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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01743
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 5, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01743
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







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27, SPIA -7TT -


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Reporter


Thursday, January 5, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 288 E 75 cents


SCHOOL GRADES



'B's for CHS, Fort White High


But both schools fail to
meet fed. benchmark for
Adequate Yearly Progress.

By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter. corn
Both Columbia County high schools
maintained their "B" grades last year,
although the schools failed to make
Adequate Yearly Progress, according to
data released Wednesday by the Florida
Department of Education.
Statewide public high schools improved


their grades in the second year since the
state added factors other than testing to
the school assessments. *
Last school year 78 percent of high
schools earned either an "A" or "B" grade,
an increase from 71 percent in 2009-10.
Education Commissioner Gerard
Robinson said average points received for
FCAT. scores actually declined, so all of
the improvement statewide came in the
new grading areas, particularly participa-
tion and success in advanced placement,
industrial certification and dual enrollment
college courses.
The grading system is based 50 percent
on FCAT scores and 50 percent on factors


such as graduation rates, performance and
participation in advanced coursework and
college preparation.
Elementary and middle schools received
their grades in June, which are based on the
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test.
The federal No Child Left Behind Act
requires states to evaluate the yearly
progress of students. Factors that deter-
mine Adequate Yearly Progress in Florida
include 95 percent participation in state
testing, reading and math proficiency,
graduation rates and writing assessment
scores. For the 2010-11 school year, 79
percent of students in reading and 80 per-
cent of students in math had to score at


or above their grade level for a school to
make adequate yearly progress.
At Columbia High School, 43 percent
of students are reading at or above their
grade level. In math 77 percent of students
perform at or above their grade level.
White, African American, economically
disadvantaged and disabled students need
improvement in reading at CHS, according
to the state's. school report card. African
American and economically disadvantaged
students need improvement in math.
At Fort White High School, 57 per-
cent of students read at or above their
GRADES continued on 34


Robbery


victim

changes

story


Was intoxicated
when he ID'd
suspect, he says.

By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
A robbery victim who
picked a local man out of a
photo lineup,now says he
was mistaken, according
to police.
Derrick Thomas Jr. of
Alachua, who lost his wal-
let and two cell phones to
a thief on New Year's Eve,
originally told authorities
Marvin Dewayne Alford,
21, of 199 NE James Street,
Lake City was responsi-
ble.
Alford was arrested on
charges of robbery, lar-
ceny and assault.
On Wednesday, however,
the victim told a sheriff's
detective that Alford was
not the man who robbed
him outside a local conve-
nience store.
"According to the vic-
tim, he was intoxicated at
the time he picked Marvin
out of the photo lineup,"
the amended sheriff's
report said.
The victim signed a
sworn statement to that
effect as well as a request
not to file charges, police
said. "Arrangements were
then made to have [Alford]
released from jail and the
charges dropped," accord-
ing to the report.
On Saturday sometime
after 4:30 a.m. deputies W.
Porter .and William Scott
Busby went to a local
convenience store where
Thomas said he had been
robbed.
Thomas said two men,
one of whom wore a red
hat, approached him
and asked to use his cell
phone. He said he gave
his phone to the men, who
then told him to hand over
his wallet and other per-
sonal items.
Thomas said he thought
by their demeanor that
they may have been armed
so he gave them his wallet
and another cell phone.
The men ordered Thomas
to turn around and they
ran away.
Thomas later picked
Alford out of a photo
lineup, according to the
report, and he was arrest-
ed later that day.


.I,:,,~i


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
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Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


Fireworks blamed for Fort White grass fire


MARLEY ANDRETTI/Special to the Reporter
A grass fire burned two acres and threatened several homes and a heavily wooded area irQ rural Fort White Wednesday afternoon. The fire began behind
a home at 925 SW Morningstar Glen and spread quickly, aided by a five to ten mile per hour wind. A neighbor, Bill Brown, reportedly cut a fire break with
his tractor to contain the blaze. Columbia County firefighters were on scene within minutes and extinguished the fire quickly. According to reports at the
scene, leftover fireworks may have sparked the blaze. In the photo above, the fire burns to the edge of Morningstar Glen.



NTSB: Helicopter struck trees in crash


GREEN COVE SPRINGS A
helicopter carrying three people
to pick up a heart for transplant
struck several trees as it crashed
to the ground in north Florida,
but the pilot made no distress
call, according to a preliminary
investigation.
The Dec. 26 crash killed a. St.
Augustine veteran pilot and a
heart surgeon and a procurement
technician from the Mayo Clinic
in Jacksonville. They were flying
to Shands at the University of
Florida to pick up a heart for a
transplant in Jacksonville.
According to the preliminary


Driver
injured in
crash

Florida Highway Patrol '
Trooper Jim Taylor
writes up a report after
the driver of a Dodge
Durango ran a stop
sign at Southwest
Ichetucknee Avenue and
Southwest Elim Church
Road Wednesday after-
-noon and hit a tree. The
driver was taken to an
area hospital, possibly
with leg injuries.




65
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


reportthe National Transportation
Safety Board posted late Tuesday,
the helicopter took off from the
Mayo Clinic at 5:37 a.m.
No flight plan was filed. The last
communication from the helicopter
came at 5:49 a.m. when the pilot,
E. Hoke Smith of SK Jets, con-
tacted the air traffic control tower at
Jacksonville International Airport to
inquire about the status of restrict-
ed airspace. Air traffic controllers
told Smith the restricted areas were
inactive, and Smith acknowledged
their reply, investigators said. .
CRASH continued on 3A


---" Opinion ................ 4A
S People .................. 2A
-*k' Obituaries ..............6A
\ Advice & Comics......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
A bonanza of
controversy,


A Clay County fire official
drives through smolder-
ing brush on his way
to wreckage from a
helicopter crash in an
area west of Green Cove
Springs on Dec. 26. The
helicopter was enroute
to Gainesville from Mayo
Clinic in Jacksonville
to receive a heart for
a transplant when it
crashed.


EW WALKER/Lake City Reporter

COMING
FRIDAY
County comm.
coverage.










2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY. JANAURY 5, 2012


Celebrity Birthdays


,'"- Wednesday:
Afternoon: 8-4-6-2
Night: 0-6-7-4


Tuesday:
1-5-8-32-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Removal of plaque sparks trouble


COLLINGSWOOD, N.J.
a bonanza of controversy a
mess in a little New Jersey
a decision to move a plaque
ing hometown celebrity Mi
Landon.
A bronze plaque was ded
the actor, writer and produ
star of TV's "Bonanza" and
House on the Prairie", who
of cancer in 1991 at
54. That plaque has
been moved from a
park, an act that has
enraged fans who
frequent a website
dedicated to "Little
House," and the New
Jersey woman who
raised the money for
.the memorial 15 years
ago.
Collingswood Mayor Jim
says it was a temporary mo
to make a park safe. Maley
it wasn't a show of disrespe
Landon, who had a famous
childhood in the town and 1
best known for the charact
played on TV: Little Joe Ca
on "Bonanza," Charles Inga
"Little House" and Jonathar
"Highway to Heaven."
"It was always intended t
back in there," he said. "It
the top of our list where it I
done in the next 12 hours."
Abbe Effron, who 'got the
put up in 1997, said the mei
became part of pilgrimages
eling fans of the actor who
career playing sensible,.lovi
nonsense men.
A revived Collingswood i
known as perhaps Philadell
hippest suburb, full of art g
yoga studios, acclaimed res
and a hopping farmer's mar
But when Landon their


- There's
nd a big
town over
e honor-
ichael

licated to


by his birth name, Eugene Orowitz
- grew up there in the 1940s and
50s, it was a blue-collar, overwhelm-
ingly protestant small town where a
boy with a Jewish father and Roman
Catholic mother had trouble fitting
in.


cer and In interviews and biographies,
"Little Landon's childhood was always
Died described as lonely and difficult He
was subjected to anti-Semitic taunts
and teasing over his studious ways.
His mother was suicidal. He was
a bed-wetter into his teens and his
mother would hang his wet sheets
out the window of the home to
embarrass him. By high school, as
the story goes, Landon made a con-
scious effort to be a bad student but
Landon became a champion javelin thrower.
Effron, who now lives in nearby
Cherry Hill, said that locals weren't
1 Maley enthusiastic about contributing to
)ve meant, her drive in the mid-1990s to honor
said the native son. Her peers had been
;ct for told by their parents about bad
ly rough things he'd said about Collingswood
became on "The Tonight Show."
ers he But she did raise enough for the
rtwright $1,400 plaque. And Landon's widow,
calls in Cindy, contributed more than $6,000
n Smith in to build a playground dubbed "The
Little Treehouse on the Prairie" near
to get put the plaque in one corner of sprawl-
was not at ing Knight Park.
had to be Since then, the playground, save
a lone slide, has been replaced by
e plaque a new one in a different part of the
moral park. For years, the plaque, mounted
for trav- on a knee-high cement slab, has
spent a been an isolated marker.
ing, no- Mayor Maley said that dur-
ing a community cleanup day in,
s now November, he decided to move it.
phia's "We decided it was a hazard," he,
alleries, said. "People run through the park
Ataurants at all hours. You can't see it"
rket The plan was always to find a
n known new home for it, he said. And in the


meantime, it was at the town's public
works facility.

Streep says playing
Thatcher was 'daunting'
LONDON She's a double Oscar
winner with a knack for accents, but
Meryl Streep says playing Margaret
Thatcher was a challenge although
her own experience helped her
understand the struggles faced by
Britain's first female prime minister.
Streep is transformed into the
divisive politician who reshaped
Britain in "The Iron Lady," which
had its European premiere in
London on Wednesday, just across
the River Thames from the Houses
of Parliament
"It was extremely daunting,
because I'm from New Jersey,"
Streep said in an interview ahead of
the event. "And yet as an outsider,
I felt something of what she might
have felt."
Streep, who won Academy Awards
for "Kramer Vs. Kramer" and
"Sophie's Choice," said her youth-
ful experience as one of a handful
of women at Dartmouth College in
New Hampshire helped her under-
stand Thatcher's isolation. In 1970,
Streep spent a term as an exchange
student at the men-only college,
which became coeducational in 1972.
"There were 60 of us and 6,000
men, and I had a little flashback to
that moment," Streep said. "And so
a little bit of my emotional work was
done for me."
Streep, 62, has been nominated for
a Golden Globe and looks likely to
get a 17th Oscar nomination for her
spookily accurate performance as
Thatcher, who led Britain from 1979
until 1990. (
(AP)


Former Vice President
Walter E Mondale is 84.
Actor Robert Duvall
is 81.
S Pro Football Hall of
Fame coach Chuck Noll is
80.
King Juan Carlos of
Spain is 74.
Talk show host Charlie
Rose is 70.
Actress-director Diane
Keaton is 66.
Actor Ted Lange is 64.
Rock musician Chris


Stein (Blondie) is 62.
Former CIA Director
George Tenet is 59.
Actress Pamela Sue
Martin is 59.
Actor Ricky Paull
Goldin is 47.
Rock singer Marilyn
Manson is 43.
R Actor Bradley Cooper
is 37.
Actress January Jones
is 34.
Actress Brooklyn
Sudano is 31.


Daily Scripture

"He has shown you, 0 mortal,
what is good. And what does
the LORD require of you? To act
justly and to love mercy and to
walk humbly with your God."

i- Micah 6:8 NIV

Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Killer scheduled
for execution
TALLAHASSEE -A
Florida killer convicted of
murdering a woman and
throwing her body into
Tampa Bay more than 30
years ago is scheduled to
be executed by lethal injec-
tion on Feb. 15.
Gov. Rick Scott on
Wednesday signed a
death warrant for Robert
Waterhouse, who is now
65. Waterhouse was found
Guilty of killing Deborah
Kammerer, whose nude
body was found in the mud
flats of the bay.
The two were seen
leaving a St Petersburg
bar on the night of Jan.
2, 1980. Authorities
say Waterhouse raped
Kammerer, then beat her
in the head and throat -
about 30 times with what
was believed to be a tire
iron. Waterhouse drove
to the edge of Tampa Bay,
dragged Kammererer into
the water and left her to
drown.
Initially St Petersburg
police could not identify
Kammerer and had to turn
to the public for help. An
anonymous caller gave
police the license plate
number of Waterhouse and
said that they should inves-
tigate him.
Waterhouse was in St
Petersburg after getting
released on parole for the
1966 murder of a 77-year-
old New York woman.
He was nearly executed
in Florida's electric chair
back in 1985 his execution
was held up by judges.

Senator wants
records public
TALLAHASSEE A
Florida state senator wants
to make it clear that emails
and other records kept by
newly elected officials are
public records that cannot
be destroyed.
Sen. Don Gaetz,


R-Niceville, on Wednesday
filed a bill that would apply
the state's public records
law to someone even if they
don't take office right away. ,
Gov. Rick Scott last
August ordered an investi-
gation into why emails writ-
ten by Scott and his transi-
tion team were deleted and
whether the emails could
be recovered.
The emails were written
before) Scott took office in
January 2011. They were
lost when the private com-
pany handling 'email for
Scott's transition office shut
down the accounts. .
The investigation is still
ongoing, but documents
released so far show that
emails were accidentally
deleted from an iPad used
by Scott

High school
grades up in 2011
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's public high
schools got better grades
again in the second year
since the state added non-
test factors such as gradua-
tion rates, college prepara-
tion and participation in
advanced classes to their
annual assessments, edu-,
cation officials announced
Wednesday.
Seventy-eight percent
of the state's high schools
received an A or B in
2011. That compared to 71
percent in the first year of
the new grading system
when the increase was
even more dramatic. Just
41 percent of high schools
received an A or B in 2009.
Only six high schools
got an F in 2011. That was
five fewer than in 2010.

Justices do not
want re-districting
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's Supreme Court
justices are warning the
public not to talk to them
about redistricting.
That's because the high


court is required to review
legislative reapportion
maps. It also could get a
challenge to congressional
redistricting.
The Supreme Court
issued a scheduling order
on Wednesday. It notes the
Code of Judicial Conduct
forbids justices from dis-
cussing pending cases
with the public.
The Legislature will vote
on state House and Senate
and congressional redis-
tricting maps during its
annual 60-day session that
begins Tuesday. The order
says the seven justices can
only consider arguments
made in court and in docu-
ments filed by actual par-
ties in a case.

Biologist says 453
manatee deaths
TALLAHASSEE State
wildlife officials are report-
ing the third straight year
with high numbers of
manatee deaths.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission reported
Wednesday that 453 mana-
tee carcasses were docu-
mented in state waters in
2011.
That's the second-
highest number on record.
Biologists reported 766 in
2010 and 429 in 2009.
Biologists say the past
three years also had the
highest numbers of cold-
related manatee deaths.
Before 2009, cold stress
accounted for an average of
30 manatee deaths a year.
That number jumped to 56
in 2009, 282 in 2010 and
112 last year.
The director of the con-
servation commission's
Fish and Wildlife Research
Institute says officials
are concerned about the
number of manatee deaths
since 2009 and will do more
research to understand any
long-term implications for
the protected species.
(AP)


THE WEATHER



MOSTLY MOSTLY; ISOLATED CHANCE
SUNNY': SUNNY SHOWERS OF RAIN


HI LO HI LO HI .O., : HI 0 LO


:. ;: .:, 2 .< ...4 '": .':':. "'5 "? .''* "
S CHANCE
"J OF RAINr'
. .i L . .

; HI 3- LO 3


., .' -. . . . '. . ._ ... ..
. ,, ., ., ..:. ,, .,.. ., 0 T1 ,: :


Pensacola
6,5 50(


SValdosta
63/37
Tallahassee Lake City
66 38 oS 3


* Jacksonville
62 42


Gainesville Daytona Beach
Panama City 4 348 6 4
65,, 48 Ocala 0
66t, 44 0
Orlando Cape Canaveral
,7 47 7 4E.
Tampa *
.*rQ .1 7


O69 4


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


54
20
66
42
82 in 1974
22 in 1900

0.00"
0.06"
0.06"
0.40"
0.40"


' West Palm Beach
677 4' *
FL Lauderdale
L Myers 70 '51
3S 47 Naples .
66. 47 Miami
Key West. ,
3 .:. ... .- -; _


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


0
Jan.
9
Full


7:28 a.m.
5:44 p.m.
7:28 a.m.
5:45 p.m.

2:47 p.m.
4:12 a.m.
3:37 p.m.
5:05 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan.
16 23 30
Last New First


. a lp 7p la '6a r, i, ,r, .. i
Thursday Friday 197r chillv,' weather ,
'-.'; | | :,rrr wr.: ,' ,',.- r rr,




SJ -:. ,:.l r ,.-: r
I .Fo. rast pr f-et, rra e
w Feeas ed tn mw"drtfl "Feele'tef tie


City Friday
Cape Canaveral 6. -,51 "
Daytona Beach r6'. 5%
Ft. Lauderdale 72 56 ;
Fort Myers 71 d,
Gainesville 1., .15
Jacksonville f6, 50 I
Key West 71 6I0
Lake City 6. 45 p:
Miami -,
Naples .* u
Ocala r.9 6'.
Orlando 70 .2 "
Panama City 66 '. S .:
Pensacola '. p.:
Tallahassee r, J5
Tampa 71 5, :
Valdosta 66 45. p,
W. Palm Beach 70 5, :


-

45 nmutesti Iu
T.,, .. -,
ra, i r. r3 I .
Tor r -rea, on
r: 1':


Saturday
72 54 p,:
,5 .b p
. 6J5 pi.:
S-.
S1 J9'? p.:

7 51 p,1 .:



73 5 p,;

S7 i r,
71 -, I
74 '5,?


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


4 4 Forecasts, data and
y ^ graphics Q 2012 Weather
4t V v y / Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
weather J www.weatherpublisher.com


Ge Connected


FLO RIDA,


Wednesday:
N/A


CA$H 3. Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-7-1
Night: 6-7-5


AROUND FLORIDA


- --------------


* -\ E a. aii.? j*.r -.


.- .


- j.t. -











Page Editor: Robert Bridges. 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEW S THURSDAY. JANUARY 5 2012 3A




Romney now hopes to pull away in N.H.


By DAVID ESPO and
KASIE HUNT
Associated Press

MANCHESTER, N.H. -
Mitt Romney eagerly pock-
eted an endorsement from
two-time New Hampshire
primary winnerJohn McCain
on Wednesday and bid to
convert a single-digit victory
in Iowa into a Republican
presidential campaign jug-
gernaut. Unimpressed,
Newt Gingrich ridiculed
the former Massachusetts
governor as a liberal turned
moderate now masquerad-
ing as a conservative.
Former Pennsylvania
Sen. Rick Santorum sought
to rally conservatives to his
side after coming achingly
close to victory in Iowa,
saying he "hoped to sur-
prise a few people just like
we did" in the campaign's
first contest.
"This is a wide-open race
still," added former Utah Gov.
Jon Huntsman, who skipped
the Iowa caucuses in hopes
of making his mark in next
Tuesday's first-in-the-nation
primary.


Romney is the odds-
on favorite to win the
New Hampshire primary,
though, and it is unclear how
much campaign cash any of
his rivals has available to
try to slow or even stop his
momentum. Additionally,
in a measure of his estab-
lishment support, the for-
mer governor announced
he would campaign with
South Carolina Gov. Nikki
Haley on Thursday, as he
was joined by McCain in
New Hampshire.
"The time has arrived
for Republicans to choose
a presidential nominee, a
new standard bearer who
has the ability and determi-
nation to defeat President
Obama," said McCain, the
2008 Republican presidential
nominee, and a man with a
demonstrated appeal to the
state's independent voters.
Already, the Republican
field of challengers was
dwindling.
Minnesota Rep. Michele
Bachmann ended her cam-
paign after a dreary 5 per-
cent showing in Iowa, the
state where she was born.


Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney listens at left,
speaks during a town hall style meeting in Manchester, N.H. Wednesday.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
as Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.,


GRADES: Schools get 'B's CRASH: Helicopter hit trees, says NTSB report


Continued From Page 1A

grade level. In math 70 per-
cent of students scored at
or above their grade level.
White, economically disad-
vantaged and disabled stu-
dents need improvement
in reading at Fort White,
according to the state's
school report card. White
and economically disad-
vantaged students need
improvement in math.
Both high schools
received "B"s in 2009-10.
CHS was a "D" school from
2004-05 to 2008-09. It was a
"C" school from 1998-99 to
2003-04.
Fort White has been a
"B" school since 2007-08. It
was a "C" school from 2001-
02 to 2006-07.


Continued From Page 1A


The high school grades
were released about a
month later than last year.
It takes longer to gather
and analyze data on gradu-
ation rates and the other
new factors that go into
the high school grades and
the process spilled into the
November and December
holiday periods, causing
further delay, said Deputy
Education Commissioner
Kris Ellington.
"It didn't go quite as
smoothly as last year," she
said but noted officials are
working on a plan to speed
up the process this year.
The Associated Press con-
tributed to this article.


The helicopter, a Bell 206B, was
last recorded on radar at 5:53 a.m.
at an altitude of 300 feet and about a
mile north of the Clay County crash
site, investigators said.
The helicopter crashed at 5:54
a.m. in a remote wooded area about
12 miles northeast of the Palatka
Municipal Airport in overcast, some-
what misty conditions, according to
the report.
Mayo Clinic staff alerted authori-
ties that the team was overdue and
a Jacksonville Sheriff's Office air-
craft spotted the wreckage about four
hours later.
Several trees that were severed
by breaks at descending altitudes
marked the start of the debris field,
investigators said. The first tree strike'
was at an estimated height of 30 feet
above the ground, which severed


a roughly 50-foot tree at a ground
elevation of 118 feet, according to the
report.
The crash ignited a fire that burned
about 10 acres of woods and investi-
gators said most of the wreckage was
consumed by the fire.
The NTSB investigation into what
caused the crash may take up to a
year and a half to complete.
The crash killed Smith, 68, a
Vietnam combat veteran, and two
Mayo Clinic staff: surgeon Luis
Bonilla, 49, and technician David
Hines, 57. Bonilla had transferred in
November to the Jacksonville hospi-
tal from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,
Minn.
The patient who had been waiting
for the 'heart was put back on the.
transplant waiting list.
A message left Wednesday for


Smith's son, who is the general man-
ager of SK Jets, was not immediately
returned.
The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville
has had a contract with SK Jets
since 2006 for organ transplant
retrieval and recovery transporta-
tion services, spokesman Kevin
Punsky'said.
Such flights sometimes have to
be coordinated quickly because of
the sporadic nature of organ avail-
ability and the short window of time
that organs remain' viable for trans-
plant, he sqid. He declined further
comment on the crash or the NTSB
report because of the ongoing inves-
tigation.


A Associated Press


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OPINION


Thursday, January 5, 2012


ONE
ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


And the

survivors

move on

to N.H.

It is one of the oddities
of American politics that
a small, unrepresenta-
tive state has taken
upon itself the task of
launching the quadrennial U.S.
presidential campaign through
one night of local caucuses, an
essentially meaningless process
except for the amount of atten-
tion the press and politicians
pay to it.
And Tuesday night about
123,000 Iowans spoke, about 0.9
percent of registered American
voters, who stand 137.3 million
strong until the Republicans,
with their voter ID laws, suc-
ceed in winnowing out students,
minorities and the elderly.
They made former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney, respected but unloved
by the GOP base, the party's
front runner by eight votes over
the surprising Rick Santorum,
a former two-term senator from
Pennsylvania soundly repudi-
ated, by 18 points, in his 2006
re-election bid. Both had about
25 percent of the caucus votes.
Third, at 21 percent, was
Texas Rep. Ron Paul, whose lib-
ertarian views are well out of the
Republican mainstream but who
seems to exist in his own political
universe.
Fourth, with a tepid 13
percent, was former House
Speaker Newt Gingrich.
The Iowa results pushed
Rep. Michele Bachmann out
of the race and left Texas Gov.
Rick Perry with one foot out
the door.
Santorum may find it difficult
to replicate his Iowa success
elsewhere, especially in the
larger states. As of now, he
doesn't have the money to go
the distance, but success has a
way of attracting donors.
The Iowa campaign marked
the emergence of Super Pacs,
anonymous political entities
freed by the courts to collect
unlimited money from the
wealthy and corporations. The
potentially massive thumb of
Super Pacs on the political
scale suggests a problem that
Congress should address down
the road.
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County_
Since 1874 *
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Good guys, bad guys


remember the good old
days, and western mov-
ies, when Roy Rogers or
Gene Aurtry always won,
and the bad guys went to
jail 6r died trying to get away.
These days movie and televi-
sion plots are more likely to star.
"heroes" who win through vio-
lence, lies, bullying, greed, ruth-
less competition and. self-inter-
est. I notice that the themes of
almost every sitcom are about
lies, violence, hostility, problems
with communication or self
interest. Is it harder to find the
good guys these days?.
What do I mean? The news
focuses on Bernie Madoff
stealing millions from retired
folks' pensions, charities, and
nonprofit corporations like the
United Way. Celebrities are
depicted as role models, like
Lindsay Lohan, Coach Sandusky
or Charlie Sheen. The news
is full of uncovered skeletons
in the.closets of politicians
and leaders,, even if they've,
learned from their mistakes.
Maybe they even became "good
guys?" Through all the smoke,
you can still find themes like
"Pay It Forward," people who
restore bikes for Christmas
presents for families who can't
afford them, who gather used
cell phones for troops serving
in war zones, or bring music
performance visits to nursing


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


homes. This Christmas season
we, found out that many anony-
mous donors paid off layaway
charges for people who couldn't
afford 'to complete their pur-
chases. When we take the time
to notice, so many do so much
good in this world.
If we're shown that being a
bad guy works so well, why are
there still so many good guys?
I believe that being a good
guy and the good deeds they
do are so valuable to society
that the forces of good in the
universe (whatever your beliefs
are) reward these good works-
by giving hope and strength
to those in need. I think it can
also reward the good guys
with feelings of satisfaction and
fulfillment, and build their char-
acter. Being a good guy today
starts a habit that can help heal
the world's troubles, and make
the world a little better place for
all of us.


You may be askirig yourself,
"What can I do?"
I think it can start simply by
making a choice. Ask yourself,
"Who do I want to be today?"
Decide, 'Today I will be a good
guy."
As you go through your day
today, notice the choices you
are given. Ask yourself, "In this
situation, what's the right thing
for me to do?
Base your choices on your
principles. I kind of like hon-
esty, sharing, reaching out to
others, and making the most of
what you've got to work with.
Don't be afraid to reach out,
to stretch. Take a step, learn,
and grow.
. You can do more.than you-
think you can. It starts with just
one person. It doesn't matter
who you are--male or female,
your age, job, race, religion,
state of your health, mistakes
you've made, or anything that
happened in your past The
past is gone. Build a better
future world for us all. I'm
watching to see how it turns
out


* Robert Denny is a licensed
mental health therapist, and
teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College in' Lake City.
Comments welcome at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.com.


Iran is not our enemy


Iran is not our enemy.
The regime that enriches
itself while murdering,
oppressing and impover-
ishing ordinary Iranians,'
the regime that incites geno-
cide against Israel, threatens
its neighbors in the Persian
Gulf and vows to bring about a
"world without America" that
is our enemy. This was one of
the key points driven home by a
trio of extraordinary individuals
gathered for a dinner in Tel Aviv
last week.
At the table were Bernard
Lewis, for my money the great-
est living historian of the Middle
East; Uri Lubrani, Israel's envoy
to Iran prior to the fall of the
Shah and an adviser to leaders
of the Jewish state ever since;
and Meir Dagan, a retired para-
trooper, commando and general
who was recruited in 2002 by
Prime Minster Ariel Sharon to
rebuild the Mossad as an intel-
ligence agency "with a knife in its
teeth." A small group of American
national security professionals
- from the Hill, the Defense
Department, Homeland Security,
even the D.C. police department
- broke pita with them.
None of the three minimizes
how dire will be the conse-
quences should Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad's finger come to
rest on a nuclear trigger. The
Iranian president subscribes
to an extremist school of Shia
theology that, Dagan explained,


Cliff May


looks forward to an apocalyp-
tic war that would "hasten the
arrival of the Mahdi," mankind's
ultimate savior.
Lubrani, who predicted Iran's
1979 revolution when then-
President Jimmy Carter, among
others, saw Iran "an island of
stability" believes regime
change is a realistic goal.
Which raises the question:
Based on the analyses of the his-
torian, the diplomat and the spy
can,a coherent strategy be con-
structed? I'd argue that it might
begin with four specific policies:
1. Tighten the sanctions
noose to maximally increase
pressure on the Iranian econ-
omy. Sanctions can work if we
focus on reducing oil revenues
to Iran. European countries
should impose an embargo on
purchases. Other countries
should drive for discounts. The
fewer the number of buyers, the
higher the discounts and the
lower Iran's oil revenue.
2. The threat of force must
be credible. Iran's rulers should
lose sleep over the possibility
that a military strike against


their nuclear facilities or against
them more directly may be
seen by Americans and/or
Israelis as the least bad option.
3. Help Syria break free of
Iran. Under Bashar al-Assad,
Syria has been Iran's bridge into
the Arab and Sunni worlds. An
incredibly brave Syrian opposi-
tion is attempting to bring down
the dynasty. The loss of Syria
would be a heavy blow to the
Tehran regime.
4. Iran's anti-regime opposi-
tion also deserves moral sup-
port and material assistance.
That should have begun in 2009
when, in the wake of blatantly
fraudulent elections, mass pro-
tests broke out in Tehran.
Finally, take into account the
context In what has been misper-
ceived as an "Arab Spring," the
downtrodden masses in Egypt
and elsewhere may be coming to
the conclusion that "Islam is the
answer." Iranians, having tested
that proposition over decades,
know it is the wrong answer.
Rule by mullahs has made
them less free and poorer then
they ever were under the Shah.
These disenchanted Iranians,
Lewis, Lubrani and Dagan agree,
may offer the best hope for the
Muslim world and for winding
down the global war against the
West
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Occupy

D.C.

crime

wave


Walking by dirty
neo-hippies in
McPherson
Square isn't
the biggest
problem with the Occupy
movement. The ongoing pro-
test is.making Washington
streets less safe.
Since breaking out on
Oct. 1, the cost to the city of
supporting, protecting and
cleaning up after Occupy
D.C. has been $1.6 million
and counting. According
to D.C. police union head
Kristopher Baumann,
District residents can now
start tabulating the cost of
the movement in crimes.
Compared to the previous
year, violent and overall
crime has increased since
Occupy D.C. was unleashed.
From the beginning of
October to Dec. 15, violent
crime is up by 13 percent
and total crime is up by 10
percent compared to the
same time period in 2010.
Overall crime in the city is
up by 2 percent for 2011.
Making the increase in law-
breaking worse is the city's
obfuscation on the crime statis-
tics and policing of the move-
ment. Mayor Vincent Gray
and Metropolitan Police Chief
Cathy Lanier have claimed
that police officers monitor-
ing occupiers haven't been
pulled out of neighborhoods
of the taxpayers who fund the
department But according to
police logs produced by Mr.
Baumann, they have been reas-
signed on a daily basis with
-detrimental results for their
regular beats.
"Your failure to warn District
residents, about a double digit
spike in crime is inexcusable,"
Mr. Baumann wrote in an
angry letter to Mr. Gray last
week. '"The public has a right
to know when crime is increas-
ing and public awareness can
facilitate crime prevention. As
the [Fraternal Order of Police,
Mr. Baumann's organization]
made clear with your one-term
predecessor, risking public
safety for political advantage is
not an acceptable practice." A
spokesman for the mayor said
he would respond by letter to
Mr. Baumann and that it would
"probably" be released to the
public.
Mr. Gray has supported the
protest movement, particu-
larly once some of its mem-
bers embraced his misguided
campaign for D.C. statehood.
The tacit message to toler-
ate the movement has been
passed throughout the city
bureaucracy. Chief Lanier
even gave her cellphone
number to demonstrators,
according to the Daily Beast.
At times, legal transgressions
by the movement are over-
looked. "The frustration for
me and my officers is these
guys are drinking on the
- streets and doing things that
we would lock residents up ,
for and they're getting away
with it and that isn't right,"
Mr. Baumann explained to
Anneke E. Green of The
Washington Times.
Mr. Baumann is asking Mr.
Gray not only to correct his
misleading comments but
apologize for the misinforma-
tion. The local representative
for the "thin blue line" has
a different message for the
occupiers: "Maybe it's time


that they step back and say,
'we're harming regular folks
we're claiming to represent
so maybe it's time for us to
move elsewhere or tone it
down.'"
* Scripps Howard News Service













Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY JANUARY 5 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporteroffice located at 180 E.
Duval St.. via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Jan. 5

Revival

Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church, Ft.
White, Rev. Donnell
Sanders, Pastor.
Revival, January 3-5,
7:30 pm nightly.
Revivalist: Rev. Dr.
Larry T. Walthour of St.
Andrew M.B. Church,
Opa Locka, Fla.
For more information
call Ora Enman 386-497-
2254


CHS MATH rally

Columbia High School
is hosting a Math Pep
Rally in in the school
auditorium from 6 to
8:00 p.m. on Thursday,
January 5. The aim of
the rally is to "fire up"
students who have 80
days to prepare for the
End of Course exam in
algebra.


Jan. 7

Community blood
drives

Saturday, January 7, 11
a.m. to 7 p.m. Domino's;
All donors receive a
FREE Large Cheese
Pizza, LifeSouth Boxers,
and a chance to win an
Apple IPAD 2!
Sunday, January 8,
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fort
White Hungry Howie's;
All donors receive a
FREE one topping
personal pizza or small
sub, LifeSouth Boxers,
and a chance to win an
Apple IPAD 2!
Wednesday, January
11, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Lake City Reporter; All
donors receive FREE
LifeSouth Boxers,
chance to win an Apple
IPAD 2, and a chance to
win a Anytime Fitness 7
Day Pass!


Jan. 8

134th church
anniversary

The New Mt. Pisgah
A.M.E Church, 345 NE
Washington St., church
family invites you to
share in our 134th
church anniversary on
Sunday Jan. 8 at 4 p.m.
The speaker will be the
Rev. Lantz Mills of New
Day Spring Day Church
arid the theme is faith,
hope and love.


Ordination Service

Ordination Service for
Minister Al Nelson is to
be held Sunday January
8, 2012 @ 3pm.
Location, the Shiloh
Missionary Baptist
Church, Dr.
Dwight Pollock, Pastor.
Please come share with
us.


Friends of the Library
Author Program

Sunday, January 8,
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library:
Dante Amodeo, author
of Saban and the Ancient
Dante Amodeo was born
in New York and raised
on a farm. He moved to
Florida as a teenager
and now lives in
Jacksonville Beach. His
book, Saban


and the Ancient was
awarded first prize in
the action/adventure
category by
POW (Promoting


Outstanding Writers),
and his first script was
made into the
2010 NBC made-for-
television movie Secrets
of the Mountain.
http://
www.danteamodeo.com/


Jan. 9

Women's Cancer
Support Group

The Women's Cancer
Support Group of
Lake City will meet at
Baya Pharmacy East,
780 SE Baya Drive
from 5:30 to 6:30 PM
on Monday, January
9, 2012. Our guest
speaker, Dr. Paul G.
Goeto'wski, Community
Cancer Center, will be
discussing "Women's
Cancer in 2012".
Information at 386-752-
4198 or 386-755-0522.

Jan. 10

Historical Society
meeting

The Columbia County
Historical Society will
have its quarterly
meeting on Tuesday,
January 10 at 7:00 p.m.
at the downtown library.
Guest speaker will be
Olustee re-enactor Cody
Gray. The meeting is
free and open to the
public. For details
contact Sean McMahon
at 754-4293



Jan. 11

Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon

The regular meeting
of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be held at 11:00
a.m. on Wednesday, Jan.


11th at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a
fun day.

Jan. 12

Lake City Garden
Club

The Lake City Garden
Club will hold its
monthly meeting at
10 a.m. on Thursday,
January 12 at the Club
House (formerly the
Woman's Club). Coffee
will be served at 9:30.
The program will be
"History of Alligator
Lake Park" by James
Montgomery. Visitors
are welcome to attend.

'Preserving Traditions
of DAR'

The Edward Ru.tledge
Chapter, Daughters
of the American
Revolution, will meet
on Thursday, January
12, 2011, 10:30 a. m.,
at the Senior Service
Center, 28 SE Allison
Court. Beth Wilson
will be speaking on
"Preserving Traditions
of DAR". Guests are
always welcome. For
further information, call
752-2903.



Jan. 13


Revival


Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with
Rev. Jay Walden Jan. 13,
14, 15, 7 p.m. Sunday,
11 a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90
West to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.


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Masonic banquet

Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan.
13 at 7 p.m. until. For
ticket info contact Chris
Mirra at 386-623-3611 or
Dennis Murphy at 386-
697-3739.

Jan. 14

North Florida Writers
Group meets

Love to write? From
novice to published
author, the North
Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is
the place where local
writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire.
Writers of any
experience level from
the area are welcome
to join us Saturday,
January 14, 2012, 2pm
- 4pm, at the Columbia
County Public Library,
Main Branch, 308 NW
Columbia Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055. Join us
Saturday and see what
we are all about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so'
please reserve your spot
today!
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Leader,
(386) 438-3610.
Email inquiries to:
editor@afinaldraft.com


Revival


Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11


a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Hospice Chili Cook-
off


The Third Annual
Branford Chili Cook-
Off to benefit children
and families served by
Herry's Kids Pediatric
Services will be held
on Saturday, January 14
from 11 a.m. 2 p.m. at
Hatch Park located on
Craven Dr. in Branford.
The event will include
a silent auction, games,
a bounce house for
the kids, live DJ, door
prizes, antique car show,
thrift store items for
sale, and all the chili
you can eat. There
will be a five dollar
admission to the event.
In order to register
to be a contestant
call 386-755-7714.
Hospice of the Nature
Coast, is a program
of Hospice of Citrus
County, Inc., licensed
in 1985. To learn
more about hospice
services call 386-755-
7714 or visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org.

Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program

On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this


memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
lives forever in our
hearts. Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 p.
m, at Trinity United.
Methodist Church.
Glynnell Presley,
Secretary
John F. Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO


Revival

Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.


Jan. 16


Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. Parade

The Northeast Florida
Leadership Council
presents the Grand
Dr. Martin Luther
SKing, Jr. Parade,
Monday, January 16,
2012 at 10am. Line-
up will begin at the
DOT office at 9:00am.
For participation and
information call Anthony
Newton at 386.365.1470.
The MLK Worship
Service will follow .
the parade at the New
Bethel Baptist Church
at 12:30p, Bishop Ron
Williams, II is the
speaker, Rev. Alvin
Baker, Pastor. Call

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY JANUARY 5. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY. JANUARY 5, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson @lakecityreporter.com.


CALENDAR con'tfrom 5A

Audre' Washington at
386.344.9915 for more
information.
The MLK Classic will
feature a re-match
basketball game at
the Lake City Middle
School at 3:30pm
featuring Altumni
Women and Men's
players of CHS and
Suwannee. Call Mario
Copp'ock for details at
386.754.7095.



Jan. 17

Loss workshop

Eight Critical Questions,
an educational workshop
offering practical
tips to help cope and
move forward during
the new year will be
January 4 at 2 p.m.
located at the Wings
Education Center, 857
SW Main Blvd, (Lake
City Plaza). There is
no cost. For information
or to register, contact
Vicki Myers at 755-
7714 Ext. 2411 or 866-
642-0962. The Wings
Education Center is a
program of Hospice of
Citrus County, Inc./
Hospice of the Nature
Coast licensed 1985,
serving north central
Florida. Visit www.
hospiceofthenaturecoast.
org for more
information.

Traffic safety meeting


The Columbia
Community Traffic
Safety will hold its first
meeting of the new year
on Tuesday, January 17
at 10 a.m. at.the FDOT
Operations Complex,
710 NW Lake Jeffery
Road, in the Crew
Room. The Team works
on traffic hazards and
enforcement issues in
Columbia County and
the public is welcome
to attend. Issues can be
called in to the FDOT
at 758-3714 or e-mailed
to Tres Atkinson, team
chair, at tres.atkinson@
columbiacountyfla.com
or to Gina Busscher,
team secretary, at gina.
busscher@dot.state.,
fl.us The team is made
up of members of law
enforcement, emergency
services, engineering
and education.



Jan. 18

Olustee meeting


The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across


from Aquatics Center.



Jan. 19


Voices that Change

Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County.
Fairgrounds banquet
facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit
for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.



Jan. 20

Community.Concerts

Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
.world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
n lot of Jerry Lef
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.,

communityconcerts.info.



Jan. 22


Bridal show

The 2nd Annual Your
Perfect Day Bridal
Show will be from noon
to 4 p.m. on January
22 at the Holiday Inn &
Suites. Vendors include
The Rose Mary CAtering
Company, David's
Bridal, Belk, Lake City
Florist and Design,
Glass Slipper Bridal,
The Grand Event,
Ms. Debbie's Cakes
& Sugar Art, DND
Escapes, Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park,
and More! Door Prizes,
Complimentary Food
Tasting, & Cash Bar.
Advance Ticket prices
are $7.00; Day of Event
$10.00. Tickets can be
purchased at the Holiday
Inn & Suites, 213 SW
Commerce Dr., Lake
City. For ticket sales or
vendor information, call
Margie Hicks at (386)
754-1411.


Jan. 24

Friends of the Library
Author Program

Tuesday, January 24,
2012 at 7:00 pm at the
Main Library, sponsored
by Save Our Suwannee:
Cynthia Barnett, author
of Mirage: Florida and
the Vanishing Water of
the Eastern U.S.
and Blue Revolution:
Unmaking America's
Water Crisis
Cynthia Barnett is an
award-winning journalist
and senior writer for
Florida Trend magazine.
She has a special
interest in
environmental history
and in 2004, spent a year
at the University
of Michigan as a Knight-
Wallace Fellow studying
freshwater supply. Ms.
Barnett will discuss
Florida's water crisis
and look at solutions,
that have found success
in communities around
.the
world. Don't miss this
timely program on a
topic so very relevant to,
Columbia County and
North Central Florida.
Thank you to Save Our
Suwannee and Florida's
Eden for working with
the Friends of the
Library tb bring you this
program.
http://www.
cynthiabarnett.net/



Jan. 25

Building Assn. lunch


The Columbia County
Builders Association
will hold a General
Council lunch at Guang
Dong starting at 11:30
a. m. on January 25.
Cost of lunch is $10
for members and $15
for non-members and'
prices include tax and
gratuity. Speaker is
Dale Williams. After
the lunch an attorney'
from Tritt/Anderson in
Jacksonville will hold
a short seminar (about
45 minutes) and he
will go over numerous
contracts, their wording,
etc. There is no charge
for this if you have
attended the CCBA
lunch. Reservations
are preferred call:
386-867-1998 or e-
mail: colcountybuild@
comcast.net.



Jan. 29


Friends of the Library
Author Program


Sunday; January 29,
2012 at 2:00 pm at the
Main Library:


Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita
Nights and
Champagne
for Buzzards
Phyllis Smallman is
a Canadian who has
spent a lot of time in
Florida, the setting
for her award-winning
mystery series
featuring
sassy bartender,
Sherri Travis, A
former potter with a
lifelong love
of mysteries, Phyllis
divides her time
between her native
Ontario and
Sarasota. She will join
us live via Skype for
this program.

http://www.

phyllissmallman.com/





Feb. 1

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.



Feb. 4


Olustee Festival
Pageant

The Olustee Festival
Pageant will be held this
Saturday, February 4.
Ages 3-12 mos, 13mo-23
mo, 2-4, 5-6, and 7:-9 will;
be held at,4:00 pm at the
Columbia County School
Administrative Complex
Auditorium. Ages 10-12,
13-15 and 16-20 will be
held at 7:00pm. Winners
in each division will
receive a $50 savings
bond, crown, banner
and ride in the Olustee.
parade on February
14. The runners up
in each division will
receive a large trophy
and all contestants
will receive a trophy
for their participation.
The winner of the
Miss Olustee title (age
16-20) will receive
a $500 educational
scholarship, 1st runner
up a $300 scholarship
and the 2nd runner
up a $200 scholarship.
Entertainment will
be provided by The
pageant is open to the
public with admission
at the door: $5.00 .
adults and students.
Pre-schoolers are
free. Applications
are available at the
Columbia County
Library or Chamber of
Commerce. Deadline


for entries is 1-23-2012.
For more information
you may contact pageant
director, Elaine Owens
at 386-965-2787.



Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.

Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program

Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.


Feb. 25

Community Concerts

The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3
p.m. Feb. 25 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. This elite
singing ensemble from
the University of North
Florida performs world
music, vocal jazz, and
other choral gems.
Each singer is chosen
byaudition for solo-
quality excellence and
enthusiasm. Award-
winning director Cara
Tasher has served
around the world
as chorus master,
guest conductor,
clinician, and soprano
soloist. Ticket and
membership,information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.



March 7

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is having a Wrap-up
meeting 5:30 p.m. March
7 at the Central Building
for the Olustee Festival
2012.'The building is
located at 409 SW St.
Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.


Community Concerts

Carpe Diem String
Quartet performs 7:30
pm March 9 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Carpe Diem plays their
classical string quartet
repertoire as well as
Gypsy, tango, folk, pop,
rock & jazz. Their 2009
album was Grammy
listed for Best Classical
Album, Best Chamber
Music Performance,
Best New Artist, and
Best Engineered Album-
Classical. We believe
that their electrifying
style will keep you
engaged from beginning
to end. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.


May 20

Community Concerts

The Jacksonville
Symphony Orchestra
performs 3 p.m. May 20
at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. The full
Jacksonville Symphony
Orchestra presents
a rousing "Patriotic
Pops Spectacular"
program featuring
popular works by John
Williams, Gershwin,
Bernstein, Berlin,
Sousa, and other season
favorites. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
comunityconcerts.info


ONGOING

Flag football tryouts

.Flag Football, Christ
Central Sports.
Registration now thru
January 13. Age 5-12.
Fee: $40. Call Ronnie for
more info 386-365-2128.


Boys Club winter
program


The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program, which runs
through March 1. Fees
are $175, which includes
tiansportstion from all
elementary and junior
high schools.
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts and crafts,
gamerooms ad special
events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutorial
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
available,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones
Way.


March 9


OBITUARIES


Andrew James Brown
Mr. Andrew James Brown, 77
and longtime resident of Lake
City passed away on Wednes-
day, January 4 2012 at the Ha-
ven Hospice Suwannee Valley
Care Center in Lake City. He
was born in Gainesville, Florida
in 1934 to the late Elmer Andrew
James and Lillie E. Williams
Brown. Mr. Brown graduated
from the Madison County High
School in 1954 and worked for
the City of Lake City for 29
years with the Customer Ser-
vice Department having retired
in 1996. He enjoyed fishing
and was a member of Eastside
Baptist Church. Mr. Brown
was preceded in death by one
brother, Carlton Brown in 1977.
Mr. Brown is survived by his
wife of 41 years, Carrie Bryan
Brown, Lake City, three daugh-
ters, Debbie (J.W.) Grant and
Cindy (Mike) Parker both of
Ocala and Geniece (Doug) Col-
lins, Summerfield, one brother,
Edward Keil (Ona Lee) Brown,
Auburndale and one sister,


Velma Jean McClamma, Live
Oak. Six grandchildren, Jona-
than (Brianna) Grant, Gun-
tersville, AL, Shelley (Joe)
Charles, Catania, Italy, Christy
(Gary) Godin, Ashley (Ben)
Long, Lorrie Lietz and Daryl
Brown all of Ocala and nine
great grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Brown
will be conducted on Friday,
January 6, 2012 at 2:00 PM at
Eastside Baptist Church with
Rev. Brandon Witt, pastor, and
Rev. Hugh Dampier officiating.
Interment will follow at Memo-
rial Cemetery. Visitation with
the family will be from 5-7:00
PM on Thursday evening at the
funeral home. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made to Haven
Hospice at 6037 W US Hwy 90,
Lake City, F1 32055. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome.net


Odell Bryant, Jr.
. Odell Bryant, Jr., 40, was born in
Gainesville, Florida on October-
2, 1971 to the late Curtis and the
late Odell Bryant, Sr. The Lord
in His infi-
nite wisdom,
called Odell
home Sun-
day. Decem-
ber 25, 2011.
Odell became
a member of
Zion Temple
Holiness Church at an early age.
He was a graduate of Columbia
High School. He later moved
to Portland. Maine, where he
was employed by Barber Foods
until his untimely demise.
He leaves to cherish his memo-
ries: A grandmother Laura Pate
Kelly. Palatka. Fl.; a devoted
companion of fifteen years, Jody
McElroy. Portland, MA; three
sons. Kamarus Bryant. San Ja-
cinto, CA. Mario Bryant, Clear-
water. FL. Armon Bryant, Port-
land. MA: one daughter, Nikole
Bryant. Lake City, FL; four


sisters, Katina Wilson, Albany,
Georgia, Katrena Bryant, Ka-
tina Bryant, both of Lake City,
FL., Odessa Bryant, San Jacinto,
CA; three brothers, Toderick
Bryant, Lake City, FL, William
(Brenda) Bryant, San Jacinto,
CA, and Fred (Twilla) Queen,
Lake City, FL. host of aunts,
uncles, nieces, nephews, cous-
ins, other relatives and friends;
Funeral services for Mr. Odell
Bryant will be 11:00 A.M. Sat-
urday, January 7, 2012 at New
Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church. 550 NE Martin Luther
King Street.Alvin J. Baker Pastor.
The family will receive
friends from 5:00 7:00
P.M. at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"


Bernice Watson Walters
Mrs. Bernice Watson Walters,
resident of Fort White, FL.,
passed away January 2, 2012 at
Haven Hospice terminating an
illness. Born
in Ft. White,
Fl., Colum-b
bia County,
she was the
daughter of
Mrs. Mae A.
Simpkins and
Mr. Boney
Watson. She attended the
public schools of Columbia
County and was a member
of Jerusalem Baptist Church.
She leaves to cherish her memo-
ries a loving, caring, devoted
son, Andre' (Tonya) Walters;
Grandchildren, Jamal Walters,
Tyler Walker. Two sisters; Mar-
garet Show, Leesburg, FL.;
Phyllis (Guerain) Fort, Alachua,
FL. Three brothers, William
(Phyllis) Watson, Wayne (De-
lois) Watson, David (Cynthia)
Watson. One Aunt; Eulla Shep-
pard, Lake City, FL. Uncle,
Johnell Watson, Ft. Pierce, FL.


Cousins, Betty Williams, Val-
dosta, Ga,; Eunice Abney, Or-
lando, FL.; Daisy B. Watson;
Hazel Watson; Daisy L. Watson,
Ft. White, FL.; Nathaniel Wat-
son, Ft. White, FL.; Alvin Wat-
son, Miami, FL. Special friend;
Leander Bennett, Ft. White,
FL. Host of nieces, nephews,
cousins and sorrowing friends.
Funeral services for Bernice Wat-
son Walters, will be 2:00pm Sat-
urday, January 7, 2012, at Jerusa-
lem Missionary Baptist Church,
Rev. George Clark, Jr., Pastor,
Rev. Ronald Walters, Eulogy.
Interment will follow in the Wat-
son Cemetery. The family will
receive friends Friday, January
6, 2012 at Cooper Funeral Home
Chapel from 6:00pm-7:00pm.
Arrangements entrusted
to COOPER FUNERAL
HOME, 251 N.E. Washington
Street, Lake City, FL. 32055.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY. JANUARY 5. 2012


Facebook can be route to new kidney


By DONNA GORDON
BLANKINSHIP
Associated Press

SEATTLE Here's
another reason for holdouts
to join the social media site
Facebook: It's a great place
to find a kidney.
Between the kid photos
and reminiscences about
high school, more and
more pleas for help from
people with failing kidneys
are popping up. Facebook
and other social media sites
are quickly becoming a go-
to place to find a gener-
ous person with a kidney
to spare, according to the
people asking for help and
some national organizations
that facilitate matches.
Damon Brown found a
kidney on Facebook after
telling his story on a special
page the Seattle dad created
under the name, "Damon
Kidney." His friends and
family forwarded the link
to everyone they knew and
on Jan. 3 a woman his wife
has known for years, but
not someone they consider
a close family friend, will be
giving him a kidney.
"She said it wasn't really
for me. It was for my kids,
because they deserve to
have a dad around," said
Brown, 38.
Brown's story is not
unique, said April Paschke,
a spokeswoman for the
United Network for Organ
Sharing, a private nonprofit
organization that manages
the nation's organ trans-
plant system for the federal
government.
"We see more and more
people matched up by social
mediaa" she said. "It's an
extension of the way we
communicate. Before we
found the Internet, people
found other ways: through
a church bulletin, word of
mouth or an advertisement
even."
This past year, a man
in Michigan also found a
kidney donor through
Facebook, and a Florida
woman found one through
Craigslist.
Damon Brown admits
he was a little embar-
rassed to ask for help so
publicly. Except for telling
close friends and family, the
Seattle father of two young
boys had been keeping his
illness pretty quiet.
He was on the official
transplant list and had start-
ed mobile dialysis through
Northwest Kidney Centers
but .Brown was seeing his
health deteriorate he was
constantly tired and achy.
He couldn't sit on the bed
.to tell bedtime stories to
5-year-old Julian and 3-year-
old Theo because he had
to stay close to his dialysis
machine.
"I'm a strong guy, but I
would have to say, it's been
rough this year," he said.
Brown had put himself on
the long wait list for a kid-
ney from a deceased donor,
knowing he would have to
wait ,at least three years
before he was called.
After one particularly
difficult visit with his doc-
tor, Damon and his wife,
Bethany, decided to create
the Facebook page, which
has attracted more than
1,400 friends.
A few weeks ago, after
the transplant was approved
and scheduled, Brown post-
ed the good news to his
DONORS continued on 8A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Damon Brown sits with his son Julian, 5, at their home in Seattle. Damon Brown found a kidney on Facebook after telling his story on a special page the
Seattle dad created under the name, "Damon Kidney." His friends and family forwarded the link to everyone they knew and on Jan. 3, a woman his wife has
known for years but not someone they consider a close family friend, will be giving him a kidney.



Tucson shooting survivors try to move on


By AMANDA LEE MYERS
Associated Press

TUCSON, Ariz. Ron
Barber's nightmares wake
him in the dead of night
and he can still see it The
flash of a gun muzzle aimed
at Rep. Gabrielle Giffords'
head. ,
"Pop, pop, pop,.pap,.pop,"
went the gunman's weap-
on, recalls Barber, who fell
to the ground, shot in the
cheek and thigh.,
He saw the pool of
blood around his body and
Giffords breathing shallow-
ly as she lay facing away
from him. Then he looked
into the eyes of colleague
Gabe Zimmerman and
knew the 30-year-old was
dead.
The shooter had moved
methodically down a line
of people, killing six people
and wounding 13 before
two men tackled him. The
cold, bloody morning was
one year ago on Jan. 8, a
day that shattered many
lives, shook the nation and
changed the city of Tucson
forever.
But to the bewilderment
of those were weren't per-
sonally affected by the
tragedy, Barber and some.
of the others who were
there that day either don't
feel any anger about the
shooting or choose not to
dwell on it Instead, they're
trying their best to move
forward. They've bonded
with each other in a way
that only they fully under-
stand, lobbied for legisla-
tion in hopes of preventing
similar shootings and many
of them have started non-
profits to bring some good
from the tragedy.
Barber started the Fund
for Civility, Respect and
Understanding, which tar-
gets bullying in schools and
spreads awareness about


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mental illness in hopes of
preventing a similar crime.
Accused shooter Jared Lee
Loughner, 23, has bipolar
disorder and showed signs
of being disturbed for at
least two years before the
shooting.
Barber was diagnosed
with post-traumatic stress
disorder and has spent
much of the past year try-
ing to move forward from
the shooting with his non-
profit and by undergoing
extensive physical and
emotional therapy. He also
returned to work but only
for half-days because of
fatigue.
He still walks with a
cane and has been expe-
riencing more flashbacks
and nightmares. In some
of them, he imagines dif-
ferent scenarios that could
have played out, including
if he had been able to trip
the gunman or grab the
weapon.
"But I've learned from
counseling that you can
manage how you respond
to these dreams, flash-
backs," Barber said. "I
don't think you ever com-
pletely forget, but you can
manage it"
Pam Simon, another
Giffords' staffer who sur-
vived two gunshot wounds
to her chest and wrist, said
the emotional journey is
taking longer than she
imagined. She has a fuzzier
memory from that morn-
ing; some parts are dream-
like, others crystal clear.
What stands out to her
is the kindness of a strang-
er named Bob Pagano,
who ran from inside the
grocery store toward the
gunshots that day and saw
Simon face-down holding
her chest
Pagano put his sweater


under Simon's head and
told her, "I'm not a medical
person but I will stay with
you. You won't be alone."
And Pagano did just that,
trying to comfort her by
telling her that Giffords was
still alive and that the gun-
man had been disarmed.
He rode in the ambulance


to the hospital with her and
explained to her husband
what had happened.
Simon also is back at
work, though part-time,
and struggles most with
Zimmerman's death. One
moment, Simon will be OK
and then stumble across
a reminder of Zimmerman


and become overwhelmed
with emotion, she said.
"The thing that I learned
abotit grief is that it's a slow
and very jagged process,"
she said. "You have to stop
and pause and reflect, and
what I've learned is that it's
TUCSON continued on 8A


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SERVICE WE OFFERS
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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THJRSDAY JANjUAR'Y 5, 2012


TUCSON: Mass shooting survivors learning to cope, trying to move on
Continued From Page 7A


OK, that's part of the process, acc:ptin',
and be-ing open to those emotions."
Suzi Hileman has chosen to move past
the anger.
She took her young friend and ri-:ighbor,.
9-year-old Christina Taylor Green, to meet
Giffords that day so the bright young girl,
who was interested in politics, could meet
a real-lift: female politician.
Hileman said that Christina planned
to ask G iflords about pollution and the
Dr--:pwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf,
and what the country could do about
them. The girl, wearing -,parkly tennis
shoes, blue sapphire earrings, and skinny
jeans, began "jumping up and down" when
she spotted a photographer at Giffords'
event that day, overcome with excitement
about getting their picture taken with the
congresswoman, Hileman said.
"And then boom. The next thing I remem-
ber is looking down at my leg and seeing
*blood pouring out of a hole in my jeans,"
Hileman said. "And then I remember lying
on the ground holding b hands with Christina
telling her not to die and leave me there.
"'We came together, we're going to leave
together, Sweetie,"' Hileman told a dying
Christina. "'I love you. Don't leave me on
the cold ground by myself."' .
Hileman had tried to shield Christina
when the bullets began flying, but the girl
was fatally hit once in the chest Hileman
was shot three times.


When Hil'eman was taken off a ventila- than to receive." Hileman said. "It helps
tor in the hospital for the first time the me heal and it takes me out of myself, and
first words out of her mouth were, "What
about Christina?" Even after learning the
truth about the girl's death, a heavily
medicated Hileman would cry out for the
little girl.
"Someone took a gun, aimed it at a 9-
year-old and killed her, and I was respon-
sible for bringing her home and I couldn't
do that," Hileman said. "That pisses me
off. It's infuriating, butbeing angry doesn't
get me anywhere. The shooter does not
get to win.
"I couldn't protect Christina, I couldn't
save myself, but there are things that I
do have control over and I can find joy
in really simple things and tremendous
things."
Hileman has found a way to move
forward with the help of family and
friends, and by starting a nonprofit called
GRandparentslNresidence, or GRIN, in
which she pairs up volunteers with proj-
ects at schools.
She came up with the idea as she
learned to accept generosity from peo-
ple' who wanted to help her following
the shooting people who brought her
and her husband food for three months
straight, delivered her books and music,
and cheered her on when they saw her
around town using a walker.
"I saw first-hand that it is better to give


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ron Barber, a staffer for Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, talks in Tucson, Ariz. Barber, along with
other survivors of the Tucson shooting rampage,'and countless others, will come together in
the close-knit southern Arizona city this Jan. 8, 2012, to commemorate the one-year mark of
that tragic day and remember those who died.



DONORS: Found through Facebook
Continued From Page 7A


A A


Facebook friends. More
than 300 people responded:
"Whoo hoo....what a great
Christmas present," wrote
Kelly L. Hallissey. "This is
awesome!! Praying for you
and your family for positive
news and a great way to
begin 2012!" wrote Brenda
Tomtan.
Many people are not
aware that kidney and liver
donations can now come
from living donors.
In 2010, 16,800 kidney
transplants were performed
in the United States, of
which 6,277 came from liv-
ing donors, according to
the United Network for
Organ Sharing. An average
of 46 kidney transplants
take place each day in this
country, while another 13
people who have been wait-
ing for a kidney die each
day. About 90,000 are on the
transplant list right now.
Jacqueline Ryall, 45, said
she felt a need to donate
a kidney to Brown to give
back her own good health
and all she has been given.
She's not a mom and
gushed about how beauti-
ful Damon and Bethany's
kids are.
"The real reason I'm
doing this is he's got kids
and he's a good guy," she
said. "My life is in a good
place. I've been given lots
and I have a responsibility
to give back."
Ryall said her elderly
mother does not under-
stand why she would give
a kidney to someone other
than her own brother and
sister, and her family is
worried about her health
going forward.
After her own research,
however, Ryall decided it's


relatively safe for a woman
in good, health to donate
a kidney. If something is
going to go wrong with her
own kidneys, she has heard
'they usually fail in twos.
"Right now it feels like
absolutely the right thing
to do," she said, adding that
she hopes her decision will
help make other people
less afraid to do the same
thing.
News media coverage of
his quest flooded his hospi-
tal with so many requests
for information from
total strangers that
Brown said he was asked
to pull back on his pub-
licity efforts. Four people
passed the initial screening
and came in for tests. Now
that he sees a happy ending
coming for himself, Brown
would like to do whatever
he can to help others.
April Capone, the previ-
ous mayor of East Haven,
Conn., knows what Brown
means about the attraction
of happy endings.
Two years ago, she was
sitting in her office check-
ing her Facebook feed,
when a post from one of
her constituents popped up '
saying he needed a kidney.
"At that moment, Carlos
was at Mayo, testing to
get on the transplant list,"
said Capone, 36. "He really
didn't tell anyone he was
sick. The doctor said, 'if
you don't do it, no one is
going to know'." So Carlos
Sanchez pulled out his
cell phone and posted
the request and Capone
responded immediately.
"I knew from the second
I saw his post that I was
going to be a donor," said
Capone, who barely knew


Sanchez at the time. Now
they're as close as siblings,
talk on the phone almost
daily and meet for lunch
regularly.
Capone said she had no
personal reason for donat-
ing a kidney; she just want
to save a life.
"It was the best thing I
ever did with my life," she
said. "I wish I had more; I
would do it again."


1. A..ll . .' .."."" ...
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,,, ,,- .-:- .,.:.,--:A


PCIV.
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CARE
MEDICINE
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* Physicals
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the Best
, 5 Years


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LAKE CITY


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sometimes in.'self is not a happy place. It's
easy to go down the dark path."


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


F-GE 1PirL n3










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
(;rfc /&i;'eo;'trepoTr~e~cr


SPORTS


Thursday, January 5, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
CHS FOOTBALL
Awards banquet
Friday at school
The Columbia High
football team's end of the
year banquet is
7 p.m. Friday in the
school cafeteria. The
banquet is a fundraiser
for the quarterback club
and attire is semi-formal.
Tickets are on sale for
$12 at Hunter Printing.
For details, call coach
Brian Allen at 755-8080
ext. 140.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Registration for
Boys Club hoops
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
accepting registration
for its basketball
program. Cost is $45.
Three leagues are
offered: Training, ages
6-7-8; Jr. Varsity, ages
8-9-10; Varsity, ages
11-12-13-14. '
For details, call
752-4184.
CHS SOFTBALL
Tryout planned
for Monday
Columbia High's
softball team tryout is
'3:30 p.m. Monday at the
softball field. All players
must have current
physical and consent
forms.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today .
Fort White High
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (boys-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Atlantic
Coast High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High girls
weightlifting vs. -Union
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
wrestling in Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High (CYSA field),
6p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High (CYSA field),
7 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer at Newberry High,
7 p.m. (girls-5)
Fort White High
basketball vs. Interlachen
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling in Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
High, TBA. -
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Dana Roberts, 16, clean and jerks 160
pounds during a weightlifting meet against Fort White High on
Wednesday. Roberts won the unlimited division.


CHS lifters top

Lady Indians


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's girls'
weightlifting team defeated
Fort White High, 64-24, at
home on Wednesday.
Lifters who earned points
follow by weight class
with bench press, clean and
jerk and total listed.
101 1st, Seaira
Fletcher '(FW) 90-75-
165; 2pd, Erin Markham
(CHS) 65-50-115; 3rd,
Jamie Tolkkinen (FW) 50-
55-105;
- 11 110 --- 1st, Kayla
Carman (CHS). 90-90-180;
2nd, Jessica Burns (FW) 65-
60-125; 3rd, Carla Pentolino
(FW) 55-55-110; '
119 1st, Marissa
Fletcher (FW) 85-95-180;
2nd, Savannah Thomas
(CHS) 90-90-180; 3rd,
Kelston Sund (CHS) 75-90-
165;
129 1st, Stephanie
Harris (CHS) 80-100-180;
2nd, Alanis Koberlein


(CHS) 85-90-175;
139 1st, Charline
Watson (CHS) 105-115-220;
2nd, Lindsay Lee (CHS)
90-90-180; 3rd, Hannah
Chamberlain (FW) 85-70-
155;
154 1st, Ashtyn
Marsee (CHS) 100-115-215;
2nd, Ashley Mackey (CHS)
90-90-180;
169 1st, Kaicie
Chasteen (CHS) 110-115-
225; 2nd, Lauren Eaker
(CHS) 95-105-200;
183 1st, Kayla
Redwine (FW) 95-105-200;
2nd, Hayden Stancil (CHS)
100-100-200; 3rd, Vanessa.
Morrill (CHS) 85-90-175;
199 1st, Brandy
Spranger (CHS) 105-105-
210; 2nd, Enigiah Manning
(CHS) 80-85-165; 3rd,
Katherine Crosby (FW)
80-70-150;
Unlimited 1st, Dana
Roberts (CHS) 170-160-330;
2nd, Jasmyne Davis (CHS)
155-140-295; 3rd, Taylor
Law (FW) 80-85-165..


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Katherine Crosby, 16, lifts 75 pounds during
a weightlifting meet against Columbia High on Wednesday.


un


ing


evils


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's A.J. Legree looks for position in a game played earlier this season.


Fort White drop s wo


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High hosted a
double dip of hoops on
Wednesday. Unfortunately
for the Indians, they came
out on the wrong end of
both games.
The Lady Indians took
the floor first against
Williston High and fell
48-33. Fort White trailed
24-5 at the half before ral-


lying in the second half for
the 15-point loss.
Tosha Robinson scored
13 points to lead the Lady
Indians in the contest,.
The Lady Indians are 2-8
on the season.
Fort White's boys
team kept the game
close throughout but fell
in the 60-51 final against
Williston.
All of the Indians' seven
starters scored in the
game.


Melton Sanders led the
way with 14 points in the
contest. He scored 10 in
the second half:
AJ. Legree was. second
on the team in scoring with
nine points. Trey Phillips
and Jonathan Dupree each
had nine.
Fort White fell to 6-3
with the loss.
Both teams will return to
action as Fort White hosts
Interlachen at 6 p.m. in a
doubleheader on Friday.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY. JANUARY 5. 2012


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, Africa
Open, first round, at East London, South
Africa (same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Pittsburgh at DePaul
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Michigan at Indiana
II p.m.
FSN -Arizona vs. UCLA, at Anaheim,
Calif.
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally. Chilecito to
Fiambala,Argentina (delayed tape)
NBA
8 p.m.
TNT Miami at Atlanta
10:30 p.m.
TNT LA. Lakers at Portland
PREP FOOTBALL
7:30 p.m.
ESPN All-America Game, at
St. Petersburg

FOOTBALL

NFL playoffs
Wild Card
Saturday
Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sunday
Atlanta at NewYork Giants, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Denver,4:30 p.m.
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
Atlanta, N.Y. Giants or New Orleans
at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m.
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh or Denver at
New England, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan.. 15
Pittsburgh, Denver or Houston at
Baltimore, I p.m.
Detroit, Atlanta or' N.Y. Giants at
Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.

College bowl grries

TicketCity Bowl
Houston 30, Penn State 14
Capital One Bowl
South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
Outback Bowl
Georgia vs, Michigan State.
Gator Bowl
Florida 24, Ohio State 17
Rose Bowl
Oregon 45,Wisconsin 38
Fiesta Bowl
Oklahoma State 41, Stanford 38, OT
Sugar Bowl
Michigan 23,Virginia Tech 20, OT
SOrange Bowl B .
WestVirginia vs. Clemson (), ...
Friday
Cotton Bowl
AtArlington,Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)
Saturday
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday
GoDaddy.com Bowl


At Mobile,Ala-
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3). 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1).
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

AP Top 25 results
No. I LSU (13-0) vs. No. 2 Alabama,
BCS Championship, Monday.
No. 2 Alabama (11-1) vs. No. I LSU,
BCS Championship, Monday.
No. 3 Oklahoma State (12-1) beat
No. 4 Stanford 41-38, OT, Fiesta Bowl.
No. 4 Stanford (11-2) lost to No.3
Oklahoma State 41-38, OT, Fiesta Bowl.
No. 5 Southern Cal (10-2) season
completed.
No. 6 Oregon (12-2) beat No. 9
Wisconsin 45-38, Rose Bowl.
No. 7 Arkansas (10-2) vs. No. II
Kansas State, Cotton Bowl, Friday.
No. 8 Boise State (12-1) beat Arizona
State 56-24, MAACO Bowl.
No. 9 Wisconsin (11-3) lost to No. 6
Oregon 45-38, Rose Bowl.
No. 10 South Carolina (11-2) beat
No. 21 Nebraska 30-13, Capital One
Bowl.
No. II Kansas State (10-2) vs. No. 7
Arkansas, Cotton Bowl, Friday.
No. 12 Michigan State (11-3) beat
No. 18 Georgia 33-30'30T, Outback
Bowl.
No. 13 Michigan (11-2) beat No. 17
Virginia Tech 23-20, OT, Sugar Bowl.
-No. 14 Clemson (10-3) vs. No. 23
WestaVirgiriia, Orange Bowl,.
No. 15 Baylor (10-3) beat Washington
67-56,Alamo Bowl. ,
No. 16 TCU (11-2) beat Louisiana
Tech,31-24, Poinsettia Bowl.*
No. 17 Virginia Tech (11-3) lost to.
No. 13 Michigan 23-20, OT, Sugar Bowl.
No. 1'8 Georgia (10-4) lost to
No: 12 Michigan State 33-30 30T,
Outback Bowl..
No. 19 Oklahoma (10-3) beat Iowa
31-14, Insight Bowl.
No:'20:Houston (13-1) beat No. 24
Penn State 30 14,TicketCity Bowl.
No. 21 Nebraska .(9-4) lost to No. 10
South Carolin. 30-13, Capital One Bowl.
No. 22, Southern Miss (12-2) beat
Nevada 24-17, Hawaii Bowl.
No. 23 West Virginia (9-3) vs. No. 14
Clemson, Orange Bowl.
.No. 24,Penn State (9-4)- lost to No. 20
Houston 30-14,TicketCity Bowl.
No. 25 Florida State (9-4) beat
Notre Dame 18-14, Champ Sports
Bowl.

FCS championship '
Friday "
At Pizza Hut Park
Frisco,Texas
Sam Houston State (14-0) vs. North
Dakota State (13-1), I p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule
Tuesday's Games
Cleveland I 15, Charlotte 101
Chicago 76,Atlanta 74
Portland 103, Oklahoma City 93
Memphis 113, Sacramento 96
Utah 85, Milwaukee 73
LA. Lakers 108, Houston 99
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland atToronto (n)
Washington at Orlando (n)
New Jersey at Boston (n)


Chicago at Detroit (n)
Indiana at Miami (n)
Charlotte at New York (n)
Philadelphia at New Orleans (n)
Memphis at Minnesota (n)
Phoenix at Dallas (n)
Golden State at San Antonio (n)
Sacramento at Denver (n)
Houston at LA. Clippers (n)
Today's Games
Miami at Atanta, 8 p.m.
Dallas at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Portland, 10-30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Toronto, 7 p.m.
New York at Washington, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Houston at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Denver at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Cleveland at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Orlando, 8 p.m.
Memphis at Utah, 9 p.m.
Golden State at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
Portland at Phoenix, 10-30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 12 Indiana vs. No. 16 Michigan,
9 p.m.
No. 17 UNLV at Cal State Bakersfield,
10 p.m.
No. 24 San Diego State vs. San Diego
Christian, 10 p.m.
No. 25 Gonzaga vs. Pepperdine, 9 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR
TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS
Site: Kapalua, Hawaii.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Kapalua Resort,The Plantation
Course (7,411 yards, par 73).
Purse: $5.6 million. Winner's share:
$1.12 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday,
5:30-10 p.m., 10:30 p.m.-3 a.m;; Saturday-
Sunday, I-5 p.m., 5:30-10 p.m., 10:30 p.m.-
3 a.m., Monday, II1 am.-3 p.m., 4-8 p.m.,
9 p.m.-I a.m.),

HOCKEY,

NHL schedule
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 4, Carolina 3, SO
Buffalo 4, Edmonton 3
Toronto 7,Tampa Bay 3
Washington 3,Calgary I -
St: Louis 4, Phoenix I
Detroit 5, Dallas 4
Wednesday's Games
Winnipeg at Montreal (n)
Boston at New Jersey (n)
Minnesota atVancouver (n)
San Jose at Anaheim (n)
., Today's Games .
Calgary at Boston, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Columbus at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Florida at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Anaheim, 10 plih.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter.
Florida State's Okaro White (10), Luke Loucks (3) and Deividas Dulkys (4) fights Florida's
Erving Walker (11) for, possession of the ball while playing in a game on Dec. 27;.



FSU routs Auburn



in ACC/SEC clash


Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Michael Snaer scored a
career-high 22 points -
going 10 of 10 from the
free-throw line and Ian
Miller added 15 points as
'Florida State routed Auburn
85-56 on Wednesday
night
Snaer had 14 points in the
first half as the Seminoles
(9-5) grabbed a 50-16 half-
time lead. It was a stun-
ning reversal of fortune for
Florida State, which trailed
by 17 points at the half in
Friday's triple-overtime loss
to Princeton.


Chris Denson had 15
points and Kenny Gabriel
added 10 points and seven
rebounds for Auburn (10-
4), which made just 5 of 33,
(15.2 percent) of ts shots in
the first half.
Xavier Gibson also had
12 points, five rebounds
and four 'blocks for .the
Seminoles, who scored a
season-high 85 points.
Auburn led 5-4 in the
opening minutes after a
3-pointer by Gabriel. But,
Florida State went on a 20-0
run including nine points
from Snaer to build a 24-
5 lead with 10:34 left in the
first half.


The Tigers tried to make
3-pointers to close the gap
but were just 1 of 9 in the
first half and 4 of 14 for the
game.
; Florida State made 22
of 26 shots from the free-
throw line. Miller Was 5 of
6 from the line, and Gibson
was also 4 of 4 from the
line.
The Seminoles also
showed off their height and
athleticism inside, blocking
10 shots and outrebound-
ing Auburn 45-30.
The Seminoles shot 53.7
percent (29 of 54) from the
floor. The Tigers shot 32.3
percent (21 of 65).


BRIEFS'


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school. Planning
for the varsity banquet is
under way.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White
meeting Friday
Fort White Youth
Baseball's annual meeting "
is 6:30 p.m. Friday at South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call Millissa
Blakley at 365-4133.


Young Guns team
tryout Saturday
The Young Guns 9-under
travel baseball team has an
open tryout set for 1 p.m.
Saturday at the Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call manager
David Williams at
(386) 697-0764.


North Florida
Blaze tryouts
The North Florida Blaze
travel baseball team for
ages 11-12 has a tryout
planned for 2 p.m. Saturday
at Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423.


North Florida
Rays tryouts,
The North Florida Rays
9-under travel baseball
. team has tryouts set for
10 a.m. Saturday and
Jan. 14 at Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call
Todd Green at 365-5161.


Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
available at www.lcccyb.
com. Online registration is



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

IGAOEM I


FATINN




YOOTEC



Answer:


$75 plus a transaction fee.
Registration begins
5-7 p.m. Friday and
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
at Southside Sports
Complex with a cost of $80.
For details, call president
Tad Cervantes at 365-4810:

FLAG FOOTBALL
Christ Central
registration open
Registration for Christ
Central Sportsflag football
for ages 5-12 runs through
Jan. 13. Cost is $40.
For details, call 365-2128.

From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


STHE SMARTEST KIP IN THE
MATH CLA55 COULP
ALWAYS E -
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)


Yesterday's Jumbles: LLAMA CRIMP TYRANT SIMPLY
Answer: The dog was content to sleep through all the fes-
tivities because he wasn't a PARTY ANIMAL


ACROSS
1 Nurse's
concern
6 Monk
11 Take the dais
12 Dogie stopper
13 Fillet
15 Rice
alternative
16 Crape -
18 Spy novel by
Kipling .
19 Sauna site
21 - few
rounds
22 Oil cartel
23 Kimono
sashes
25 Alphabet trio
28 Like Rambo?
30 Byron work
31 Grassland
32 Rollover subj.
33 Food additive
35 Strongman
of myth
37 Ring count


38 Gives in the
middle
40 Golf target ,
41 Thai neighbor
42 Some whiskey
43 down roots
46 "Crocodile -"
48 Quenched, as
thirst
50 Gold Rush
state .
54 Blacksmith's
need
55 Expression
56 Likes and
dislikes
57 Show biz org.

DOWN
1 Husk
2 Suffix for
forfeit
3 Big black dog
4 Tolerate
5 Counting-
rhyme start
6 Berg


Answer to Previous Puzzle


C R AK E B L IN K S
DAT NG L A C I E R
SHELVE AME BAS
LLYEl D-AP,
J.QY Z EE AM--T

B|UR1 |R|EB SCARE
s _c~|RB A|K _RO
NAr l R KB A R OK|
R IN K S I N K R 01Y
BO GE Y NE EPA/
RE N EGO IDS
SE V CO N
SEC DE OFFSE
P 0 P L I N N I ECE
YEA.S. T TRI K R


7 Wharf denizen
8 Ms. Dinesen
9 spumante
10 Latitude
14 Syllogism
word
15 Kilt pattern


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


17 Winter
coaster
19 Trunk
contents
20 Praline nut
22 Neglect to
mention
24 Whale habitat
25 Brass or
bronze
26 Blues street
in Memphis
27 Look over to
rob
29 Mantra chants
34 Cancun toast
36 Strings beads
39 Fizzy
beverage
43 Exam for HS
juniors
44 Arm bone
45 Hebrew
letters
46 Edit out
47 Charles Lamb
49 First-aid box
51 Thus, in
citations
52 RV haven
53 Current meas.


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY. JANUARY 5, 2012


DILBERT


BABY BLUES

y-


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


T"sT w cotL. N O CWT\'
URIP M--aMY 8 a DoTqW A
IaSOMuN. w I


r"%~' jJ3
,~~~~ ^Q^ i^


40, t'tLW~T
~ NOTIAIN6?


DEAR ABBY


Strict mom wants applause

despite teen's complaints


DEAR ABBY: I was sure
"Emotionally Abused in
California's" letter (Nov.
2) was inspirational, but
fictional. The 15-year-old
writer felt her mother was
unreasonable because of
the rules Mom enforced
and the chores the teen
was required to do. Then I
started re-reading my high
school diary. There were
many parallels between
this girl's complaints and
my own as a teen.
My mom also didn't let
me go to parties if she
didn't know the parents
and confirm they'd be
home; my curfew, was
11:30 p.m. on weekends
because Mom couldn't
sleep until I was in for the
night. She always offered
to host Friday pizza-and-
movie night at our home
to ensure my friends and
I had a safe place to hang
out.
Like "Emotionally
Abused," I also resented
my lack of freedom, but
because of her efforts, I
never had run-ins with the
law, never got an STD or
became pregnant, and I
didn't try drugs or alcohol.
When I expressed my frus-
tration, Mom would say,
"When you're a parent,
you'll understand."
Now that I have two
small children, I DO
understand. I hit the Mom
jackpot! I'm grateful for
her guidance, love and the
boundaries she set for me.


Abigail Van Buren
wvw.deorobby.com
I'll be sending her that
column and a copy of this
letter to you as a thank-
you for making decisions
that kept me grounded
and safe. WON THE
JACKPOT IN MICHIGAN
DEAR WON THE
JACKPOT: When that
letter hit print, I was
overwhelmed with mail
from readers supporting
my response and sharing
experiences that validated
"Emotionally Abused's"
mom's parenting tech-
niques. I took special note
of the responses from
teens, which I'll share
tomorrow. Today, some
comments from adults:
DEAR ABBY: It's
refreshing to know there
are still parents who
actually care about how
they raise their children.
Bringing a child into this
world is a tremendous
responsibility. It requires
years of 24/7 vigilance,
teaching and love to pro-
duce a moral, loving and
productive pillar of our
society. Some parents
today do not take their
responsibility seriously.
How we raise our children


will directly affect how we
function as a society in the
future. CONCERNED
DAD IN LAS VEGAS
DEAR ABBY: I am a
teacher of many spoiled,
lazy, irresponsible and'
incompetent students. If all
parents were as dedicated
in rearing their children
as this teen's mother, my
job would be wonderful.
She has the necessary par-
enting skills to mold her
child into a responsible,
productive and mature
adult. She's an awesome
woman! TEACHER IN
NASHVILLE, GA
DEAR ABBY: It's
about time parents raise
their children appropri-
ately. I grew up with much
less than "Emotionally
Abused," but with more
rules and restrictions.
My mom divorced my
physically abusive father
when I was 3. There was
no alimony or child sup-
port. Mom did it all on her
own. She even went back
to school to get a college
degree.
Parents are not meant
to be their children's BFF.
They are responsible for
raising their children with
morals and social values.
Welcome to the REAL
world. -JACKSON, WIS.,
READER

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Consider ways to
bring in extra cash. A sud-
den change of plans will
help you,realize a service
you have'to offer. Take the
initiativewith regard to a
partnership you want to
pursue. Love and romance
are highlighted. ****,
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): A false impression
may cause you to over-
react. Step back and view
your situation before you
say or do anything that.
may work against you.
A misunderstanding is
apparent if you aren't clear
about what you want or
what you are willing to do.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Emotional issues will
be brought to the surface.
You are best to keep an
open mind and listen to.
what's being said and
offered. A quick change on
your part can actually help
things turn out to your
benefit. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You may be left in
the dark regarding what
everyone else is doing.
Make adjustments to suit
your needs, but be pre-
pared"to adapt to whatever
comes your way. You need
to be versatile if you want
to keep up and make an
impression. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Getting along with oth-


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

ers will be essential if
you want to advance. Mix
and rnmige with people
who share your interests
and goals. Love is in the
stars, and your charm will
make you hard to resist.
Spontaneity will enhance
your popularity. ****A
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Emotions will lead to
unpredictable behavior.
Whether it's you or some-
qne else who is upset, you
are best to stick to the
truth and clear matters
up quickly. Letting a situa-
tion fester will only make
matters worse. You need a
break. **-
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Socializing will bring
out the best in you. Take
on a challenge and show
everyone how capable
you are when it comes to
creative thinking and ver-
satility. Changes to your
residence will increase its
value. Focus on financial
gain. *****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Discipline will be,
required, especially when
working with a partner.
Keep an open mind, but
don't let anyone railroad
you into something you
don't want using emotional
blackmail. Set your pri-
orities and stick to them.


Strive for equality. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Tie up loose
ends and stand behind
your work. It's important
to send the right signal,
especially when dealing
with those who can affect
your future. Diplomacy
and charm will work won-
ders. Love, romance and
travel are highlighted.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't let added
responsibilities get you
down. Stellar work will
increase your chance to
get ahead. Mixing busi-
ness with pleasure will
open doors. Your ability to
schmooze will give you a
competitive edge. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Prepare to make
changes that will alter
your lifestyle. Adjusting
your living arrangements
will open up opportunities
that will help stabilize your
finances. More responsibil-
ity will enhance your repu-
tation. Love is in the stars.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Question anyone who
is procrastinating. You
need firm answers from
the people you are trying
to do business with. Don't
settle for something you
don't really want You're
better off starting from
scratch than making do.
**


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: S equals F
" K O G K J W V V Z F V Z KWOL W J U TEDRW Z
S. OF EGL B FEZ V Z K T WOL D KSL OF
GLDD WJBONKJ R HFXXLZHKWDDB."
- DWEZ LJ MWH W DD

Previous Solution: "To make headway, improve your head." B.C. Forbes
"History is a race between education and catastrophe." H.G. Wells
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-5


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


HOROSCOPES


PHYSIC.IMT CAN'T EXPLAINN vWHY NUTRINOS
/ A WER CLOC6.0D GOINO FAMT
S/. THAN TH 5PED OF LIGHT.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, JANUARY 5, 2012

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


. ADvantage -


IOne M er per ad -|
Slines 6 days Eachaddinal
f|t" p top m' p te o tt ealog |
pesTonua mehalndls toSlattng 0 or as. .
K Et, Hu,,= m au d =Inc" a price e.
Shsitesa tnonrefundabM ale g




One tem per ad do
4 lines 6 ays additional
ates pples to private Individuals selling
personal nerchandisel totalling aS or ltem.
SEach UIn mut fInclude a price.
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eham mper ad e1 it




4 lines 6 day S Each additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling ,000 or less.
Each-tem must Include a price,
SThis o fdable rai




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persona htni talnings$eot o rtag2,50 s.
Each, ern mast Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rat.





4 lines 6 days tli e i
Rat applies to privatOs ndividuals iing
Spersonsal trclandiu totalling $4,000 or less
Each Itsm mast Include a price
This ta a non-refundable rate.





4 lInes 6 days ti ins6
Rate applies to pIt ndividuals selling
Spersonsi tmrchendise iota=$l6lig, o ss.
Each Ito moat Inclodes price
STh~s is a non-reundabl rate.


L.'i ,wgHrfl^.rru lll


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....'92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
S Monday,through Friday from 8:00
a.m: tdt :0b p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please.
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifiedstlakecityre-.
porter.com





AdistoAppean Callby: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon., :00f am: Mon, 9:00 a.m..
Wednesday Mon., 1:00a.11. Mon., 9:00a..'
Thursday Wedl. a.ti: .Wed., 9:00am.
Friday Th is.,.10:00am. Thurs,l9:00a.m.
Saturday. .Fri., 10i)0a Ari., 9:00a.m. -
. Sunday .. Ffi.l-0a N.. FiN.,9.00in.
1 Thse dbadlines are subject to change without notice."




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors'. by the -.
advertiser on the first.day of pub-
Ilcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecitvreporter.eoin


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY CIVIL DI-
VISION
Case No. 12-2009-CA-000808
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN D CASSELL AND JESSICA
D CASSELL, STATE OF FLORI-
DA, DEPARTMENT OF REVE-
NUE, AND UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on De-
cember 21,2011, in the Circuit Court
of Columbia County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in Colum-
bia County, Florida described as:
LOT 5, BLOCK 7, COUNTRY
CLUB ESTATES REPLAT, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 32, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
and commonly known as: 184 SE
OLUSTEE AVE, LAKE CITY, FL
32025; including the building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest bid-
der, for cash, AT THE FRONT
DOOR OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 145 N.
HERNANDO STREET, LAKE
CITY, FLORIDA, on 1/25/12 at
I11:00a.m.
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 28 day of December,
2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: /s/ B.'Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05529867
January 5, 12, 2012

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.: 12-2011-CA-000355
Division:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NATION-
AL ASSOCIATION, TRUSTEE
POOLING AND SERVICING
AGREEMENT DATED AS OF AU-
GUST 1. 2006 SECURITIZED AS-
SET BACKED RECEIVABLES
LLC TRUST 2006-HE1 MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIF-
ICATES, SERIES 2006-HE1
Plaintiff,
v.
MELODY L. MAY A/K/A MELO-
DY LYNN MAY; RICHARD AR-
THUR DUBOIS; CITIFINANCIAL
EQUITY SERVICES, INC,; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTH-
ER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT(S) WHO ARE NOT'KNOW
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST 'AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTH-
ER CLAIMANTS,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF ACTION
Melody L. May a/k/a Melody Lynn
May and Richard Arthur Dubois
Last Known Address: 222 North
West Kobie Way
Lake City, FL 32055
Current Address: Unknown
Previous Address: 136 SE Shallow
Creek Gln
Lake City, FL 32025 3206.
ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTH-
ER CLAIMANTS :.
Last Inown Address:,Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
LOT 1 AND THE NORTH 1/2 OF
LOT 2 BLOCK 2, RUBY PARK
SUBDIVISION, SECTION -20,
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 112, IN THE
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT'S
OFFICE ON COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
This property is located at the Street
address of: 222 North West Kobie
Way, Lake City, FL 32055
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses on or before Janu-
ary 24, 2012 a date which is within
30 days after the first publication, if
any,.on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A.;
Plaintiff's, attorney, whose address is
350 Jim Morgan Blvd., Suite 100,
Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and
file the original, with this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney,
or immediately thereafter; otherwise,


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod.
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint or petition.
This Notice shall be published once a
week for two consecutive weeks in
The Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
the court on December 16, 2011.
P. DEWIT CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Yashmin Chen-Alexis, Esquire
Elizabeth R. Wellbdrm, PA.
350 Jim Morgan Blvd, Suite 100
Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954)354-3544
Facsimile: (954)354-3545
IN ACCORDANCE WTH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are.entitled, .at
no cost to you, -to. the .provision of-
certain assistance. .Persons .with .a
disability who needs .any accommo-
dation to participate should call the
ADA Coordinator, Jacquetta Brad-
ley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL
32056, 386-719-7428, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing impaired
call (800)955-8771; if you are a
voice impaired call (800)955-8770.
05529776
December 29, 2011
January 5, 2012


020 Lost & Found
$200 REWARD for info leading
to return of 2 Blue Tick hounds.
Missing from Norris Rd. the week
of Christmas. Call 386-623-0200


$200 Reward for the return of a
Tree stand & Deer Camera.
Missing from the end of Lake
Jeffery in Wellborn.386- 623-0200
100 Job
Opportunities

05529880
VyStar Credit Union Seeking
Member Relationship
Specialist Supervisor
Location: Lake City Branch
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS:
Trains, monitors, coaches and
develops member service and
teller staff on a daily basis.
Provides on-going training for
all member service and teller
staff as changes are
implemented and other-duties
JOB KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS
& ABILITIES:
A minimum of three years of
experience with a financial
institution: '
A minimum of two years ina
leadership or supervisory .
position isprteferfed. "
Knowledge of Microsoft Word
and Excel are required.
EDUCATION:
An Associate Degree is required
and a four-year undergraduate
degree is preferred. Work and/or
supervisory experience may be
substituted for the Associates
Degree.
Please visit
www.vystarcu.org/home/careers
to apply.
VyStar Credit Union is an Equal
-Opportunity Employer
05529886
FANTASTIC
OPPORTUNITY
Guest Services Position PT
18-24 hrs. wkly. MUST be a
people person with strong work
ethic, DEPENDABLE, good
communication,-great custorper
service slkilk;: cb6mApt' slls, .
add w.ilingne~s to lani- .
SMUST be a team player. arid,
able to work a flexible schedule'
including weekends anid
holidays. We offer Competitive
Pay and Health Benefits. Hotel
Experience Highly Preferred..
Only those seeking long term
employment apply in person
at Comfort Suites 3690 W US
HWY 90. Please do not call the
hotel regarding your application.
Activities Coordinator (P/T, Tu-F)
Computer literate with a desire to
provide creative activities for
senior adults. Level II background
screen req'd. Must be able to drive
company van when needed, start-
ing pay $8.00 an hour. Call Leona
for more info at 386-755-0235
BARTENDER NEEDED Must
have experience and-be reliable.
Must have own phone and own
car. 386-752-2412..
Immediate Collector Position
Available. Full-time. $8/hr.
Dedicated and determined
individuals wanted. Bilingual
applicants encouraged to apply.
Apply at
www.salliemae.candidatecare.com
or. Call Christine at 1-866-441-
2623' ext 4342. -
Needed Secretary/Assistant for
busy Real Estate Office. computer
skills a Must. Call Debbie at
386-719-1224 for application
Now Hiring Restaurant Manager.
Experience preferred but will train
right person. 24 hour operation.
Send resumes to: 186 SE Newell
Dr. Lake City, FL. 32025.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota. Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


100 Job
S Opportunities
Officer Manager Position:
Must have Real Estate knowledge.
Also prefer Real estate license.
Must have knowledge of
QuickBooks & Microsoft Office.
Motivated individual with an abili-
ty to multi task. Mon Fri 40 hr
wk. Contact Mike or Lynn: 386-
719-5600 or 386-288-3596
Accredited Real Estate Svcs.. LLC

Medical
120 Employment


05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 Units.
Monthly Specials
S550. mo. Free Water.
386-984-8448


750 Business &
5 v Office Rentals

For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
WPP;kdi. 36,, 9 iQw O4Q 62?,


Country Living evenings/weekends 497-4762
2&3bdrm. $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS! Midtown Commercial Center,
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280 brand new executive front suite &
Mobile Homes for rent in . suite w/warehouse.
White Springs, & FL White. :.Call Vicki-or Joe 386-935-2832.
Contact 386-623-3404 .: office for Lease, was Dr's office
or 386-397-2779 .:..... $3 sqft/2707 sqft
NEW 72'X18' .- Oak Hill Plaza
Mobile home 3br/2ba Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor


$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale


Director of Allied Health Palm Harbor Homes
Programs (RN) wanted at North New.2012 Models.
...l.ondahCnimiunity College... $5.. ffAll Homes
:':See www.nfcc.edu for details. :.. .:800-622-2832 ext2r'.


170 Business
Opportunities
Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

2A4 Schools &
**4 Education&

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances


ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737


705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hopial and
Tirmco. Call for Jdeail.
386-365-5150
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$6651C month & bckgrnd chk,


For Sale:.GE Washerl g 3. -6.007-3241 or 352-377-7652
capacity, Whirlpool..Dryer oe in Speci. from $109-$39
Lgcapacutv $45F.ttor tith ob 2 & 3 br aparimeo Also. r
-168
.'3'"64-'tltr r ndAw. 1 ptorHmeflso.l lerJ-
... .- ": '-" '7-'.1" . . .er 2/br for $-t95 ~no. Incl waier
..;' .... ... ... ; -." 75 5-2 2 ngsbsri n- alscorn


407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales
Multi Family: Kountry Kids Day
Care. Marion Ave. Sat. 8-1.
From toys to housewares. Kids to
adult plus size Clothes.


NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. IJtil. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626

720 Furnished Apts.
I20 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


PUBLISHER'S NOTE STUDIO APT. FOR RENT
S .. All Yard Sale;Ads . .. All utilities included & Cable,; .
:.) ':. M a-b Pe-P id:. :; t i- + k. 3 se 'de .it.
..:.:,-':'.l.. ^ '" .C: .all \3 (> W .6'9 ,: :7" "


440 Misceis aneous

8 ft x 5.5 ft wide single axle trailer
With Dump and lights.
Excellent condition $325 FIRM
386-288-8833
PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control,
in original box. $270,
386-984-7510
STORAGE SHED
10x16
$2500
Call 288-9858
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminumitool box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800.or 752-4740

450 Good Things
450 to Eat.
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We-buy, sell & crack Pecans.
: Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896.


460 Firewood

It's Getting Colder,! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 ri
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.
REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
wwwlakecityreporter.com


1 'AhUnifurnished
30 HonmeFor Rent .
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
S. 386-752-3225 '
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace;
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
For Rent with Option to Buy. :-
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On: the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494 .
SWMH 2/2.in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
. 386-365-1243or 965-7534

750 Business &
750 DOffice Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' S450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' S2973/mth
8300 sq' S55533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll;free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172


820 Farms &
O2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 ww.w.landnfl.com


870 Real Estate
Wanted


I Buy Houses
CASH!
. Quick Sale Fair Price
; 386-269-0605


V*


Lake City Reporter



















Bring the picture in or
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with a description and photo in the
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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton. metal work
shelves/Aadder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
S Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $1 5.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


T Get cYour


^SELL I


FSIND T


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