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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01742
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 4, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01742
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






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Reporter


Wednesday, January 4, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 287 E 75 cents


LIVE OAK


Woman


loses


foot in


hit-run

Motorcyclist who
struck pedestrian
sought by police.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
SUWANNEE COUNTY
The Florida Highway
Patrol is looking for a motor-
cyclist who fled the scene
of an accident that severed
a Tallahassee woman's foot
Monday night.
Connie Denise Harris,
58, of Tallahassee, was
taken to Shands at the
University of Florida after
being struck while trying
to cross U.S. 129 about a
tenth of a mile south of
Interstate 10 at 7:50 p.m.
Lt. Pat Riordan, Florida
Highway Patrol Troop B
public information offi-
cer, said Harris' foot was
severed in the crash.
Authorities at the scene
were not able to locate the
foot, he said.
Harris was attempt-
ing to reach the west side
of U.S. 129 when struck
in the northbound lane.
Authorities are unsure
whether the motorcyclist
continued north on U.S.
129 or got onto Interstate
10.
The motorcycle is
described as black with
raised chrome handlebars,
with possible damage to the
foot peg, fender, exhaust
or undercarriage area. The
rider of the motorcycle was
wearifig dark clothing and
a black helmet.
Anyone with information
about the accident is asked
to contact authorities.


Travel

and learn,

courtesy

Rotary

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
Traveling to a foreign
country and staying with
a host family for an inter-
national exchange program
isn't just for students.
Rotary International's
northwest Florida district
is. looking for young profes-
sionals to travel to Brazil for
an expenses-paid vocational
and cultural exchange pro-
gram.
Professionals ages 25
to 40 have until January
9 to apply for the month-
long program in Santa
Catarina, Brazil. The Rotary
Foundation pays for round-
trip transportation to the
country, while local Rotary
members provide meals,
lodging and area travel.
From May 16 to June 15,
participants will observe
their profession as prac-
ticed in Brazil, develop
professional and personal
TRAVEL continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Chris Finley inspects the 'WWE 12' video game he purchased Tuesday at the Blockbuster video store in Lake City, set to close permanently on Jan. 22. '1
hate that they're leaving,' Finley said.. 'It's been here my whole life. Now there's no movie stores here anymore and that aggravates me.'



Local Blockbuster closing



its doors for good Jan. 22


Is Lake City's last
remaining walk-in
video rental store.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
After nearly a quarter century in Lake City,
the Blockbuster video store is permanently
closing on Jan. 22.
Store manager Cynthia Cannon said 10
employees, including herself, will lose their jobs
when the store closes. Two Blockbuster kiosks
independently owned and operated at separate
locations in Lake City will remain open.


en .. .
porate officials decided not to renew the lease
or if the building owneTir chose not to offer a
new one.
"All I know is our lease is expiring," Cannon
said. "Our store is considered a busy one.
Nobody was expecting it"
Two calls to' Dish Network, the company
that bought Blockbuster last year, were not
returned Tuesday. But national media reports
said Dish Network announced plans close hun-
dreds of stores when it bought Blockbuster,
which was sold after it filed for Chapter 11
bankruptcy.
The store stopped renting videos on Dec.
27 and is holding a liquidation sale of its
entire inventory and that means every-


I .'. . deep discounts on
y viewed rental and
new viweozs Lu ..... -J display racks that
hold merchandise.
Cannon said many of the regular customers
who rent videos at the store are upset about
losing the only walk-in video store in the city.
"There's nothing good to say about it,"
Cannon said. "Customers aren't reacting well,
at all. But we're going to serve our customers
until the end."
Blockbuster offers one month of free movie
rentals for customers who sign up at the com-
pany's website, but Cannon said any custoniers
who come to her store before it closes can get
two free months of free mail-in movie rentals.
CLOSING continued on 3A


Giving it
a whirl
Edward Gardner,
17, the Columbia
High School JROTC
Exhibition Team
commander, tries to
keep his composure
as he spins a rifle
with both hands.
'The hardest thing
to do is to keep
a straight face,'
Gardner said.


County PWD hurt in hunting accident


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man, accidentally shot while
dove hunting, was able to drive himself to a
local hospital with shotgun pellets in his hand.
Kevin D. Kirby, 39, of Lake City, was treated
and released from the Lake City Medical
Center fo injuries he suffered in the weekend


accident Kirby is the Columbia County public
works director.
According to Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission reports, Kirby
drove himself to the hospital with the injuries
around 6:08 p.m. Saturday.
The Columbia County Sheriff's Office was
then notified about the shooting.
"The Columbia County Sheriff's Office noti-


fied us when Kirby went to the hospital and
that's when we started our investigation," said
Karen Parker, FWC spokesperson. "We are
investigating the incident, but we're not plan-
ning on filing any charges. Fortunately, he was
not badly injured and from what I understand,
he hunted the next day."
HUNTING continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


53 30
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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012

Celebrity Birthdays


FLORIDA"
10 0 Saturday:
--cr 11-22-29-34-44-46
x3


A$H 3je Tuesday: 1 Tuesday:
,_.. Afternoon: 8-1-8 l Afternoon: 6-2-5-9


* Monday:
8-13-29-32-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



American Idol' finalist marries


SANTA CRUZ, Calif
A A merican Idol finalist'
James Durbin has mar-
ried longtime girlfriend
Heidi Lowe in a New .
ear's Eve ceremony at
the edge of a California redwood for-
est.
The couple says in a statement
that the wedding in a Santa Cruz
Mountains chapel was a perfect way to
kick off 2012.
The Contra Costa Tunes reports
the 85 guests included their 2-year-old
son, Hunter, who was the ring bearer.
Other guests included fellow
"American Idol" alums Haley Reinhart,
Stefano Langone and Casey Abrams.
The "Idol" season 10 finalist turns
23 on Friday. His debut album,
"Memories of a Beautiful Disaster,"
was released in November.
Durbin is from nearby Santa Cruz.

Bonnie Raitt preps first
album in seven years
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Bonnie Raitt
is releasing a new album in 2012, her
first in seven years.
"Slipstream," out April 10, follows a
long break from studio work for the
Grammy-winning Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame member. She lost her parents,
her brother and her best friend.
"I hadn't stopped moving in a very
long time so I really wanted to take
a total break and not concentrate- on
making a new record or what I was
going to do next," Raitt said. "So that
was really valuable because I waited
until I was really ready to come back."
"Slipstream" is the 62-year-old
slide guitarist's first album since
2005's "Souls Alike" and will be the
first release on her own record label,
Redwing Records. The 12-track album
will feature four songs recorded with
producer Joe Henry and his musi-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
"American Idol" finalist James Durbin has married longtime girlfriend Heidi Lowe in'
a New Year's Eve ceremony.


cians, which she describes as experi-
merital. The remainder of the album is
self-produced with her touring band.
She says she's thrilled with the
resulting eclectic mix of blues, rock
and soul that even includes a dash
of reggae and Celtic sounds. She
covers Bob Dylan's "Million Miles"
and "Standing in the Doorway," and
Loudon Wainwright 'Is "You Can't
Fail Me Now" as well.
"Ifs just a new batch of great.
songs," Raitt said.

Backers of millionaire
tax target Kardashian
SACRAMENTO, Calif. Kimr
Kardashian, the model who has par-
layed reality TV fame into a personal
fortune for her family and herself, is


the target of a new online advertis-
ing campaign asking Californians to
support a proposed ballot initiative
to raise taxes on its wealthiest resi-
dents.
An online video from the Courage
Campaign flashes images of
Kardashian living the good life and'
proclaiming that "being on TV has
changed my life, because you get
lots of free stuff."
The video says Kardashian made
$12 million in 2010 but paid just 1
percentage point more in California
income taxes than someone mak-
ing $47,000 10.3 'percent vs. 9.3
percent.
The video ad, which is posted
,at www.Taxkimk.com, urges
Kardashian to support the proposal
for a tax increase.


(AP)


Football Hall-of-Fame
coach Don Shula is 82.
Actress Dyan Cannon
is 75.
Country singer Patty
Loveless is 55.
M Rock singer Michael
Stipe is 52.
Actor Dave Foley is


Actress Julia Ormond
is 47.
Country singer Deana
Carter is 46.
Rock musician
Benjamin Darvill (Crash
Test Dummies) is 45.


Daily Scripture

"For- the grace of God has
appeared that offers salva-
tion to all people. It teaches
us to say 'No' to ungodliness
and worldly passions, and to
live self-controlled, upright and
godly lives in this present age,"

Titus 2:11-12 NIV


Lake Citq
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation..*.............755-5445
Online... www.Iakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodic postage paid atLake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
SThe Assoc:are-: Press.
All material herein Is propertyof.the Lake
City Reponer Reproductlon' in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of tIe publisher. U.S. Postal Service
1No 310-880
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
Io Lake City Reporter, PO Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com),
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
-(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
,CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad; call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 am.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery, or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ................755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks .....:..............$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks:..................$82.80
52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
spa .e7Aid thanks'for reading.
~ ~ 9't~ri/l ^ 'l~ >'iii';,'^.1 ,,'....


Scott panel can't
compare' hospitals
TALLAHASSEE A
panel appointed by Gov.
Rick Scott, who once
headed the nation's largest
for-profit hospital chain,
told him on Tuesday that it
could not determine wheth-
er Florida's public hospitals
provide better or worse
care than private ones.
A study commissioned
by the seven-member
Commission on Review of
Taxpayer Funded Hospital,
Districts said it was difficult
to compare the quality of
care at various types of
hospitals because they are
very diverse and have com-
plex business models.
The commission noted
a third of Florida's pub-,
licly owned hospitals are
in rural areas that have too
few patients to generate
data comparable to urban
hospitals.
The report did conclude
that patient expenses are
up to 12 percent higher in
public hospitals. A public
hospital economist attribut-
ed the difference largely to
Miami's Jackson Memorial
Hospital.
Scott created the panel
last March to determine
if it's in the public's best
interest to continue having.
government-operated hos-
pitals.
Florida has 30 active hos-
pital districts but only 16
have the authority to levy
taxes or receive tax money.

Blow to advocates
for old, disabled
WEST PALM BEACH
- A federal judge struck a
blow Tuesday to advocates
for the elderly and disabled,
removing class-action sta-
tus from a lawsuit that had
argued Florida illegally
forces people into nursing
homes when they are capa-
ble of living elsewhere.
U.S. District Judge
Robert Hinkle ruled in favor


of one of the institutional-
ized Medicaid patients who
sued the state of Florida in
2008, saying they should be
allowed to live in other set-
tings. But by removing the
suit's class status, the ruling
applies to just one person,
Clayton Griffin, instead
of the 8,500 plaintiffs esti-
mated by attorneys to be in ,
a similar situation.
"It is a limited victory,"
said David Bruns, a spokes-
man for AARP, the nonprofit
group for those 50 and
-over which took up the
case up on the behalf of the
plaintiffs. Southern Legal
. Counsel also joined AARP
in that action.
Filed just shy of four
years ago and argued in
court early last year, the
lawsuit has dragged on so
long that of the original,
seven plaintiffs, five have
died. A sixth, according to
the judge's written decision,
said he no longer wished to
leave a nursing home after
relatives moved away.
Because of that, Hinklde
vacated the class action he
previously had granted, also
citing changes to the state
Medicaid program have'
ensured people can avoid
nursinghomes if they wish.

Bear-proof
garbage cans
FORT WALTON BEACH
Florida wildlife officials
have proposed a pilot proj-
ect for bear-proof garbage
cans in one Panhandle
county.
If approved by Okaloosa
County commissioners, the
six-month program would
be funded with a $30,000
grant from the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
One of the agency's
biologists, Adam Warwick,
tells the Northwest Florida
Daily News that the grant
could pay for 700 to 1,000
reinforced garbage cans
in a neighborhood where
many bear incidents are


reported.
At the end of the six
months, residents can
opt to keep the cans for a
monthly fee.
State and local officials
are discussing which neigh-
borhood will test the cans.

Historic Miami
firehouse restored
MIAMI A historic
Miami firehouse that'
has been abandoned for
more than 20 years will be
rebuilt and restored.
Preservationists say Fire
Station No. 2 is one of the
best remaining examples
of Mediterranean Revival
architecture in an early
Miami civic building.
Preservationists tell
The Miami Herald that
the firehouse's twisted
columns, wrought-iron
window grilles and balcony
railings were characteristic
of the 1920s real-estate
boom. It was designed by
August Geiger and is on
the National Register of
Historic Places.
The building has long
stood roofless, neglected
and damaged by vagrants
and the elements.

White powder
found in letter
WEST PALM BEACH
- Authorities are trying
to determine whether any
dangerous substance was
contained in a white pow-
der found in a letter at the
Palm Beach County State
Attorney's Office.
Three people who work
in or near the office's
mailroom were exposed
to the substance Tuesday
morning.
City spokesman Chase
Scott says they've com-
plained of headaches and
nausea. The three workers
were taken to the hospital
along with a firefighter
who reported possible car-
diac problems.
(AP)


THE WEATHER



SUNNY MOSTLY", MOSTLY PARTLY;
SUNNY SUNNY, CLOUDY


HI LO H HI. 10 HI LO H17.:L041


- .. ,,.. -


Pensacola
56,/45


Valdosta
52/33
Tallahassee Lake City
53 32 53.30
S Gainesville *
Panama City 54 30
55/43 Ocala
55/31


Tampa S
58/42


- JacksoIIV Cape Canaveral
54/32 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
5 736 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
58.3-7 59,.'41 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala


63/44 0 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 64/49 Pensacola
63, 40 0 Naples Tallahassee
62/43 Mimi Tampa
64/49 Valdosta
Key60/56West* W. Palm Beach


TEMPERATURES
Higr Tuesday
Low Tuesdiay
Normal hign
Normal lov..
Pecord high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


S46
29
66
43
84 in 1947
15 In 1928


0.00"
0.06"
0.06"
0.30"
0.30"


SUN
Sunrise today 7:27 a.m.
Sunset today 5:43 p.m.
Sunrise torn. 7:28 a.m.
Sunset tom. 5:44 p.m.

MOON
Moonnse today 2:03 p.m.
Moonset today 3:18 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 2:47 p.m.
Moonset tom. 4:12 a.m.


0
Jan.
9
Full


30
Jan. Jan. Jan.
16 23 30
Last New First


wea


-M
7a Ip 7p la 6a On this date in
.;. Wednesday Thursday 1990, a winter
storm moving out'
of the southwest-
ern U.S. spread
? i heavy snow across
Nebraska and Iowa
.:'.. i- into Wisconsin.
0..0/ Snowfall totals in
: Iowa ranged up
e_,r e to 11 inches at
SCarlisle.
-- -.ed- e j


4

45nmiumesb bm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


Thursday Friday


66/49/s
64/45/s
69. 53 s
68, 49,'s
65 37i,.
63/37/s
68/59/s
65 36 s
69.53,s
66/48 s
66/40/s
66 46/s
62.,49 s
65.. 47. pcr
63i 37/s
68/50/s
60.'34's
66 48 s


68/50/s
68/48/s
73/57..s
73/52. s
67/43, s
65/43/s
71/61/s
67 43,'s
73.'57. s
71./s 's
68/4 5/s
71/50's
66' 56.:pc
68, 56 pc
68,47/s
70/53/s
65,4J!s
71 '53. s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


k weatnecomj

Forecasts, data and
p Y graphics 02012 Weather
\ Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
3tPe Y www.weatherpublisher.conm




Get Connected

1111


...AROUND FLORIDA


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IOWA CAUCUSES



At last, opening night for GOP race


By DAVID ESPO and
THOMAS BEAUMONT
Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa Republicans
rendered the first verdict in the 2012
race for the White House on Tuesday
in Iowa caucuses from Adel to Zearing,
opening night for the campaign to pick
a challenger to President Barack Obama
in the fall.
Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney, Texas Rep. Ron Paul and for-
mer Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum
shared the straw poll ballot with former
House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Texas
Gov. Rick Perry and Minnesota Rep.
Michele Bachmann in a caucus race as
jumbled as any in the 40 years since
Iowa gained the presidential campaign
lead-off position.
The winner was in line for bragging
rights and perhaps much more as the
Republican nominating campaign makes
the turn to primaries in New Hampshire
on Jan. 10, then South Carolina and Florida
before the end of January. For some of the
also-rans, history suggested the first event
of the year might also be their last.
As the caucuses began, an entrance
survey of early arrivers suggested that
Romney, Paul and Santorum were in the
top tier of vote getters.
About a third of early arrivers said they
most wanted a candidate who could defeat
Obama, while about a quarter said their
top priority was selection of a true con-
servative. Slightly more than one in five of
those who completed the survey question-
naire said the most important factor for
them was backing a candidate with strong
moral character.
The economy and the federal budget
deficit were top issues for caucus attend-
ees, more important than abortion or
health care.
The survey by Edison Media Research
for The Associated Press and television
networks was based on interviews with
more than 600 people arriving at nearly 40
precinct caucuses across the state.
Obama was unopposed for the
Democratic nomination. Even so, his re-
election campaign set up eight offices
across Iowa, made hundreds of thousands
of calls to voters and arranged a video con-
ference with caucus night supporters.
'"This time out is going to be in some
ways more important than the first time,"
the president told Democrats across the
state. "Change is never easy."
The Iowa caucuses' outsized importance
was underscored by the estimated $13 mil-
lion in television advertising by the candi-
dates and so-called super PACs as well as
thousands of campaign stops designed to
sway 100,000 or so voters.
Ironically, the weak economy that has


made Obama appear vulnerable nation-
ally was muted as an issue here. Despite
areas of economic distress, the farm econ-
omy is strong. Iowa's unemployment in
November was 5.7 percent, sixth lowest
in the country and well below the national
reading of 8.6 percent
Despite its importance as the lead-off
state, Iowa has a decidedly uneven record
when it comes to predicting national win-
ners. It sent Obama on his way in 2008,
but eventual Republican nominee John
McCain finished a distant fourth here to
former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.
Even before Tuesday night's results
were known, this year's Republican hope-
fuls were turning their attention to the next
contests. Romney's campaign purchased
time to run television ads in Florida, where
balloting is three weeks distant Aides said
the Gingrich campaign had purchased a
full-page newspaper ad in New Hampshire
for Wednesday morning calling Romney a
'Timid Massachusetts Moderate."
Romney, who finished second in Iowa in
2008 despite a costly effort, initially cam-
paigned cautiously this time around.
But he barnstormed extensively across
the state in the race's final days in pursuit
of a first-place finish, running as a conser-
vative businessman with the skills to fix
the economy and as the challenger with
the best chance to defeat Obama.
Santorum, Gingrich, Perry and
Bachmann argued that Romney wasn't
nearly conservative, enough on the econ-
omy and social issues such as abortion.
They vied for months to emerge as the
alternative to the former Massachusetts
governor.
Paul's libertarian-leaning views set him
apart, and he hoped that might be enough
to claim victory in a six-way race where no
one broke away from the pack.
Unlike in a primary, in which voting
occurs over hours, the 809 Iowa caucus-
es were meetings in which Republicans
gathered for an evening of politics. Each
presidential candidate was entitled to
have a supporter deliver a speech on his
or her behalf before straw ballots were
taken.
Under party rules, caucus results have
no control over the allocation of Iowa's
25 delegates to the Republican National
Convention. The Associated Press uses
the caucus outcome to calculate the num-
ber each candidate would win if his sup-
port remained unchanged in the pre-con-
vention months.
The race in Iowa came to be defined by
its unpredictability as the months rolled by
and nationally televised candidate debates
piled up.
Bachmann gained early momentum on
the strength of a victory in a summertime
straw poll and a feisty debate perfor-
mance.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Jan. 3, 2008 file photo, Republican presidential hopeful former Arkansas Gov. Mike
Huckabee, left, is joined by his wife Janet as he addresses a victory party in Des Moines,
Iowa, after being declared the winner of the Iowa Caucus. Sen. John McCain, who won the
party nomination, ended up fourth. The Iowa caucuses draw outsized attention from politi-
cians and the news media because they are first and can put a symbolic political wind behind
the sails of the top finishers, making them more attractive not only to voters but also to donors
who finance campaigns.


But she quickly faltered when Perry
joined the race and overshadowed her as
the 10-year governor of Texas with deep-
pocketed supporters and an unbroken
record of electoral success at home.
Perry's rise lasted only as long as a
couple of debates including one where
he memorably was unable to recall the
third of three federal agencies he' wanted
to abolish.
Next up was Herman Cain, a black
former businessman who improbably
shot to the top of the polls in a party
that draws its support chiefly from white
voters. He suspended his candidacy a
few weeks later, after a woman said she
and he had carried on a long-term extra-
marital affair.
Gingrich rode the next surge in the
polls, a remarkable comeback for a man
whose campaign had imploded earlier in


2011 when most of his aides quit in frustra-
tion. But his rise lasted only until a super
PAC that supports Romney began attack-
ing him on television.
Enter Paul, and Santorum, both cam-
paigning widely across the state and hop-
ing to have the last say.
Democrats watched carefully in a state
that has swung between the two parties in
recent presidential elections.
It'was Iowa that launched Obama on the
way to the White House four years ago
when he won a convincing victory in the
caucuses.
The state's lead-off spot has been a
fixture for decades. Democrats moved
the caucuses up to early January in 1972,
and Republicans followed suit four years
later.

David Espo reported from Washington.


K.C. Trowell appointed new

president of Columbia Bank


The Board of Directors of Columbia
Bank has announced the appointment
of K.C. Trowell as President, Chief
Executive Officer and Director of the
Board. ,
"The appointment of someone with
KC. Trowell's background and experi-
ence represents Columbia Bank's com-
mitment to being the premier commu-
nity bank in Lake City," said Lester Scaff,
Chairman of the Board of Directors.
'Trowell's knowledge of the local mar-
ket; long-standing, customer relation-
ships; and proven leadership capabilities
make him uniquely qualified for this
position."
With more than 30 years of banking
leadership in Lake City, Trowell is best
known for organizing and leading CNB
National Bank from its opening in April
1986 with only $2 million initial capital to
more than $850 million in assets when it
merged with the South Financial Group
in 2004. CNB was publicly traded on
the NASD exchange from 1999 until the
merger.


"It is my privilege to join a bank that
is truly a mainstay in the community,"
Trowell said. "Columbia Bank is well-
capitalized with assets of more than
$225 million and has
four convenient bank-
ing locations. Going
forward, we will be
adding staff, especially
loan officers; and, will
have a reputation for
developing genuine
Trowell relationships with our
customers through
hard work, loyalty and straightforward-
ness."
Columbia Bank is the second old-
est locally owned community bank in
Florida, and in February will celebrate
its 100th anniversary.
"The bank has survived tough times
including the Great Depression," Trowell
said. "We are committed to making sure
Columbia Bank is here for the next 100
years, serving our customers and our
community."


CLOSING: Local Blockbuster store
Continued From Page 1A


Cannon said customers who take advan-
tage of the offer can get videos mailed
directly to their homes. The service is
similar to those offered by competitors
such as Netflix.
"It's something to give them an option
since we won't be here," she said. "They
can only get the two free months if they
come to the store and sign up."
Carol Artley, of Lake City, is one of the
customers who visited the store Tuesday
to look for bargains.
"I'm sorry to see them close," she said.
"I like to look and pick out my movies. I
hate to see another business go down."
Brittany Coleman said she has rented


videos at the store as long as she can
remember and hasn't decided how she will
rent videos now.
"I was shocked because it's the only
one [video rental store] in Lake City," she
said. "I might go to the boxes. That's one
option."
Lana Jones is another city resident who
is uncertain what she will do once the
store closes. She knows there are other
ways to rent videos, but it's not the same
as shopping in the store.
"I like to go up and down the aisles and
look," she said. "It's kind of sad. I don't
understand it It's another empty build-
ing."


HUNTING: County PWD hit in hand
Continued From Page 1A

The accident occurred on private land hand at the hospital.
on State Road 47, near Columbia City, "It was just somebody in the same field
while Kirby was dove hunting. at the same time," Parker said, noting
Reports said Kirby was downrange when she did not know whether Kirby and the
he was hit by pellets from another hunter. shooter were hunting together.
Several pellets were removed from Kirby's


TRAVEL: Rotary exchange program
Continued From Page 1A

relationships, and learn about the county's Catarina, a state in southern Brazil, is
institutions and ways of life. urban and modern with many Italian and
Participants travel in small groups with German immigrants.
a Rotary leader. Applicants should have at "We've had people from our area go
least two years of experience in their field. there and they just brag about what a great
Applicants cannot be Rotary members, the experience it is," Logan said.
spouse of a Rotary member or the blood Logan said those who submit an applica-
relative of a Rotary member, tion are likely to be selected for the pro-
Thomas Logan, Lake City Rotary Club gram. For more information or an applica-
international service director, said Santa tion contact Logan at (386) 697-3041.



Columbia County's Most Wanted I


t.. j


Amanda Michelle
Gill
DOB: 12/1/80
Height: 5' 3"
Weight: 180 lbs.
Hair: Brown
Eyes: Brown
Wanted For: Passing a
Worthless Check


4

A'


Sierra Lashae
Jones
DOB: 5/27/85
Height: 5' 3"
Weight: 155 lbs.
Hair: Black
Eyes: Brown
Wanted For: VOP Grand
Theft III


WANTED AS OF 1/2/2012
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.


I I7I CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
SCOlUMBIA COUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 4. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Wednesday, January 4, 2012


ONE


ONE
OPINION



China's


space


odyssey

China is pressing
forward with plans
to land a man on the
moon. The United
States, meanwhile,
cannot even get an astronaut
into space without hitching a
ride.
Last week, Beijing released a
white paper titled "China's Space
Activities in 2011," which outlines
the People's Republic of China's
new five-year plan for space.
Beijing seeks to "push forward
the comprehensive, coordinated
and sustainable development .
of China's space industry," one
aspect of which is to conduct
studies "on the preliminary plan
for a human lunar landing."
These will include launching
unmanned craft into lunar orbit,
practicing unmanned lunar land-
ings, exploring the moon's sur-
face and bringing samples back
to Earth.
Beijing is a relatively new
entrant into the manned-space-
flight arena but has made signifi-
cant progress since 2003, when
Yang Lwei became the first
taikonaut to reach Earth's orbit
Since then, China has tested/
docking mechanisms, launched
two successful lunar probes and
sent taikonauts on spacewalks.
The Chinese Communist Party
sees space exploration, and in
particular manned space flight,
as a critical component of eco-
nomic progress and national
achievement
Beijing's optimism for manned
space flight contrasts with the
sagging U.S. space program. In
July, during the final space-shut-
tie mission, the Atlantis touched
down on the 42nd anniversary
of mankind's first steps on the
moon. American astronauts now
have to buy seats on Russian
rockets to reach the International
Space Station.
Today, America lacks that
type of visionary leadership.
If the United States somehow
does reach Mars sometime
in the 2030s, it will not be
because of anything Mr. Obama
has done. The way things are
going, our astronauts on the
red planet will be greeted by a
Chinese welcoming party.
N Washington Post

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is published
with pride for residents of Columbia and
surrounding counties by Community
Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers get
things done!"
Our primary goal is to pubish
distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LET
PO


TERS
LICY


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for .
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


I've been giving myself
what my mother used to
call a good "talking to."
It's a kind of pep talk to
remind me to count my
blessings, when all I want to do
is crawl up under the porch with
the dogs and cry.
No, I don't mean that literally.
It's a figure of speech. I don't
own a dog. Or have a porch it
could crawl under. If I did, we
might both be under it tonight.
The "talking to" is a simple
matter of naming things for
which I'm thankful. It allows
me to refocus my thoughts
from false to true; my feelings
from sad to glad; and my heart
from empty to overflowing.
Usually, it works like a
charm. Tonight, not so much.
I started the "talk" about
an hour ago, the minute I
dropped my kids at the airport.
They had been visiting my
husband and me for the past
three days my youngest, his
sweet wife and their 18-month-
old redheaded Firecracker. We
talked and laughed and ate,
watched a lot of bad TV, spent
hours chasing the Firecracker,
did everything possible to
have a great time, and still, I
wanted more.
But tonight, they had to fly
back to California. So I drove
them to the airport, kissed
them each several times, and
nearly swooned when the
Firecracker kissed me back.
Then I waved goodbye, drove
away dry-eyed and began giv-
ing thanks:
That my husband and I
are blessed to have children
(his two, my three, their others
and three grandchildren) who


www.lakecityreporter.com


SRWMD addresses water


issues in cost-effective way


Over the past sev-
eral years, the
Suwannee River
Water Management
District has adapted
to difficult and changing eco-
nomic times by refocusing our
human and financial resources
solely on our core mission.
- water supply, water quality,
flood protection and natural
resource protection. That effort
has served the District and its
citizens well.
As a diligent steward of tax-
payer dollars, the District has
tightened its belt, readjusted ,
priorities, eliminated non-criti-
cal staff positions, sought out-
sourcing where it made sense,
downsized or cut programs that
didn't meet our core mission
principals, acquired funding
through grants and partner-
ships, and generally found ways
to do more with less.
For example, this past year
the District completed its water
supply assessment study and
designated four water resource


Donald J. Quincey Jr.


caution areas in an effort to
ensure adequate groundwa-
ter resources to meet future
demands for the next 20 years.
1. The.District embarked on
a joint regional water supply
plan with neighboring St Johns
River Water Management
District to develop and imple-
ment a minimum flows and
levels prevention and recovery
strategy when withdrawals in
one district contribute to water
resource impacts in the other
district.
This landmark agreement is
vital to successfully addressing
future protection of our rivers,


lakes, springs and natural sys-
tems.
We also strengthened our
partnership with the state of
Georgia, where roughly 55
percent of the Suwannee River
Basin is located.
The District has accom-'
plished much but there is still
so much left to do. Fiscal chal-
lenges will not dampen the
District's determination to "get
the water right"
Losing our springs and other
precious water resources is
.not an option, and with the
continued support of the *
Legislature and the Department
of Environmental Protection,
the District will continue to find
innovative, cost-effective ways
to meet the needs of its citizens
while protecting our environ-
ment

* Donald J. Quincey Jr. is
chairman of the Suwannee
River Water Management
District Governing Board.


ANO
VI


Sharon Randall
wwwshoronrandollcom


seem to like us well enough to
visit when they can, and not just
because we live in Las Vegas.
That while we couldn't all
be together for Christmas, we
saw everyone at some point,
except my daughter and her
husband and their 4-month-
old, and I'll see them soon,
Lord willing.
That there are only 500
miles between us and our
offspring, and not the conti-
nent that I wedged between
my mother and me and the
grandchildren she adored, but
seldom saw.
That the driver of the SUV
who honked rather rudely
when I accidentally cut in front
of him on the freeway didn't
run me off the road or shoot
me.
That toddlers don't care
how much you spend on
them for Christmas. The
Firecracker's favorite things
were a tube of tennis balls
that we dumped out and he
refilled countless times; chas-
ing pigeons off the lawn; piling
gravel on the walk and laugh-
ing hysterically each time I
brushed it off; and helping
me open and read a stack of
reader mail (thank you very
much.)
That there are people I


have never met who are not
only kind enough to read my
work, but care enough to send
best wishes for the new year
to me and my family, including
the Firecracker who ripped
open their cards.
That one of the best things
about being a grandparent
is watching your child be a
parent and having him ask,
"Mom, was I like that when I
was his age?"
That one of the best things
about being married is watch-
ing your husband dance like
Baloo the Bear while your
grandson bangs on the bongo
drums.
Those were just a few of
the gifts I named driving back
from the airport. They helped.
A lot.
Then I got home and found
in the kitchen sink the "spork"
- a combination spoon and
fork the Firecracker used to
push food around on his high-
chair tray to pretend he had
actually eaten it.
It's funny how a little piece
of plastic and metal can make
you forget all about being
thankful.
Pretty soon, Baloo was ask-
ing, "Are you OK?"
"I am," I said, "or will be."
Then I went back to giving
thanks for all good things -
good health, good husbands,
good children, good readers -
and the fact that soon I'll go to
California, to see my daughter
and her family, and give the
Firecracker his spork.

E Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


4A


THEIR
EW


EEOC

limits job

creation

The Obama admin-
istration is float-
ing the idea that
requiring a high-
school diploma
for a job can be an illegal act
of discrimination. No wonder
employers are refusing to hire.
An "informal discus-
sion letter" from the Equal
Employment Opportunity
Commission (EEOC) posted
Dec. 1 argues that people
with learning disabilities who
don't obtain diplomas face
discrimination if businesses
use the diploma as a way to
screen job applicants. The
EEOC says this is a viola-
tion of the Americans with
Disabilities Act. Faced with
having committed this crime,
employers will only be safe
if they "can demonstrate that
the diploma requirement is
job-related and consistent
with business necessity."
Part of the problem is
knowing what a high-school
diploma actually equips
graduates to do. The public-
education system is more
concerned with turning out
a student with politically-cor-
rect attitudes and an inflated
sense of entitlement rather
than relevant job skills.
Requiring an applicant to
have a diploma is simply a
means of identifying people
who have demonstrated the
, ability to show up. Most
employers would probably :
have a hard time articulat-
ing exactly what they expect
when they require a diploma,
much less be able to convince
a skeptical bureaucrat that it
is "consistent with business
necessity."
The EEOC posits that even
if a company can convince the
government, after much time
and expense, that a diploma
requirement is necessary, "the
employer may still have to
determine whether a particular
applicant whose learning disabil-
ity prevents him from.meeting it
can perform the essential func-
tions of the job, with or without.
a reasonable accommodation."
If a business owner cannot
demonstrate and document that
he went through this analytical
process for every applicant who
doesn't have a diploma, and who
claims to have a learning dis-
ability, then the business is in
jeopardy.
After presenting its convo-
luted argument, the EEOC
notes, 'The employer is not
required to prefer the applicant
with a learning disability over
other applicants who are better
qualified." However, a person
who has a diploma and isn't
hired has no legal recourse,
while the purportedly learn-
ing-disabled nongraduate has
legions of bureaucrats and
government lawyers ready to
make life difficult for the small-
business owner who has the
impertinence to judge them
"less qualified."
This EEOC discourse is
particularly ill-timed. The glut
of unemployed and discour-
aged workers places the least
qualified at an even greater
competitive disadvantage.
There are ample numbers at
the low end of the education
spectrum looking for work, but
this new EEOC thinking will
make life even harder for them
as businesses weigh whether
considering new hires is worth
the risk.
On Dec. 15, the EEOC
announced the launch of a
small-business task force to try
to assist corporate compliance
with ever-expanding, more com-
plex and more threatening fed-
eral regulations. Business own-
ers should be afraid the federal


task force is coming to help.

* Washington Post


Giving myself a good talking to












Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4. 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Jan. 4

Blue/Grey meeting

Olustee meeting
The Blue/Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Jan. 4
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Newcomers
Friendship Luncheon

The January
Friendship Luncheon
of The Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be at Casa Del Sol
on US 90 on January
4th at 11:30 a.m. All
members, guests and
friends are welcome. For
more information call
Rose Taylor at 755-2175
or Barbara Test 754-
7227.

Revival

Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church, Ft.
White, Rev. Donnell
Sanders, Pastor.
Revival, January 3-5,
7:30 pm nightly.
Revivalist: Rev. Dr.
Larry T. Walthour of St.
Andrew M.B. Church,
Opa Locka, Fla.
For more information
call Ora Enman 386-497-
2254


Jan. 5

Revival

Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church, Ft.
White,_Rev. Donnell
Sanders, Pastor.
Revival, January 3-5,
7:30 pm nightly.
Revivalist: Rev. Dr.
Larry T. Walthour of St.
Andrew M.B. Church,
Opa Locka, Fla.
For more information
call Ora Enman 386-497-
2254


CHS MATH rally

Columbia High School
is hosting a Math Pep
Rally in
in the school auditorium
from 6 to 8:00 p.m. on
Thursday
January 5. The aim of
the rally is to "fire up"
students who have 80
days to prepare for the
End of Course exam in
algebra.


Jan. 8

134th church
anniversary

The New Mt. Pisgah
A.M.E Church, 345 NE
Washington St., church
family invites you to
share in our 134th
church anniversary on
Sunday Jan. 8 at 4 p.m.
The speaker will be the
Rev. Lantz Mills of New
Day Spring Day Church
and the theme is faith,
hope and love.

Friends of the Library
Author Program

Sunday, January 8,
at 2:00 pm at the Main
Library:
Dante Amodeo,
author of Saban and
the Ancient Dante
Amodeo was born in
New York and raised
on a farm. He moved


to
Florida as a teenager
and now lives in
Jacksonville Beach.
His book, Saban
and the Ancient was
awarded first prize in
the action/adventure
category by


POW (Promoting
Outstanding Writers),
and his first script was
made into the
2010 NBC made-
for-television movie
Secrets of the
Mountain.

http://www.

danteamodeo.com/


Jan. 9

Women's Cancer
Support Group

The Women's Cancer
Support Group of
Lake City will meet at
Baya Pharmacy East,
780 SE Baya Drive
from 5:30 to 6:30 PM
on Monday, January.
9, 2012. Our guest
speaker, Dr. Paul G.
Goetowski, Community
Cancer Center, will be
discussing "Women's
Cancer in 2012".
Information at 386-752-
4198 or 386-755-0522.

Jan. 11

Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon

The regular meeting
of the Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be held at 11:00
a.m. on Wednesday, Jan.
11th at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a
fun day.


Jan. 13


Revival


Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet

Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan.
13 at 7 p.m. until. For
ticket info contact Chris
Mirra at 386-623-3611 or
Dennis Murphy at 386-
697-3739.

Jan. 14

North Florida Writers
Group meets

Love to write? From
novice to published
author, the North
Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is
the place where local
writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire.
Writers of any
experience level from
the area are welcome
to join us Saturday,
January 14, 2012, 2pm
- 4pm, at the Columbia
County Public Library,
Main Branch, 308 NW
Columbia Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055. Join .us
Saturday and see what
we are all about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so
please reserve your spot
today!
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Leader,
(386) 438-3610.
Email inquiries to:
editor@afinaldraft.com

Revival


Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan. 13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program

On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this
memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited .to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
lives forever in our
hearts. Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 p.
m, at Trinity United
Methodist Church.
Glynnell Presley,
Secretary
John F. Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO


Revival

Revival at First Full
Gospel Church with Rev.
Jay Walden Jan.-13, 14,
15, 7 p.m. Sunday, 11
a.m., 6 p.m. U.S. 90 West
to Jones Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.


Jan 18


Olustee meeting


The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.


Jan. 19


Voices that Change

Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet
facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit
for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.


Jan. 20

Community Concerts

Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.

communityconcerts.info.


Jan. 24

Friends of the Library
Author Program

Tuesday, January 24,
2012 at 7:00 pm at the
Main Library, sponsored
by Save Our Suwannee:
Cynthia Barnett, author
of Mirage: Florida and
the Vanishing Water of
the Eastern U.S.
and Blue Revolution:
Unmaking America's
Water Crisis
Cynthia Barnett is an
award-winning journalist
and senior writer for
Florida Trend' magazine.
She has a special
interest in
environmental history
and in 2004, spent a year
at the University
of Michigan as a Knight-
Wallace Fellow studying
freshwater supply. Ms.
Barnett will discuss
Florida's water crisis
and look at solutions
that have found success
in communities around
the
world. Don't miss this
timely program on a
topic so very relevant to
Columbia County and
North Central Florida.
Thank you to Save Our
Suwannee and Florida's'
Eden for working with
the Friends of the
Library to bring you this
program.
http://www.
cynthiabarnett.net/



Jan. 29


Friends of the Library
Author Program

,Sunday, January 29, -
2012 at 2:00 pm at the
Main Library: .....
Phyllis Smallman,
author of Margarita
Nights and
Champagne
for Buzzards
Phyllis Smallman is
a Canadian who has
spent a lot of time in
Florida; the setting
for her award-winning
mystery series
featuring
,sassy bartender,
Sherri Travis. A
former potter with a
lifelong love
of mysteries, Phyllis
divides her time
between her native
Ontario and
Sarasota. She will
join us live via Skype
for this program.

http://www.

phyllissmallman.com/




Feb. 1

Blue/Grey meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program

Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year


from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.

Feb. 25

Community Concerts

The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3
p.m. Feb. 25 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. This elite
singing ensemble from
the University of North
Florida performs world
music, vocal jazz, and
other choral gems.
Each singer is chosen
by audition for solo-
quality excellence and
enthusiasm. Award-
winning director Cara
Tasher has served
around the world
as chorus master,
guest conductor,
clinician, and soprano
soloist. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts. info.



March 7

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is having a Wrap-up
meeting 5:30 p.m. March
7 at the Central Building
for the Olustee Festival
2012. The building is
'located at 409 SW St.
Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.

March 9

Community Concerts

Carpe Diem String
Quartet performs 7:30
pm March 9 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Carpe Diem plays their
classical string quartet
repertoire as well as
Gypsy, tango, folk, pop,
rock & jazz. Their 2009
album was Grammy


listed for Best Classical
Album, Best Chamber
Music Performance,
Best New Artist, and
Best Engineered Album-
Classical. We believe
that their electrifying
style will keep you
engaged from beginning
to end. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.

May 20

Community Concerts

The Jacksonville
Symphony Orchestra
performs 3 p.m. May 20
at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. The full
Jacksonville Symphony
Orchestra presents
a rousing "Patriotic
Pops Spectacular"
program featuring
popular works by John
Williams, Gershwin,
Bernstein, Berlin,
Sousa, and other season
favorites. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
comunityconcerts.info

ONGOING

Flag football tryouts

Flag Football, Christ
Central Sports.
Registration now thru
January 13. Age 5-12.
Fee: $40. Call Ronnie for
more info 386-365-2128.

Boys Club winter
program

The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
, program, which runs
through March 1. Fees
are $175, which, includes
transportation from all
elementary and junior
high schools.
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts and crafts,
gamerooms ad special
, events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutorial'
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
available,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones
Way.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE WEDNESDAY JANUARY 4. 2012


Court ponders drug dog's sniff


By CURT ANDERSON
AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI Franky the drug dog's super-
sensitive nose is at the heart of a question
being put to the U.S. Supreme Court: Does
a police K-9's sniff outside a house give
officers the right to get a search warrant for
illegal drugs, or is the sniff itself an uncon-
stitutional search?
Florida's highest state court said Franky's
ability to detect marijuana growing inside a
Miami-area house from outside a closed
front door crossed the constitutional line.
State Attorney General Pam Bondi, an elect-
ed Republican, wants the nation's justices to
reverse that ruling.
The Supreme Court could decide this
month whether to take the case, the latest
in a long line of disputes about whether
the use of dogs to find drugs, explosives
and other illegal or dangerous substances
violates the Fourth Amendment protection
against illegal search and seizure.
Many court watchers expect the justices
will take up the Florida case.
"The Florida Supreme Court adopt-
ed a very broad reading of the Fourth
Amendment that is different from that
applied by other courts. It's an interpreta-
tion that a majority of the U.S. Supreme
Court will question," said Tom Goldstein,
who publishes the widely read SCOTUSblog
website and also teaches at the Harvard and
Stanford law schools.
The case, Florida v. Jardines, is being
closely monitored by law enforcement agen-
cies nationwide, which depend on dogs for a
wide range of law enforcement duties.
"Dogs can be a police officer's best friend
because they detect everything from mari-
juana or meth labs to explosives," said
Kendall Coffey, a former U.S. attorney in
Miami now in private practice. 'They are an
essential tool for law enforcement."
,he 8-year-old Franky retired in June
after a seven-year career as a K-9 dog with
the Miami-Dade Police Department. He's
responsible for the seizure of more than 2.5
tons of marijuana, 80 pounds of cocaine and
$4.9 million in drug-contaminated money.
"He's a friendly, happy dog," said his
former handler, Detective Douglas Bartelt,
who kept Franky after he retired. "People'
'don't have fear because of his appearance."
The U.S. Supreme Court has OK'd drug
dog sniffs in several other major cases. Two
of those involved dogs that detected.drugs '
during routine traffic stops. In another,
a dog hit on drugs in airport luggage. A
fourth involved a drug-laden package in
transit.
The difference in the Florida case is that
it involved a private residence. The high
court has repeatedly emphasized that a
home is entitled to greater privacy than cars
on the road or a suitcase in an airport. In
another major ruling, the justices decided
in 2001 that police could not use thermal
imaging technology to detect heat from
marijuana grow operations from outside-a
home because the equipment could also
detect lawful activity.
"We have said that the Fourth Amendment
draws a firm line at the entrance to the
house," the court ruled in that case, known
as Kyllo v. United States. The justices added
that the thermal devices could detect such
intimate details as "at what hour each night
the lady of the house takes her daily sauna
and bath."
It's well-settled that law enforcement
officials can walk up to a home and knock
on the front door, in hopesithat someone
will open up and talk to them. But if a
person inside refuses the "knock and talk"
effort, the officers must get a search war-
rant and for that they need evidence of
a crime.
On the morning of Dec. 5, 2006, Miami-
Dade police detectives and U.S. Drug
Enforcement Administration agents set up
surveillance outside a house south of the
city after getting an anonymous tip that it
might contain a marijuana grow operation.
Bartelt arrived with Franky and the two
went up to the house, where Franky quickly
detected the odor of pot at the base of the
front door and sat down as he was trained
to do.
That sniff was used to get a search war-
rant from a judge. The house was searched
and its lone occupant, Joelis Jardines, was
arrested trying to escape out the back door.
Officers pulled 179 live marijuana plants
from the house, with an estimated street
value of more than $700,000.
Jardines, now 39, was charged with mari-
juana trafficking and grand theft for stealing
electricity needed to run the highly sophis-
ticated operation. He pleaded not guilty and
his attorney challenged the search, claim-
ing Franky's sniff outside the front door
was an unconstitutional law enforcement
intrusion into the home.
The trial judge agreed and threw out the
evidence seized in the search, but that was
reversed by an intermediate appeals court.
In April a. divided Florida Supreme Court
sided with the original judge.
"There is simply nothing to prevent


agents from applying the procedure in
an arbitrary or discriminatory manner,
or based on whim and fancy, at the home
of any citizen," the Florida court majority
concluded.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami-Dade detective Douglas Bartelt and narcotics detector canine Franky give a demonstration in Miami. Franky's super-sensitive nose
is at the heart of a question being put to the U.S. Supreme Court: Does a police K-9's sniff outside a house give officers the right to get a
search warrant for illegal.drugs, or is it the sniff itself a search that violates the home's sanctity?




Dog joins probe at burnt clinic


By MELISSA NELSON
Associated Press

PENSACOLA Investigators enlist-
ed a chemical-sniffing dog from the
Florida state fire marshal's office on
Tuesday to help determine if a New
Year's blaze at' a Pensacola abortion
clinic was arson.
The two-story clinic that was gutted
by flames early Sunday has been site of
violence and protests for 30 years.
It was bombed on Christmas Day in
1984, and in 1994 a doctor and a volunteer
who escorted patients to and from the
clinic were shot to death as they arrived.
The gunman, Paul Hill, was executed in
2003.
No one was hurt in Sunday's fire, which
was reported around 1 a.m.
The Florida Fire Marshal's Office is
heading the investigation, but the FBI and
the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms
and Explosives have joined in because of
the location of the blaze, said Deborah
Cox, spokeswoman for the marshal's
office.
"Because of the structure that was
involved, because it was an abortion clin-
ic," she said.
Samples of materials that were detect-
ed by the dog during a walkthrough of the
fire site on Tuesday afternoon have been
sent to a lab for analysis, Cox said. Results
could take weeks, she said.
A preliminary investigation found that
the fire began outside the clinic, Cox
said.
Yellow crime scene tape stretched


The American Family Planning Clinic in'Pensacola, Fla., remains closed Monday after being
damaged by fire early Sunday morning. The state fire marshal's office says federal inves-
tigators will join an investigation into the suspicious fire that gutted the Florida Panhandle
abortion clinic.
*


across the front entrance of the charred
American Family Planning clinic Tuesday
morning. The shell of the building con-
cealed the burned-out interior that could
be seen from the back. Investigators said
late Tuesday that the clinic had been
undergoing some renovations before
Sunday's blaze and that paint and other
possibly flammable materials were on site


because of the work.
Clinic officials did not return phone
messages left by The Associated Press
seeking comment about the blaze.
The unassuming house-like structure
fronts a busy street near a major north
Pensacola intersection. Protesters often
gather outside the clinic holding anti-
abortion signs, Bibles or crosses.


__


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428-













Page EdItor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:.30 p.m.
ESPN Orange BowL West Virginia
vs. clneson, at Miami
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p"m.
ESPN2 Duke at Temple
8 p.m.
FSN -Tennessee at Memphis
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 am.
NBCSP '- Dakar Rally. San Juan to
Chileclto,Argendna (delayed tape)
NHL
7:30 p.m.
NBCSP Boston at New Jersey

FOOTBALL

NFL final standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
N.Y.Jets
Miami
Buffalo


y-Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


y-Baltimore
x-Pittsburgh
x-Cincinnati
Cleveland


y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
NATIONAL


East
W L
13 3
8 8
6 10
6 10
South
W L
10 6
9 7
5 II
2 14
North
W L
12 4
12 4
9 7
4 12
West
W L
8 8
8 8
8 8
7 9


TPct PF FPA
0.813513 342
0 .500 377 363
0.375 329 313
0 .375 372 434

T Pct PP PA
0.625 381 278
0.563 325 317
0.313 243 329
0.125 243 430

T Pct PF PA
0.750 378 266
0 .750 325 227
0 .563 344 323
0.250 218 307

T Pct PF PA
0 .500 309 390
0 .500 406 377
0 .500 359 433
0.438 212 338


kL CONFERENCE


East
W L
y-N.Y. Giants 9 7
Philadelphia 8' 8
Dallas 8 8
Washington .5 II
South

yiNew Orleans 13 3
xAtlanta, 10 6
darolinai '6 10
TampaBay 4" .12


T Pct PF PA
0 .563 394 400
0.500 396 328
0 .500 369 347
0 .313 288 367

T Pct PF PA.
0 .813 547 339
0 .625 402 350
0 .375 406 429
0 250 287 494


North
S W LT Pct ,P1' PA
y.Green Bay 15 I 0.938 560 3,9
3Detroit 10 6 0.625 474 387
Chicago 8 8 0.500 353 341.
Minnesota. 3 13 0.188 340449
West
W L TP PF PA
y-San Francisco 13 3 0.813 380 229
Arizona 8 8 0.500312348
Seattle 7 9 0.438 321 315
St-Louis 2 14 0.125,193407
y-division champions
x-wild-card team

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Saturday
Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m. '
Detroit at New Orleans. 8 p.m.
Sunday
Adanta at NewYork Glancs, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Denver, 4 30 p.m
Divisional Playoffs
S' Saturday, Jan. 14
Atlanta. N Y Giants or New Orleans
at San Francisco., 4:30 p m "
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh or Denver at
New England.8 p.m Sunday, Jan 15
S Pittsburgh, Denver br Houston at
"altimore, I p.m .. '
Detroit. Adanta or N.Y. Giants at
Green Bay.,4.30 pm .
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 22
Dvislonal winners
: Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 5

NFL coaching changes

2011 season
SKANSAS CITY- Todd Haley, fired,.
Dec. 12; Romeo Crennel (interim)
JACKSONVILLE-Jack Del Rio, fired,
Nov. 29r,Mel Tucker (interim)
MIAMI -Tony Sparano, fired, Dec. 12;
Todd Bowles (interim)
ST. LOUIS Steve Spagnuolo, fired,
Jan. 2.
S.TAMPA BAY Raheem Morris, fired,


College bowl games

New Mexico Bowl
. Temple 37,Wyoming 15
Famous Idaho-Potato Bowl
: Ohio24, Utah St 23
New Orleans Bowl
'Louisiana-Lafayette 32, San Diego
State 30
Beef'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20,FIU 10
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU 31, Louisiana Tech 24
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 56,Arizona State 24
Hawaii Bowl
Southern Mississippi 24, Nevada 17
Independence Bowl
Missouri 41, North Carolina 24
Uttle Caesars Pizza Bowl
Purdue 37,Western Michigan 32
Belk Bowl
North Carolina State 31, Louisville 24
Military Bowl
Toledo 42,Air Force 41
Holiday Bowl
Texas 21, California 10
Champs Sports Bowl
Florida State 18, Notre Dame 14
Alamo Bowl
Baylor 67,Washington 56
Armed Forces Bowl
BYU 24.Tulsa 21
Pinstripe Bowl.
Rutgers 27, Iowa State 13
Music City Bowl
Mississippi State 23,Wake Forest 17
Insight Bowl
Oklahoma 31, Iowa 14


Meinke Car Care Bowl
Texas A&M 33, Northwestern 22
Sun Bowl
Utah 30, Georgia Tech 27. OT
Uberty Bowl
Cincinnati 31 Vanderthlt 24
Fight Hunger Bowl
Illinois 20, UCLA 14
Chick-fil-A Bowl
Auburn 43,Virginia 24
TicketCity Bowl
Houston 30, Penn State 14
Capital One Bowl
South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
6utback Bowl
Georgia vs. Michigan State
Gator Bowl
Florida 24, Ohio State 17
Rose Bowl
Oregon 45,Wisconsin 38
Fiesta Bowl
Oklahoma State 41, Stanford 38, OT

Tuesday
Sugar Bowl
Michigan vs.Virginia Tech (n)

Today
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestVirginia (9-3) vs. Clemson (10-3).
*8 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday,
Cotton Bowl
AtArlington,Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m.'(FOX)

Saturday
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh.(6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Moblle,Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

FCS championship

Friday
At Pizza Hut Park
Frisco,Texas
Sam Houston State (14-0) vs. North
* Dakota State (13-i), I p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Monday's Games
Phoenix 102. Golden State 91
Boston 100.Washingon 92
Indiana 108, New Jersey 94
Detroit 89. Orlando 78
Atlanta 100. Miami 92. -
Toronto 90, NewYork 85
Minnesota 106, San Antonio 96
Dallas 100, Oklahoma City 87
Denser 91. M.iwaukee 86
S Utah 94, New Orleans 90 '.
U 9 Tuesday's Games
Cleveland 115. Charlotte 101
Atlanta at Chicago (n)-
Portland at Oklahoma City (n)
Sacramento at Memphis (n)
Milwaukee at Utah (n)
Houston at L A Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Cleveland at Toronto. 7 p.m.
SWashingtorn at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Boston. 7 30 p m
Chicago at Detroit, 7 30 p m
Indiana at Miami, 7-30 p m.
Charlotte at NewYork. 7 30 p m.
Philadelphia at New Orleans. 8 pm
SMemphis at Minnesota. 8 p.m
Phoenix at Dallas. 8-30 p m.
Golden State at San Antonio., 8 30 p m.
Sacramento at Denver. 9 pm
Houston at L.A Clippers. 10 30 pm
Thursday's Games
Miami at Adarta, 8 pm.
Dallas at San Antonio. 8 30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Sacramento. 10 p.m.
LA. Lakers at Portland. 10-3 i p m

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Syracuse at Providence. 9 p.m.
No. 5 Duke at Temple, 7 p.m. "
No. 9 Georgetown vs. No. 20
Marquette, 7 p.m. ,
No. 14 Kansas vs. No. 23 Kansas St.,
8 p.m.
No. 19 Murray State vs Eastern
Kentucky, 8 p.m. .
Thursday's Games
No. 12 Indiana vs. No. 16 Michigan,
9 p.m.
No. 17 UNLV at Cal State Bakersfield,
10p.m. ".
No. 24 San Diego State vs. San Diego
Christian, 10 p.m.



Unscrahnble these four Jumbles,
one .letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

MALAL I


No. 25 Gonzaga vs. Pepperdine, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Syracuse vs. No. 20 Marquette.
4 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky vs. South Carolina.
4 p.m.
No. 3 North Carolina vs. Boston
College, 230 pmn-
No.4 Baylor at Texas Tech, 1:45 pmn.
No. 5 Duke at Georgia Tech, Noon
No. 6 Ohio St. at Iowa, 3 p.m.
No. 7 Missouri at No. 23 Kansas Sr.,
1:30 p.m.
No. 8 UConn at Rutgers, 8 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown at West Virginia.
Noon
No. II Louisville vs. Notre Dame
at 4 p.m.
No. 13 Florida at Tennessee,
II a.m.
No. 14 Kansas at Oklahoma, 2 p.m.
No. 15 Mississippi St. at Arkansas,
9p.m.
No. 19 Murray St. at Austin Peay,
8 p.m.
No. 20 Kentucky vs. South Carolina,
4 p.m.
No. 21 Virginia vs. Miami, 6 p.m.
No.22 Harvard vs. Dartmouth, 2 p.m.
No. 25 Gonzaga vs. Santa- Clara,
8 p.m.

Florida 79, UAB 61

At Gainesville
UAB (5-8)
Soko 4-10 5-8 13, Moore 6-13 3-5
15, Swing 3-9 0-0 7, Purifoy 0-4 0-0 0,
Taylor 5-9 4-4 16, Williams 1-4 2-2 5,
Tyler 0-0:0-0 0, Whitaker I-5 2-2 5,
Scodand-Williamson 0-1 0-0 0.Totals 20-
55 16-21 61.
FLORIDA (12-3)
Murphy 4-6 0-0 9,Young 7-10 1-2 15,
Boynton 7-12 0-1 20, Walker 8-12 0-0
23, Beal 2-15 1-2.5,Wilbekin 1-2 0-0 3,
Yeguete 2-4 0-0 4.Totals 31-61 2-5 79.
Halftime-Florida 37-26. 3-Point
Goals-UAB 5-17 (Taylor 2-5, Williams
-1., Swing 1-3, Whitaker 1-4, Purifoy
0-4), Florida 15-27 (Walker 7-9, Boynton
6-10, Wilbekin 1-2, Murphy 1-3, Beal
0-3). Fouled Out-Young. Rebounds-
UAB 36 (Soko 12), Florida 34 (Yeguete
11). Assists-UAB 7 (Taylor, Williams 2),
Florida 21 (Walker 6).Total Fouls-UAB
13, Florida 17.A-7,512.

GOLF

Golf week

/. PGATOUR
TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS
Site KapIlua, Hawaii
Schedule Fr.day-Sunday.
Course Kapalus Resorr.The Plantation
Course (7.411 yirds, par 73)
*'Purse: -$5.6'. million. Winner's share:
$1 12 million -
Television Golf Channel (Friday,
5 30-10 p 0 pm. p m-pm3 a.m. Saturday-
Sunday, 1-5 p mn. 530-10 p m (0:30 p:m.-
3 am. Monday. II a m.-3 p.m., 4-8 p.m.,
-9 prn -I a.m) .
Online: httpillwww.pgaour.com
EUROPEANTOUR/
SUNSHINETOUR
AFRICA OPEN
Site: East.London, South Africa,
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday. -
Course: East London Golf Club (6,770
yards, par 73). '
Purse: $1.3 million. Winner's share:
$205,800. .'
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 9 a.m.-I p.m.).
Online: http://www.europ.eantour.com
Sunshine Tour site: http://www.
sunshinetour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
San Jose 3,Vancouver 2, SO
'Colorado 2, Los Angeles I, SO
N.Y. Rangers 3, Philadelphia 2
Ottawa 3, New Jersey 2, OT
Edmonton 4, Chicago 3
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 4, Carolina 3, SO
Buffalo 4, Edmonton 3
Toronto .7,Tampa Bay 3
Washington 3, Calgary I
Phoenix at St. Louis (n)
Detroit at Dallas (n)
Today's Games
Winnipeg at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota atVancouver, 10 p.m.
San Jose atAnaheim, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Calgary at Boston, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
STampa Bay at Ottawa. 7:30 p.m.
Edmoriton at S. Louis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Nashville,8 p.m.
Phoenix at Los Angeles. 10:30 p.m.
Columbus at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


iT ITHE OG WAS CONTENT TO
I SLEEP THROUGH ALL THE
FESTTIHITES BECAUSE HE
YSPLIM t WA5NTA- j
S- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: MULCH ABOVE MUFFIN LESSON
I Answer: When the singer performed in the capital of
South Korea, she sang this "SEOUL" MUSIC


GOLF REPORTS



Allen wins blitz shootout


Jonathan Allen dodged
a late birdie by Dwight
Rhodes to stay at the top of
the A flight in Wednesday's
blitz.
Allen's +10 edged Rhodes
by a stroke. Mike McCranie
finished third at +2.
Hank Rone took his sec-
ond win in as many weeks
in J3 flight with a +7. Mike
Gough was two shots back.
Eddy Brown (+2) was in
third place.
Lynn Smith had the-
day's ohly birdie on the
designated, pot hole.
Unfortunately-he lost a big
payoff by failing to enter the
pot hole game. One pot hole
remains at the maximum
level and the other is fast
approaching that number.,
Smith did pick up a
skin with his birdie. Chad
Hunter and Scott Kishton
had the other two skins.
Thirty-two players bat-
tled it out in. the Saturcay
blitz. Jerry West broke out
ofa packed field to take the
A flight win, at +10. Terry
Hunter fired a late birdie


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

barrage, but was two shots
short of catching West. Bob
Randall and Steve Patterson
shared third place at +6.
Jim Carr, Randy
Sommers and Al Alvarado
staged a battle royal in B
flight. Carr" hung on for
the win with +12. Sommers
(+11) and Alvarado (+10)
didn't go down easily. Don
Combs and Tom Wade tied
for fourth place with +5.
Six players posted skins.
Ken Radcliffe, Dennis
Crawford, Dave Mehl and
Larry Ross joined Hunter
and Alvarado in a share of
the proceeds.
Individual members of
the Good Old Boys groups
groused about how poor-
ly they. played, but team
scoring was respectable.
Marc Risk, Tom Elmore
and Bobby Simmons took
match one by a 7-5 count
over Jim Carr, Joe Persons


and Howard Whitaker.
In a three-way contest,
Monty Montgomery, Jim
Bell, Dave Cannon and
Merle Hibbard put up five
team points to overcome
their opponents.
Stan Woolbert, Eli Witt,
Bill Wheeler and Paul
Davis matched Ed Snow,
Jim Stevens, Bill Rogers
and Dan Stephens with
two 'points for a second-
place tie.
Risk and Montgomery
each posted 74 to share
the medalist spot Woolbert
shot 78 for a third-place
finish.
I Snow and 'Elmore tied
the front side, with 39 in
nine-hole play. Stephens
was unchallenged in a back
nine win with 39.
* The ladies were rained
out this week.
Upcoming events:
Jan. 15, Mixed Pairs
tournament;
Jan. 21, MGA All For
One;
Jan. 27, Chamber of
Commerce scramble.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER.'L Il 1.-i,1 I-.:,r
Florida's Erik Murphy.(33) yells out after grabbing a rebound from Florida State's,
8avier Gibson (1) and Bernard James (5) in a game on Dec., 27.



Florida knocks off UAB


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE-E
Walker scored 23 p
Kenny Boynton added
and No. 13 Florida
UAB 79-61 on Tuesda
Gators' final tune-up b
beginning Southea

ACROSS
1 Short-billed
marsh bird
6 Bats an
eyelash
12 Going steady
14 More frilly
, 15 Put aside for
a while
16 They have
pseudopods
17, Drain cleaner
18 Skip stones
19 Extreme
happiness
21 MarkofZorro
23 Oz. or tsp.
26 Clingy
seedpod
27 Dixie fighter
28 False alarm
30 Santa
Winds
31 Moon or
planet
32 Rubber city
33 Skaters'
haunts


rving
points,
ed 20
beat
y, the
before
stern


Conference play..
Patric Young chipped
in 15 points and seven
rebounds for the Gators
(12-3), who won their 14th
consecutive home game.
Florida trailed midway
through the first half and
UAB held a 21-13 rebound-
ing advantage at halftime,


'but Florida coach Billy
Donovan challenged his
team at the break.
The Gators were much
more aggressive in the
second half.
The biggest difference,'
though, was the 3-point
line. Florida made 15 of 27
from behind the arc.


35 Octopus Answer to Previous Puzzle,
defense
37 Trigger's rider | ||
38 Par plus one B CB AC H E
39 Bridalnotice FAA A L E RHUM
word FY M U E A H U
40 Envir. monitor
41 Stimpy's pal YONDER DEMI
42 Freud topic USER LANG
43 Badges AB I T
44 Ariz. neighbor
46 Not,pro J UK E ORA SAGE
48 Withdraw E K ED SGT TWIT
51 Make up for TEE CHEESE
55 Upholstery -E E

56 Daughters' OUST S L GAN
cousins BL --LI E G
57 Dough raisers V U
58 Kiddie ride IISE EMI L L O D


DOWN
1 Investor's
options
2 Go, team!
3 Put away
4 Skier Jean-
Claude --


T UIRINE PI I ITI YENY E


,5 Begrudge
6 Propeller arm
7 Tibetan monk
S Swelling
reducer
(2 wds.)
9 Tip of a pen.


10 Large parrot
11 Mex.
gentlemen
13 Old coot
19 Kind of
college
20 Popsicle
flavor
22 Waning
24 Having
blemishes
25 Regiments
26 Cutting
remark
27 Blushing
28 Quaff with
sushi
29 New Age
singer
34 Doghouses
36 Political
stance
42 Odds'
opposite
43 Derive by
reasoning
45 Mark up for
revision
47 Never
heard -
48 Double agent
49 Help-wanted
abbr.
50 1040 pro
52 Biol. or
astron.
53 Startled cry
54 Mao -tung


SCOREBOARD


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comr
1 2-,3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11
12 23 1431
FrI


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor ,
754-0421
tkJrby4lakedtyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter.





SPORTS


Wednesday. lanuarv 4. 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page 8A


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Fort White
meeting Friday
Fort White Youth
Baseball's annual
meeting is 6:30 p.m.
Friday at South
Columbia Sports Park.
For details, call
Millissa Blakley at
365-4133.

North Florida
Rays tryouts
The North Florida
Rays 9-under travel
baseball team has tryouts
set for 10 a.m. Saturday
and Jan. 14 at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Todd
Green at 365-5161.

Young Guns
tryout Saturday
The Young Guns
9-under travel baseball
team has an open tryout
at 1 p.m. Saturday at
the Southside Sports,
Complex.
For details, call
manager David Williams
at (386) 697-0764.

North Florida
Blaze tryouts
The North Florida
Blaze travel baseball
team for ages 11-12 has a
tryout planned for 2 p.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Christ Central
registration open
Registration for Christ
Central Sports flag
football for ages 5-12
continues through
Jan. 13. Cost is $40.
For details, call
365-2128.
M From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High girls
weightlifting- vs. Fort
White High, 4:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Leon, High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
basketball vs. Williston
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Thursday
Fort White High
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (boys-5)
S'Columbia High girls
basketball at Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Atlantic
Coast High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High girls
weightlifting vs. Union
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
wrestling in Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High (CYSA field),
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High (CYSA field),
7p.m.
Fort White High
soccer at Newberry High,
7 p.m. (girls-5)
Fort White High
basketball vs. Interlachen
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Newberry


High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Columbia girls hoops


starts new year strong

Everyone scores
points in win over
Iody Christian.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High's girls
basketball team got the
new year off to a good start
with an 83-12 home win
over outgunned Melody
Christian Academy.
With two games against
Melody Christian wrapped
around the Fort White High
School Country Christmas
Classic, the Lady Tigers
have won four of five.
"We got everybody some
playing time and everybody
scored," CHS head coach
Tera Perry said. "We've
got some hard games .
coming up Thursday and
Friday against-good teams.. ,
We worked on some drills
today and we'll'see what we
can do."
Justice Campbell led
the family scoring with
19 points. Also in double
figures were Hollianne
Dohrn with 13 points and
Stephanie Silva with 11.
Lona Wilson scored eight
points, while Arnereanna
Bryant, Stantrell Harris
and Akiria Richburgh
each scored six. Sierra
Vanderpool and Melissa
Randall scored four points
apiece, with three points
from both Ranicka Givens
and Bernisha Clark.
Melody Christian not
only faced a dominating
team, but is doing it with a
new coach.
Brittany Breedlove led
the Wildcats with six points,
with five points from Brooke
Corbett and, a free throw by
Destiny Jordan.
Columbia (7-6, 0-2) faces.
Stanton Prep in a District JASON MATTHEW WALKER/LakeC ity Reporter
4-6A game at 7:30 p.m. Columbia High's Ranicka Givens goes in for a basket in the
Thursday in Jacksonville. Lady Tigers' win over Melody Christian Academy on Tuesday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Marcus Amerson looks to shoot in a game against Lee High on Dec. 9.


Local Tigers hold sway


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
The hometown Tigers
carried the day, as Columbia
High's basketball team beat
Union County High 60-46
on Tuesday.
Columbia jumped out to
a 23-4 lead at the end of
the first quarter, but took
its foot off the gas facing
a Union County team with
only five players.


."We came out good, but
we have got to find a way to
keep our intensity and exe-
cute," said Columbia head
coach Horace Jefferson,
who took his share of the
blame for not handling the
substituting well.
Marcus Amerson had
seven points in the first
quarter and finished with a
team-high 13.
Other scorers were:
Monte Tisdale, 8, Nigel


Schreiber wins
award for best
lightweight
From staff reports

Columbia High took
nine wrestlers to the
Valdosta (Ga.) Wildcat
Invitational on Dec. 30-31.
The Tigers placed seventh
in the 14-team field.
Georgia schools Ware
County High and Lowndes
County High finished
1-2. Wakulla High placed
third.
Cole Schreiber was 3-0
in his matches and won
first place in the 106-pound
weightclass. Schreiberwas
voted Most Outstanding


Lightweight Wrestler of
the tournament by partici
paying coaches.
Monterance Allen was
4-0 and won the 195-pound
weight class.
Kaleb Warner was 2-2
and placed fourth at 12Q
pounds. 'Joe Fields (3-2)
was fifth at 182 pounds.
Dustin Regar (1-3 at 126
pounds), Isaac Henderson
(2-3 at 152 pounds) an4
Trey 'Allen (1-3 at 281
pounds) placed sixth. |
Ethan Trevarrow anW
Josh Walker were 1-2 at 113
pounds and 170 pounds,
respectively.
The Tigers will wrestlI
in the Clay County Rotary
Invitational at Clay High
on Friday and Saturday.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's Cole Schreiber (left) and Monterance Allen
won their weight classes at the Valdosta Wildcat Invitational
wrestling tournament in Valdosta, Ga., on Dec 30-31.


Atkinson, 7, Laremy Tunsil,
6, Morris Marshall, 6,
Javonta6 Foster, 6, Kelvin
Jones, 5, Tre' Simmons,
3, Jalen Wyche, 2,
Taylor Veins, 2, and Shaq
Johnson, 2.
Shaimea Maeweather
led Union County with 13
points and Keldric Bradley
scored 11.
Columbia (10-2, 3-0)
plays at Atlantic Coast High
at 7:30 p.m. Thursday.


CHS wrestlers


place seventh


in Valdosta


- -- --- --- ----I I r -- r












olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City and


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Chamber of Commerce Ball is back


From staff reports

of Commerce will have
the opportunity to attend
a fun, traditional event to
begin the new year.
The second annual Lake City -
Columbia County Chamber Ball will be
held on Friday, Jan. 27 and Saturday, Jan.
28.
The ball kicks off with a golf tourna-
ment on Friday at the Country Club at
Lake City, which is sponsored by Gulf
Coast Financial Services, Inc.
Dennille Decker, Chamber executive
director, said this event gives members
the opportunity to get out of the office
andenjoy a day of fun out on the green.
The 18-hole tournament is $60 per
golfer, and each hole will be sponsored by
a business.
Sandy Kishton, board member of the
Chamber and golf tournament chairper-
son, said, "As [members] sign up for dif-
ferent sponsorships, they will be sponsor-
ing a hole."
Kishton said there will be prizes given
for hole-in-one and par-3 that are spon-
sored by McDuffie Marine. Attendees will
also have the opportunity to win raffle
prizes.
In addition to the tournament; there
will be a putting contest, closest to the pin
contest and long drive contest.
The second event for the ball is an
extravagerit dinner which will take place
on Saturday at 6 p.m. at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds. The dinner is spon-
sored by Rountree-Moore Automotive
Group.
Decker said, 'Well start at 6:00 with
cocktails and socializing."
At 6:30 p.m., the dinner will be served
and the meeting will be conducted.
The highlight of the evening will be the
inauguration of the new president
The 2011 Chamber president, William
Haley, will "pass the buck" to the 2012
Chamber president Todd Wilson.
"The focus for the night is on Todd. It's
his year." said Decker. _


William Haley, 2011 Chamber of Commerce president, and Dennille Decker, Chamber executive director,,at last year's ball.


During the meeting. Decker said the
high points from 2011 will be discussed,
and the plans for 2012 wifl be announced.
A silent auction will take place at the
dinner.
"Anybody can donate. No item is too
big or too small," Decker said.
Attendees will also get to enjoy a live
band and dancing.'
Dinner tickets are 860 per person and
the attire is business or semi-formal.
-The ball was held least-yearq-.-reinstate


an old tradition that was once called "play
day."
Decker said that since the Chamber
must have a meeting to introduce the new
Chamber president, they might as well
have fun and do it in style. ,
"Last year we had so much positive
feedback," she said. "We're looking for-
ward to it being bigger and better than
last year."
Decker said preparation for the event
began in November.


FILE PHOTO


"As of last week, we have already sold
220 tickets," she said.
She said there are only 350 seats avail-
able so Chamber members who would
like to attend are encouraged to purchase
their tickets as soon as possible.
There are additional sponsorships and
golf anddinner packages available..
For more information, contact the
Chamber at 752-3690.


m ^*1., am a --- m -- S, --* A




Get Connected Sw,
Get Connee www.lakecityreporter.com
Lake City Reporter


Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park
& Glass Slipper Bridal
Invites you to our


Wedding

Expo


0 Fashion Show
by (lass Slipper Bridal
Door Prizes
o Vendor Booths-
0 Refreshments

*Taste Testing


Saturday
January 21, 2012
1:00pm- 5:00 pm


Let the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park & Campground
help you plan your special day.
for more information call
I q
limii~


Columbia County









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 4, 2012

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


B U YI T


SEi'Tfl~


4 Oin $ 1 50
3 days 1 5
Includes 2 Signs i f, Ad i snal ire 31 65


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon.,9:0ranm.t
Wednesday Mon,, 10:00 a.m. Mon.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 a.m. Wed.,9:00 a.m.
Friday Tuis., 10:00 a.m. Thurs., 9:00a.m.
Saturday i., 10:00 a.m. Fri.,9:00 a.m.
*Sunday F., 10:00 am. Fri.,9:00a.m. ,
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
wVIn.,lakecitvreporter.com


020 Lost & Found

$200 REWARD for info leading
to return of 2 Blue Tick hounds.
Missing from Norris Rd. the week
of Christmas. Call 386-623-0200

$200 Reward for the return of a
Tree stand & Deer Camera.
Missing from the end of Lake
Jeffery in Wellbom.386- 623-0200

100 Job
Opportunities

05529870
Murphy USA Job Fair
Store Managers/Asst. Managers
Job Fair at
The Holiday Inn & Suites
213 SW Commerce Drive
Lake City, FL 32025.
Jan. 4th 2012 10:00am-5:00pm
*Please email resume for,
immediate interview. time*
hectorcastro(amurphyoilcrp.
comr
* Location: Lake City, Fl.
* Compensation:
-30K-34K salary + Monthly
commissions, paid
vacations. 401k, profit sharing


05529873
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia Counts is accepting
applicanons for a 911 Public
Safety Telecommunicator I or [I
Depending upon qualifications i.
Position is responsible for call
taking and dispatching for law
enforcement, fire, and medical
emergency calls, as well as,
certain non,-emergency .
funcuons. Minimum
requirements- At least -18 yeass
old, possess high school
diploma/GED and for Telecom-
municator I at least one )ear
continuous work experience in a
busy and/or high stress environ-
ment. Experience requirement
for Telecommunicator II two
years of recent communications
dispatching experience with'
demonstrated proficiency in the
essential functions and must
possess State of FL NCIC/FCIC
certification & a current
Emergency Medical Dispatch
certification. Successful
applicant must pass pre-employ-
ment physical, drug screen, and
criminal history check to satisfy
FL Dept of Law Enforcement
standards for NCIC/FCIC opera-
tors. Salary based on qualifica-
tions (Telcommunicator I -,
$20,842 annually, Telecommu-
nicator II -'$22,963 annually).
Excellent benefits. Applications
available at Human Resources
Office, Board of County Com-
missioners, 135 NE Hernando
Ave, Suite 203, Lake City, FL
or www.columbiacountyfla.com
com>. (386)719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139. Deadline for
apps: 01/20/12. An
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.


FLORIDA




PROGRAMMER ANALYST
Responsible for providing programming
support and development of technology
solutions for one or more business areas
of the college. Assists as required in the
solution of operational difficulties
encountered in existing programs.
AS Degree required, Bachelor's degree
preferred. Knowledge, Skills, Abilities
Required: Ability to work independently
to resolve and maintain all aspects of
technical support. Ability to communicate
information and ideas in speaking so
others will understand. Able to accurately
provide'information to supervisors,
co-workers and staff by telephone, in
written form; e-mail, or in person. Ability
to plan'and organize. Ability to adjust to
change and be innovative.
Desirable Qualifications: Bachelor's
degree. Knowledge of SungardHE
Banner software, Oracle database
systems, Oracle Application Express
programming, PL/SQL programming, C
programming, Sharepoint programming,
Net programming and Microsoft Access
programming preferred.
SALARY: $37,500-$70,000 annually,
plus benefits.
APPLICATION DEADLINE:
Open until filled.
College application, vita, and photocopies
of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation. .
Position details and applications available'
'on web at: www.fgc.edu
I-Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrOfqc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges
of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education
and Employment


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
Opportunities
Activities Coordinator (P/T. Tu-F)
Computer literate with a desire to
provide creative activities for
senior adults. Level I background
screen req'd. Must be able to drive
company van when needed. start-
ing pay $8.00 an hour. Call eona
for more info at 386-755-0235

BARTENDER NEEDED Must
have experience and be reliable.
Must have own phone and own
car. 386-752-2412
Immediate Collector Position
Available. Full-time. $8/hr.
Dedicated and determined
individuals wanted. Bilingual
applicants encouraged to apply.
Apply at
www.salliemae.candidatecare.com


or Call Christine at 1-866-441-
2623 ext 4342.


Local CPA Firm is looking for
an experienced tax return preparer.
Ideally, the candidate will be able
to prepare personal, corporate.
and partnership returns.
The seasonal time frame is
February 1 through April 17.
Send reply to Box 05080, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O:
Box'1709, Lqke City, FL, 32056
Now Hiring Restaurant Manager.
Experience preferred but will train
right person. 24 hour operation.
Send resumes to: 186 SE Nevell
Dr. Lake City, FL. 32025.


Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Tovota, Great benefits, paud"
tr~mmg/Ivacauon. Exp a plu- but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentmo 386-623-7442

2 Medical
120 Employmentl


LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

170 Business
7 Opportunities
Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

240 Schools &
Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

For Sale: GE Washer Ig
capacity, Whirlpool. Dryer
Lg capacity. $450.for both obo
352-264-8168


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
8 ft x 5.5 ft wide single axle trailer
With Dump and lights.
Excellent condition S325 FIRM
386-288-8833
BEER MEISTER for sale.
S200 obo.
386-758-1991

PS 3 System with 9 games.
2 wireless control,
in original box. $280.
386-984-7510
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool' box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740

450 Good Things
45 0 toEat
The.Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood


It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call.you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120 .
per load, Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.


63A Mobile Homes
UJV for Rent
3/2 DWMH, CH/A
$, 450. mo. plus
$200. dep
386-752-2254
Country, Living
2&3bdrm,$500-$550.'
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280


Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

(640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K Off All Homes
800-622-2832 ext 210

705 Rooms for Rent
Ne', furnished studio, apt Ln a
home. pri.ite entrance & b.uh. i tn-
elude. dall uilite. trash. cable. frig
and pest control $451i .per month
plus deposit; January 1.1 ai aillabd-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

7'/1 Unfurnished Apt..
/ U For Rent


2/2w/garage & washer/dryer
hookup.. West side of town,
Call for details
S,. 386-755-6867
S2BR/2BA w/garage
S5 minutes-from VA hospital and
S Timed. Call for details. '
S'386-365-5150
Duplex /,'garage spacious. 2."I.
1300 sq ft. WID hook up. CH.' A
$65t0 month & bckgmd cl-r..
386-9 7-324S or 35-2-3p7-b65
Move in Special from $199-$399.
, 2& 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
'er 2/br. for $495..mo. ncI water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
The Lakes Apt. Studios & lBr's
from.$125/wk. Until' & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, W/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great 'area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626.
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2
8 mi NV%1 of \A Pn\ ate ,ooded
acre, deck, roomy. No dogs
$600 mo + dep 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
7 V For Rent,
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person'$135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170


For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office;'Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
SWeekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation. r, ''.
discrimination." ,ariilial status,
:nk lude, hildrern urdu r [te ac of
IS i ing ith parents or let il
c u.lo)diaris. pregnant i omenr .rid
people e.curmig cutod%\ o chil-
dren under the ,ige of l-. Tri
nev .papcr n ill not knoi er l',
accept jn,. adi ertniing tfr real es-
ite ., hich i. in 'In oIon tlo tl.-
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that .ll elUrings adver-
ted in tilis nric. paper .ire availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired I 1-8 -1.027-92;5


S820 Farms &
O 2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots., Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
0 U Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
\Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


Lake City Reporter


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


730 Unfurnished
730Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage. Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, 1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st. last, sec., ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch. fenced.concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
2br/lba newly remodeled.
On Lomond Street. No pets!
Stove & fridge incl. $350 dep.
$550. mo. 386-719-0584
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
4 BR/2BA in town on cul-de-sac,
good area, fenced yard, fireplace,
no pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.
386-755-6916.
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365;-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
Office Rentals

055297M9
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq'$5533/mth
.- also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386):961-1086 DCA Realtor


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445




ii' llI


Apply in person or online
ltl.^iiji~ii~jij~j~ffli.Hi~aH Ali^^ i~i^,jLi? ^


- ADvantage


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you.
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.







- U86) 55-544








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


I "- 02012 JhnL.Hart FLP .I
FRANK & ERNEST


ANY IDMS FOR APOgE56ING OUR FIFTY P9C6NT
WFCTIV PRODUCT RAT6 SiDE1 A
PU ,Y ON/16T
rs, ONE MRE"


DEAR ABBY


Sister's affair with boss

costs boyfriend his job

DEAR ABBY: My - DEAR NEAR AND FAR:
long-distance boyfriend, You and Kurt appear to
"Wavne," moved here two be compatible on many
years ago to take a job levels, but you must accept
working for my twin sister that as wonderful a person
"Kim's" mentor. After five as he is he cannot give
months on the job, Wayne you the romantic love
was terminated and was you're looking for. He isn't
replaced by my sister! Abigail Van Buren "wired" that way. Wishing,
Wayne and I were www.deorabby.com hoping and dreaming
unaware that Kim had For the present, make won't change that but it
been having an affair with no hard and fast decisions. WILL waste your time and
this much-older married This could play out in any prevent you from looking
father of two. He has now number of ways. Her boss for eligible men.
left his wife and kids and could marry her, or he You need to put the
is living with my sister. could return to his wife brakes on this friendship
Kim is enjoying her job as and family. Wait and see until you have regained
his assistant and reaping what the future brings. It's your balance and/or have
all the benefits of his long- often full of surprises. met someone else. And tell
established business. ** ** ** Kurt why, so his feelings
I'm devastated by the DEAR ABBY: I.am a won't be hurt. I'm betting
betrayal. It frustrates me single adult female. I have it won't be the first time
that after months of decep- a neighbor and friend I'll he's heard it.
2.*- ,-* : ,,, /..C +:./- 0 -** *** **


UUII, lily itwUI is UenettLLulg
from a massive indiscre-
tion that ended a marriage
and destroyed a family. We
were always close, but I
don't want to include her
lover in any upcoming
events in my life. She says
they're a "package deal."
How do I move past this -
or should I? DECEIVED
BY MY EVIL TWIN
DEAR DECEIVED: I'm
not sure what "upcoming
events in your life" you're
referring to, but if they
include Wayne, his feelings
should also be taken into,
consideration. How angry
and resentful will he feel if
he's forced to interact with
the man who fired him so
he could be replaced by
your sister?.


call Kurt He has been ter-
rific to me. He has given
me things, taken me out a
few times and seems very
caring. I enjoy the time we
spend together and I have
developed romantic feel-
ings for him. My problem
is Kurt is gay.
I know I can't have the
kind of relationship with
him that I'd like to. Once,
we spent the whole day
together and I spent the
whole time wishing it had
been a realdate. It seems
like whenever we go out
together I don't know how
to handle the situation.
Because he's a neighbor, I
run into him a lot I could
use some advice on this.
- SO NEAR AND YET SO
FAR IN TEXAS


DEAR ABBY: Is a grand-
mother being disrespectful
when she purposely con-
tinues to misspell her 12-
year-old grandson's name
on cards and gifts? HIS
NAME IS JOE!
DEAR H.N.I.J.!: She may
be letting you know she's
disappointed you didn't
name the boy after his
grandfather "Morris." She
could also be illiterate, or
somewhat demented, but
I'm betting she's letting
you know she's not happy
with the name you chose.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Consider what you
want to work toward this
year and start the ball roll-
ing. Sign up for courses
or make travel plans. The
more incentives you have,
the better you will do.
Hard work will pay off and
bring you greater opportu-
nities. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Clear up any ques-
tions you have or research
information you need to
help you with a project or
job prospect you are work-
ing toward. Be prepared to
travel further or to make
a move if it will broaden
your chances of employ-
ment. -***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Take on a challenge
that will get you. motivated
to follow through with ,
your promises and unfin-
ished projects. A relation-
ship can be taken to the
next level, and a greater
commitment should be
made to a personal or busi-
ness partner. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Emotional confusion is
apparent if you don't plan
and organize properly. Set
your sights on philosophic.
or lifestyle changes that
will improve your cur-
rent personal situation.
Someone from your past
will help you out ******
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Keep things simple. You


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

will face opposition if you
take on too much or over-
extend your budget. Stick
to the plan and do the best
job possible. End your day
relaxing and enjoying the
company of someone you
love. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't give anyone
the chance to complain.
Focus on being your best
and mingling with people
who share your interests.
You will learn a lot if you
participate in an exercise
that expands your cultural
or community knowledge.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Put creative effort into
making your surroundings
more comfortable. Make
a workspace at home that
will help you expand your
interests or bring in extra
cash. Romance is on the
rise, and networking or
socializing will enhance
your love life. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Don't let someone's
emotional whim ruin your
day. Good fortune can be
yours if you actively seek
information that will con-
tribute to a venture you
want to put into motion.
Don't let uncertainty stand
between you and getting
ahead. *** .


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Start working
toward changes at home
that will lead to a better
situation financially, emo-
tionally and physically. It's
up to you to make things
.happen, but be sure to get
the go-ahead if what you
do will affect someone
else. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You can wheel
and deal where your per-
sonal assets and liabilities
are concerned. Open
up communication with
anyone with whom you
have a pending agreement
or from whom you need
approval. There are gains
to be made if you act fast

AQUARIUS.(Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Not everyone will
see things your way, Avoid
conversations that will
hinder your plans. Focus
on what you feel you can
do in order to get what you
want. Innovation will help
you bypass those skeptical
of your ability. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Let the past lead you
into the future. Bigger and
better opportunities await
if you remember what you
have learned and reunite
with people who can help
you now. Greater financial
stability is within reach. A
partnership will pay off.
-*4**,


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M equals U
" Z N LBP K F KBEGBT XL VW NHK TNMW
F KBE -- S O Y NWSK J
"FXJZNWT XJ B WBOK SKZGKKA
KEMOBZXNA BAE OBZBJZWNVFK."
-- F C G K R R J

Previous Solution: "As beautiful as simplicity is, it can become a tradition that
stands in the way of exploration." Laura Nyro
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-4


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS





Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2012


(a


Women s Centesr of 'Coiu
Obstetrics and Gynecology
- Chandler Mohan, MID Emad Atta, MD
./ Annmarie Fenn, CNM, MS.
- { Weight Loss/ Hair Removal/ Chemical Peels/ 4D Baby Ultrasc
.' ALL $69
Accepting all Insurance. No Ins visit $50
M (386) 466-1106
Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak


pr wMnlva4 www.aspeniakecity.com


Timeutess I[lemORies
Celebrating with 20% to 50%
savings storewide
Now thru Jan. 7th A
1034 SW Main Blvd. next tothe Money Man) Lake City, FL 32055 V A
'A!. A


I have a toothache, and need to see

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Give us a call.


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& A -S __
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Coupon #008


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THE POLICY OF OUR OFFICE IS THAT THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL
PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR ANY SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT IF PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72
HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT.


752-2336


Open 6 Days A Week
Monday-Saturday.
Evening Appointments Available

www.aspenlakecity.com


www. lcfr.com


U~IYIIIPYLIII~-Piill


'.PII1~I~lllllllr-1~1113 L c -r


---


1788 SW Barnett Way (Hwy 47 South)


Bv


I


pounds