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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01744
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 6, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01744
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







jrN


y Reporter


Friday, January 6, 2012


.cityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 289 0 75 cents


Atkinson resigns as fire chief


County's first, only
chief, plans return
to South Carolina.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. corn
Columbia County's first and
only fire chief has submitted his
resignation, effective Feb. 1.
In his letter to the county on
Jan. 3, Tres Atkinson said he


COUNTY


COUNTY
COMMISSION



Water


meeting


set for


Jan. 23

By GORDON JACKSON
gackson@lakecityreporter.com
Commissioners at
Thursday's meeting chose
not to sign a petition oppos-
ing Gov. Rick Scott's Florida
Workforce Accountability
Act
CommissionerRonWilliams
initially made a motion to
approve a request from Florida
Crown Workforce Board
director John Chastain to
sign a resolution opposing the
governor's
proposed leg-
islation.
He said the
governor's
proposed leg-
islation was
in response
to misman- Williams
agement
problems in the Orlando area
and that there were no prob-
lems in the four-county Crown
Workforce region.
"Do we think one size fits
all?" he asked. "It was a mess
in Orlando. I don't think the
governor can do what he's
doing."
But Williams withdrew the
motion and voted with other
commissioners not to sign the
resolution after some commis-
sioners said they didn't sup-
port everything in the resolu-
tion sent by Chastain.
Commissioner Stephen
Bailey expressed disappoint-
ment that Chastain did not
accept an invitation to appear
at Thursday's meeting to
answer questions before the
vote. Commissioner Jody
DuPree said there were parts
of the resolution he supported
but questioned how it would
be possible to pick and choose
what everyone supported and
suggested not signing the
resolution.
Williams then changed his
motion not to sign the resolu-
tion. His motion was unani-
mously approved.
Commissioners also dis-
cussed how they would
acquire a 60- by 300-foot tract
of wooded land adjacent to
the closed Columbia County
Landfill to install more moni-
toring wells near an area
where asbestos was buried
years ago.
The state is ,requiring the
wells as a precaution to moni-
tor possible leeching near the
site. But the property owners
are balking at selling the land

COUNTY continued on 3A


accepted a position in Dorchester
County, S.C.
"I have enjoyed the challenges
of creating, equipping, staffing
and leading the new Columbia
County Fire Department," he
wrote in his resignation letter. "I
am proud of what I have started
here and hope that the future
is good for the department and
staff."
In a phone interview Thursday,
Atkinson said he accepted the
new position because he has 20
years of fire fighting experience


By MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press
STUART- Gov. Rick ScottvowedThursday
to coax the Legislature to approve his $40 mil-
lion budget proposal for Everglades restora-
tion projects.
Though Scott was met with distrust by
many environmentalists when he took office,
he garnered a standing ovation as he took


By MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press
PENSACOLA Authorities
say a homeless man charged
Thursday with setting a New
Year's Day fire that gutted a fam-
ily planning clinic told investiga-
tors he acted out of a strong
disbelief in abortion and was also
fueled by seeing a young woman
enter the clinic while he looked
on recently with protesters.


South Carolina
and returning
there will enable
him to be eli-
gible for retire-
ment faster than
if he remained in
FAtkinson Florida, where
he has worked
since 2006.
"It's kind of a torn decision," he
said. "I wasn't actually looking for
another job."
Atkinson said he accepted the
Columbia County job in 2006


because every fire chief dreams
about building a department
from scratch, even though the
challenge can "make or break a
career" if things go wrong.
"It was a lot of fun building a
department from the ground up,"
he said. "I was fortunate to have
good people around me. It went
very smooth."
The biggest challenge was not
being from the area and knowing
the people he eventually hired.
Until the county established
a fire department in 2006 with


. the stage at the Everglades Coalition's annual
conference, and was interrupted by loud
applause after promising to push for the fund-
ing.
"We've got to do everything we can to put
the money in there," he said.
Scotts budget request is $10 million great-
er than the current allocation. Though the
Republican has made headlines with his bud-
get slashing, he told the crowd gathered in


Bobby Joe
Rogers, 41,
was charged
with one count
of damaging a
building by fire
or explosive
Rogers and was being
held Thursday
at the Escambia County Jail in
the Florida Panhandle region.

ARREST continued on 3A


Atkinson's help, the Lake City
Fire Department was responsible
for fire protection countywide.
There are now 10 county fire
stations in Columbia County. The
county now provides fire protec-
tion in parts of Lake City and the
city provides fire protection in
parts of the unincorporated areas
of the county as part of a mutual
aid agreement.
County manager Dale Williams
praised Atkinson for his role in
CHIEF continued on 3A .


LAST PASS OVER IRAQ


1989 CHS grad
flies final recon
mission of war.

By STAFF SGT. J.G.
BUZANOWSKI
380th Air Expeditionary Wing
Public Affairs
GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
SOUTHWEST ASIA A
U-2 pilot from Lake City
completed the final manned
intelligence, surveillance
and reconnaissance mission
over Iraq Dec. 18, as the last
American troops withdrew
into neighboring Kuwait
Maj. Steve Eadie, 42, was
born and raised in Lake
City and graduated from
Columbia High School in
1989. ,
Eadie, deployed from'
Beale Air Force Base, Calif.,
said he was proud to be part
of this landmark event
"The best part about it
was it was quiet for the folks
on the ground," Eadie said.
"There were no issues as
they were leaving so it was a
good day. I'm proud to have
been a part of it."
As a U-2 pilot, Eadie is
responsible for flying mis-
sions between nine and 12
hours at a time. The equip-
ment aboard the Dragon
Lady, as the U-2 is com-
monly known, is some of
the most sophisticated in
the world and provides data
IRAQ continued on 3A


Air rorce pnoto oy oDgi. J.G. uzanowsKI
Maj. Steve Eadie climbs out of his U-2 aircraft after completing the. final manned intelligence, surveillance and recon-
naissance flight over Iraq Dec. 18.


Maj. Steve Eadie
lands his U-2 at
an undisclosed
air base in
Southwest Asia
after completing
the final manned
intelligence,
surveillance and
reconnaissance
flight over Iraq that
same day.


Air Force photo by TSgt. DeNoris A. Mickle


Stuart that Everglades restoration efforts are
necessary and worthy expenditures.
"The future of Florida depends on its health,"
he said. '"They're worth every penny."
To some, the governor's comments are sur-
prising given his first year in office.
Restoration funding was cut from $50
million to $29 million. Property taxes for


SCOTT continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 2 photo, the American Family Planning Clinic remains closed
after being damaged by fire early Sunday in Pensacola.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


6944
Patchy a.m. fog
WEATHER, 2A


--^ '- Opinion ................ 4A
/w People ................. 2A
S' Obituaries ..............5A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
'Cable Guy'
tours country.


COMING
SATURDAY
Local news
roundup.


( C -
* -, .-r--


STATE NEWS


Scott: Everglades projects are worth it


Man arrested, charged

in abortion clinic fire











2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY. JANUARY 6, 2012

Celebrity Birthdays


ay'4t Thursday:
S Afternoon: 0-2-3-6


r- .. Wednesday:
9-16-17-21-32


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



'Larry the Cable Guy' tours USA


NEW ORLEANS
Funny man Dan Whitney,
the Blue Collar Comedy
crew member known as
"Larry the Cable Guy,"
says Louisiana and Alaska
are among the states that gave him
great fodder for the second season
of his History Channel show "Only
in America with Larry the Cable
Guy," which premieres Jan. 11.
The show takes quirky and humor-
ous approaches to interesting people
and places across the country. Season
two opens with Whitney's venture to
the Alaska frontier, where he goes on a
stakeout with authorities to catch illegal
moose hunters, learns some moose
calls and helps one of the state's top
moose scientists with an experiment
Whitney said he also made an unan-
nounced visit to the home of former
Alaska governor and 2008 Republican
vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin.
"She was a good sport," Whitney
said with a laugh. "She didn't shoot me
or anything."
Whitney said he made repeat visits
to Louisiana to tape segments for his
show because "there are so many inter-
esting things to do there."
During a trip to New Orleans a few
months ago, he met with a voodoo
priest, ate beignets at Cafe du Monde
in the French Quarter, helped decorate
a Mardi Gras float and marched in a
street parade. He returned to Louisiana
in December for a nutria hunting expe-
dition in a south Louisiana swamp.
"I didn't even know what a nutria
was," said the Kentucky native who
now lives in Florida. "My show tries to
be funny but informative too. We talk
about why it's important to get rid of
the nutria, how they're doing a lot of
damage down there."
The nutriais a rodent native to South
America that is believed to have been
accidentally introduced into coastal


In this undated photo released by
History, funny man Dan Whitney, the
Blue Collar Comedy crew member
known as "Larry the Cable Guy," is
seen during a filming of the show in
New Orleans.

Louisiana in the 1930s. It wreaks
havoc on the state's fragile wetlands by
devouring the roots of erosion-stopping
marsh plants. They also damage banks
and levees by burrowing. Louisiana
holds periodic nutria hunts in which
hunters turn in tails as proof of a kill.
Whitney said he addresses those
subjects in his show and even gets a
taste of some fried nutria meat
'It was kind of like eating rabbit," he
said. "Its a little gamey, but ifs not that
bad."
Whitney has been to about.65 cit-


ies for the taping of the show's two
seasons. Season two premieres Jan. 11
at 9 p.m. on the History Channel and
includes stops in more than a dozen
states, among them Florida, New York,
Maryland, Colorado, Virginia, Georgia
and Ohio.
The Blue Collar Comedy troupe
- formed more than a decade ago
- includes comedians Whitney, Jeff
Foxworthy, Bill Engvall and Ron White.

Nickelback: We don't
follow music trends
NEW YORK Nickelback has
had a number of Top 40 hits over
the years, and although today's pop
scene is dominated by dahce music,
the band doesn't plan to shift gears to
attain past radio success.
'We don't look at what all the popu-
lar artists are doing. We're not chasing
Lady Gaga or Katy Perry or any of
those guys. They're doing fabulous
doing what they're doing, and we're
just doing what we do, and that's it,"
lead singer Chad Kroeger said.
"Obviously, there isn't a person in
the world that would say, 'You know
Nickelback is so trendy.' And we're
not. We don't care. We really just don't
care."
The Canada-based act -which
includes Kroeger's brother, Mike, on
bass, guitarist Ryan Peake and drum-
mer Daniel Adair was named group
of thde by Billboard magazine
and their 2001 breakthrough hit "How
You Remind Me" was the decade's top
rock song. Their best-selling album is
2005's "All the Right Reasons," which
has sold 8 million copies in the U.S.
Peake pokes fun at the state of con-
temporary pop music: "Unless some
famous DJ wants to make a huge,
Euro-pop smash remix of our song!
Call our label."
(AP)


Bluegrass performer
Earl Scruggs is 88.
Retired MLB All-Star
Ralph Branca is 86.
Actress Bonnie
Franklin is 68.
Former FBI director
Louis Freeh is 62.
Rock musician
Malcolm Young (AC-DC)


is 59.
Actor-comedian
Rowan Atkinson is 57.
World Golf Hall of
Famer Nancy Lopez is 55.
TV personality Julie
Chen is 42.
Actor Danny Pintauro
("Who's the Boss?") is 36.


Daily Scripture
"Wash and make yourselves
clean. Take your evil deeds out
of my sight; stop doing wrong.
Learn to do right; seek justice.
Defend the oppressed. Take
up the cause of the fatherless;
plead the case of the widow."

-Isaiah 1:16-17


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Legislature could
wrap up early
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida lawmakers are
supposed to return to the
Capitol next week to start a
60-day session, and already
leaders are divided over how
and when to address the
state's nearly $2 billion bud-
get shortfall.,
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos said Thursday
that he remains worried that
the state's finances are fluc-
tuating and that lawmakers
may have a vote on a new
budget until later this year.
Haridopolos said one
option that could be consid-
ered is to have the session
end early and then return
sometime later in the spring
to work on the budget.
Such a move would force
legislators to finish up all
their other work much more
quickly. One idea is to end
the session after just 40 days
since legislators have until
July to pass a new budget
"I hope we don't have to
do this," Haridopolos said.
The only reason this
year's annual session is start-
ing on Jan. 10 is because leg-
islators must also pass maps
that redraw Congressional
and legislative districts based
on new U.S. ,Census figures.
The Merritt Island
Republican said a final deci-
sion on the budget will hinge
largely on whether or not
senators have confidence
in new estimates that state
economists are expected
to release next week.
Economists who work for
the state periodically during
the year look at tax collec-
tions and try to predict how
much money the state will
have to spend.
Last summer, economists
briefly predicted the state
would have a small budget
surplus for 2012, but as the
debate over the debt ceiling
heated up and consumer
confidence dropped, tax
collections went down. That
led to a new forecast that
showed a budget shortfall.


"We are going to do our
best to move forward with
the budget," Haridopolos
said. "But unless we have
confidence in that number,
it's going to be difficult"
Talk of a possible early
end to the session has
caught House Speaker Dean
Cannon off guard. Cannon
has insisted for weeks now
that lawmakers can pass a
budget during between now
and March.
"The president has not
mentioned anything like
. that to me," Cannon said. "I
am surprised that would be
a serious option if he hasn't
shared that with the House."
Legislators are only
required this year to pass
the redistricting plans and
the budget But there are
plenty of other legislative
proposals up for consid-
eration, including one to
bring mega-casinos to South
Florida. If the Senate ends its
work early, it could force the
House to either accept bills
as passed by the Senate or
allow those measures to die.


Facebook users
to help sell state
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Gov. Rick Scott took
to the social media website
Facebook on Thursday to
help drum up success sto-
ries he can use to lure cornm-
panies to the Sunshine State.
If he wanted feedback,
Scott certainly got it
Those who heeded Scott's
challenge said the state's
weather and the lack of
income tax should be his
main selling points. The gov-
ernor also got a lot of heat
from some saying he should
resign. Others said he
should back the legalization
of marijuana or the creation
of additional casinos to help
the economy.
Scott said he wanted
people to help him "work
together to make the case
for why Florida is the best
state to live, work and play."


Man tortured
girlfriend: Police
TAMPA Tampa police
and the U.S. Marshals
are seeking a man who is
accused of torturing his
girlfriend.
Leon Jorge Washington
is accused of attacking
his 31-year-old girlfriend
with an ice pick, clothes
iron and knife from Dec.
23 to 29. Authorities say
the 41-year-old man did
not allow the woman to
leave for those six days
and forced her to perform
sexual acts.
Washington is also
accused of hitting the
woman's 6-year-old daugh-
ter and spitting on her.
The woman's sister
reported Washington
to authorities after vis-
iting and convincing
Washington to release the
woman to seek medical
treatment.

Fewer consumer
complaints settled
TALLAHASSEE -
The state resolved fewer
complaints from Florida
consumers last year but
recovered $1.1 million more
on their behalf
The Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Affairs issued its annual
consumer report Thursday.
The department fielded
41,961 complaints. That's a
9 percent increase over the
previous year. It resolved or
closed 25,187 complaints.
That's 30 percent fewer
than in 2010. Money recov-
ered, though, increased to
$5.6 million from $4.5 mil-
lion.
Violating the state's
do-not-call list was the top
source of complaints fol-
lowed by telemarketing.
They've been one or two for
three years in a row now.
Communications includ-
ing telephone service came
in third.
(AP)


THE WEATHER


PATCHY PATCHY ISO. ISOLATED r ISO.
AM FOG AM FOG SHOWERS SHOWERS T-STORMS
LATE

HI .0 HI HI LO .0 HI. LO HI L0 i




l dos ta City Saturday Sunday
*67/46 Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 7 1 l4 p, 3 5. p.:
Tallahassee Lake City 6 4 Daytona Beach 71 5,5 p( 74 5 p.:
7 Ft. Lauderdale 75 62 p.: t9 6.2 ;
SPensacola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 6 J p.: .:
t68 55 PanamaCity J4 "' Gainesville 72 4' p: 50' sir
7 5, 55 Ocala Jacksonville 70 53 p.: ;7 52 -r,
SKeyWest .5 6. 1 77. ,7
SOrlando Cape Canaveral
73 149 69.4-8 Lake City P.: 14 r,
Miami 75 63 p, 7 ,r p,-
Tampa Naples 7 3 57 p: 3 60 .
'2,- West Palm Beach Ocala 7.3 5, p.: 3 52 ;r,
71 57 Orlando 74 55. p.: 75 56 p.t
S* FtL Lauderdale Panama City 70 p.-: 55 ,:
Ft. Myers 72 E, Pensacola 70 59 p.: 71 57 .r,
73 50 *Naples Tallahassee 71 53 p.: 72 50 r
72,. 52 Miami Tampa J. 55 p : 77 56 pP
K 72 59 Valdosta 72 51 p. J r
Keyest* W. Palm Beach 72 59 p.: 7 62 p.;
ey 7'.


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


68
27
66
42
84 in 1937
21 in 1999

0.00"
0.06"
0.06"
0.50"
0.50"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tornm.
Moonset tornm.


0
Jan.
9
Full


7:28 a.m.
5:45 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:46 p.m.

3:37 p.m.
5:05 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
5:57 a.m.


4


MODEM
45 ilesi t bumn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Jan. Jan. Jan. 0V&
16 23 30 t
Last New First f
weather


.p76-- ,- -r -- ,. ,1.-^ ^ r ,
1a Ip 7p la 63 rn ir in
..' Fnday Saturday 1989, a blizzard
ripped thr o gh
south central and
southeastern Idaho. || b l VV
.; Strong winds, gust-
"-. ,! ing to 60 mph at
.the Fort Hall Indian
Reservation, cre-
ated 5-foot snow-
drifts and 35 degree
Below zero wind fl flHfIIl
F-, Fntalenre 'Fes be'tn'enwratre chills. _M M M =


FLOR4DA7
=O0ro Wednesday:
-js' 9-18-21-22-33-51
x5


A 3.0 Thursday:
Afternoon: 1-1-6


Lake City Reporter
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AROUND FLORIDA


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY. JANUARY 6, 2012


ARREST: Homeless man faces charges in Panhandle abortion clinic fire
Continued From Page 1A


He could face up to 20 years in prison if
convicted.
In an affidavit, prosecutors say Rogers
told investigators he went to the Pensacola
clinic of American Family Planning around
midnight on New Year's eve with a fire
bomb he had crafted from a 32-ounce beer
bottle and gasoline with a wick made from
an old shirt
He told them he lit the bomb, threw it
against the building and watched it burst
in flames and ignite the building, the affi-
davit said. He then went across the street
to an abandoned car wash until he was
sure the fire was going, according to the
document.


"He stayed at the car wash just long
enough to make sure the fire was going
and recalled hearing a lot of crackling and
popping as the fire progressed," the affida-
vit stated. It added that he then went to a
shed where he often would sleep behind a
closed barbecue restaurant
Rogers has a long criminal history that
includes arrests in Alabama, Georgia,
Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana,
Iowa, Missouri and Florida, authorities
reported. The affidavit said he had felo-
ny convictions for burglary in Alabama,
Missouri and Tennessee.
They said he was identified as a suspect
following tips from the community.


COUNTY: $9 million for road projects
Continued From Page 1A


and granting an easement to install addi-
tional wells, county manager Dale Williams
said. Instead, the family proposes selling a
tract about 40 acres in size to the county.
"It may come down to filing for eminent
domain," he said.
Commissioners voted unanimously to
authorize county attorney Marlin Feagle to
take legal action to acquire the easements
so they can install the monitoring wells.
Commissioners approved a request by
staff to budget about $270,000 from the
non-allocated budget for roadside mowing.
and salaries. They also approved funding
from the non-allocated budget for a list
of projects including construction of the
Westside Community Center, renovation
of the old Fort White Library for county


offices, parking lot paving near a boat
ramp, a pilot roadway stabilization project
and repairs to a historical building.
And, they voted 4-1, with DuPree casting
the dissenting vote, to seek $9 million in
financing for a variety of road improvement
and paving projects, including completion
of the Bascom Norris connector project
Dale Williams announced at the end of
the meeting that a Jan. 31 meeting to cre-
ate a working group to discuss concerns
about a permit that allows the Jacksonville
Electric Authority to pump as many as 155
million gallons of water each day from the
Floridan Aquifer has been rescheduled.
The new meeting time is 6 p.m. on Jan.
23. ,


Investigators initially said Rogers was
from Tuscaloosa, Ala., and later said he
was from Pensacola. They offered no rea-
son for the discrepancy. Jail records listed
no address.
The two-story Pensacola clinic that was
gutted by flames has been attacked before.
It was bombed on Christmas Day in 1984,
and in 1994 a doctor and a volunteer who
escorted patients to and from the clinic
were shot to death as they arrived. The
gunman, Paul Hill, was executed in 2003.
Pensacola was the site of other abortion-
related violence in 1993 when Dr. David
Gunn was shot and killed at another clinic
by an abortion protester.
Since the Hill murders, American
Family Planning has been the site of near-
daily protests with anti-abortion activists
carrying Bibles, crosses and signs, but
the violence that marked the clinic in the
midl990s had stopped before Sunday's
blaze. No one was hurt in the fire.
Investigators from a federal joint terror-
ism task force and the Bureau of Alcohol,


for coalition leaders to make informed
decisions about any given situation.
While this part of their mission is com-
pleted, Airmen from the 99th ERS will con-
tinue supporting commanders in the field
with flights over Afghanistan and other
parts of Southwest Asia, as well as support-
ing units in the Horn of Africa.
'This is the busiest the U-2 has ever


Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives joined
the investigation headed by the state fire
marshal.
Rogers had a brief preliminary hearing
on Thursday. He waived his right to deten-
tion hearing and to a preliminary hearing
and agreed to be represented by the fed-
eral public defender's office.
Records from Alachua County show he
was arrested on Dec. 12, 2009, on charges
of vehicle theft Art Forgey, spokesman
for the Alachua County Sheriff's office
said Rogers spent three months in the
Alachua County Jail. Court records from
the Alachua County case were not imme-
diately available.
Rogers offered only "some kind of pris-
on release ID card," when he and another
man were pulled over driving the stolen
car in 2009, the arresting officer wrote in
his report
The officer stopped the 1994 Mercury
Sable because of a malfunctioning head-.
light Rogers was the passenger.


been in its storied 56-year-career," Clark
said. "It amazes me to see what we've been
able to accomplish so far. And as long as
combatant commanders still need us, we'll
keep flying."
Eadie's mother-in-law, Linda Cribbs of
Lake City, said, "All of the family is very
proud of Steve and his service to our
country."


SCOTT: 'Glades projects are worth it
Continued From Page 1A


CHIEF: Plans return to South Carolina
Continued From Page 1A


the state's water management districts
were cut $210.5 million, which required
substantial layoffs at the agency leading
Everglades efforts. And funding was with-
held from the Florida Forever land-buying
program, which aided in restoring the flow
of water to the River of Grass.
For now, at least, environmentalists
appeared ready to put those differences
aside, eager to defend Scott after his bud-
get proposal and prepared to fight lawmak-
ers who might try and cut the number.
"What happened last year is behind us.
.2012 is a new year and right now it looks
like a year of bountiful opportunity .for


the Everglades," said Jerry Karnas of the
Everglades Foundation. 'Trust is built
step by step and right now the governor is
taking positive steps."
The Everglades have been dying for
decades from the intrusion of farms and
development, cut by dikes, dams and
canals, effectively draining much of the
swamp and polluting it with fertilizers and
urban runoff. The state and federal gov-
ernments' efforts to restore the wetlands
have been stymied for years by funding
shortfalls, legal challenges and political
bickering.


helping to establish a fire department
With the help of recommendations from a
consultant.
"When Tres came to the county, his task
was to take the plan and implement it," he
said. 'Tres has been a tremendous chief
and we're going to miss him."
Williams said the search for a replace-
ment will begin within the department.
"My search will begin in house before
going outside," he said. "We're definitely
going to consider existing employees."


Atkinson said he is certain he will
visit Columbia County on a regular basis
because his parents moved here when he
accepted the job and they plan to stay. He'll
also visit his old staff when he returns to
the county.
"I've built some good relationships
here," he said. "The bond I've made with
the guys here can't be replaced.".


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


Del














OPINION


Friday, January 6, 2012


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Pipeline


can be


done


safely

The fire sale of a tax-
payer-backed etha-
nol plant in Georgia
and the collapse of
a California maker
of solar panels despite $535 mil-
lion in federal loan guarantees
and the generous government
subsidies intended to lure
reluctant motorists into electric
vehicles show that alterna-
tive fuels are no easy answer
to American energy needs.
Certainly they are no immedi-
ate answer.
For the foreseeable future,
we're stuck with oil, gas and,
for power generation, coal. For
consumer purposes, the first
two have proven and efficient
distribution systems. And that's
why the Obama administration
should approve the proposed
1,700-mile Keystone XL pipeline
from western Canada to the
Gulf Coast.
President Barack Obama is
caught between two powerful
Democratic constituencies:
organized labor, which wants
the jobs; and environmentalists,
who don't want the pipeline
period, because of the danger
of spills and the indisputably
messy process of extracting the
oil from tar sands.
And then there are the
Republicans, who seem to
have uncritically swallowed the
ludicrously high estimates of
the number of jobs the pipeline
will create, estimates that, not
unsurprisingly, come from the
people who want to build it
However, the Republicans
are likely key to the most satis-
factory compromise.
Allow the pipeline to be built,
but swallow their anti-regula-
tion bias and provide for thor-
ough and well-funded regula-
tory oversight of the pipeline's
structural integrity and safe
operation.
Surely we learned something
from the disastrous BP drill-
ing-rig fire in the Gulf where
sloppy, spotty and indifferent
federal regulations encouraged
operators to cut corners. It
needn't have happened.
Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETT
POLl


ERS
CY


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Hot on the heels
of his eight-vote
Iowa-caucus land-
slide, Willard
Mitt Romney is
crisscrossing New Hampshire
before Tuesday's key primary.
Romney is masquerading as
a limited-government, free-
market executive from next-
door Massachusetts. From the
Golden Gate to the Granite
State, voters should greet
Romney's impersonation with a
quarry full of skepticism.
In fact, Romney increased
taxes by $309 million, mainly on
corporations. These tax hikes,
described by Romney apolo-
gists as "loophole closures,"
totaled $128 million in 2003,
$95.5 in 2004, and $85 million in
2005. That final year, Romney
proposed $170 million in higher
business taxes, the Boston
Globe reports. However, the
Bay State's liberal, Democratic
legislature balked and only
approved an $85 million
increase.
'Tax rates on many corpora-
tions almost doubled because
df legislation supported by
Romney," Boston Science
Corporation chairman Peter
Nicholas explained in the
January 6, 2008 Boston Herald.
Also, Romney raised the tax
on subchapter S corporations
owned by business trusts from
5.3 percent to 9.9 percent an
85 percent hike.
"Romney went further than
any other governor in trying
to wring money out of corpora-
tions," the Council on State
Taxation's Joseph Crosby com-
plained.
Romney also created or
increased fees by $432 million.
He was not dragooned into this
by greedy Democratic lawmak-
ers; Romney himself proposed
these items. In 2003 alone,
Romney concocted or boosted
88 fees. Romney charged more
for marriage licenses (from $6
to $12), gun registrations (from


What does it
mean to be
"healed" and
ready for a rela-
tionship? Any
relationship?
I've been talking about this
a lot lately with a dear friend,
recently divorced, who has been
told by Christian counselors that
after a long-term marriage one
should wait years before begin-
ning a new, serious romantic
relationship. To work, in the
meantime, on becoming whole
and healed before connecting
with any new partner.
Having been through a
divorce myself, I know such
advice is common.
Well, a mutual friend of ours
chimed in. She talked about how
her father was very critical of
her as a child. She'll never really


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANO
VI


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com

$25 to $75), a used-car sales tax
($10 million), gasoline deliverie's
($60 million), real-estate trans-
fers ($175 million), and more.
Particularly obnoxious was
Romney's $10 fee per Certificate
of Blindness. Romney also
billed blind people $15 each for
discount-travel ID cards.
While Romney can take credit
for a $275 million capital-gains
tax rebate, property-tax relief
for seniors, and a two-day, tax-
free shopping holiday, he also
must take responsibility for
signing $740.5 million in higher
taxes, plus that $85 million in
business taxes that he request-
ed and legislators rejected.
"Romney did not even
fight higher death-tax rates,"
notes former California State
Assembly Minority Whip Steve
Baldwin, a Romney critic.
"When the (Massachusetts)
legislature considered this
issue, Romney's official position
was 'no position.' This echoed
Barack Obama's 'present' votes
in the Illinois State Senate."
As Romney drained his con-
stituents' pockets, the Public
Policy Institute of New York's
Cost of Doing Business Index
rated Massachusetts in 2006
as America's fourth costliest
state in which to practice free
enterprise. The Tax Foundation
dropped Massachusetts from
America's 29th most business-
friendly state to No. 36. The Tax
Foundation also calculated that,
under Romney, Massachusetts'
per-capita tax burden increased
from 9.3 percent to 9.9 percent.
In real dollars, the Romney-era
per-capita tax burden grew by


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com

heal from that, and she knows
it. Early in her relationship with
the man who has now been her
husband for over 20 years, she
said, "Please be sensitive in how
you approach me when you are
tempted to be critical. I need
you to be extra sensitive."
And he is. In so doing, he
isn't helping to heal her hurt as
much as he is bearing it with
her. In the process of serving
her, he's growing, too, and she


$1,175.71.
As if impoverishing his
own taxpayers were not bad
enough, Romney's March 5,
2003 signature raised taxes on
non-residents retroactive to
that January 1. Perpetrating
taxation without representation,
Romney's law declared that,
"gross income derived from...
any trade or business, includ-
ing any employment," would
be taxable, "regardless of the
taxpayer's residence or domicile
in the year it is received."
Consequently, accord-
ing to data furnished by the
Massachusetts Department
of Revenue, between 2002
and 2006, New Hampshire
residents who work or do busi-
ness in the Bay State shipped
Massachusetts $95 million
above what they paid when
Romney arrived. The average
tax paid by New Hampshirities
to Massachusetts grew by 19.1
percent, from $2,392 in 2002 to
$2,850 in 2006.
Notwithstanding the higher
taxes and fees that Romney him-
self advocated, he claims that he
was a powerless victim of a left-
wing legislature. Nonsense.
The profusion of Democrats
on Beacon Hill did not prevent
Romney's GOP predecessors
from dramatically cutting taxes.
Former Republican governors
William Weld and Paul Cellucci
signed more than 40 tax-cut
bills while Democrats ran the
state house.
Romney seems stuck at
25 percent support among
Republicans. That's because
75 percent of GOP voters sim-
ply don't trust him. There are
at least 740.5 million reasons
not to trust Romney on taxes,
either.

* Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


finds new ways to appreciate
him. She gives him grace when
he doesn't get it right, and in
turn she helps to bear the hurts
he carries with him.
Every one of us is dam-
aged in some way because we
are human and subject to the
Fall. Sometimes it's the sin of
another, sometimes it's our own.
But it's there in each of us. The
amazing part? First, that God
can work in the midst of the bro-
kenness. Second that he often
does it through community,
including the special intimacy of
marriage, by first helping us to
understand just how weak and
inter-reliant not how strong
and independent we are.

* Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


4A


THEIR
E W


"I o TAIR%P'oLUI'I&,


* Washington Times


Tax-


haven


wars

t's bad enough that
U.S. citizens have to
deal with the Internal
Revenue Service and
its incomprehensible
rules, but Congress is about
to export much of this
bureaucracy overseas. In the
name of taxing away a bit of
profit made by Americans
living overseas, much more
costly harm will be done to
the U.S. economy.
Thanks to the Foreign
Account Tax Compliance
Act (FATCA), law-abiding
American expatriates are in
for a rude shock as they find
it increasingly difficult to
access banking services over-
seas. This obnoxious statute
imposes sweeping and priva-
cy-invading reporting require-
ments on every financial firm
operating outside the United
States.
The idea was to prevent
Americans from using hid-
den offshore trusts to evade
taxes never mind that
Americans should be free
to move their funds as they
see fit. Under FATCA, every
foreign financial institution,
and every foreign firm that
has American taxpayers as
beneficial owners, must now
verify the American-held
accounts are in'compliance
with the legislation. Failure
to comply results in a with-
holding charge of up to 30
percent on any income and
capital payments the com-
pany might receive from the
United States.
The cost of compliance
is astronomical, as foreign
banks must re-tool their com-
puter systems. One Swiss
expert estimates implemen-
tation would run $200-500
billion just so the IRS can
collect $870 million a year,
by the Joint Committee on
Taxation's estimate.
Like most taxes, the
Treasury isn't likely to get
what it expects. Foreign
banks aren't just going to
spend that kind of cash if it
would be cheaper to dump
U.S. accounts. That would
mean Americans living
abroad wouldn't have access
to bank accounts to pay their
rent and utilities or cash their
paychecks. These law-abiding
expats, already burdened by
double taxation, will find it
increasingly hard to access
financial services.
At a higher level, foreign
banks may respond by spin-
ning off subsidiaries that
won't deal with U.S. financial
instruments at all. If this hap-
pens, the inevitable long-term
effect on the U.S. financial
industry will be negative.
Wall Street became a global
financial powerhouse, just as
London and Hong Kong have,
because of its open and fair
regulatory and legal frame-
works. As the U.S. environ-
ment becomes more hostile
and rapacious, financial trans-
actions will move to more
open markets. The result will
be loss of the comparative
advantage we've long enjoyed
in the provision of financial
services.
Congress is causing all this
disruption for a few million a
year, what passes for chump
change in Washington.
There is still time to stop
this train wreck from hap-
pening. FATCA does not
go into effect until June 30,
2013, under the most recent
extension granted by the IRS,
which is still struggling to
cope with this act. It would
be better to scrap the law
entirely before the damage is
done.


Romney's tax hikes


should worry taxpayers


Emotional healing













Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY. JANUARY 6. 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Jan. 7

Community blood
drives
Saturday, January 7, 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. Dbmino's;
All donors receive a
FREE Large Cheese
Pizza, LifeSouth Boxers,
and a chance to win an
Apple IPAD 2!
Sunday, January 8,
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort
White Hungry Howie's;
All donors receive a
FREE one topping
personal pizza or small
sub, LifeSouth Boxers,
and a chance to win an
Apple IPAD 2!
Wednesday, January
11, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Lake City Reporter; All
donors receive FREE
LifeSouth Boxers,
chance to win an Apple
IPAD 2, and a chance to
win a Anytime Fitness 7
Day Pass!

Couponing workshop
The Friends of the
Columbia County Public
Library will host a
Couponing Workshop
at the Main Library on
Saturday, January 7 at
2:00 pm. Tami Nelson
of Rural Budgeting will
be the presenter. The
program is free and
open to the public.


Jan. 8

134th church
anniversary
The New Mt. Pisgah
A.M.E Church, 345 NE
Washington St., church
family invites you to
share in our 134th
church anniversary on
Sunday Jan. 8 at 4 p.m.
The speaker will be the
Rev. Lantz Mills .f New
Day Spring Day Church
and the theme is faith,
hope and love.

Ordination Service
Ordination Service for
Minister Al Nelson is to
be held Sunday January
8, 2012 @ 3pm.
Location, the Shiloh
Missionary Baptist
Church, Dr.
Dwight Pollock, Pastor.
Please come share with
us.


Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 8,
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library:
Dante Amodeo, author
of Saban and the Ancient
Dante Amodeo was born
in New York and raised
on a farm. He moved to


Florida as a teenager
and now lives in
Jacksonville Beach. His
book, Saban
and the Ancient was
awarded first prize in
the action/adventure
category by
POW (Promoting
Outstanding Writers),
and his first script was
made into the
2010 NBC made-for-
television movie Secrets
of the Mountain.
http://
www.danteamodeo.com/



Jan. 9

Women's Cancer
Support Group
The Women's Cancer
Support Group of
Lake City will meet at
Baya Pharmacy East,
780 SE Baya Drive
from 5:30 to 6:30 PM
on Monday, January
9, 2012. Our guest
speaker, Dr. Paul G.
Goetowski, Community
Cancer Center, will be
discussing "Women's
Cancer in 2012".
Information at 386-752-
4198 or 386-755-0522.


Jan. 10


Historical Society
meeting
The Columbia County
Historical Society will
have its quarterly
meeting on Tuesday,
January 10 at 7:00 p.m.
at the downtown library.
Guest speaker will be
Olustee re-enactor Cody
Gray. The meeting is
free and open to the
public. For details
contact Sean McMahon
at 754-4293



Jan. 11

Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon
The regular meeting
of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be held at 11:00
a.m. on Wednesday, Jan.
11th at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a
fun day.

Jan. 12

Lake City Garden
Club


The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its
monthly meeting at
10 a.m. on Thursday,
January 12 at the Club
House (formerly the
Woman's Club). Coffee
will be served at 9:30.
The program will be
"History of Alligator
Lake Park" by James
Montgomery. Visitors
are welcome to attend.

'Preserving Traditions
of DAR'
The Edward Rutledge
Chapter, Daughters
of the American
Revolution, will meet
on Thursday, January
12, 2011, 10:30 a. m.,
at the Senior Service
Center, 28 SE Allison
Court. Beth Wilson
will be speaking on
"Preserving Traditions
of DAR". Guests are
always welcome. For
further information, call
752-2903.



Jan. 13

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel,Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,


15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet
Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan.
13 at 7 p.m. until. For
ticket info contact Chris
Mirra at 386-623-3611 or
Dennis Murphy at 386-
697-3739.



Jan. 14
North Florida Writers
Group meets

Love to write? From
novice to published
author, the North
Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is
the place where local
writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire.
Writers of any
experience level from
the area are welcome
to join us Saturday,
January 14, 2012, 2pm
- 4pm, at the Columbia

CALENDAR continued on 6A


OBITUARIES


J. Ramsey Hammers
J. Ramsey Hammers, 76, died
on Wednesday, January 4, 2012,
at the Health Center of Lake
City. He was the son of the late
Walter C. & Dathna Puckett
Hammers. He was a native of
Greenville, Mississippi, but had
been a resident of Lake City for
the past 46 years, having lived
in Gainesville for a few years.
He was a loving father, grand-
father and great grandfather that
enjoyed calling square dancing,
achieved the honor of Eagle
Scout with the Boy Scouts of
America and Quartermaster with
the Sea Scouts. He also was the
Suwannee River District Com-
missioner for the BSA for 25
years. He received the Silver
Beaver Award from the BSA
for his ,years of dedicated ser-
vice to scouting. He, was pre-
ceded in death by his brothers,
L.S. Hammers & Ben Ham-
mers and* hig loving wife, of
55 years, Sadie V. Hammers
He is survived by his son, Jim
Hammers (Amanda) ofMonticel-
lo, FL; daughters, Dathna Henry
of Lake City, FL and Patricia
Humphries (Gary) of Jackson-
ville, FL; 13 grandchildren and 3
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services will be; con-
ducted at 2:00. p.m. on .Sunday,
January 8, 2012 in the chapel of
Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home with Pastor Louie Mabrey
officiating. Interment will follow
in Forest Lawn Memorial Gar-
dens. Visitation with the family
will be Saturday evening, Janu-
ary 7, 2011 at the funeral home
from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.
GATEWAY-FORESTLAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
FL 32025, (386) 752-1954,
is in charge of arrangements.
Please leave messages of love
and comfort for the family at
www.gatewayforestlawn .com

Deborah Ann Morrison
Mrs. Deborah Ann Morrison, age
55, daughter of the late James
Wesley Robinson and the late
Fannie Mae
passed away
Sunday, Janu-
ary 1, 2012 at
her residence
terminating a
sudden illness.
Born andraised


in Lake City, FL., she attended
the pubic schools of Columbia
County and was a member of
New Bethel Baptist Church.
She leaves to cherish her
memory a beloved daughter,
Cortez Johnson (Jerris), a son,
Dionne Leslie, a brother, Ray
Robinson of Miami, FL., four
grandchildren, Dionne Leslie
Jr., Sirrej Johnson, Chyna Les-
lie, Raden Leslie and several
nieces, nephews, cousins and a.
special friend Nelo. Williams.
Funeral services will be at 1:00pm
Saturday, January 7, 2012, at
New Bethel Baptist Church,
Rev. Alvin Baker, Pastor, Rev.
Frank Stewart, eulogy. Interment
will follow in the Garden of Rest
Cemetery. Family will receive
friends on Friday, January 6,
2012 from 7:00pm-8:00pm at the
Cooper Funeral Home Chapel.
Arrangements entrusted
to COOPER FUNERAL
HOME, 251 N.E. Washington
Street, Lake City, FL 32055


Charles Noble
Charles Noble, 84, of Atlanta,
Georgia, former resident.of Ken-
tucky, Ohio, and Florida, died
in his home on .
January 3,2012, t
surrounded by
his family. He
was born on July
22, 1927, in Combs, Kentucky,
to James and Bessie Noble and
served honorably in the United
States Army in World War II and
the Korean Conflict. In 1947,
Mr. Noble married his wife of
64 years, Juanita Morris Noble.
He worked for Proctor and
Gamble at the Ivorydale plant
in Cincinnati for 36 years before
retiring to live in Starke, Florida.
While there, Mr. Noble was an
active member of the First Bap-
tist Church of Starke, where he
volunteered as a DJ with the lo-
cal radio ministry. In addition to
his loving wife, he is survived
by his sons, Charles Noble Jr.
and his wife Kathy, and Daniel
Noble; his daughters, Peggy Hil-
leary and her husband Jim, and
Karen Napier-Hoy and her hus-
band Clinton; nine grandchil-
dren; and 17 great-grandchil-
dren. Mr. Noble was preceded
in death by six siblings and one
grandchild. An on-line guest-
book is available at www.fisch-
erfuneralcare.com and in lieu


of flowers, memorial donations
may be made to the American
Cancer Society. The family will
receive friends and loved ones
from 12:30 pm to 1:30 prm, Sat-
urday, January 7 at Fischer Fu-
neral Care, 3742 Chamblee Dun-
woody Rd., Atlanta, GA 30341;
funeral services and entombment
will follow at 2:30 pm in the
Abbey of Westview Cemetery,
l680Westview Dr. SW, Atlanta,
GA 30310. Family arrange-
ments are under the direction of
FISCHER FUNERAL
CARE, 678-514-1000.

Dale W. Smith
Mr. Dale W. Smith, 69, a life-
long resident of Union County,
Florida, passed awvay peacefully
late Wednesday afternoon at his
residence while surrounded by


his family. Born and raised in
rural Union County Mr. Smith
was the son of the late Wilbur
and Annie Mae Waklron Smith.
He was, educated in the Uniorn
County School System and was a
graduating member of the Union
County High School Class of
1961. He then joined the United
States Army and served for two
years. He worked many different
jobs in his lifetime but owned
and operated his own poultry
farm and liquid fertilizer busi-
ness until ill health forced him
to retire. He served as both a
Union County County Commis-
sioner and School Board Mem-
ber. Mr: Smith was a member
of the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints Lake Butler
Ward. He had served as Bishop
of the Lake Butler Ward and as
a High Council Member of the
Lake City, Florida Stake as well


as many other leadership roles in
the church. Mr. Smith enjoyed
spending his spare time with his
children and his grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by a
daughter, Dana Gene Smith.
Mr. Smith is survived by his
wife of forty-five years, Doro-
thy Ann Hardison Smith; three
daughters, Deann Marie Smith
Bennett (Jeff); Dori Aleen Smith
Romrell (David); Ann Marie
Smith McLaughlin (Alex) all
of Lake Butler; a brother, Billy
Ray Smith (Nell) of Valdosta,
Georgia; and two sisters, Bob-
bie Jo Smith Morgan (Ken) of
Lake Butler, Florida; and Betty
Kay Smith Pilcher (Jerry) of
Keystone Heights, Florida. Thir-
teen grandchildren, three step-
grandchildren and a step-great
grand-daughter also survive.
Services for Mr. Smith will be
conducted at 10:00 A.M. on


Saturday, January 7, 2012 in the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Saints Lake Butler Ward
with Bishop Bobby Cabral offi-
ciating. Private family interment
services will be held at d later
date. There will be no visitation.
The family requests that in lieu
of flowers memorial donations
be made to the Haven Hospice
of the Suwannee Valley, 6037
U.S. Highway '90 West, 'Lake
City, FL 32055. Arrangements
are under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERALHOME, 458 S. Mar-
ion Ave., Lake City, FL .32025
386-752-1234 Please sign
our online family guestbook at
Parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Lake Shore Hospital Authority

Board of Trustees


2012 Meeting Schedule


January 9, 2012

February 13, 2012


March 12, 2012

April 9, 2012

May 14, 2012

June 11, 2012


July, 9, 2012

August 13, 2012


September ** 2012

October 8, 2012

November 12, 2012

December 10, 2012


**Budget Hearings take place in the month of September and dates will be announced.


Regular Board Meetings are held on the second Monday of the month at 5:15 PM.
Special Meetings may be called as necessary and will be announced accordingly.
Board Meetings are held in the Conference Room at the LSHA Administrative Complex,
259 NE Franklin Street, Suite 102, Lake City, Florida 32055
For further information, contact (386) 755-1090 or info@lakeshoreha.org


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY. JANUARY 6. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 6. 2012 Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


CALENDAR con'tfrom 5A
County Public Library,
Main Branch, 308 NW
Columbia Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055. Join us
Saturday and see what
we are all about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so
please reserve your spot
today!
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Leader,
(386) 438-3610.
Email inquiries to:
editor@afinaldraft.com

Revival
Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Hospice Chili Cook-
off
The Third Annual
Branford Chili Cook-
Off to benefit children
and families served by
Herry's Kids Pediatric
Services will be held
on. Saturday, January 14
from 11 a.m. 2 p.m. at
Hatch Park located on
Craven Dr. in Branford.
The event will include
a silent auction, games,
a bounce house for
the kids, live DJ, door
prizes, antique car show,
thrift store items for
sale, and all the chili
you can eat. There
will be a five dollar
admission to the event.
In order to register
to be a contestant
call 386-755-7714.
Hospice of the Nature,
Coast, is a program
of Hospice of Citrus
County, Inc., licensed
in 1985: To learn :
more about hospice
services call 386-755-
7714 or visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast..
org.

Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program

On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this
memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
lives forever in our
hearts. Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 p.
m, at Trinity United
Methodist Church.
Glynnell Presley,
Secretary
John F. Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO


Revival

Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.


Jan. 16


Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade

The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
presents the Grand
Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. Parade,


Monday, January 16,
2012 at 10am. Line-
up will begin at the
DOT office at 9:00am.
For participation and
information call Anthony
Newton at 386.365.1470.
The MLK Worship
Service will follow
the parade at the New
Bethel Baptist Church
at 12:30p, Bishop Ron
Williams, II is the
speaker, Rev. Alvin
Baker, Pastor. Call
Audre' Washington at
386.344.9915 for more '
information.
The MLK Classic will
feature a re-match
basketball game at
the Lake City Middle
School at 3:30pm
featuring Alumni
Women and Men's
players of CHS and
Suwannee. Call Mario
Coppock for details at
386.754.7095.


Jan. 17

Loss workshop
Eight Critical Questions,
an educational workshop
offering practical
tips to help cope and
move forward during
the new year will be
January 4 at 2 p.m'.
located at the Wings
Education Center, 857
SW Main Blvd, (Lake
City Plaza). There is.
no cost. For information
or to register, contact
Vicki Myers at 755-
7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-
642-0962. The Wings
Education .Center is a
program of Hospice of
Citrus County, Inc./
Hospice of the Nature
Coast licensed 1985,
serving north central
Florida. Visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org for iiore
information.

Traffic safety meeting
The Columbia
Community Traffic
Safety will hold its first
meeting of the new year
on Tuesday, January 17
at 10 a.m. at the FDOT
Operations Complex,
710 NW Lake Jeffery
Road, in the Crew
Room. The Team works
on traffic hazards and
enforcement issues in
Columbia County and
the public is welcome
to attend. Issues can be
called in to the FDOT
at 758-3714 or e-mailed
to Tres Atkinson, team
chair, at tres.atkinson@
columbiacountyfla.com
or to Gina Busscher,
team secretary, at gina.
busscher@dot.state.
fl.us The team is made
up of members of law
enforcement, emergency
services, engineering
and education.


Jan. 18

Olustee meeting


The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The.
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.


Jan. 19


Voices that Change .

Vocal Impressionlist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from


Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet
facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit


for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.


Jan. 20

Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.

communityconcerts.info.


Jan. 22


Bridal show

The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary Catering
Company, David's
Bridal, Belk, Lake City
Florist arid Design,
Glass Slipper Bridal,
The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices
are $7.00; Day of Event
$10.00. Tickets can be
purchased at the Holiday
Inn & Suites, 213 SW
Commerce Dr., Lake
City. For ticket sales or
vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386)
754-1411.


Riding club banquet


The Columbia County
Riding Club is having
its annual banquet Jan
22,2012, @lpm,@Mason
City Community Center.
The club will have its
rides the 2nd and 4th
Sat. of each month. The
club will be hosting
Pleasure Shows this
year. Check our website
for all information. www.
columbiacountyriding
club.com.


Jan. 24

Friends of the Library
Author Program

Tuesday, January 24,
2012 at 7:00 pm at the
Main Library, sponsored
by Save Our Suwannee:
Cynthia Barnett, author
of Mirage: Florida and
the Vanishing Water of
the Eastern U.S.
and Blue Revolution:
Unmaking America's
Water Crisis
Cynthia Barnett is an
award-winning journalist
and senior writer for
Florida Trend magazine.
She has a special


interest in
environmental history
and in 2004, spent a year
at the University
of Michigan as a Knight-
Wallace Fellow studying
freshwater supply. Ms.
Barnett will discuss
Florida's water crisis
and look at solutions
that have found success
in communities around
the
world. Don't miss 'this
timely program on a
topic so very relevant to
Columbia County and
North Central Florida.
Thank you to Save Our
Suwannee and Florida's
Eden for working with
the Friends of the
Library to bring you this
program.
http://www.
cynthiabarnett.net/



Jan. 25

Building Assn. lunch
The Columbia County
Builders Association
will hold a General
Council lunch at Guang
Dong starting at 11:30
a. m. on January 25.
Cost of lunch is $10
for members and $15.
for non-members and
prices include tax and
gratuity. Speaker is
Dale Williams. After
the lunch an attorney
from Tritt/Anderson in
Jacksonville will hold
a short seminar (about
45 minutes) and he
will go over numerous
contracts, their wording,
etc. There is no charge
for this if you have
attended the CCBA
lunch. Reservations
are preferred call:
386-867-1998 or e-
mail: colcountybuild@
comcast.net.


Jan. 29


Friends of the Library
Author Program
Sunday, January 29,
2012 at 2:00 pm at the
Main Library:
Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita
Nights and
Champagne
for Buzzards
Phyllis Smallman is
a Canadian who has
-spent a lot of time in
Florida, the setting
for her award-winning
mystery series
featuring
sassy bartender,
Sherri Travis. A
former potter with a
lifelong love
of mysteries, Phyllis
divides her time
between her native
Ontario and
Sarasota. She will
join us live via Skype
for this program.

http://www.

phyllissmallman.com/




Feb. 1

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


SPECIAL


Feb. 4


Olustee Festival
Pageant
The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, February 4.
Ages 3-12 mos, 13mo-23
mo, 2-4, 5-6 and 7-9 will
be held at 4:00 pm at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be
held at 7:00pm. Winners
in each division will
receive a $50 savings
bond, crown, banner
and ride in the Olustee
parade on February
14. The runners up
in each division will
receive a large trophy
and all contestants
will receive a trophy
for their participation.
The winner of the
Miss Olustee title (age
16-20) will receive
a $500 educational
scholarship, 1st runner
up a $300 scholarship
and the 2nd runner
up a $200 scholarship.
Entertainment will
be provided by The
pageant is open to the
public with admission
at the door: $5.00
adults and students.
Pre-schoolers are
free. Applications
are available at the
Columbia County
Library or Chamber of '
Commerce. Deadline
for entries is 1-23-2012.
For more information
you may contact pageant
director, Elaine Owens
at 386-965-2787.


Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8


at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center. ,
Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program
Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.

Valentine's Day Ball

1st Annual "Valentine's
Day Ball" presented by
the Rotary Club of Lake
City.
Saturday, February 11,
2012 6pm-10pm.
The Country Club of
Lake City
Cocktails, Dinner,
Dancing with
entertainment by
"Harry, Sally & Billy"
Cash Bar Dress is
Black-Tie optional
Tickets are $50 each
($100 per couple) and
are available at the '
Lake City Reporter, The
Wheeler Agency, Hunter
Printing, First Street *
Music,
Parks-Johnson Agency
on Hwy 90 West or call
752-0812 or 965-0298
Gentlemen...BE A
HERO...bring her to the
"Valentine's Day Ball!"


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, JANUARY 6. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby~akeatyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Friday, January 6, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS
I -& ~


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirbyakecityreporter.comrn


Tide &

Tigers

The rematch to
determine the
BCS National
Champion
between
Louisiana State and
Alabama is Monday in
New Orleans.
A main criterion
in choosing who to
cheer for in these title
games is which team is
from the Southeastern
Conference.
This year, both are.
That leaves little
guidance for locals.
Alabama did make a
big play for Columbia
High's Timmy Jernigan,
who signed with Florida
State. Several times, the
Crimson Tide private
plane was spotted at the
Lake City Airport
Jernigan's decision
leaves Marty Hudson,
who graduated from CHS
in 1975, as the only
former Tiger in memory
to sign with Alabama.
Another Crimson
Tide connection in town
is Norbie Ronsonet
of Rsosonet Buick.
Ronsonet played at
Alabama'in the early
Bear Bryant days of the
late 50s and early 60s.
On the LSU side is
Columbia swim coach
Mary Kay Mathis, who
was a collegiate swimmer
for the Tigers. Mathis
is a strong advocate for
both purple and gold
schools.
The only former CHS
football player I could
come up with. is Demetri
Robinson, and that
turned into a downer.
Robinson, who played
at LSU in the early 2000s,
was arrested on a
shooting charge in
Louisiana in September.
Other athletes of both
schools are urged to
come forward.
The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football
schedule and roster for
the upcoming season are
on its website.
The 35-man roster has
19 former Tigers.
The Falcons open the
2012 season on the road
against the Tampa Bay
Tigers on Feb. 4.
Gridiron Alumni,
which pushes full contact
football games for adults,
is trying to establish a
toehold in this area and
proposing teams from
Columbia, Fort White
and nearby counties.
Gridiron Alumni has
a high opinion of its
product ("hundreds of
players and thousands of
fans swarmed stadiums
to watch their home town
heroes strap it on one
more time"). This was in
Georgia and Louisiana.
We passed along
alumni games
information last year, but
apparently locals were
much less swept up.
The website is www.
gridironalumni. corn.
* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


No one does

football better

than the SEC


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama coach Nick Saban throws passes during practice for the BCS Championship at
the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Thursday. Alabama will face LSU in the BCS
Championship game on Monday.-


ne


Tigers, Indians
will compete in
All-Star Game.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
A group of Columbia and
Fort White high school
football players will get
one more shot to live out
their high-school dreams
on the football field as The
Columbia Youth and Lake
City Pop Warner Football
Associations will sponsor
the 5th annual East-West
All-Star Game. *
Columbia High head
coach Brian Allen will lead
the East in the game and
will be assisted coach-
ing by Quinton Callum,
Andy Giddens and Vernon
Amerson.
Fort White High- head
coach Demetric Jackson
will also help on the coach-
ing staff along with Ken
Snider.
The East will be made up
of players from both local
schools as well as players
fromBakerCounty, Baldwin,
Hamilton and Union County
high schools.
The West will consists of
players from Bell, Branford,
Chiefland, Lafayette, Dixie,
Madison, Suwannee, Taylor
and Trenton high schools.
FOOTBALL continued on 3B


more


League's top
teams will meet
for national title.
By PAUL NEWBERRY
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS A
few months ago, when
there were rumblings that
Virginia Tech might be
jumping to the Southeastern
Conference, Eddie Whitley
and his teammates got
excited.
"Everyone was like, 'Man,
I would love to play there!"'
the Hokies senior safety
said, his eyes lighting up. "I


was like, 'Man, I wish I was
a freshman now!"'
The switch never hap-
pened. Virginia Tech stayed
put, at least for the time
being, in the Atlantic Coast
Conference. But Whitley's
account sums up what just
about everyone else in the
nation has been forced to
concede: Love it or hate, no
one plays college football
like the SEC.
Look no further than
Monday night's BCS title
game between No. 1 LSU
and No. 2 Alabama. For the
first time under this format,
SEC continued on 3B


shot


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Austin Reiter (52) tackles Middleburg High's Rick Lassiter (12) in a game on Oct. 21.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School's Tristan O'Steen (15) fights Fort White's Brandon Moulton (2) for
possession of the ball during a game on Dec. 6.


Tigers fall



on road


to Lions


Leon gets best of
Columbia, 2-1,
in Tallahassee.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
Columbia High fell in
a district road match on
Wednesday as the Tigers
were beaten 2-1 by hosting
Chiles High in Tallahassee..
Jimmy Blakely scored
Columbia's only goal off an
assist by Hunter Grow.
The Tigers will return
home tonight in a double-
header against Hamilton


County High with the girls
beginning at 5 p.m.
Lady Tigers soccer
Columbia High's Lady
Tigers soccer team fell in a
4-1 defeat at Chiles High on
Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers begin a
doubleheader with the boys
today for Senior Night at
5 p.m.
Tigers wrestling


Columbia


High's


CHS continued on 3B













LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY. JANUARY 6. 2012


SCOREBOARD


BRIEFS


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BOXING
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Super middleweights. Dyah
Davis (20-2-1) vs.Alfonso Lopez (22-1-0),
at Key West
11 p.m.
SHO Lightweights, Luis Ramos Jr.
(20-0-0) vs. Raymundo Beltran (25-5-0).
at Indio, Calif.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
FOX Cotton Bowl, Kansas. St. vs.
Arkansas, at Arlington, Texas
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, Africa
Open, second round, at East London,
South Africa (same-day tape)
S:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Tournament
of Champions, first round, at Kapalua,
Hawaii
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP Dartmouth at RPI
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally, Fiambala,
Argentina to Copiapo, Chile (delayed
tape)
NBA
8 p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Orlando
10:30 p.m.
ESPN Portland at Phoenix

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Saturday
Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Atlanta at New York Giants, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Denver, 4:30 p.m.
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
Atlanta, N.Y. Giants or New Orleans
at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m.
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh or Denver at
New England, 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15
Pittsburgh, Denver or Houston at
Baltimore, I p.m.
Detroit, Atlanta or N.Y. Giants at
Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan.42
Dvisional winners
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 29
At Honolulu
NFC vs.AFC
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5
At Indianapolis
Conference winners

College bowl games.

New Mexico Bowl
Temple 37,Wyoming 15
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Ohio 24, Utah St. 23
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 32, San Diego
State 30
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20, FIU 10
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU 31, Louisiana Tech 24
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 56,Arizona State 24
Hawaii Bowl
Southern Mississippi 24, Nevada 17
Independence Bowl
Missouri 41, North Carolina 24
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
Purdue 37,Western Michigan 32
Belk Bowl
North Carolina State 31 Louisville 24
Military Bowl
Toledo 42, Air Force 41
Holiday Bowl
Texas 21, California 10
Champs Sports Bowl
'Florida State 18, Notre Dame 14
Alamo Bowl
Baylor 67,Washington 56
Armed Forces Bowl
BYU 24,Tulsa 21
Pinstripe Bowl
Rutgers 27, Iowa State 13
Music City Bowl
Mississippi State 23,Wake Forest 17
Insight Bowl
Oklahoma 31, Iowa 14
Meinke Car Care Bowl
Texas A&M 33, Northwestern 22
Sun Bowl
Utah 30, Georgia Tech 27, OT
Liberty Bowl
Cincinnati 3 IVanderbilt 24
Fight Hunger Bowl
Illinois 20, UCLA 14
Chlck-fil.-A Bowl
Auburn 43,Virginia 24



Jeffery to

enter NFL

draft

By PETE IACOBELLI
Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -
South Carolina receiver
Alshon Jeffery is giving up
his senior season for the
NFL


The 6-foot-4, 229-pound
Jeffery said Thursday he
will enter the NFL draft this
spring.
"I would like to thank
the fans, my teammates,
Coach (Steve) Spurrier
and everyone involved for
all the opportunities South
Carolina has provided me,"
Jeffery said in a statement


TicketCity Bowl
Houston 30. Penn State 14
Capital One Bowl
South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
Outback Bowl
Georgia vs. Michigan State
Gator Bowl
Florida 24, Ohio State 17
Rose Bowl
Oregon 45,Wisconsin 38
Fiesta Bowl
Oklahoma State 41, Stanford 38, OT
Sugar Bowl
Michigan 23,Virginia Tech 20, OT

Orange Bowl
West Virginia 70,.Clemson 33

Today
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Jan. 21
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs.West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Jan. 28
Senior Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Feb. 5
Texas vs. Nation
At San Antonio
Texas vs. Nation, 2 p.m. (CBSSN)

Conference records


Through Wednesday
Conference W L F
Big 12 6 I .8
Conference USA 3 I .7
Mid-American 3 I .7
Big East 3 I .7
Southeastern 4 2 .6
Independents I I' .5
Sun Belt I I .5
Big Ten 4 6 .4
Mountain West 2 3 .4
Pac-12 2 5 .2
Atlantic Coast 2 6 .2
Western Athletic 0 3 .0


FCS championship

Today
At Pizza Hut Park
Frisco,Texas
Sam Houston State (14-0) vs. North
Dakota State (13-1), I p.m.

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule
' .Saturday's Games
No. I Syracuse vs. No. 20 Marquette,
4 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky vs. South Carolina,
4 p.m.
No. 3 North Carolina vs. Boston
College, 2:30 p.m.
No. 4 Baylor atTexas Tech, 1:45 p.m.
No. 5 Duke at Georgia Tech, Noon
No. 6 Ohio St. at Iowa, 3 p.m.
No. 7 Missouri at No. 23 Kansas St.,
1:30 p.m.
No. 8 UConn at Rutgers, 8 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown at West Virginia,
Noon
No. II Louisville vs. Notre Dame
at 4 p.m.
No. 13 Florida at Tennessee,
II a.m.
No. 14 Kansas at Oklahoma, 2 p.m.
No. 15 Mississippi St. at Arkansas,
9 p.m.
No. 19 Murray St. at Austin Peay,
8 p.m.
No. 20 Kentucky vs. South Carolina,
4 p.m.
No. 21 Virginia vs. Miami, 6 p.m.
No. 22 Harvard vs. Dartmouth, 2 p.m.
No. 25 Gonzaga vs. Santa Clara,
8 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 12 Indiana at Penn St., Noon
No. 16 Michigan vs. No. 18 Wisconsin,
1:30 p.m.

NBA standings

EASTERN CONFERENCE



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I YOPPP I


Atdantic Division
W L
Philadelphia 3 2
Boston 4 3
Toronto 3 3
New York 2 4
New Jersey I 6
Southeast Division
W L


Miami
Orlando
Atlanta
Charlotte
Washington


Pct
600
571
500
333
143

Pct


6 I .857
5 2 .714
4 2 .667
2 4 .333
0 6 .000


Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago" 6 I .857 -
Indiana 4 2 .667 I'
Cleveland 3 3 .500 2''
Milwaukee 2 3 .400 3
Detroit 2 4 .333 3a'
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division ,
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 4 2 .667 -
Memphis 3 3 .500 I
Dallas 3 4 .429 I ',
Houston 2 4 .333 2
New Orleans 2 4 .333 2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Portland 4 I .800 -
Denver 5 2 .714 -
Oklahoma City 5 2 .714 -
Utah 3 3 .500 I'h
Minnesota 2 4 .333 2',
Pacific Division
W L Pet GB
LA. Clippers 3 2 .600 -
L.A. Lakers 4 3 .571 -
Golden State 2 4 .333 I '
Phoenix 2 4 .333 I'k
Sacramento 2 5 .286 2
Wednesday's Games
Toronto 92, Cleveland 77
Orlando 103,Washington 85
Boston 89, New Jersey 70
Chicago 99, Detroit 83
Miami 118, Indiana 83
Charlotte 118, NewYork 110
Philadelphia 101, New Orleans 93
Memphis 90, Minnesota 86
Dallas 98, Phoenix 89
San Antonio 101, Golden State 95
Denver I10, Sacramento 83
LA. Clippers 117, Houston 89
Thursday's Games
Miami at Atlanta (n)
Dallas at San Antonio (n)
Milwaukee at Sacramento (n)
LA. Lakers at Portland (n)
Today's Games
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Washington, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Utah,; 9 p.m.
Golden State at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Portland at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Chicago at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Miami at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
NewYork at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Houston, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Denver at SariAntonio, 8:30 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m..

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Montreal 7,Winnipeg 3
Boston 6, New Jersey I
Vancouver 3, Minnesota 0
San Jose 3,Anaheim I
Thursday's Games
Calgary at Boston (n)
Winnipeg at Toronto (n)
Florida at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Chicago at Philadelphia (n)
Tampa Bay at Ottawa (n)
Edmonton at St. Louis (n)
Dallas at Nashville (n)
Phoenix at Los Angeles (n)
Columbus at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Vancouver at Boston, I p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Edmonton at Dallas, 2 p.m.
Columbus at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Carolina at Nashville, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Calgary, 10 p.m.
Washington at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans: A I X
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: OMEGA DOUBT INFANT COYOTE
Answer: The smartest kid in the math class could
always be COUNTED ON


ADULT BASKETBALL

'The Rematch'

set for Jan. 16

The Lake City
Recreation Department
and Richardson
Community Center Annie
Mattox Park North, Inc.,
is hosting "The Rematch"
adult basketball games
between Lake City and
Live Oak players on
Jan. 16 at the Lake City
Middle School gym. The
women's game will begin
at 3:00 p.m.; the men's
game will begin promptly
at 4:30 p.m. Admission is
$5. All proceeds go to
support youth sports
programs in both
communities. The LCMS
girls basketball team will
sell concessions. The
games are a part of the
Martin Luther King Jr.
weekend activities
sponsored by the North
Florida Leadership Council
and everyone is invited to
attend.
For details, call Mario
Coppock at 754-7095.

CHS SOCCER

Moe's Night set

for Monday

Columbia High's soccer
teams are hosting a Moe's
Night fundraiser from
5-8 p.m. Monday at Moe's
Southwest Grill in Lake
City. The soccer program
receives a percentage of
the sales.
For details, call
(386) 288-4726.

CHS FOOTBALL.

Awards banquet

today at school

The Columbia High
football team's end of the
year banquet is 7 p.m.
today in the school


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 217; 2. Lori Davis 202;
3. Susie Camacho 194. 1. (tie) Dave
Ward, Mark Koppa 209; 3. Mark Davis
206; 4. Bill Price 202.
High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 552; 2. Susie Camacho 532;
3. Lori Davis 492. 1. Dave Ward 580;


ACROSS
1 Set a price
4 RN assistant
7 Carthage loc.
10 Unhatched
fish
11 Fill
13 Positive
14 Racing circuit
15 Dog food
brand
16 Vicinity
17 Cheery one
19 Talk like tots
20 "King"
Cole
21 Geologic
period
23 Kiosk lit.
26 Downs
(racetrack)
28 Spiral
molecule
29 Hi-tech scan
30 Enliven
(2 wds.)
34 Catty
36 Windy City
trains


cafeteria. The banquet is a
fundraiser for the
quarterback club and
attire is semi-formal.
Tickets are on sale for $12
at Hunter Printing.
For details, call head
coach Brian Allen at
755-8080 ext. 140.

YOUTH BASEBALL

Fort White

meeting today

Fort White Youth
Baseball's annual meeting
is 6:30 p.m. today at South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call Millissa
Blakley at 365-4133.


Registration for

Lake City open

Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
5-7 p.m. today and Jan. 13
and Jan. 20, and 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday and Jan.
14 and Jan. 21 at Southside
Sports Complex with a
cost of $80. Online
registration at
www.lcccyb.com is $75 plus
transaction fee.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 3654810.

CHS SOFTBALL
Trui ut et fnr


Young Guns tryout Monday at school


set for Saturday

The Young Guns
9-under travel baseball
team has an open tryout
set for 1 p.m. Saturday
at the Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call David
Williams at (386) 697-0764.


North Florida

Blaze tryouts

The North Florida
Blaze travel baseball
team for ages 11-12 has a
tryout planned for 2 p.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423 or
Jamie Sosa at 867-9039.


North Florida

Rays tryouts

The North Florida Rays
9-under travel baseball
team has tryouts set for
10 a.m. Saturday and
Jan. 14 at Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call Todd
Green at 365-5161.


BOWLING

2. Mark Koppa 564; 3. Mark Davis
544.
High handicap game: 1. (tie) Mary
Lobaugh, Lori Davis 239; 3. Brandy
Watson 226; 4. Gloria Dennis 215.
1. Bill Price 230; 2. Mark Koppa 225;
3. (tie) Adam Alford, Mark Davis 217.
High harfdicap series: 1. Susie
Camacho 673; 2. Marty Sanders 598;
3. Maggie Battle 595. 1. Dave Ward
673; 2. Chris Camacho 621; 3. Eddie
Hillhouse 594.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 182,


38 Coll. credits
39 Harden
41 Thin gold
layer
42 Play the
guitar
44 Vigoda or
Fortas
46 Bake pottery
47 Boundlessness
52 Memorable
decades,
53 New Year's
Eve word
54 -Magnon
55 Camping
need
56 Swiss artist
57 Beer barrel
58 Naval off.
59 British inc.
60 Indeed

DOWN'
1 Woody's son
2 Daytime
drama


Columbia High's
softball tryout is 3:30 p.m.
Monday at the softball
field. All players must have
current physical, parent
consent, and drug testing
forms completed.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL

Q-back Club

meeting Tuesday

The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in
the teacher's lounge at the
high school.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

FLAG FOOTBALL

Christ Central

registration open

Registration for Christ
Central Sports flag
football for ages 5-12
continues through Jan. 13.
Cost is $40.
For details, call
365-2128.

N From staff reports


Mark Davis 195.
(results from Dec. 27)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Oddballs
(48-24); 2. The Sandbaggers (47-25);
3. Legal Ladies (40-32).
High handicap game: 1. Cythe
Shiver 239; 2. Judy Daniels 230;
3. Joan Carman 223.
High handicap series: 1. Angie
Meek 660; 2. Diane Madsen 635;
3. Shirley Highsmith 604.
(results from Jan. 3)


Answer. to Previous Puzzle


3 Reserved
4 Andes
ruminant
5 More civil
6 Has a snooze
7 Mr. Goldfinger


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


8 Not wilted
9 Gather grain
12 Indulges
excessively
13 Seven-veil
dancer
18 Connections
22 Fixes corn
23 HMO workers
24 Raggedy doll
25 Moo goo
pan
27 Jetty
29 Waiter's
offering
31 Beta Kappa
32 Home page
addr.
33 L.A. zone
35 Most urgent
37 Spring growth
40 Kayak cousin
41 Ike's rank
42 Alarm
43 Mission
starter
45 Waited
46 Wine and dine
48 Canceled
49 Gummy
50 Trunk
possessor
51 Guru's
practice


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


MIYjRjT LE K IM
SPIA GOA
OPEC OBIS ABC
MACHO ODEHLEA

AT
R AI MG#
TEN AGS
/ .1


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


A|OMR


CIDIAC
.
^ _'











Page dito: Bradon inley 7540420 AKE ITY EPORTER SO T RDY AUR .21


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School's Kaicie Chasteen performs the clean-and-jerk while participating in a
weightlifting match against Fort White High School on Wednesday.


CHS: To compete in Clay today


Continued From Page 1E

wrestling team is compet-
ing in the Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
High today and Friday.


The Tigers Cole Schreiber
wrestled in the third round
of a match against a Ware
County High opponent


at last week's Valdosta
(Ga.) Wildcat Invitational:
Schreiber won on points,
6-0.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Cole Schreiber tries to position his opponent for a pin during the Wildcat
Invitational in Valdosta last week.


SEC: Offers best brand of football
Continued From Page 1B


two teams from the same
league heck, the same
division are facing off in
a no-lose situation for the
SEC. Before one strand of
confetti falls to Superdome
floor, the conference is
assured of its sixth straight
national title. No other con-
ference has won more than
three in a row.
'You've got the best ath-
letes in the nation going
to one conference," Whitley
marveled. "Alabama's got
linebackers that are 260,
270 (pounds). Our defen-
sive tackles are 270."
The SEC's dominance
has been decades in the
making.
Many point to the SEC's
revolutionary decision in
the early 1990s to expand
from 10 to 12 teams, allow-
ing it to become the first
conference to split into divi-
sions and set up its own
championship game. Other
factors, everything from an
exclusive national televi-
sion deal with CBS to top
coaches such as LSU's Les
Miles and Alabama's Nick
Saban to the abundance of
high school talent in the
Deep South, help keep the
SEC on top year after year.
But the real roots of the
SEC's breakaway can be
traced to the turbulent '60s,
when the region was ripped
apart by the struggle for
civil rights and its universi-


ties were still clinging to
the notion of only letting
whites through the school-
house door.
In 1966, Alabama post-
ed a perfect 11-0 record
with an all-white team but
still finished third in The
Associated Press pollbehind
Notre Dame and Michigan
State, which had played to
a 10-10 tie. The feeling at
the time, and one that is
even- more apparent with
the hindsight of history,
was that both the Fighting
Irish and the Spartans were
superior programs because
they had African-Americans
players and faced teams
that allowed them on the
field, too.
"There were athletes who
were qualified and capable
and had the ability to play in
the SEC, but they were not
recruited because they were
black," said Wilbur Hackett,
a longtime conference ref-
eree who, in the late '60s,
became the first African-
American captain when he
played at Kentucky, per-
severing through intense
racial prejudice.
When it became clear that
integration was inevitable,
the SEC finally tapped into
a whole new pool of talent,
gaining the inside track to
huge numbers of immense-
ly qualified locals who
had always been forced to
sign with historically black


schools or venture far from
home, to the Big Ten or the
Pacific Coast, if they wanted
to play at the highest level.
Today, every SEC roster
is filled with black players.
Their influence on the game
is undeniable.
"The league was strong,
but it could have been stron-
ger if they had integrated
sooner," Hackett said. "Look
at the Tennessee States and
the Jackson States and the
Gramblings, all the play-
ers from those schools
that went on to play in the
NFL. Now, those schools
don't put players in the NFL
because all those players
are in the SEC."
Over the last 10 years, a
staggering 72 players from
SEC schools have been
first-round draft picks. The
Big 12 is next on the list, far
behind at 51.
With Heisrnan Trophy
winner Cam Newton lead-
ing the way, the SEC
had five of the top six picks
in 2011. -The odd man
out was Von Miller from
Texas A&M'- which is
joining the league next
fall.
"There's a lot of talent
down there and they do a
good job of coaching a lot
of talent," said Al Borges,
the offensive coordinator
at Michigan who formerly
coached at Auburn. "That's
all there is to it."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Will Yeguete (15) shoots for two points as UAB's Alexander Scotland-Williamson
(33) tries to stop the shot in Gainesville Tuesday.


Florida to open SEC


play without Rosario


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE It
appears No. 13 Florida
will be shorthanded for its
Southeastern Conference
opener at Tennessee.
Guard Mike 'Rosario's
likely will miss his second
straight game because.
of a sprained left ankle,
but coach Billy Donovan
expects to have Casey
Prather back Saturday.
Prather missed the last
three games with a stom-
achI virus.
Donovan also believes


forward Erik Murphy
will be available. Murphy
took an elbow just about
the right eye in, practice
Thursday and needed
stiches.
"The biggest thing you
worry about in those situ-
ations is ..., are there con-
cussion-like symptoms,"
Donovan said. "He's nothav-
ing that right now. Provided
he doesn't have that, the cut
is not going to prevent him
from being out at practice
and/or the game."
Murphy and teammate
Patric Young were both
going;for -a rebound when


Young whacked Murphy
in the forehead with his
elbow. It's not the first time
Young has hammered a
teammate, either. He broke
Prather's nose in practice
last year.
"Whether it's been a pick
or a rebound, Pat has defi-
nitely gotten everybody on
this team," leading scorer
Kenny Boynton said. "I
think he's used to it. He's
been doing it all his life."
Rosario, who is aver-
aging 9.0 points and 2.3
rebounds a game off the
bench, has missed three of
Florida's last-five games.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) is chased by Santa Fe High defenders in a game on
Nov. 11.


FOOTBALL: CHS Banquet at 7 p.m.


Continued From Page 11
Players expected to
compete for Columbia are
Koran Amerson, Hayden
Lunde, Austin Reiter,
Quayshon Monismith,
Ronald Williams.
Dequan Ivory was invit-
ed to compete but will be
on an official visit to the,
University of Louisville dur-
ing the day of the game.
Allen also noted that
Ivory was offered by
Miami after head coach Al
Golden visited the school
on Wednesday.
"It's a matter of him
getting the grades right
and holding his end of the
rope," Allen said.
Allen didn't give any
indication to whether Ivory
would stick with his com-
mitment to Louisville.
Nigel Atkinson was also
invited to compete in the
game, but hasn't commit-
ted officially.
Fort White will have
at least six players in the


game. Markeius Coffee,
Jonathan Dupree, George
Fulton, Dalton O'Dell,
Wesley Pitts and Soron
Williams will play. A.J.
Legree has been invited
but has not committed to
playing.
"This will be an oppor-
tunity for some players to
get extra film and possibly
get a look from a small col-
lege," Allen said. "It will be
a game with some of the
better talent in the area
and help evaluate the kids
talent against some of the
better players."
Practice will begin for
the East squad at 4 p.m. at
Annie Mattox on Monday.
Rules will dictate a lot
of what Allen will be able
to do with his team during
the game.
"It will be similar to a
spring game," he said. "We
can only blitz inside the
10. The focus is to keep
the kids healthy and with-


out any major injuries.
Offenses won't be allowed
to show unbalanced pack-
ages. We'll spot the ball at
the 30 after kickoffs and
there's no rushing the
punters."
Still, the game should
be a good chance for
some of the mofe talented
players without scholar-
ships to showcase their
skills.
Allen will also host the
Columbia High football
banquet at 7 p.m. tonight
in the Columbia High caf-
eteria.
Florida State offensive
line coach Rick Trickett
will be the guest speaker
for the event.
Tickets are on sale at
the door for $12 with a
meal included as part of a
fundraiser for the Tigers'
Quarterback Club.
"Its never too early to
get started on things for
next year," Allen said.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY. JANUARY 6. 2012


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 2012


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


HO! HO HO O YOU HAVE TO BE I DON'T HAVE TO, UT I Sn IT ISN'T YOUR JOB TO
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HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


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FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Girl who thinks she's abused

gets scolded by fellow teens


DEAR READERS:
Yesterday I printed letters
from adults in response to
a letter from "Emotionally
Abiused in California"
(Nov. 2), the 15-year-old
who felt her mother was
treating her unfairly. Today
we'll hear from teenage
readers:
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 14-
year-old girl. My mom
showed me the letter from
"Emotionally Abused" and
I almost died! Her mom
sounds just like mine. I
am not allowed to wear
clothing that shows too
much skin or get into a car
with a teenage boy. I don't
have cable TV. I have to
do my own laundry, clean
my room, cook dinner and
hem my own jeans.
Every night our entire
family sits down for din-
ner. My parents always
know my plans when
I'm out with my friends,
and I go to church every
Sunday with the occa-
sional groan. I'm not the
perfect daughter, but I'm
glad I'm being raised with
integrity, responsibility
and a whole lot of chores.
- COOPERATING TEEN
IN NEW JERSEY
DEAR ABBY: From one
teen to another: I have
heard your same story
from friends a thousand
times. You're not being
treated like a criminal.
Your mom is doing you a
huge favor. She's prepar-
ing you for the real world


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
by making you pay for
your own things. She's got
high expectations if she
thinks you can get through
college.
You need to be easier on
her and try to see things
through her eyes. Not
everything she does is an
attack on you in fact, it's
the opposite. FELLOW
CALIFORNIA TEEN
DEAR ABBY: I'm an
18-year-old girl and I have
never been in trouble. I
attend a private school
where modesty is the
dress code policy. To pay
for tuition to this school,
I work every afternoon
during the school year and
full-time during the sum-
mer. I'm expected to pay
for my own clothes, cell-
phone bill and haircuts out
of my allowance. If I can't
afford something, I don't
buy it.
As long as I live with
my parents, I will abide
by their rules. My parents
love me very much and
have my best interests
at heart. "Emotionally
Abused" should have
respect for her mother
and be thankful for the


many things she has. -
MONTANA TEEN
DEAR ABBY: After
we read the letter from
"Emotionally Abused," my
brother and I were laughing
to the point of tears! I would
like to say the following to
her. Our mom makes my
brother (who's also 15)
and me go to church every
Sunday AND Wednesday.
Mom home-schools us, thus
making her teacher, princi-
pal and mother all in one. ITll
be 17 in January and I still
can't date.
Mom checks my com-
puter regularly, and I'm
not allowed to go to chat
rooms. My brother and.I
have to set the table and
eat with her every night.
As for visiting Dad, I wish
we could see ours every
week. Unfortunately, he's
deployed overseas.
In conclusion: DEAL
WITH IT! Your mom
isn't being unreasonable;
she's looking out for you.
Mothers like yours are
few and far between. What
hurts you, hurts her. If
she didn't love you, she
wouldn't act the way she
does. Abby's right when
she says one day you'll
look back and thank her.
My brother and I already
thank ours. LAUGHING
SIBS IN NORTH
CAROLINA
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Talks will bring good
results. Your ability to ,
express your thoughts
and make suggestions
will captivate an audience.
Relationships should be
your prime concern. Do
your best to establish
responsibilities, as well
as devotion and loyalty.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Spice up your life.
Try new things and get
involved in groups that
offer a positive challenge
and a chance to make
long-lasting friendships.
Incorporate your ideas into
your work and you will
become more efficient and
valuable. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Hard work will pay
off and start you moving
in a direction that shows
promise. Your reactions
will come from the heart
and your emotions will
be difficult to contain. Be
careful not to start an argu-
ment when dealing with
personal matters. *** -
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll learn a lot from
someone who has more
experience. Cultivate a
relationship with people
who have as much to
offer you as you do them.
Someone from your past
will pay back a debt or
favor owed to you, if you
ask. ***--


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You will meet interesting
people and open doors
that can help you get
ahead professionally by
participating in a cause or
organization you believe
in. Love is in a high cycle,
and romance should be
scheduled for the evening
hours. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You'll be anxious
about the things you
need to complete. Use
any means you can to
help push you ahead of
the competition. You can
advance by staying moti-
vated and using innovative
ideas to get the work done.
**
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): You've got a handle
on what needs to be
done and the resources
to pull it off. Socializing
will allow you to show off
your talents and attract
both friendships and love
relationships. A purchase
will boost your confidence.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Put time and
effort into your surround-
ings and finances. Home
improvement projects will
enhance your relationship
with someone special and
stabilize your personal life.


Financial gain is in the
stars; all you have to do is
the work. ***
SAG1ITARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Emotional issues
will surface and must be
dealt with before they get
out of control. You will
'avoid future dilemmas that
can affect your personal
life if you listen to what's
being said and give an
honest answer to whatever
-is asked. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't stop until
you've taken care of your
responsibilities. What you
do will set an example and
affect your reputation. You
will excel by striving for
perfection and completion.
Good fortune is heading
your way. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put more time
and effort into your home,
family and financial well-
being. Set up a new budget
that will reflect your goals
and help you succeed.
Love is highlighted, and
a commitment can be
made to someone special.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't give in to emo-
tional blackmail. You have
to weigh the pros and cons
before you decide how to
handle anyone stepping
out of line. Diplomacy,
understanding and remain-
ing calm will bring the best
results. Take action. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: Z equals P
"BTCHV JTC AGFLM HOLHTFLV FLBC
BTV DFRVH CY CBTVGH PNLLCB XVVZ


FB YGCW BTVWHVDRVH."


- U. W .


A N G G F V

Previous Solution: "It's inappropriate and vulgar ... to use your private life to
sell anything commercially."- Lauren Bacall
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-6


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


SPage Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 2012


Lake City Reporter




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appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement





with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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abbreviations are acceptable; how-
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not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
FILE NUMBER: 11-292-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF GENEVIEVE
SUMMERS BUIE NELSON, FOR-
MERLY GENEVIEVE SUMMERS
BUIE,,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
GENEVIEVE SUMMERS BUIE
NELSON, formerly GENEVIEVE
SUMMERS BUIE, deceased, whose
date of death was November 5, 2011,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Columbia County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Post Office Box 2069, Lake City,
Florida 32056-2069. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims or demands
with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION. OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-,
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE is
December 30, 2011.
Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-
tatives
DARBY & PEELE
HERBERT F. DARBY
Florida Bar No. 0017901
285 Northeast Hemando Avenue
Post Office Drawer 1707
Lake City, Florida 32056-1707
telephone: 1-386-752-4120
Co-Personal Representatives
By:/s/ GEORGE A. BUIE, ffI
2403 Coventry Avenue,
Lakeland, Florida 33803
By:/s/ ELIZABETH: PATRICIA
1825 SW Paloma Court
Lake City, Florida 32Q25
05529779
December 30, 2011
January 6, 2012
Public Auction to be held
February 11, 2012 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, LLC 2492
SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
99 Ford
Vin# 1FTZX1726XNA63472
05529917
January 6, 2012

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.Ilakecityreporter.com







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


020 Lost& Found
$200 REWARD for info leading
to return of 2 Blue Tick hounds.
Missing from Norris Rd. the week
of Christmas. Call 386-623-0200
$200 Reward for the return of a
Tree stand & Deer Camera.
Missing from the end of Lake
Jeffery in Wellborn.386- 623-0200

10n Job
100w Opportunities

05529880o1
VyStar Credit Union Seeking
Member Relationship
Specialist Supervisor
Location: Lake City Branch
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS:
Trains, monitors, coaches and
develops member service and
teller staff on a daily basis.
Provides on-going training for
all member service and teller
staff as changes are
implemented and other duties
JOB KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS
& ABILITIES:
A minimum of three years of
experience with a financial
institution.
A minimum of two years in a
leadership or supervisory
position is preferred.
Knowledge of Microsoft Word
and Excel are required.
EDUCATION:
An Associate Degree is required
and a four-year undergraduate
degree is preferred. Work and/or
supervisory experience may be
substituted for the Associates
Degree;
Please visit
www.vystarcu.org/home/careers
to apply.
VyStar Credit Union is an Equal
Opportunity Employer

05529886
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Guest Services Position PT
18-24 hrs. wkly. MUST be a
people person with strong work
ethic, DEPENDABLE, good
communication, great customer
service skills, computer skills,
and willingness to learn.
MUST be a team player arid
able to work a flexible schedule,
including weekends and'
holidays. We offer Competitive
Pay and Health Benefits. Hotel
Experience Highly Preferred.
Only those seeking long term
employment apply.in person
at Comfort Suites 3690 W US
HWY 90. Please do not call the
hotel regarding your application.

05529914
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
COMPUTER SYSTEMS
TECH
Knowledge and experience with
ability to maintain hardware and
software including maintenance
and upgrading. Perform routine
network administration, research
and troubleshoot problems. High
School graduate, a degree in
computer science or related
field. Two (2) years experience
in computer systems and com-
munications systems required.
For further information,
please visit our website:
www.lakebutlerhospital.com
(386) 496-2323,
FAX (386) 496-1611
Equal Employment Opportu-
nity / Drug Free Workplace

BARTENDER NEEDED Must
have experience and be reliable.
Must have own phone and own
car. 386-752-2412


Immediate Collector Position
Available. Full-time. 3$8/hr.
Dedicated and determined
individuals wanted. Bilingual
applicants encouraged to apply.
Apply at
www.salliemae.candidatecare.com
or Call Christine at 1-866-441-
2623 ext 4342.


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer. Landscapers
Paradise, LLC Fayette Co. KY.
All Activities of Nursery
Production & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 03/01/2012 -
01/01/2013. 12 months verifiable
experience required. Wage of
$9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center and reference the job order
#KY0443511.
12 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Lee Childress
Farms, LLC Lucedale, MS.
Row Crop and Produce Production
with Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 02/20/12 -
12/20/12. Wage of $9.30/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center and reference the job order
#MS44990.
MECHANIC
Part Time
Call: FJ Hill Construction
386-752-7887
Needed Secretary/Assistant for
busy Real Estate Office. computer
skills a Must. Call Debbie at
386-719-1224 for application
Now Hiring Restaurant Manager.
Experience preferred but will train
right person. 24 hour operation.
Send resumes to: 186 SE Newell
Dr. Lake City, FL. 32025.
4 Temp Farm Workers needed
2/6/12-11/30/12. Workers will
perform any combo of duties
including planting, cultivating,
harvesting andpruning;
vegetables, blueberries and nursery
stock including container & field
grown plants, trees, & shrubs.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
All tools, supplies, equip/provided'
at no cost. Free housing provided
for non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract or
earlier. Random drug testing at
employer's expense. Worksite in
Mobile Co. AL. $9.39/hr.Report or
isendLtesitine tcrthe-nearestiFL-
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & ref. job order # 758201 or
call 850-921-3466. Oak Hill Tree
Farm Grand Bay, AL
Officer Manager Position:
Must have Real Estate knowledge.
Also prefer Real estate license.
Must have knowledge of
QuickBooks & Microsoft Office.
Motivated individual with an abili-
ty to multi task. Mon Fri 40 hr
wk. Contact Mike or Lynn: 386-
719-5600 or 386-288-3596
Accredited Real Estate Svcs., LLC
Part Time Welder needed for
FJ Hill Construction
Call 386-752-7887


8 Temp Nursery Workers needed
2/6/12-11/30/12. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, prune,
propagate, grade, store, & ship
container & (ueld grown
horticultural products. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. Tools,
supplies, equip. provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
$11.10/hr. Worksite location in
Painesville, OH. Random drug
testing at employer's expense.
Report or send a resume to the
nearest FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & ref. job order
# OH536063 or call 850-921-
3466. Penn-Ohio Wholesale -
Painesville, OH

Preschool Teacher. Must be 21 &
have req'd 40 hrs. PT w/opportuni-
ty for FT. Apply in person 1226
SW Grandview St. Lake City.


100 Jb0
100 Opportunities

Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

4 TEMP Stable Attendants needed
2/3/12-9/30/12. Wrkrs will
perform all duties associated with
caring for yearlings and racehorses
and their environment. Must have
3 month experience working with
horses. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools, supplies, equipment
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Random drug
testing at employer's expense.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
$9.38/hr. Worksite in
Harrodsburg, KY. Report or send
a resume to nearest local FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & reference Job
#KY0441636 or call 850-921-
3466. G Watts Humphrey Jr
DBA Shawnee Farms -
Harrodsburg, KY.
Wanted: mature person to live in
and care for elderly woman must
cook clean and give meds. Day#'s
386-755-5099 or 288-1078

1 Medical
120 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529913
LAKE BUTLER HOSPITAL
PHYSICAL THERAPIST
Will be required to evaluate and
treat a variety of diagnoses/post
surgical conditions in a
hospital/swing-bed and out
patient setting. Hand experience
preferred /not required. Serious
inquiries only. Please contact
our Director of Therapy
386-496-28.43 ext 275 or
e-mail resume to
therapydirector(&lakebutlerho-
slpital.com
Equal Employment Opportunity
/ Drug Free Workplace

05529919
RN, Unit Supervisor ,
Experienced in Long Term
Care. Full Time, excellent pay
and benefits.
Please apply at Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
587 SE Ermine Ave., Lake. City,
Fl 32025 or fax resume to
386-752-7337. EOE/DFWP

05529923
Admission Director
Avalon Healthcare is currently
accepting applications for
the full time position of
Admissions Director.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent Benefit package.
Please send resume to:
Tony Anderson, Administrator
admin@avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE

05529924
Occupational Therapist
Avalon Healthcare Center is
currently accepting applications
for the full time position of
Occupation Therapist.
Competitive Salary and
Excellent benefit package as
well as a sign on bonus is being
offered. Please contact Jennie
Cruce Director of Rehab
dor(&avalonhrc.com
Avalon Healthcare and Rehab
1270 S.W. Main Blvd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
Or fax resume to: 386-752-8556
386-752-7900 EOE


170 Business
SOpportunities
Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

24A0 Schools & -
240v Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish atnd Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

402 Appliances
For Sale: GE Washer Ig
capacity, Whirlpool. Dryer
Lg capacity. $450.for both obo
352-264-8168

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 Garage Sales
" Multi Family: Kountry Kids Day
Care. Marion Ave. Sat. 8-1.
From toys to housewares. Kids to
adult plus size Clothes.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
8 ft x 5.5 ft wide single axle trailer
With Dump and lights.
Excellent condition $325 FIRM
SOLD
BEER KEG Refrigerator for sale.
38* cold always. $200 obo.
386-758-1991

Glock 27,40 cal. Pistol. w/2 clips,
one double stacked w/laser site.
W/Paddle type, lock down holster.
Exc. Cond. $475. FIRM. Excellent
for concealed carry 386-288-8833

PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control,
in original box. $270,
386-984-7510,
STORAGE SHED
lOx16
$2500
Call 288-9858
TRAILER 7'X18"Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740
REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line

www.Iakecityreporter.com


A


----



confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


BUY I^

SELL ITT.1


F^INDIT


Classified Department: 755-5440












Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY. JANUARY 6. 2012


4 0 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell. crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W. Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
FIREWOOD:
Cut to order and delivered.
1/2 cord $75.00
386-243-1977 or 752-3771

It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 Units.
Free Water,
sewer and trash pickup.
386-984-8448

3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

6 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K Off All Homes
800-622-2832 ext 210

ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City


RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER


710 iUnfurnished Apt.
71 0For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of to'. n.
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious. 2/1.
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk.
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br. apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
QUAIL HEIGHTS. 2br/lba
Duplex. Washer/dryer hook up.
Private, safe, secluded, $750 mo
$500 sec. 386-754-1155
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626


720 Furnished Apts.
7 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcresi. Sands.
Columbia. All furnished. ElecLmc.
cable, fridge, microv.ae. Weekly
or monthly\ rates. I person S135.
2 persons 5150. week\
386-752-5808
STUDIO APT. FOR RENT
All utilities included & Cable.
5500 month + 5300 sec. deposit.
Call 386-697-9950

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage. Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace., wash-
er/dr aer, ac fenced. private, some
pets. lease. 1st. last, sec. ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2 STORY, 2 BR/1.5 BA on
1/2 acre. fenced lot.off Turner Rd.
1st + last + dep. (includes water)
352-335-8330 or 352-258-9598
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
S485. mo S485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced.concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.


REPORTER Classifieds 386-294-2494
I SWMH2/2 in Wellborn,
In Print and On Line $550 mo, and
wwwlakecityreprter m $550 security.
www.Iakecityreporter.com 386-365-1243 or 965-7534


7S0 Business &
Office Rentals


OFFICE SPACE for Lease
S-6 sq S-50 mtLh
9XX0 'q S600, mih
356S sq 52973'mth
U3C0 'q S533 mth
also Bank Buildin.
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle. GRI
1386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: 1100+/- sqft. Of-
fice Space beside the Red Barn on
Hw y 90. S750. mo. Please call
Steve for details. 850-464-2500

For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office. Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762

Office for Lease, was Dr's office
S8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086. DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


805 Lots for Sale
laxw. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this new spaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777.
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW. 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well. tank.
& pole on site. (727)289-2172

820 Farms &
SAcreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down. $39,900. $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

ACERAGE
10 Acres of clear land, frontage.
Also, 21 Acres with pines.
Call (386) 752-1200
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

8 0 Real Estate
70 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
S& Supplies
TOW HITCH
All Ford Pickups and
maybe others. $100.
386-758-1991


Contact us


at the paper.


CLASSIFIED ADS-

386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION

386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

386-752-1293


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THIS REPORTER WORKS FOfl YOU!:
Lake ity Rporte


180 East Dual St
Lake City, FLorida 32055


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C llMa y -
(386) 755-54'40