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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01746
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 8, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01746
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






I llA M


ty Reporter


I


Sunc


Was K-9


death


scene staged?


One vet says Trooper
didn't likely die in kennel;
another thinks he did.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A veterinarian who reviewed nec-
ropsy records and photographs of-
a Lake City Police Department K-
9 officer believes the dog's death
scene may have been staged, accord-
ing to an LCPD internal affairs report
released Wednesday.
Dr. Robert Reisman, medical coor-
dinator of animal cruelty cases at
Bergh Memorial Animal Hospital in
New York, answered "Yes" when
asked by police whether K-9 officer
Trooper's death was "highly unlikely
to have occurred in his kennel,"
where he was reportedly found.
When asked whether "the position-
ing of the body is possibly staged,"
Reisman also said "Yes."
Trooper was a five-year-old Belgian
Malinois trained in narcotics detec-
tion.
His handler, LCPD officer Kevin
Johns, reported having found the
dog dead in his kennel at 1:10 p.m.
on July 22. Johns said he left his
residence at 11:30 a.m.- to take trash
to the dump and returned to find
Trooper dead.
The cause of death was ruled
heat stroke after, a necropsy at a
Gainesville animal hospital. Johns
was issued a written reprimand in
the incident.
Reisman, interviewed August 22
in Lake City by LCPD Capt. Robert
Smith, said there were "a number of
TROOPER continued on 6A


COURTESY LCPD
The 10 by 10 chain-link kennel in which Lake City Police Department K-9 officer
Trooper was housed until his July 22 death.


Few rules govern

care of LCPD K-9s


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
An internal affairs investigation
into the death of a Lake City Police
Department K-9 officer revealed the
absence of policies governing many
aspects of the care of such animals
at the department. LCPD officials
say they now plan to remedy the
problem.
K-9 officer Trooper was found dead
in his kennel at his handler's home
on July 22. The handler, officer Kevin


Johns, reportedly left
the dog in his. kennel
for about 100 minutes
while he went to dump
trash. Johns said that
when he returned
home he found the
dog dead in his ken-
Blanchard nel, a six-foot tall, 10
by 10 chain-link fence
with no roof and minimal shade.
During the investigation into
LCPD continued on 6A


TONY BRITTlLake City Reporter
Andy Redding, a detective and K-9 handler with the
State Fire Marshal's office, and his dog, Molly, look for
evidence at the scene of a fire that destroyed a Lake
City church Saturday morning.


Fire levels


abandoned


church; no


one injured

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Local, state and federal authorities are investigat-
ing a fire that destroyed an abandoned northside
church Saturday. morning.
The cause of the fire has not been determined.
Representatives from the state fire marshal's office
and the federal Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco Firearms
and Explosives are investigating along with the Lake
City Police Department.
"The fire marshal came in because there are no
utilities in the building, which made the fire suspi-
cious," said Capt. John Blanchard, LCPD public infor-
mation officer. "We're assisting the fire marshal's
office in the investigation."
The fire occurred at the Gospel of the Living
Water Church, 726 Northeast Washington Street, at
the intersection of Northeast Washington Street and
Northeast Curry Drive.
Units from the Lake City Fire Department respond-
ed to the scene around 4:30 a.m.
"When 'C' shift arrived it was a fully involved
church fire," said Frank Armijo, LCFD assis-
CHURCH continued on 3A


5 hurt in 1-75 crash


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter
A Columbia County firefighter inspects a sports utility vehicle that overturned in the south-
bound lanes of Interstate 75 near.mile marker 439 Saturday afternoon. Five occupants were
believed seriously hurt. Further information was not immediately available.

STATE NES

'Bird plane' runs afoul

of federal regulators


By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Ten young whooping
cranes and the bird-like plane they think is
their mother had flown more than halfway
to their winter home in Florida when fed-
eral regulators stepped in.
Now the birds and the plane are ground-
ed in Alabama while the Federal Aviation
Administration investigates whether the


journey violates regulations because the
pilot was being paid by a conservation
group to lead the cranes on their first
migration instead of working for free.
FAA regulations say only pilots with
commercial pilot licenses can fly for hire.
The pilots of Operation Migration's plane
are instead licensed to fly sport aircraft
because that's the category of aircraft that
BIRDS continued on 3A


By GORDON JACKSON
giackson@lakecityrep'orter. corn
Florida House of Representatives
District 11 currently includes Gilchrist,
Suwannee and Lafayette counties, as well
as parts of Columbia, Alachua and Dixie
counties.
But that is certain
to change when the
60-day state legisla-
tive session begins
Tuesday, State Rep.
Elizabeth Porter said.
Porter, R-Lake City,
said she doesn't know
the extent of changes
to the existing district
because legislators are
considering as many
as 20 proposed redis- m
tricting maps. -.
Many of the pro-
posed redistricting
maps for District 11
include all of Columbia
and Suwannee coun-
ties, as well as part or State representat
all of Hamilton County bills she will introd
and portions of at least that begins Tuesc
two other counties in
the region. Porter said
adding Hamilton County to her district
makes sense because it shares many
of the same issues and concerns with
Columbia and Suwannee counties.
But there are many other issues that
will be considered during the upcoming
session.
One of the major ones that could
impact the region is a permit allowing


the Jacksonville Electric Authority to
draw as much as 155 million gallons of
water a day from the Floridan Aquifer.
Elected officials, residents and environ-
mental groups are concerned the water
draw down jeopardizes springs, creeks
and rivers throughout the region.
.m :


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
ive Elizabeth Porter, R-Lake City, describes
duce during the 60-day legislative session
lay.

In November, elected officials from
Columbia, Hamilton and Suwannee coun-
ties held a joint meeting to discuss ways
to overturn the permit, which was issued
to JEA by the St. Johns River Water
Management District.
Porter and State Sen. Charlie Dean,
SESSION continued on 3A


I1 !!.I i


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


74 7.
Partly cloudy
WEATHER, 8A


Opinion ................
Business ................
Life ....................
Advice ..................
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
.*. ,-._ id : ,
12,- 2 w-Ir-'-


COMING
TUESDAY
', -I : u ri il


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 291 $ 1.00


LEGISLATIVE PREVIEW


Redistricting to


dominate session











2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012

FL ORIDA


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
21-26-32-36 7 3-10-22-29-36 Afternoon: 3-3-1 Afternoon: 2-4-9-1 N/A N/A
Evening: N/A Evening: N/A



AROUND FLORIDA



Jacksonville man practices what he preaches as donor


OCALA After more
than 25 years of speaking
out about donating organs,
Terry Dennis gave the gift
himself so his son Matt
could have a second organ
transplant.
This time, Terry gave
one of his kidneys.
The 59-year-old
retired Jacksonville Fire
Department battalion chief
has been a tireless advocate
of organ and blood donation
- even pedaling a bicycle
from Seattle to Florida to
spread the message.
His motivation stems in
large part from his 28-year-
old son Matt Dennis, who
was just 3 years old in
1986 when he underwent
Florida's first pediatric heart
transplant at Shands at the
University of Florida.
Sitting next to Matt,
again a transplant patient
at UF&Shands after their
operation, Terry was asked
how it felt to give the gift
of life.
"A pain," he said.
But then he laughed,
glanced at his grinning son
and said it helped with holi-
day shopping.
"I didn't have to give him
a sweater this Christmas,"
dad said.
Matt's first transplant
donor was an 18-month-
old Midwesterner who had
died in an automobile acci-
dent The timing could not
have been closer.
Because of a condition
known as cardiomyopathy
a sudden deterioration in
his heart muscle's ability
to function doctors had


given Matt only 12 hours
to live.
Terry said there was
no time to ponder his son
undergoing Florida's first
pediatric heart transplant
"There was some drugs
that could have helped,
but he reacted violently to
them," Terry said. "It was
either do this (transplant)
or it was over."
Matt, now a Jacksonville
stockbroker, doesn'tremem-
ber being sick as a young-
ster. But he does remember
unstrapping himself from a
gurney so he could look out
the helicopter window as
they flew from Jacksonville
to Gainesville.
"I remember, I was in a
helicopter and I wanted to
look out the window," he
said.
Relatives say that Matt
has done a lot with his heart
- graduating from the
University of Noith Florida
with a master's in business
administration, skiing black-
diamohd trails downhill and
whitewater rafting.
Last January, though,
routine blood work was
beginning to show that the
anti-rejection drugs he had
been taking to keep his
heart healthy were destroy-
ing his kidney function.
E Jay Fricker, chief of
Pediatric Cardiology and
director of the Pediatric
Cardiology Fellowship
Training Program who has
been Matts heart doctor,
said that subsequent medi-
cal thinking has refined the
dosages of anti-rejection
drugs since Matt first got


them and that his new
kidney likely won't face the
same threats.
"The (anti-rejection)
drug was first available in
1980-81," he said. "We know
much more about it now."
But Matt said he resisted
the notion that his kidneys
were failing.
"I didn't feel bad at all -
it was just numbers on the
chart telling me my kidneys
were failing," he said. "'m
kind of jaded around doc-
tors."
But Terry said he told his
son he was ready to donate.
The human body needs just
one kidney to run properly.
In May, around Matt's
birthday, a nephrologist
gave him a bleak outlook-
get a kidney transplant or
dialysis.
So, Terry Dennis' young-
est child asked him if he
was serious about being
willing to give up a kidney.
He said yes.
"He handed me the
papers right then," Terry
said.
Terry said he's glad to be
part of the miracle of life,
another chance for his son
to live a full life.
"I have more to give,"
Terry said, smiling. "But I'll
have to be deceased."

Defendant wears
drug recipe jacket
FORT LAUDERDALE
A man charged with
selling drugs alleg-
edly showed up toa South
Florida court hearing


wearing a jacket with a
cartoon-style recipe for
cooking crack cocaine.
An attorney snapped a
picture of the defendant
Friday.
The Sun Sentinel
reports the jacket had pic-
tures of a white substance
with a spoon, a carton of
baking soda and a small
pot over a fire. The end
product was a "rock,"
which is slang for the
drug.
The man's attorney
Joshua Rydell would not
reveal the name of the
man. The defendant did
not get in trouble for his
apparel.

Firefighter falls to
death from ladder
POMPANO BEACH A
veteran South Florida fire-
fighter has died after falling
nearly 100 feet from the top
of a ladder truck during a
training exercise.
William "Bill" Elliott
was climbing up and down
the ladder in a training
exercise with four other
firefighters Friday.
Pompano Beach Fire
Rescue Chief Harry Small
said it was a new truck,
but similar to other trucks
they've had and that Elliott
and been on nearly identi-
cal ladders repeatedly.
Firefighters wear a harness
going up and down ladders
but are only hooked in at
certain points.
A firefighter standing on
the ladder below 50-year-


old Elliott said he watched
him fall.
The Sun Sentinel reports
Elliott has been with the
department since 1989.
Dozens of firefighters
passed through the emer-
gency room to mourn
throughout the night

Man found dead
in Everglades
MIAMI Authorities
arg searching for a clues
after a man was found shot
to death in the Florida
Everglades.
Twenty-one year-old
Adrian Lopez was found
dead Thursday night.
Authorities said he was
shot multiple times.
He was reported miss-
ing on Tuesday.
The Miami Herald said
the motive is unknown.

Pedestrian struck
by car, dies
ORLANDO -An
,18-year-old pedestrian was
killed when he was hit by
a car while crossing a cen-
tral Florida street.
Christian Anthony was
standing with two other
people when he tried to
cross an Orlando street
and for some reason fell
face first into the road.
The driver was unable
to swerve and struck
Anthony.
The Florida Highway
Patrol says Friday's crash
remains'under investiga-
tion.


Boaters told to
look for manatees
WEST PALM BEACH -
Boaters are being cautioned
to look out for manatees
that may be congregating
near power plants during
the state's chilly weather.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission says the cold
fronts have driven large
numbers of manatees to
warm-water areas near
power plants.
FWC Capt David
Schaeffer says as the weath-
er warms up, the mammals
move away from the plants
toward feeding areas.

Injured officer
given big honor.
WINTER HAVEN An
Auburndale police officer
shot several times with an
assault rifle while respond-
ing to a domestic distur-
bance call has been named
officer of the year.
Stacy Booth was rec-
ognized Thursday as the
2011 Small Department
Law Enforcement Officer
of the Year by the Polk
County Police Chiefs'
Association. She was
shot in September while
responding to a domestic
disturbance call.
The Ledger reported
that a man inside fired 20
shots through the door.
Booth, though hit three
times, was able to crawl to
cover.
(AP)


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Griffin to get own Bravo talk show


PASADENA, Calif. Comic Kathy'
Griffin is never shy about offering
her opinions. Soon she'll have a
weekly outlet for them.
The Bravo network said Saturday
that it will premiere "Kathy," a once-
a-week talk show hosted by Griffin
sometime this spring. The network
hasn't decided when
it will air regularly.
Bravo promised
that "this will be the
destination to get
Griffin's thoughts
on everything pop
culture as she rants
on the week's big-
gest headlines and Griffin
tabloid gossip." The
show will also feature
stand-up comedy, celebrity inter-
views and taped segments.

Obama book tells of
tensions with First Lady.
WASHINGTON First lady
Michelle Obama is a behind-the-
scenes force in the White House
whose opinions on policy and politics
drew her into conflict with presi-
dential advisers and who bristled
at some of the demands and con-
straints of life as the president's wife,
according to a detailed account of
the first couple's relationship.
New York Times reporter Jodi
Kantor, in a book to be published
Tuesday, portrays a White House
where tensions developed between
Mrs. Obama and former White
-House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel
and former press secretary and pres-
idential adviser Robert Gibbs.
The Associated Press obtained
a copy of the book, "The Obamas,"
Friday evening and The Times
posted a 3,300-word adaption on its
website that appeared to capture
its most revealing accounts. The
book is based on interviews with 30
current and former aides, though
President Barack Obama and the
first lady declined to be interviewed
for the book.
The book portrays Mrs. Obama


as having gone through an evolu-
tion from struggle to fulfillment in
her role at the White House but all
the while an "unrecognized force" in
pursuing the president's goals.
She is seen publicly as the friendly
and popular face of the softer side of
the White House, the one readingto
school kids or promoting exercise as
a means to reduce child obesity.
According to Kantor, early in 2010
as the president's health care agenda
seemed in danger of collapsing,
Mrs. Obama let it be known she was
annoyed by how the White House
was handling the strategy. After
media reports indicated Emanuel
was unhappy pursuing the health
care overhaul, Emanuel offered to
resign, Kantor wrote. The president
declined the offer.
By that spring, however, Kantor
writes that Mrs. Obama "made it
clear that she thought her husband
needed a new team, according to her
aides."
Among the book's most provoca-
tive anecdotes, Kantor recounts a
scene in which Gibbs, frustrated
after tamping down a potential public
relations crisis involving the first
lady, exploded when presidential
adviser Valerie Jarrett told him the
first lady had concerns about the
White House response to the flap.

Sheen's ex-wife does
not want to be filmed
ASPEN, Colo. Attorneys for
Charlie Sheen's ex-wife have pre-
vailed in keeping a celebrity-news
website from airing her appearance
in a Colorado courtroom on drug
and assault charges.
The Aspen Times reports that a
Pitkin County judge has denied a
request from TMZ to air the Jan.
23 proceeding for Brooke Mueller.
District Judge Gail Nichols said the
live courtroom feed would "unduly
detract from the solemnity, deco-
rum and dignity of the court"
TMZ petitioned the court last
month to access Mueller's first
court appearance, where she is to


answer to a felony charge of posses-
sion of cocaine with intent to dis-
tribute and a misdemeanor assault
offense. Aspen police arrested the
* 34-year-old on Dec. 3 after a woman
reported being assaulted at a night-
club.

Ex-Chronical editor
Bronstein leaving Hearst
SAN FRANCISCO Former San
Francisco Chronicle Editor Phil
Bronstein has announced his resig-
nation from Hearst Newspapers, the
San Francisco Chronicle reported
Friday.
Bronstein, 61, who has served
as editor at large for the past four
years, will move into an unpaid
role with the nonprofit Center for
Investigative Reporting in Berkeley,
where he is president of the board,
the newspaper reported.
Bronstein had worked as a news-
man in San Francisco for 31 years,
joining the then-Hearst-owned San
Francisco Examiner as a reporter in'
1980.
During his career, he worked as
an investigative reporter, then as a
foreign correspondent His cover-
age of the fall of Philippine dictator
Ferdinand Marcos in 1986 was a
finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.
In the 17 years he worked as an
editor for the Chronicle, Bronstein
oversaw the newspaper's investiga-
tion into the Bay Area Laboratory
Co-Operative, or BALCO, a steroids
distribution ring. He also guided the
paper through its expansion into the
Internet age, and through belt-tight-
ening as the newspaper industry ran
into financial troubles.
He made headlines himself when
he married actress Sharon Stone
in 1998. Bronstein was in the news
again in 2001 when a Komodo drag-
on bit his toe during a private tour
at the Los Angeles Zoo, then again
when he and Stone divorced in 2004.
Bronstein left the editor's office
in 2008 but remained as The
Chronicle's executive vice president
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Former Independent
Counsel Lawrence E.
Walsh is 100.
Actor-comedian Larry
Storch is 89.
Broadcast journalist
Sander Vanocur is 84.
M CBS newsman
Charles Osgood is 79.
Singer Shirley Bassey
is 75.
Game show host Bob


Eubanks is 74.
Country-gospel singer
Cristy Lane is 72.
Physicist Stephen
Hawking is 70.
Rock musician Robby
Krieger (The Doors) is 66.
Rock singer David
Bowie is 65.
Singer R Kelly is 45.
Actress Sarah Polley
is 33.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fa. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakectyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 7555440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Daily Scripture

"Follow God's example, there-
fore, as dearly loved children
and walk in the way of, love,
just as Christ loved us and gave
himself up for us as a fragrant
offering and sacrifice to God."

Ephesians 5:1-2 NIV
















Local man seriously hurt in Live Oak crash


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn


SUWANNEE COUNTY -A Lake City
man was seriously injured Thursday night
when he was ejected from his vehicle after
failing to negotiate a curve on a Suwannee
County road, according to the Florida
Highway Patrol.


Chris Samson, 39, was taken to an area
hospital for treatment of injuries he suf-
fered in the single vehicle crash.
The crash occurred at 10:47 p.m. at
the intersection of County Road 137 and
County Road 252.
According to Florida Highway Patrol
reports and information from FHP trooper
Mitchell Gill, Samson was traveling north
on County Road 137 in a 2007 Chevrolet


Corvette when he failed to negotiate the
curve and ran off the right side of the
roadway. Samson crossed a private drive-
way, which caused his vehicle to become
airborne. The vehicle then struck several
small trees, overturned onto its left side
and came to rest on the north shoulder
of the roadway. Gill said Samson was not
wearing his seatbelt and was ejected from
the vehicle in the crash. Alcohol was not a


factor, Gill said.
Samson suffered serious injuries and
was taken to Lake City Medical Center for
treatment.
Samson was cited for careless driving,
Gill said.
S"He was going around a curve, lost con-
trol and wrecked," Gill said.
Information on the crash was not avail-
able from FHP until Saturday.


BIRDS: Halfway to winter home, plane runs afoul of federal regulators
Continued From Page 1A


the group's small, open plane
with its rear propeller and bird-
like wings falls under. FAA regu-
lations also prohibit sport aircraft
- which are sometimes of exotic
design from being flown to
benefit a business or charity.
The rules are aimed, in part,
at preventing businesses or
charities from taking passengers
for joyrides in sometimes risky
planes.
'That's a valid rule. They
shouldn't be hired to do that.
But it wasn't written, I believe,
to stop a wildlife reintroduction,"
Joe Duff, an Operation Migration
co-founder and one of its pilots,
said. The conservation group has
agreed voluntarily to stop flying
and has applied to FAA for a
waiver.
"We're considering that
waiver," FAA spokesman Lynn
Lunsford said. He said he didn't


know when a decision would be
made or whether it would be
made before spring, when the
birds would return to Wisconsin.
'The same regulations that
we're applying to these pilots we're
applying to everybody who holds
that type of (pilot) certificate,"
Lundsford said. "The regulations
are very clear and anyone who is
a pilot holding that certificate is
expected to know what the duties,
privileges and limitations are."
Operation Migration is part
of a U.S.-Canadian partnership
of government and private orga-
nizations trying to re-establish
migrating flocks of whoop-
ing cranes. The cranes nearly
became extinct, dwindling to only
15 birds in 1941. One flyway has
already been re-established, but
that flock of over 100 birds is
vulnerable to extinction should a
disaster strike, Duff said.


The grounded birds are part of
the organization's 10-year effort
to re-establish an Eastern flyway
that disappeared in the late 1800s
when the last whooping cranes
flying that route died off, he said.
Since there were no birds still
flying the route, conservationists
had to teach young cranes how to
make the journey.
The birds are bred and hatched
at the Patuxent Wildlife Research
Center in Maryland. A small group
of conservationists in baggy bird
suits that conceal their human fea-
tures are the first thing the birds
see when they begin pecking their
way out of their shells. The conser-
vationists also give the birds their
first nourishment, thus imprint-
ing themselves as "parent." The
first thing they hear is a recording
of a crane's brood call combined
with the purr of the small plane's
engine.


The birds are later transferred
to a wildlife refuge in Wisconsin,
where they are conditioned to fol-
low the baggy-suited humans and
purring plane. By fall, they are
ready to begin a 1,285 journey
from Wisconsin to two wildlife
refuges in Florida. The cranes
glide behind the plane, surfing
on the wake created by its wings.
The pilots are dressed in the
same baggy white suits and have
a fake bird beak attached to one
arm, adding to the illusion that
the plane is a bird.
It's a slow trip, primarily
because of the plane's limitations.
No flying on windy or rainy days.
This year, one young whooping
crane took a wrong turn and
wound up spending a few days
with some sandhill cranes in wet-
lands before being herded back
to the flock. Rain kept the flock
on the ground 16 days in Illinois.


Then, just before Christmas,
FAA officials told Operation
Migration that they had opened
an investigation of possible viola-
tions. The birds are now safely
penned in Franklin County, Ala.,
while conservationists await a
decision on their waiver request.
If the waiver doesn't come
through, "the only option we can
think of as a contingency would
be to transport them by ground
to release sites in Alabama or in
Florida," said Peter Fasbender,
a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
field supervisor in Green Bay,
Wis., which is part of the partner-
ship to re-establish the cranes.
But Fasbender says he's con-
fident the young cranes will
make it back to Wisconsin in the
spring. Once they meet up with
other cranes making the journey,
he said, they usually don't have a
problem.


SESSION: Redistricting expected to dominate legislative agenda
Continued From Page 1A


R-Inverness, will introduce
legislation on behalf of
the three counties in the
upcoming session prohib-
iting water districts from
granting permits that could
adversely impact another
water district.
Porter said the electric
authority has already hired
two lawyers in an attempt
to block the proposed leg-
islation.
The state will continue
wrestling with the budget
shortfall estimated at more
than $2 billion this year.
Porter said she and other
elected officials will look
for more ways to cut spend-
ing without impacting the
safety of residents.
"We'll just have to keep
looking for the little lux-
uries and put the money
where it's needed," she


said. "If we look hard
enough, we can find ways
to reduce spending."
One way to save money
and support local business-
es is to overturn a policy
requiring state employees
to get medical prescrip-
tions from out-of-state com-
panies by mail.
She said the first 90-day
prescription can be poten-
tiallycostlybecausepatients
often have an adverse reac-
tion ard require a different
medication.
The rule also harms
local, independent pharma-
cies which are struggling
for business, she said.
Mail-order prescriptions
can also easily be stolen
from mail boxes.
A solution is to allow
local pharmacies to fill pre-
scriptions if their prices are


comparable to the mail-
order companies, she said.
"They at least need the
opportunity to compete,"
she said.
She also wants to help
bring jobs to the region by
helping an unnamed com-
pany start a business at
the North Central Florida
Catalyst Site off U.S. 90,
just east of the Lake City
Airport.
If the business reaches
an agreement with the
county, the project would
include a $150 million capi-
tal investment at the site
and create 50 jobs with an
average salary of $50,000.
A second support business
would also come to the site
and employ about 30 peo-
ple with an average salary
of about $70,000 a year.
Porter said she.supports


construction of a rail spur
that would cut through
the Osceola Forest to the
Catalyst Site. She said the
U.S. Forest Service is balk-
ing at approving a permit
request to build the spur
over environmental con-
cerns, including how the
construction of the rail line
through the forest would
iffmpact ie n idange red .ed


CHURCH: Built in the 1930s
Continued From Page 1A


cockaded woodpeckers.
"East to west, the forest
is already cut in half," she
said. "We just keep getting
these roadblocks from the
forest service. The U.S.
Forest Service is complete-
ly out of touch with what
we want to do."
Porter said she plans to
contact federal officials to
see what she i'ani do to
i.. .. .. 11 1, .F,


get the rail spur approved
because it is a key compo-
nent to the creation of arn
inland port at the Catalyst
Site.
"It's my job and goal to
get some good jobs here,"
she said. "You have to pull
out all the stops. It's frus-
trating and discouraging,
but I'm not going to stop."


tant chief. "They utilized
our ladder truck. Due to
the proximity of all the
high voltage power lines
that were right here at
the corner they couldn't
approach the church. For
their safety, they extin-
guished the fire with the
ladder truck."
Units from the Columbia
County Fire Department
were on the other side of
the building spraying the
flames with their water del-
uge gun, as two hydrant
lines were used to supply
water to battle the blaze.
'We attacked it from both
sides because we couldn't
approach it," Armijo said.
After the blaze was extin-
guished, firefighters began
a search of the building for
possible victims.
'We have been told the
church was non-operation-
al and we were looking for
if someone had been in
there, any transients trying
to stay warm," Armijo said.
The wood-framed church
was destroyed in the blaze.
Four hours after the
blaze, firefighters remained
at the scene, sifting through
debris and rubble-looking
for possible victims.
"It's going to be an
extended mop-up," Armijo
said, noting a state fire
marshal was heading to the
scene as well as:
Three units from the
Lake City Fire Department
responded to the scene
with two administrative
staff members, as well as
four units from the coun-


ty fire department and
a member of the county
fire department's admin-
istrative staff. Lifeguard
Ambulance Services also
had an emergency unit at
the scene.
Washington Street was
closed from the intersec-
tion of Broadway Street to
Patterson Street because
debris from the church was
on the roadway and strewn
about the nearby area.
Firefighters cordoned


off the scene and waited
for ATF agents to arrive.
ATF agents were called to
the scene as part of the
protocol where a church
has been vandalized or
destroyed, Armijo said.
The church was built in
the 1930s and last used
about five years ago.
Nearly 60 homes were
without power for more
than seven hours as a
result of the fire.


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I


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY. JANUARY 8, 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Sunday, January 8, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


ONE


ONE
OPINION


By the

rich, for

the rich

The worst develop-
ment by far in the
2012 presidential race
is the emergence of
powerful super PACs
that heavily influenced the Iowa
Republican caucuses through a
barrage of vicious attack ads.
Our political system increas-
ingly responds to the rich and
powerful, but the trend has
steepened since the most recent
presidential election largely
thanks to the Supreme Courts
abominable decision striking down
the McCain-Feingold campaign
regulation with the bizarre finding
that corporations have the same
rights to make political donations
as individuals. Mitt Romney's
slim victory in Iowa may well be
a result of the blistering, virtually
anonymous $4 million campaign
waged against Newt Gingrich by
the' socalled independent super
political action committee Restore
Our Future, which is controlled
by close political and personal
associates of Romney. Less than a
month before the Iowa caucuses,
Gingrich was the front-runner in
the polls, but he finished a distant
fourth Tuesday.
At the time of the court ruling
a year ago, Gingrich called it "a
great victory for free speech."
However, he spent Wednesday
bashing Romney and the system
that worked to his advantage.
Former conservative presidential
candidate Mike Huckabee joined
the chorus Wednesday, calling
super PACs "one of the worst
things that ever happened in
American politics."
Its impossible to eliminate
money's influence on politics,
but liberals and conservatives
now can witness the damage
the Supreme Court ruling will
wreak. Congress has to work
on new laws to create a political
system that is at least closer to
being fair.
Congress needs to rein in
huge, destructive donations by
wealthy individuals, organiza-
tions and corporations that now
can anonymously wield extreme
influence on elections. The
fallout from Citizens United is
as damaging to the public trust
as it is to some party leaders,
as Gingrich now famously has
learned.
* San Jose Mercury News

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
:This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work. ,
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


ot them lowdown,
after Christmas
blues
The decora-
tions have been
put away and the last of the
fruitcake has been eaten. All the
ringing, singing great cheer has
fallen silent. Bing Crosby and
Frank Sinatra's wisecracking
Christmas album has been put
back in the racks for another
year and the kids and grandkids
have gone back to their own
homes. It's so quiet around here
that I can hear the.fireplace logs
popping in the next room.
Pop, pop, pop. I've got them
dirty, low-down after-Christmas
blues.
I should've seen this coming.
The same thing happens every
year, you know. I get all caught
up in the razzle-dazzle merri-'
ment and spirit of the season
and forget that it doesn't go on
forever. Somehow, every year,
I manage to delude myself into
believing that this is the year
that will be different. This will
be the year we start celebrat-
ing the holiday season around
Thanksgiving and go right on
celebrating well into January, or
even February somehow.
One winter when I was a
young man in the Navy, we spent
the entire holiday period in a
Spanish resort city because the
skipper wanted to reward us for
all the hard work and the sacri-
fice of being away from our fami-
lies back home. I've never seen
such a celebration. The Spanish
people celebrate Christmas right
up to January 6, the Feast of the
Epiphany, also known as the
Feast of the Three Kings.
Talk about a treat. In Spain
you get not only the weeklong
celebration between Christmas
and New Year's Day, but


f it hasn't already, your
cellphone service provider
will soon notify.you that it
has hooked up with a new
government emergency
system that will send direct
text messages to alert you to
missing kids, impending bad
weather and, most ominously,
word from the president about a
national cataclysm.
If you would rather not be
bothered with AMBER alerts
and flash-flood warnings, you'll
be able to opt out But if you
don't like the idea of being
directly connected to the White
House, you're out of luck.
The rules of the Commercial
Mobile Alert System ordered
by Congress in 2006 and
developed by the Federal
Communications Commission
and the Federal Emergency
Management Agency make it
mandatory that you receive the
presidential message on your
phone, and, in the future, other
devices as well.
This is not sitting well with
those who view the federal gov-
ernment with distrust In their
eyes, this is a ploy by the feds to


Joe Palmer
treysurflcomcostnet

another whole week until the
Epiphany. It's like Mardi Gras.
The laughter and partying and
merrymaking seems like it'll go
on forever. It's a big deal.
Here, it's Christmas and
New Year's and then blammo
- the doldrums of winter with
nothing in between. It's not like
we don't have the Feast of the
Epiphany on our calendars. We
do. Problem is, with the excep- '
tion of a few religions in this
country, we don't observe it.
And that's too bad. We're miss-
ing a great opportunity to make
the holiday season last a little
bit longer before cruel January
and February blows their cold'
breath into our faces.
So now here we are already
two weeks out from Christmas
and a week into the New Year
and I catch myself wondering,
where in the heck did it go so
fast this time? Maybe it's just
part of getting older, this inward
looking and pondering about
holidays past in which I've
been engaged these past few
days. After all, there are exactly
the same number of days
between Christmas Eve and
New Year's Eve and Christmas
Day and New Years Day and
Thanksgiving and Christmas as
there ever were, aren't there?
Well, aren't there?
Then why does it seem to go
by so quickly with each passing


Lisa Hoffman
lisohoffman@shns.com


"implement a centralized system
of control over all communica-
tions," as Paul Joseph Watson
has warned on infowars.com.
**
A mystery that continues to
puzzle U.S. government officials
is when, if ever, any of the tons
of detritus washed out to sea
by Japan's tsunami will hit the
U.S. Pacific coast and, if any
does, how much debris will be
deposited.
Scattered reports of bottles,
metal containers and floats used
in oyster-harvesting bearing
writing in Japanese have been
surfacing in the past couple of
weeks in the Pacific Northwest
and Northern California, but
experts are unsure if the items
are tsunami-related or just the


year? It must have something
to do with the aging process.
That's the only thing I can think
of. Ask any kid and he will tell
you it seems like forever to him.
Maybe that's because when
we're young we still have so
much to look forward to. So
much of our world lies before
us like unopened Christmas
packages when we're children.
The world is a great big shiny
bauble on a fresh cut tree and
it fills our senses and fires our
imaginations. Santa Claus lives
at the North Pole and the day
after he delivers toys to boys
and girls all over the world, he's
back home in his cozy work-
shop with his legions of elves
getting ready to do it all over
again.
Christmas never ends at the
North Pole, only here among
us where the big shiny bauble
becomes tarnished and the nee-
dles on the tree dry out and fall
on the carpet like bitter drops
of rain.
Each year, my wife and I
watch The Polar Express. The
narrator is a lad who doubts the
magic of Christmas. He and a
bunch of other kids are whisked
away on a mystical train to the
North Pole on Christmas Eve.
The gift he takes home is one of
Santa's sleigh bells. As long as
he believes in Santa Claus and
the magic of Christmas, he can
hear the bell ring, even into his
old age, where the story ends.
I love that story. It brings
out the child in me every year
when we watch it And then two
weeks out from Christmas, I'm
feeling bluesy and depressed.
Maybe I just don't believe
enough.

a Columnist Joe Palmer lives in
Fernandina Beach.


usual flotsam from ocean-going
ships and fishing boats.
The Japanese government esti-
mated that the March earthquake
and tsunami created 25 million
tons of rubble pieces of build-
ings and their contents, lumber,
vehicles of all kinds, household
appliances, TVs and other rem-
nants of life in the hard-hit region.
In September, a Russian sail- '
ing ship reported finding a mass
of debris about 2,000 miles
from Japan that was so huge it
took seven days to pass it But
the U.S. National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
noted Dec. 16 that no debris field
is now visible via satellite, thanks
to the dispersal of the detritus by
winds and ocean currents.
One scientific model predicts
some debris could approach the
U.S. West Coast and Canada in
2013.
But NOAA official Holly
Bamford told Congress Dec. 15
that the scale of the tsunami and
the devastation it caused has left
scientists largely at sea about
what is to come.

a Scripps Howard News Service


ANO
VI


THEIR
E W


Justice


Dept.'s


political


action


The Justice
Department has
been empowered
to use millions of
dollars intended
to go to victims of racial
discrimination to enrich
pressure groups with close
White House ties. It's another
revelation of the means the
Obama administration is
using to divert funds to politi-
cal cronies.
Information obtained by
the public interest group
Judicial Watch has exposed
the details of this latest shady
deal. On Dec. 28, the United
States District Court for the
Central District of California
issued a consent order in
the case of the United States
v. Countrywide Financial
Corporation et al. Under
the terms of the settlement,
Countrywide will pay $335
million to 200,000 blacks and
Hispanics who took out home
loans between 2004 and 2008.
The Justice Department claims
they were charged higher
interest rates than white
borrowers not because of
poor credit scores but solely
because of their race. The
payment is intended to "com-
pensate allegedly aggrieved
persons for monetary and
other damages they may have
suffered."
The aggrieved parties may
not be the only beneficiaries
of this substantial payout.
According to the terms
of the consent order, any
money not distributed with-
in two years will be given to
"qualified organizations that
provide services including
credit and housing counsel-
ing, financial literacy and
other related programs tar-
geted at African-Americans
and Hispanics." This could
include "non-profit com-
munity organizations that
provide education, counsel-
ing and other assistance to
low-income and minority
borrowers ... ."
The trick of course is defin-
ing what organizations are
"qualified." This matter is left
to the Justice Department,
which admits there are no
particular guidelines govern-
ing who gets the handouts,
and no follow-up as to how
the money is actually being
spent. This is a shocking lack
of accountability, and the
practice of giving awards to
interest groups that weren't
parties to the original com-
plaint is an affront to the
American sense of justice.
Organizations beholden to
the Democratic Party and to
President Obama in particu-
lar stand to gain millions of
dollars, which could then be
shifted into use for political
purposes. It's another mani-
festation of the intentional,
institutional corruption of
American politics. The pub-
lic has been forced to fund
corporate handouts and
sweetheart deals to political
donors such as occurred in
the Solyndra loan debacle.
All these efforts are aimed at
propping up those in power
and seeking maximum bene-
fits for their friends. It comes
at the expense of working
Americans, the economy and
the legitimacy of the political
system.
The Countrywide deal is the
Justice Department's latest
contribution to reducing the
United States to the status of a
banana republic.


* Washington Post


4A


Got them lowdown,


after-Christmas blues


New: Alerts for cellphones











LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY. JANUARY 8. 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Jan. 8

134th church
anniversary
The New Mt. Pisgah
A.M.E Church, 345 NE
Washington St., church
family invites you to
share in our 134th
church anniversary on
Sunday Jan. 8 at 4 p.m.
The speaker will be the
Rev. Lantz Mills of New
Day Spring Day Church
and the theme is faith,
hope and love.

Ordination Service
Ordination Service for
Minister Al Nelson is to
be held Sunday January
8, 2012 @ 3pm.
Location, the Shiloh
Missionary Baptist
Church, Dr.
Dwight Pollock, Pastor.
Please come share with
us.


Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 8,
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library:
Dante Amodeo, author
of Saban and the Ancient
Dante Amodeo was born
in New York and raised
on a farm. He moved to
Florida as a teenager
and now lives in
Jacksonville Beach. His
book, Saban
and the Ancient was
awarded first prize in
the action/adventure
category by
POW (Promoting
Outstanding Writers),
and his first script was
made into the
2010 NBC made-for-
television movie Secrets
of the Mountain.
http://
www.danteamodeo.com/


Jan. 9

Women's Cancer
Support Group.
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of
Lake City will meet at
Baya Pharmacy East,
780 SE Baya Drive
from 5:30 to 6:30 PM
on Monday, January
9, 2012. Our guest
speaker, Dr. Paul G.
Goetowski, Community
Cancer Center, will be
discussing "Women's
Cancer in 2012".
Information at 386-752-
4198 or 386-755-0522.

Jan. 10
Historical Society
meeting
The Columbia County
Historical Society will
have its quarterly
meeting on Tuesday,
January 10 at 7:00 p.m.
at the downtown library.
Guest speaker will be
Olustee re-enactor Cody
Gray. The meeting is
free and open to the
public. For details
contact Sean McMahon
at 754-4293



Jan. 11

Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon
The regular meeting
of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be held at 11:00
a.m. on Wednesday, Jan.
11th at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a


fun day.

Jan. 12

Lake City Garden
Club


The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its
monthly meeting at
10 a.m. on Thursday,
January 12 at the Club
House (formerly the
Woman's Club). Coffee
will be served at 9:30.
The program will be
"History of Alligator
Lake Park" by James
Montgomery. Visitors
are welcome to attend.

'Preserving Traditions
of DAR'
The Edward Rutledge
Chapter, Daughters
of the American
Revolution, will meet
on Thursday, January
12, 2011, 10:30 a. m.,
at the Senior Service
Center, 28 SE Allison
Court. Beth Wilson
will be speaking on
"Preserving Traditions
of DAR". Guests are
always welcome. For
further information, call
752-2903.



Jan. 13

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan.
13 at 7 p.m. until. For
ticket info contact Chris
Mirra at 386-623-3611 or
Dennis Murphy at 386-
697-3739.
Jan. 14
North Florida Writers
Group meets

Love to write? From
novice to published
author, the North
Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is,
the place where local
writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire.
Writers of any
experience level from
the area are welcome'
to join us Saturday,
January 14, 2012,
2pm 4pm, at the
ColumbiaCounty Public
Library, Main Branch,
308 NW Columbia
Avenue, Lake City, FL
32055. Join us Saturday
and see what we are all
about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so
please reserve your spot
today!.
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Leader,
(386) 438-3610.
Email inquiries to:
editor@afinaldraft.com

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.


Hospice Chili Cook-
off
The Third Annual
Branford Chili Cook-
Off to benefit children
and families served by
Herry's Kids Pediatric
Services will be held
on Saturday, January 14
from 11 a.m. 2 p.m. at
Hatch Park located on
Craven Dr. in Branford.
The event will include
a silent auction, games,
a bounce house for
' the kids, live DJ, door
prizes, antique car show,
thrift store items for
sale, and all the chili
you can eat. There
will be a five dollar
admission to the event.
In order to register
to be a contestant
call 386-755-7714.
Hospice of the Nature
Coast, is a program
of Hospice of Citrus
County, Inc., licensed
in 1985. To learn
more about hospice
services call 386-755-
7714 or visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org.

Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program

On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this
memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
lives forever in our
hearts. Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 .
m, at Trinity United
Methodist Church.
Glynnell Presley,
Secretary
John F. Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO


Revival

Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with
Rev. Jay Walden Jan. 13,
14, 15, 7 p.m. Sunday,
11 a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90
West to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.


Jan. 16


Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade

The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
presents the Grand
Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Parade,
Monday, January 16,
2012 at 10am. Line-
up will begin at the
DOT office at 9:00am.
For participation
and information call
Anthony Newton at
386.365.1470.


The MLK Worship
Service will follow
the parade at the New
Bethel Baptist Church
at 12:30p, Bishop Ron
Williams, II is the
speaker, Rev. Alvin
Baker, Pastor. Call
Audre' Washington at
386.344.9915 for more
information.
The MLK Classic will
feature a re-match
basketball game at
the Lake City Middle
School at 3:30pm
featuring Alumni
Women and Men's
players of CHS and
Suwannee. Call Mario
Coppock for details at
386.754.7095.


Jan. 17

Loss workshop
Eight Critical Questions,
an educational workshop
offering practical
tips to help cope and
move forward during
the new year will be
January 4 at 2 p.m.
located at the Wings
Education Center, 857
SW Main Blvd, (Lake
City Plaza). There is
no cost. For information
or to register, contact
Vicki Myers at 755-
7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-
642-0962. The Wings
Education Center is a
program of Hospice of
Citrus County, Inc./
Hospice of the Nature
Coast licensed 1985,
serving north central
Florida. Visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org for more
information.

Traffic safety meeting
The Columbia
Community Traffic
Safety will hold its first
meeting of the new year
on Tuesday, January 17
at 10 a.m. at the FDOT
Operations Complex,
710 NW Lake Jeffery
Road, in the Crew
Room. The Team works
on traffic hazards and
enforcement.issues in


Columbia County and
the public is welcome
to attend. Issues can be
called in to the FDOT
at 758-3714 or e-mailed
to Tres Atkinson, team
chair, at tres.atkinson@
columbiacountyfla.com
or to Gina Busscher,
team secretary, at gina.
busscher@dot.state.
fl.us The team is made
up of members of law
enforcement, emergency
services, engineering
and education.


Jan. 18

Olustee meeting


The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.


Jan. 19


Voices that Change

Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet
facility. Showtime is'at
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit
for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.


Jan. 20'.

Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical


twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.

communityconcerts.info.


Jan. 22


Bridal show

The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will-be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's
Bridal, Belk, Lake City
Florist and Design,
Glass Slipper Bridal,
The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices
are $7.00; Day of Event
$10.00. Tickets can be
purchased at the Holiday
Inn & Suites, 213 SW
Commerce Dr., Lake
City. For ticket sales or
vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386)
754-1411.


Riding club banquet


The Columbia County
Riding Club is having
its annual banquet Jan
22,2012, @lpm,@Mason

CALENDAR continued on 7A


Florida Tax Payers

please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous fallacy
of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia High
School, and Fort White High School students and alumni. All of them
are offspring of Adam and his female wife Eve and therefore are created
by God, in the image of God. (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1
End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1;
page 52 SC.912.L15.10

http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)

I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com

In The Year of our Lord 2011
Paid for by Kenny Merriken





SOUTMRN0

INTERNAL MEICINE
is pleased to announce the addition of

^^^^^^^ Lori eE~oteMSNARNP^^^
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^to our Practice.^^^^


Li_]


Accepting New Patients
Specializing in adult medical care including:
* Primary Care Arthritis
* High Blood Pressure Low Back Problems
* Heart Disease Full Dizziness,
" Lung Disease vertigo and balance
* Gastrointestinal diagnosis and
* High Cholesterol treatment
SDiabetes Optifast Weight
* Women's Health Loss System


Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation


386-719-25400.5


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY. JANUARY 8. 2012


TROOPER: Handler had written reprimand placed in personnel file
Continued From Page 1A


things about the way the animal was found
and its death that are hard to explain by
the animal having been in that kennel for
110 minutes."
Trooper's kennel was a six-foot tall, 10
by 10 chain-link fence with no covering or
roof and limited shade from nearby trees.
The dog did have water.
"For the animal to be found right at the
cage door was surprising, especially the
way it was found," Reisman said in the
report. "With both legs up against the
door, it's an odd position; if the animal
really died you wouldn't expect it to be
like that."
Reisman, who has testified as an expert
witness in 38 animal cruelty cases, said
rigor mortis usually takes "many hours" to
set in for an animal. However, he said, "the
body temperature of the dog was very hot,
so that's what would speed that process."
According to necropsy reports,
Trooper's body temperature was over 110
degrees during the procedure.
"Actually during the necropsy it was
almost burning my hand he was so hot,"
said Dr. Trysh Hamiltoh of Countryside
Animal Hospital in Gainesville, who per-
formed the necropsy.
The ambient temperature that day was
91.9 degrees, with a heat index of more
than 100, according to police.
"The environment you .would expect
to have an animal's body that hot would
have to be in a confined space, like a car,"
Reisman said in the LCPD report.
A forensic team at the University of
Florida examined Johns' police cruiser
and said it was "inconclusive as to whether
or not Trooper's death occurred in the
vehicle," according to the LCPD report.
"In addition to a lack of blood evidence,
there was no indication of frantic actions
(i.e. scratches to the walls or rubber floor-
ing). While there is no evidence indicating
the death occurred in the rear compart-
ment of the vehicle, it also cannot be ruled
out"
Johns' police cruiser contained a heat
alarm that, when activated, would auto-
matically lower the rear windows, start the
exhaust fan and ,set off the horn and siren
when the car reached a certain pre-deter-
mined temperature.
The UF report was incorporated into


the 251-page LCPD report released
Wednesday.
A month later police sought a second
opinion on the case.
Dr. Melinda Merck. a veterinary foren-
sic consultant who testified in the Michael
Vick dog-fighting case and has been pro-
filed on National Public Radio and in
People magazine, said one obstacle to cer-
tainty in the case was the necropsy, which
she deemed incomplete.
Merck, who co-founded a veterinary
forensic science training program at the
University of Florida, said the death scene
appeared "natural" and "unaltered."
She called heat stroke "a presumptive
cause of death, unfortunately, because
there was not a complete examination of
all vital organs to rule out anything else."
Merck did say heat stroke would be
more likely had the animal suffered a
previous such incident, which records
indicate may have occurred.

THE INDEPENDENCE
DAY INCIDENT

Trooper was left atVon-Seestadt Kennels
in Lake City while Johns was on vacation
in Savannah July 1-5, reports indicate.
One the facility's owners, Peggy Hickey,
said she believed Trooper suffered a heat
stroke on July 4.
She said around 9 p.mi.that day her
neighbors were setting off fireworks
or discharging firearms, which caused
the police dogs, trained to respond to
gunfire, to go "nut-so" and want to "go
play."
SWhen she went to check the dogs she
noticed vomit on the floor of Trooper's
kennel and that he was beginning to stag-
.ger and that his tongue was turning black
and his gums were turning dark purple,
the report indicates.
Hickey said she recognized the possible
symptoms of heat stroke and immediately
attempted to lower Trooper's temperature
by running water over his body with a
hose. Once she believed he had cooled
down, she placed him in an air-conditioned
ennel inside her home and 'turned a fan
on him.


The next morning Trooper appeared to
be fine, she reported.
When Johns came to get the dog the
next day, Hickey told him what had hap-
pened and Johns reported it to his supervi-
sor, Capt John Blanchard. Blanchard told
him to take the dog home and monitor
him, the report indicates.
Hickey, who has no formal education
regarding the care or training of animals
but who assists her husband, who is a cer-
tified trainer, in running a boarding kennel
and training facility for police dogs, told
Johns she did not seek medical treatment
for Trooper.
"I could have taken him to the vet and
they would have charged you about three
or four hundred bucks to keep him over
night and do exactly what I did," she said
when interviewed for the LCPD report.
Trooper was not seen by any veterinar-
ian regarding the July 4 incident, accord-
ing to the report.
Reisman, however, questioned whether
Trooper actually suffered a heat-related
incident on July 4.
"It is more likely that the dog had
some degree of noise phobia (fear/anxiety
related to loud noise such as thunder, fire-
'works, firecrackers, gunshots, etc. This
is certainly a possibility on July 4th. The
signs for noise phobia can include: pant-
ing, pacing, whining, howling, trembling,
hypersalivation, urination, and defecation.
Anxiety/fear to loud.noises can present as
a panic attack and cn be confused with a
heat related event."
Reisman. concluded that "an anxiety
attack due to noise is a more probable
cause of Trooper's health problem on
7/4/11."
At the end of his statement he added
that a Belgian Malinois such as Trooper
"may have a genetic predisposition to heat
stroke." However, he said, that theory is
unproven."

THE STATE ATTORNEY'S
POSITION

The Third Circuit State Attorney's office
declined prosecution upon review of an
initial report on Trooper's death.
"After reviewing all the facts submit-


ted to the office it is my opinion that the
state cannot prove criminal charges in this
case as required by law," Roberta Getzan,
assistant state attorney, wrote in a July 28
letter to LCPD investigator Smith. "The
approximate time of one and a half hour
when Trooper was left unattended would
not be unreasonably long to prove that it
was done in an inhumane or cruel man-
ner. This is just a tragic death of a canine
officer and not a criminal incident"
Getzen wrote that "if additional evidence
surfaces in this investigation that could
impace the decision in this case."
When contacted by phone Friday, Getzan
said the state attorney's office had not
been contacted concerning subsequent
findings, including claims by Reisman that
the death scene may have been staged.

TROOPER'S HANDLER
QUESTIONS FINDINGS


Johns' response to the LCPD report
came from the Florida Police Benevolent
Association.
On Nov. 29, Johns' PBA representative,
Rick Nelson, asked that Johns be exonerated
based on Merck's statement that heat stoke
could not be conclusively proven based on
what she called an incomplete necropsy.
In addition, Nelson said LCPD has an
inadequate written policy regarding: K-9
officers' fitness for duty standards; ken-
nels/housing for K-9 officers; administra-
tive supervision of the K-9 program.
Johns was cited for neglect of duty in
Trooper's death and a written reprimand
was added to his personnel file.
Johns was unavailable for comment for
this story.
Richard E. Stadler, assistant city attor-
ney for Lake City, wrote that while he
believed the investigation was thorough
and well-documented, due to "the lack
of K-9 specific policies and procedures
reasonable men could review this report
and draw different conclusions. However,
there is sufficient evidence to support the
conclusion that the K-9 officer died of heat
stroke, at least in part, because he was left
in an open kennel during the heat of-the
day."


LCPI ees gqyerin trent ofK-9 officers; changes said coming

ContinuedKomPae. ,


Trooper's death, Capt. Robert Smith
interviewed Lt.. Mark Wheeler of the
Tallahassee Police Department regard-
ing TPD's policies governing the
treatment and care of K-9 officers.
Wheeler, who became a K-9 handler in
September 1986, assisted in developing
the current TPD K-9 policy.
Wheeler said TPD's K-9 school cov-
ers various topics including .the effect of
heat on dogs.
"I wasn't there, but that's a lack of
common sense," Wheeler said when told
Trooper had been left in open sun.
Wheeler also viewed photographs of
Trooper's kennel.
"The location of that kennel is not even
good," he said. "Ninety percent of this is
the handler's responsibility. He should
have known better that this, should have
been trained better than this,,and whom--
ever his immediate supervisor is should
have gone out there and looked to see
where it was."
At the end of internal affairs report,
it was suggested LCPD adopt a uniform
code for K-9 kennels as well as for care
of the K-9 officers themselves.
"Using industry standards the Lake
City Police Department should develop
written procedures to detail how a police
K-9 dog kennel will be constructed, the


materials to be used in the construction
of the kennel, anid the proper mainte-
nance for cleaning and repairing of the
kennels," the report said. "Additionally,
the Lake City Police Department should
specifically identify who will be finan-
cially responsible (for) the cost of build-
ing the kennel. If the Lake City Police
Department does not bear the entire
burden of con-truction cost, the LCPD
should make reasonable effur ts to assist
in the cost."

HANDLER TRAINING

Larry Shallar is a Lake City Police offi-
cer and K-9 handler who recently received
his K-9 patrol certification.
He said it took nearly two years to get
certified, describing "intermittent" ses-
sions.
According to Shallar, LCPD does not
have an organized, structured K-9 train-
ing program and his training was "hit and
miss."
His description of the program: "If I
compared it to anybody else, it's way
behind times as far as instruction, as far
as the equipment and just the way it's
handled."
Shallar said he purchased the materials


himself to construct his kennels. His ken-
nel consists of a concrete slab surrounded
by a 6-foot chain-link fence.
Capt. John Blanchard, the LCPD K-9
instructor and trainer, said the city will
pay to .put a slab down and noted that's
something that's normally done for the
dogs. He said kennels are purchased on
a case-by-case basis and that he did not
approach LCPD Chief Argatha Gilmore
on Johns' behalf to pay for a kennel.
Blanchard said in past administrations
the policy was, "you either had to get it
yourself or beg for it and a lot of times it
was just as easy to do it yourself.''
The department does not have a policy
regarding how to or where to set up a
kennel.
Blanchard was shown a photograph
of Trooper's kennel and asked whether
it was a proper kennel for an LCPD K-9.
He responded "No," according to the
report.
The report also noted the department
does not have fit-for-duty standards for
its K-9s.
'The LCPD should seek the assistance
of a licensed veterinarian and develop a
fit-for-duty standard for animals," Smith
wrote in the report. "This document
should address medical issues and estab-
lish procedures to address these issues;


similar to standards already in place for
police officers having medical problems
and return to work procedures."
The LCPD K-9 program started some-
time before 1989. The department cur-
rently has one dog in use as a K-9 offi-
cer.
"It will probably take us a few weeks
to review all the policies," Blanchard
said of initiating, a comprehensive K-9
policy. "What we're doing is looking at
several other policies from other agen-
cies. We're going to tailor that specifi-
cally to our department. We're looking
to make sure that specific things are
covered in there which is not only
going to cover the dog's housing, fit
for duty standards as well as some of
the training."
Blanchard said the new policy will be
beneficial to the department.
"It takes away any doubt as to the
policy and procedure for care, custody
and control of the animal and how you're
supposed to utilize your partner out
there," Blanchard said.
He added, "Obviously there are some
things that we can do to improve our
care, custody and deployment of the K-
9s and that's exactly we we're going to
do especially with the policies."


Trooper, Johns together since 2010


By Tony Britt

Kevin Johns and Trooper were
certified in the detection of narcot-
ics.
Johns began his K-9 handler
training in February 2010, when
he applied for the position and was'
selected. His dog, Trooper, was
donated to the Lake City Police
Department by Susan Howard.
Johns said Trooper was given to
him personally and that he never
signed anything transferring owner-
ship. However the LCPD report into
Trooper's death said Chief Argatha
Gilmore reportedly told him in a
one-on-one meeting that Trooper
was the property of the City of Lake
City. The city paid Johns a supple-
mental allowance as a K-9 handler
and paid for Trooper's food and
medical care. However, Johns used
his own funds to build a kennel and
house Trooper.
K-9 Trooper was training to be
a dual-purpose dog patrol and
narcotics.


Blanchard said the training with
Trooper was not complete.
"He was. going through the
patrol apprehension part, which
can be up to around 500 hours,"
he said. "Trooper had completed
his narcotics training, which was
approximately 200 hours."
Blanchard said Trooper was
Johns' first (K-9) dog and his only
training with a K-9.
Blanchard was one of the train-
ers for Johns as Johns completed
his department certification to
become a K-9 handler. Blanchard
said there were several other peo-
ple involved in the training and
several other handlers would have
assisted in Johns' training.
There was a certification pro-
cess on the completion of Johns'
narcotics training where there
were two trainers and evaluators
who signed off on the training.
The other trainer and evaluator
working with Blanchard was John
Hickey of Von-Seestadt Kennels.
"It's not just one person's word


that the dog is suitable to go out
there and conduct these activi-
ties," Blanchard said.
Blanchard said initially Johns
was looking for a dog and the
department spoke with officer
Johns. as well as the woman who
was the prior owner to the dog,
that the dog would be donated
to the police department and the
owner of the dog would be the
City of Lake City.
He said city council members
voted on it and it was accepted
that the dog would be donated to
the City of Lake City.
Blanchard said it is not uncom-
mon for officers to have some
input on the dogs they get as K-9
handlers.
"With our agency, for quite a
few years, most of the dogs were
actually owned by the officers,"
he said. "It is very normal for the
agency to own the dog and in many
cases, they do try to manage the
dog with the handler."
i


oMBece


www.lakecityreporter.com


. -E- i I


---


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson@lakecityreporter.com.


CALENDAR con'tfrom 5A
City Community Center.
The club will have its
rides the 2nd and 4th
Sat. of each month. The
club will be hosting
Pleasure Shows this
year. Check our website
for all information. www.
columbiacountyriding
club.com.


Jan. 24

Friends of the Library
Author Program

Tuesday, January 24,
2012 at 7:00 pm at the
Main Library, sponsored
by Save Our Suwannee:
Cynthia Barnett, author
of Mirage: Florida and
the Vanishing Water of
the Eastern U.S.
and Blue Revolution:
-Unmaking America's
Water Crisis
Cynthia Barnett is an
award-winning journalist
and senior writer for
Florida Trend magazine.
She has a special
interest in
environmental history
and in 2004, spent a year
at the University
of Michigan as a Knight-
Wallace Fellow studying
freshwater supply. Ms.
Barnett will discuss
Florida's water crisis
and look at solutions
that have found success
in communities around
the
world. Don't miss this
timely program on a
topic so very relevant to
Columbia County and
North Central Florida.
Thank you to Save Our
Suwannee and Florida's
Eden for working with
the Friends of the
Library to bring you this
program.
http://www.
cynthiabarnett.net/


Builders AssociatioA
will hold a General
Council lunch at Guang
Dong starting at 11:30
a. m. on January 25.
Cost of lunch is $10
for members and $15
for non-members and
prices include tax and
gratuity. Speaker is
Dale Williams. After
the lunch an attorney
from Tritt/Anderson in
Jacksonville will hold
a short seminar (about
45 minutes) and he
will go over numerous
contracts, their wording,
etc. There is no charge
for this if you have
attended the CCBA
lunch. Reservations
are preferred call:
386-867-1998 or e-
mail: colcountybuild@ '
comcast.net.


Jan. 29


Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 29,
,2012 at 2:00 pm at the
Main Library:.
Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita
Nights and
Champagne
for Buzzards
Phyllis Smallman is
a Canadian who has
spent a lot of time in
Florida, the setting
for her award-winning
mystery series
featuring
sassy bartender,
Sherri Travis. A
former potter with a
lifelong love
of mysteries, Phyllis
divides her time
between her native
Ontario and
Sarasota. She will join
us livevia Skype for
this program.

,http://www.

phyllissmallman.com/:


Jan. 25


Building Assn. lunch
The Columbia County


Feb. 1


Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.

Feb. 4


Olustee Festival
Pageant
The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, February 4.
Ages 3-12 mos, 13mo-23
mo, 2-4, 5-6 and 7-9 will
be held at 4:00 pm at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be
held at 7:00pm. Winners
in each division will
receive a $50 savings
bond, crown, banner
and ride in the Olustee
parade on February
14. The runners up
in each division will
receive a large, trophy
and all contestants
will receive a trophy
for their participation.
The winner of the
Miss Olustee title (age
16-20) will receive
a $500 educational
scholarship, 1st runner
up a $300 scholarship
and the 2nd runner
up a $200 scholarship.
Entertainment will
be provided by The
pageant is open to the
public with admission
at the door: $5.00
adults and students.
Pre-schoolers are
free. Applications
are available at the
Columbia County
Library or Chamber of
Commerce. Deadline
for entries is 1-23-2012.
For more information
you may contact pageant
director, Elaine Owens,
at 386-965-2787.


Feb. 8


Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.
Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program
Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookmat University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.

Valentine's Day Ball

1st Annual "Valentine's
Day Ball" presented by
the Rotary Club of Lake
City.
Saturday, February 11,
2012 6pm-10pm.
The Country Club of
Lake City
Cocktails, Dinner,
Dancing with
entertainment by
"Harry, Sally & Billy"
Cash Bar Dress is
Black-Tie optional
Tickets are $50 each
($100 per couple) and
are available at the
Lake City Reporter, The
Wheeler Agency, Hunter
Printing, First Street
Music,
Parks-Johnson Agency
on Hwy 90 West or call
752-0812 or 965-0298
Gentlemen...BE A
HERO...bring her to the
"Valentine's Day Ball!"'



Feb. 25


Community Concerts

The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3
p.m. Feb. 25 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. This elite
singing ensemble from
the University of North
Florida performs world
music, vocal jazz, and
other choral gems.
Each singer is chosen
by audition for solo-
quality excellence and
enthusiasm. Award-
winning director Cara
Tasher has served
around the world
as chorus master,
guest conductor,
clinician, and soprano
soloist. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.



March 7

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is having a Wrap-up
meeting 5:30 p.m. March
.7 at the Central Building
for the Olustee Festival
2012. The building is
located at 409 SW St.
Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.

March 9

Community Concerts

Carpe Diem String
Quartet performs 7:30
pm March 9 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Carpe Diem plays their
classical string quartet
repertoire as well as
Gypsy, tango, folk, pop,
rock & jazz. Their 2009
album was Grammy
listed for Best Classical
Album, Best Chamber
Music Performance,
Best New Artist, and
SBest Engineered Album-
Classical. We believe
that their electrifying
style will keep you
engaged from beginning


to end. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.

May 20'

Community Concerts
The Jacksonville
Symphony Orchestra
performs 3 p.m. May 20
at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. The full
Jacksonville Symphony
Orchestra presents
a rousing "Patriotic
Pops Spectacular"
program featuring
popular works by John
Williams, Gershwin,
Bernstein, Berlin,
Sousa, and other season
favorites. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
comunityconcerts.info

ONGOING

Flag football tryouts

Flag Football, Christ
Central Sports.
Registration now thru
January 13. Age 5-12.
Fee: $40. Call Ronnie for
more info 386-365-2128.


Boys Club winter
program


The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program,,which runs
though March 1. Fees
are $175, which includes
transportation from all
:elementary and junior
high schools.
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts and.crafts,
gamerooms ad special
events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutorial
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
:available,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones
Way.


Signature updates are

due at elections office


Signature updates must
be received by the elec-
tions office no later than
the start of canvassing of
absentee ballots which
begins on January 25, 2012
at 1 p.m. per Florida Statute
98.077(4)
If your signature does not


match what is on file your
absentee or provisional
ballot will not count.
For more informa-
tion 'contact the office
of Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections
Liz P Home at (386) 758-
1026.


CITY COUNCIL MEETING


THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA WILL
MEET ON MONDAY, JANUARY 9,2012 AT 7:00 P.M. IN THE COUNCIL
CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL AT
205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA

All interested persons are invited to attend.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk




NOTICE OF JOINT MEETING OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE
AND THE PLANNING AND ZONING BOARD TO BE HELD ON
TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2012 AT 5:30 PM, IN THE COUNCIL
CHAMBERS LOCATED ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL
AT 205 NORTH MARION AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.

THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING IS AS FOLLOWS:

Master Plan Review

All interested persons are invited to attend.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


0 SM
Can *yw



Weiht oss

Dr oprwl ei i


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY. JANUARY 8. 2012


THE WEATHER


NATIONAL FORECAST: A frontal boundary stretched across the southeastern United States
will be responsible for scattered showers and a few thunderstorms from eastern Texas to the:
Carolinas. Meanwhile. look for scattered snow showers to develop over parts of the Great
Lakes. High pressure over the Intermountain West will keep most of the western United
States dr) today.


I" --' ---
PARTLY H PARTLY.
CLOUDY SUNNY



HI 74 LO 47 HI175 LO- HI


ISOLATED


CHANCE


LOWERS S ) -STORMS


175 LO .


r.


e71/58
71/58


aosta
73/50 j

Tlaiassee Lake Cit
74/50 74/47
Gainesville .
PaanamC 74/48
72/59 Ocala


Tan
77/


MOSTLY
SUNNY


. l 71 LO HI 66 LO


I


a1so1rie
71/51


Daytona Beach
74J54


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesville
Jacksonville


75/50
5/50 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
77/54 73/58 Lake City
Miami
Ipa Naples
/54 West Palm Beach Ocala
74/65 Orlando
S Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 75/65 Pensacola
78/54 Naples Tallahassee
76/60 Miami Tampa
KeWet 76/66 Valdosta
ey'West* W. Palm Beach
77'67


Monday
76/60/pc
76/57/pc
76/66/pc
80/58/pc
76/49/pc
73/53/pc
78/69/pc
75/48/pc
76/67/pc
78/60/pc
76/51/pc
77/58/pc
70/61/pc
70/60/sh
72/53/pc
78/56/pc
73/52/pc
76/66/pc


Tuesday
76 6.3 r,:

78/69/pc
'. t 20:


73/56/pc
79/70/s



-5 56 :

-5, 'J, i
70/54/t
71/55/t
77/60/pc

- r9 p,


- - .v5&,~aa.&a~AmA. .ZZ.J.CZC..uICLC .ar~


TEMPERATURES SUN
High Saturday 74 Sunrise today 7:28 a.m.
Low Saturday 45 Sunsettoday 5:47 p.m.
Normal high 66 Sunrise tom. 7:28 a.m. MODEII
Normal low 42 Sunset tom. 5:47 p.m. 30 nitesto m
Record high 85 in 1923 T:a,
Record low 21 in 2010 MOON u .r,,-


PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


0.00"
0.06"
0.06"
0.72"
0.72"


Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


0
Jan.
9
Full


Jan.
16
Last


5:28 p.m.
6:45 a.m.
6:28 p.m.
7:31 a.m.


ir ili[, ,n ri -
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An exclusive
service
:. I .W ':t to
our readers
, \



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!' aeath rcorn


[i
;


'

Jan. Jan.
23 30
New First


wPZ ajrrcher


Forecasts, data and
graphics @ 2012 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 46/28/0
Albuquerque 50/25/0
Anchorage 7/1/.01
Atlanta 68/50/0
Baltimore 66/33/0
Billings 36/19/0
Birmingham 69/55/0
Bismarck 38/16/0
Bolse 39/28/0
Boston 59/30/0
Buffalo 47/41/0
Charleston SC 73/44/0
Charleston WV 60/50/.02
Charlotte 70/40/0
Cheyenne 37/17/0
Chicago 44/31/0
Cincinnati 53/35/0
Cleveland 46/37/0
Columbia SC 73/43/0
Dallas 60/45/0
Daytona Beach 73/44/0
Denver 37/23/0


HI/Lo/W
38/20/pc
39/24/sf
15/-1/c
63/49/sh
48/38/pc
45/34/pc
64/54/t
41/26/pc
41/23/s
42/25/s
35/30/pc
64/53/pc
45/31/s
53/42/c
36/21/s
41/35/pc
47/29/pc
37/31/pc
61/46/c
62/41/c
74/54/s
34/16/sf


D.C.


50s5




41 It-r 60ss



6241* 3/49 C




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76 66
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High: 820, Harlingen, Texas Low: 1, Stanley, Idaho


Saturday Today


CITY
Des Molnes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Uttle Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolls
Mobile
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
42/25/0
47/37/0
58/31/0
-20/-40/0
68/37/0
61/27/0
77/64/0
75/54/0
48/34/0
71/52/0
72/42/0
48/26/0
64/41/0
59/47/0
59/48/0
61/52/0
75/52/0
37/25/0
73/49/0
75/56/0
62/47/0
57/38/0


HI/Lo/W
45/28/c
37/29/pc
60/36/pc
-17/-32/sn
53/40/c
41/23/s
79/66/s
75/62/c
45/29/pc
72/56/t
71/51/pc
48/28/c
58/41/s
50/37/sh
71/46/s
55/44/sh
76/66/s
38/26/pc
71/56/c
74/59/c
43/31/s
47/35/c


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp.
40/22/0
72/44/0
62/34/0
66/46/0
51/46/0
41/25/0
45/37/0
70/39/0
38/17/0
43/23/0
69/43/0
63/35/0
52/36/0
35/32/.25
72/48/0
58/55/0
61/41/0
41/37/0
31/25/0
72/54/0
71/43/0
68/36/0


HI/Lo/W
46/27/c
77/54/s
47/33/s
64/42/pc
40/27/pc
39/19/s
46/38/pc
54/39/c
43/30/pc
46/21/s
53/33/s
60/32/s
47/29/pc
34/20/pc
72/55/c
70/45/s
57/44/s
53/43/pc
36/27/pc
77/54/s
61/36/s
48/36/pc


S in viis lar- in
'003. a rare ,. _1t

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. Appal:rar n mounr.
Lrin ridge sinilar
to a Criri,.,o even '-
along tne Ro:i';- i 1
Tr,, r,,rges ",,rtia F' _lll__l l|__l|Bm_ ___
uhis hireOrel .i
sas 72 rrpr, at I
-farrsonburg. -
Virginia.:
ji .ws- -


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a you want to avoid high closing costs...


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{Please call for other rates & terms). (Loans of $





CAMPUS



yJUSA
Membership i ope to ayo e Columbia andSuwnnee counties

Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwannee counties!'


1. Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum LTV of 70-%), and first mortgage position are required.
Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property insurance is required; flood and/or title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. Example: a 5100,000 loan
at 3.25% for 120 months would require 119 monthly payments of 5977.40 and one final payment of S96037, total finance charge of S 17,454.57; for a total of payments of S 117,287.57. The amount financed is 599,833.00 the APR is 3.285%.
APR=Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of 55 required. Mention this ad and well waive the S15 new member fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.


LENDER


Cit183SWBscomNorisDr. E.apsCllk 115
SprihiC n 0 W h.la 3097BSW College Rd.EastOcala
BmfiB fI I1 *' ^I 0ISI *


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/72/0
48/43/0
51/44/0
64/61/0
25/21/0
43/34/.22
88/63/0
64/48/0
37/25/0,
79/48/0
27/19/.08
59/54/0
84/75/0


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
8 Auckland
SBeling
SBerlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Td Stra o a y Toa,


Today
HI/Lo/W
85/67/pc
48/42/pc
52/42/s
70/67/r
37/14/s
41/36/sh
93/75/s
64/48/s
41/35/sh
79/63/pc
25/22/pc
68/60/c
86/75/pc


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nalrobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
54/39/0
79/72/0
52/45/0
59/30/0
68/41/0
25/18/0
37/34/0
77/63/0
81/55/0
63/55/0
27/21/0
88/73/0
54/45/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
55/40/sh
79/68/pc
50/44/pc
56/31/s
71/43/pc
19/9/s
33/29/sn
83/64/c
77/64/pc
62/48/pc
23/14/pc
89/77/t
4_ 42 pc,


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/75/0
57/37/0
80/70/.09
83/73/.17
81/57/0
34/12/0
88/77/0
77/59/0
64/45/0
48/39/0
45/36/0
43/37/0
36/30/.02


Today i
HI/Lo/W
80/73/t
58/40/s
83/73/sh
82/73/sh
82/56/s
32/21/pc
84/76/t
80/72/c
62/49/s
47/36/s
31/23/pc
40/36/sh
40/33/rs


)SING COSTS'
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ri


I-81-------------


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


,


--


KEY TO CONDITIONS: i .,lud. ,'j n-dr--i I= 1i,i, if ',..i,- r,-ri.y a. -1) [JI=i-r,,c= ,.I:, .], r= rain, s-sunny,
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
^rfc/5i c -eo ;e;'Te" *


SPORTS


Sunday, lanuary 8, 20 2


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS Suwannee takes


CHS SOFTBALL
Team tryout
set for Monday
Columbia High's
softball team tryout is
3:30 p.m. Monday at the
softball field.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.
ZUMBA
Free introduction
class offered
Instructor Sarah
Sandlin is offering a free
introduction to Zumba
kickoff class at 5:30 p.m.
Monday at Lake City
Skating Palace.
For details, call Sandlin
at 758-0009.
CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night
set for Monday
Columbia High
soccer has a fundraiser
from 5-8 p.m. Monday at
Moe's Southwest Grill.
For details, call (386)
288-4726.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the teacher's lounge.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Bradford
High, 6 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m. (boys-5)
Tuesday
Fort White High girls
basketball at Branford
High, 5:30 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer vs. Columbia
High, 7 p.m. (boys-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Wednesday
Fort White High girls
weightlifting at Santa Fe
High, 4 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Santa Fe
High, TBA
Columbia High girls
basketball at Wolfson
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball at Keystone
Heights High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling at Billy Saylor
Invitational in Live Oak,
TBA
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Lincoln High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer vs. Oak Hall
School, 7 p.m. (boys-5)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling at Billy Saylor
Invitational in Live Oak,
TBA
Columbia High
girls basketball at Union
County High, 5:30 p.m.
(JV-3)
Columbia High
boys basketball vs.
St. Augustine High,
7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


rematch against

Tigers, 73-54


Columbia's slow
start leads to loss
against rivals.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High came into
Saturday's rematch riding
a six-game winning streak
but a cold-shooting night
ended the Tigers run as
Suwannee came away with
a 73-54 victory.
Columbia fell behind
36-15 at the half after scor-
ing only nine points in the
first quarter.
The Tigers held Bulldogs'
star Jimmie Taylor III in
check during the first half
with no points, but Taylor
made the Tigers pay with
16 in the second half.


4


Columbia pulled within 12
points late in the fourth quar-
ter due to four three-point
shots from Tre Simmons
in the period. Simmons fin-
ished with 15 points.
Morris Marshall led the
Tigers with 16 points.
"We didn't shoot the ball
well, but we played hard,"
Columbia High coach
Horace Jefferson said. "We
had good looks, but had a
tough time creating our own
shots in the zone. That's
kind of been our nemesis.
I don't want to take any-
thing away from Suwanne,
however, because they're a
good team. Did they out-
play us? Maybe not, but
they out shot us tonight."
Columbia travels to
Robert E. Lee at 7:30 p.m.
on Tuesday.


named


Reporter file photos
LEFT: Columbia High's Darius Williams (2) attempts to help with a tackle of a Middleburg runner in a game played last season. Williams was named
honorable mention to the 6AAll-State team. RIGHT: Columbia High's Laremy Tunsil (77) blocks a Middleburg defender in a game played last season. Tunsil
earned first team All-State honors in 6A.


Dupree,
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Three local football play-
ers were named to All-State
football teams as Columbia
High's Laremy Tunsil and
Darius Williams and Fort
White High's Jonathan
Dupree and A.J. Legree
earned honors.
Tunsil led the group of
players with a first-team
honor in Class 6A at the left
tackle position.
"This will serve as moti-


Legree, T
ovation to keep me working,"
Tunsil said. "I have to give a
lot of credit to the guy that
lines up left of me Deonte
Crumitie. He's out there
helping me."
Tunsil was also sure to
thank his mom, Desiree,
for her help throughout the
season including transpor-
tation to practice.
Only a junior, Tunsil had
only one goal for his senior
season.
"Keep working," he said.
Tunsil has already been


BRANDON FINLEY Lake Cq Re&:'er
Columbia High head coach Brian Allen shows off new locker
room materials purchased this season for the Tigers' football
team.


invited to the U.S. Army All-
American Bowl next season
and will be a highly-touted
recruit
Legree was named first
team honors but was left
off the original list due to
omission.
"I got a call from Pete'
Thompson, a reporter in
Orlando," Fort White head
coach Demetric Jackson
said. "He let me know that
it was left off."
Legree committed to
Kentucky after his senior


Tigers have
newly-built shed
to store gear.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High head
coach Brian Allen wants
fans to know that the only
changes coming to the
Tigers' football program
aren't coming on the field.
Columbia reached the
second round of the play-
offs in Allen's first year and
he says some of that is due


season in which he finished
with 46 catches for 694
yards-and 12 touchdowns.
Legree caught six passes
for more than 100 yards
and scored a touchdown
in the Florida Athletic
Coaches Association 57th
Annual North/South All-
Star Football Classic.
Williams earned honor-
able-mention honors during
his senior season playing
cornerback for the Tigers.
He's looking at col-
leges such as Florida


to the help of the quarter-
back club and sponsors for
providing the equipment
needed for the coaching
staff to get the most out of
each of its players.
"It's helped some of our
success," Allen said. "We've
been able to provide basic
things that allow the coach-
es to develop each player at
their position."
Among the items pur-
chased this year were
speed machines, a JUGGS
machine (for wide receiv-
ers) and a renovation of the
locker room that included


International, FAMU and
Indiana to continue his play-
ing career.
"This is an honor that
comes from all the hard
work I put in the last four
years," Williams said. "God
gave me a talent and I
couldn't do it without the
players that line up beside
me, come to practice and
watch film."
Fort White's Dupree
was named to the Class 3A
STATE continued on 4B


new carpet, lockers and
storage containers.
"The corporate sponsors
and ads enabled us to get
the carpet addition to the
locker room," Allen said.
"I want to thank anyone
that had a part to do with
that job. It definitely helped
with the morale of the
program.
Allen believes in the long-
standing :. 11r'.il philopso-
phy of looking good, feeling
good and playing good.
He believes the addition
ALLEN continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tre Simmons (2) makes his way past defenders as he gets closer to the
basket during a game against Robert E. Lee High on Dec. 9.


All-State


unsil, Williams earn honor


MAllen gives thanks for new

=I equipment, locker room


Ill I
Ill I '














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. JANUARY 8 2012 Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN GoDaddy.com Bowl,
Arkansas St. vs. N Illinois, at Mobile.Ala-
GOLF
.9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Africa
Open, final round, at East London, South
Africa (same-day tape)
5:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Tournament of
Champions, third round, at Kapalua,
Hawaii
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
1:30 p.m.
CBS -Wisconsin at Michigan
5:30 p.m.
FSN -Arizona at Southern Cal
7:30 p.m.
FSN California at Oregon
NFL
I p.m.
FOX NFCAtlanta at N.Y. Giants
4:30 p.m.
CBS- AFC Pittsburgh at Denver
NHL
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP Detroit at Chicago
RODEO
2:30 p.m.
NBC PBR, Madison Square Garden
Invitational, at New York (same-day tape)
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
I p.m.
FSN Memphis at UTEP
3 p.m.
FSN -'Oklahoma at Texas A&M

Monday
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN BCS National Championship
Game, LSU vs.Alabama, at New Orleans
GOLF
4 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Tournament
of Champions, final round, at Kapalua,
Hawaii
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 West Virginia at UConn
(Hartford, Conn.)
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally, Copiapo to
Antofagasta, Chile (delayed tape)

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Saturday
Houston 31, Cincinnati 10
Detroit at Newy Orleans (n)
Today
Atlanta at NewYork Giants, I p.m.
Pittsburgh.at.Denv.er, 4;30.pj... -.
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
Atlanta, N.Y, Giants or New Orleans
at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh or Denver at New England,"
8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 15
Houston at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Detroit. Atlanta or N.Y. Giants at
Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.

College bowl games

New Mexico Bowl
Temple 37,Wyoming 15
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Ohio 24, Utah St. 23
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 32, San Diego
State 30
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20, FIU 10
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU 31 I, Louisiana Tech 24
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 56,Arizona State 24
Hawaii Bowl
Southern Mississippi 24, Nevada 17
Independence Bowl
Missouri 41, North Carolina 24
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl


YOUTH BASEBALL

Registration for
Lake City open

Lake City Columlia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
5-7 p.m. Friday and
Jan. 20, and 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday and
Jan. 21 at Southside Sports
Complex with a cost of $80.
Online registration is
available at www.lcccyb.com
for $75 plus a transaction
fee.
For details, call president
Tad Cervantes at 365-4810.

ADULT BASKETBALL
'The Rematch'

set for Jan. 16

The Lake City
Recreation Department
and Richardson
Community Center Annie
Mattox Park North, Inc.,
is hosting "The Rematch"
adult basketball games
between Lake City and
Live Oak players on
Jan. 16 at the Lake City
Middle School gym.
The women's game will
begin at.3:00 p.m.; the
men's game will begin


Purdue 37,Western Michigan 32
Belk Bowl
North Carolina State 31. Louisville 24
Military Bowl
Toledo 42,Air Force 41
Holiday Bowl
Texas 21, California 10
Champs Sports Bowl
Florida State 18, Notre Dame 14
Alamo Bowl
Baylor 67,Washington 56
Armed Forces Bowl
BYU 24,Tulsa 21
Pinstripe Bowl
Rutgers 27, Iowa State 13
Music City Bowl
Mississippi State 23,Wake Forest 17
Insight Bowl
Oklahoma 31, Iowa 14
Meinke Car Care Bowl
Texas A&M 33, Northwestern 22
Sun Bowl
Utah 30, Georgia Tech 27, OT
Liberty Bowl
Cincinnati 31 ,Vanderbilt 24
Fight Hunger Bowl
Illinois 20, UCLA 14
Chick-fil-A Bowl
Auburn 43,Virginia 24
TicketCity Bowl
Houston 30, Penn State 14
Capital One Bowl
South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
Outback Bowl
Georgia vs. Michigan State
Gator Bowl
Florida 24, Ohio State 17
Rose Bowl
Oregon 45,Wisconsin 38
Fiesta Bowl
Oklahoma State 41, Stanford 38, OT
Sugar Bowl
Michigan 23,VirginiaTech 20, OT
Orange Bowl
West Virginia 70, Clemson 33
Cotton Bowl
Arkansas 29, Kansas State 16

Saturday
BBVA Compass Bowl
SMU 28, Pittsburgh 6

Today
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

FCS championship

Saturday
Worth Dakota State 17, Sam Houston
State 6

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
Atlanta 102, Charlotte 96, OT
New Jersey 97,Toronto 85
NewYork 99,Washington 96
Philadelphia 96, Detroit 73
Indiana 87, Boston 74
Oklahoma City 109, Houston 94
Denver 96, New Orleans 88
Cleveland 98, Minnesota 87
Chicago 97, Orlando 83
Utah 94, Memphis 85
Phoenix 102, Portland 77
L.A. Lakers 97, Golden State 90
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Atlanta (n)
Charlotte at Indiana (n)
Miami at New Jersey (n)
New York at Detroit (n)
Oklahoma-City at Houston (n)
Toronto-at Philadelphia (n)
Denver at San Antonio (n)
New Orleans at Dallas (n)
Utah at Golden State (n)
Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Minnesota atWashington, I p.m.
Orlando at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Portland, 9 p.m.
Memphis at LA. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games



BRIEFS

promptly at 4:30 p.m.
Admission is $5. All
proceeds from this event
will go to support youth
sports programs in both
communities.
The Lake City Middle
School girls basketball
team will sell concessions.
The games are a part



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

IKDBAE _


@2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved,





AMESSE I


Minnesota at Toronto, 7 p-m.
Indiana at Philadelpha. 7 p-m.
Ad anta at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Chariotte at NewYork. 7:30 p.m-
Detroit at Chicago, 8 p.m.
New Orleans at Denver, 9 p.mrn

Tennessee 67, Florida 56

At Knoxville.Tenn.
FLORIDA (12-4)
Murphy 5-7 2-2 13, Young 4-9 4-7
12, Boynton 4-12 2-4 13, Walker 3-8
0-0 8. Beal 4-12 0-0 9, Rosario 0-0 0-0
0, Wilbekin 0-2 0-0 0.Yeguete 0-3 0-0 0,
Prather 0-3 1-2 I,Larson 0-00-0 0 0.Totals
20-56 9-15 56.
TENNESSEE (8-7)
Woolridge 1-4 0-2 2, Maymon 4-8
4-10 12, Richardson 2-3 2-2 7, Golden
4-8 2-2 12,Tatum 3-7 2-2 9, Makanjuola
0-0 0-0 0,Washpun 1-20-0 2, McBee 0-0
0-0 0, Hall 6-8 1-1 13, McRae 4-9 1-2 10.
Totals 25-49 12-21 67.
Halftime-Tennessee 33-29. 3-Point
Goals-Florida 7-22 (Boynton 3-9,Walker
2-5, Murphy 1-2, Beal l-5,Wilbekin 0-1),
Tennessee 5-10 (Golden 2-3, Richardson
I- I,Tatum I I, McRae 1-4,Woolridge 0-1).
Fouled Out-None. Rebounds-Florida
37 (Young 7), Tennessee 34 (Maymon
7). Assists-Florida 10 (Boynton 3),
Tennessee 15 (Golden 7). Total Fouls-
Florida 20,Tennessee 19.A-17,689.

Clemson 79,
Florida State 59

At Clemson. S.C.
FLORIDA ST. (9-6)
Gibson 3-5 0-0 6, James 4-8 2-3 10,
Loucks 1-6 2-2 4, Dulkys 1-3 2-2 5, Snaer
3-8 0-0 7, White I-5 0-0 2, Peterson 1-6
3-4 5, Space 0- I 0-0 0, Miller 7-17 0-0 16,
Whisnant II 1-3 1-2 4, Kreft 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 22-62 10-13 59.
CLEMSON (9-6)
Jennings 7-10 I-I 15, Booker 1-1 3-4
5, Sapp 0-3 0-0 0, Smith 3-9 6-6 13,Young
3-6 10-12 18, Fields 1-1 0-0 2, Hall 4-8
3-5 II, Baciu 3-4 3-3 9, Coleman 0-4
0-0 0, Narcisse 1-2 0-0 2, Sullivan I-I
2-2 4, McDaniels 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 24-49
28-33 79.
Halftime-Clemson 36-22. 3-Point
Goals-Florida St. 5-19 (Miller 2-6, Snaer
1-2, Whisnant II 1-3, Dulkys 1-3, Space
0-1, Loucks 0-2, Peterson 0-2), Clemson
3-14 (Young'2-4, Smith 1-4, Narcisse 0-1,
Sapp 0-2, Coleman 0-3). Fouled Out-
Gibson. Rebounds-Florida St. 34 (James
8), Clemson 35 (Jennings 8). Assists-
Florida St. 10 (Peterson 4), Clemson 14
(Hall, Smith 4).Total Fouls-Florida St. 24,
Clemson 17.A-8,026.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
*No. 12 Indiaha at Penn St., Noon
No. 16 Michigan vs. No. 18 Wisconsin,
1:30 p.m.

HOCKEY-

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
New Jersey 5, Florida 2
N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh I
Carolina 4, Buffalo 2
Colorado-4, Chicago 0
Anaheim 4, N.Y. Islanders 2
Saturday's Games
Vancouver 4, Boston 3
Philadelphia 3, Ottawa 2, OT
Dallas'4, Edmonton I
Columbus I, Los Angeles 0
Winnipeg at Buffalo (n)
Detroit at Toronto (n)
Tampa Bay at Montreal (n)
New Jersey alt Pittsburgh (n)
Colorado at St. Louis (n)
Carolina at Nashville (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Phoenix (n)
Minnesota at Calgary (n)
Washington at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Vancouver at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at,Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


of the Martin Luther King
Jr. weekend activities
sponsored by the North
Florida Leadership Council
and everyone is invited to
attend.
For details, call Mario
Coppock at 754-7095.

E From staff reports

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


THE FIGHT AT THE
L-AUNN9ROMAT WOU-P
RE5LuT TN s-OMEONE
Gerh& THIs5.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Print your answer here: ( I I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday Jumbles: UNITY UPPED FIASCO CURFEW
Answer: He planted the new evergreen in his yard to -
SPRUCE IT UP


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Bradley Beal (23) makes his way around Florida State's Luke Loucks (3) during a
game on Dec. 22.



No. 13 Florida loses



to open SEC season


Associated Press

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.
- Florida coach Billy
Donovan wants his play-
ers to learn that they can't
rely on their offense to bail
them out of tough road
games.
The 13th-ranked Gators
had their lowest scoring
output of the season while
allowing Tennessee plenty
of shots around the basket
in the Volunteers' 67-56 win
on Saturday.
"Both teams played hard,.
but the difference was the
defense," Donovan said. "I
still think our guys have a
long way to go in terms of
what they need to learn and
how they need to grow, and
these experiences hopeful-
ly will help -us." ,
Florida, which has lost all
four of its true road games
this year, came in averag-
ing 85.4 points this season,
best among SEC teams
and fifth in the nation. The
Volunteers held the Gators
to 35.7 percent shooting

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while hitting 51 percent of
their own attempts.
Josh Richardson hit a
3-pointer 41 seconds into
the second half that set the
tone for the Vols the rest of
the way. Cameron Tatum
stole the ball from Erving
Walker on the next pos-
session and ran it down
the floor for a dunk to give
Tennessee a 38-31 lead.
Kenny Boynton hit a
3-pointer for the Gators at
.the other end. Boynton,
,who entered the game
averaging 19.5 points, fin-
ished with 13. Erik Murphy
also had 13 for Florida
(12-4, 0-1) and.Patric Young
added 12.
Renaldo Woolridge
answered with a layup
for the Vols. Tatum drew
a charge by Bradley Beal
and after running a bit of
an offensive- set drove to,
the basket to hit a layup to
make it 42-34.
"If we defend a little bit
better, I'm riot saying we win
the game but at least we're
probably a little bit more in

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the game, and we needed to
be," Donovan said.
The Vols ,(8-7, 1-0)
expanded their lead as they
hit 12 of 22 shots in the sec-
ond half while the Gators
hit only 8 of 27. Tennessee
outscored Florida 32-20 in
the paint.

Clemson 79,
Florida State 59

CLEMSON, S.C. -
Andre Young scored 18
points, Milton Jennings
added 15 points and
Clemson started Atlantic
Coast Conference play with
a 79-59 victory over Florida
State on Saturday.
The Tigers (9-6, 1-0)
took control of this one
early with a 20-0 run in the
first half as the Seminoles
(9-7,. 0-1) struggled to find
any offense. Florida State's
leading scorer coming in,
Michael Snaer, was held to
seven points about half his
13.6 point a game average.
Ian Miller led Florida
State with 16 points.

or to Previous Puzzle


PA W ROOT
LANE EDI E
ENTS LILT
ST DANS
SS L IP


NARID ELMS


BBY OLDIIE




YANG PEA
ER G SOP


up


rs


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 At the
drop of -
19 Feedbag
morsel
22 None at all
23 Thumbnail
sketch
24 Arith. term
25 Flapjack
chain
26 Slalom
obstacle
27 Wolf lead-in
28 Quiz
29 Reno rollers
31 Sentry's
command
33 be an
honor!
35 CEO aides
36 Vestibules
38 Melville novel
39 Skip stones
41 Jackpot game
42 Purple flower
43 Shark
giveaways
44 Read
46 Winged
goddess
47 DeMille genre
48 Change decor
50 Low reef
51 Cable movie
channel
52 Mouse alert


1-9 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


CEENDT
', -7 7
1 __/ ___ __ _


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SUNDAY. JANUARY 8. 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, JANUARY 8. 2012


Lucky Les no more: Miles now legit rival to Saban


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS LSU
coach Les Miles can be hard
to take seriously, chomping
on grass, jumbling phrases
and words, wrestling with
the game clock.
Even with all his success,
it's taken a while for Tigers
fans to appreciate him.
Alabama coach Nick
S Saban, on the other hand,
S often makes football seem
as serious as surgery.
Crimson Tide fans greeted
him as a savior from Day 1
and their admiration for the
man Miles replaced at LSU
has only grown.
Miles no longer coaches
in the shadow of Saban, is
no longer derisively com-
pared to his predecessor.
Heading into the BCS
championship Monday
night between the top-
ranked Tigers and No. 2
Tide, Miles has shed his
Lucky Les nickname and is
now viewed as a legitimate
and formidable rival to
Saban in the Southeastern.
Conference.
"You can't have the level
of success that they've had
on a consistent basis with-
out doing a fantastic job as a
coach and a leader," Saban
said Friday during media
day at the Superdome. "And
I think Les has done that. I
think he's done a marvel-
ous job."
Saban did a marvelous
job at LSU first, leading
the Tigers to the 2003 BCS
championship, before bolt-
ing to the Miami Dolphins
after the 2004 season.
S Miles was hired away
from Oklahoma State to
replace Saban, and LSU
fans were skeptical.
Eleven victories in each of
his first two seasons wasn't
enough to satisfy,many of
them, and even when Miles
led the Tigers to another
national championship in.
2007, Miles was viewed by
many as a guy who.simply
stepped into a ready-made


ASSOCIATED PRESS
LSU head coach Les Miles watches his team during practice for the BCS championship NCAA college football game in
Metairie, La., Saturday. LSU fill play Alabama for the national championship on Monday. in New Orleans.


situation,
The 58-year-old Miles,
who is 3-2 against Saban,
said he never felt burdened
by the sky-high expecta-
tions Saban left behind.
"I've kind of always felt
like, you know, (the pro-
gram) was in a tremen-
dous position," he said.
"Certainly we're grateful for
the position that it's in. But
I never felt that there was a
shadow, or something that
needed to be done."
Some high-profile issues
with clock management
made Miles an easy target
for critics. Not to mention
his admission that he'll pick
a blade of grass from the
field and eat it during the
game, and his penchant
for ... let's call it creative
English.
On.,Friday, while .answer,
ing a question about his


team, Miles said: "I'm just
letting you know that this
football team, irrespec-
tive of the coach, deserves
to play well in this next
game."
Maybe he meant regard-
less of the coach?
It happens a lot at LSU.
"We'll be in the meeting
room, and I can't even think
of the words he'll group
together, and we'll just look
at each other like, 'What'
does that mean?"' defen-
sive end Barkevious Mingo
said.
But make no mistake,
Mingo said, players don't
take kindly to others taking
shots at their coach.
And his daring style
emboldens his team.
'That feeds down to our
players," offensive line
coach..Greg Studrawa said.-
"The trick plays, the going


for it on fourth down, the
fake field goals over the
head the kids buy into
that, and know that their
head coach is doing every-
thing he can to fight for
them for victory. I know
that's why our kids play
with so much enthusiasm."
They also play very well.
Miles is 75-17 at LSU and, like
Saban, is among the high-
est-paid coaches in the sport,
with a salary that will surpass
$4 million this season.
All Saban had to do to
win over Alabama fans was
take the job.
The proud program had
been more about melodra-
ma than championships for
more than two decades fol-
lowing the retirement of the
great Bear Bryant after the
1982 season.
SSabanr ,-ha.lit- pLaing for
an SEC title in his second


season and he won the
national championship
in Year 3. His formula is
simple and has less to do
with Xs and Os than man-
agement and motivational
skills that he learned from.
his time working for New
SEngland Patriots coach Bill
Belichick.
"First of all, there's cer-
tain things that we think
are important to being a
champion. And hard work
is one of those things, a
tremendous commitment
to the goals and things that
are important to you," he
said. "But I also think it's
important that people learn
how to be responsible for
their own self-determina-
tion, which is accountability.
And to have that in an orga-
nization, any organization,
you have to define what the
expectation is of thepeople


in the organization."
The 60-year-old Saban,
54-12 at Alabama, doesn't
reveal his lighter side as
readily as Miles does, but
his players insist he's not
quite the taskmaster outsid-
ers perceive.
Asked what the biggest
misconception about Saban
is, Alabama running back
Trent Richardson said:
"Everybody thinks he's
mean:"
Col. Mike Edmonson,
now the superintendent of
the Louisiana State Police,
was the' personal security
officer for both Saban and
Miles.
"Personality-wise, they
are different people,"
Edmonson said. "But inten-
sity-wise, they are very
similar. The desire to put
together the perfect game
plan, to win, to help the kids
get better, is evident."
He said Saban can be as
affable as Miles, but has a
harder time turning off the
intensity.
Take the day after each
won the BCS title for LSU.
Saban was still in New
Orleans and talked with
Edmonson about walking
to a hotel in the French
Quarter and celebrating
with some fans, but ulti-
mately decided to stay in
his room, calling recruits
and focusing on winning
the next title.
When it was suggested to
Miles that he take the crys-
tal football trophy into the
Quarter to revel with the
fans, Edmonson recalled
that Miles said: "Let's do
it!"
Tide fans will forgive
their coach for being less
social than Miles, as long
as he keeps winning. The
long-term forecast is good.
Conventional wisdom has
been that as long as Saban
is at Alabama, the Tide
should contend for national
titles for years.
Now, it seems the same
can be said of Miles and
LSU.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High head coach Brian Allen shows off equipment stored in a shed built by
Quarterback Club President Blake Lunde to store equipment during the offseason.


ALLEN: Gives thanks for help


Continued From Page 11

to the locker room give the
Tigers a college feel.
And Allen's vision for
the Tigers doesn't end this
year. He's got plans that go
five years down the road.
"A huge project that I'd
like to see would be having
field turf and a rubberized
track," Allen said. '"That
could lead to things like
us hosting the state track
meet"
Allen points out that
hosting a state track meet
would not only be good for
the school but also help
the local economy.
"You're going to gener-
ate revenue through hotels,
resteraunts and the whole
economy of Lake City will
benefit," Allen said. "It's
something on the wish list
that I have in mind."
And Allen's dreams for
Columbia's stadium don't
stop at the field level. He


would like to see addi-
tions made to the sta-
dium to enhance the fan
experience.
"We have a nice stadium
compared to most of them
we play in," Allen said. "I'd
like to add some acces-
sories, however, to dress
it up."
Among the ideas Allen
has is adding chairback
seating to the reserved
section.
"I'm not talking about
anything major to start," he
said. "There will be some
cost, but I will benefit the
stadium. I'd like to add a
little bit of new equipment
every year."
In the short-term plans,
Allen would like to con-
tinue adding equipment to
help the coaching staff bet-
ter prepare the Tigers at
each position.
"We'd like to add some-


thing every year to bet-
ter develop each position,"
Allen said. "We'd also like
to get some new weights
for the weight room and
possibly some machines. I
know we're probably using
some of the same weights
that I lifted here when I
was on the team. Those
are some things that we
can target in the short
term. We'll use some of
that grant that we received
'to do some of those things
in the coming months."
Still, Allen didn't want to
forget to give thanks for all
that was already given to
help propel the Tigers pro-
gam toward a state cham-
pionship.
"I just want to make sure
to thank anyone that gave
their time or money wheth-
er it was an hour or 10
dollars," Allen said. "Every
bit helps."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State quarterback EJ Manuel (3) scrambles away from the Notre Dame defense
during the first half of the Champs Sports Bowl NCAA college football game Dec. 29 in
Orlando.


FSU, Fisher return


many players in 2012


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

,TALLAHASSEE -Jimbo
Fisher heads into his third
season at Florida State with
the nucleus intact from a
team that failed to live up
to some big expectations
in 2011.
The slogan for the past
season was "Now," which
translated to one week at a
time after an early season
three-game losing streak.
"We were close, but there
were details we left out,"
Fisher said. "Hopefully the
details will be the differ-
ence and take us over the
top next year."
Unlike the recently com-
pleted campaign, 2012
could be a now or never
year for Seminoles with so
many key players either
seniors or likely to leave
early for the NFL.
Fisher has also made
some adjustments over his


first two years as a head
coach trying to balance the
requirements of being boss
and trying to handle the
quarterbacks and offense.
"He's been a little more
patient with the team," star
safety Lamarcus Joyner
said. 'Trusting the kids."
The 46-year-old Fisher
is sold on the talent avail-
able. Nearly all of the top
playmakers and defenders
return, along with one of
the nation's most reliable
placekickers in Dustin
Hopkins. He is closing in on
Florida State and Atlantic
Coast Conference records
for field goals and scoring.
Redshirt senior quar-
terback EJ Manuel has
17 starts (13-4) under his
belt and battled through a
shoulder injury while play-
ing behind an offensive line
that struggled almost all
season. Manuel's health will
be crucial to Florida State's
success next season.


"He's a guy you're proud
to be the leader of your
football team," Fisher said.
"The face of your organiza-
tion."
Manuel already ranks
ninth in career total
offense at the school with
4,853 yards and has ran or
passed for 31 touchdowns.
He heads into his final
year working on a masters'
degree in international rela-
tions and trying to rejuve-
nate an offense that was
almost nonexistent in the
final three games of the sea-
son. The Seminoles man-
aged only a field goal in the
second half of a 14-13 loss
to Virginia and followed the
next week with less than
100 yards of total offense in
a 21-7 win at Florida.
An 18-14 Champs Bowl
victory over Notre Dame
on Dec. 29 took some sting
out of the somewhat dis-
appointing season for the
Seminoles (9-4, 5-3 ACC).


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


JL










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. JANUARY 8. 2012


Texans earn 1st playoff win
k.--..V3 v


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Melissa Randall (32) reaches for a loose ball
while.playing a game against Melody Christian Academy on
Tuesday.


Lady Tigers


fall on road


to Newberry


From staff reports

Columbia High's girls
basketball team fell to host-
ing Newberry High, 62-21,
on Friday.
Justice Campbell led the
Lady Tigers with six. points
in the contest. Melissa
Randall finished the game
with four points and Ranicka
Givens had three points in
the contest
A host 9f Columbia play-
ers scored a basket includ-
ing Stella Harris, Stephanie
Silva and Akiria Richburg.
All finished with two points.
Lona Wilson connected
from the foul line for one
point
Newberry's Jasmine
Walker controlled the game
with 10 points, 10 rebounds
and four blocks.

Indians basketball
Fort White's girls bas-
ketball team beat visiting
Interlachen High, 49-41,
in a District 54A game on
Friday.
Tasha Robinson led the
Lady Indians with 17 points
and added five rebounds
and two steals, as Fort
White swept the season
series against the Rams.
Rykia Jackson chipped
in 13 points and had
four rebounds. Cenise
Armstrong scored nine
points and had 10 rebounds
and one blocked shot.
Khadijah Ingram pulled


down 10 rebounds.
Fort White has had to
cancel the remainder of
its junior varsity season
because of injuries.
The varsity (3-8, 2-3)
hosts Bradford High in a
district make-up game from
Dec. 1 at 6 p.m. Monday.
The Lady Indians play at
Branford High at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday.
Fort White's boys also
beatInterlachentoimproved
to 6-4 overall and 3-3 in dis-
trict play. The Indians hosts
Santa Fe High at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday.

Indians soccer
Fort White's soccer
teams lost a District 5-2A
doubleheader at Santa Fe
High on Thursday.
The Lady Indians fell
3-0, while the boys lost 7-1.
Fort White's girls lost at
Newberry High on Friday,
1-0.
Anthony Gonzales
scored the goal for Fort
White, which fell to 2-10-1
overall and finished district
play at 1-6-1.
the Lady Indians are 9-
7-1, and ended district play
at 6-7-1. The district tourna-
ment begins at Santa Fe on
Jan. 16.
Fort White travels to
Lafayette High on Monday
and hosts Columbia High
on Tuesday. The boys play
at 5 p.m., followed by the
girls at 7 p.m.


Reporter file photo
Fort White High's Jonathan Dupree was named to the Class
3A All-State football team as an offensive lineman.

STATE: 4 locals named
Continued From Page 1B


All-State football team,
which was released Friday
as the only member of the
Indian's squad.
Dupree was chosen as
an offensive lineman on the
second team in voting by
selected newspaper sports
editors and reporters.
Dupree, one of the season
captains for the Indians, was
a starter on both the offen-
sive and defensive line.


"I'm excited for him,"
Fort White head coach
Demetric Jackson said. "He
could have easily been first
team."
Jackson said Dupree is on
a short list of offensive line-
men for Presbyterian College
and has been contacted by
Western Carolina for the
defensive side of the ball.
N Tim Kirby contributed
to this story


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SUNDAY, JANUAY 8, 2012
Alm.


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz


GARFIELD/ by Jim Davis


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
,rbrridte.faojcyhV~/reWrV. ,cn"


BUSINESS


Sunday, january 8, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


COUNTY TOURISM


Harvey Campbell
386-758-1397


Vacancy on

TDC board

A vacancy exists
on Tourist
Development
Council board
The
Columbia County Tourist
Development Council
(TDC) would like to
express our appreciation
to Hampton Inn General
Manager Allison Gravely
for her eight years of ser-
vice as a member of our
TDC board of directors.
Ms. Gravely's seat is now
open for applications for
a three-year term on the
board. Applications will be
accepted until 5:00 p.m.
on Thursday, January 12.
This particular seat is
limited to "collectors of
the Local Option Tourist
Development Tax" and
must be an owner or
employee of a hotel or
motel in Columbia County.
In addition, applicants must
be a registered voter and
resident of this county.
For additional information,
please contact the TDC
office at 758-1312.

Bed-tax collections
Continue to increase
Local Option Tourist
Development Tax (bed
tax) collections contin-
ued on the upswing in
October with the Florida
Department of Revenue
reporting that $49,795 was
collected for the month.
This compared to $46,902
for October of 2010. For
CAMPBELL continued on 2C


The hotel
was named
the top hotel
in 2011 for
reservations,
check-in/
check-out,
guest rooms,
food and
beverages,
services,
facilities and
costs and
fees.



Chain claims
top honors from
J.D. Power and
Associates.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
erry Quick is
authorized by his
employer to stay at
any motel or hotel
when he drives
Loxley, Ala. to Tampa
each week.
He chooses to stay at
the Holiday Inn & Suites
in Lake City for a good
reason.
'"The people here are
very knowledgeable and
friendly," he said. "The
hospitality is way above
and beyond."
Quick, an interstate
truck driver for Ace
Hardware, said other driv-
ers recommended the
Lake City hotel when he
began driving the route
two years ago.
Every visit has been so
positive that Quick said he
has not stayed at another
hotel chain the past two
years. And he's not alone
in his opinion.
Holiday Inn is ranked
highest in guest satisfac-
tion by J.D. Power and
Associates, a global mar-


World's Best Inn





Holiday


that is


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


keting information com-
pany that rates services
and products worldwide.
The information from
:customer surveys is used
by companies to improve
their businesses.
Holiday Inn was ranked
No. 1 among hotels in
2011 in reservations,
check-in/check-out, guest
rooms, food and beverage,
services, facilities, as well
as costs and fees.
The hotel chain earned
the distinction after
launching a $1 billion
global branding cam-
paign in 2010 to ensure


guests enjoy the same
experience regardless of
which Holiday Inn they
visit. What that means is


JHOaUN MI I nCHw WWALERIvLaKe uly rceporter

every hotel in the chain
was required to make
changes to ensure con-
sistency, said Rod Butler,


Deana McMillian, a
front desk clerk at the
Holiday Inn & Suites in
Lake City, assists Jim
Brewster (left) and Steve
McDade. The hotel was
recently awarded the
hotel guest satisfaction
trophy by J.D. Power
and Associates.


general manager of the
Lake City hotel located on
Commerce Blvd. near the
intersection of U.S. 90 and
Interstate 75.
"Word is still getting out
about the award," Butler
said.
Signs with the chain's
new logo were erected.
Signature music is piped
through a sound system
in the lobby. New linen
BEST INN continued on 2C


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C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY. JANUARY 8, 2012


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CAMPBELL: Vacancy on TDC board


Continued From Page 1C
the 10 month period of the 2011 calen-
dar year, collections have been up every
month, except for July which had a
decrease of approximately $500. Meanwhile,
Smith Travel Report showed occupancy
at Columbia County hotels and motels
increased by 11,1% for November of this year
with average daily rate rising 3.6% to $67.88
and total room revenues were up 15.1%.
For the entire year, occupancy in Columbia
County is up 7.2% with average daily rate up
7.9% and room revenue increasing by 15.7%
for the 2011 calendar year.

Sports committee to issue report
on recommended improvements
The Columbia County TDC and Board of
County Commissioners appointed a-sports
advisory committee in late summer to iden-
tify needed improvements at the Southside
Sports Complex. Chaired by County
Commissioner Jodi'DuPree, the commit-
tee includes Jack Muenchen, Clint Pittman,
Mario Coppock, Greg Kennon, Scott Everett
and Randall Plyn Advisory staff for the
committee includes Dale Williams, David
Kraus, Tommy Matthews, Patrick Weaver
and Harvey Campbell. It is expected that
recommendations of the seven member com-
mittee will be presented to the TDC at the
monthly meeting on January 17th. The firm-
of North Florida Professional Services and
Greg Bailey are preparing a master plan for
the sports complex and helping put together
estimates of costs associated with such
items as improved lighting, additional park-
ing, safety netting, additional restrooms and
concessions, American with Disabilities Act
(ADA) compliant sidewalks, bleachers and
landscaping. The recommendations will ulti-
mately be presented to the Board of County
Commissioners for potential action. We'd like
to express our appreciation to the members
of the committee for their dedication and dili
gence in the process. In addition, Columbia
County has applied for membership with the
Florida Sports Foundation and a site visit of
our facilities is scheduled for February 1-3.

Research project is planned
for Olustee Battle Festival and
Reenactment
The Columbia County TDC will be part-
nering with Florida State Parks, the Blue-
Grey Army and Touch Poll Florida to con-
S. duct market research projects both in down-
Stown Lake City and at the Olustee Battlefield
Polling will be done at the battlefield on
both Feb. 18 and 19 and in downtown Lake
City on Feb. 17 & 18. The research will be
more specifically targeted toward the re-
enactors at the battlefield and the downtown
research will be more consumer driven with


more emphasis on spending, geographical
origination and questions about lodging, etc.
Brochures have already been distributed
to all of our racks on the upcoming 34th
Annual Olustee Battle Festival and 36th
Olustee Battle Reenactment. Posters for the
event will be distributed beginning in early
January. The event/itself is scheduled for
Feb. 17-19.

Columbia County TDC seeks
accreditation
We are pleased to announce our agency
has filed its Intent to Apply application
with Destination Marketing Association
International for certification for the
Destination Marketing Accreditation
Program. Staff has already reviewed the 88
elements of the review process and strongly
believes we will earn the designation which
currently includes only 135 tourism market-
ing organizations worldwide with 12 of them
in Florida. If our application is approved, we,
will be working towards a March 31 deadline
for the completed application.,

Tourism Day is upcoming for the
legislative session
The Columbia County TDC and repre-
sentatives of the Suwannee River Valley
Swill be participating in Tourism Day in the
Legislature on Wednesday, January 12.
Activities will include updates on issues .
relevant to the tourism industry, individual
meetings.with legislators and a reception
hosted at the Florida Restaurant and Lodging
Association. During the unveiling of the
proposed 2012-13 by Governor Rick Scott,
proposed funding for VISIT FLORIDA, the
state's official tourism marketing organiza-
tion, was $34.9 million, the same as in the
current budget year. Here are some key facts
-about the importance of tourism to Florida.

Tourism provided 22 percent of our total
state budget in 2010.
In 2010 alone, tourism returned $3.8 bil-
lion to Florida in tax revenue and generated
$62.7 billion in direct economic impact
In 2010, nearly one million Floridians
were directly employed by the tourism indus-
try.
SFor each $1 invested in tourism advertis-
ing, more than $11 is returned to the state in
tourism related taxes with 60-90 days of the
campaign conclusion.
Every 85 visitors coming to the Sunshine
State supports one Florida job. Those visitors
support local economies in the form of jobs
and taxes that benefit cities and counties.

Harvey Campbell is the executive director
of the Columbia County Tourist Development
Council. He can be reached at 386-758-1397.


NASA questions Apollo 13


commander's sale of list


By Curt Anderson
AP Legal Affairs Writer
MIAMI NASA is questioning wheth-
er Apollo 13 commander James Lovell has
the right to sell a 70-page checklist from
the flight that includes his handwritten
calculations that were crucial in guiding
the damaged spacecraft back to Earth.
The document was sold by Heritage
Auctions in November for more than
$388,000, some 15 times its initial list
price. The checklist gained great fame as
part of a key dramatic scene in the 1995
film "Apollo 13" in which actor Tom Hanks
plays Lovell making the calculations.
After the sale, NASA contacted Heritage
to ask whether Lovell had title to the
checklist GregRohan, president of Dallas-
based Heritage, said Thursday the sale
has been suspended pending the outcome
of the inquiry. The checklist, he said, is
being stored for now in the company's
vault
Rohan said Lovell provided a signed
affidavit that he had clear, title to the
ring-bound checklist, which is standard
procedure. Heritage does robust business
in space memorabilia and this is the first
time NASA has ever raised questions
about ownership of its items, he added.
"Ifs one that is near and dear to our


hearts," Rohan said of the space collect-
ibles business. "We, like a lot of people,
consider these astronauts to be national
heroes."
The latest inquiry follows a federal law-
suit NASA filed last year in Miami against
Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell seek-
ing return of a camera he brought back
'from his 1971 moon mission. That lawsuit
was settled in October when Mitchell
agreed to give the camera to NASA, which
in turn is donating it to the National Air
and Space Museum in Washington.
NASA spokesman Bob Jacobs said the
lawsuit and Lovell inquiry do not repre-
sent an aggressive, broad new agency
effort to recover space items. .
"It's a challenge to continually monitor
the growing auctions community, which
is usually how these items come to light,"
he said in an email. "This latest issue
demonstrates a need to reach out to for-
mer astronauts and other former agency
personnel who may have these kind of
items."'
Lovell, 83, lives near Chicago and owns
a restaurant bearing his name in IAke
Forest, Il. In an email, Friday to The
Associated Press, the former astronaut
said he is "seeking a meeting with NASA
administration to clear up this misunder-
standing." He did not elaborate.


BEST INN: Holiday Inn


Continued From Page 1
packages with pillow-top
mattress pads ard in each
room. Exterior lighting is
identical at every hotel.
Every hotel even smells
the same when customers
check in.
The hotel, which is
Lake City's only full-
service facility, features
a banquet room with a
capacity of 120 people, a
restaurant, bar and room
service. New 37-inch flat-
screen TVs with the most
high-definition program-
ming in Lake City were
recently added to all 127
guest rooms.
And it's not just physi-
cal improvements that led
to the award.
Butler said his staff
is trained ensure every
guest has a memorable,


enjoyable stay. Staff are
capable of providing
driving directions and
information about special
events and tourist destina-
tions in the area.
"It's for guest satisfac-
tion," Butler said. "We
stress being courteous
and sincere with guests.
In order to stay com-
petitive, that's what it's all
about"
All employees are also
empowered to resolve
customer complaints with-
out seeking permission
from supervisors.
"There's no limit to
what they can do," Butler
said. "If any part of the
stay is not satisfactory, we
promise-to make it right.
What sets us apart is our
service."


The hotel also offers
packages where guests
are given transporta-
tion to events such as
University of Florida
football games or perfor-
mances at the Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park.
'We'll build packages
around special events,"
Butler said.
Luc Houle, the hotel's
front desk manager, said
one bad experience can
taint a customer's impres-
sion of the hotel and Lake
City.
"The hotel employees
are the ambassadors
to the city," Houle said.
'They may never meet
anyone else. Instead of
buying a hotel room,
you're buying a whole
experience."


The Motle yFool[
o TEcaeAse &goric


.~__~____ .....
1


-j


I


IAV u -sLL>turi -lffilf,3c I-x Lf to-it















LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY. JANUARY 8, 2012 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


NYSE Amex

7,557.68 +80.65 52295.11 +16.77


IGainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
TmsRty 3.04 +1.40 +85.1 RareBeg 5.76 +2.51 +77.2
NBGrepfA 4.24 +1.36 +47.2 TasmraMg 2.07 +53 +34.4
ChinaMeps 2.08 +.57 +37.7 ASpecty 6.36 +1.51 +31.2
DexOneh 2.26 +,60 +36.1 Crexendo 3.50 +.69 +24.5
TorchEngy 2.80 +.70 +33.4 CiesIUd 9 2.74 +.54 +24.5
BkAmCotA 2.69 +.67 +33.2 SamsOG 2.42 +.47 +24.1
Edeor 6.90 +1.64 +31.2 iProlor 5.15 +.88 +20.6
BBVABFm 6.28 +1.41 +29.0 AvalnRare 284 +.47 +19.8
SunTrwtB 2.64 +.59 +28.8 TnanPet 7.14 +117 +19.6
HovnEntun 9.83 +2.18 +28.5 TravelCtrs 5.00 +.75 +17.6

Losers ($2 or more) Losers (s2 or more)
Name Last Chg q Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Barnesob 11.1 -3.29 .2 -22.7 Badten 2.45 -41 -14.3
CSVS2xVxS25.30 -6.65 -20.8 Aerosornc 289 -.31 -9.7
PrUItVi1ST 9.66 -2.50 -20.6 OronEngy 2.68 -.27 -9.2
ChiMMrs 4.83 -1.17 -19.5 Quepasa 3.06 -.26 -7.8.
PrsaA 3.70 -.70 -15,9 SbdCp 1911.21-124.79 -6.1
C-TrCVOL 24.03 4.38 -15.4 HMG 3.65 -.22 -5.7
Impervan 30.01 -4.80 -13.8 InvCapHld 3.87 -.23 -5.6
PrisaB 4.20 -.64 -13.2 AntaresP 2.08 -.12 -5.5
CSVS3xlnSv53.19-7.93 -13.0 Espey 2212 -1.19 -5.1
ChiCBood 2.31 -.34 -12.8 Vicon 3.16 -.14 -4.2

Most Active ($1 or more) Most Active (i or more
Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name Vol(O0) Last Chg
BkofAm 13045959 6.18 +.62 VanlageDr 173186 1.05 -.11
S&P500ETF5510467127.71+2.21 RareEleg 150856 5.76+2.51
SPDR Fnd2704597 13.40 +.40 CheniereEn 134863 9.00 +.31
FordM 2493614 11.71 +.95 NwGoldg 105170 10.76 +.68
iShEMkts 2116623 38.23 +.29 GoldStrg 80579 1.73 +.08
Ciligrprs 2110384 28.55+2.24 NovaGldg 80350 8.82 +.34
GenElec 1959457 18.65 +.74 GrtBasGg 79274 1.06 +.15
Pfizer 1599182 21.57 -.07 Rentech 73306 1.50 +.19
iShR2K 1569475 74.80+1.05 SamsO&G 65464 2.42 +.47
Alcoa 1484312 9.16 +.51 AvalnRare 65411 2.84 +.47

Diary Diary
Advanced 2,222 Advanced 382
Declined 934 Declined 124
New Highs 303 New Highs 46
NewLows 25 New Lows 10
Total issues 3,195 Total issues 527
Unchanged 39 Unchanged 21
Volume 14,935,796,633 Volume 320,047,975


A Nasdaq
2,674.22 +69.07


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Dndreon 12.35 +4.75 +62.5
HovnEn pfA 2.24 +.84 +60.0
ArsWay 8.15 +3.03 +592
LCAVis 4.54 +1.64 +56.6
FFmSvc 2.38 +.85 +55.6
FstSecurrs 3.48 +1.13 +48.1
ChinaAuto 4.48 +1.18 +35.8
RemarkM 4.55 +1.12 +32.7
BlueDolph 5.50 +1.31 +31.3
A123Sys 210 +.49 +30.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BioMimetic 2.00 -.85 -29.8
LiveDeal 2.84 -1.15 -28.8
Spreadtrm 14.98 -5.80 -27.9
ifePtrs 4.87 -1.59 -24.6
IntegUSc 24.49 -6.34 -20.6
BonTon 2.71 -.66 -19.6
Telestone 3.36 -.80 -19.2
AVEO Ph 13.97 -3.23 -18.8
NeptuneTg 2.39 -.53 -18.2
AngiesLn 13.23 -2.87 -17.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Microsoft 2971896 28.11 +2.15
SiriusXM 2762611 2.00 +.18
Oracle 1891084 26.93+1.28
Intel 1737303 25.25+1.00
MicronT 1697289 7.20 +.91
Cisco 1537073 18.85 +.83
PwShs QQQ149808457.81 +1.98
Yahoo 861214 15.52 -.62
RschMotn 823077 15.34 +.84
Dndreon 814328 12.35+4.75

Diary
Advanced 1,709
Declined' 980
New Highs 111
New Lows 81
Total issues 2,735
Unchanged 46
Volume 6,929,661,015


Name Ex Div Last


WCgy Wldy YTD
Chg sChg 'Chg


AT&TIkc NY 1.76 29.68 -.12 -. -:.9
Alcoa NY .12 9.16 -5.9 5.
AutoZone NY ._ 33804+13-07 -40 ,4.0
BkoAm NY .04 618 +.62 1-2 -1123
BobEEans Nasd .00 34.62 +1.08 -32 -32
CNBFnPANasd 66 15.74 -.4 -0.3 -3
CSXs NY .48 22.69 +. 63 7.7 +7.7
Cemex NY ... 5.43 +.4 +0.7 7
Chevron NY 324 10831 +1.91 +1.8 +1.8
Cisco Nasd .24 18.85 +.83 +4.6 +4.6
Citgprs NY .04 28.55 +2.24 +85 +8.5
CocaCea NY 1.88 68.93 -1.04 -1.5 -1.5
Dehaze NY 2.45 57.49 +1.14 +2.0 +2.0
Dndreon Nasd 12.35 4.75 +62.5 +62.5
DrSCtrs NY ... 25.45 -1.03 -3.9 -3.9
DirxSCB NY ._ 46.56 +1.72 +3.8 +3.8
EMCCp NY .. 22.01 +.47 +22 +2.2
EKodak NY .37 -28 -42.8-42.8
FanilyOD NY .72 53.63 -4.03 -7.0 -7.0
FordM NY 20 11.71 +.95 +6.8 +8.8
GenElec NY .68 18.65 +.74 +4.1 +4.1
HomeDp NY 1.16 4320 +1.16 +2.8 +2.8
iShEMkts NY .81 3823 +.29 +0.8 +.8
iSEafe NY 1.71 49.15 -.38 -0.8 -.8
iShR2K NY 1.02 74.80 +1.05 +1.4 +1.4
Intel Nasd .84 2525 +1.00 +4.1 +4.1
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 35.36 +2.36 +7.2 +6.3
Lowes NY .56 26.34 +.96 +3.8 +3.8


WtuyWkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg'.ChgChg
Mc Oncs NY 20 100.6 +27 +0.3 +.3
.&rmT Nad ... 720 +.91 +14.5 +14.5
Iroso8 Nasd .80 28.11 +2.15 +.3 +8.3
MorStan NY .20 15.90 +.7 +51 +5.1
NY Trne NY 7.78 +.05 +0.6 +.6
NexEraEnNY 2.20 5892 -1.96 -3.2 -32
NobtiHlif Nasd 5.54 +26 +4.9 +4.9
NoaiaCp NY .55 524 +.42 +8.7 +8.7
OccPet NY 1.84 95.77 +2.07 +22 +22
Orale Nasd .24 26.93 +128 +5.0 +5.0
Penney NY .80 34.96 +.01 -.5
PepsiCo NY 2.06 65.39 -.96-1.4 -1.4
Pfize NY .88 21.57 -0.7 3 -.3
Potash s NY .28 41.77 +.49 +12 +12
PIShs QOQNasd .46 57.81 +1.98 +3.5 +3.5
RsdchMotn Nasd ... 15.34 +.84 +5.8 +5.8
Ryder NY 1.16 54.65 +1.51 +2.8 +2.8
S&P500ETFNY 2.58 127.71 +221 +1.8 +1.8
SearsHldgsNasd .33 2920 -2.58 -8.1 -8.1
SiriusXM Nasd 2.00 +.18 +9.9 +9.9
SouthnCo NY 1.89 44.48 -1.81 -3.9 -3.9
SprintNex NY ... 219 -.15 -6.4 -6.4
SPDRFndNY 22 13.40 +.40 +3.0 +3.0
TimeWamNY .94 36.55 +.41 +1.1 +1.1
VeizonCmNY 2.00 38.33 -1.29 -3.3 -4.5
WalMart NY- 1.46 59.00 -.76 -1.3 -1.3
WellsFargo NY .48 28.94 +1.38 +5.0 +5.0
Yahoo Nasd ... 15.52 -.62 -3.8 -3.8


Stock Foolt s: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadan doars. h = Does not meet continued-isling standards.
f = Late flBlg wiS SEC. n= New in past 52weeks, pt = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock spl
of at least 50 pement win the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has splt by at
least 20 percent wthn te last year. un = Units. v = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When dstrbuted. wi =
When issued. t=Warrants.
Mutual Fund Folnolo: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. ft=front load (sates charges). m =Multiple tees are caged. NA = not avaiabe. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund spt shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Galners and
Loaermust be worth at least$2 tobe listed in tables at left. Most Actves must be worth at leas $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Sowrc The Assocated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
ILast Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.015 0.02
6-month 0.05 0.06
5-year. 0.86 0.83
10-year 1.96 1.88
30-year 3.02 2.89


' II


I Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 12,359.92
1-week change: 142.36 (1.2%)
13,000


12,500

12,000

11,500

11,000

10,500


CLOSED 179.82


MON TUES


21.04 -2.72 -55.78


WED THUR FRI


A S O N D


MUTUAL FUNDS I
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min nit
Name Obj ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetls
Vanguard TotStldx
Vanguard Instldxl
American Funds GrthAmA m
American Funds CaplncBuA m
Fidelity Contra
Vanguard 500Adml
American Funds IncAmerA m
Vanguard TotStlAdm
American Funds CpWldGrlA m
American Funds InvCoAmA m
American Funds WAMutlnvA m
Dodge & Cox Stock
Dodge & Cox IntlStk
Vanguard InstPlus
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m
PIMCO TotRetAdm b
Vanguard TotBdAdml


144,426
62,667
58,398
54,829
54,764
54,719
51,925
51,409
49,496
45,594
42,793
37,593
36,562
35,923
35,140
34,617
31,439
31,366


American Funds BalA m MA 30,56
Last Pvs Day American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 30,35
Australia .9770 .9746 Amercan Funds FnlnvA m LB 30,35
Brita*in 1.5426 1.5483 Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 30,13
Britain 1.5426 1.5483 Vanguard Totint d FB 29,94
Canada 1.0266 1.0192 Vanguard TotStllns LB 29,46
Euro .7859 .7823 American Funds NewPerspA m WS' 28,54
Japan 77.02 77.18 PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 26,13
Mexico 13.7179 13.7475 Vanguard 5001nv LB 25,96
Switzerlnd .9550 .9533 CA -Conservatrve Alcaton Cl -Interediate-Term Bond, 6S
Lage Value, IH -World Alocatio, LB -large Blend, LG -La
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- Mi-Cap Value, SH -Specally-healh, WS -World Stock, Tol
ers show dollar in foreign currency. ohers wth same obective:A is in top 20%, Ein boom 20%


+4.8/E
+1.3/B
+2.4/A
-3.8/D
+2.6/A
+0.4/B
+2.4/A
+5.5/A
+1.5/B
-7.1/C
-0.7/C
+7.3/A
-3.9/D
-15.7/E
+2.4/A
+2.8/B
+4.6/E
+8.0/A
+4.5/A
-13.4/C
-1.1/C
+4.3/A
-13.7/C
+1.5/B
-6.5/C
+4.4/E
+2.3/B


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
NL 200,000,000
4.25 1,000
NL 1,000,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 50,000
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
3.75 1,000
NL 3,000


8
7
4
8
9
7
7
5
6


-Europe Stock FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Fregn
ie Growth, LV -Lar Value, MA -Moderate Allocaton, MB -Md-Cap Blend, MV -
SReturn: Chng in V wit dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs.
. Min In nvt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Momingstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Name Div YId PE


AES Corp, ...
AFLAC 1.32 3.0
AK Steel .20 2.3
AT&TInc 1.76 5.9
AblLab 1.92 3.4
AberFdc .70 1.6
Accenture 1.35 2.6
AMD
Aetna .70 1.6
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.3
Allstate .84 3.0
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.64 5.7
AmBev 1.10 3.2
AMovilLs .28 1.2
-AmAxle
AEagleOut .44 3.3
AEP 1.88 4.6
AmExp .72 1.5
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower .35
Anadarko :36 .4
Annaly 2.43 15.1
Apache .60 .6
ArcelorMit .75 4.0
ArchCoal .44 2.9
ArchDan .70 2.4
AssuredG .18 1.3
ATMOS 1.38 4.2
Avon .92 5.2
BB&TCp .64 2.5
BakrHu .60 1.2
BcoBrades .80 4.7
BcoSantSA .84 12.2
BcoSBrasil 1.50 18.5
BkofAm .04 .6
BkNYMel .52 2.5
Barclay .36 3.1
BariPVix ...
BamesNob ...
BarrickG .60 1.3
Baxter 1.34 2.7
BeazerHm ...
BerkH B .
BestBuy .64 2.6
Boeing 1.76 2,4
BostonSci ...
BrMySq. 1.36 4.0
CBREGrp ...
CBS B .40 1.4
CMS Eng .84 3.9
CSX s .48 2.1
CVR Engy ...
CVSCare .65 1.6
CblvsNY s .60 4.0
Calpine
CampSp 1.16 3.7
CdnNRs gs .36
CapOne' .20 .4
CapitlSrce .04 .6.
Camival 1.00 3.0
Caterpillar 1.84 1.9
Cemex ... ..
CenterPnt .79 4.0
CntryUnk 2.90 7.8
ChesEng .35 1.5
Chevron 3.24 3.0
Chimera .51 19.3
Citigrprs .04 .1
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.7
CocaCola 1.88 2.7
Comerica .40 1.4
CmclMtls .48 3.2
ConAgra .96 3.6
ConocPhil 2.64 3.6
ConEd 2.40 4.1
ConstellEn .96 2.6


Wkly -YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


19 +.39 +3.3
9 +.98 +2.3
... +.49 +5.9
15 -.12 -1.9
19 -.37 -.7
17 -3.93 -8.0
15 -1.40 -2.6
4 +.03 +.6
9 +1.88 +4.5
13 +2.47 +7.1

9 +.51 +5.9
41 +.61 +2.2
49 +.77 +3.8
17 -.93 -3.1
... -1.61 -4.5
10 -.07 -.3
5 +1.51 +15.3
14 -1.89 -12.4
11 -.52 -1.3
12 +1.28 +2.3
... +.34 +1.5
87 +.24 +.4
... +3.94 '+5.2
8 +.10 +.6
9 +6.46 +7.1
14 +.48 +2.6
13 +.85 +5.9
9 +.47 +1.6
4 +1.14 +8.7
14 -.70 -2.1
10 +.07 +.4
16 +.78 +2.5
14 +2.62 +5.4
.. +.45 +2.7
... -.61 -8.1
... -.01 -.1
... +.62 +11.2
9 +.54 +2.7
... +.48 +4.4
... -3.77 -10.6
... -3.29 -22.7
11 +2.29 +5.1
13 +.66 +1.3
... +.38 +15.3
16 +.09 +.1
8 +.85 +3.6
15 +.63 +.9
15 -.04 -.7
17 -.68 -2.9
19 +.74 +4.9
16 +.65 +2.4
14 -.45 -2.0
14 +1.63 +7.7
7 +2.25 +12.0
16. +.68 +1.7
12 +.63 +4.4
-.48 -2.9
13 -1.79 -5.4
i.71 +1.9
6 +2.87 +6.8
35 -.14 -2.1
14 +.27 +.8
15-+5.16 +5.7
... +.04 +.7
15 -.55 -2.7
17 -.18 -.5
7 +1.69 +7.6
8 +1.91 +1.8
5 +.13 +5.2
8 +2.24 +8.5
5 +4.24 +6.8
13 -1.04 -1.5
13 +2.12 +8.2
... +1.16 +8.4
15 +.02 +.1
10 -.21 -.3
16 -2.93 -4.7
16 -2.10 -5.3


Name Div
Coming .30
Covidien .90
CSVS2xVxS...
CSVellVSts...
Cummins 1.60
DDR Corp .48
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir ..
DenburyR ...
DeutschBk 1.07
DevonE .68
Dex One h ...
DxFnBull rs ...
DrSCBr rs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEnBear ...
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .40
Disney ..60
DomRescs1.97
DEmmett .52
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
DukeRlty .68
EMCCp ...
Eaton s 1.36
EIPasoCp, .04
Elan
EldorGldg .12
EmersonElI1.60
EnCanag .80
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
Fedlnvst .96
FstHorizon .04
FirstEngy 2.20
Flotek
FordM .20
ForestOils ...
FMCGs 1.00
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop ..
Gannett .32
Gap .45
GenGrPrp .40
GenMills 1.22
GenMotors ...
GenOn En
Genworth ...
Gerdau .20
Goldcrp g ,54
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
HCP Inc 1.92
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM .02
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HollyFrt s .40
HomeDp 1.16
Honwillntl 1.49
HostHotls .20
Huntsmn .40
Hyperdyn ...
IAMGId g .25
ING
iShGold ...
iShBraz 1.50
iShGer .67
iSh HK .41
iShJapn .20
iSTaiwn .47


,Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
2.2 6 +.54 +4.1 13.52-
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11 +.23 +2.8 8.32
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.. -2.74 -7.3 34.61
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3.8 18 -1.65 -3.1 51.43
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3.3 13 +1.56 +5.4 30.32
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3.5 ... +.07 +.4 19.29
2.6 ... +.08 +.5 15.55
2.2 ... -.05 -.5 9.06
4.0 .... +.12 +1.0 11.83


TAKE CHARGE



OF YOUR FUTURE.


Create and implement a strategy designed to help you
achieve your long-term financial goals.


Do something positive for yourself Call today for a no-cost,

no-obligation portfolio review. Together, we can create a strategy

that's right for you based on your current situation, objectives

and risk tolerance.


Steve Jones, CFPO
Financial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386.752-3847


www.edwardjones.com Member$ ic


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


iShSilver ...
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iSSP500 2.60
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IBM 3.00
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ItauUnibH .82
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Jabil .32
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JnprNtwk
KB Home .25
Keycorp .12
Kimco .76
KindMorn 1.20
Kinrossg .12
KodiakOg ...
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp ...


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Name


Wkly YTD
Div YId PE Chg %Chg


LVSands ... ... 25 -.56 -1.3 42.17
LennarA .16 .8 43 +.75 +3.8 20.40
UllyEli 1.96 4.9 9 -1.68 -4.0 39.88
Limited .80 2.1 14 -1.48 -3.7 38.87
UncNat .32 1.6 6 +.72 +3.3 20.06
UzClaib ....:.. +.98 +11.4 9.61
LyonBasA 1.00 2.9 6 +1.96 +6.0 34.45
MBIA ......... +.77 +6.6 12.36
MEMC ........ -.09 -2.3 3.85
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MGIC ... ... ... +.18 +4.8 3.91
MGMRsts ... ... ... +.70 +6.7 11.13
Macys .80 2.3 13 +2.38 +7.4 34.56
MagHRes ... ... ... +.49 +9.1 5.88
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Metife .74 2.2 9 +1.72 +5.5 32.90
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Cha Last


Molycorp
Monsanto 1.20 1.5
MorgStan .20 1.3
Mosaic .20 .4
MotrlaMob ...
MuellerWat .07 2.5
NCRCorp ...
Nabors
NatGrid 3.00 6.4
NOilVarco .48 .7.
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NewmtM 1.40 2.3
NextEraEn 2.20 3.7
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NokiaCp .55 10.5
NorflkSo 1.72 2.3
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OcciPet 1.84 1.9
OfficeDpt ...
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PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 .9
Penney .80 2.3
PepsiCo 2.06 .3.2
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Pelrobras 1.28 5.0
Pfizer .88 4.1
PhilipMor 3.08 4.0
PlainsEx
Potashs .28 .7
PwshDB ...
PS USDBull...
ProLogis 1.12 3.9
ProShtS&P ...
PrUSh&P ... ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
ProUltSP .31 .6
ProUShL20 ...
.ProUSSP500...
ProUSSlv rs...
ProUShEuro..
ProgsvCp .40 2.1
Prudent 1.45 2.7
PSEG 1.37 4.3
PulteGrp ...
QksilvRes .
RSC Hldgs ...
RadianGrp .01 .4
Raytheon 1.72 3.6
RegalEnt .84 7.2
RegionsFn .04 .9
Renren n
RepubSvc .88 3.2
RioTinto 1.17 2.3
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RoyDShllA 3.36 4.6
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SpdrS&PRB.44 1.7
SpdrRetl .50 1.0
SpdrOGEx .59 1.1
SpdrMetM .46 .9
Safeway .58 2.7
Saks
Salesforce ...
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82 5.1
SaraLee .46 2.4
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.5
Schwab .24 2.0
SiderurNac .81 9.5


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Name Div YId
SilvWhtng .18 .6
SouthnCo 1.89 4.2
SwstAil .02 .2
SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.12 3.7
SprintNex ...
SPMatls .74 2.1
SP HthC .67 1.9
SPCnSt .88 2.7
SPConsum.61 1.5
SP Engy 1.07 1.5
SPDR Fncl .22 1.6
SP Inds .73 2.1
SPTech .38 1.5
SP Util 1.38 3.9
StateStr .72 1.7
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SuccessF ...
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Synovus .04 2.5
TJX .76 1.1
TaiwSemi .52 4.0
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20 2.5
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TenetHlth .
Teradyn
Terex
Tesoro
Textron .08 .4
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3MCo 2.20 2.6
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TollBros
Transocn 3.16 8.0
Travelers 1.64 2.8
Tycolntl 1.00 2.1
Tyson .16 .8
UBSAG ...
USAirwy ..
USG ... ...
UtdContl
UPSB 2.08 2.8
UtdRentals ...
US Bancrp .50 1.8
USNGsrs.
US OilFd
USSteel .20 .7
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WPXEnn ...
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Weathflnt .
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WDigital .
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YumBmds 1.14 1.9


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Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly 'YTD Wkly
Dhr YId PE Che %Chg Last


Comc spcl .45 1.9
Costco .96 1.2
DeckrsOut ...
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ..
DishNetwk 2.00 ..
DonlleyRR 1.04 7.0
DryShips .12 .
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts
EricsnTel .37 3.9
Expedias ...
ExpScripts...
FifthThird .32 2.4
Finisar
FstNiagara .64 7.1
FstSolar
Flextm
FocusMda ...
Fortinets ...
FrontierCm .75 14.7
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC ...
Hasbro 1.20 3.8
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .32 4.7
HumGen ...
Illumina
Informant
Inhibitex
Intel .84 3.3
InterMune ...
JDS Uniph ...
JamesRiv...


17 +.74
24 -2.19
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Name Div
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.40
LamResrch ..
LeapWirlss ...
UbtylntA
lululemngs ...
Magma
MarvelT ...
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .88
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .80
Nil Hldg
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
PMC Sra .
Paccar .72
PacEth rs ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.28
PeopUtdF .63
Polycoms ...
Popular
PwShs QQQ.46
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...
RAM En h
RschMotn ...
RiverbedT ...
RossStrss .44
SLMCp .40


AMEX Most Active


Wky YTD Wkly
Yld PE. Chg %Chg Last
... 24 +.25 +4.8 5.45
2.9 10 -.52 -1.1 47.73
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2.9 15 +.38 +2.8 13.78


Name Div
SanDisk ...
SeagateT .72
SearsHIdgs .33
Sequenom ...
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
SodaStrm ...
Spreadtrm .40
Staples .40
Starbucks .68
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .24
TakeTwo
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .90
Texlnst .68
TibcoSft
TiVo Inc ...
TrdentMh ...
TriQuint
UnivDisp
UrbanOut
VertxPh ..
ViacomB 1.00
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 2.10
Wendys Co .08
Windstrm 1.00
Winn-Dixie ...
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04
Zvnqa n


YId PE


Wkly YTD Wkdy
Chg %Chg Last


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12 +.67 +2.3
37 -.08 -.3
... +1.23 +13.7
... -.10 -55.0
9 -.06 -1.2
... +.15 +.4
20 +.11 +.4
... +.84 +2.5
13 +2.04 +4.5
... +.55 +2.6
... -.18 -.6
... +.07 +1.3
22 -.04 -.3
... -.03 -.3
25 -3.55 -3.2
15 +.11 +.3
19 -.62 -3.8
... +1.36 +8.4
... -.60 -6.4


Name DIv YId
AbdAsPac .42 5.6
AdeonaPh ...
Adventrx
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AlldNevG ...
AmApparel ...
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BrigusG g ...
BritATob 3.86 4.1
CanoPet ...
CardiumTh ...
CFCdag ,01 .1
CheniereEn ...
ChinaShen ...
ClaudeR g ...
ClghGlbOpl.08 10,0
CrSuiHiY .32 10.9
DejourE g ...
DenisnMg ...
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ExeterR gs ..
FrkStPrp .76 7.8
GamGkdNR1.68 11.2
GascoEngy ...
Gastar grs...
GenMoly ...
GoldenMin ...
GoldStrg ... ...
GranTrrag ...
GriBasGg ... ...
GtPanSilvg ...
ImpOil qs .44 ...


Wikly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
... +.11 +1.5 7.44
... +.38 +30.2 1.64
... +.04 +5.9 .63
... -.22 -3.2 6.59
... +2.04 +6.7 32.32
+.13 +18.1 .85
... +.16 +40.5 .55
... -.12 -5.5 2.08
+.36 +7.3 5.29
+.47 +19.8 2.84
+.47 +12.7 4.17
... +.49 +1.2 42.73
... +.84 +3.3 25.96
... +.06 +5.7 1.02
...-1.35 -1.4 93.53
... +.02 +28.6 .09
... +.08 +27.1 .37
... +.36 +1.8 19.97
... +.31 +3.6 9.00
... +.44 +34.9 1.70
... +.18 +13.6 1.50
... +.19 +1,8 10.76
... +.03 +1.0 2.91
... -.01 -2.3 .51
... +.12 +9.6 1.37
... +.26 +9.8 2.91
+.36 +13.8 2.97
19 -.18 -1.8 9.77
... +.89 +6.3 15.00
... +.03 +12.4 .25
.. +.13 +4.1 3.31
... +.16 +5.2 3.25
... +.38 +6.5 6.19
... +.08 +4.8 1.73
... +.09 +1.9 4.89
... +.15 +16.4 1.06
S+24 +12.3 2.19
... +.88 +2.0 45.36


Name Div
InovioPhm ...
IntTowerg ..
LadThalFn .
LucasEngy ..
MdwGoldg ...
Minefnd g
NBRESec .24
Nevsun g .10
NwGoldg ...
NAPallg ...
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VimetX
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WT DrfChn .55
WizzardSft .
YMBio ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


STocKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Currencies


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chq %Cho Last


ASML Hid .58
AcmePkt
ActivsBliz .17
AdobeSy
AkamaiT
AlIscriptH ...
AlteraCp If .32
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.44
A123 Sys ...
ApolloGrp ..
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatI .32
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP
ArmHId .15
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.58
BMG St ...
Baidu
BedBath ...
BioSante ...
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20
Cadence ...
Celgene
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .24
CitrixSys ....
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .45


... -.88
37 -4.33
19 -.08
17 +.45
32 +.48
83 -.66
14 +.39
. -.74
96 +9.51
4 +.29
3 +.50
16 +.55
... +.49
16 +2.77
16+17.40
8 +.30
... -.25
...+1.27
+.35
32 +.18
8 +.94
26 +.63
21 +.87
13 -.77
47 +4.62
16 +1.97
... -.01
18 +.78
54 +.23
12 +.36
24 -.21
28 -.38
... +1.47
16 +.83
35 +1.30
... -.06
24 +2.10
17 +.98


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. JANUARY 8, 2012


Lake City Reporter


CLASSIFIED


Ti755L54
755-5440


SADvantae


100 Job
Opportunities

0552'j 0
VyStar Credit Union Seeking
Member Relationship
Specialist Supervisor
Location; Lake City Branch
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS:
Trains, monitors, coaches and
develops member service and
teller staff on a daily basis.
Provides on-going training for
all member service and teller
staff as changes are
implemented and other duties
JOB KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS
& ABILITIES:
A minimum of three years of
experience with a financial
institution.
A minimum of two years in a
leadership or supervisory
position is preferred.
Knowledge of Microsoft Word
and Excel are required.
EDUCATION:
An Associate Degree is required
and a four-year undergraduate
degree is preferred. Work and/or
supervisory experience may be
substituted for the Associates
Degree.
Please visit
www.vystarcu.org/home/careers
to apply.
VyStar Credit Union is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

05529'86
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Guest Services Position PT
18-24 hrs. wkly. MUST be a
people person with strong work
ethic, DEPENDABLE, good
communication, great customer
service skills, computer skills,
and willingness to learn.
MUST be a team player and
able to work a flexible schedule
including weekends and
holidays. We offer Competitive
Pay and Health Benefits. Hotel
Experience Highly Preferred.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply in person
at Comfort Suites 3690 W US
HWY 90. Please do not call the
hotel regarding your application.

05529914
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
COMPUTER SYSTEMS
TECH
Knowledge and experience with
ability to maintain hardware and
software including maintenance
and upgrading. Perf,:,m.:.routine.
network administr.i[,:n, research
and troubleshoot problems. High
School graduate, a degree in
computer science or related
field. Two (2) years experience
in computer systems and com-
munications systems required.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386) 496-2323,
FAX (386) 496-1611
Equal Employment Opportu-
nity / Drug Free Workplace

05529964
Food service
professionals wanted.
Experienced Banquet Cook
Dishwashers
Banquet Servers
Must have a positive attitude,
ability to work well with people,
eagerness to learn, dedication to
quality, and have an eye for
detail and a willingness
to do what ever it takes to get
the job done.
Background Check Mandatory.
Application available at
Camp Weed, 11057 Camp
Weed Place, Live Oak
BARTENDER NEEDED Must
have experience and be reliable.
Must have own phone and own
car. 386-752-2412

Needed Secretary/Assistant for
busy Real Estate Office. computer
skills a Must. Call Debbie at
386-719-1224 for application
Officer Manager Position:
Must have Real Estate knowledge.
Also prefer Real estate license.
Must have knowledge of
QuickBooks & Microsoft Office.
Motivated individual with an abili-
ty to multi task. Mon Fri 40 hr
wk. Contact Mike or Lynn: 386-
719-5600 or 386-288-3596
Accredited Real Estate Svcs., LLC
Preschool Teacher. Must be 21 &
have req'd 40 hrs. PT w/opportuni-
ty for FT. Apply in person 1226
SW Grandview St. Lake City.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442







Land Clearing

Back Hoe. Dozer. Chopping, root
raking, bush hog. seeding, sod,.
disking, site prep. ponds &
irrigation. Free Est' 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
Opportunities

Wanted: mature person to live in
and care for elderly woman must
cook clean and give meds. Day#'s
386-755-5099 or 288-1078


120 Medical
1AU Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529913
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
Will be required to evaluate and
treat a variety of diagnoses/post
surgical conditions in a
hospital/swing-bed and out
patient setting. Hand experience
preferred /not required. Serious
inquiries only. Please contact
our Director of Therapy
386-496-2843 ext 275 or
email resume to
therapvdirector(@lakebutlerlio-
spital.com
Equal Employment Opportunity
/ Drug Free Workplace

05529919
RN, Unit Supervisor
Experienced in Long Term
.Care. Full Time, excellent pay
and benefits.
Please apply at Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake City,
FI 32025 or fax resume to
386-752-7337. EOE/DFWP

05529923
Admission Director
Avalon Healthcare is currently
accepting applications for
the full time position of
Admissions Director.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent Benefit package.
Please send resume to:
Tony Anderson, Administrator
admin@avalonhrc.corri
Avalon Healthcare and'Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05529924
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Ocopation Therapist. ,-
Cornpilti ,IAlar, pD.1'
E illent ehcneha p..,c...ge as
well as a sign on bonus is being
offered. Please contact Jennie
Cruce Director of Rehab
dor(@avalonhr :.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
'Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05529969
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare
www.mbhci.org
-Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps For its Student Loan
Forgiveness program. Licensed
Clinicians who serve in our ap-
proved locations may
qualify for up to $60k in Student
Loan forgiveness for F/T 2yr
commitment.
Therapists:
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred
Case Management
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Master's Therapist in
Screening
Medical Services
RN full-time Lake City CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify Inc.

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

17O Business
Opportunities

Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.


240 Schools &
Education

Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant. $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion. $800 next class-01/16/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
German Shepherd AKC Czech
pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &.
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife., If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances
For Sale: GE Washer Ig
capacity, Whirlpool. Dryer
Lg capacity. $450.for both obo
352-264-8168

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Antique round side table.
Dark wood.94" around,
29" tall. $50.
386-754 4094

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 -arage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous.
BEER KEG Refrigerator for sale.
S38' cold always. $200 obo.
386-758-1991

Glock 27, 40 cal. Pistol. w/2 clips,
one double stacked w/laser site.
W/Paddle type, lock down holster.
Exc. Cond. $475. FIRM. Excellent
for concealed carry 386-288-8833

PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control,
in original box. $270,
386-984-7510
STORAGE SHED
10xl6
$2500
Call 288-9858
TRAILER -' 18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot.Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740

450 Good Things
5 Uto Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood

FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771

It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.


I FOPSlef -P Renl~


fItI

S3ELLf

FBNB!T


r63 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8-48
3/2 SW. just renovated, off41 on
246 between I-10 & 75.
5550 mo. $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Country Living
2&3bdrmm S500-S550.
Very clean. NO PETS'
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs. & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
ASSUME PAYMENTS!
4br/2ba on 1/2 acre!
$0 Down Pint! $377. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6574

BAD CREDIT OK!!
A 575 Beacon Score will qualify
you for a new home!
Call Kevin for details!
386-719-5641
Beautiful, Brand new 4/2
manufac-
tured home on 5 acres in Lake
City, Fl. $9,900.00 down, $995.00
per month. Easy Qualifying**
Owner Financing,**
Ready to move in. Call Today!!
512-663-0065.
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call.Kevin 386-719-5641
OWNER FINANCE
New 3 or 4 BR home
Set up on your land or
Mine!! $500 Down/$289 mo.
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
'$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cath.. Cha.dje. Bo
- .. Rulah- Home
3-.S-754-6S "37
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574.

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent


750 Business &
v Office Rentals
2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately ll00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info


FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500


5710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town.
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.



$650 month & bckgmd chk.
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
QUAIL HEIGHTS. 2br/lba
Duplex. Washer/dryer hook up.
Privatafe, secluded, $750 mo
$500 sec. 386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

70n Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, 1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec,ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2 STORY, 2 BR/1.5 BA on
1/2 acre, fenced lot.off Turner Rd.
1st + last + dep. (includes water)
352-335-8330 or 352-258-9598
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Brw/Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
3br/2ba Split floor plan, 1850sf +
garage. Quiet Cul-de-sac, 4 mi SW
of Hwy 90. Privacy fence, Lg
rooms, Jacuzzi tub in Master BR.
$1195m6 $800.dep. 386-984-5872
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
*For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494


Set your Sights

on something







Apply in person or onl]e.. .


R -7



386-754-5422
1137 W. U.S.
Highway 90
Lake City.FI
32055


PrvateEstate o4ueo -*a.eeaWo eoeter
Within the city limits Beautiful .
older home with mature land- O 9 'r
scaping and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5 Obstetrics and Gynecology
baths, 3 fireplaces, private paved .yn e o y
drive. 39.7 acres of property in- -Chandler Mohan, MD Emad Atta, MD
cluded with home. $994,000 or 9' Annmarie Fenn CNM, MS
$2,500 per mo. for rent or home ,
plus 2 acres only $495,000. Call R -Weight Loss/ Hair Removal/ Chemical Peels/ 4D Baby Ultrasounds
for additional info and showings. L-U-t a ALL $69 d
ALL $69
Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst Accepting all Insurance. No Ins visit $50


3 o co-owner (3811106)397-5131
121 or co-owner (386)397-5131 Located Shands Lake Cit & Live Oak


FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office. Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza a
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale

All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race., color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble oi an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172

820 Farms &
2A( Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Dead's Bullard/BKL Properties
3867752-4339 www.landnfl.com.,

SReal Estate'
870 Wanted -
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
2v & Supplies
TOW HITCH
All Ford Pickups and
maybe others. $100.
386-758-1991


Knur h I lurid





Lake City Reporter


SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534


7777--


I s-
* out

S a ll .
ypu


750 Business &
75 Office Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor














Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges e Jkecryreporterccm


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday. january 8, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Gardening

inthe

living room

X T u decided to
Pass on an out-
Sdoor gardening
project this win-
Ster. How about
bringing a garden indoors
and setting it right on your
living room table? Just a
little something to help the
gardener without a garden
survive until spring.
Terrariums are miniature
gardens grown indoors in
a clear glass or plastic con-
tainer such as a fishbowl or
large jar. Containers with
lids will allow the terrarium
to recycle the water in the
system. Open terrariums
will need to be monitored
more closely for moisture
content.
Place
a layer of
gravel in
Choose the bot-
the tom of
location the con-
for your tainer to
terrarium serve as
and then drainage..
choose Then
the fill the
plants. container
about
one-fifth
full with
sterile potting soil so it is
at least two inches deep.
Plants are intended to grow
slowly and stay small in
this kind of garden, so fer-
tilizer is not necessary.
Choose the location for
your terrarium and then
choose the plants. All of
the plants that you select
should suit that particu-
lar location. Don't try to
combine a plant that has
low a light requirement
with a plant that needs lots
of light. Most plants will
need some light, but avoid
direct sunlight because it
will get too hot inside the
container.
Many plants of varying
colors, shapes and sizes
will thrive in a terrarium.
Design your inside garden
the same way you design
an outdoor flower bed. If
you want to view the gar-
den from all sides, plant
taller plants on a 'hill' in the
center with shorter plants
around them. Gardens
that are seen from one
side have the taller plants
toward the back and short-
er plants to the front.
Purchase healthy 1 1/
or 2" potted plants at a
garden center or start your
own using the instructions
found at http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/mgl08 Some foliage
plants to look for include
creeping.fig, ribbon plant,
prayer plants and parlor
palm. Try adding an annu-
al flower for color such as a
fibrous begonia.
After planting your
garden, sprinkle the soil
lightly with water. Water
will seldom be needed, and
apply only a few teaspoons
when the soil is dry. For
more ideas on bringing a
garden indoors, visit www.
solutionsforyourlife.com
or call me at 752-5384.
D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Candy company
on tour with
Guinness
record-holder

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter. com
It doesn't take much
sugar to get most
children excited, so
when the world's
largest chocolate
bar visited Columbia City
Elementary it was defi-
nitely a sugar rush.
Weighing in at 12,190
pounds and measuring
21 feet long, the bar was
officially recognized by
Guinness World Records
and on display Wednesday
for students. The bar's
creator, fundraising
company World's Finest
Chocolate, has toured the
country's schools since
September, with the mega-
sized candy bar, but not
solely to sell chocolate.
The chocolate bar is
part of the "Think Big
Eat Smart" tour, which
encourages children to
consider portion size and
exercise.
During assemblies for
fundraisers, students are
prepared to sit quietly,
said Sarah Lynn Brannan,
tour director. Instead
students participated by
answering questions about
healthy eating and learn-
ing a dance routine. "Our
goal is to get them up and
moving," she said. "The
idea is to make the mes-
sage more memorable and
get the kids excited."
Students watched a
video on portion control
and moderation, with
suggestions for fitting
candy into a healthy life-
style. Brannan said the
chocolate company wants
to make sure they aren't
part of the childhood obe-
sity problem. Students'
cheers filled the room
when Brannan announced
that every student would
receive a free jump rope.
Outside in the school's


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake Cit
Students from Columbia City Elementary School yell Thursday out while participating in the World's Finest Chocolate
'Think Big, Eat Smart' tour.


parking lot, students saw
the colossal candy bar
up close. When it's too
hot outside the candy's
container can be air condi-
tioned.


In May the bar will be
broken up and served at
the Sweets & Snacks Expo
in Chicago. The stop in
Lake City was one of four
in Florida and 600 across


Chelsea Vocal,
an assistant tour
director, dances
-- with first-, fourth-
and fifth-graders
at Columbia City
Elementary School
Thursday. The
presentation was
shown to about
665 children at
the school. The
school was one of
only two schools
in Florida chosen
to be apart of the
tour the other
was a school in
Fernandina Beach.

Reporter

the country.
Fundraising helps
pay for equipment and
student incentives, said
Lana Boone, Columbia
City Elementary principal.


Nutrition is always some-
thing the school wants to
impress on students, she
said. The school will incor-
porate the dance students
learned into physical edu-
cation classes.
Chad Cady of Cady
Fundraising Services said
Columbia City Elementary
has been an awesome
customer for about three
years. Sales representa-
tives were able to choose
a school take part in the
tour. Cady Fundraising
Services' sales territory
covers Orlando and into
Georgia, said Cady, whose
father Mark Cady is the
owner.
The chocolate bar
contains 1,200 pounds of
almonds, 5,500 pounds
of sugar 2,000 pounds of
milk powder, 1,700 pounds
of cocoa butter and 1,400
pounds of chocolate
liquor.


, .c~~ad


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Columbia City Elementary School students pass by the world's biggest chocolate bar Thursday during the World's Finest Chocolate 'Think
Big, Eat Smart' campaign that was held at the school. The campaign stressed eating in moderation and living a long life through daily
exercise and a proper diet. The candy bar weighs 12,190 pounds and is measured at 21-feet-long, 3-feet-high and 4-feet-wide.


The chocolate
bar is part of the
"Think Big Eat
Shnart" tour, which
encourages
children to
consider portion
size and exercise.





ew








2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, JANUARY 8,2012



Topic: Harshing the language


By Troy Appling, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Florida Gateway College

discussing
some ran-
dom literary
methodology
during one of my gradu-
ate seminars at Florida
State University, one of
my colleagues took issue
with a particular critic's
theories. She noted with
enthusiasm that she
wished said critic were
present, because "I'd just
have to harsh on him so
badly." A few days liter,
*my friend was discuss-
ing a particularly intense
movie and noted that it
was too scary for her; she
said that it "weirded" her.
Most recently, several of
my students apparently
live in fear of seekingg," as
one of them called it; that
is, they fear demonstrat-
ing a higher-than-average
proficiency with language
in the presence of their


peers. They'd rather a
hush fall over the room
than to answer a question,
and thus "geek out" in
class.
This adjective-to-verb
transformation seems
more prevalent in the past
few years, primarily with
the Millennial genera-
tion (that is, those born
in the 1980s and 1990s).
"Harshing," "weirding,"
and seekingg" all seemed,
at first thought, to be
curiosities created for
their verbal economy.
The use of "weird" as a
transitive verb meaning
"to preordain" goes back
to around 1300 accord-
ing to the Oxford English
Dictionary, but the usage
in question here, that
of inducing "a sense of.
discomfort, alienation,
strangeness, etc." was
indeed a late-twentieth-
century addition to the _
language, first appearing
in 1972 on the campus of
UNC-Chapel Hill.
"Geeking" as a transi-


tive verb has an even
more recent history, hav-
ing been first recorded in
E.S. Raymond's 1991 New
Hacker's Dictionary. To
"harsh" in the sense of
"become harsh with" is
apparently new enough
that it has not even made
it into the OED; the clos-
est definition is in use
from 1889, a transitive
verb meaning "to rub or
clash roughly against," as
in "the defender [was] tak-
ing care not to harsh his
blade." However, the fact
that this phenomenon in
general seems to be pre-
dominately an oral form
would explain the dearth
of written-references.
In her Biography of the
English Language, C. M.
Millward defines this phe-
nomenon as functionall
shift," or "creating one
part of speech from anoth-
er without altering its.
form." Two other linguists,
SBartolomj and Cabrera,
. note that conversion ,(their
term for functional shift)


"is particularly common in
English because the basic
form of nouns and verbs is
identical in many cases."
(Compare "I'm going
for a run" with "I like to
run.") This allows for
greater fluidity between
parts of speech. (Linguists
note that it's harder for
the shifts to take place
in languages with more
clearly defined differ-
ences between nouns and
verbs.) They contend that
instances of conversion
will continue to increase
because "the meaning is
perfectly comprehensible
and the speaker can rapid-
ly fill a meaningful gap in
his language or use fewer
words." It is this point
which I think explains
the rampant usage 6f
adjective-to-verb shifts in
Present-Day English. .
To borrow a cliche, in
the fast-paced world that'
i5 the twenty-first century,
time is money. DSL replac-
es dialup, e-mail replaces:
snail-mail (giving us a


nifty back-formation in the
process), and PowerPoint
replaces chalkboards. In
today's -society, informa-
tion becomes a commod-
ity, agd the faster it can
be conveyed, the better.
Furthermore, people of
Generation X and later
have had their entire
social structure formed
around this compression
of information, allowing
them to decipher frag-
ments of information on
the fly much better than
earlier generations. Thus
the speech of this gen-
eration- has become much
more allusive and ellipti-
cal; the listener/reader
automatically fills in the
blanks and deciphers
meaning from these short-
'ehed forms.
Take, for example, the
allusiVe nature of such
phrases as "that's so
* September 10th", or "don't
ask him-he's Atlanta'd."
The first instance, mean-
ing passs6, is clearly a ref-
erence to the world before


the terrorist attacks of
2001. The other one poses
perhaps more of a chal-
lenge, reminiscent of deci-
phering Cockney rhyming
slang. The telephone area
code for Atlanta is 404, the
same number used by web
browsers to indicate a "file
not found" error. Thus
someone "Atlanta'd" is
clueless or uninformed.
To return to the func-
tional shifts, however,
the key linguistic issue
is economy. The lis:-
tener understands that
to phrase "I would harsh
him" means "I would treat
him harshly" or that the
phrase "to geek" means to
behave in a geekish man-
ner. Compression is the
ideal-to convey the most
information in the fewest
words. In a world of cell
phones, Twitter, and text
messaging (txt msgng?),
brevity is indeed the soul
of wit-and language..
Contact Troy Appling
at 386-754-4369; email:
troy.appling@fgc.edu


ASSOC
In this Monday, Aug
2009, file photo, bot
alcohol are seen lini
shelves of a liquor s
Springfield, Ill.

Parents h
responsible
for undei
drinking
By Leanne Italie
Associated Press
NEWYORK -1


IATFID PRESS!


. 31,
tles of
ino the


Euthanasia to control


shelter population


.is unpopular solution


By Sue Manning
Associated Press


tore in ) LOS.ANGELES Seven
in 10. pet owners say they
believe animal shelters
id
leld should be allowed to eutha-
nize animals only when they
ble are too sick to be treated or
too aggressive to be adopt-
rage dfed.
-;---. ..-,- Only-a quarter of the peo-
S ple who took part in a recent
AP-Petside.com poll
said animal shelters
should sometimes be
Parents of allowed to put animals


teens: If you think a drinking
disaster at your kid's party
can't happen at your house,.
not with your kid, because!
he's a good kid, its time to
wake up and smell the whis-
key bottle tossed on your
lawn.
Because of the higt risk of
underage drinking and driv-
ing this time of year, many
parents open their homes
to partying teens as a: way
to keep them off the roads.
What some may not know is
that liability laws can leave
Mom and Dad vulnerable to
lawsuits, fines and even jail
time if underage drinking is
found to be going on under
their roof.
. Parents can get in trou-
ble even if they didn't know
about the drinking.
Thafs what a Menlo Parkl
Calif, father says.,he is up,
against
SBill' Burnett, a Stanford
University professor, was
arrested the -night after
Thanksgiving over a base-
ment party thrown by his
17-year-old son to celebrate a
big high school football win.
Burnett said he and his
wife had forbidden alcohol at
the party and were upstairs
at the time police received a
call about possible drinking
by minors. In fact, he said,
he had twice made his way to
the basement to check on the
merry-making.
He spent a night in jail and
was booked on 44 counts of
suspicion of contributing to
the delinquency of a minor.
Each misdemeanor count
carries up to a $2,500 fine
and nearly a year in jail.
Eight states have specific
"social host" laws that say
parents can get in trouble if
underage guests are drink-
ing, even if no one gets hurt,
according to the National
Institutes of Health. (Some
of those states allow parents
to serve alcohol to their own
children in some situations.)
Sixteen other states have
laws that hold Mom and Dad
legally responsible for under-
age drinking under certain
circumstances.


down as a population
control measure.
Gisela Aguila, 51,
'of Miramar, Fla.,
believes shelter ani-
mals should only be
euthanized when
there is no chance they'll
be adopted for example,
if they are extremely ill or
aggressive. "I don't think
shelters should be euthaniz-
ing animals to control the
population," she said.
She'd like to: see an. end
to shelters destroying ani-
mals when they run out of
room, saying, "We are way
too civilized of a society to
allow this."
But Leslie Surprenant 53,
of Saugerties, N.Y., believes
shelters should be allowed
to control populations. She
says no-kill shelters that
only accept animals with
good prospects for adoption
or that turn away animals
once the shelter reaches
capacity do not solve the
problem. .
"That doesn't truly mean
no-kill shelters. It means
there are more animals
out on the streets being hit
by cars and starving and
living in Dumpsters," said
Surprenant, who has two
dogs and a cat "It does not
mean the general popula-
.tion is lower; it just means
that they've opted not to
kill."
Surprenant believes spay-.
ing and neutering is the way
to go. In fact, higher rates
of spaying and neutering
in recent decades have cut
the number of abandoned
puppies and kittens, which
in turn has cut euthanasia
rates. Before 1970, about
20 million animals were
euthanized each year in this
country. In 2011, fewer than
4 million abandoned ani-
mals were euthanized.
Younger pet owners are
most likely to favor no-kill
policies, with 79 percent of
those under 30 saying shel-
ters should only euthanize
animals that are untreatable
or too aggressive, compared
with 67 percent of those age


50 or over saying that. Spoka
The poll results are effort
encouraging to leaders of He
,the nation's no-kill move- a no-I
ment, who'd like to see dogs,
the, U.S. become a "no-kill may
nation" with homes for becau
every adoptable pet, and popul;
euthanasia reserved only Thf
for extremely.ill or aggres- attract
sive animals. reek
-- -Any plan will take team- that a
work between shelters with at a V


'I don't think shelters
should be euthanizing
animals to control the
population.9
Gisela Aguila of Miramar, Fla.


government contracts that are ii
must accept every animal gassir
and the no-kill shelters that Bes
often only take animals they Societ
can help, said Ed Sayres,' try's
president and CEO of the tuary
A American Society for the abuse
Preventioti oqf Cruelty to Utah,
Animals. 1,700
Rich Avanzino, president bits,
of Alameda-based Maddie's under
Fund, pioneered no-kill in said I
San Francisco in the early
'90s through a pact between b-.i
the open-admission city
shelter and the local Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty ".
to Animals. .
"We are just a breath away
from doing what is right o
for the animals," Avanzino
said.
He- believes the.country
can achieve no-kill status by '.-1
2015, partly due to corpo-
rate giving to animal causes,
which totaled about $30 mil-
lion in 2010 and is expect-
ed to reach $70 million by '
2015. That money can help
with spaying, neutering and
outreach, he said.
Public attitudes are also
changing, with more people
saying ifs unacceptable for '"
pets to languish or die in .
an animal shelter, Avanzino
said.
Avanzino pioneered
the no-kill concept in San
Francisco. Sayres succeed-
ed him and nurtured it, then
went to New York and imple-
mented it there in a much
bigger way. The model is
the same, but instead of two
partner agencies like in San
Francisco, New York has
155, Sayres said.
About 44,000 animals
enter New York City shel-
ters each year. Since Sayres
has been there, the eutha-
nasia rate has dropped from
74 percent to 27 percent
The ASPCA has also
teamed up with 11 commu-
nities from Tampa, Fla., to


ne, Wash., in no-kill
s, Sayres said.
believes he .will see
ill nation, at least for
in his lifetime. Cats
take a little longer.
se of the large feral
ation, he said.
e euthanasia issue
ted some attentionthis
when it was reported
a stray'cat being held.
West Valley City, Utah,
animal shelter
survived two
trips to the shel-
ter's gas cham-
ber. The shelter
has stopped try-
ing to kill the cat,
named Andrea,
and she :, has.
been adopted.
Shelter 'officials
investigating why the
ig failed.
st Friends Animal
y operates the coun-
largest no-kill sanc-
for ,abandoned and
d animals. The Kanab,
preserve is home to
dogs, cats, birds, rab-
horses and wildlife
'going rehabilitation,
Best Friendsi director


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This undated photo courtesy of Best Friends Animal Society
shows a cat named Cala Lilly at the Best Friends Animal
Society in Kenab Utah. Best Friends Animal Society operates
'the country's largest no-kill sanctuary for abandoned and
abused animals.


Gregory Castle.
More than 800 ,grass-
roots rescue organizations
belong to Best Friends'
No More Homeless Pets
Network and are working to


make their communities no-
kill, Castle said. Attendance
at an annual conference
for network members has
grown from 250 in 2001 to
1,300 last year.


take': Reporter


ngagpm. ckage






























Complimentary

Engagement Package


i i


YP












LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012


DEAR ABBY


Address book names unlock


mother-in-law's memories


DEAR ABBY: Several
years agd my mother-in-law
had to be placed in a nursing
care residence because of
dementia. When I visited her,
it became more and more
difficult to find things to talk
about, until one day I came
across her old address book.
The idea struck me to take
it with me each time I visited
her, and what a success it
was!
I started at the beginning
of the "A" section, giving her
a name and asking her to tell
me about that person. She
remembered a lot about most
of the people in the book and
related wonderful stories of
friendships in rural America
during the Great Depression
of the 1930s. Of course, there
were hardships, too. She and
my father-in-law worked side-
by-side on the farm to support
their family.,
Our "story time" visits
continued until full-blown
Alzheimer's disease set in.
I only hope she enjoyed
our times together as much
as I did. They were special
to me, and I'd always leave
the nursing home with a
smile. FOUND A WAY IN
KANSAS,
DEAR FOUND A WAY:
I'm sure your mother-in-law
enjoyed those visits, and
what a treasure trove of fam-
ily history she must have
shared with you. Please
write down all the stories
you remember for the rest
of the family because they


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

are priceless. Your idea was
brilliant, and thank you for
sharing it with me and my
readers.



DEAR ABBY: I have
recently become engaged.
I have been planning this
day since I was a little girl.
My problem is my mother.
She's a little bit of a control
freak. She plans to pay for
the wedding which is nice
and I appreciate it but at
the same time I feel like she's
ignoring my plans and substi-
tuting hers. Every time I tell
her what I'd like, she tries to
persuade me to do what she
wants.
I even tried once being -
. rude and telling her that she
has had four weddings and
this one is mine, but: she got
defensive when I tried to ,
be frank with her. I feel like
nothing I suggest is good
enough. I don't want to spoil
this for her because I'm her
only daughter, but I don't
want her spoiling it for me
because HOPEFULLY this


will be my only wedding.
- LOSING PATIENCE IN
LOUISIANA
DEAR LOSING
PATIENCE: This may not
be what you would like mic
to say, but as long as your"
mother is footing the bills
for your wedding, she will
have some say in the plan-
ning. If you prefer to make
this a one-woman production
- and that's your privilege
- thank her warmly for her
generous offer and tell her
you can't accept it, and that
you will be planning and
paying for your wedding
yourself.
** ** **

DEARABBY: I work in a
small, quiet office. My boss sits
at the desk across from me and
spends a great deal of time bit-
ing his nails. The noise 'drives
me crazy and turns an other-
wise pleasant work experience
into a stressful one.
I've tried turning up the
radio, to no avail. Do you
have any suggestions on
how to tell my boss that he
has. a loud ;mnd nasty habit?
- TRAPPED WITH A NAIL.
BITER
DEAR TRAPPED: No, I do
not, an I recommend against
you doing it. Be thankful he's
not biting his toenails.

I Write pear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Lo
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Be careful how you respond
to people with whom you have
an emotional issue. Recognize
both sides of any matter that
concerns you. Someone is
likely to try to bully you. Don't
get angry or take offense, but
don't give in, either. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Travel or visit someone
who can offer the type of
challenge or information you
require to stimulate you men-
tally. Changing your environ-
ment for the day will help
motivate you to incorporate
something or someone new
into your life. **-**
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Don't fret over legal or finan-
cial issues that are out of your
control. Focus more on ways
to put yourself in demand by
adding skills or knowledge
that will make you more
employable. Taking action will
solve your problem. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): A last-minute change will
alter your plans and cause
emotional tension. Don't
sulk when compromise is
required. Suggest alterna-
tives and you can save the
dav. and eniov a varietPv of


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

interesting events or activi-
ties. An open mind is the key
to progress. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Keep your thoughts and
feelings to yourself. You are
best not to upset anyone who
can affect your emotional
well-being or your financial
future. A change of scenery
will do you good and help
you put things back into per-
spective. ***-
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Do for others and they
will do for you. The results
you get will bring the help
you need to finish a job that
can improve your personal
life and your surroundings.
Strive for perfection. ****"
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
Be careful what you wish
for. You will have difficulty
dealing with personal mat-
ters. Emotidhons will surface,.
causing problems evaluating
the gravity of the situation.
Take a break until you bet-
ter understand howto make,
improvements*. t* '
SCORPIQ-(Oct. 23-Nov. 21):


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luls Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
.: Each letter'in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE. L equals B
" TWBG ... GCGXDLHZD SP KOFJ SPGD.
UW.OS K'S, WOZ BHJ.S NGHNAG .XGWAAD
zH o' s GO V HD KS HOEG SPG D R G S
KS." F GAJG D RXWBBGX
Praoic.us Sciti'onG tr 'o do mnt rignt thing with money ... clip some coupons
r. u IGour surr.rr .l-,:,mo rn r-.la Of eight." LL Cool J
'20 1-. 4,, NElA inr: dost. by Universal Uclick 1-9


Travel, research and discus-
sions will all contribute to a
decision that will help you
make a positive move. Visiting
a place from your past will
spark an idea that can lead
to a satisfying compromise.
Overcome uncertainty with
ingenuity. *****
SSAGITrARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You'll be caught
up in the past, present and
future. Remembering should
be educational, while updat-
ing what you have done
should be eye-opening and
allow you to project the pos-
sibilities that lay ahead. Love
is in the stars. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Take on whatever and
whoever gets in your way.
You will have the strength to
overcome whatever you face.
Your ability to take action will
be recognized and rewarded.
A change of pace and scen-
ery will lead to greater
expansion. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Don't let youngsters or
seniors take advantage of
, you. Offer what you can, but
refuse to go beyond your
comfort zone. Self-improve-
imnent projects will bring you
the biggest rewards and lead
Sto financial gains. Put your
needs first '***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Formulate a plan and
discuss your objectives with
a potential partner. Take con-
trol and show your strengths.
Once you have made it clear
who will be responsible for
what, you can proceed with-
out delay. Romance is high-
lighted. *****


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


Addendum By Patrick Berry / Edited by Will Shortz 1. 1 2 3 4W 516 7 81' .10I112 13 114 15 16 17


Across
1 Many, college
profs
5 Food preserver
10 Sandwich choice,
for short
13 Crosswise to the
keel
18 Pool ball's
"Watch this!"
Comment .'
21 Aries affirmaiite
22 Onetime first
name in Israeli
,politics
23 High-mounted/
w window you
can't stop
looking at? ,
25 "Come ?"
26 Steely' Dan album
featuring
"Deacon Blues"
27 Traveled'by bus
28 Thin blue line?
29-Resisted a job
offer; say
30 Go downhill
32 Part of a watch
touching the '
breastbone?
35 End of many a
list
36 Camper.'s canful
38 She's
entertaining
39 Heist planner's
concern
41 Wedding part
42 Ceiling
45 Strong winds
46 "You don't have
to be busy to
look busy," e.g.?

For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


54 Squished bug,
e.g.
56 [I'm so funny!]
57 Go all to pieces-
58 Antipato tidbil
59 Pill that relieves
computer-related
anxiety?
63 High
64 Bring in
65 History.topic
66 "I think," to
texters
68 Empire State
Building
climber, for.
short
69 Holds under the
tap
71 Inhuman group of
golfers?
76 Behaved
77 1988 Summer
Olympics site
79 Handbag
monogram
80 "A Love Like
(Barbra
Streisand album)
81 Sultan's wife,
perhaps?
83 Sends up
85 Thank you for
waiting
86 Reed of rock
87 "1984" Y
superstate
89 Desperately want
94 Bad experience
96 Late sixth-
century year
99 Jungle king's
jeans and
overalls?
102 Looked intently
104 Knocked on the
noggin
105 Rainy day
planner?


106 Twelve Oaks
neighbor
108 Pac-12 athlete
109 Restaurant .
greeter's option
110 Ennui among
quantum
physicists?
114 Go on a
shopping.spree
115 Savings plan.
briefly)
'116 Dessert
delivered over
the Internet?
117 Brouhahas
118 Cowlick fixer
119 Monster of
Jewish folklore
120 The Big Board,
for short

Down
1 "What a loa8 of
Hogwashh"
2 Jimi Hendrix's
debut single
3 Set out-
4 Stray from
righteousness
5 Refuge to release
6 Low-pH compound
7 Go to the tape?
8 hath an
enemy called
Ignorance": Ben
Jonson
9 Negative
conjunction
10 Conjecture
11 It's good in.Italy
12 Pal of Huck Finn
13 Swirly marbles
14 "The Big Sleep"
co-star, 1946
15 Funny Boosler
16.They're
exchanged in
France


17 Candy eaten ih
handfuls
19 "Praying" part of
a.praying mantis
20 Master .
24 Pixar title
character
29 Best-selling
author who
wrote "I did not
write it. God
wrote it. I
merely did his
dictation"
31 Downswing
32 They're heavy
during storms
33 Sample
34 Injury symptom
36 Reception room
in a mansion
37 Rare craps roll
40 Sharp nails
41 Through
42 "The Big Bang
Theory" network
43 Sports
Illustrated's
Sportsman of the
Century
44 Creamy Italian
side dish
46 One taking a bow
in Japan
47 Smoothie
ingredient
48 Homme's partner
49 Travel by car
50 ___ Quijano
(Don Quixote's
real name)
51 Deleting
52 "__ got a
feeling .."
53 What's in an Rx
55 Leaning'
60 Words to live by
61 Garden spot
62 Lash of old
westerns


63 Hides in the
shadows
67 In olden times
69 When doubled,
ardent
70 Diamonds, to a
yegg
72 Einstein's
I birthplace
73 NATO alphabet
vowel
74 Hosp. diagnostic
aid
75 Ability to
identify Zener
cards


77 Lacking a coat,
maybe
78 de vie
82 Fill, and then
some
83 Big name in
Champagne
84 Easily drawn gun
87 One of the music
industry's Big
Four
88 Kick out
89 If everything
goes your way


90 Cut-rate'
91 Fierce, as an
argument
92 Weather Channel
newsmaker
93 Wicked ones
94 About ready to
drop
95 Square
97 Badly made
98 Says no to
100 Catch
101 R. J. Reynolds
brand


102 Like three of
golf's four
majors
103 "Philadelphia"
director
106 Greenish blue
107 Having the
knack
110 Chinese zodiac
animal
111 Smoke
112 Sort who's a'
natural leader,
supposedly
113 Great time


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
C ANITAT1A A M ITCIHUM
O0VERDU NRUINS -OKOONO
B A R EA L D O6 IT w WNOO(0 P IN
RI TE LEGO MOC EATA KOTO
ALSOP ALLSMILES MINES
RA KS ABATE SI TEL
CORNCH P BYTES T AMCARS

NL R IA C HE S D T A SU T Y H
M DERN0D TT D
NEGRI 1cICI G ABU E
BT NTSEADTN SUGAR I
S GI GE BE WAD
MO I SP MAN I HR K
TR T ED I TA EFF C S
T L IRT IW A AASM
PHI RIE I A I LBO0




ALS STI ON TR I LI DAP
TKT Z EST SSS R ETA


1 2 5


75 92 8


6 1


48 9 3 57


2 8


3 5


1 6 4


93 7


4 8 3 2


ZLE 6 8 9 V 9 L


9 L 8 L1 C E 6 9 E


17 6 99 L ZE L 8


L.199 J E 8 L 6 E


E 8 6 17 9 L EL 9


L 9 Z L 6 9 8 17


9 L-L E 9 81- 6


8 17 6 L fL iA_9-


6 9 L 8 1 9V L
69L89VSZL


Page Editor: Robert Bridges 754-0428












4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY. JANUARY 8. 2012


Flower











Plant them right to avoid spring no-shows.


By Dean Fosdick
Associated Press

ng bunch. They can
be buried upside down,
stomped on or ignored,
yet most will bloom for
several seasons.
There
are the
occasional
no-shows,
of course
- those
that fail
to flower
and deliv-
er the
first burst
of color
in early
spring.
Here's
why some
bulbs fall This April 21, 2009 photo
short, and Bulborum, a museum ga
what you Village, The Netherlands
can do Bulborum in Limmen villa
about it: is the only museum gard
U Bad where you can find over
bulbs: hyacinth, daffodil and oth
Even bloom. Some of the tulipE
proven
flower
bulbs can
go bad. "Give them the squeeze
test," said Brent Roozen, spokes-
man for Washington Bulb Co., the
continent's largest tulip grower, in
Mount Vernon, Wash. "If there are
brown or black spots on them or
they're soft to the touch, don't use


them."
Poor timing. Spring-blooming
bulbs need time to go dormant if
they're to bloom. Planting dates
vary with the climate but often
extend into the winter. Just get
them into the ground early enough
so they can develop roots.
Expired shelf life. "You can't
carry them over (from season
to season). The bulbs will dry,"
Roozen said. "When customers ask
me about the best time for plant-
ing, I always tell them 'today'."
Crowding. "Bulbs will grow,
even if you don't give them enough
shoulder room," Roozen said. "But


rd

eg
er


in a few years, the flowers and
the blooms will progressively get
smaller."
Predation: 'Tulips are the
'chocolate cake and ice cream' of
the bulb world if there are voles
or deer in the area," said Becky
Heath, co-owner of Brent and
Becky's Bulbs at Gloucester, Va.
"We spray our
tulips with a
nasty smell-
ing substance
to mask their
sweet smell,
and it really
helps, but
sometimes
for only
one year."
Daffodils,
leucojum,
galanthus and
colchiums are
ASSOCIATED PRESS the bulbs to
shows the Hortus choose if you
en in Limmen want some-
The Hortus thing that no
e, The Netherlands, animal eats,
n in the world she said.


3,700 different tulips,
ler bulb cultivars in
s date from 1595.


Environment.
"If bulbs are a
failure because
they fail to


bloom year
after year, it's probably because
the gardener is in 'shade denial',".
Heath said. "There can be a lot of
sun when the bulbs are in bloom,
so that seems like enough sun-
light. However, when photosynthe-
sis happens after flowering time,
which is crucial for the bulb to
generate enough nutrients for the
next seasons, the leaves are on the
trees and there often isn't enough
sunlight. Then the bulbs dwindle."
Planting depth. "Bulbs planted
at too shallow a depth are vulnera-
ble to frost heaves that can expose
them to drying winter winds and
cold," said Hans Langeveld, vice
president and owner of Longfield
Gardens LLC, a source of bulbs
and perennials in Lakewood, N.J.
Plant tulips and daffodils 6 inches
deep where winters are the cold-
est, he said. Plant smaller bulbs
like crocus and muscari 4 to 5


This April 20, 2009 photo shows tulip bulbs being used for an ornamental purpose in a private garden near
Alkmaar, The Netherlands. Flower bulbs are a forgiving bunch. They can be buried upside down, stomped
on or ignored, yet most will bloom for several seasons.


inches deep.
Over-watering in summer. Most
bulbs come from arid climates and thrive
where summers are dry, Langeveld said.
Plan to start a new batch next fall
unless bulbs are labeled "Good for
Naturalizing," he said. "Most tulips
are annuals for American gardeners,
but some are famous for coming back,
including the Darwin hybrids. Other
naturalizers include daffodils and other
narcissi, muscari, alliums and crocuses.'

Online: For more about the care and


feeding of flower bulbs, see plants/landscape/flowers/
this Clemson University hgicll55.html
fact sheet: You can contact Dean
http://www.clemson. Fosdick at deanfosdick@
edu./extension/hgic/ netscape.net


Home's age important for child lead exposure


By Lauran Neergaard
Associated Press
WASHINGTON If you've been put-
ting off repairing a peeling windowsill, or
you're thinking of knocking out a wall,
listen up: Check how old your house is.
You may need to take steps to protect
your kids from dangerous lead.
The risk of lead-based paint from older
homes is back in the
news, as the govern-
ment considers tighten-
ing the definition of lead Very h
poisoning in babies, els can
toddlers and preschool- convu
ers. Lower levels than death
previously thought may death t
harm their developing rari


brains.
That's a scary-sound-
ing message. But from a practical stand-
point, it's not clear how much would
change if the government follows that
advice. Already there's been a big drop
in childhood lead poisoning in the U.S.
over the past few decades. Public health
programs have targeted the youngsters
most at risk poor children living in
crumbling housing, mostly in cities to
try to get them tested and their homes
cleaned up.
But specialists say it can be a risk
in more affluent areas, too, as do-it-
yourselfers embark on fix-ups without
knowing anything about an environmen-
tal hazard that long ago faded from the
headlines.
The main value of the proposed
change may be in increasing awareness
of how to avoid lead in everyday life.
"What we need to do is prevent the
exposure in the first place," said Dr.
Nicholas Newman, who directs the
environmental health and lead clinic at
Cincinnati Children's Hospital.
There are lots of ways people can
be exposed to lead: Soil polluted from
the leaded gasoline of yesteryear. Old
plumbing with lead solder. Improperly
using lead-glazed pottery or leaded crys-


i
I
Fl
t


tal with food. Certain jobs that expose
workers .to the metal. Hobbies like refin-
ishing old painted furniture.
Sometimes even imported toys or
children's jewelry can have illegal lead
levels, prompting recalls if they're caught
on the U.S. market
But the main way that U.S. children
are exposed is from layers of old paint
in buildings built before 1978, when lead
was banned
from residen-
tial paint
gh lead lev- Sure, the
cause coma, walls might
sions, even have been
rtpately Painted over
fortunately a recently, and
:y today, there may be
no obvious
paint chips to
attract a tot crawling around on the floor.
But friction from opening and closing
windows and doors allows tiny leaded
particles to make their way into house-
hold dust and youngsters then get it
on their hands that go into their mouths,
explained Dr. John Rosen, a lead poison-
ing specialist at the Children's Hospital
at Montefiore in New York City.
Very high lead levels can cause coma,
convulsions, even death, fortunately a
rarity today. But lower levels, especially
in children under 6, can -harm a child's
brain, can reduce IQ and cause other
learning, attention and behavioral prob-
lems without any obvious symptoms
to alert the parent
How much is too much? Until now,
the definition of lead poisoning in young
children was 10 micrograms of lead per
deciliter of blood. But in a draft report last
fall, the National Toxicology Program
analyzed recent scientific research to
conclude there's good evidence that lev-
els lower than 10 are a risk. Now advis-
ers to the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention are urging that agency to
lower the definition to 5 micrograms for
now, periodically reassessing.
If the CDC agrees, its advisers esti-


mated that could classify about 450,000
children with lead poisoning, up from
roughly 250,000 today.
At these levels, there's no treatment
for the child other than to end the ongo-
ing exposure clean up the house,
Newman stressed. That's why preven-
tion is so important And while the
youngest children are the most vulner-
able, lead's not good for anyone's brain,
so he advises taking common-sense pre-
cautions before potential exposures like
renovating an old home.
What should families do? Here's advice
from the Environmental Protection
Agency and public health agencies:
Check the age of your house. At
checkups for babies through age 5, pedi-
atricians are supposed to ask if you live
in a home built before 1960, or one built
before 1978 that's recently undergone
renovation. The answers help guide who
may need a blood test to check lead
levels. Some states require testing of
toddlers on Medicaid.
Wash kids' hands before they eat,
good advice no matter where you live or
how old your house.
Clean up paint chips immediately,
and regularly wash toys that tots put in
their mouths.
Regularly wash windowsills and
floors where paint dust can collect
If you're planning repairs or renova-
tion in an old building, use lead-certified
contractors who must follow EPA rules
to minimize exposure from the work and
can perform quality tests to see if your
old paint really contains lead.
If you rent and have peeling paint,
notify your landlord. Many cities and
states have lead-abatement rules, and
programs to contact for help.
Aside from paint, take off shoes at
the door, to minimize tracking in lead-
tainted soil.
Use only cold water for drinking,
cooking and making baby formula, and
run it for 15 to 30 seconds. Hot tap water
can pick up more lead from older plumb-
ing than cold water.