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441 Lake City,
Florida 32025 (386) 752-1954

Clyde Downing
Clyde Downing, 76, a resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida
passed away January 8, 2012
at the Suwannee Health Care
Center, Live Oak, Florida.
Mr. Downing was a lifelong res-
ident of Lake City, Florida and
is the son of the late Caulie and
Georgia Spells Downing. He was
a farmer for all of his life. He is
preceded in death by a daughter,
Linda K. Hutchinson. and was a
member of the Mt. Beulah Bap-
tist Church, Wellborn, Florida.


We thefami < j">


Deacon Aaron

J. Sumpter
Wish to take this
opportunity to thank
each and everyone of
you for your kind
acts shown during
this most difficult
hour in our lives.
S Your heartfelt
expressions of
Christmas love, has
helped to ease
our pain.
The Sumpter Family
S' -. 'li


Survivors include his wife .of
fifty-six years: Shirley Down-
ing, Lake City, Fl. Three daugh-
ters: Barbara (Gary) Garner,
Lake City,' Fl., Mary (Bruce)
Williams, Mayo, Fl. and Joyce
Poulnot, Ochlocknee, Ga. One
Son: Mitchell (Ellen) Down-
ing, Lake City, Fl. Three sis-
ters: Virginia Deal, Largo, Fl.,
Lois Walker, Luraville, Fl. and
Sarah Hildebrandt, Michigan'.
Seven grandchildren and eight
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Down-
ing will be conducted Wednes-
day, January 11, 2012 at 2:00
P.M. in the Mt. Beulah Baptist
Church with 'the Rev. Tommy
Cannon, officiating. Interment
will follow in the Church Cem-
etery. The family will receive


friends Tuesday January 10,
2012 from 6:00-8:00 P.M. at
the funeral home. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME 2659 SW.
Main Blvd. Lake City is in charge
of arrangements. 386-752-2414

Mary Jayne Lee
Mary Jayne Lee, of Lake City,
FL, passed away on Janu-
,ary 4, 2012 at Haven Hospice.
She was born to the late Dan-
iel and Julia Covert, June 22,
1939, in Bradford,, PA. and
spent her childhood in Ran-
dolph, NY. Mary moved to
Vero Beach, FL in 1962, Mar-
ried Ken Lee in 1982, and they
resided in O'Brien, FL, before
relocating to Lake City in 2003.


After retiring from the poul-
try business she spent her
time collecting antiques,
dolls, and other unique items.
Mary also enjoyed garden-
ing and taking care of her pets.
Mary and is survived by Ken
Lee her husband of 29 years,
by four children: Sharon Hooks
and Charity Glackin, of Lake
City, Ken Lee Jr., of Delray, FL;
and George Lee, of Charlotte,
NC. She also is survived by ten
grandchildren and six great-
grandchildren, and six sisters.
In lieu of flowers, the family
is requesting that donations be
madeto HavenHospice. Payable
to "Suwannee Valley Care Cen-
ter" RE: for use at this location
only. Memorial will be held at


Accepting New Patients
. Specializing in adult medical care including:
Primary Care Arthritis
High Blood Pressure Low Back Problems
Heart Disease Full Dizziness, ,
Lung Disease vertigo and balance
Gastrointestinal diagnosis and
High Cholesterol treatment
Diabetes Optifast" Weight
Women's Health Loss System
Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation


Locatd inthe ake ity ed l~kBin
40 .-,Hal-o Fam DrveSake.CitS F


Haven Hospice, W Hwy 90, Lake
City FL. Saturday January 14,
at 2pm. Arrangements provided
by ICS FUNERAL HOME,
Lake City, FL (386)-752-3436.

Annie R. Rogers
Annie R. Rogers, 81, Live Oak,
Fl passed away on Thursday,


January 5, 2012. DANIELS
FUNERAL HOMES &
CREMATORY, INC.
Live Oak & Branford, Fl.



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-7293.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428
















Romney draws flak on eve of NH primary


By DAVID ESPO and
KASIE HUNT
Associated Press

NASHUA, N.H. Republican front-
runner Mitt Romney stumbled down the
homestretch of the New Hampshire pri-
mary on Monday, declaring, "I like being
able to fire people who provide services to
me" as his rivals intensified already fierce
criticism.
"Gov. Romney enjoys firing people. I
enjoy creating jobs," said former Utah Gov.
Jon Huntsman, who has staked his candi-
dacy on a strong showing in Tuesday's
primary and has shown signs of gaining
ground in recent polls.
Adding insult to any injury, Texas Gov.
Rick Perry posted a ringtone to his cam-
paign website that consisted of Romney
saying, "I like being able to fire people,"
over and over.
Romney is the odds-on favorite in New
Hampshire, and Huntsman as well as
other Republicans who are contesting the
state have generally been content to vie for
second place in hopes of emerging as his
main rival in the South Carolina primary
on Jan. 21. ,
"Second place would be a dream come
true," said former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick
Santorum, as he raced through a final full
New Hampshire campaign day that began
before sunrise and stretched for more


than 14 hours. The former Pennsylvania
senator finished a surprising second in
last week's Iowa caucuses, but without
money for television ads he has appeared
to struggle as he seeks to convert that into
momentum.
Romney, the former Massachusetts gov-
ernor, won in Iowa by eight votes. A victo-
ry in New Hampshire would make him the
first Republican in a contested presidential
nomination battle to capture the first two
races of the campaign since Iowa began
leading off for the GOP in 1976.
The battle has grown increasingly ran-
corous in recent days both in New
Hampshire and next-up South Carolina -
with Santorum, Perry and former House
Speaker Newt Gingrich escalating their
attacks on Romney's claim that a back-
ground in business uniquely qualifies him
to help create American jobs.
At the same time, an organization that
backs Gingrich has spread the word that it
intends to spend $3.4 million on television
ads in South Carolina that are expected to
attack Romney with gusto.
"Now we'll see if he has the broad
shoulders and can stand the heat," said
Gingrich, relishing the battle ahead as the
nominating campaign wheels South.
Romney's remark about firing people
was the second jarring moment for the
front-runner in the span of less than 24
hours.


On Sunday afternoon, the millionaire
businessman told an audience that he
understood the fear of being laid off,
adding, 'there were a couple of times
when I was worried I was going to get
pink-slipped." His aides refused to provide
details.
On Monday morning, addressing the
Nashua Chamber of Commerce, he said
he wants individuals to be able to choose
among different health insurance policies
as they seek coverage.
"That means the insurance company
will have an incentive to keep you healthy.
It also means if you don't like what they
do, you can fire them," he said.
"I like being able to fire people who
provide services to me. If someone doesn't
give me the good service I need, I'm going
to go get somebody else to provide that
service to me," he added.
A few hours later, in a previously
unscheduled appearance before reporters,
Romney emphasized he had been talking
about insurance companies.
"Things can always be taken out of
context, and I understand that's what the
Obama people will do. But as you know I
was speaking about insurance companies
and we need to be able to make a choice
and my comments entirely reflected that
discussion."
As for once fearing he. would be fired,
he said, "I came out of school, and I got an


entry level position like the other people
that were freshly minted MBAs, and like
anybody that starts at the bottom of an
enterprise you wonder, when you don't do
so well, whether you're going to be able to
hang onto your job."
Romney has made his career in busi-
ness the core credential of his candidacy,
saying that his firm, Bain Capital, created
100,000 jobs on balance as it started some
firms while taking over, remaking and
then spinning off others.,.
Gingrich told one interviewer during
the day that Bain Capital "apparently
looted the companies, left people totally
unemployed and walked off with millions
of dollars."
He wasn't asked to provide details.
But Perry, campaigning in Anderson,
South Carolina, was and did.
"If you're a victim of Bain Capital's
downsizing, it's the ultimate insult for Mitt
Romney to come to South Carolina to tell
you he feels your pain. Because he caused
it," he said.
'I have no doubt that Mitt Romney was
worried about pink slips whether he'd
have enough of them to hand out."
He cited Holson Burns Group Inc. of
Gaffney, S.C., where he said 150 workers
who made photo albums lost their jobs.
"They looted that company," Perry said,
referring to Bain Capital.


House narrows proposed redistricting maps


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Subcommittees in the
Republican-controlled
House narrowed the num-
ber of redistricting maps
the chamber is considering
in separate and largely par-
tisan votes Monday.
Most Democrats
opposed the maps. Some
called for public hearings
around Florida before final
roll calls are taken.
The panels approved
three maps each for the
House and Florida's con-
gressional delegation as
well as the Senate's single
proposal for redistricting
itself.
The House began with
five maps for itself and
seven for Congress. House
and Senate redistricting
leaders have agreed to not
to draw maps for each oth-
er's chamber.
Lawmakers are begin-
ning their annual session
on Tuesday, two months
earlier than usual so the
maps can be passed and
reviewed by the courts and
federal government before
the Aug. 14 primary elec-
tion. Lawmakers also are
'considering a proposal to
move the primary back a
week.
The Senate
Reapportionment
Committee is scheduled to
vote on its plans one
each for the Senate and
Congress on Wednesday
and floor votes are expected
next week. The full House
Redistricting Committee is
set to consider its maps on
Jan. 20.
Only one member of the
public, Democraticcongres-
sional candidate Jim Roach
of Cape Coral, appeared
before the Congressional
Redistricting
Subcommittee.
Roach said the congres-
sional maps pack high per-
centages of Democrats into
a handful of districts, which
would give Republicans a
better chance of winning
more seats.
"I know you didn't plan
it that way, but it's time to
look at that again," Roachd
said. "We're going to be
doing this for 10 years;
we're going to be using
these maps, stuck with
these maps. They're politi-
cally not fair."
Republicans say they
didn't consider the politi-
cal consequences due to
a pair of new state consti-
tutional amendments that
prohibit lawmakers from
gerrymandering in favor
of incumbents or political
parties.
The GOP holds 19 of
Florida's current 25 con-
gressional districts. The
state will add two more
seats this year due to popu-


nation growth.
Lawmakers also will be
redistricting the 120-seat
House and 40-seat Senate.
Republicans, as well, hold
overwhelming majorities in
both although Democrats
still hold an edge in voter
registration statewide.
The Legislature held 26
public hearings around the
state before drafting the
maps. Neither chamber
plans more hearings out-
side Tallahassee, but the
Senate Reapportionment
Committee did seek public
comment on its maps by
way of telephone, emailand
video recordings before
voting to introduce its plans
- one each for the Senate
and congressional delega-


tion last month.
"I don't believe you
can have too much pub-
.1ic participation," said Rep.
Dwayne Taylor, D-Daytona
Beach. "We're going to do
our citizens a disservice."
"That sounds like a fair
enough idea, but in terms
of the time frame it's prob-
ably impractical," respond-
ed Rep. Scott Plakon, R-
Longwood.
The legislative maps
automatically go to, the
Florida Supreme Court
and Gov. Rick Scott has
veto- power over the con-
gressional plan. All three
maps are subject to Justice
Departmentreview to make
sure they comply with the
federal Voting Rights Act


because of past racial dis-
crimination in five Florida
counties.
Lawsuits challenging the
maps also are likely as they
are the first to be drawn
under the Fair Districts
amendments. Besides
barring lines from being.
drawn to benefit incum-
bents or political parties,
the amendments protect
minority representation
and require districts to fol-
low city' and county lines
when possible.
The proposals in both
chambers generally
retain existing black and
Hispanic-access and major-
ity districts and keep more
cities and counties intact
than the existing maps.


The congressional
maps also include a cen-
tral Florida district with a
Hispanic voting age popu-
lation of 38 percent to 40
percent that could open the
door for a fourth Hispanic
U.S. House member from
Florida. Most central
Florida Hispanics, though,
are Democratic leaning
Puerto Ricans. Florida's.
three existing Hispanic U.S.
representatives are Cuban-
American Republicans.
Florida also would retain its
existing three black- access
and majority congressional
districts.
The public will have a


4


. ; .


chance to review the maps
and other details on the
Legislature's website -
http://www.leg.state.fl.us.
- before final votes are
taken, said Rep. John Legg,
a Port Richey Republican
who chairs the congressio-
nal panel.
Rep. Betty Reed, D-
Tampa, said that's not good
enough because many
people don't have Internet
access or computers. Legg
said he'd talk to House
Speaker Dean Cannon, R-
Winter Park, about finding
other ways to make the
plans available to the pub-
lic.


"If you go to jail, give
me a call. I can get
you out."


Office: (386) 208-0645
Cell: (386) 344-2233
1 24/7
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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY. JANUARY 10. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


le:



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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY. JANUARY 10. 2012


Bulletin Board

NES BOT URCHOL


Campus

News


Five Points
Elementary
Teacher and employee
of the year
Five Points Elementary
School would like to con-
gratulate Andy Schrader
for being selected as 2012
Teacher of, the Year and
Anthony Perry as being
selected as 2012 School
Related Emrnployee of the
Year.

Melrose Park
Elementary
Cupstacking
The Melrose Cupstacking
team placed 6th countywide
on December. The team
members did an awesome
job in representing Melrose
Park. Team members were
Amaria Bowles, Darrel
Brown, Zachary Croker,
Claudia Feagle, Hailey
Giamarino, Hope Giamarino,
Cheyenne Gilreath, Vernita
Gray, Autara Home, Brittany
Karr, Savannah Lor'd,
Rebecca Magee, Sierra
Mancil, Brenden McMahon,
Natalie Nelson, Jordan Smith
and Makinsey Sheldon.
Olustee Fun Run
An upcoming event for all
students to present Melrose
Park will be the Olustee Fun
Run on Saturday, February
18th, downtown. Let's see
if we can get as many stu-
dents as we can at the Fun
Run. You will have to have
a signed permission slip to
participate.
First grade
First grade students at


Asia Wilds, 8
Niblack Elementary
School, Third Grade
Parents: Raveen
Daniels and Adrian Wilds
Clubs and/or orga-
nizations to which you
belong: "I am a new
member of the National
Achievers Society. I'm also
a member of New Day
Spring Missionary Baptist
Church."
What would you like
to do when you com-
plete your education? "I
would like to go to medical
school and become a doc-
tor."
Achievements: A/B
Honor Roll student
What do you like best

Melrose Park are busy get-
ting back to work after our
Christmas break. In read-
ing we are learning about
why authors write stories.
We read about the Tortoise
and the Hare and'found out
the author's purpose was
to teach us a lesson. We
are finishing up patterns of
numbers in math and will
be learning how to add and
subtract two digit numbers in
our next chapter. In science
we are studying our Earth's
resources. We just started
learning about what we can
find on Earth. We have a
nutrition lesson this month
on vegetables. Mrs. Yeager
will be planting a garden in
the palm of our hands! She
will have the students plant
a garden in a plastic glove
with seeds for each finger in
a wet cotton ball. Then they
will tape them to a window to
watch their garden grow!
Tech lab
In Tech Lab at Melrose


about school? "I get to
do many different activities
that help me learn. My
favorite subject is science."
Teacher's comment
about student: "Asia is
an intelligent, well behaved
student She tries her best
in every situation. Asia is
very helpful, and will ask
questions if she doesn't
understand something."
Principal William
Murphy's comment con-
cerning student: "Asia
is a great student and she
works very hard in class.
She always sets a good
example for everyone else
at school."
Student's comment on
being selected for stu-
dent focus: "I feel excel-

Park Kindergarten and first
grade are sharpening up
their typing skills. Second
grade is creating a Math
Dictionary. Third and fifth
grades are gearing up
for FCAT by practicing on
http://www.fcatexplorer.com.
Fourth grade is creating a
document to use to break
down prompts and plan
their writing. Grades 1-5 are
updating their Excel charts
to keep track of Box Tops
being given to the school.
Fourth grade
Fourth grade at Melrose
Park is-working toward 100%
success in Process Writing:
A Monday boot camp has
been implemented to give
extra opportunity for success
in expository and narrative.
writing. In addition fourth
grade has been thinking out-
side the box and the whole
4th grade team is working
together after lunch to bring
team building and team
teaching to the forefront.


..

COURTESY
Asia Wilds
lent about being named
an outstanding student at
Niblack. I will always con-
tinue to be an outstanding
student."


Art
Students at Melrose Park
are beginning a variety of
projects in art for the New
Year. Kindergarten and first
grade are creating self-por-
traits using several different
materials and techniques.
These will include crayons,
oil pastels, torn paper.and
collage. Second and third
grade students are learning
about symmetry. Presently
the boys and girls have cre-
ated snowflakes. Later these
symmetrical flakes will be
glued onto textured snow
scenes. Students will also
incorporate science into
their lessons as they study
polar bears. Using dabs of
paint like.the artist Monet,
students will add polar bears
into their artwork. Older
students will soon begin
painting landscapes, which
highlight winter birch trees.
As fourth and fifth graders
work on this project, they will
utilize both pastel chalk and
tempera paint.


i-


COURTESY PHOTO
Christmas around the world
Judges Joe Puerrung and Jennifer Strickland listen as Kirsten,
Espenship and Delaney Dunn give them a tour of a Russian
Christmas at Lake City Christian Academy before winter
break. Judges were given passports and escorted by travel
agents to ten different countries, including: Spain, Egypt,
Scotland, Mexico, Sweden, the Middle East, Fr'nce and
Brazil. After touring travelers'were Treated To sugar cookies,
homemade hot chocolate, s'mores and music by.Mike Mullis
in the courtyard.


Today
Report cards go home
today
Pinemount
Elementary- Columbia
Writes! for grades 2 to 5.
Parent College in cafeteria
from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Fort White- Fort White
FFA Alumni meeting at
7 p.m. in the Agriscience
classroom. Indian Middle
School Basketball at Lake
Bulter at 5/6 p.m., Indian
JV/V Boys Basketball vs
Santa at 6/7:30 p.m. at
home. Indian JV/V Girls
Basketball at Branford at
5:30/7 p.m., Indian Boys.
Girls Varsity Soccer vs
CHS at home at 5/7 p.m.
Richardson Middle-
Wolf Wresting at
Suwannee at 5 p.m. Wolf
Girls/Boys Soccer vs
Taylor County at 5/6:30
p.m.
Lake City Middle-
Falcon Basketball at Perry
5/6:15 p.m. North Florida
Honor Band auditions at
5 p.m.
Columbia County
School Board Meeting at
7 p.m. in the school district
administrative complex
auditorium
Columbia City
Elementary- Students


Council Officer open
school board meeting at 7
p.m.

Wednesday, Jan.
11
Secondary/Middle
School, Science Fair-
Wednesday through Friday
at Florida Gateway College
Columbia City
Elementary- Nine week
awards for K, 1 and ESE

Thursday, Jan. 12
Eastside Elementary-
School Advisory Council
meeting in Media Center
at 2:30 p.m.
Fort White- Indian
JV/V Girls Basketball vs
Santa Fe at home 6/7:30
p.m., Indian JV/V Boys
Basketball at Keystone
Heights at 6/7:30 p.m.,
Indian Middle School
Girls/Boys Basketball at
Branford 5/6:30 p.m.
Richardson Middle-
Wolf Girls Basketball at
Suwannee at 5 p.m., Wolf
Girls/Boys Soccer at
Lafayette 5/6:30 p.m., Wolf
Basketball Districts at
Suwannee at 6:15 p.m.
Fort White
Elementary- Parent
College


Columbia City
Elementary- Nine weeks
awards for second grade
Westside Elementary-
Science Night at 6 p.m.

Friday, Jan. 13
Pinemount
Elementary- Columbia
Writes scoring day, School
Mall kick-off
Fort White- Indian
Middle school Girls/Boys
Basketball at Ruth Raines
at 5/6:30 p.m., Indian
Boys/Girls Soccer vs Oak
Hall at 5/7 p,m.
Richardson Middle-


Wolf Girls Basketball
at Madison Central at 6
p.m., Wolf Basketball at,
Madison at 7:15 p.m.
Columbia City
Elementary- Nine weeks
awards for grade 3
Westside Elementary-
Science Day

Saturday, Jan. 14
Lake City Middle-
Falcon Wrestling at
Wakulla at 5:30 p.m.
Richardson Middle-
Wolf Wresting at Oak Leaf
at 5 p.m.


After-school program
teaches fishing, life lessons


SUSAN COCKING
The Miami Herald

MIAMI A back injury
suffered by former Palm
Beach County building
contractor Richard Brochu
five years ago is indirectly
responsible for more than
3,000 kids and teens learn-
ing how to fish.
Out of work and bored,
Brochu an avid angler
- asked his young daugh-
ter if there were programs
where kids could learn
how to become responsible
anglers.
"She was like, 'No, would


you like to start one?'"
Brochu said.
Poinciana became the
launch pad for. the Florida
Fishing Academy a non-
profit, after-school program
that teaches life skills and
ethical angling to at-risk
youth ages 8 through early
20s.
"We want to raise the
next generation of ethi-
cal anglers and captains,"
Brochu said. "I want peo-
ple to realize that there's
more to it than catching
fish and throwing them on
the dock."


STUDENT PROFILE


Lake City Reporter


CALENDAR


Page Editor: Laura Hampson. 754-0427.








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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby(@akecityreportercom


Tuesday. January 10. 2012


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS
CHS BASEBALL
Alumni game
set for Jan. 28
Columbia High
baseball's third annual
alumni game is
Jan. 28 at Tiger Stadium.
Registration begins at
10 a.m. and there is no
fee to participate. There
will be a home run derby
at 11 a.m. with a $5 entry
fee. The Tigers will play
a Purple and Gold game
following the home run
derby. Admission is free.
Barbecue dinners will be
sold.
For details, call coach
J.T. Clark at 365-1754
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Alumni game
planned Feb. 4
Former Fort White
High baseball players
are invited to play in an
alumni softball game
at 11 a.m. Feb. 4 at the
Fort White baseball field.
There will be a home run
derby fundraiser
following the game, plus
fish fry and barbecue
dinners will be sold.
For details, call coach
Mike Rizzi at 288-8680.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting today
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. today in
the teacher's lounge at "'
the high school. Planning
for the varsity banquet is
under way.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 3974954.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High girls
basketball at Branford
High, 5:30 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer vs. Columbia
High, 7 p.m. (boys-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Lee High.
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Fort White High girls
weightlifting at Santa Fe
High, 4 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Santa Fe
High, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Wolfson'
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Keystone
Heights High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Billy Saylor
Invitational in Live Oak,
TBA
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Lincoln High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer vs. Oak Hall
School, 7 p.m. (boys-5)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Billy Saylor
Invitational in Live Oak,
TBA
Columbia High
girls basketball at Union
County High, 5:30 p.m.
(JV-3)
Columbia High
boys basketball vs.
St. Augustine High,


7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Lady Indians fall,.


despite 40 points


from Robinson


Bradford answers for
win with 49 points
from Diggs, Griner.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort White
High's Tosha Robinson filled the
basket with 40 points, but it was not
enough as the Lady Indians fell to
Bradford High on Monday, 64-57.
The District 5-4A contest was a
make-up game from Dec. 1. Fort
White (3-9, 2-4) is right back in
action with a 5:30 p.m. game today
at Branford High.
Robinson scored all 12 of Fort
White's points in the second
quarter, but the Tornadoes used a
20-0 run to take a 42-23 lead into
intermission.
The Lady Indians trimmed the


Tide


lead by three points in the third
quarter, but midway through the
fourth quarter Bradford was lead-
ing by 19.
Robinson went on a personal 12-
0 run and pulled the Lady Indians
within seven points with a minute
to play.
Bradford was able to hold on to
even its district mark at 4-4.
The Tornadoes had a pair of
point machines to offset Robinson.
Quandra Diggs scored 28 points
with 13 coming in the crucial
second quarter. Willisha Griner
scored 14 points in the second
quarter and finished with 21.
Cenise Armstrong scored
six points for Fort White, while
Khadijah Ingram and Rykia
Jackson each scored three, Shenia
Pelham and Daisha Rossin added
two apiece, and Desma Blake hit a
free throw.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Tosha Robinson (5) fights for a rebound Monday against
Bradford County. Robinson scored 40 points, but Fort White lost 64-57.


kicks.


Tigers


Defense dominates as Alabama shuts out LSU


ASSOCIATED PRESS
LSU quarterback Jordan Jefferson (9) is swarmed by Alabama's Dont'a Hightower (30), Damion Square (92) and
Courtney Upshaw (41) during the BCS National Championship college football game in New Orleans on Monday.


x "".. ..


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Daniel Devers is in action at the Clay County Rotary Invitational.
Devers posted his first tournament win in the weekend matches at Clay High.


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS -
Jeremy Shelley kicked
five field goals and Trent
Richardson broke a 34-yard
touchdown run late in the
fourth quarter as No. 2
Alabama beat No. 1 LSU
21-0 on Monday night -
the first shutout in BCS title
game history.
Richardson swept around
left end and raced down
the sideline to the end zone
with 4:36 left for the first
touchdown between the
Southeastern Conference
rivals in more than 115
minutes of play.
Alabama had put it away
before that as Shelley
kicked field goals of 23, 34,
41, 35 and 44 yards in the
first three quarters to make
-it 15-0, matching an all-bowl
record. He also missed two
field goals and an extra-
point attempt
But this time the missed
kicks didn't matter to the
Tide.
The Tigers and Tide
met on Nov. 5 in what was
dubbed the Game of the
Century, and the Tigers won
a touchdown-less, defensive
standoff, 9-6 in overtime.
Alabama went 2 for 6 on
field goals in Tuscaloosa.


CHS wrestlers


strong at Clay


Devers, Schreiber
win classes as
Tigers place fifth.
From staff reports

Columbia High's wres-
tling team had a strong
showing in the Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
High over the weekend.
The Tigers placed fifth out
of 29 teams.
Daniel Devers chalked
up his first tournament win.
He was 4-0 in the 160-pound
weight class.
Cole Schreiber also went
4-0 and took first place in


the 106-pound weight class.
Schreiber's victory in the
final was his 100th high
school win.
Monterance Allen was
3-1 and placed second at
195 pounds.
Kaleb Warner and Isaac
Henderson were both 3-2
and in fourth place at 120
pounds and 152 pounds,
respectively. Joe Fields was
4-2 and placed fifth at 182
pounds.
Josh Walker was 2-2 at 171
pounds. Ethan Trevarrow
and Trey Allen were 1-2 at
113 pounds and 285 pounds,
respectively. Dustin Regar
was 0-2 at 126 pounds.


Section B















LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 10. 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Georgia at Florida
ESPN2 Louisville at Providence
9 p.m.
ESPN Ohio St at Illinois
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 am.
NBCSP Dakar Raily,Anofagasta to
Iquique, Chile (delayed tape)
NHL
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP San Jose at Minnesota

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Saturday
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
New Orleans 45, Detroit 28
Sunday
NewYork Giants 24,Atlanta 2
Denver 29, Pittsburgh 23, OT
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
New Orleans at San Francisco,
4:30 p.m.
Denver at New England, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 15
Houston at Baltimore, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.

College bowl games

Hawaii Bowl
Southern Mississippi 24, Nevada 17
Independence Bowl
Missouri 41, North Carolina 24
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
Purdue 37,Western Michigan 32
Belk Bowl
North Carolina State 31, Louisville 24
Military Bowl
Toledo 42,Alr Force 41
Holiday Bowl
Texas 21, California 10
Champs Sports Bowl
Florida State 18, Notre Dame 14
Alamo Bowl
Baylor 67,Washington 56
Armed Forces Bowl
BYU 24,Tulsa 21
Pinstripe Bowl
Rutgers 27, Iowa State 13
Music City Bowl
Mississippi State 23,Wake Forest 17
Insight Bowl
Oklahoma 31, Iowa 14
Meinke Car Care Bowl
Texas A&M 33, Northwestern 22
Sun Bowl
Utah 30, Georgia Tech 27, OT
Liberty Bowl
Cinciniati 31 ,Vanderbilt 24
Fight Hunger Bowl
Illinois 20, UCLA 1.4
Chick-fil-A Bowl
Auburn 43,Virginia 24
TicketCity Bowl
Houston 30, Penn State 14
Capital One Bowl
South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
Outback Bowl
Michigan State 33, Georgia 30, 30T
Gator Bowl
Florida 24, Ohio State 17
Rose Bowl
Oregon 45,Wisconsin 38
Fiesta Bowl
Oklahoma State 41, Stanford 38, OT
Sugar Bowl '
Michigan 23,Vlrginia Tech 20, OT
Orange Bowl
West Virginia 70, Clemson 33
Cotton Bowl
Arkansas 29, Kansas State 16
BBVA Compass Bowl
SMU 28, Pittsburgh 6
GoDaddy.com Bowl
Northern Illinois 38, Arkansas St. 20

Monday
BCS National Championship
LSU vs.Alabama (n)

BASEBALL

Hall of Fame voting

573 votes cast, 430 needed
x-Barry Larkin 495 (86.4%),Jack Morris
382 (66.7%), Jeff Bagwell 321 (56.0%),
Lee Smith 290 (50.6%), Tim Raines 279
(48.7%), Edgar Martinez 209 (36.5%),Alan
Trammell 211 (36.8%), Fred McGriff 137
(23.9%), Larry Walker 131 (22.9%), Mark
McGwire 112 (19.5%), Don Mattingly 102
(17.8%), Dale Murphy 83 (14.5%), Rafael
Palmeiro 72 (12.6%), Bernie Williams 55
(9.6%).
By receiving fewer than 30 votes (less
than 5 percent), Juan Gonzalez 23 (4.0%),
Vinny Castilla 6 (1.0%), Tim Salmon 5
(0.9%), Bill Mueller 4 (0.7%), Brad Radke
2 (0.3%),Javy Lopez I (0.2%), Eric Young
I (0.2%),Jeromy Burnitz 0, Brian Jordan 0,
Terry Mulholland 0, Phil Nevin 0, Ruben
Sierra 0, Tony Womack 0 are no longer
eligible for election by the BBWAA.
x-elected

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 6 2 .750 -
NewYork 5 4 .556 1'%
Boston 4 4 .500 2
Toronto 4 5 .444 2'A
New Jersey 2 8 .200 5
Southeast Division
W L Pet GB


Miami 8 I .889 -
Atlanta 7 3 .700 I'A
Orlando 6 3 .667 2
Charlotte 2 7 ..222 6
Washington 0 8 .000 7'A
Central Division
W. L Pct GB
Chicago 8 2 .800 -
Indiana 6 3 .667 I'A
Cleveland 4 4 .500 3
Milwaukee 2 6 .250 5
Detroit 2 7 .222 5'A
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division


San Anto
Dallas
Memphis
New Or
Houston


Oldahom
Portland
Utah
Denver
Minneso


W L Pet
nio 6 3 .667
4 5 .444
3 5 .375
leans 3 6 .333
2 6 .250
Northwest Division
W L Pct
a City 8 2 .800
6 2 .750
5 3 .625
6 4 .600
ta 3 6 .333
Pacific Division


W L Pct GB
LA. Clippers 4 2 .667 -
LA-Lakers 6 4 .600 -
Phoenix 4 4 .500 I
Sacramento 3 6 .333 2'A
Golden State 2 6 .250 3
Sunday's Games
Minnesota 93,Washington 72
Orlando 104, Sacramento 97
Oklahoma City 108, San Antonio 96
Phoenix 109, Milwaukee 93
Portland 98, Cleveland 78
LA. Lakers 90, Memphis 82
Monday's Games
Toronto 97, Minnesota 87
Philadelphia 96, Indiana 86
Atlanta 106, New Jersey 101
New York 91, Charlotte 87
Chicago 92, Detroit 68
New Orleans 94, Denver, 81
Today's Games
Houston at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Toronto atWashington, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Utah, 9 p.m.
LA. Clippers at Portland, 10 p.m.
Miami at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Phoenix at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.rrt.
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Sacramento at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at NewYork, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at New Orleans,
8 p.m.
Dallas at Boston, 8 p.m.
Houston at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Denver, 9 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m.
Orlando at Portland, 10 p.m.
Miami at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Jan. 8, total points based on 25
points for a first-place vote through one
point for a 25th-place vote and previous


ranking:


Ri


I.Syracuse (60)
2. Kentucky (5)
3. North Carolina
4. Baylor ,
S. Ohio St. ......
6. Michigan St.
7. Indiana -
8. Duke
9. Missouri
I 0. Kansas
I I. Georgetown
12. UNLV
13. Michigan
14. Louisville
IS. Murray St.
16.Virginia
17. UConn
18. Kansas St.
19. Florida
20. Mississippi St.
21. Gonzaga
22. San Diego St.
23. Creighton
24. Seton Hall
25. Marquette


record
17-0
15-1
14-2
15-0
15-2
14-2
15-1
13-2.
14-1
12-3
13-2
16-2
13-3
13-3
16-0
14-1
12-3
12-2
12-4
13-3
13-2
13-2
13-2
14-2
12-4


Others receiving votes:Wisconsin 97,
Alabama 40, Vanderbilt 37, West Virginia
33, New Mexico 28, Saint Mary's (Cal)
18; Harvard 16, Illinois 14, Arkansas II,
Stanford 9, Saint Louis 7, Dayton 2, Iowa
St. l,Wagner I.

Top 25 results

I. Syracuse (17-0) beat Providence
87-73; beat No. 20 Marquette 73-66.
2. Kentucky (15-1) beat UALR 73-51;
beat South Carolina 79-64.
3. North Carolina (14-2) beat Boston
College 83-60.
4. Baylor (15-0) beatTexas A&M 61-52;
beat Texas Tech 73-60.
5. Duke (13-2) lost to Temple 78-73;
beat Georgia Tech 81-74.
6. Ohio State (15-2) beat Nebraska
71-40; beat Iowa 76-47.
7. Missouri (14-1) beat Oklahoma
87-49; lost to No. 23 Kansas State 75-59.
8. UConn (12-3) lost to Seton Hall
76-63; lost to Rutgers 67-60.
9. Georgetown (13-1) beat No, 20
Marquette 73-70; lost to West Virginia
74-62.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

PRUOG
8
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved.

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10. Michigan State (14-2) beat No. 18
Wisconsin 63-60, OT.
11. Louisville (13-3) beat St. John's
73-58; lost to Notre Dame 67-63.20T.
12- Indiana (15-1) beat No. 16 Michigan
73-7 1; beat Penn State 88-82-
13. Florida (12-4) beat UAB 79-
61; lost to Tennessee 67-56.
14. Kansas (12-3) beat No. 23'Kansas
State 67-49; beat Oklahoma 72-61.
15. Mississippi State (13-3) lost to
Arkansas 98-88.
16. Michigan (13-3) lost to No. 12
Indiana 73-71; beat No. 18 Wisconsin
59-41.
17. UNLV (16-2) beat Cal State
Bakersfield 89-57.
18. Wisconsin (12-5) lost to No. 10
Michigan State 63-60. OT; lost to No. 16
Michigan 59-41.
19. Murray State (16-0) beat Eastern
Kentucky 76-67; beat Austin Peay 87-75.
20. Marquette (12-4) lost to No. 9
Georgetown 73-70; lost to No. I Syracuse
73-66.
21. Virginia (14-1) beat LSU 57-52;
beat Miami 52-51.
22. Harvard (13-2) lost to Fordham
60-54; beat Dartmouth 63-47.
23. Kansas State (12-2) lost to No. 14
Kansas 67-49; beat No. 7 Missouri 75-59.
24. San Diego State (13-2) beat San
Diego Christian 83-52.
25. Gonzaga (13-2) beat Pepperdine
73-45; beat Santa Clara 82-60.

USA Today/ESPN Top 25

The top 25 teams in the USA Today-
ESPN men's college basketball poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Jan. 8, points based on 25 points
for a first-place vote through one point
for 25th place vote and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
I. Syracuse (30) 17-0 774 I
2. Kentucky (1) 15-1 742 2
3. North Carolina 14-2 702 4
4. Baylor 15-0 '684 5
5. Ohio State 15-2 649 7
6. Duke 13-2 583 3
7. Michigan State 14-2 578 II
8. Indiana 15-1 552 12
9.'Missouri 14-i 540 6
10. Kansas 12-3 480 15
II. Georgetown 13-2 425 9
12. UNLV 16-2 374 17
13. Michigan 13-3 351 13
14. Murray State 16-0 341 18
15. Louisville 13-3 321 10
16. UCqnn 12-3 304 8
17.Virginia 14-1 251 23
18. Kansas State 12-2 242 22
19. Florida 12-4 226 14
20. Mississippi State 13-3 181 16
21.Creighton 13-2 163 24
22. San Diego State 13-2 131 25
23.Gonzaga 13-2 103 -
24. Marquette 12-4 69 20
25. Harvard 13-2 58 21


Others receiving votes:Wisconsin 43,
Saint Mary's 39, Seton Hall 36,Vanderbilt
33, New Mexico 25, Middle Tennessee
20,Alabama 18,'WestVirginia 9, Southern
.Miss. 8, Stanford 5,Wichita State 5, Dayton
4,Illinois 4, Iowa State I, Nevada I.

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 3 North Carolina vs. Miami,
9 p.m.
No. 4 Baylor at No. 18 Kansas State,
8 p.m.
No. 5 Ohio State at Illinois, 9 p.m.
No. 6 Michigan State vs. Iowa, 7 p.m.
No. 14 Louisville at Providence, 7 p.m.
No. 19 Florida vs. Georgia, 7 p.m.
No. 22 San Diego State vs. Chicago
State, 10 p.m.
No. 23 Creighton vs. Northern Iowa,
9 p.m.
No. 24 Seton Hall vs. DePaul, 7 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Sunday's Games
Ottawa 6, Philadelphia 4
Detroit 3, Chicago 2, OT
Anaheim 7, Columbus 4
Monday's Games
Florida 2,Vancouver I
Washington at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Winnipeg at Boston, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Carolina, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Nashville at Colorado, 9 p.m.
New Jersey at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Dallas at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Pittsburgh at Washington, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Edmonton, 9 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: BAKED POKED SESAME DECENT
I Answer: The fight at the laundromat would result in
someone getting this SOCKED


Trinkett offers




advice to Tigers


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley at lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High's foot-
ball team was presented
with laughs and a little
bit of wisdom as Florida
State offensive line coach
Rick Trickett visited with
the Tigers at their annual
end of the year banquet on
Friday.
Trickett is a nationally
recognized coach who has
spent 39 years in the game,
with stops at West Virginia
and Florida State along the
way. In his fifth season with
the Seminoles, Trickett
coached the offensive line
to five nominations for
All-ACC honors.
Trickett has been a nom-
inee for the Frank Broyles
award twice (2006, 2009),
which is given annually to
the nation's top assistant
coach.
Trickett shared a vision
for success with the Tigers.
He told them what it will
take to get the program
back to a state champion-
ship. According to Trickett,
it's a matter of always
being accountable for your
actions. The Tigers will
only get out what they put
into the program.
Trickett described a
model that he calls 595.
'To me, it's the 595,"
Trickett said. "You have the
top five percent and that's
your Tom Brady, Vince
Wilfork type of player.
Below that you have the
90 percent which makes up
the base of your team."
At the bottom is another
five percent that Trickett
says can kill a program.
"They're not buying in,"


BRANDON FINLEYLake City Reporter
Florida State coach Clint Trinkett was guest speaker for the
Columbia High football end of the year banquet on Friday.


Trickett said. "Those guys
don't stay very long."
Trickett explained that
in a football \program that
the 90 percent can travel
toward greatness with the
top five percent or fall to
the bottom with the rest.
Trickett said it's important
to always strive for great-
ness, but to get there the
Tigers must put in the
work.
Trickett announced to
the crowd that he's done
500 crunches a day for the


last 20 years. That's how he
stays accountable for enjoy-
ing cake, according to the
offensive line coach.
"You've got to have disci-
pline," Trickett said. "That's
why I go to church every
Sunday, because I need
to for what I did Monday
through Friday."
And Trickett told the
Tigers to have goals.
Columbia head coach
Brian Allen hopes that the
Tigers' goal will be gravitat-
ing to that top five percent.


Stricker opens season with win


Associated Press


KAPALUA, Hawaii -
Steve Stricker kicked off
the new PGA Tour season
Mondaywith avictoryin the
Tournament of Champions,
though' he didn't make it
easy on himself.


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ACROSS
Colorful pond
fish
Dit opposite
Taxi rider
Ms. Thurman
of "The
Avengers"
He directed
Marion
Say frankly
Absorbed
Kid around
Perfect place
Pimiento
holders
Hockey great-
Butter serving
Parking -
Rock layers
Lean
backward
Too compliant
Tach reading
Mountain
pass
Dappled
Catherine
- -Jones
Iris centers


His five-shot lead Was
reduced to one shot after
only six holes before
Stricker pulled himself
together with back-to-back
birdies and closed with a
4-under 69 to win by three.
Martin Laird, Jonathan
Byrd and Webb Simpson


38 Medieval
adventure
39 Soho co.
40 Chignon
41 Self-defense
method
44 Middles
48 Magnets
attract it
49 Space
traveler
51 La femme
52 Windshield
option
53 Christina's
p op
54 Battery word
55 Faux -
56 In need of a
towel

DOWN
1 Striped
antelope
2 Leave out
3 Othello's foe
4 Set one's
heart on
5 Wedding site
6 Scurry along


each got within one shot of
Stricker in the final round,
but they couldn't catch
him.
It was the 12th career
win for Stricker, and ninth
since he turned 40. He
moved back to No. 5 in the
world.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


7 Tortilla
treat
8 Tel -
9 Ramble
around
10 Pasture
grazers


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


S OP V E R IY W AD
TH AWETTA ORE
E I ICEMAK ER

SN BA I R
L IG HT W I E






I FS
RICO CHET R IPE
|PH~r^ E 0 TI






I NA ABET K ID
SSNY OK O ECO


13 Voted to
accept
16 Period
20 Harmless
prank
23 Kangaroo
pouch
24 Movable
stage item
25 Rights org.
26 Has an
understanding
of
27 Coat rack
28 Living qtrs.
30 Most balmy
32 Gym pad
34 Brad of the
movies
35 Pueblo
Indians
37 Venus or Mars
38 Motor oil
amounts
40 Safari leader
41 Ukraine
capital
42 Alice's
chronicler
43 Wallpaper unit
45 George
Bernard -
46 Makeshift
swing
47 Hiss
50 Friendly
advice


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 10. 2012


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


TUESDAY. JANUARY 10, 2012


Sl Flag football


added to MLK


Day sports


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow (15) celebrates after beating the Pittsburgh Steelers, 29-23, on the first play of
overtime in an NFL wild card football game in Denver on Sunday.



Broncos stun Steelers



with overtime strike


By EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press

DENVER The Drive. The
Fumble. And now, The Blink of an
Eye.
With a quick flick of the wrist and
a mad dash to the end zone, Tim
Tebow, Demaryius Thomas and the
Denver Broncos put a sudden end to
their playoff game against Pittsburgh
- an 11-second throw, catch and run
that accounted for the quickest over-
time in NFL history.
. On the first play of the extra period
Sunday, Tebow threw a crossing pat-
tern to Thomas, who stiff-armed Ike
Taylor and won the race to the end
zone for an 80-yard score that lifted
the Broncos to a 29-23 playoff victory
over the stunned Steelers.
All in 11 ticks of the clock the
quickest overtime ever, regular sea-
son or playoffs.
It will be talked about for much
longer, destined to earn a spot in
Denver's colorful playoff history,
somewhere up there with The Drive,
The Fumble and the franchise's two
Super Bowl titles.
John Elway, the quarterback who
was around for those magic moments,


was like every other Broncos fan for
this one he could only watch and
hope. When Thomas crossed the goal
line; ol' No. 7 raised his arms and
celebrated like a kid on the sideline.
And Tebow?
"When I saw him scoring, first of
all, I just thought, Thank you, Lord,"'
he said. "Then, I was running pretty
fast, chasing him."
A few moments later, he was
Tebowing in the end zone down on
one knee, resting one hand against
his forehead, while he punched his
other fist in the turf. After that, he
did victory laps and jumped into the
stands at a stadium that has been
thirsting for something special for
a while now. Denver's last turn in
the playoffs was the 2006 AFC title
game, a 34-17 loss to the Steelers, five
seasons before Tebow arrived.
And boy has this unorthodox, often
divisive but very clutch quarterback
made a difference.
"Definitely a special memory. One
that will always be very special,"
Tebow said of his fourth overtime win
of the season, against no losses.
The Tebow-to-Thomas connection
denied fans a good look at the NFL's
new ppstseason overtime rule.


"They said, 'We're going to run
this play, all you have to do is cross
the safety's face,"' Thomas said. "I
was walking to the line and saw the
safety come down and I knew, at that
time, the play we had called, the only
person I had td beat was the corner."
After Denver's third straight loss
last week in which Tebow threw for
60 yards and logged a quarterback
rating of 20.8, Elway now the
team's executive vice president of
football operations urged him to
be more aggressive with the ball. He
wanted his quarterback to step up
and take more chances run when
he saw daylight, throw during that
split second when he saw a receiver
open.
Message received. Tebow did that
all game, softening the Steelers with
gains of 51, 58, 30 and 40 yards, all in
the first half.
"I think it's just a mentality, being
aggressive," Tebow said. "Whether
it's in the pocket, when I was step-
ping up and I start to scramble ... or
whether ift's when I'm stepping up and
giving a receiver an opportunity on a
deep ball."
The Steelers rallied from a 14-point
deficit in the second half.


Home sweet home for wild card teams


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

Here come the big boys.
After the four host teams
swept the wild-card round,
the division winners who
earned byes get to try their
hands at protecting the
home-field advantage.
Tim Tebow's overtime
heroics and the Giants' bal-
ance on offense and stingi-
ness on defense were deci-
sive Sunday.
Tebow hooked up with
Demaryius Thomas on an
80-yard pass to lift Denver
over Pittsburgh 26-20.
Manning, having his
best pro season, threw for
three touchdowns and even
scrambled for 14 yards to
get New York's offense
on track in a 24-2 victory
against inept Atlanta.
"Before the game I said,
'Hey, let's have fun, these
are special moments and
just go out there and play
your best,'" Manning said.
"I knew all of them would be
great and try not to make a
big deal about things."
The big deals on Saturday
were Drew Brees and the
Saints, and the Texans in
their postseason debut.
Brees and New Orleans


; --IN

i : :".' -' "
t- : -'7 -- -- -' ---=-.0 -'-- 2, - -h .-

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Atlanta Falcons free safety Thomas DeCoud (28) tries to
bring down New York Giants running back Brandon Jacobs
(27) during the game in East Rutherford, N.J., on Sunday.

dominated the second half round was 2006, when the
to romp past Detroit 45-28 Patriots beat the Jets, the
in the NFC. In the AFC, Colts took the Chiefs, the
Houston won in its first Eagles downed the Giants,
playoff game in its 10-year and the Seahawks beat the
existence, 3"1-10 against Cowboys.
Cincinnati. And now the power-
Thelasttimeallfourhome houses join the action.
teams won in the wild-card NFC South champion


New Orleans (13-4) visits
West winner San Francisco
(13-3) on Saturday. The
49ers were 7-1 at home,
winning their last six.
New England, also
7-1 at home, hosts Denver
(9-8) that night. The- AFC
East champ Patriots (13-3)
whipped the West champ
Broncos 41-23 on Dec. 18 in
the Mile High City.
The Texans (11-6) visit
Baltimore (12-4), which
won all eight home games
in 2011, including a 29-14
victory over Houston on
Oct. 16.
That matchup of AFC
division winners is fol-
lowed by defending Super
Bowl champion Green Bay
(15-1), which swept its
games at Lambeau Field,
taking on the Giants. The
NFC North winners won at
the Meadowlands 38-35 in
early December.
But that was when
the Giants were sliding.
They've won four of five
since as their defense has
come alive. The hot streak
earned, the Giants (10-7)
the NFC East title.
"If we can play defense like
that," coach Tom Coughlin
said, "we will continue to
make ourselves heard."


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn

Two community sports
events were such a
success over Thanksgiving
weekend, they have been
reprised as part of the
Martin Luther King Jr.
weekend celebration.
The Breon Thomas
Turkey Bowl brought
together former Columbia
High players for a flag
football tournament.
The Martin Luther King
Jr. Day Battle of the Classes
will have the same format.
The event has been spear-
headed by Jerome Carter.
"The success of the
Thanksgiving tournament
inspired me," Carter said.
"We said we would try to
do three a year and this
is a good time for another
one. A lot of guys can't wait
until Thanksgiving. We'll
see how this one goes and
plan one more."
The tournament will be
at Annie Mattox Park on
Monday and Carter said
players should assemble
around noon, right after
the MLK parade. Carter
reserved the park and has
a trophy to be presented
the winning team.
Carter has coordinated
with Michael Dales (phone
number 678-595-6769),
who came up with the
Turkey Bowl idea and cap-
tained his 1996 Tigers to a
win in the tournament.
The 1996 Tigers will
defend their title in the 7-
on-7 competition and other
teams expected are 1997-98
combined under Terrence
Harrell (386-438-7833) and
Theis Rossin (386-719-
5572), 2000 under Rodney
Johnilson (386-675-3383)
and 2001 under Carter.
Players whose class is
not officially represented
are welcome to come out
and will be assigned a
team.
Carter asked that
players call the captains


this week.
"We don't want to have
to adjust that much on the
run," Carter said. "We have
a deadline of Thursday
and that allows us to set
up everything properly.
Hopefully, we will have a
good turnout."
Carter said old Tigers
still
sa vor
the com-
petition.
"For
me and
most of
the guys
Carter I deal
w i t h,
once football is in you a
lot of guys still want to
play," he said. "Once you
are competitive, you are
competitive. This will give
them something else to do
on Martin Luther King Jr.
Day and we hope it will be
a good success.
"I want to thank every-
body who is taking part
helping me with this event
and all the participants
playing."
The Thanksgiving bas-
ketball doubleheader was
the second annual Lake
City All-Stars vs. Live Oak
All-Stars charity game for
adults.
Lake City won both
the women's and men's
games, and Live Oak has
been spoiling for another
shot ever since.
Dubbed "The Rematch,"
the Monday games are at
3 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. at
Lake City Middle School.
Admission is $5 and pro-
ceeds will be donated to
the youth sports programs
in both communities.
The LakeCity Recreation
Departm t' -""a nd
Richardson Community
Center Annie Mattox Park
North are the sponsoring
organizations.
For details, call Columbia
County Recreation
Director Mario Coppock
at 754-7095.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this file photo from July 28, 2004, Barry Larkin takes a
curtain call after hitting a pinch-hit grand slam off St. Louis
Cardinals pitcher Steve Kline in Cincinnati.


Larkin sole pick

for Hall of Fame


By RONALD BLUM
Associated Press

NEW YORK .Barry
Larkin has been elected to
baseball's Hall of Fame.
The former Cincinnati
Reds shortstop received
495 votes (86 percent)
in balloting announced
Monday by the Baseball
Writers' Association of
America, well above the
necessary 75 percent.
Larkin was on the ballot
for the third time after
falling 75 votes short last
year.
He will be inducted July
22 in Cooperstown along
with the late Ron Santo,
elected last month by the
Veterans Committee.
"It's just amazing,"
Larkin said in an interview


on MLB Network. "Last
year I just started to smell
it a little bit. The first year
I didn't even think it was
fathomable, to be quite
honest."
Jack Morris was next
with 382 votes (67 per-
cent), missing by 48 votes
on his 13th try but up
sharply from 54 percent
last year. The pitcher has
two chances left on the
BBWAA ballot.
Playing from 1986-04,
Larkin hit .295 with 198
home runs, 960 RBIs, 2,340
hits and 379 stolen bases.
He won the 1995 NL MVP
award, three Gold Gloves
and the 1990 World Series.
In 1996, he became the
first shortstop to have 30
homers and 30 steals in a
season.












Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY. JANUARY 10. 2012


DILBERT
I'M HEARING SOME
COMPLAINTS THAT
YOU BUILT A ROBOT
SHARK TO PATROL THE
SO-CALLED TERRI-
f TRIAL WATERS
AROUND YOUR
ICUBICL


BABY BLUES

I TO Z, G To D N y


;r'f-zi TTo


1G" 47 WHo A PLUMBER
..ab) ARE WORKINGON
YOU? SOAE PIPES
INSIDE

30

0
-lo


DEAR ABBY


Caring neighbors fill void

left by inattentive parents


IT'S A ROBOT DOLPHIN.
I CAN SEE HOW PEOPLE
@ IGHT BE CONFUSED.



8


DEAR ABBY: "Friend of
a Lonely Child" (Nov. 7)
complained his wife didn't
like him befriending the
neighbor boy, "Donny,"
whose father is terminally
ill.
Many years ago, I was
that child. My home life
was a mess, and the neigh-
bors ended up raising me
and teaching me about
life. I am positive the only
reason I didn't end up in
prison was the concern of
those people.
Mr. and Mrs. P. taught
me manners and work
ethic, Mr. and Mrs. M.
schooled me in kindness
and compassion, and the
local store owner, Mr. R.,
taught me economics.
He'd never let my credit
go over $3, and he'd
charge me a quarter a
week if I didn't pay it off!
Here I am at 51, having
never made a credit card
interest payment or taken
a loan to term, thanks to
him. I loved those neigh-
bors more than I loved
my own family.
"Friend," your wife is
right. You CAN'T save
everyone, but a little
kindness and mentor-
ing can change a child's
life. And all it will cost
you is a little time. -
THANKFUL FOR OHIO
NEIGHBORS
DEAR THANKFUL:
Like you, many readers
encouraged this man to


examples of how a true
man treats a woman. I
never fail to express my
thanks to their wives
and family members for
allowing their husbands
and fathers to spend time
with my son. Because
of it, he has become a
better man and future
husband. Maybe "Friend"
and his wife can set
predetermined times at
which Donny can visit
for male companion-
ship. PROUD MOM IN
PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR ABBY: As the
mother of two daughters,
I didn't have a great deal
of interaction with 10-
year-old boys until my .
nephew came to stay with
us for an entire summer.
His father was gravely ill
and succumbed while the
boy was living with us.
As his mom dealt with
the issues concerning his
father's death, our neph-
ew became a member of
our household. It ended
up being a tremendous
experience.
"Friend's" wife needs to
open her heart. She'll be
given a wonderful gift and
help a child in the process.
- PHYLIS IN NORTH
CAROLINA


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com pr
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST

A YOU STICKING v/ITH NO, TH6 SOUTH FACH Di6T
YOUR RESOLUTION TO v.AWN'T WORKING FOR
L05E WIG5HTI A/ E-- H ATQ 5N

>7'-. IN MY
F BETTERT "- O SOO .

^. ..-. ..... .


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Concentrate on you
and the people you care
about and you will make
personal gains that will
prepare you for future
opportunities. Love is
highlighted, and with a
little experimentation you
can enhance your relation-
ship with someone special.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll overdo, overre-
act and overspend unless
you keep very busy pro-
ducing what you do best
and wheeling and dealing
to get ahead. The bulk of
your day should be dedi-
cated to work and avoiding
anything or anyone that,
can distract you. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Your creative ideas
will lead to an unusual
offer. Expect someone you
help to connect you to a
third party with a vested
interest in something you
want to pursue. Love and
romance are in the stars,
and a stronger commit-
ment is apparent *****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be tempted to
do too much for others,
and you'll end up being
taken advantage of if you
don't say no. Emotional
matters will lead to uncer-
tainty regarding participa-
tion in a group endeavor.
Equality must be the deter-
mining factor. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Don't let flightiness lead
you down a lonely path.
Take your ideas or a ser-
vice you have to offer and
find a way to expand your
skills to satisfy a wider
range of clients. Working
from home will help pay
down debt. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): An opportunity will
arise from a conversation
you have while network-
ing, socializing or en route.
Prepare to make a couple
of changes, despite the
inconvenience. Your will-
ingness to compromise
will help sweeten the deal
offered. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
What you do for others will
turn out to be beneficial.
Participating in a fundrais-
ing event or a good cause
will lead to a position that
brings in extra cash. Don't
let someone close to you
hold you back. Follow your
heart ****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Bottling up your
feelings will cause your
problems to linger. The
only way to get rid of the
uncertainty you are feeling
is to air whatever is both-
ering you so that you can
continue to be productive
and progress. **


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Put your
money and your heart on
the line. Be prepared to
make a promise to some-
one who can match you
mentally, physically and
financially. You don't have
to overspend to impress,
but you do have to keep
the momentum flowing.
*****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You've got what
it takes to surpass the
Competition. Display what
you can offer, but don't sell
yourself short. Negotiate
what you want into a long-
term contract that will
enable you to expand'your
plans, leading to higher
returns. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't take a risk;
the cost will be too high.
Focus on things you enjoy
doing and the people you
love most. Now is the time
to make changes that will
lead to a higher income.
Present and promote
something you have to
offer. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): -You'll meet with dif-
ficulty if you don't upgrade
your skills or find a new
way to make money.
Problems with partner-
ships will develop if you
don't deal in fairness.
Equality will get you much
further than trying to take
control. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: G equals V
"KTY OBVVBX NMDCVYXK KTNK OMSVY
SJ ONCJ Y Z PA LBG Y M KA SJ N USX Z
BE J WNXZYM BX KTY LBBM. T W .
V Y X 0 U Y X

Previous Solution: "Fame ... everybody thinks they want it, and most people
really don't enjoy it once they get it." Kelsey Grammer
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-10


CLASSIC PEANUTS


I NEED YOU TO
SMILE MORE_


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
continue in his role of
father figure. My newspa-
per readers comment-
DEAR ABBY: I have
two daughters who are
now grown. Many of their
friends spent a lot of time
in our home and at our
dinner table. Many of
them were from troubled
backgrounds. Sharing our
home with others never
deprived our daughters of
love and attention. Instead,
they learned the impor-
tance of giving.
After the friends grew
up I was surprised and
touched when they told
me how much the time we
shared had meant to them.
I never realized I was mak-
ing a difference.
Abby, "Friend"'s wife
is blessed to have such
a caring husband. Yes,
sometimes we ARE our
brother's keeper. CHRIS
IN ARIZONA
DEAR ABBY: As a
single mom of a son, I
was fortunate to have
men around who took
him under their wings.
They provided friend-
ship, male bonding and


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY. JANUARY 10. 2012












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY. JANUARY 10, 2012

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[Personal Merchandise]


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 12-2009-CA-000671
DIVISION:
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP F/K/A COUNTRY WIDE
HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GABRIEL HERREARA, et al, De-
fendant(s)
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgment of Mort-
gage Foreclosure dated December
21, 2011 and entered in Case No. 12-
2009-CA-000671 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein BAC HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS
SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff
and GABRIEL HERRERA; CARO-
LINA HERRERA; OAK MEADOW
PLANTATION AND FOREST
PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCI-
ATION, INC.; are the Defendants,
Tie Clerk of the Court will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at FRONT STEPS OF THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 25th
day of January, 2012, the following
described property as set forth on
said Final Judgment:
LOT 32 OAK MEADOW PLANTA-
TION UNIT ONE A SUBDIVISION
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 164 AND
165 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA.
A/K/A 4294 NW SAVANNAH'
LOOP, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus form the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on December 28, 2011.
P, DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Publish in The Lake City Reporter
Invoice To: Florida Default Law
Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa. Florida 33622-5018
F09096144 COUNTRYCAL-
SPECFHLMC---Team 2
**See Americans with Disabilities
Act NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons, need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator Whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
05529858
January 10, 17,N2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S
AUTO SERVICE gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on
01/30/2012, 08:30 am at 2550 SW
MAIN BLVD. LAKE CITY, FL
32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes.
JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
1FALP4042TF221271
1996 FORD
1FTES14Y9MHA12872
1991 FORD
1FrYR14V5YTA62184
2000 FORD
1G1ND52M1VY131446
1997 CHEVROLET
1G3WH52H7YF183022
2000 OLDSMOBILE
KMHJG25F81U250441
2001 HYUNDAI
05529895
January 10, 2012
We will sell the following tenants
units on a new day and time at Com-
munity Self Storage 814 SW State
Road 247/Branford Hwy., on Janu-
ary 30, 2012 at 9:00 AM
WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY
386-961-9926
DEBRA GRIFFIS
Personal Property
SHEILA CRAWFORD
Household/Furniture/Clothes
DARRELL MORRELL
Household Goods
LARONDA ROGERS
Furniture and appliances
MELISSA WILLIAMS
Household Goods
KATRINA LANCASTER (2 units)
Household Goods
MICHAEL ANGLIN
Furniture and household
ROGER WARD







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer. Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,.
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,


Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota. Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


Legal

Household Goods
ANNIE CALHOUN
Furniture and clothes
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REFUSE ALL BIDS.
Cash only. 10V Buyers premium,
Jerry Duncan #AU527
05529818
January 10, 17.2011


020 Lost & Found
Found 2 puppies near
Birley and Pinemount.
Call 561 312-5620

100 Job
Opportunities
05529880
VyStar Credit Union Seeking
Member Relationship
Specialist Supervisor
Location: Lake City Branch
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS:
Trains, monitors, coaches and
develops member service and
teller staff on a daily basis.
Provides on-going training for
all member service and teller
staff as changes are'
implemented and other duties
JOB KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS
& ABILITIES:
A minimum of three years of
experience with a financial
institution.
A minimum of two years in a
leadership or supervisory
position is preferred.
Knowledge of Microsoft Word
and Excel are required.
EDUCATION:
An Associate Degree is required
and'a four-year undergraduate
degree is preferred. Work and/or
supervisory experience may be,
substituted for the Associates
Degree.
Please visit
www.vystarcu.org/home/careers
to apply.
VyStar Credit Union is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

05529964 .
Food service
professionals wanted.
Experienced Banquet Cook
Dishwashers ,
Banquet Servers
Must have a positive attitude,
ability to work well with people,
eagerness to learn, dedication to
quality, and have an eye for
detail and a willingness
to do what ever it takes to get
the job done.
Background Check Mandatory.
Application available at
Camp Weed, 11057 Camp
Weed Place, Live Oak

BARTENDER NEEDED Must.
have experience and be reliable.
Must have own phone and own
car. 386-752-2412
Child care center looking for
qualified and experienced
Director. Apply in person at Wee
Care in Columbia City.
52 Temp Nursery Workers needed
1/30/12-11/30/12. Wrkrs will
perform any combo of duties to
plant, cultivate, propagate, grade,
store & ship and harvest nursery
stock. Wrkrs will be required to
harvest both container and field
grown plants, trees and shrubs.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
All tools, supplies, equipment
provided at no cost. Free, housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract. Random drug testing at
employer's expense. Pay rate is the
highest $9.39/hr or applicable
piece rates depending on crop
activity. Worksite in Mobile Co.
AL. Applicants should report or
send a resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office ref job order # 757807 or
call 850-921-3466..T.A.S. Inc
DBA Cottage Hill Nursery -
Irvington, AL
MECHANIC for busy truck shop.
Experience required with own
tools. Southern Specialized
Trucks. 386-752-9754
8 TEMP Nursery workers needed
1/30/12- 11/30/12. Workers will
plant, cultivate & harvest
greenhouse and nursery stock.
Must have 3 month verifiable
work experience in agricultural
/horticultural work. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools,
supplies, equipment provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers. Random
drug testing at employer's
expense. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract. S9.39/hr. Worksite in
Paulding county GA. Report or
send a resume to nearest local
Florida Department of Employ-
ment and Workforce or call (850)
921-3466& reference Job #
GA7989864
Rambo Nursery LLC: Dallas GA.


100 Job
100 Opportunities

2 TEMP Nursery workers needed
2/1/12- 11/30/12. Wrkrs will
perform any combo of duties to
plant, cultivate and harvest
bedding plants and nursery stock.
Wrkrs will be reqrd to harvest both
container and field grown trees
and shrubs. Must have 1 month
verifiable experience working on a
tree and shrub nursery. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools,
supplies, equipment provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers. Random
drug testing at employer's
expense. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract. $9.39/hr. Worksite in
Mobile Co AL. Report or send a
resume to nearest local FL Agency
of Workforce Innovation office &
reference Job #762822 or call
850-921-3466. Turner Farms -
Wilmer, AL.

Wanted: mature person to live in
and care for elderly woman must
cook clean and give meds. Day#'s
386-755-5099 or 288-1078

120 Medical
1290 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529923
Admission Director
Avalon Healthcare is currently
accepting applications for
the full time position of
Admissions Director.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent Benefit package.
Please send resume to:
Tony Anderson, Administrator
admin@avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

To place your
class field ad-call

M %N lft p l ', ~iiXW[


120 Medical
120 Employment

055-9924
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupation Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as a sign on bonus is being
offered. Please contact Jennie
Cruce Director of Rehab
dorr(avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE


170 Business
170 Opportunities
Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

240 Schools &
2 Education
05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/23/10

Phlebotoiny national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-03/12/12
Continuing education"
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies'
German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law-828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free frovl intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


SOL$IT



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from the Lake City Reporter Classifieds.

Let our sales team help you place

an ad today, in print and online!


Call 386-755-5440 or go to www.lakecityreporter.com



Lake City Reporter


lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


IBUYI


SLL Ti


FIND I11T


402 Appliances
For Sale: GE Washer Ig
capacity, Whirlpool. Dryer
Lg capacity. $450.for both obo
352-264-8168

403 Auctions
4 BURNER stainless steel
gas range. Less than
3 yrs old. $400.
386-205-7713

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292,-2170

408 Furniture
Antique round side table.
Dark wood.94" around,
29" tall. $50.
386-754 4094

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood.&
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
7000 WATT Troybilt generator
10 watt surge. new in 2011
$750.00
386-205-7713
BEER KEG Refrigerator for sale.
38 cold always. $200 obo.
386-758-1991

BLUE OX Tow Bar.
Like new. Used 2 years.
$175.00
386-752-9645
Glock 27, 40 cal. Pistol. w/2 clips,
one double stacked w/laser site.
W/Paddle type, lock down holster.
Exc. Cond. $475. FIRM. Excellent
for concealed carry
S****SOLD.*._* *-
PS 3 System with 9 games,
'2 wireless control,
in original box. $270,
386-984-7510











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY. JANUARY 10. 2012


440 Miscellaneous
STORAGE SHED
10xl6
$2500
Call 288-9858
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed.
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
**SOLD**

4 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker. Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load.-Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between I-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404.
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

64O Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
4BR/2BA
Over 2000 sq ft.
of living area.
Only $61,900
Call 386-752-3743
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
ASSUME PAYMENTS!
4br/2ba on 1/2 acre!
$0 Down Pmt! $377. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6574


BAD CREDIT OK!!
A 575 Beacon Score will qualify
you for a new home!
Call Kevin for details!
386-719-5641
Beautiful, Brand new 4/2
manufac-
tured home on 5 acres in Lake
City, Fl. $9,900.00 down, $995.00
per month. Easy Qualifying**
Owner Financing**
Ready to move in. Call Today!!
512-663-0065.


Need a Home?
Bad Credit or No Credit?
Call 386-755-2132.
We Finance You
Must have Land.


NEW 2012
28X80
4BR/2BA FACTORY REPO
$61,900
Call 386-7523743
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
OWNER FINANCE
New 3 or 4 BR home
Set up on your land or
Mine!! $500 Down/$289 mo.
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
PALM HARBOR
Give Away
$20,000 in Options FREE
All sizes
1-888-313-2899
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Showcase Closeout
All Palm Harbor
Lot models
Make Dreams Happen!
386-758-9538
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy. Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737


Corial, Homes
by Arthur Rutenberg
,Br RZchc c Hone"- I. nd-tndicn I-ranic
,fA.,h,.r R nbcrg Home. L.-,- C:B(:1257.i343


A640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den. SBS Fridge'
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574
WE HAVE access to
New & Used Homes.
Call 386-755-8854 to make sure.
You are getting your best deal


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. m6. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
QUAIL HEIGHTS. 2br/lba
Duplex. Washer/dryer hook up.
Private, safe, secluded, $750 mo
$500 sec. 386-754-1155
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com


Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
72 ForRent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
STUDIO APT. FOR RENT
All utilities included & Cable,
$500 month $300 sec. deposit.
Call 386-697-9950

730 Unfurnished
J730Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
3br/2ba Split floor plan, 1850sf+
garage. Quiet Cul-de-sac, 4 mi SW
of Hwy 90. Privacy fence. Lg
rooms, Jacuzzi tub in Master BR.
$1195mo $800.dep. 386-984-5872
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.


Jasmine
*/ ---- 1130
Visit the model in
The Preserve at
Laurel Lake
227 Belflower Drive
Model Hours:
Tuesday-Friday 12-5
Sat. 10-4
Sun. l-4pm
Call Bryan Zecher
(386) 752-8653


730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
For Rent %% ith Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn.
S550 mo. and
S550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
Office Rentals
055297-9
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' 5450/mth
900 sq' S600/mth
3568 sq' S2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 1 l00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age.of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
Swide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
Custon Built 3/2 on 1.37 ac in
High Springs. Real wood floors,
,stainless steel appl.Screened lanai.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 79601 $178,000 623-6896
COMPLETELY REMODELED!
3BR/2BA mfg home on 1-acre
in Providence Vlg $45,900
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79669


---0 D-








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper, and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only..





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


810 Home for Sale
CYPRESS LANDING' 3BR/2-BA
/1g2 great room. split floor plan
& 2-car garage 105.K000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY.
INC. 755-5110 =79634
NICE 3BR/2BA DWMH w/fenced
yard plus double carport &
wkshop $39.900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY. INC.
755-5110 #79078
ONLY S38.500 for 4BR/2BA
concrete block' home: apply
TLC & make this house a home
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #79477
PRICE SLASHED! 3BR/2BA
brick home newly renovated &
inground pool. fenced yard
$69,500 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY. INC. 755-5110 #79233
PRICED TO SELL FAST! Large
3BR/2BA home near schools
& shopping $28.500 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC
755-5110 #77505

820 Farms&
SAcreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


870 Real Estate
Wanted


I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
2Iy & Supplies-
TOW HITCH
All Ford Pickups and
maybe others. $100.
386-758-1991


Lake City Reporter


LLC (800)572-5489 ext. 227


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The most complete superfood ever
discovered. Watch the amazing video titled
"Another Day" at: www.forevergreen.org/
cinema.html and purchase the Frequensea
product at: www.6570244.myforevergreen.
ORG


Land For Sale


20 Acres-Live On Land NOW!! Only $99/
mo. $0 Down, Owner Financing, NO CREDIT
CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful,
Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure.
(800)755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com

7 ACRES WITH LAKE FRONTAGE. Buy
Off-Season -BARGAIN only $39,900! (was
$89,900) Wooded setting, dockable shoreline,
on 4 season -recreational lake! Boat, ski,
fish, camp, more. Paved rds, power, phone.
Excellent financing. Won't last, call now
(866)952-5302

Miscellaneous

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid, if qualified. SCHEV certified.
Call (877)206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for
hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified -
Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769


Real Estate


Mobile Home with acreage ready to move in,
great for pets. Lots of space for the price, 3Br
2Ba, serious offers only, no renters. (850)308-
6473


Schools & Instruction


Help Wanted


Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay
2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-
8782 www.meltontruck.com

Driver- Weekly Hometime. Dry and
Refrigerated. Daily Pay! 31 Service Centers.
Local Orientation. Newer trucks. CDL-A. 3
months current OTR experience. (.*iiii4 -4
9569. www.driveknight.com

Drivers: RUN 5 STATE REGIONAL! Get
Home Weekends, Earn Up to 39/mi. I yr OTR
Flatbed exp. req'd. SUNBELT TRANSPORT,


Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job
Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690




ANF
Ai.,',/?T'F''.l fjI'AORK5 OF P.ORISA


aed iOsplayi Met-o Daily


Week of January 9, 2012 ]