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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01745
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 7, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01745
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





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Reporter


Saturday, January 7, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 290 M 75 cents





Bonus time for county schools


Nine are eligible for
funds, based on their
state-assigned grade.

By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter.com

Bonus money for nine Columbia County
schools will be distributed to the district by
Feb. 20, after the money was delayed while


the state calculated grades for high schools.
Schools see the money typically two to
three weeks after it is transferred to the
district, said Michael Millikin, Columbia
County School District superintendent
The state delayed distributing more
than $100 million in bonus money until it
released high school grades Wednesday.
Public schools that receive an "A" school
grade or show grade improvement are
eligible for about $70 per student as part of
the School Recognition Program.
Columbia City Elementary, Eastside


Elementary, Fort White
Elementary, Melrose
Park Elementary,
Pinemount Elementary,
Summers Elementary,
Westside Elementary,
Niblack Elementary and
Millikin Lake City Middle will
receive money from the
state.
Last year the state Department of
Education gave out money in two phases,
giving elementary and middle schools


their money earlier, as the two-year-old
formula for calculating high school grades
takes longer. However this year the state
delayed payments partly out of concern
that the state's pot of money might not be
sufficient
. Bonus money was as high as $100 per
student in 2007, although schools received
$75 per student last year, according to a
Florida House of Representative publica-
tion. How much each school receives

BONUS continued on 3A


One really big chocolate bar


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILaKe GCity Reporter
Columbia City Elementary School students pass by the world's biggest chocolate bar during World's Finest Chocolate's 'Think Big, Eat Smart' campaign,
held at the school Thursday. The campaign stressed eating in moderation, daily exercise and a proper diet. See Sunday's Lake City Reporter for the story.
The candy bar, by the way, weighs 12,190 pounds and measures 21 feet long, 3 feet high and 4 feet wide.




Who owns Apollo 13 checklist?


Sale by commander of
ill-fated vessel called
into question by NASA.

By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI NASA is question-
ing whether Apollo 13 commander
James Lovell has the right to sell
a 70-page checklist from the flight
that includes his handwritten cal-
culations that were crucial in guid-
ing the damaged spacecraft back
to Earth.
The document was sold by
Heritage Auctions in November for
more than $388,000, some 15 times
its initial list price. The checklist
gained great fame as part of a key
dramatic scene in the 1995 film
"Apollo 13" in which actor Tom
Hanks plays Lovell making the
calculations.
After the sale, NASA contacted
Heritage to ask whether Lovell had
title to the checklist Greg Rohan,
president of Dallas-based Heritage,
said Thursday the sale has been
suspended pending the outcome
of the inquiry. The checklist, he
said, is being stored for now in the
company's vault.
Rohan said Lovell provided a
signed affidavit that he had clear
title to the ring-bound checklist,
which is standard procedure.
Heritage does robust business in
space memorabilia and this is the
first time NASA has ever raised
questions about ownership of its
items, he added.
"It's one that is near and dear
to our hearts," Rohan said of the
space collectibles business. "We,
like a lot of people, consider these


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
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astronauts to be national heroes."
The latest inquiry follows a fed-
eral lawsuit NASA filed last year in
Miami against Apollo 14 astronaut
Edgar Mitchell seeking return of
a camera he brought back from
his 1971 moon mission. That law-
suit was settled in October when
Mitchell agreed to give the camera
to NASA, which in turn is donating
it to the National Air and Space
Museum in.Washington ......
NASA spokesman Bob Jacobs
said the lawsuit and Lovell inquiry
do not represent an aggressive,
broad new agency effort to recov-
er space items.
"It's a challenge to continually
monitor the growing auctions com-
munity, which is usually how these
items come to light," he said in an
email. 'This latest issue demon-
strates a need to reach out to for-
mer astronauts and other former
agency personnel who may have
these kind of items."
Lovell, 83, lives near Chicago
and owns a restaurant bearing his
name in Lake Forest, Ill In an
email Friday to The Associated
Press, the former astronaut said
he is "seeking a meeting with
NASA administration to clear up
this misunderstanding." He did not
elaborate.
The Apollo 13 moon mission
was aborted about 200,000 miles
from Earth when an oxygen tank
exploded on April 13, 1970, caus-
ing another tank to fail and seri-
ously jeopardizing- the three-man
crew's ability to return home.
Astronaut Jack Swigert famously
said "Houston, we've had a prob-
lem here" after the explosion.
The crew was forced to move

NASA continued on 3A


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ASSOCIATED PRESS
This file photo released by Heritage Auctions shows a key page from the
Apollo 13 Lunar Module Checklist with handwriting by Commander James
Lovell.The list shows calculations made by Lovell that helped him and his
crew navigate the damaged aircraft back to earth. Lovell has the right to
sell a 70-page checklist.


i i.or Opinion
People
ObitEuaries
Adice & Comics
Puzzles


4A

.... . 6A
... 7A
... 9A


TODAY
PEOPLE
Sheen gives $
to tornado r


200K


jobs


added


in Dec.


By CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER and
PAUL WISEMAN
AP Economics Writers

WASHINGTON Four
painful years after the Great
Recession struck and wiped
out 8.7 million jQbs, the
United States may finally be
in an elusive pattern known
as a virtuous cycle an
escalating loop of hiring
and spending.
The nation added 200,000
jobs in December in a burst
of hiring that drove the
unemployment rate down
two notches to 8.5 percent,
its lowest in almost three
years, and led economists to
conclude that the improve-
ment in the job market
might just last.
"There is more horse-
power to this economy than
most believe," said Sung
Won Sohn, an economics
professor at California State
University, Channel Islands.
'The stars are aligned right
for a meaningful economic
recovery."
It was the sixth month
in a row that the economy
added at least 100,000 jobs,
the longest streak since
2006. The economy added
jobs every month last year,
the first time that has hap-
pened since 2005.
And the unemployment
rate, which peaked at 10
percefit in October 2009
and stood at 9.1 percent
in August, has fallen four
months straight. It was 8.7
percent in November.
If economics textbooks
and the best hopes of
millions of unemployed
Americans are confirmed,
the virtuous cycle may be
under way, which would
suggest the job market will
continue to strengthen.
When people are hired,
they have more money to
spend. The means greater
demand for goods and ser-
vices and results in busi-
nesses hiring even more
people. That results in even
more spending and leads to
even more hiring.
That would be the
reverse of the vicious cycle
that took hold during the
Great Recession. People
lost jobs and spent less,
so businesses rang up less
sales and were forced to lay
off more people. That led
to even less spending and
more layoffs.
'"The labor market is
healing," said Diane Swonk,
chief economist at Mesirow
Financial. She cautioned
JOBS continued on 3A

IN COMING
E SUNDAY
;25K Was K-9 death
relief, scene staged?


I


- -


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_ --


'


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012

Celebrity Birthdays


FLORIDA"
= "O Wednesday:
9-18-21-22-33-51
x5


CAH 3 Friday:
s -Afternoon: 8-1-6
Night: 8-4-9


^- Friday:
^t Aftemoon: 3-9-6-9
Night: 4-4-1-9


Thursday:
3-9-17-26-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Sheen gives $25K to tornado relief


TUSCALOOSA, Ala. Actor
Charlie Sheen quietly donated
$25,000 to help tornado relief in
Alabama, making good on a pledge to
help survivors of the deadly twisters
even though some had doubted his
promises.
The head of Tuscaloosa's tourism
agency, Don Staley, said a repre-
sentative of Sheen recently turned
over money that came in through a
fundraising website that the actor set
up after tornadoes
last spring killed


in the west Alabama
city.
Sheen wrote a
check for about
$15,000 after the web-
site generated just Sheen
$10,000 in contribu-
tions.
"He said he wanted to raise
$25,000, and he made good on that,"
said Bob Maron, one of Sheen's man-
agers.
Sheen visited Tuscaloosa after
the April 27 twisters in response to
messages from then-University of
Alabama student David Harris, who
had sent tweets to celebrities ask-
ing them to help out Sheen who
had been fired the previous month
from the hit sitcom 'Two and a Half
Men" talked about staging a relief
show and celebrity ball game to raise
$25,000.
Months passed and many of
Sheen's plans didn't materialize, lead-
ing some to wonder whether he'd for-
gotten about the town of more than
80,000. But the actor donated the
money without any public announce-
ment around Dec. 1, said Donny
Jones of the West Alabama Chamber
of Commerce, which is helping man-
age the Tuscaloosa Disaster Relief


Fund, which received the donation.
Staley, who accompanied Sheen
during his daylong visit to Alabama,
said the actor just wanted to help.
"The man delivered," Staley said
Wednesday. "He's a man of his word."
Tornadoes that ravaged the South
last April badly damaged or destroyed
thousands of homes and businesses
in Alabama.
After touring the destruction and
visiting with survivors and relief
workers, Sheen posted a photo and
message on Twitter that called the
scene "beyond words."


Brothers has been released from
the Metro Nashville Jail. He was
charged with aggravated assault,
public intoxication and disorderly
conduct late Wednesday night'
Police say the man seated next to
him, Ronald Sixt Jr., was treated for
minor facial injuries.
Officers say Sixt apparently
bumped into Brothers and the two
argued, fought and then Brothers
took a knife out of his back pocket
and began stabbing Sixt while
Allman was still on stage. Ryman
security broke up the fight and
called police.


Barrymore gets engaged eetwood Mac
to art consultant Ex-m eetwood Mac
member Weston dies


NEW YORK Drew Barrymore
is engaged to art consultant Will
Kopelman.
Barrymore's publicist confirmed
the engagement Friday. The couple
were reportedly engaged over the
holidays in Sun Valley, Idaho. It will
be the actress' third marriage.
Us Weekly first reported the
engagement A photo of the pair, in
which Barrymore sports a diamond
ring, was released to People maga-
zine.
'The 36-year-old Barrymore was
briefly married to Jeremy Thomas in
1994 and to comedian Tom Green in
2001. .
Kopelman is the son of former
Chanel CEO Arie Kopelman.

Man stabbed during
Greg Allman concert
NASHVILLE, Tenn. A man was
stabbed during a Gregg Allman per-
formance at the Ryman Auditorium
and a concertgoer has been charged
in the assault
Forty-four-year-old Carl Darren:


LONDON Bob Weston, a British
guitarist who played with Fleetwood
Mac, has died aged 64.
Police say Weston's body was
found in his north London home on
Tuesday after neighbors raised the
alarm.
Police said Friday that his death
was not being treated a suspicious.
An aatopsy-revealed the causes of
deafh as gastric intestinal hemor-
rhage, cirrhosis of the liver and
throat problems. .
Weston joined Fleetwood Mac
in 1972 as replacement for Danny
Kirwan, and played on the band's
albums "Penguin" and "Mystery to
Me." '
But during an American tour the
next year, Mick Fleetwood discov-
ered Weston was having an affair
with his wife, Jenny Boyd. IWeston
was fired. :' :
He released several solo albums
and played with musicians including
Long John Baldry, Murray Head,
Sandy Denny and Steve Marriott.
He is survived by a brother.
T .(AP)


Author William Peter
Blatty is 84.
Pop musician Paul
Revere is 74.
Magazine publisher
Jann Wenner is 66.
Singer Kenny Loggins
is 64.
Actress Erin Gray is 62.
Actor David Caruso
is 56.
Katie Couric is 55.
Country singer David
Lee Murphy is 53.


Rock musician Kathy
Valentine (The Go-Go's)
is 53.
M Actor Nicolas Cage
is 48.
Singer-songwriter
John Ondrasik (Five for
Fighting) is 47.
Actor Jeremy Renner
is 41.
Country singer-musi-
cian John Rich is 38.
Actor Dustin Diamond
is 35.


Daily Scripture
"[Be Holy] Therefore, with
minds that are alert and fully
sober, set your hope on the
grace to be brought to you
when Jesus Christ is revealed at
his coming."

1 Peter 1:13 NIV

Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space..And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLO


City settles death
suit for $2.6M
TALLAHASSEE -
Tallahassee city commis-
sioners have approved a
$2.6 million settlement in
the wrongful-death suit of
a police informant who was
fatally shot during a drug
sting.
The parents of 23-year-
old Rachel Hoffman
filed suit after her
2008 death, seeking
money damages from
the city of Tallahassee.
Commissioners decided
to settle Friday, with the
trial scheduled to begin
Monday.
Hoffman's parents claim
city police were negligent
in setting up the Florida
State graduate as an under-
cover informant after she
was caught with marijuana
and pills she didn't have
a prescription for. She
was shot five times after
police lost track of her
during a purported drug
deal in a rural area north
of Tallahassee. Her body
was found 36 hours later in
a roadside ditch in Taylor
County, roughly 50 miles
away.

Lawmaker pushes
for immigration bill
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida lawmakers will
likely have another battle
over immigration during
their upcoming session.
State Rep. Gayle Harrell,
R-Stuart, on Friday filed
a bill that would require
employers in the state to
check the status of new
employees against a fed-
eral database also known
as E-Verify. The new
requirement would start in
January 2013 if lawmakers
approve the bill.
Last year the GOP-
controlled Legislature
debated a tough immi-
gration bill that was
backed by several leading
Republicans. But the House


and Senate could not agree
on the bill and the measure
died.
Since that time neither
Gov. Rick Scott nor other
legislative leaders have spo-
ken much about the need
for legislation this year.

Legislature may
change primary
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida lawmakers are con-
sidering whether to change
the date of the August pri-
mary election again.
A Sefiate panel next
week will take up a bill that
would push back the date
from Aug. 14 to Aug. 21.
Last year the Florida
Legislature changed the
date of the primary election
so it did not conflict with
the Republican National
Convention being held in
Tampa. The convention will
start Aug. 27.'
Florida's political calen-
dar could be thrown into
disarray if there are wide-
spread legal challenges
to new Congressional and
legislative districts. The
Legislature moved up its
2012 session to January so
it can deal with the once-a-
decade job of redistricting.
A change in the primary
date would also change the
date of when candidates
can qualify for the ballot

Traffic deaths up
through holidays
TALLAHASSEE -
Preliminary figures show
111 people died on Florida's
roads during an 18-day holi-
day period through Jan. 2.
That was almost double
the 60 deaths recorded over
an 18-day holiday period a
year ago.
Florida Highway Patrol
Capt Mark Brown said offi-
cials don't yet have an expla-
nation for the increase.
Law enforcement agen-
cies in Florida and across
the nation beefed up traffic
enforcement during the


IDAEATH

holidays both years. W W T E

Panther died in
fight, officials say PARTLY -, PARTLY .. PARTLY
CLOUDY I : CLOUDY CLOUDY


NAPLES Officials
in southwest Florida say
they've found another dead
panther.
The Florida panther was
found in Collier County on
Thursday. It's the second
dead panther officials have
documented in a week.
The 3 1/2 year old pan-
ther was found in a tomato
field. Officials with the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
believe it was the victim of a
fight with another panther.
On Jan. 2, authorities
found a dead panther Jan.
2 along State Road 82 in
Collier County. The Naples
Daily News reports officials
believe that panther was hit
by a vehicle.
In 2011, the wildlife
agency reported 24 panther
deaths.

Man apologizes in
tossing carcasses
BRADENTON A
Manatee County man told
police that he killed eight
wild hogs and dumped
them in a creek.
The hog carcasses were
a mystery for authorities.
Residents this week said
the remains had gotten
trapped under docks and
attracted vultures.
The Bradenton Herald
reports that Justin Alday
told officials he and friends
hunted the hogs and butch-
ered them for 50 people
during a New Year's Eve
feast He buried six hogs
and put eight in the water.
When he read about the
problems the carcasses
had caused residents,
Alday called authorities. He
apologized and pledged to
retrieve any remains. He
said he thought the car-
casses would "be eaten by
the crabs and whatnot"
(AP)


HI 73 LO. 46 H74 LO 47| H175L047
' S.i_ '-' P7- 7


Pensacoa
71/58


Tallahassee *
73/49. ,,

71/57Panama C
71/57


71/48
Lake City
73/46
Gainesville *
73 46
Ocala
73,47


Tampa *
74/56


FL Mye
75'53


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


70
41
66
42
85 in 1936
19 in 1999

0.00"
0.06"
0.06"
0.61"
0.61"


:,,;". ",, : ,* *: : *


City
* Jacksonvile Cape Canaveral
69/49 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
70 54 Gainesville
0 Jacksonville
Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
74 52 71,59 MIamI
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
74 59 0 Orlando
* FL Lauderdale Panama City
rs 75 62 0 Pensacola
S Naples Tallahassee
73/56 Miami Tampa
ey West 76, 62 Valdosta
... W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.


7:28 a.m.
5:46 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:47 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 4:30 p.m.
Moonset today 5:57 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 5:28 p.m.
Moonset tomr. 6:45 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
9 16 23 30
Full Last New First


On this date in
1821, a major
snowstorm moved
through the area
from the mid-
Atlantic region
to New England.
Philadelphia, Penn.,
reported 18 inches
of snow, with 14
inches reported in
Baltimore, Md., and
New York City.


4

6fimnesto un
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 1(0+
A ^


Sunday
73 55 p.:
74 53.'pc
76/66/s
79 56 s
75 417 p,:
71 '51 pr,
77 67 s
74.4 i. pi:
77 65 s
77 61 i
75. 49 p
76 54.1 pc
72 61 c'
71 59 p,:
74 55- pr
7;7 57 p,:
73 54 pc
75 64, s


Monday
74 '57 'p, :
73 54, pc
77/66/pc
79' 58 pc
75 418 Pc
72 51. pC
78 69 pc
75 4 7 pc
78 66 i
79, 59, pc
75 50 pc
77 55 p.:
71 59. pc
72. 59 pc
72,53 pc
77 59 pC
73 51 pc
77 63 s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Forecasts, data and
graphics 0 2012 Weather
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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY. JANUARY 7. 2012


JOBS: Economy adds 200,000 in Dec.
Continued From Page 1A


NASA: Sale of Apollo 13 list questioned
Continued From Page lA


that "we still have a long way to go
- years to recoup the losses we have
endured."
Indeed, the economy added 1.6 mil-
lion jobs for all of 2011. That is better
than the 940,000 added during 2010. In
2009, the most bruising year of the Great
Recession, the nation lost more than 5
million.
But it will take 6 million more jobs to
get the United States back to what it had
in December 2007, when the recession
began. Economists forecast the nation
will add almost 2 million this year.
The unemployment report was the first
to be released since Republicans across
the country began voting to determine
a candidate to face President Barack
Obama this fall in an election that will
turn on the economy.
Obama appears bound to face vot-
ers with the highest unemployment rate
of any president running for re-election
since World War II. Unemployment was
7.8 percent when Obama took office.
But the president's re-election chances
may hinge more on the direction of
the unemployment rate than on what
the rate is come Election Day. The rate
was a still-high 7.2 percent when Ronald
Reagan beat Walter Mondale in 1984, but
it had fallen from 10.8 percent two years
earlier.
Obama, visiting the new Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau in
Washington, said: "We have made real
progress. Now is not the time to stop."
He called on Congress to extend a tax
Social Security payroll tax cut that is due
to expire at the end of next month.
Campaigning in New Hampshire
for Obama's job, former Pennsylvania
Sen. Rick Santorum claimed credit for
Republicans, suggesting the gains were
tied to voter optimism that a Republican
would take the White House.
"There's a lot of concern still," added
Santorum, who finished in a virtual tie
with Mitt Romney in the Iowa caucuses
earlier this week. Another candidate,
former House Speaker Newt Gingrich,
dismissed the job gains as inadequate.
The report painted a picture of a broad-
ly improving job market Average hourly
pay rose by 4 cents. The average work-
week lengthened by six minutes, a sign
that business is picking up and more
companies may soon need to hire.
The private sector added 212,000 jobs
in December. That gain was offset by
12,000 layoffs by governments.
Hiring increased across industries.
Manufacturing added 23,000 jobs, as did
the health care industry. Transportation
and warehousing added 50,000 jobs.
Retailers added 28,000. Even the belea-
guered construction industry added
17,000.
In manufacturing, the 225,000 jobs
added for the year is the most since
1997, and is a particularly good sign for
the economy. Factory jobs tend to pay
well, and plant expansions signal that
businesses are gaining confidence about
the future.
LL Bean is adding 125 workers at its
plant in Maine to keep up with demand
for its popular duck .boot. In North
Carolina, Baldor Electric is expanding a


plant that makes electric motors, adding
166 jobs outside Gastonia. And Chrysler,
bouncing back from bankruptcy, just
announced that it is hiring 1,250 at two
Detroit factories.
Meanwhile, oil and gas companies,
are struggling to find engineers willing
to relocate to rural areas where most of
the drilling is done, said Jack Downing,
managing partner for the recruiting firm
MRINetwork WorldBridge Partners in
Chicago.
Telecommunications and finance com-
panies are restoring the jobs they elimi-
nated at the depths of the Great Recession.
And human resources employees, among
the first jobs slashed when the economy
collapsed, are in demand.
William Dunkelberg, chief economist
at the National Federation of Independent
Business, said hiring is strongest in the
West and Rocky Mountain states, partly
because high energy prices have helped
the oil and gas industry. But job creation
is still "dismal" east of the Mississippi
River.
Economists cautioned that some of the
month's gains reflected temporary hiring
for the holiday season. The government
adjusts the figures to try to account for
.that seasonal factor, but doesn't always
get it exactly right.
The gains in transportation and ware-
housing, for example, reflected a strong
increase in hiring for couriers and mes-
sengers. That could be because of the
jump in online shopping over the holi-
days, the Labor Department said.
And the economy still faces many
challenges, including a likely reces-
sion in Europe exacerbated by the debt
crisis there. That could drag on the
U.S. stock market, making U.S. inves-
tors feel poorer and weighing on their
spending.
In a reminder of the threat, U.S. stocks,
which had appeared poised for a higher
open, declined for the day. The Dow
Jones industrial average lost 55 points.
Analysts blamed a spike in borrowing
costs for Italy, an ominous sign for the
debt crisis.
"While December's data represent
good news, there is no guarantee that
January will follow a similar path," said
Joshua Shapiro, chief economist at MFR
Inc., in a note to clients.
Dow futures jumped 40 points when
the unemployment report was released
at 8:30 a.m. EST, but when the market
opened an hour later, the Dow dropped
83 points in the first half-hour of trading.
It recovered some of those losses later.
The Dow closed at 12,359, still up 142
points for the first week of the year.
The government counts people as
unemployed only if they are searching
for jobs. Discouraged workers who have
stopped looking are not included in the
unemployment rate.
A strengthening job market normally
encourages those people to get out and.
look for work. If that happens, the unem-
ployment rate could jump again.
There are also 8.1 million Americans
working part-time who would rather be
working full-time, though that number
has fallen from 9.3 million in September
and is the lowest since January 2009.


from the command ship into the attached
lunar landing module for the return flight-
Lovell's calculations on the checklist were
key in transferring navigation data from
the command craft to the lunar module.
NASA has raised questions about
title rights for three other space items
Heritage had sold in the same November
auction. Two were from Apollo 9 astro-
naut Rusty Schweikart: a lunar module
identification plate that brought more
than $13,000 and a hand controller that
received a $22,705 bid. The space agency
also targeted a fourth item, a hand glove
worn by Alan Shepard during training
for Apollo 14, that brought more than
$19,000.
In an email to Heritage, NASA Deputy
Chief Counsel Donna M. Shafer said there
wAs no indication the agency had ever
transferred ownership of any of the items
to the astronauts.
"Only NASA has the authority to clear
NASA property for sale," Shafer said in
the email, which was provided by NASA to
The Associated Press.
She said the matter has been turned over
to NASA's Office of Inspector General, add-


ing that "there is potential risk of the items
being seized by the government until title
issues have been resolved."
In the Mitchell lawsuit, his attorney
argued prior to the settlement that NASA
officials told astronauts long ago they could
'keep certain equipment from the missions,
and many such items wind up on auction
house lists. A 1972 NASA memo seems to
back up that claim, requiring only that the
astronauts provide the agency with lists of
items in their possession.
Apollo 15 astronauts were reprimanded
after they took unauthorized, special enve-
lopes to the moon with stamps that were
given a special postal marking shortly after
their return in 1971. They had a deal with a
German stamp dealer who later sold them
for $1,500 each.
Last month, the NASA inspector general
reported that since 1970, more than 500
pieces of moon rocks, meteorites, comet
chunks and other space material have
been stolen or gone missing. The report
said NASA needs to keep better track of
some 26,000 samples sent to researchers
and museums or the agency runs greater
risk they will be lost.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 11, 1970 file photo, Apollo 13 commander James A. Lovell Jr., foreground, speaks
during a news conference in Cape Kennedy before the spacecraft launched on its ill-fated
journey to the moon. At center is astronaut Fred Haise. NASA is questioning whether Lovell
has the right to sell a 70-page checklist from the flight that includes his handwritten calcu-
lations crucial in guiding the damaged spacecraft back to Earth. The document sold at a
November auction for $388,000. rt ". Th d "
!,, ,.


BONUS: 9 county schools are eligible
Continued From Page 1A


depends on the amount
available from the state
and the number and size
of schools eligible for the
bonus.
The school's staff and
school advisory council
have until Feb. 1 to jointly
decide how the money will
be used. The money can
be used for a faculty and
staff bonus, for educational
equipment or for tutorial
programs.
Although both Columbia
and Fort White high
schools maintained their
"B" grades, they do not
qualify for bonus money.
"We are excited regarding
the high schools' scores,"
Millikin said. '"There is
always room for improve-
ment, but more.importantly
I'm pleased that we seem to
be in a consistent routine of
both our high schools earn-
ing "B" scores and also hav-
ing a much higher gradua-
tion rate than the state as well
as a proportionately large
number of students taking
college-ready classes."
Millikin said Columbia
High earned enough
points to be an "A" school
but was penalized a letter
grade because the lowest
scoring 25 percent of stu-
dents did not make learn-
ing gains in the eyes of
the state.
In the reading portion
of the FCAT, 41 percent


of .students in the lowest
quarter made adequate
progress, according to
the Florida Department of
Education. However the
state requires 50 percent
of students to show a gain
and therefore docked the
school a letter grade. In
math 70 percent of stu-
dents in the lowest quar-
ter make progress.
Millikin said penalizing a
school a whole letter grade
is frustrating. The penalty
seems to ignore the fact
that students must pass the
FCAT in order to graduate,
he said.
The Columbia County
graduation rate is 86.8 per-
cent, higher than the state's
80.1 percent.
Students pass the FCAT
in order to graduate but not
always on the first try, which
places them in the lower
quartile, he said. Some stu-
dents need remedial classes
to help them pass.


Millikin said the new
formula for calculat-
ing high school grades,
which includes FCAT
scores, graduation rates
and advanced course-
work, is a better reflec-
tion of schools. Two years
ago high school grades
were based only on FCAT
scores.
"It's been a battle
every year," said Terry
Huddleston, CHS principal,
of improving the school's
grade. "Our teachers over
the past five years have
worked extremely hard."
Huddleston said the
school has a large number
of low-scoring students
and has invested many
resources into improving
their scores. "We are just
disappointed we didn't
make that gain there. The
silver lining is we know we
scored enough to make an
'A,'" he said.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY. JANUARY 7. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Saturday, January 7, 2012


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Taliban


ready


to talk

The Taliban's decision
to open an office
in Qatar, although
a small step, offers
considerable poten-
tial for eventually holding peace
negotiations and plans to reinte-
grate the Taliban into the civic
life of Afghanistan which is,
after all, their homeland, no mat-
ter how grievously they misgov-
erned it from 1996, when they
forcibly assumed power, until
2001, when they were forcibly
evicted for sheltering al-Qaida.
Moreover, the Taliban
expressed interest in holding
direct talks with the United
States. This represents a signifi-
cant change in their long-stand-
ing policy of refusing to negotiate
while U.S. troops, or any foreign
troops, remained on Afghan soil.
The Taliban also asked,
as a gesture of good will,
that the U.S. release senior
Taliban leaders being held at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The
U.S. indicated it might be ame-
nable if the leaders were held
in custody in Afghanistan or
under house arrest in Qatar.
I It is a promising break-
through, but from here on in it
gets complicated.
The U.S. position is that any
"formal" talks should be Afghan-
led and -supported, but pri-
vately the U.S. worries about its
erratic and mercurial ally, Afghan
President Hamid Karzai. Last
November, Karzai torpedoed a
similar deal, recalling his ambas-
sador to Qatar in a fit of pique.
Now he claims to welcome
the deal, but he remains a loose
cannon where delicate negotia-
tions are concerned. Similarly,
it is not clear how Pakistan will
react Pakistan, which has been
sheltering the Taliban leader-
ship in Quetta, is demanding a
place at the table in any talks.
The whole exercise might be
a Taliban ploy to buy time until
2014, when most foreign troops
are scheduled to withdraw.
The odds of any kind of
clean, final settlement to the
war are'not great, but this is
a rare chance to try for prog-
ress in a stalemate where such
opportunities have been almost
nonexistent.
Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished


Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
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BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


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BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
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www.lakecityreporter.com


NAACP plays the


race card


R ick Santorum must
be racist because
he thinks all people,
regardless of ethnic-
ity, should have the
dignity of self-sufficiency.
At least that's how the
NAACP sees it.
Talking about pushing back
against those in government
endlessly trying to expand
welfare programs because
they make money off them,
Santorum said, "I don't want to.
make black people's lives better
by giving them somebody else's
money; I want to give them the
opportunity to go out and earn
the money."
NAACP PresidefifBenjamin.
Todd Jealous called this "...out-
rageous...race-based stereotypes
about public assistance."
Santorum was talking about
Medicaid. The more states
expand their Medicaid pro-
grams, the more federal funds
they get. So they have a per-
verse incentive to keep growing
these programs.
It is unfortunately analogous
to drug pushers who get richer
with each new addict.
If indeed Santorum did single
out blacks, it's not unreasonable
because they are dispropor-
tionately on Medicaid. Blacks
comprise 12 percent of the pop-
ulation but they constitute 30
percent of those on Medicaid.
Medicaid is government
monopolized socialized medi-
cine for the nation's poor.,
Not surprisingly, its spending
is out of control while delivering
increasingly shoddy care.
The program cost taxpayers
$118 billion in 2000. By 2010 it
was almost $300 billion and is
projected to reach almost $500
billion by 2020.
Forty percent of physicians


- again


the core problems that perpetu-
ate the cycle of poverty in black
America.
For instance, education. More
and more blacks are getting the
message that inner city public
schools are beyond repair and
that the only hope for black
children is competition. Give
parents.a choice with vouchers,
tax credits, or combinations
thereof, to go to other schools.
But the NAACP can always
be depended on to initiate or
join law suits fighting charter
schools and vouchers, as it did
in New York City earlier this
year.
Despite the crisis of break-
down of the traditional black
family, NAACP promotes same
sex marriage as a civil rights
issue. Despite half of black
pregnancies ending in abortion,
NAACP opposes anti-abortion
activism of black pro-life groups.
Any well meaning white con-
servative like Rick Santorum,
honest enough to state the truth
about the destructiveness of
welfare state prograpis on black.
Americans, can look forward
to a press release from the
NAACP calling him or her racist
or the equivalent.
They then have to spend
weeks doing media to apologize
and carry the stigma forever.
There is no reason to apolo-
gize for telling the truth even if
the NAACP attacks you for it.
To apologize just hurts blacks
and the whole nation and leaves
the sharp weapon of racial
intimidation always ready for
use in the hands of the planta-
tion masters.
* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


Star Parker
parkei@urbancure.org


won't see Medicaid patients
because the reimbursements
they get don't cover their costs.
According to studies reported
in the Wall Street Journal, the.
chances of a Medicaid patient
dying in the hospital are double
that of patients on private insur-
ance and Medicaid patients
are 59 percent more likely to
have complications after heart
surgery than privately insured
patients.
Now it's about to get worse.
Despite over 60 million
Americans on this program that
is bankrupting states and deliv-
ering substandard health care,
Obamacare expands it to add
another 16 million.
Given the disproportionate
exposure of black Americans to
this horrific program, wouldn't
anyone who cares about these
folks want to seek better options
for them?
Not the NAACP
The NAACP wants to keep
Medicaid as it is and opposes
efforts to reform it to improve
its efficiency.
One idea floated to fix the
built in state incentives to keep
spending more is to switch to
federal block grants to states.
NAACP calls this "extremist."
Besides fighting reforms
to improve dysfunctional pov-
erty and entitlement programs,
NAACP fights efforts to address


Majoring in unemployment


Old age has its com-
pensations, and one
of them is sneering
at the young and
their problems. But
it's hard not to feel heartbroken
for youngsters who go in debt
to get a college education in a
field they love, then graduate to
find themselves really deep in
debt and with no job to repay it.
There is also a guilty sense
of relief of having gone through
none of that. I went to college at
a time when the tuition was con-
siderably less than the current
benchmark used by colleges
to set their tuition the cost
of buying and then totaling an
uninsured BMW every year for
four years.
What brought this to mind
was a study by Georgetown
University on the unemploy-
ment rates by major among
recent college grads. Tuition
and fees at Georgetown, by the
way, are $41,393 annually, plus


Dale McFeatters
mcfeottersd@shns.com
another $13,543 for room and
board and $1,270 for books and
supplies.
Worst off are those with under-
graduate degrees in architecture
- a jobless rate of 13.9 percent.
The construction industry is in
the doldrums you don't need
architects if you're not building
anything. And why build a new
home when the bank will practi-
cally give you a foreclosed one?
Not far behind are the arts,
but I've never met fine-arts
majors who weren't resigned to
a long period of impoverishment
and frustration if they stayed
with their chosen field. For


them a jobless rate of 12 percent
is practically full employment.
Surprisingly, the jobless rates
for recent graduates in comput-
ers, math, engineering and busi-
ness were higher than those for
journalism grads.
But there's a catch, notes
The Washington Post: "over a
lifetime the earnings of work-
ers who have majored in engi-
neering, computer science or
business were as much as 50
percent higher than those who
majored in the humanities, the
arts, education and psychology."
Still, the college grads are so
much better off than those recent
grads with only a high-school
diploma, 22.9 percent, or those
who dropped out, 31.5 percent.
Maybe they haven't fully grasped
the metaphor of annually wreck-
ing a $41,393 BMW as a means of
career advancement.
* Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A


ANO
VI


THEIR
EW


Obama's

strategic

retreat

President Obama's new
defense strategic-guid-
arnce document sends
a clear message to
America's adversaries:
Go for it
The Obama administration
frequently produces major
publications that belie their-
own titles. For example, the
president's first of several bud-
gets with trillion-dollar-plus
deficits was titled "A New Era of
Responsibility." The same could
be said of "Sustaining U.S.
Global Leadership," the strate-
gic document introduced with
great fanfare at the Pentagon
Thursday morning. This mini-
Quadrennial Defense Review
is an eight-page admission of
American impotence.
Mr. Obama claimed the new
strategy reflects the personal
guidance he gave throughout
its formulation. It's odd he
would seek to tie himself so
closely to something that attests
to his administration's dreary
performance. The new strategy
claims the United States faces
"an inflection point," which is a
poorly chosen phrase because
in calculus this is the point at
which a curve changes from
upward to downward, for exam-
ple, from positive to negative.
Rather than a change in the
strategic landscape, the inflec-
tion in question is the massive
$450 billion in defense budget
cuts over the next 10 years
mandated by the budget-control
act.
In. his prepared remarks, Mr.
Obama stated, "The size and
the structure of our military
and defense budgets have to
be driven by a strategy, not the
other way around." That's true.
However, this plan is wholly
driven by the need to adapt
America's defense structure to
the ruinous budgetary realities
that Mr. Obama's deficit spending
have imposed on the Pentagon.
The document is a new mile-
stone marking America's strategic
retreat The Cold War-era require-
ment that the United States be able
to fight and win "2 1/2 wars" was
downgraded to "two major-theater
wars" during the Clinton adminis-
tration. Under the new guidance,
we are down to a war and a half
"Even when U.S. forces are com-
mitted to a large-scale operation in
one region," it declares, '"they will
be capable of denying the objec-
tives of- or imposing unacceptable
costs on an opportunistic aggres-
sor in a second region." So, while
Washington will pledge to defeat
one adversary, in the second,
smaller conflict, U.S. forces will
only be able to play for a draw. This
was a strategy that worked well in
the Vietnam War for our enemy.
To make up for the decline
in U.S. power, the new defense
document promotes the idea of
"building partnership capacity,"
a concept inherited from the
George W. Bush administra-
tion. America will "seek to be
the security partner of choice,"
which reduces defending free-
dom to an uninspiring market-
ing plan. The guidance suggests
pursuing partnerships with "a
growing number of nations ... "
whose interests and viewpoints
are merging into a common
vision of freedom, stability and
prosperity." Unfortunately, this
statement is flatly untrue; free-
dom, stability and prosperity are
not growing but are in global
retreat. The guidance suggests
the future lies in "innovative,
low-cost and small-footprint
approaches" to global partner-
ship, which is like calling for a
coalition of Facebook friends.
"Today," Mr. Obama
declared, "we're fortunate to be
moving forward from a position
of strength." The Joint Chiefs of
Staff, arrayed behind him like
extras on a movie set, stared


grimly ahead, in silence.
* Washington Times


EMPLOYMENT LIFESPAN...


N5A1 *IZ


1













FAITH


Saturday, January 7, 2012 w


&


VALUES


rww.lakecityreporter.com


for 201]

L ast week we raised the
question what kind of
grades would God give us
on our report card on some
things we ought to do.
They were taken from the 13th chap-
ter of Hebrews. They were: hospital-
ity (vs. 2), sympathy (vs. 3), personal
purity (vs. 4), and contentment (vs. 5).
This week as we continue our
thought, we add Confidence (vs. 6)
to the list Paul said "So we may
boldly say: The Lord is my helper; I
will not fear what man can do to me".
Confidence means we have the cour-
age to stand boldly on God's word
all the time. Confidence is one thing
missing in the lives of many of God's
children. How about you?
Then we add Intercession to the
list. How much time did you spend
praying for others; especially those
who God has appointed to rule in the
assembly and to preach the Word.
Hebrews 13:7-8 says "Remember
those who rule over you, who have
spoken the word of God to you,
whose faith follow, considering, the
outcome of their conduct. Jesus
Christ is the same yesterday, today,
and forever" (NKJ). We who are
children of God have the responsi-
bility to pray for pastors, preachers,
and teachers that God has placed
over us to fulfill the work of the min-
istry. They all go through the same
Lips and down of life that we do.
They are faced with the cares of the
world like you and me. The Devil
does much to try to take them away
from their study time, prayer time,
and ministry time. We need to con-
tinually lift therm up in prayer.'
'Then we see the next on the list is
Stability (vs. 9). "Do not be carried
about with various and strange doc-
trines. For it is good that the heart be
established by grace, not with foods


Part 2


which have not profited those who
have been occupied with them".
It -is so important to know what we
believe about God's Words so that
those who come to your door or meet
you anywhere else cannot sway you.
(See II Peter 2:1-3; Matt: 7:15-23; Mark
13:22-23).
We are living in the days in which
Jesus said 'Take heed that no man
deceive you by any means". There is
no period in the history of God's people
when there is so much deception and
false doctrines as this period we are in.
Our land has been invaded by Godless
religions, sects, and cults. They quote
scripture, claim supernatural powers,
promise healing, health, and wealth,
while
leaving BIBLE STUDIES
behind
people
who are easily fooled? s because
disillu- i n
signed,
disap-
pointed,hians that still have need of milk
and frus-not the strong meat of the Word.
trated.ss we saturate ourselves
hy are Word ugh Sherrill Jr.
Christians ems-hugh43@comcastnet
so gull-
ible?
Why they are easily fooled? It's because
they have no stability in th be Word of
God. off they arlse dothe Christians in the
Book of Hebrews and the Book of 1st
Corinthians that still have need of milk
and not the strong meat of the Word.
Unless we saturate ourselves
in the Word and become mature
through the strong meat of
Scripture, we shall not be able to
ward off the false doctrines. Now,
how does your report card look?

Hugh Sherrill is a Bible teacher at
Eastside Baptist Church.


In the Bible, counting


describes obedience


The fourth book of the
Old Testament is entitled
Numbers. Most people
conclude from the title,
and from the first several
chapters of the book, that it is all
about the census of the whole nation
of Israel as well as the recording of
how many people there were from
each tribe. However, that is only a
portion of the book.
The book of Numbers may be
more adequately described as a
book about obedience of God's
people to the things He has com-
manded. The book is all about how
God dealt with the Israelites' reac-
tion to His instructions. A common
phrase
BIBLICAL MEDITATION found
through-
out the
book is
"just as
Lf the Lord
had com-
manded
Moses."
Among
Carlton McPeak the sto-
carlton_mc@msn.com ries told
in this
book
are how God wanted the people
arranged around the tabernacle;
the order in which they were to
travel when either the cloud or pil-
lar of fire moved; the murmuring of
the people for water or food; who
was to be in charge; the lack of
faith on the part of ten spies that
caused the nation to wander in the
wilderness for an extra 38 years.
The book 'of Numbers gives some
detailed information to certain
events that took place on their jour-


ney from Mt. Sinai to the east side
of the Jordan. One of the funny
events is a prophet of God speak-
ing to the donkey on which he was
riding (chapter 22). The book also
records the death of the brother
and sister of Moses. All of these
stories are about obeying the com-
mands of God.
The major lesson modern man
can learn from this ancient book
is that we cannot do anything
without God telling us or giving
us a command. Based upon sev-
eral different commands we may
come to a conclusion of a given
action, but if that action is not
approved by God, we are being
disobedient to Him.
In our world we have the attitude
that if we are not specifically told
not to do something then we have
permission to do it. This attitude
is demonstrated in the way people
look at religious activities, how-
ever, that is not the attitude that
God wants us to have towards His
commands. Likewise, it is not the
attitude companies have or our gov-
ernment laws.
The book of Numbers does
record a lot of counting, but in this
counting, obedience is described.
Let us not get caught up in the
counting but in the description of
how to be obedient to God.


Carlton G. McPeak is an evange-
list working in the Lake City area.
All Scriptural quotations are from
the New American Standard Bible,
Holman Bible Publishers, unless oth-
erwise stated.


:.:*^- -. '..:..., ...':.

' .. . -'


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave:
386-752-3900


Sunday School:
Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


9:45AM
11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E. Duval Street Lake City
Sunday 10:30AM & Wednesday 7:00PM
www.firstassemblylc.com

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed, Famn. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
.Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor. Ron Thompson





M layElectric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


SALEM PRIMITIVEBAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Paslor Elder Hermani Grtifi,
752-4198

SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive 755-5553


Sunday:
Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Mom. Worship
Sunday Eve.
Wed, Prayer Meeting
Pastor: Mike Norman
THE VINEYARD
Sunday School
Sunday Worship
Sunday INight


1832 SW Tomaka Terrace
(off SW Bascom Norris Dr.)
thevineyardoflakecity.com


10 AM
11 AM
6 PM
7:30 PM


9:30 AM
10:30 AM
6:00 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
12:30 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday SchooliRehgious Eduiati'ri
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN
:.HRISTIANl SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.* 755-9436
Sunday School 9
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:
Wed. Prayer Meeting


:30 AM
:30 AM
7 PM


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


4' 3~ Si. *. -.


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON '
ChurJh oii Chrs
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:4,
Sun, Worship 10:30AM & 6:0
Wed. Family Night
Wed. Youth Service
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
-:0 SW Mcnilor len, 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45
Sunday Worship 10:50 &


'Ved Spilrlual Ennrrimernt


5 AM
OOPM
7PM
7 PM



5iAM
6:30
7PM


"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Nornis Dr.,
Lake City, F 32025- 386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sunday. 8:00 & 10:00AM
Wednesday 5:15PM
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 12 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75* 752-3807
Sunday Worship 9:30AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
lur P,, ni r Johin D.3id Bryjinl





Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW Deputy Jeff Da is Lane tformflv Pinemnot' n Rd .)
752?-.rOT 1-5XO -597-5.26
Mon.-Sal. 803-5: 4) ('li-d Sinda)


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service ,8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School 9:45AM Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Bible Study 7:00PM Mon. Prayer Noon
Friday Prayer 6:00-7:OOPM
Pastor Rev. Fatha M. DeSue
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:OOAM
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Awana (ages 3-18) 5:30-7:30PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com
WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.'
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM &6PM
Wed. Night Service 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum
NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM


S ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., NC.
,A a ASPHALT PAYING
COMMERCIAL *INDUSTRIAL
Slte Preparation Road Building Parking Lots
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


Youth Services -Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408* Everyone Welcome
Pastor: Rev. Stan Ellis

PRESBYTERIAN
TIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697,SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sun. School 10AM Sun. Worship 9AM
Contemporary 9AM
Traditional 11AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Celebration Service 9:30 & 11:15 AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave,, from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. *755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 PM.
Pastor: Rev, Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:OOAM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PEf SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELUS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
1701. S.I St
.t- 755-7050

BAYWAYantorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Reaidenda| & Commercial
755-6142

North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights








Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427
GWHunter, Inc.
C~ Chevron Oil
W Jobber



HollypIecuic, Inc.
"Quality /.ork at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
1036 E. Dural St., Lake City F..
(386) 752-0O67
Fresh Meat, Fresh Produce!
41-3- en'"" 3


To Advertise in
this Church Directory
call
755-5440.


Your report card


OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

(386) 466-1106
'.[ h, laij anrani oi .: n o .,."L'


SI HARRY'S
im7ac 5 2- ,8Heatin& Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Msley President

,IPA 752-2308 'g.









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SATURDAY. JANUARY 7, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson @lakecityreporter. com.


Jan. 7

Community blood
drives
Saturday, January 7, 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. Domino's;
All donors receive a
FREE Large Cheese
Pizza, LifeSouth Boxers,
and a chance to win an
Apple IPAD 2!
Sunday, January 8,
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort
White Hungry Howie's;
All donors receive a
FREE one topping
personal pizza or small
sub, LifeSouth Boxers,
and a chance to win an
Apple IPAD 2!
Wednesday, January
11, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Lake City Reporter; All
donors receive FREE
LifeSouth Boxers,
chance to win an Apple
IPAD 2, and a chance to
win a Anytime Fitness 7
Day Pass!

Couponing workshop
The Friends of the
Columbia County Public
Library will host a
Couponing Workshop
at the Main Library on
Saturday, January 7 at
2:00 pm. Tami Nelson
of Rural Budgeting will
be the presenter. The
program is free and
open to the public.

Farmers Market

The Lake DeSoto
Farmers Market is
Saturday from 9am to
1pm (winter hours) in
Wilson Park located
along Lake DeSoto
between the Columbia
County Courthouse
and Shands Lakeshore
Hospital in downtown
Lake City." The market
features locally grown
fresh produce, herbs,
plants, cheese, milk,
eggs and local baked
. breads, pies and other
items. Vendors also sell
homemade craft items
like jewelry, woodwork
and other handmade
items. Upcoming events
include the 1st Annual
Chili Cook Off on
January 21st to benefit
Relay for Life. For more
information about the
Lake DeSoto Farmer
Market call 386-719-5766
or'visit market.lcfla.com.



Jan. 8

134th church
anniversary
The New Mt. Pisgah
A.M.E Church, 345 NE
Washington St., church
family invites you to
share in our 134th
church anniversary on
Sunday Jan. 8 at 4 p.m.
The speaker will be the
Rev. Lantz Mills of New,
Day Spring Day Church
and the theme is faith,
hope and love.

Ordination Service
Ordination Service for
Minister Al Nelson is to
be held Sunday January
8, 2012 @ 3pm.
Location, the Shiloh
Missionary Baptist
Church, Dr.
Dwight Pollock, Pastor.
Please come share with
us.


Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 8,
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library:
Dante Amodeo, author
of Saban and the Ancient
Dante Amodeo was born
in New York and raised
on a farm. He moved to
Florida as a teenager


and now lives in
Jacksonville Beach. His
book, Saban
and the Ancient was
awarded first prize in
the action/adventure
category by
POW (Promoting


Outstanding Writers),
and his first script was
made into the
2010 NBC made-for-
television movie Secrets
of the Mountain.
http://
www.danteamodeo.com/



Jan. 9

Women's Cancer
Support Group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of
Lake City will meet at
Baya Pharmacy East,
780 SE Baya Drive
from 5:30 to 6:30 PM
on Monday, January
9, 2012. Our guest
speaker, Dr. Paul G.
Goetowski, Community
Cancer Center, will be
discussing "Women's
Cancer in 2012".
Information at 386-752-
4198 or 386-755-0522.

Jan. 10
Historical Society
meeting
The Columbia County
Historical Society will
have its quarterly
meeting on Tuesday,
January 10 at 7:00 p.m.
at the downtown library.
Guest speaker will be
Olustee re-enactor Cody
Gray. The meeting is
free and open to the
public. For details
contact Sean McMahon
at 754-4293



Jan. 11
Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon
The regular meeting
of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be held at 11:00
a.m. on Wednesday, Jan.
11th at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall.-Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a
fun day.

Jan. 12

Lake City Garden
Club
The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its
monthly meeting at
10 a.m. on Thursday,
January 12 at the Club
House (formerly the
Woman's Club). Coffee
will be served at 9:30.
The program will be
"History of Alligator
Lake Park" by James
Montgomery. Visitors
are welcome to attend.

'Preserving Traditions
of DAR'
The Edward Rutledge
Chapter, Daughters
of the American
Revolution, will meet
on Thursday, January
12, 2011, 10:30 a. m.,
at the Senior Service
Center, 28 SE Allison
Court. Beth Wilson
will be speaking on
"Preserving Traditions
of DAR". Guests are ,
always welcome. For
further information, call
752-2903.

Jan. 13

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.


Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan.


13 at 7 p.m. until. For
ticket info contact Chris
Mirra at 386-623-3611 or
Dennis Murphy at 386-
697-3739.

Jan. 14

North Florida Writers
Group meets
Love to write? From
novice to published
author, the North
Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is
the place where local
writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire.
Writers of any
experience level from
the area are welcome
to join us Saturday,
January 14, 2012, 2pm
- 4pm, at the Columbia
County Public Library,
Main Branch, 308 NW
Columbia Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055. Join us
Saturday and see what
we are all about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so
please reserve your spot
today!
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Leader,
(386) 438-3610.,
Email inquiries to:
editor@afinaldraft.com

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Hospice Chili Cook-
off
The Third Annual
Branford Chili Cook-
Off to benefit children
and families served by
Herry's Kids Pediatric
Services will be held
on Saturday, January 14
from 11 atm. 2 p.m. at
Hatch Park located on
Craven Dr. in Branford.
The event will include
a silent auction, games,
a bounce house for
the kids, live DJ, door
prizes, antique car show,
thrift store items for
sale, and all the chili
you can eat. There
will be a five dollar
admission to the event.
In order to register
to be a contestant
call 386-755-7714.
Hospice of the Nature
Coast, is'a program
of Hospice of Citrus
County, Inc., licensed
in 1985. To learn
more about hospice
services call 386-755-
7714 or visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org.

Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program
On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.


Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this
memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
lives forever in our
hearts. Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 p.
m, at Trinity United
Methodist Church.
Glynnell Presley,,
Secretary
John F. Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO


Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.



Jan. 16


Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade

The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
presents the Grand
Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Parade,
Monday, January 16,
2012 at 10am. Line-
up will begin at the
DOT office at 9:00am.
For participation and
information call Anthony
Newton at 386.365.1470.
The MLK Worship
Service will follow
the parade at the New
Bethel Baptist Church
at 12:30p, Bishop Ron
Williams, II is the
speaker, Rev. Alvin
Baker, Pastor. Call
Audre' Washington at
386.344.9915 for more
information.
The MLK Classic will
feature a re-match
basketball game at
the Lake City Middle
School at 3:30pm
featuring Alumni
Women and Men's
players of CHS and
Suwannee. Call Mario
Coppock for details at
386.754.7095.



Jan. 17

Loss workshop
Eight Critical Questions,
an educational workshop
offering practical
tips to help cope and
move forward during
the new year will be
January 4 at 2 p.m.
located at the Wings
Education Center, 857
SW Main Blvd, (Lake
City Plaza). There is
no cost. For information
or to register, contact
Vicki Myers at 755-
7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-
642-0962. The Wings
Education Center is a
program of Hospice of


Citrus County, Inc./
Hospice of the Nature
Coast licensed 1985,
serving north central
Florida. Visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org for more
information.

Traffic safety meeting
The Columbia
Community Traffic
Safety will hold its first
meeting of the new year
on Tuesday, January 17
at 10 a.m. at the FDOT
Operations Complex,
710 NW Lake Jeffery
Road, in the Crew
Room. The Team works
on traffic hazards and
enforcement issues in
Columbia County and
the public is welcome
to attend. Issues can be
called in to the FDOT
at 758-3714 or e-mailed
to Tres Atkinson, team
chair, at tres.atkinson@
columbiacountyfla.com
or to Gina Busscher,
team secretary, at gina.
busscher@ dot. state.
fl.us The team is made
up of members of law
enforcement, emergency
services, engineering
and education.



Jan. 18

Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.



Jan. 19


Voices that Change
Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A'night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet
facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit
for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.

Jan. 20

Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.


communityconcerts.info.



Jan. 22


Bridal show
The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's
Bridal, Belk, Lake City
Florist and Design,
Glass Slipper Bridal,
The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices
are $7.00; Day of Event
$10.00. Tickets can be
purchased at the Holiday
Inn & Suites, 213 SW
Commerce Dr., Lake
City. For ticket sales or
vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386)
754-1411.

Riding club banquet
The Columbia County
Riding Club is having
its annual banquet Jan
22,2012, @lpm,@Mason
City Community Center.
The club will have its
rides the 2nd and 4th
Sat. of each month. The
club will be hosting
Pleasure Shows this
year. Check our website
for all information. www.
columbiacountyriding
club.com.

Jan. 24

Friends of the Library
Author Program
Tuesday, January 24,
2012 at 7:00 pm at the
Main Library, sponsored
by Save Our Suwannee:
Cynthia Barnett, author
of Mirage: Florida and
the Vanishing Water of
the Eastern U.S.
and Blue Revolution:
Unmaking America's
Water Crisis
Cynthia Barnett is an
award-winning journalist
and senior writer for
Florida Trend magazine.
She has a special
interest in
environmental history
and in 2004, spent a year
at the University
of Michigan as a Knight-
Wallace, Fellow studying
freshwater. supply. Ms.
Barnett will discuss
Florida's water crisis
and look at solutions
that have found success
in communities around
the
world. Don't miss this
timely program on a
topic .so very relevant to
Columbia County and
North Central Florida.
Thank you to Save Our
Suwan


OBITUARIES


Cullen LeVoye Boggus
Cullen LeVoye Boggus, 78 ,
Live Oak, Fl passed away on
Thursday, January 5, 2012.
DANIELS FUNERAL
HOMES & CREMATORY,
INC. Live Oak & Branford, Fl.

Tom Nelson McClure
Tom Nelson McClure, 83, long
time Florida resident passed
away on Wednesday January 4,
2012 at his home. He had moved
to Lake City in 2001. Mr. Mc-
Clure was born in Dayton, Ohio
to Juanita Isabel Allison and
Frank McClure. He attended
Pan American School for Pi-
lots in California and served in
the US Navy with honors dur-
ing the clean up campaign in
the Far East. He was preceded
in death by three brothers and
two sisters: Bob, Ronald, Dick,


Eloise and Shan. His survivors
are his wife of 51 years, Rose
McClure, and three children:
Dennis of Tallahassee, Don of
Naples and Lynda of Kansas and
four grandchildren. Several dear
nephews and nieces also survive.
GATEWAY FOREST
LAWN is in charge of ar-
rangements. A memorial will
be scheduled at a later date.
Mr. McClure enjoyed a variety
of interest, but playing music
was his greatest pleasure. His
legacy to his wife and family
is one of honor, trust, upright-
ness and compassion. He'll
be remembered with deep
love until the end of our lives.

Shirley Ann Owens
Shirley Ann Owens, 75, of Dav-
enport, IA, died Wednesday,
January 4, 2012 at Good Samari-
tan Nursing Home in Davenport.


Her children
will be having
a celebration of
her life gather- r.
ing at the home -
of her son, Jeff
on Sunday,
January 8, 2012
at 1:00 pm. In
lieu of flowers, memorials may
be made to a favorite charity.
Online condolences may be left
at www.therungemortuary.com.
Shirley was born April 4, 1936 in
Kankakee, IL and was the only
child of Joseph John and Beu-
lah (Bertrand) Kral. Her family
moved to Moline, IL where she
graduated from Alleman High
School in Rock Island, IL. She
then attended Marycrest College.
Her father, Joseph was the owner
of Kral Motor Company located
at 1510 6thAvenue in Moline, IL,
which was later sold to Bill Sex-
ton, former owner of Sexton Ford
in Moline. She was a farm wife,


an Avon representative and later
a sales person for JC Penney Co.
Shirley enjoyed playing the
piano, playing cards, especially
euchre and assembling puzzles.
She was preceded in death by
her first husband of 23 years,
Hubert Reed and by her sec-
ond husband of 11 years, Larry
Owens of Lake City, FL and
a son, Jerome Reed (2010).
Those left to honor her memo-
ry include her children: David
(Jane) Reed, Billings, MT; Pam
(Steve) Frost, Taylor Ridge, IL;
Ron (Carolyn) Reed, Daven-
port, Jeff (Cindy) Reed, Blue
Grass, IA; John (Valerie) Reed,
Davenport, 11 grandchildren
and five great grandchildren.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY. JANUARY 7. 2012


DILBERT


THE PROJECT MANAGE-
MENT FRAMEUJORK
EMBODIES A PROJECT
LIFE CYCLE AND FIVE
MAJOR PROJECT
MANAGEMENT PROCESS
GROUPS.


BABY BLUES

\ATE CLA.T








BLONDIE.


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


ZITS


GARFIELD


OH NO! THE EXTREME
LEVEL OF ABSTRAC-
TION HAS MADE US
WEIGHTLESS.
^(2? > >


To TWT \



6-1


B.C.


DEAR ABBY


Daughter bears the burden

of her parents' unhappiness


THAT DOESN'T
EVEN MAKE SENSE.


M a


DEAR ABBY: A few days
ago, my mom told me that
if it wasn't for me, she and
my dad would be divorced.
She also said that the last
few years with my dad
have been terrible. I feel
so guilty about this, know-
ing that I'm the reason my
parents are unhappy.
I barely slept the night
my mom told me this,
but actually, it all makes
sense. Now I know why
my parents yell at me for
no reason and why I get
in trouble for no reason.
Abby, please help me. How
do I tell my mom how it
made me feel? FEELS
GUILTY IN GEORGIA
DEAR FEELS GUILTY:
Your mother was wrong to
say that you are the only
reason she and your father
have stayed married. You
are not responsible for
their unhappiness.
Your parents appear to be
under a lot of pressure right
now, which may be'why
their tempers are frayed.
Before discussing this with
your mother, it might help
to talk about what happened
with another adult relative
you trust However, if there
is no one else, clip this let-
ter, show it to your mother
and tell her you wrote it

DEAR ABBY: I am a
20-year-old woman with a
problem I'm not sure how
to solve. I am 30 pounds
overweight (I have been
heavyset my whole life).
My mom and I have been


DEAR ABBY: I have
been married to "Daryl"
for 10 years. He has never
really hit the mark in what
I want someone who is
mature, stable, predictable
and has an appropriate
perspective on life. Daryl
depends on the outside
world to make him feel
good about himself, and
when that doesn't happen,
he drinks and smokes pot.
I love exercise and the
outdoors. He doesn't like
hiking. In fact, he's afraid to
challenge himself physically
in even the smallest way.
I have to decide whether
to stay and "make do" or
move on. How do I make
ti at choice? (I'm over 40.)
- LOOKING FOR BETTER,
LAGUNA HILLS, CALIE
DEAR LOOKING:
Tell your husband what
you have told me. That
will give him a chance to
shape up and at least try
to be more of the man you
thought you married. (I'm
giving you the benefit of
the doubt and not assum-
ing you felt you were
compromising when you
accepted his proposal.)
Daryl deserves to spend
his life with someone who
values him for who he is,
not someone who feels
she's "making do." If it
doesn't work; then you
should BOTH move on.

* Write Dear Abby 'at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Help is on the way.
Travel, knowledge and dis-
cussing necessary changes
will have a positive effect
on what you are trying to
accomplish. Romance is
highlighted, anid plans for
an evening of fun should
be your intent. ****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll be tempted
to.take on too much and
overreact under pressure.
Consider whom you can
call in to help you out.
Being responsible will
make a lasting impression
on someone who doubted
you in the past. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You can accomplish
whatever you set your
mind to. Send out your
resume or apply for a posi-
tion that interests you.
Expanding your horizons
will lead to positive chal-
lenges and greater earning
potential. Don't get mad
over money matters, get
moving. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll be sensitive to
what other do and say.
Keep your thoughts to
yourself. The more you
do around home to add to
your comfort or to ease
your stress,-the easier it
will be to move forward.
Take the initiative and take
action. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Someone will try to steer
you in a questionable direc-
tion. If you don't like whats
transpiring, take a pass.
Going it alone will bring far
better results and allow you
to maintain complete con-
trol. Believe in your abilities
and press on. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You can learn from
your experiences and ben-
-efit from the people you
encounter. Getting out.and
participating in your com-
munity will open your eyes
to new possibilities. Your
contribution will lead to an'
opportunity to further your
personal goals. ****-
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Think before you say
something you may regret.
It's better to listen before
you divulge your own
plans. Taking care of your
own needs or doing some-
thing that will add to your
physical appearance will
boost your confidence. **
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): You will show greater
stability and self-confi-
dence when dealing with
people who can influence
your future. Network
as much as possible to
make a name for yourself.
Promote a project you've
been working on and you


will get a good response.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Be true to your
word. You can stabilize
your personallife,if: you,
sort out differences with
someone who can affect
your future. Romance will
develop spontaneously
and bring greater vision to
your personal plans. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You can change
the dynamics of your life.
Check out professional
possibilities that interest
you. Advancement is in the
stars if you make phone
calls, set up interviews or
find a way to supplement
your income with a service
you can offer. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Love,'romance
and socializing should all
be scheduled into your
plans for the day. A finan-
cially friendly agreement
with someone will make
both your lives less stress-
ful. A creative idea will
pay off. A contract can be
signed. *****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Be careful how you word
what you want to say, espe-
cially if dealing with personal
issues that will affect a rela-
tionship you have with some-
one. Better to keep a secret
than to hurt someone's feel-
ings. An emotional argument
is apparent **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
|wLRTS mAPPENING- UOM SHE SRID SHI'b
NOw, MICHPAEL-? SORR- PND NoW
S, "Fi-y'F(E HUG-GSWI.


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S C _UE: M equals A
"X YLV YB F B YKT LXEKY Y K XG E JXYK
U BGTV . S HX R ZB UT SB PR BGZ . .
APV NBPL ZPUUTL .KBUTZ XG.ZYT.MIF BN
TXEKY." -- HH SBBH 0

Previous Solution: "Those who bring sunshine into the lives of others cannot
keep it from themselves." J.M. Barrie
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-7


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Abigail Van Buren
w,'. ,:deoarbby.com
walking together for years,
talking and enjoying each
other's company as we go.
For a while, we were
both losing weight con-
sistently as a result of our
walks. But since my par-
ents' divorce three years
ago, Mom has had to work
full-time and isn't able to
walk with me as often.
I want to continue walk-
ing to lose weight so I
can be healthier and feel
better about myself. But I
feel I. will be betraying my
mom by not including her.
Walking together has been
our tradition, so I don't
know how she'll feel if I
continue to walk without
her. What should I do? -
STEPPING LIGHTLY
DEAR STEPPING
LIGHTLY: Get out there
and continue walking with
headphones or with friends.
Exercise with your mother
on weekends if she's avail-
able, and encourage her
to do some walking on her
own during her lunch hour.
The only thing you should
NOT do is quit walking
because you feel guilty that
you and your mother are
now on different "paths."
** ** **


i9WT ocEN ? RiL,(


,,/7t, e .- O~i~ ..LK ^


HOROSCOPES


Page Editor: Emogene Graham. 754-0415












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY. JANUARY 7. 2012

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440.


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No.
12-2011 -CP-000314-XXXX-XX
Division
IN RE: ESTATE OF NATHANIEL
THOMAS, SR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Nathaniel Thomas. Sr., deceased,
whose date of death was April 14,
2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for COLUMBIA County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 173 NE Hemando Ave.,
#225, Lake City, FL 320554000.
The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or de-nands
against decedent's estate on i tom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is January 7, 2012.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ D. Craig Calley, Esq.
A attorney for Nathaniel Thomas, Jr.
Florida Bar No. 0990991
David Craig Calley, P.A.
2518 Park Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32204-4518
Telephone: (904)388-4567
Fax: (904)388-3887
Personal Representative:
By:/s/Nathaniel Thomas, Jr.
250 NE Alpha Terrace
Lake City, Florida 32055
05529900
January 7, 14, 2012


Liz P. Home
Columbia County
Supervisor of El166idi6 :'
(386) 758-1026
The Canvassing Board will conduct
a Logic and Accuracy (L&A) test of
the tabulating equipment for the Jan-
uary 31, 2012 Presidential Prefer-
ence Primary on January 11, 2012 at
7:00 am. The canvass of absentee
ballots will be on 1/25/12, 1 pm,
1/31/12, 1 pm & 5 pm. Canvassing
functions are held at the Supervisor
of Elections, 971 W. Duval St, Lake
City, FL.
05529920
January 7, 2012
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: AU-
TO EMPORIUM OF LAKE CITY
INC. gives Notice of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell these vehicles
on 01/20/2012, 10:00 am at Auto
Emporium of Lake City Inc.
2832 SE Main Blvd, Lake City FL.
32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes. AUTO EM-
PORIUM OF LAKE CITY INC. re-
serves the right to accept oig reject
any and/or all bids.
1C3EU4632RF315417
1994 CHRYSLER
05529921
January 7, 2012
Public Auction
Will be held by Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W. CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 01/23/2012
Time: 8:00 A.M.
2002 Ford
Vin# 2FMDA53462BB80382
05529948
January 7, 2012
100Job
Opportunities
BARTENDER NEEDED Must
have experience and be reliable.
Must have own phone and own
car. 386-752-2412
Officer Manager Position:
Must have Real Estate knowledge.
Also prefer Real estate license.
Must have knowledge of
QuickBooks & Microsoft Office..'
Motivated individual with an abili-
ty to multi task. Mon Fri 40 hr
wk. Contact Mike or Lynn: 386-
719-5600 or 386-288-3596
Accredited Real Estate Svcs.. LLC
Needed Secretary/Assistant for
busy Real Estate Office. computer
skills a Must. Call Debbie at
386-719-1224 for application







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog. seeding. sod.
disking, site prep. ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
0 Opportunities

0552980J
VyStar Credit Union Seeking
Member Relationship
Specialist Supervisor
Location: Lake City Branch
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS:
Trains, monitors, coaches and
develops member service and
teller staff on a daily basis.
Provides on-going training for
all member service and teller
staff as changes are
implemented and other duties
JOB KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS
& ABILITIES:
* A minimum of three years of
experience with a financial
institution.
* A minimum of two years in a
leadership or supervisory
position is preferred.
* Knowledge of Microsoft Word
and Excel are required.
EDUCATION:.
An Associate Degree is required
and a four-year undergraduate
degree is preferred. Work and/or
supervisory experience may be
substituted for the Associates
Degree.
Please visit
www.vystarcu.org/home/careers
to apply.
VyStar Credit Union is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

05529886
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Guest Services Position PT
18-24 hrs. wkly. MUST be a
people person with strong work
ethic, DEPENDABLE, good
communication, great customer
service skills, computer skills,
and willingness to learn.
MUST be a team player and
able to work a flexible schedule
including weekends and
holidays. We offer Competitive
Pay and Health Benefits. Hotel
Experience Highly Preferred.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply in person
at Comfort Suites 3690 W US
HWY 90. Please do not call the
hotel regarding your application.

05529914
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
COMPUTER SYSTEMS
TECH
Knowledge and experience with
ability to maintain hardware and
software including maintenance
and upgrading. Perform routine
network administratic,', research
and troubleshoot problems. High
School graduate, a degree in
computer science or related
field. Two (2) years experience
in computer systems and com-
munications systems required.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386) 496-2323,
FAX (386) 496-1611
Equal Employment Opportu-
nity / Drug Free Workplace


9 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: D & H Farms
LLC Herndon, KY. All
Activities of Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
& Row Crop Production &
Alternative Work. Employment
Dates: 03/01/2012- 12/31/2012.
Wage of $9.38/hr. Worker
guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to non
commuting workers. Transporta-
tion & subsistence reimbursed
when 50% of contract is met.
Apply for this job at the nearest
Florida One Stop Career Center
and reference the job order
#KY0442570.

Preschool Teacher. Must be 21 &
have req'd 40 hrs. PT w/opportuni-
ty for FT. Apply in person 1226
SW Grandview St. Lake City.

Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

Wanted: mature person to live in
and care for elderly woman must
cook clean and give meds. Day#'s
386-755-5099 or 288-1078

120 Medical
120 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529913
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
Will be required to evaluate and
treat a variety of diagnoses/post
surgical conditions in a
hospital/swing-bed and out
patient setting. Hand experience
preferred /not required. Serious
inquiries only. Please contact
our Director of Therapy
386-496-2843 ext 275 or
email resume to
therapydirectortlakebutlerho-
spital.com
Equal Employment Opportunity
/ Drug Free Workplace

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


120 Medical
120 Employment


RN, Unit Supervisor
Experienced in Long Term
Care. Full Time. excellent pay
and benefits.
Please apply at Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave.. Lake City.
Fl 32025 or fax resume to
386-752-7337. EOE/DFWP

Admission Director
Avalon Healthcare is currently
accepting applications for
the full time position of
Admissions Director.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent Benefit package.
PJease send resume to:
Tony Anderson, Administrator
admin@avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05529924
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupation Therapist.
Competitive Salajy and
Excellent benefit package as
well as a sign on bonus is being
offered. Please contact Jennie
Cruce Director of Rehab
dor5avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

170 Business
Opportunities

Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

SSchools &
0 Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12

Continuing education. .
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

German Shepherd AKC Czech
,pups w/health cert/shots. Excellent
temperament,superior quality &
socialized. Parents on site. $575
(352)486-1205
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats beingsold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

For Sale: GE Washer Ig
capacity, Whirlpool. Dryer
Lg capacity. $450.for both obo
352-264-8168


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Antique round side table.
Dark wood.94" around,
29" tall. $50.
386-754 4094


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales

Multi Family: Kountry Kids Day
Care. Marion Ave. Sat. 8-1.
From toys to housewares. Kids to
adult plus size Clothes.

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

8 ft x 5.5 ft wide single axle trailer


With Dump and lights.
Excellent condition S325 FIRM
SOLD

BEER KEG Refrigerator for sale.
38' cold always. $200 obo.
386-758-1991


440 Miscellaneous
Glock 27, 40 cal. Pistol. -/2 clips.
one double stacked w/laser site.
W/Paddle type. lock down holster.
Exc. Cond. 8475. FIRM. Excellent
for concealed carry 386-288-8833

PS 3 System with 9 games.
2 wireless control.
in original box. 5270.
386-984-7510
STORAGE SHED
10x16
$2500
Call 288-9858
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail. w/Aluminum tool box $1.700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740

A Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W. Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood

FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi

per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on'
246 between I-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

|640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale


ASSUME PAYMENTS!
4br/2ba on 1/2 acre!
$0 Down Pmt! $377. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6574


BAD CREDIT OK!!
A 575 Beacon Score will qualify
you for a new home!
Call Kevin for details!
386-719-5641
NEW SINGLEWIDE
2br/lba set up
w/air $799 DOWN $179. mo!
Owner will Finance!
Call Kevin 386-719-5641
OWNER FINANCE
New 3 or 4 BR home
Set up on your land or
Mine!! $500 Down/$289 mo.
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
OWNER FINANCE!
New 4br Doublewide!
Set up on your land
$0 Down/$329. mo
Call Kevin 386-719-6578
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K Off All Homes
800-622-2832 ext210
ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737
USED DOUBLEWIDE!
3 br/2ba w/Den, SBS Fridge!
One Owner! I Finance!
Call Kevin!
386-719-6574


705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit: January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710) For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town.
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150


710 Unfurnished Apt. 805 ots for ale
I1U For Rent 805 Lots for Sale


A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious. 2/1.
1300 sq ft. W/D hook up. CH/A.
S650 month & bckgmd chk.
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Move in Special from $199-S399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also. larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
QUAIL HEIGHTS. 2br/lba
Duplex. Washer/dryer hook up.
Private, safe, secluded, $750 mo
$500 sec. 386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
STUDIO APT. FOR RENT
All utilities included & Cable,
$500 month + $300 sec. deposit.
Call 386-697-9950

\730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings,.brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
'2 STORY, 2 BR/1.5 BA on
1/2 acre, fenced lot.off Turner Rd.
1st + last + dep. (includes water)
352-335-8330 or 352-258-9598
2br Apartment.
Closeto shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.-.,
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225


3br/2ba Split floor plan, 1850sf +
garage. Quiet Cul-de-sac, 4 mi SW
of Hwy 90. Privacy fence, Lg
rooms, Jacuzzi tub in Master BR.
$1195mo $800.dep. 386-984-5872


4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900.mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq'$2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle. GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

2 Business Offices For lease:
Approximately 11 00sq ft each.
Located SE Baya Ave.
Call 386-755-3456 for info
FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hwy 90. $750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500
FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086. DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex.
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin: or any intention to make
such preference. limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


la.. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

3br/2ba DW. 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well. tank.
& pole on site. (727)289-2172

820 Farms &
SAcreage

4 acres. Wellborn. New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin.
no down. $39,900. $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines,
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

Q870 Real Estate
87 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
& Supplies

TOW HITCH
All Ford Pickups and,
maybe others. $100.
386-758-1991


We're on target!


10Kay


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


-- -f-


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-623-9026

If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To et ou
VehcleSold

Call Mary


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com (CURRENT5 magnin
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


BYITi'ii



ktIS'La


FllIND TIT









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 2012


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Ip.m.
ESPN BBVA Compass Bowl, SMU
vs. Pittsburgh, at Birmingham.nla.
ESPN2 NCAA, FCS. playoffs,
championship game, Sam Houston St. vs.
N. Dakota St.. at Frisco.Texas
GOLF
.9 alm.
TGC European PGA Tour. Africa
Open, third round, at East London, South
Africa (same-day tape)
5 30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour. Tournament of
Champions, second round, at Kapalua,
Hawall
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
II am.
ESPN2 Florida at Tennesee
2p.m.
FSN -Washington at Utah
4p.m.
ESPN2 Florida Seat Clemson
FSN -Washington St. at Colorado
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally, at Copiapo,
Chile (delayed tape)
NFL
4:30 p.m.
NBC -AFCCIncinnati at Houston
8 p.m.
NBC NFC Detroit at New
Orleans
PREP BASKETBALL
8 p.m. I '
ESPN2- Simon (III.) vs. Miller Grove
(Ga.),atWheellng,W.Va.
PREP FOOTBALL
I p.m.
NBC All-Str game, All-American
Bowl, at San Antonlo
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2CpBm 2p m. *
CBS Michigan St. at Penn St.
4 p.m.
CBS UConn at Notre Dame
6 p.m.
FSN UCLA at Arizona St.

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Wild Card '
S Today
Cincinnati at Houston, '.4:30 p.m.
SDetroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Atlanta at NewYork Giants, I p.m.
tsburgh at Denver, 4:30 p.m..
Divisional Playos1
Saturday, Jan. 14
Atlanta, N.Y. Giants or New Orleans
at San:Francisco, 4:30 p.m.
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh or Denver at
New England, 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15
Pittsburgh, Denver or Houston at
Baltimore, I p.m.
'Detroit, Atlanta or N.Y. Giants at
Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.

APAII-Pro team

NEW YORK The Associated Press.
2011 -NFL All-Pro team selected by a
national panel of 50 media members:
S OFFENSE
Quarterback-Aaron Rodgers, Green
Bay.' --
S Rnining Backs-Maurice JonesDrew, *
Jacksonville; LeSear McCoy, Philadelphia.
-Fullback-Vonta Leach, Baltimore.
Tight End-Rob Gronkowski, New
England
Wide Receivers-Calvin Johnson,
Detroit;Wes Welker, New England.
Tackles-Jason Peters, Philadelphia;
Joe Thomas, Cleveland.
Guards-Carl Nicks, New Orleans;
Jahri Evans, New Orleans.
Center-Maurkice Pouncey,
Pittsburgh.
Placekicker-David Akers, San


YOUTH BASEBALL
Young Guns travel
team tryout today
The Young Guns 9-under
travel baseball team has an
open tryout at 1 p.m. today
at the Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call David
Williams at (386) 697-0764.


North Florida
Blaze tryout today
The North Florida Blaze
travel baseball team for
ages 11-12 has a tryout at
2 p.m. today at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423 or
Jamie Sosa at 867-9039.


North Florida
Rays tryouts
The North Florida Rays
9-under travel baseball
team has tryouts at
10 a.m. today and Jan. 14 at
Southside Sports Complex.
For details, call Todd
Green at 365-5161.


Registration for
Lake City open
Lake, City Columbia


Francisco.
Kick Returner-Patrick Peterson.
Arizona.
DEFENSE
Ends-jared Allen. Minnesota; Jason
Pierre-Paul. New York Giants.
Tackles-Haloti Ngata, Baltimore;
Justin Smith. San Francisco.
Outside Unebackers-Terrell Suggs.
Baltimore; DeMarcus Ware. Dallas.
Inside Linebacker-Patrick Willis,
San Francisco; NaVorro Bowman, San
Francisco, and Derrick Johnson, Kansas
City.
Comrnebacks-Charles Woodson,
Green Bay; Darrelle Revis, New York Jets.
Safeties-Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh;
Eric Weddle, San Diego.
Punter-Andy Lee, San Francisco.
SECOND TEAM
OFFENSE
Quarterback-Drew Brees, New
Orleans.
Running Backs-Ray Rice, Baltimore;
Arian Foster, Houston.
Fullback-John Kuhn, Green Bay.
Tight End-Jimmy Graham, New
Orleans.
I Wide Receivers-Larry Fitzgerald,
Arizona;Victor Cruz, New York Giants.
Tackles-Duane Brown, Houston; Joe
Staley, San Francisco.
Guards-Marshal Yanda, Baltimore;
Logan Mankins, New England.
Center-Ryan Kalil, Carolina, and
Nick Mangold, New York Jets.
Placekicker-Sebastian janikowski,
Oakland. *
Kick Returner-Devin Hester,
Chicago.
DEFENSE
Ends-Justinr Smith, San Francisco;
Jason Babin, Philadelphia.
Takles-Geno Atkins, Cincinnatil
Vince Wilfork, New England, and Richard
Seymour, Oaldand.
Outside Linebackers-Tamba Hall,
Kansas City;Von Miller, Denver.
Inside Unebackers-Brian Cushing,
Houston; London Fetchel, Washington.
Cornerbacks-Johnathan -Joseph,
Houston; Carlos Rogers, San Francisco.
Safetles-Ed Reed, Baltimore; Earl
Thomas, Seattle..
Punter-Shane Lechler, Oakland.

College bowl games

Friday
Cotton Bovil
Kansas State vs.Arkansas (n)
Today
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)
Sunday
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans I"" ..
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

FCS championship

Today
Sam Houston -State (14-0) vs. North
Dakota State (13-1), I p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Thursday's Games
Miami 116,Atlanta 109,30T
San Antonio 93, Dallas 71
Sacranlento 103, Milwaukee 100
Portland 107, LA. Lakers 96
Friday's Games
Atlanta 102, Charlotte 96, OT
New Jersey 97,Toronto 85 .'
NewYork 99,Washington 96
Philadelphia 96, Detroit 73
Indiana 87, Boston 74


BRIEFS

County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
5-7 p.m. Friday and Jan. 20,
and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today
and Jan. 14 and Jan. 21 at
Southside,Sports Complex
with a cost of $80. Online
registration is available at
www.lcccyb.com.for $75 plus
a transaction fee.
For details, call president
Tad Cervantes at 3654810
or vice-president David
Williams at (386) 697-0764.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

NYUJT


Oklahoma City 109. Houston 94
Denver 96. New Orleans 88
Cleveland 98. Minnesota 87
Chicago 97, Orlando 83
Memphis at Utah (n)
Golden State at LA. Lakers (n)
Portland at Phoenix (n)
Today's Games
Chicago at Adanta. 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Indiana. 7 p.m.
Miami at New jersey, 7:30 p.m
New York at Detroit. 7:30 pin.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 8 p.a.
Toronto at Philadelphia. 8 pin.
Denver at San Antonio, 830 pmn.
New Orleans at Dallas, 9 pnm.
Utah at Golden State, 1030 p.m.
Milwaukee at LA Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Minnesota at Washington. I p.
Orkndo at Sacrarsento,6 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City. 7 pn.m.
Milwaukee at Phoenix. 8 pnm.
Cleveland at Portland,9 pln.
Memphis at LA Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule-

Today's Games
No. I Syracuse vs. No. 20 Marquette,
4 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky vs. South Carolina,
4 p.m.
No. 3 North Carolina vs. Boston
College, 2.30 p.m.
No.4 Baylor at Texas Tech, 1:45 p.m.
No. 5 Duke at Georgia Tech, Noon
No. 6 Ohio St. at lowa, 3 p.m.
No. 7 Missouri at No. 23 Kansas St.,
1:30 p.m.
No.8 UConn at Rutgers, 8 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown at West Virginia,
Noon
No: II Louisville vs. Notre Dame
at 4 p.m.
No. 13 Florida at Tennessee,
II a.m.
No. 14 Kansas at Oklahoma, 2 p.m.
No. 15 Mississippi St. at Arkansas,
9 p.m.
No. 19 Murray St. at Austin Peay,
8 p.m.
No. 20 Kentucky vs. South Carolina,
4 p.m.
No. 21 Virginta vs. Miami, 6 p.m.
No. 22 Harvard vs. Dartmouth, 2 p.m.
No. 25 Gonzaga vs. Santa Clara,
8 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 12 Indiana at Penn St., Noon
No. 16 Michigan vs. No. 18 Wisconsin,
1:30 pm.

HOCKEY.

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Boston 9,-Calgary 0
Toronto 4,Winnipeg 0
N.Y. Rangers 3, Florida 2, OT
Philadelphia 5, Chicago 4
Ottawa 4,Tampa Bay I
St. Louis 4, Edmonton 3
Dallas 4 Nshyille I
Los Angeles I, Phoenix 0, OT
San Jose 2, Columbus I
Friday's Games
New Jersey 5, Florida 2
N.Y. Rangers 3, Pittsburgh I
Carolina 4, Buffalo 2
Colorado at Chicago (n).
N.Y. Islanders at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
Vancouver at Boston, I p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Edmonton at Dallas, 2 p.m. -
Columbus at, Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
.Wihnipeg at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Carolina at Nashville, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Washington at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Anaheim, 8 p.m.


CHS SOCCER
Moe's Night
set for Monday
Columbia High soccer
has a Moe's Night
fundraiser from 5-8
p.m. Monday at Moe's
Southwest Grill.
For details, call (386)
288-4726.

From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


ASCOIF

He'PL-ANTEP THE
-NEW EVaEGREEN N W51
FUWREC YARPTOI-
S -- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: W W
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: POPPY TAKEN FICKLE ACIDIC
Answer: He would later find out that he was playing
pool with one A PICKPOCKET


HOOPS: 3 district games next week


Continued From Page 10

we have to do from the
beginning."
Jefferson said one of the
keys for the Tigers will be
controlling Jimmie Taylor
l.
Taylor scored 11
points for the Bulldogs
and accounted for nine
assists. Jefferson gave him
even more credit for the
Suwannee victory.
"He scored 11, buthe was
probably responsible for
35," he said. "We're going
to play Monte Tisdale on
him like we did before, but
he'll be more aggressive.
He knows his role and he's
accepted his role. That's
the thing about this team,
we have roles and on any
given night a kid can bust
out"
Jefferson is looking
for ways for Marshall to
break out and is consider-
ing bringing him in off the
bench.
"It's something we've
talked about and ITl make
a decision on it at game
time," Jefferson said. "Well
discuss it again before the
game. A lot of great players


come in as the sixth man.
He's not our sixth man
though. He's a starter, he's
just not starting if he comes
in off the bench. It will
give us versatility, because
he can play so many
positions."
Jefferson was quick to
point out that it wasn't a
move for punishment
"Ift's not, ift's to let him see
the defense and be able to
see for himself where he's
able to attack the defense
and see how to do that,"
Jefferson said. "We want to
find ways for him to get off
early. Most teams are play-
ing us in zone. When they
play us in man, it's easy to
get a kid off, but in zone a
kid has to get himself off
sometimes. We want to let
him see what they're doing
and get some confidence."
Despite the recent strug-
gles, Jefferson als6 noted
that he's been an excellent
teammate.
"Even last night when he
struggled at Atlantic Coast,
he was sitting on the bench
and became the bench
captain," Jefferson said. "I


thought the cheerleaders
had traveled with us he was
so vocal. That says a lot
about his character."
And the coach hopes
that Marshall doesn't have
to do much cheering with
the home crowd behind
Columbia at 7:30 p.m.
tonight
"Our fans have been very
supportive and that goes
with winning," he said.
"We're becoming increas-
ingly optimistic. This team
is fun to coach and they're
buying into what me and
the coaching staff are tell-
ing them. -This isn't the
Oaken Bucket, but it's a
rivalry. The players want to
redeem themselves."
Columbia has three
games next week follow-
ing Suwannee, beginning at
Robert E. Lee High at 7:30
p.m. onTuesday.TheTigers
return home beginning
Friday with back-to-back
games against Stanton Prep
and St Augustine High.
Columbia hosts, Stanton
Prep at '7:30 p.m. Friday
and the Yellow Jackets at
6:30 p.m. Saturday


SOCCER: Play at Fort White Tuesday


Continued From Page 10
Christy Everett also had
an assist
Paige Fenneman scored
for Hamilton County (5-7).
Jimmy Blakely's three
goals came in the first 12
minutes of the boys game.
He had an assist from Nikil
Swaroop -and two assists


from Nigel Merricks.
Merricks added a third
assist on a goal by Alex
Rhea in the' 19th minute
and Dylan Sessions blasted
in a 35-yard unassisted shot
in the 25th minute for a 5-0
halftime score.
Tyler-. Rix and Hunter


Grow scored in the second
half. Rix's goal was unas-
sisted, while Cody Beadles
has the assist for Grow.
The Lady Tigers (4-13,
0-8) and Columbia's boys
(6-8-1, 1-4-1) travel to Fort
White High on Tuesday for
a 5 p.m. doubleheader.


Penn State hires Bill


O'Brien as football coach


By GENARO C. ARMAS of child sex abuse charges
Associated Press against retired assistant
coach Jerry Sandusky.
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. NotonlyisO'Brienrepldc-
Penn State has hired ing Division Is wirinningdst
New England' Patriots coach, but he must also
offensive coordinator Bill guide a program shrouded
O'Brien as its head coach, in uncertainty. Besides the
the first change in leader- criminal investigation into
,,ship for the storied football Sandusky, the NCAA has
program in nearly a half- launched its own inquiry.
century. The 42-year-old OT'Bien
, Theannouncementcapsa was set to be formally
turbulent two-month period announced at a news con-
that began with the firing of ference late Saturday morn-
Hall of Famer Joe Patern6 ipg.. .
on Nov. 9 in the aftermath Penn State hadn't hired

ACROSS, 34 Crow's-nest. Answe
1 Mi. above sea locale
level 36 Mich.
4 Bear's foot neighbor A|SK I
4 Bear's foot 37 Threadbare ROE
7 Tooth anchor 37 Threadbare 0E
11 Zodiac sign 39 Any Elvis L A
12 Rustic road recording
13 Singer 41 ShoutofP T I
Adams disapproval _

14 Turns into 42 Really tiny
Swine 43 Port side MA GS
16 Upbeat beat 45 Fab Four DNA N
17 Sunday m ember SNITD E
17 Sunday 48 Dunaway SNI
dinner of films
18 Aykroyd and 49 Edges
Rather 49aEd fe s
19 Shuttle's 52 Navajo foes
destination 53 Yincomp em
20 Gloss target 54 Princment ERAS
21 Kind of sugar irritant T NT
24 Debacle 55 Cozy dwelling ENS S
27 Big carnival 56 Joule fraction
city 57 Dip in gravy 3 Pamplon
28 Ancient runner
ointment DOWN 4 Wheezes
30 Endangered DOWN 5 Hill build
trees 1 Chatty alien 6 Unseld c
32 Air quality of TV NBA
concern 2 Bold look 7 Backslid
Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" booked
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


a head football coach in 46
seasons. In between, the
85-year-old Paterno won
409 games and was elected
to the Hall of Fame.
"I am thrilled to be the
head coach of the Penn
State football program,"
O'Brien said in a statement
"As head coach of this spe-
cial football program, it is
my responsibility to ensure
that this program rep-
resents the highest level
of character, respect and
integrity in everything we
do."
er to Previous Puzzle



















L TD YE A


la


der
if the

e


8 Thor's father
9 Fixes a
squeak
10 Lunar New
Year
12 Diminish
15 Snail -
18 Width of a cir.
20 Slangy hats
21 Fem. honorific
22 Objectives
23 Bah!
24 Come
unraveled
25 Clump of dirt
26 All, in combos
29 Pulpit
31 Sault Marie
33 Long chat
35 Angling a nail
38 Plant sci.
40 Allow to use
42 Twisted
43 After midnight
44 Watches
carefully
46 Openings
47 Layered
cookie
48 Enjoyment
49 So long!
50 Kayaking
accessory
51 Imitate an
annoying dog


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS





Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
itkrb/I lakecityreporter. com


SPORTS


Saturday, January 7, 2012


www.Iakecityreporter.com


Page IOA


FROM THE SIDEUNE







Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@laokecityreportercom


Tigers'

second

chance

He won't say
that his team
should have
won. That's
not his style,
but make no mistake,
he knows that Columbia
High has more to offer.
Columbia's basketball
team will square off
tonight at 7:30 p.m.
against Suwannee High.
The Tigers come into
the contest with only
two losses on the season
only one sticks out.
Horace Jefferson didn't
make any guarantees
of victory for his Tigers
tonight. He's not going to
promise a championship.
He's not in the game
to make those type of
promises.
Jefferson did make one
guarantee.
"The only guarantee
that I'll make is that
we will play harder,"
Jefferson said.
He believes his team
may have bought into
the hype a little too early
this season. Heading
into Suwannee, the
Tigers were undefeated.
Heading home from
Suwannee, the Tigers
were humbled.
Sometimes a loss can
be the best thing for a
team.
Since then the Tigers
have hit stride, amassing
an 11-2 record and
remain undefeated
at 4-0 in the district.'
Columbia is coming off
a tournament victory in
the'Santa Fe Hitchcock
Classic.
But still, the rivalry
remains.
And that's something
that Jefferson doesn't
want the players to
forget.
"There's not a day that
goes by that Suwannee
is not mentioned,"
Jefferson said. "I know
in my heart that was not
the effort we should have
given. If we can give
that effort, everything
else should take care of
itself."
It's not the ultimate
goal for the Tigers. The
final destination is still
a trip to the Final Four
and winning the district
championship.
Still, I can understand
the Tigers' frustration.
Living with a loss after
you feel you don't play
to your potential can eat
away at a competitor.
Sometimes people can
dwell on a specific loss
for years.
The Tigers won't have
to wait that long.
"The bottom line is
that they're athletic and
good, but I thought we
were a little arrogant
and full of ourselves,"
Jefferson said.
The arrogance is gone,
but a confidence remains
for Columbia. It's time
to use that confidence to
extract revenge.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City


Reporter.


Well-deserved recognition


Columbia honors
players at football
banquet Friday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinleyf@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia High's football
team gathered for end of
the year congratulations
and awards in the cafeteria
at the high school for the
2011 season.
Head coach Brian Allen
and the rest of the coaching
staff spoke on behalf of the
varsity squad that advanced
the second round of the
playoffs.
Award winners for the,
2011 season were:
Top Newcomer
- Deonte Crumitie, Tyrone
Sands and Ben Kuykendall
Best Offensive Lineman
- Laremy Tunsil
Best Defensive
Lineman Dequan Ivery
Best Defensive Back
- Darius Williams
Best Wide Receiver


- Nate Ayers
Best Linebac)er -
Quaysean Monismith
Best Running Back
- Braxton Stockton
Coaches Award -
Darren Burch
Coaches Award -
Soloman Bell
Unsung Hero Award
- Austin Reiter
Academics Award -
Dugan Dotson, John Sweat,
Nick Martino and Ronald
Williams
'Captains Award'
- Jayce Barber, Nigel
Atkinson, Felix Woods and
Austin Reiter
0 Jim Register Award
- Nigel Atkinson
0 Offensive MVP -
Jayce Barber
0 Defensive MVP-
Felix Woods.
Junior varsity award win-
ners for the 2011 football
season were:
0 Offensive MYVP -
Lonnie Underwood BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Defensive MVP -. Columbia High's Jayce Barber (left) and Felix Woods hold up their Offensive and Defensive
Alexander Daughty MVP trophies, respectively, during Friday's awards banquet.


0 JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High soccer introduced its seniors and their parents between the games against Hamilton County High on Friday. Seniors honored were
(front row, from left) Jimmy Blakely, Hunter Grow, Caleb Hill, Nikil Swaroop, Alex Barona, Bryce McCarthy, Justin Tompkins and Shane Hartopp.
Back row (from left) are Tyler Rix, Brittany Bethea, Alexis Angstadt, Christy Everett, Meghan Collins, Alyssa Sphalski, Michaela Burton, Lucie Faris and
Nigel Merricks. Joanne Ortiz was not present.


Soccer success on Senior Night


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's soc-
cer teams had a combined
celebration for Senior Night


on Friday.
The Lady Tigers beat
Hamilton County High,
4-1, while the boys shut out
the Trojans in the second
game, 7-0.


Senior players and
parents were introduced
between the two games.
A couple of hat tricks
- both by seniors high-
lighted the matches.


-'-- a- 3-r~-


Lucie Faris scored three
goals for the Lady Tigers.
Two came in the first 15
minutes of the first half and
the last came in injury time
at the end of the game.


Jaime Vincent scored
Columbia's other goal in the
17th minute and assisted on
Faris' second goal.
SOCCER continued on 9A


Tigers take down

Atlantic Coast,

set for rematch


Columbia will try
to reverse fortune
against Bulldogs.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia High notched
its fourth win of district play
on Thursday with a 57-44
win at Altantic Coast High.
Tre Simmons scored 14
points in the fourth quarter
to give him a game high 18
points.
Marcus Amerson contin-
ued his solid season with
17 points in the contest.
Nigel Atkinson and Morris
Marshall each finished with
seven points.
Still, it was the play of
point guard Javonta6 Foster
that had head coach Horace


Jefferson singing praise.
"Foster ran the show,"
Jefferson said. "He had
four points, but he had
five assists and controlled
the tempo. That's all you
can ask for out of a point
guard."
The Tigers (11-2,
4-0) now turn their atten-
tion to Suwannee High in
a rematch of a 60-44 loss
early in the season.
'We're not going to do
anything differently, but I
guarantee you we will play
harder," Jefferson said.
"That's what we've been
doing lately. Atlantic Coast
said we weren't a good
shooting team, but appar-
ently we're playing pretty
good defense. That's what
HOOPS continued on 9A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake Crty Reporter
Columbia High's Morris Marshall (22) drives down the court while playing against Robert E.
Lee High on Dec. 9.