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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01741
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 3, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01741
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







.2 ,.
U" -- "- U2Q'TT A "
szo_,i-1-4


Tuesday, January 3, 2012


0


www.,.. cityreporter.com


Reporter


Vol. 137, No. 286 0 75 cents


WHITE SPRINGS


Woman


struck,


killed


byATV

From staff reports

WHITE SPRINGS A
woman died when struck
'by an ATV on New Year's
Eve, the Florida Highway
Patrol said.
Angela Kent, 43, of
Jacksonville was pro-
nounced dead at the scene
by Hamilton County EMS,
reports show.
According to FHP, Jeffrey
Spradley, 44, of White
Springs was operating a
three-wheeled 1986 Honda
on private property on CR
25A when the vehicle struck
Kent at about 8:30 p.m.
Spradley was treated for
minor injuries at Lake City
Medical Center.
Alcohol was not a factor in
the crash, the report shows.
FHP said an investigation
is pending.


Man

denies

robbery

charges

By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
A local man faces charg-
es of robbery, larceny and
assault for the theft of two
cell phones and a wallet on
New Year's Eve, say police.
Marvin Dewayne Alford,
21, of 199 NE James Street,
Lake City was arrested after
the alleged victim identified
him in a photo lineup, accord-
ing to a Columbia County
Sheriff's Office report.
On Saturday sometime
after 4:30 a.m. deputies W.
Porter and
William
Busby
went to a
local con-
venience
store
Alford where
Derrick
Thomas Jr., Alachua, said
he had been robbed.
Thomas said two men,
one of whom wore a red
hat, approached him and
asked to use his cell phone.
He said he gave his phone
to the men, who then told
him to hand over his wallet
and other personal items.
Thomas said he thought
by their demeanor that
they may have been armed
so he gave them his wal-
let and another cell phone.
The men ordered Thomas
to turn around and they ran
away.
Porter recognized the
description of the suspect
in the red hat as Alford,
who is known to wear a red
hat every day and who has
a history of robbery, the
report said.
Thomas later picked
Alford out of a photo line-
up, according to the report.
Alford was arrested later
that day by Porter on NE
Craig Street.
Alford denied involve-
ment in the incident, the
report shows.


Relaxed,
retired

Lake City resident
Tommy White hooks
a fresh cricket to the
end of his line while
fishing for bream at
Watertown Lake last
week. 'I retired in
August, so now I'm
just relaxing,' White
said. 'If it gets any
better, I can't stand.
it. Fishing gives me
something to do.'


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter


2012 MEDICARE DEBATE


It's all about the boomers


By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Baby boomers take note:
Medicare as your parents have known it is
headed for big changes no matter who wins
the White House in 2012.,You may not like it,
but you might have to accept it.
Dial down the partisan rhetoric and surpris-
ing similarities emerge from competing policy


GABRIELLE BELLAMY/Lake City Reporter
Hit and run suspect Kevin Kenyatta Hester is taken into cus-
tody Monday morning.


Hit-run suspect

doesn't run far


By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter

A Lake City man fled
the scene of an accident
Monday but didn't go far,
say police.
Kevin Kenyatta Hester,
34, 232 SE Lamond .Ave.,
was arrested for leaving the
scene of a head-on, two-car
crash at S&S Food Store
No. 3 on East Duval Street.
Witnesses said Hester


hit another vehicle when he
failed to stop before pulling
out from the S&S parking
lot and onto Duval. The
driver of the vehicle that
was hit, Chauncey Born,
Live Oak, said Hester ran,
but didn't run far.
Hester drove to a fam-
ily member's house just a
block behind the food store.
A subsequent investigation
led to his arrest shortly
before noon Monday.
No one was hurt in the
accident.


prescriptions by President Barack Obama and
leading Republicans such as Wisconsin Rep.
Paul Ryan.
Limit the overall growth of Medicare spend-
ing? It's in both approaches.
Squeeze more money from upper-income
retirees and-some in the middle-class? Ditto.
Raise the eligibility age? That too, if the deal-
is right.
With more than 1.5 million baby boomers a


year signing up for Medicare, the program's
future is one of the most important economic
issues for anyone now 50 or older. Health care
costs are the most unpredictable part of retire-
ment, and Medicare remains an exceptional
deal for retirees, who can reap benefits worth
far more than the payroll taxes they paid in
during their careers.

BOOMERS continued on 3A


Romney expects to-


win Iowa's caucuses


By KASIE HUNT
Associated Press

MARION, Iowa A con-
fident Mitt Romney said
Monday that he's going to
win Iowa and become the
Republican nominee for
president.
"We're going to win this
thing with all of our pas-
sion and strength and do
everything we can to get
this campaign on the right
track," Romney told a rau-
cous crowd gathered here
on the last day of campaign-
ing before Tuesday's cau-
cus, "to go across the nation
to get the ballots I need,
the votes I need so I can
become the nominee. That's
what we're going to get."
When Iowa supporters
stand up to speakfor Romney
. at caucuses Tuesday night,
they'll offer the same pitch
the former Massachusetts
governor is making: that he
is the Republican candidate
most capable of beating
President Barack Obama.
Romney was focusing on
areas of Iowa he won in
2008 in four rallies across
the state Monday. At two
earlier events with more
muted crowds, he didn't talk
about winning. But here, as
people whooped and yelled
throughout his speech, he
was clearly upbeat as he
criticized Democrats instead
of his GOP rivals.
"They'll poison the very
spirit of America and keep
us from being one nation
under God," he said. "I want
see America united. I watch
a president who's become a
great divider, the great com-
plainer, the great excuse

ROMNEY continued on 3A


Republican presidential candidate former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney makes remarks dur-
ing a campaign stop on Monday in Marion, Iowa


Today is deadline for

presidential primary


The books close today
for Florida's Jan. 31 pres-
idential primary.
If you wish to register
to vote or change party
affiliation, you must do
so today in order to be


able to vote in the pri-
mary.
For more information
contact the Columbia
County Supervisor of
Elections office at 758-
1026.


CALL US:
SI (386) 752-1293
I SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
I Fax: 752-9400


46
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


-- Opinion ...............
People..................
SObituaries ..............
--\ Advice & Comics .........
Puzzles ................


Jackman is
money in bank.


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE WEDNESDAY


Local news
roundup.


1











LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY. JANUARY 3. 2012


FL 0 R D /
10770


Saturday:
Not available


WA$H 3


Saturday:
Not available


4-


Saturday:
Not available


ematch.dz
Saturday:
Not available


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Jackman on Broadway? Cold cash


By MARK KENNEDY
AP Drama Writer
NEW YORK Hugh
Jackman has left
Broadway with a lot of bro-
ken hearts and records.
: The hunky Australian
actor's one-man Broadway
concert show closed on
Sunday afternoon at the
Broadhurst Theatre after
having earned $2,057,354
in its final week, the
highest weekly gross
recorded by the Shubert
Organization, which owns
the Broadhurst and 16
other Broadway theaters.
Over its 10-week run,
Jackman earned a whop-
ping $14,638,428, produc-
ers said. He now owns
10 of the 11 top grossing
weeks at the Broadhurst
1. Jackman, best known
'for being the hairy
Wolverine in "The
X-Men" franchise,
.routinely sold out the
1,176-seat theater and
.'usually posted weekly
grosses of $1.5 mil-
lion, often higher than
rival musicals such as
"Jersey Boys," "Mama
Mia!" "How to Succeed
in Business," "Anything
Goes" and "Follies."
Only "Wicked" and
"The Lion King," pro-
duced by other organiza-
tions, consistently outdid
Jackman. But those
shows also had much
higher overhead costs.
The previous record at
the Broadhurst was held
by the Al Pacino-led 'The
Merchant of Venice,"
which took in $1,175,750
earlier this year.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 2011 file photo, Hugh Jackman appears onstage at the curtain call for the open-
ing night performance of "Hugh Jackman, Back on Broadway," in New York. Jackman has left
a lot of broken hearts and records on Broadway


Until now, the Shubert
Organization's one-week
biggest haul was "Billy
Elliot," which earned
$1,663,895 during an eight-
show stretch last year.
During the run,
Jackman raised a record
$1,789,580 for the charity
Broadway Cares/Equity
Fights AIDS. The run
"not only confirms him
as one of the most bank-
able stars in Broadway's
history but also as a fund-
raiser," producer Robert
Fox said.
Backed by an 18-piece
orchestra and six leggy
dancers, a charming
Jackman belted out
about two dozen musi-
cal theater songs in


"Hugh Jackman, Back
on Broadway." It was his
third time on the Great
White Way, following
"The Boy From Oz" in
2003 and the play "A
Steady Rain" with Daniel
Craig in 2009.
The show featured his
interpretations of songs
ranging from the sexy
R&B tune "Fever" to
"Rock Island," from "The
Music Man" to a medley of
classic movie songs such
as "Singin' in the Rain"
and "Luck Be a Lady." The
average ticket went for
$160, with top premiums
going for $350.
Some of the highlights
included.the eight-min-
ute "Soliloquy" from the


Rodgers and Hammerstein
musical "Carousel," and a
collection of songs from
his Tony Award-winning
turn in "The Boy From
Oz" while wearing Peter
Allen-inspired matching
gold lame pants and jack-
et, and gold shoes.
Jackman's other
stage credits include
Australian productions of
"Sunset Boulevard" and
"Beauty and the Beast."
In London he starred as
Curly in Trevor Nunn's
staging of Rodgers
& Hammerstein's
"Oklahoma!" Next year,
he plans to star in a ver-
sion of the musical "Les
Miserables."


* Actor Robert Loggia is 83.
* Actor Dabney Coleman is
81.
* Musician Stephen Stills is
68.
* Actress Victoria Principal
is 63.
* Actor-director Mel Gibson
is 57.
* Jazz musician James
Carter is 44.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproductionin whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson ..... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
.To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


* Contemporary Christian
singer Nichole Nordeman is
41.
* Actor Jason Marsden is 38.
* Actress Danica McKellar
is 38.
* Actor Nicholas Gonzalez
is 37
E Singer Kimberley Locke
is 35.
* Actor Alex D. Linz is 24.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $48.79
52 Weeks.................... $83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates .
12 Weeks.............. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call -the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA THE WEATHER


Panhandle peacocks make their
S SUNNY SUNNY! MOSTLY
film debut in 'We Bought a Zoo' SUNNY


DEFUNIAK SPRINGS Peacocks from
the Florida Panhandle are making their
movie debut in the film "We Bought a Zoo."
Several peacocks and peahens from
Rocking B-A-B Ranch in Defuniak Springs
were trained for the film starring Matt
Damon and Scarlett Johansson.
Ranch manager Josh Nelson tells the
Northwest Florida Daily News (http://bit.
ly/vQCAUJ) that he also sent 20 eggs


to California in the spring so that the
film crew could capture footage of chicks
hatching.
Thousands attend the ranch's annual
Farm Day each fall, when owners Bill
and Jane Buckelew open it to 'the public.
Nelson said the ranch exports peafowl all
over the world.


HI LO


* Associated Press


Pensacola
47 2Q.:


HI L HI LO


Valdosta
- "n i


:!. '* ." ir i i -.. ',*
PARTLY ISOLATED
CLOUDY SHOWERS


HI LO HI O


we


S Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee Lake City 46'28 Daytona Beach
3 18 4 0 Ft. Lauderdale
* Gainesvile Daytona Beach Fort Myers
Panama City 41. 21 49 30 Gainesville
46/33 Ocala 2 Jacksonville
47 '22 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
50.32 53 33 e CMiami
Miami
Tampa Naples
51; 29 West Palm Beach Ocala
56 40 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 60/41I Pensacola
56-32 Naples Tallahassee
56/33 Miami Tampa
59,42 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
61/48


edne
61
56
66
63
56
54

54





66
63


sday Thursday
40 s 66. 4'9
38 ; 64 47s
4, s 71,53 s
40 ; 6& 49 s
30 s 59, 3? s
34 58.42 s
56 p- 70 60 pc
i( i 58 35 s
51 '1 56 ]i
45 6; 52 s
32 s 62 40 s
41 66 4 ,.
47 5 63 51 5
46 p," 61 51. I
33 60 38 4
40 66 48. s
2 9 5 :5 ,
4J s, 69 50



An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


Actor Matt Damon attends the premiere of "We Bought A Zoo" at the Ziegfeld Theatre Dec. 12
in New York.



Deputy killed in S. Florida crash


TEMPERATURES
Hign Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low -

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


64
50
66
43
86 in 1975
23 in 1918


0.00"
0.00"
0.00"
0.20"
0.20"


SUN
Sunnse tuday
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7.27 a.m.
5:43 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5:43 p.m.


1:24 p.m.
2:24 a.m.
2:03 p.m.
3:18 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
9 16 23 30
Full Last New First


4
MIMME
45 nits to bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a r.3ale frijn', ( 0
- r,, r 0+


I S Forecasts, data and
graphics @ 2012 Weather
I Central, LP,Madison, Ws.
weater www.weatherpubllsher.comn


OAKLAND PARK An off-duty South
Florida sheriff's deputy has been killed in
a traffic accident.
According to the Broward County
Sheriff's Office, 45-year-old Deputy John
Blackwelder was riding his personal
motorcycle in Oakland Park on Sunday
afternoon when a car made a left-hand
turn into his path.
Blackwelder crashed into the car's rear
passenger door. Paramedics pronounced
Blackwelder dead at the scene. The sher-


iff's office says the deputy was wearing a
helmet.
The car's 75-year-old driver was not
injured. The crash remains under investi-
gation.
The sheriff's office says Blackwelder
previously worked as a deputy from 2000
through 2007 and then was rehired in
2010.


M Associated Press


7a lp 7p
Tuesday







Ftui6t54 ieeraturte


la 6a On r,, ,3 ,,
Wednesday | F-,-"-" 'i*.r
SInd., ended their Ion-
gest stretch without n
subzero tempera-
tures of 1,413 days
when the tempera-
t ur-. ,,lf t.o 1 degree
Sel,, zero


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture



"So teach us to number our
days, that we may apply our
.hearts unto wisdom."


Psalm 90:12 KJV




Lake City Reporter


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


r w v ,


,


"TO --oil'0:


fi


I
















Paul: Strong finish in Iowa is important


By THOMAS BEAUMONT
Associated Press

MASON CITY, Iowa
Republican presiden-
tial candidate Ron Paul
said Monday his path to
the party's nomination was
unclear without a strong
performance in Iowa's lead-
off caucuses.
"It will be a real chal-
lenge. There's no doubt,"
Paul told The Associated
Press aboard a charter jet
on a five-city sprint on the
eve of the leadoff caucus-
es. "We've invested a lot of
time and money in doing
well here."
Paul's campaign was
preparing to criticize rival
Rick Santorum, a former
Pennsylvania senator who
has risen sharply to the
top tier in the past week
after gaining traction with
Iowa's divided social con-
servatives.
Paul, among the lead-
ers in Iowa polls since
last month, returned to
the state after two days at
home in Texas. His five
rivals for the caucuses
crisscrossed Iowa over
the holiday weekend.
Campaigning with a son,
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., the
libertarian-leaning Texan


defended the 48-hour break
in campaigning, even as
final polls published at the
end of last week showed
more than a third of likely
caucus-goers undecided
or willing to change their
mind before the caucuses.
Paul expressed faith in
his Iowa organization, a far
more structured network
than his 2008 Iowa cam-
paign that helped him place
fifth in Iowa four years
ago.
"I don't want to sound
over-confident, but I am
confident in our organi-
zation," he said, arguing
that other candidates
were still scrambling to
shore up their supporters.
Paul has a robust staff
in New Hampshire, and
he began running ads in
South Carolina, where the
South's first primary is
scheduled for Jan.,21.
Still, Paul was waiting
until Friday to head to New
Hampshire, where he is ris-
ing but far behind former
Massachusetts Gov. Mitt
Romney in polls.
Paul's confidence was
buoyed Monday as big
crowds packed with young-
er supporters met him
in Des Moines and cities
in eastern and northern


Iowa.
"We're optimistic and
have our fingers crossed
you're going to show up
and do your job," Paul told
about 200 people in Mason
City, the final stop of the
day.
Paul railed as equally
against Democrat-backed
programs as he did against
typically Republican pri-
orities such as the Patriot
Act
Paul has steadily gained
ground in Iowa in the last
two months. And while
he narrowly trailed only
Romney a series of polls
published last week, sup-
port had leveled off in the
wake of sharp attack over
his opposition to prevent-
ing an Iranian nuclear
weapon with a military
strike.
* It did not dissuade
him from repeating in
Davenport and Cedar
Rapids a line that brought
loud cheers in Des Moines.
"Just listen to some of the
candidates. They are will-
ing to start bombing Iran
right now. One thing is
for certain, this country
does not need another
war," Paul told the crowd
in Davenport, prompting
loud cheers.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential can-
didate, Rep. Ron Paul, R-
Texas, accompanied by his
son Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.,
campaigns in Davenport,
Iowa, Monday. The elder
Paul said that without a good
showing in Iowa, winning
the Republican nomination
would be "a real challenge."


ROMNEY: Says he expects to win Iowa's caucuses
Continued From Page 1A


giver, the great blamer."
Aides worked behind the scenes
to ensure that his backers from his
failed 2608 campaign would turn
out Tuesday night to argue that the
stakes next fall are enormous and
that only Romney is capable of top-
pling the incumbent Democrat.
People like-Carol Dowhey, 51, who
plans to speak for Romney at a pre-
cinct in Atlantic, was among those
who received a one-page speech for
caucus night. "It's no wonder the
White House has focused all of their
attacks exclusively on Mitt Romney,"
the text says. "They know, like I know,
that he is the toughest opponent they
could possibly face."
Speakers were being told to men-
tion Romney's success helping
familiar businesses like Staples and
Domino's Pizza and to emphasize
that he has been married for 42 years
and won't "embarrass the country."


The text says: "If you really want
to send a message to Barack Obama
- and I know I do send it by vot-
ing for the one candidate they fear
more than any other."
Romney campaigned Monday with
South Dakota Sen. John Thune, who
also made the contrast. "This is not a
community organizer. This is some-
body who knows how to create jobs,"
he said of Romney. He told voters to
ask themselves: "Who is best posi-
tioned to win? We need to win."
The hope is that the pitch res-
onates as Romney is locked in a
close race with libertarian Texas Rep.
Ron Paul, who has limited appeal
to the mainstream GOP, and former
Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum,
who has limited organization outside
of Iowa.
On the eve of the caucuses,
Romney's aides reiterated their view
that regardless of whether he comes


in first, second or third, Romney will
emerge from the caucuses as the
most likely nominee and remain the
only one who can compete in all the
contests in other early states.
"When voters start to look at who
they want to be, the nominee we
think that helps us," said Stuart
Stevens, Romney's top strategist.
Romney aides acknowledge that
losing to Paul or Santorum wouldn't
be the same as a win. But they claim
that they don't see Santorum as a
threat on par with Mike Huckabee,
the charismatic former Arkansas
governor who united socially con-
servative voters in Iowa in 2008 and
soundly beat Romney. They say
Santorum just doesn't have the down-
home appeal the Baptist preacher
brought to the race.
"We'll see him in New Hampshire,"
said Eric Fehrnstrom, a senior
Romney adviser.


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BOOMERS: Take center stage in Medicare debate


Continued From Page 1A

"People would like to
have what they used to
have. What they don't seem
to understand is that it's
already changed," said Gail
Wilensky, a former Medicare
administrator and adviser to
Republicans. "Medicare as
we have known it is not part
of our future."
Two sets of numbers
underscore that point
First, Medicare's giant
trust fund for inpatient
care is projected to run out
of money in 2024. At that
point, the program will col-
lect only enough payroll
taxes to pay 90 percent of
benefits.
Second, researchers
estimate that 20 to 30 per-
cent of the more than $500
billion that Medicare now
spends -annually is wasted
on treatments and proce-
dures of little or no benefit
to patients.
Taken together, that
means policymakers can't
let Medicare keep running
on autopilot and they'll look
for cuts before any payroll
tax increases.
Privatizationisthebiggest
divide between Democrats
and Republicans.
Currently about 75 per-
cent of Medicare recipi-
ents are in the traditional
government-run, fee-
for-service program and
25 percent are in private
insurance plans known as
Medicare Advantage.
Ryan's original approach,
part of a budget plan the
House passed in the spring,
would have put 100 percent
of future retirees into pri-
vate insurance. His latest
plan, developed with Sen.


Ron Wyden, D-Ore., would.
keep traditional Medicare
as an option, competing
with private plans.
Older people would
get a fixed payment they
could use for private health
insurance or traditional
Medicare. Proponents call
it "premium support." To
foes, it's a voucher.
Under both of Ryan's
versions, people now 55 or
older would not have to
make any changes. GOP
presidential candidates
Mitt Romney and Newt
Gingrich praise his latest
plan.
How would it work?
Would it save taxpayers
money? Would it shift costs
to retirees as Ryan's earlier
plan did? Would Congress
later phase out traditional
Medicare? Those and other
questions must still be
answered.
"I'm not sure anybody
has come up with a formula
on this that makes people
comfortable," said health
economist Marilyn Moon,
who formerly served as a
trustee helping to oversee
Medicare finances.
White House spokes-
man Jay Carney says the
Wyden-Ryan plan "would
end Medicare as we know
it for millions of seniors,"
causing the traditional
program to "wither on the
vine."
But what administration
officials don't say is that
Obama's health care law
already puts in place one
of Ryan's main goals by
limiting future increases in
Medicare spending.
Ryan would do it with a


fixed payment for health
insurance, adjusted to
allow some growth. In
theory that compels con-
sumers and medical pro-
viders to be more cost-con-
scious. Obama does it with
a powerful board that can
force Medicare cuts to ser-
vice providers if costs rise
beyond certain levels and
Congress fails to act
Like several elements
of Obama's health care
overhaul, the Independent
Payment Advisory Board
is in limbo for now, but it is
on the books. If the board
survives Republican repeal
attempts, it could become
one of the government's
most important domestic
agencies.
The White House wants
to keep the existing struc-
ture of Medicare while
"twisting the dials" to con-
trol spending, said a current
Medicare trustee, econo-
mist Robert Reischauer of
the Urban Institute think
tank.
Ryan's latest approach
is arguably an evolution
of the current Medicare
Advantage private insur-
ance program, not a radi-
cal change, Reischauer
said. That's particularly
so if traditional Medicare
remains an option.
"In the hot and heavy
political debate we are in,
participants are exaggerat-
ing the difference between
the proposals," he said.
During failed bud-
get negotiations with
Republicans last summer,
Obama indicated a willing-
ness to make more major
changes to Medicare,


including gradually rais-
ing the age of eligibility to
67, increasing premiums
for many beneficiaries,
revamping co-payments
and deductibles in ways
that would raise costs for
retirees, and cutting pay-
ments to drugmakers and
other providers.
"I was surprised by how
much the president was
willing to offer in terms of
Medicare changes without
a more thorough vetting
and discussion," said Moon.
Obama says he will veto any
plan to cut Medicare ben-
efits without- raising taxes
on the wealthy.
Democrats are still
hoping to use Ryan's
privatization plans as a
political weapon against
Republicans in 2012, but
the Medicare debate could
cut both ways. For the 76
million baby boomers
signing up over the next
couple of decades, it will
pay to be watching.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY. JANUARY 3. 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Tuesday, January 3, 2012


ONE0


ONE
OPINION


Needed:

Rest rules

for cargo

pilots

The federal govern-
ment has been trying
to keep tired trans-
portation operators
from killing them-
selves and others for more than
a century, starting with "hours of
service" limits along railroads in
1907 and most recently updating
the rules governing airline pilots'
hours in flight
Always, there has been ten-
sion between the regulators and
the companies and workers who
must operate under the rules.
Those tensions flared in late
December after the Federal
Aviation Administration set
new limits on flying time for
passenger airline pilots but
exempted pilots of cargo planes.
The exemption came after the
industry argued that the changes
would be too costly compared to
any benefits to safety, although
federal officials expressed hope
that cargo carriers would follow
the new riles voluntarily.
That didn't fly with the
Independent Pilots Association,
the union that-represents
United Parcel Service pilots.
They sued to be included, not-
ing that, even more so than pas-
senger planes, cargo carriers
face two of the conditions cited.
by the FAA as increasing the
risk for fatigue: flying at night
and across multiple time zones.
As the rules emerge, there
continue to be evolving, but still
different, standards for the hours
not only of cargo and passenger
pilots, but also freight and pas-
senger rail operators, truck and
bus drivers and assorted types of
maritime crewmen.
Certainly, it's not reasonable
to expect the same rules for
sleep-aboard sailors and airline
pilots who shuttle home or to
hotel rooms after each flight
But it's hard to see why the
margin of sleep safety should
be much different for pilots
flying the same planes in the
same airspace just because
some carry people and others
packages. The same holds true
for locomotive engineers, inter-
state drivers and helmsmen.
All present a deadly risk if they
nod off on the job.
Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


New Year's resolu-
tions often spring
from short-lived
regrets over
holiday excesses.
Shame provokes us to vow, for
example, never to drink again
or, at least, to lose some weight.
Resolutions like these don't
bear much hope for long-term
success, but it doesn't hurt to
make them. You never know.
Similarly, I'm not particularly
optimistic about. the prospects
for these three not-necessar-
ily-related national resolutions;
nevertheless, I propose them in
the spirit of the season and with
hope for the New Year:
Resolution 1: Learn some-
thing good from a bad war: It
would have been interesting to.
be a neurological fly on the wall
on President Barack Obama's
cranium in mid-December as
he welcomed the last American
combat troops home from Iraq.
After almost nine years of war,
Obama said, in wild understate-
ment, that "Iraq is not a perfect
place." But at least, he added,
"we are leaving a sovereign, sta-
ble and self-reliant country with
a representative government
elected by its people."
Of course, part of Obama's
job is to put the best light on
things. But one wonders if it
wouldn't be healthier to admit.
that nothing of the rosy picture
that the president presented' is
true about Iraq at present and
that the prospects for stability
and democracy are grim. In fact,
civil war is much more likely.
The troops deserve a good
homecoming. Out of all the
players iA Iraq during the past
nine years, they've behaved
with more honor, courage and


The investigation
into the operation of
Arlington National
Cemetery and the
discrepancies in
thousands of death records
there has unearthed a little-
known, but revealing, piece
of American cultural history:
Call them the "tombs of the
unnamed."
In the Dark Ages of the last
century between the 1920s
and 1940s wives often were
interred in the same graves as
their husbands at the cemetery.
But the wives' names were not
inscribed on the headstone or
anywhere else on the plot
The Army's recent report to
Congress on its study of the cem-
etery's recordkeeping mess said
that was "apparently a culturally
acceptable practice" of the time.
The report says the cemetery
intends to rectify the omissions
by either replacing the existing
headstones with ones also bear-
ing the wives' names or by order-
ing the installation of footstones
to carry the women's names.
0* *0

In its new quest to be relevant
to American youths now that the


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANO
VI


fU


John Crisp
jcrisp@delmaredu
competence than most others.
Nearly 4,500 didn't come home
from doing precisely what we
asked of them.
But we do them a disservice
if we casually record Iraq as
another successful war and for-
get its origins in the mendacity,
arrogance and incompetence
of George Bush, Dick Cheney,
Donald Rumsfeld and Paul
Wolfowitz. Let's resolve not to ...
make this mistake again.
Resolution 2:'Start taking
climate change seriously:
Whenever I mention climate
change, readers write to tell,
me that the jury is still out No,
the jury has returned, and the
verdict is "Guilty." The main
question is whether the sen-
tence is "Life Without Parole" or
"Death."
Ironically, in the face of
mounting evidence that
human activity is having a sig-
nificant impact on the weather,
Americans are less and less
inclined to believe in climate
change. There's only one word
for this: denial. We should have
started on this problem sooner,
but given that we haven't, 2012
would be an excellent year for
taking action; it represents one
of a rapidly diminishing number
of opportunities.
Resolution 3: Save the Post
Office: Okay, this resolution '


Lisa Hoffman
lischoffmon@shns.com

space shuttle program is over,
NASA has launched a radio sta-
tion on the Internet that airs
rock, indie and alternative music
- punctuated by messages about
career opportunities and news at
the space agency.
Called 'Third Rock, America's
Space Station," it can be found
via NASA's home page www.
nasa.gov and at http://www.
rfcmedia.com/thirdrockradio.
The station, catering to the
4G audience, went online Dec.
12, and is a collaboration with
RFC Media in Houston. NASA
says no taxpayer money was
used in developing or operating
it Advertising is welcome.
RFC Media says the music it
selects for the station is "emerg-
ing" and consists of "the best
songs and deepest tracks from
a full spectrum of rock artists
across many styles and decades."


may be impossible to keep.
Still, as I stood in line to send a
package this Christmas, I con-
sidered what a fine privilege it
is to be able to push a physical
object across a counter in Texas
and have it delivered rapidly,
efficiently and accurately a few
days later for a very reason-
able price to any address in the
United States.
From the early days of our
republic, the Post Office's influ-
ence has been democratizing. It
tied every citizen to every other
and had the effect of drawing
the country together: every-
one was included and got the
same service, and the 1 percent
always paid the same as the 99
percent.
Privatization might be more
financially.efficient. But thJ :" ':'
purposes arid effects of the Post
Office were never entirely com-
mercial: it probably shouldn't be
expected to make a profit any
more than a battleship or air-
craft carrier should.
By the way, the Post Office
clerks were efficient and courte-
ous, and my package arrived
in plenty of time for Christmas.
Let's resolve to assess the value
that the Post Office provides
for American life and consider
maintaining it.
. Of course, these resolutions
sound more like a Christmas
wish list than feasible goals. But
Santa won't be dropping solu-
tions to these problems down
our chimneys anytime soon.
We'll have to resolve to make
these things happen on our
own. Happy New Year!

* John M. Crisp teaches in the
English Department at Del Mar
College in Corpus Christi, Texas.


Gives a whole new meaning
to moon rocks.
*

More than 400 U.S. war dogs
that served tours in Iraq and
Afghanistan are now playing
a role in understanding ill-
nesses that have befallen some
American troops deployed to
the Middle East
A database of the medical
records of 450 military work-
ing dogs some of whom
spent years at war will be
studied to identify trends in
diseases they suffered and any
similarities with the sicknesses
of troops, especially those that
might be connected to expo-
sure to environmental health
hazards.
An earlier study of war dogs
that served during operations
Desert Shield and Desert Storm
in 1990 and 1991 deployments
that gave rise to an assort-
ment of medical maladies that
came to be known as Gulf War
Syndrome found no evidence
that the dogs had ,transmitted
infectious or parasitic diseases
to human troops.

E Scripps Howard News Service


4A


THEIR
EW


Another

80,000

pages of

rules, regs


the year having
saddled Americans
with another
81,836 pages of
regulations. No issue was
too small or insignificant to
escape attention in the federal
government's final week of
pronouncements.
On Thursday, The
Department of Homeland
Security announced draw-
bridge operation rules for
the Hanover Street bridge
in Baltimore. The National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration granted one
Thomas A. Jefferson a per-
mit "to conduct research on
nine cetacean species off the
California coast." A "safety
zone" was declared for a New
Year's Eve fireworks display on.
the Sacramento River.
When Ben Franklin famous-
ly suggested that the birth of
the nation ought to be celebrat-
ed with fireworks, he didn't
mention any need to seek
prior approval from a central
government that also insists
on registering the identity of
individuals with an interest in
studying dolphins along the
California coast
The ever-expanding tome of.
mindless rules and restrictions,,-
. known as the Federal Register
serves as the most obvious'
measure of how overgrown .
Washington has becoiiie. The
annual output of 80,000 pages
of red tape comes at a tremen-
dous price. It takes $1 trillion
in borrowing to keep *the
supersized bureaucracy open.
But that's not all.
According to the
Competitive Enterprise
Institute, keeping up with all of
the latest federal dictates costs
American businesses $1.75 tril-:
lion. Every dollar spent filling
out pointless paperwork and -
every hour spent attempting to
decipher arcane laws reduces
the ability of businesses to
expand operations and hire
new employees.
That's why the greatest
gift Congress and the Obama
administration could give to the.
economy would be a regula-
tory moratorium. Even better,
the House and Senate ought to
resolve to pass no new laws, or
at least to enact nothing new
without first repealing a statute
of equivalent burden.
America has never been more
coddled, overseen and micro-
managed by its political class. ;
It's no coincidence that the
country is also facing its worst
economic crisis. Enough is
enough. Let's send the employ-
ees at the Government Printing
Office where the Federal
Register is printed home for
the remainder of 2012.
Washington Times

HIGHLIGHTS -
IN HISTORY
Today is Tuesday, Jan. 3. On
this date:
In 1947 Congressional pro-
ceedings were televised for
the first time as viewers in
Washington, Philadelphia and
New York City saw some of the
opening ceremonies of the 80th.
Congress.

In 1961 the United States sev-
ered diplomatic relations with
Cuba.

In 1967 Jack Ruby, the man
who fatally shot accused presi-
dential assassin Lee Harvey
Oswald, died in a Dallas hos-


pital.
* Associated Press


Three improbable


New Year's resolutions


'Tombs of the unnamed'











Page EdItor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2012


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Jan. 3

Revival

Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church, Ft.
White, Rev. Donnell
Sanders, Pastor,
Revival, January 3-5,
7:30 pm nightly.
Revivalist: Rev. Dr.
Larry T. Walthour of St.
Andrew M.B. Church,
Opa Locka, Fla.
For more information
call Ora Enman 386-497-
2254


Jan. 4

Blue/Grey meeting

Olustee meeting .
The Blue/Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Jan. 4
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Newcomers
Friendship Luncheon

The January
Friendship Luncheon
of The Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be at Casa Del Sol
on US 90 on January
4th at 11:30 a.m. All
members, guests and
friends are welcome. For
more information call
Rose Taylor at 755-2175
or Barbara Test 754-
7227.

Revival

Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church, Ft.
White, Rev. Donnell
Sanders, Pastor.
Revival, January 3-5,
7:30 pm nightly.
Revivalist: Rev. Dr.
Larry T. Walthour of St.
Andrew M.B. Church,
Opa Locka, Fla.
For more information
call Ora Enman 386-497-
2254


Jan. 5

Revival

Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church, Ft.
White, Rev. Donnell
Sanders, Pastor.
Revival, January 3-5,
7:30 pm nightly.
Revivalist: Rev. Dr.
Larry T. Walthour of St.
Andrew M.B. Church,
Opa Locka, Fla.
For more information
call Ora Enman 386-497-
2254


Jan. 8

134th church
anniversary

The New Mt. Pisgah
A.M.E Church, 345 NE
Washington St., church
family invites you to
share in our 134th
church anniversary on
Sunday Jan. 8 at 4 p.m.
The speaker will be the
Rev. Lantz Mills of New
Day Spring Day Church
and the theme is faith,
hope and love.


Jan. 9

Women's Cancer
Support Group

The Women's Cancer
Support Group of


Lake City will meet at
Baya Pharmacy East,
780 SE Baya Drive
from 5:30 to 6:30 PM
on Monday, January
9, 2012. Our guest
speaker, Dr. Paul G.
Goetowski, Community
Cancer Center, will be


discussing "Women's
Cancer in 2012".
Information at 386-752-
4198 or 386-755-0522.

Jan. 11

Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon

The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcmers
and Friends will be
held at 11:00 a.m. on
Wednesday, Jan. 11th
at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a
fun day.

Jan. 13


Revival


Revival at First Full
Gospel Baptist Church
with Rev. Jay Walden
Jan, 13, 14, 15, 7 p,m.
Sunday, 11 a.m., 6 p.m.
U.S. 90 West to Jones
Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Masonic banquet

Gold Standard Lodge
#167 will have their
annual Masonic banquet
at Winfield Community
Center on Friday, Jan.
13 at 7 p.m. until. For
ticket info contact Chris
Mirra at 386-623-3611 or
Dennis Murphy at 386-
697-3739.

Jan. 14

North Florida Writers
Group meets

Love to write? From
novice to published
author, the North
Florida Writers Group
(formerly Lake City
Writers Group) is
the place where local
writers gather to share
information, to create, to
learn and to inspire.
Writers of any
experience level from
the area are welcome
to join us Saturday,
January 14, 2012, 2pm
- 4pm, at the Columbia
County Public Library,
Main Branch, 308 NW
Columbia Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055. Join us
Saturday and see what
we are all about!
There are no fees to
join the group; however
space is limited, so
please reserve your spot
today!
For more information,
please contact: Marley
Andretti, Group Leader,
(386) 438-3610.
Email inquiries to:
editor@afinaldraft.com

Revival

Revival at First Full
Gospel Baptist Church
with Rev. Jay Walden
Jan. 13, 14, 15, 7 p.m.
Sunday, 11 a.m., 6 p.m.
U.S. 90 West to Jones
Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.

Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program

On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program at
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this
memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.


You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
lives forever in our
hearts. Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 p.
m, at Trinity United
Methodist Church.
Glynnell Presley,
Secretary
John F. Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO


Revival

Revival at First Full
Gospel Baptist Church
with Rev. Jay Walden
Jan. 13, 14, 15, 7 p.m.
Sunday, 11 a.m., 6 p.m.
U.S. 90 West to Jones
Way.
Pastor Stan Ellis.


Jan. 18

Olustee meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.


Jan. 19


Voices that Change

Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices, that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet
facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit
for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.


Jan. 20


Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program

Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attiie is
semi-formal or church
attire.

Feb. 25

Community Concerts

The UNF Chamb'er
Singers perform 3
p.m. Feb. 25 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. This elite
singing ensemble from
the University of North
Florida performs world
music, vocal jazz, and
other choral gems.
Each singer is chosen
by.audition for solo-
quality excellence and
enthusiasm. Award-
winning director Cara
Tasher has served
around the world as
chorus master, guest
conductor, clinician,
and soprano soloist.
Ticket and membership
information is
available at www.
communityconcerts.
info.



March 7

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is having a Wrap-up
meeting 5:30 p.m.
March 7 at the Central
Building for the Olustee
Festival 2012. The
building is located at
409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Community Concerts
.March 9


Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby. grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.

communityconcerts.info.


Feb. 1

Blue/Grey meeting.

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Community Concerts

Carpe Diem String
Quartet performs 7:30
pm March 9 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Carpe Diem plays their
classical string quartet
repertoire as well as
Gypsy, tango, folk, pop,
rock & jazz. Their 2009 '
album was Grammy
listed for Best Classical
Album, Best.Chamber
Music Performance,
Best New Artist, and
Best Engineered Album-
Classical. We believe


that their electrifying
style will keep you
engaged from beginning
to end. Ticket and
membership information
is available, at www.
communityconcerts.info.

May 20

Community Concerts

The Jacksonville
Symphony Orchestra
performs 3 p.m. May 20
at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. The full
Jacksonville Symphony
Orchestra presents
a rousing "Patriotic
Pops Spectacular"
program featuring
popular works by John
Williams, Gershwin,
Bernstein, Berlin,
Sousa, and other season
favorites. Ticket and


BETTy J


membership information
is available at www.
comunityconcerts.info

ONGOING

Flag football tryouts

Flag Football, Christ
Central Sports.
Registration now thru
January 13. Age 5-12.
Fee: $40. Call Ronnie for
more info 386-365-2128.


For Life Insurance
GO With

Someone You Know
John Bums, III Mary H. Sunmera
Agent Financial Services Rep.

Lj 234 SW Main Blvd. 752-5866



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V.
..,~


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2012


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL TUESDAY. JANUARY 3. 2012


Toe-tappin' fun, courtesy Cowboy Dave



'I wanna make their day,' Dave Henrie says of his audiences


By Bob Denny
Special to the Reporter
This morning
I'm driving to
a local nurs-
ing home.
I'm helping
"Cowboy Dave" (aka Dave
Henrie) unload country
music paraphernalia from
his truck and set up on
stage.
Walking down the hall,
I see smiles come over
faces as people recognize
Cowboy Dave. He makes
frequent stops to chat
and renew friendships.
They're about to experi-
ence some good live clas-
sic country and gospf 1
music.
Dave has been a real
cowboy and singer all his
life, bulldogging and calf
roping, rodeo announcing,
and performing music.
Now living in rural
Gilchrist County with his
wife/soulmate, Sharon,
he has fond memories of
riding and camping with
their horses Smash and
Danny in North Dakota,
South Dakota, Tombstone,
the Badlands, Mount
Rushmore, and the Grand
Canyon, and riding Florida
trails while their old
Australian Shepherd dog
tried to keep up.
Born in New York in
1940, Cowboy Dave has
been a farmer, a meat cut-
ler, a level-nine machinist,
and a snow maker for ski
resorts.
Since moving to North
Central Florida 12 years
ago, he spends lots of his
time rehearsing and per-
forming classic country
and gospel music.
Band membership is a
"rotating door," recently
including his friends .,
Cherokee, Reverend Dale,
Chris, Roxanne, Gene,
and Ron. I'm lucky to
be a part of his current
group, "Cowboy Dave and
Friends."


Submitted

Jason L. Kimbrell, the Regional
Director of Operations for Lifeguard
Ambulance Service, has received
the prestigious Wendell N. Rollason
Award. Lifeguard provides EMS ser-
vices for Columbia County.
The Wendell N. Rollason
Achievement Award is presented to an
individual who has contributed most
toward the goals of the Florida Rural
Health Association and who has pro-
vided an enduring contribution to rural
healthcare. In the spirit of Wendell
Rollason, the individual is honored for
compassion, unselfishness and com-
mitment in seeking solutions in the
delivery of rural health care or quality
of life in rural Florida.
Kimbrell has taken a strong
approach in improving the health-
care services in rural communities
across Florida. In his role as a mem-
ber of the Northwest Florida Rural
Health Network, he has success-
fully received grants over the past
six years, the funds used to enhance


'Cowboy Dave' Henrie is right at home in the saddle or in front of a mike.


Is Dave rich after a life-
time of rodeos and perfor-
mances?
He's rich in spirit.
He's one of those gener-
ous guys who performs
for veterans' hospitals,
nursing homes, the domi-
ciliary, senior centers, and
dementia wards in residen-
tial facilities.
During the Vietnam
era, Dave was not called
upon for military service
because the United States
needed those farmers and


'their farms to feed the
nation.
It's obvious that Dave
loves, respects, and
appreciates these older or
less able folks, and has a
strong desire to give them
the gift of music and fun
to his audiences who have
given so much to their
country.
"I wanna make their
day," he says. "If you have
a skill or talent, share it."
Sharon adds, "Dave
always wants to make


people feel good about
themselves."
Is he special?
Dave says no, the audi-
ences are the special
ones. Many other bands
give their time and talents
to worthy causes. He
encourages folks to do vol-
unteer work.
Once the music starts,
they tap their feet, call
out requests, and some of
them sing along.
A couple of nurses or
attendants may dance in


the aisle. There's a spar-
kle in some eyes, from old
memories revisited. Some
remember the words well
enough to sing along.
Packing up should he
really quick and easy, but
ifts not. Dave spends this
time chatting and main-
taining those friendships.


They already look forward
to the next visit from their
friend Dave.
Happy trails!

Bob Denny teaches at
Florida Gateway College
and is a columnist for the
Lake City Reporter


-R
1 iM !-- *. A i T. :
Auto i Home Bus nessI Lule
386.752.2345
.ar, c Ceo:,". ,.rr li.h3a, ,:,:,m

74- ,E Ea,3 Dr. .,,I 102
Lakle Co,


4* "'it"*
-, ,-~


I)
.4


services and implement wellness
programs in underserved areas.
Kimbrell has taken the initiative
to bring to the citizens of the com-
munity a falls-prevention program
that aims to reduce the risks of the
elderly slips and falls. The falls-
prevention initiative brings multiple
agencies together,
working to improve
S the lives of the citi-
zens in the com-
munity. Kimbrell is
frequently request-
ed to present as a
key note speaker at
Kimbrell civic events, much
in part because of
his known reputation as a leader
who strives to better the lives of
those that live in rural areas.
In his role as an EMS leader in
Florida, Kimbrell has exercised his
authority to make operational deci-
sions and has positioned amnbulanc-
es in rural regions that historically
never had permanent coverage. He
has a true commitment to the citizens


in the rural community; despite his
busy, professional schedule, he con-
tinues to be an active volunteer fire-
fighter in a rural region of Santa Rosa
County. Kimbrell is actively working
with the Florida Bureau of EMS to
develop a program focused on provid-
ing a community paramedic program,
which will be instrumental in shaping
the future of the EMS industry. The
community paramedic program will
provide a clinical outreach to many
of the rural counties in Florida and
improve access to care.
"The presentation of this award
recognizes the significant contribu-
tions that Jason has made over the
years to the improvement of rural
healthcare and to those who may
not have ready access to healthcare.
Jason's leadership within Lifeguard
and the EMS community as a whole
has significantly improved the avail-
ability of emergency healthcare to
the citizens who live in the rural
areas of our state," said Shawn
Bradberry, Lifeguard Assistant
Chief of Operations.


Tracy C. Sweat

Tracy C. Sweat, age 95, of
White Springs, Florida passed
away December 31,2011 at
Haven Hospice in Lake City,
FL. Tracy was born July 4,
1916 in Waycross, Georgia to
the late Avender and Eliza-
beth Jordan Sweat. He was
a World War II veteran of
the United States Army. Mr.
Sweat went on to work with
the United States Government
Civil Service Dept. at Jack-
sonville Naval Air Station as a
firefighter for 31 years. In 1972
he retired to Hamilton County.
Tracy was an avid reader of
western books.
Survivors include his wife of
56 years. Alma C. Sweat, White
Springs, FL.: three brothers.
Dorsey Sweat (Mary). White
Springs, FL.. A.J. Sweat,
Jacksonville, FL. and Val
Sweat, White Springs. FL.:


several nieces and nephews also
survive.
Funeral services will be held at
2:00 P.M. Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2012
in the chapel of Harry T. Reid
Funeral Home, Jasper, FL. with
Rev. Tommy Lindsey officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
Riverside Cemetery in White
Springs. FL.
The family will receive friends
between the hours of 5:00-7:00
P.M. Monday, Jan. 2 at the
funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made to Haven Hospice.
6037 West US Hw, 90, Lake
City, FL. 32055.
Harry T. Reid Funeral Home.
Jasper, FL. is in charge of ar-
rangements.



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Signature


updates due


Signature updates
must be received by
the elections office no
later than the start of
canvassing of absentee
ballots which begins on
January 25, 2012 at 1
p.m. per Florida Statute
98.077(4)
If your signature does


not match what is on file
your absentee or pro-
visional ballot will not
count.
For more informa-
tion contact the office
of Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections
Liz P Horne at (386) 758-
1026.


.- -. a
GetConvneted
__________________ j


Lifeguard Regional Director recognized


OBITUARIES


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042
rkjrL/ ,lj'eo fre orre'- 5


SPORTS


Tuesday, January 3, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

LCMS SOFTBALL
Conditioning
starts Wednesday
Lake City Middle
School softball
conditioning begins at
3:15 p.m. Wednesday at
the school field. Players
must have a physical and
consent forms.
For details, call coach
Machon Kvistad at
623-6833.

CHS FOOTBALL
Awards banquet
Friday at school
The Columbia High
football team's end of
the year banquet is
7 p.m. Friday in the
school cafeteria. Tickets
are $12 and on sale at
Hunter Printing.
For details, call coach
Brian Allen at 755-8080.

CHS SOFTBALL
Tryout planned
for Monday
Columbia High's
softball team tryout is
3:30 p.m. Monday. All
players must have
current physical and
consent forms.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.

From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Melody
Christian Academy,
4:30 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer at Leon High,
7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Wednesday
Columbia High girls
weightlifting vs. Fort
White High, 4:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Leon High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
basketball vs. Williston
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Thursday
Fort White High
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (boys-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Atlantic
Coast High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High girls
weightlifting vs. Union
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
wrestling in Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
SHigh, TBA
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High (CYSA field),
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High (CYSA field),
7 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer at Newberry High,
7 p.m. (girls-5)
Fort White High
basketball vs. Interlachen
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling in Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Suwannee


High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


ASSOCIATED PRESS
University of Florida running back Jeff Demps (28) is chased by Ohio State linebacker Andrew Sweat (42) during the second
half of the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville on Monday.




Special victory


Gators avoid losing season with win over Buckeyes


By MARK LONG
Associated Press
JACKSONVILLE -
Florida's special teams
came up big in the Gator
Bowl, scoring twice as the
Gators beat Ohio State
24-17 on Monday in a game
between Urban Meyer's old
team and his future one.
Andre Debose returned
a kickoff 99 yards the
longest scoring play in bowl
history and Chris Rainey
blocked a punt that was
returned for a touchdown.


The speedsters helped
the Gators (7-6) avoid their
first losing season since
1979 and pick up some
much-needed momentum
after losing six of their
previous eight games.
Ohio State (6-7) finished
below .500 for the first time
since 1988. The Buckeyes
can take solace in knowing
that Meyer, who officially
takes over at Ohio State
this week, will make it a
priority to improve special
teams. Meyer did that in his
six seasons in Gainesville,


Spartans bring

down Bulldogs

in 3rd overtime


Michigan State
snaps bowl losing
streak, 33-30.
By FRED GOODALL
Associated Press
TAMPA Kirk Cousins
threw for 300 yards and
led a late rally to tie the
game, then Dan Conroy
kicked a 28-yard field g6al
in the third overtime that
lifted No. 12 Michigan
State over No. 18 Georgia,
33-30, Monday in the
Outback Bowl.
Georgia's Blair Walsh
became the Southeastern
Conference's career scor-
ing leader with a field goal


in the second extra period.
But he missed a 42-yarder
in the first overtime after
conservative play-calling
and had a 47-yard attempt
blocked on the final play of
the game.
Michigan State overcame
a 16-0 halftime deficit and
scored with 14 seconds left
in regulation to tie it.
Georgia (10-4) finished on
a two-game losing streak.
Cousins led a 10-play,
85-yard drive without the aid
of any timeouts to wipe out
a 27-20 deficit on LeVeon
Bell's second touchdown of
the game. Cousins finished
the day as Michigan State's
career passing and total
offense leader.


,.' ..' I..-, .


_' .
a;.!-.


~j

:~


-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
University of Georgia running back Isaiah Crowell (1) is
tackled by Michigan State safety Trenton Robinson (39) and
defensive end Denzel Drone (52) during the Outback Bowl in
Tampa on Monday.


.and Rainey and Debose
were two of his most prized
recruits.
The win had everything
to do with Florida's speed.
The Gators dominated
the defensive line of scrim-
mage. They had a season-
high six sacks, harassing
Braxton Miller on nearly
every passing play. Jaye
Howard and Sharrif Floyd
were disruptive all day.
Debose and Rainey
proved to be the difference
in the much-hyped rematch
that centered around


Meyer.
Just after Ohio State tied
the game at 7 on Miller's
5-yard pass to DeVier Posey
in the second quarter,
Debose took the kickoff,
made one cut to the outside
and went untouched for his
third career special teams
touchdown.
Florida was up 14-10 at
halftime and essentially put
the game out of reach on
the opening possession of
the third.
GATORS continued on 2B


Houston

crushes

Penn St.
Tough season
ends with loss in
TicketCity Bowl.
By GENARO C. ARMAS
Associated Press
DALLAS Penn
State's tumultuous year
ended with a 30-14 loss to
Houston in the TicketCity
Bowl on Monday, a
dispiriting finish to a
season in which coach
Joe Paterno was fired as
part of a child sex-abuse
scandal that shook col-
lege sports.
The 24th-ranked
Nittany Lions were
picked apart by Cougars
star Case Keenum, who
threw for 532 yards and
three touchdowns. Penn
State was allowing 162
yards passing per game,
but Keenum threw for
more than double that by
halftime.
"I thought the guys
came out and they played
hard. It's been a difficult
year for them," Penn
State interim coach Tom
Bradley said.
Keenum burned the
Nittany Lions' veteran
secondary with touch-
down passes of 40 and 75
yards to build a 24-7 lead
by halftime.
It was the school's
first bowl game without
Paterno as head coach
since the 1962 Gator Bowl,
a 17-7 loss to Florida.
Already the NCAA
career leader for passing
yardage and TD passes,
Keenum added another
record to his resume. His
227 first-quarter passing
yards set the record for
most passing yards in one
quarter in a bowl game.


South Carolina wide receiver Alshon Jeffery (right) grabs a pass over Nebraska cornerback
Stanley Jean-Baptiste (16) for a 51-yard touchdown as time expires in the first half of the
Capital One Bowl in Orlando on Monday.


First 11


Capital One win
a milestone for
South Carolina.
By KYLE HIGHTOWER
Associated Press
ORLANDO Alshon
Jeffery had four catches for
148 yards and a touchdown
before getting tossed out of
the game for fighting, and
No. 11 South Carolina's
defense had six sacks and
shut out No. 21 Nebraska
in the final three quarters
of 30-13 win at the Capital
One Bowl on Monday.
The .victory gave South
Carolina (11-2) 11 wins


for the first time in school
history and snapped a
string of three straight
bowl losses.
Nebraska (9-4) lost its
second consecutive bowl
game and drops to 12-6
all-time in bowl matchups
against SEC foes.
Both teams lost standout
players in the third quar-
ter when Jeffery,. playing
weeks after surgery on his
hand, and Cornhuskers
cornerback Alfonso
Dennard were ejected for
throwing punches at each
other after a play.
But the Gamecocks
kept the pressure on even
without him and went up


ever

23-13 with 12:25 to play on a
9-yard touchdown pass
from Connor Shaw to
Kenny Miles. Miles then
added a 3-yard touchdown
run with just over three
minutes left his first of
the season to put the
game out of reach.
Jeffery out-jumped the
Nebraska secondary in the
end zone to catch a 51-yard
Hail Mary touchdown pass
from Shaw at the end of
the first half to send the
Gamecocks into the locker
room with a 16-13 lead.
Shaw passed for 161
yards in the half and fin-
ished the game 11 for 17
for 230 yards.


__














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY. JANUARY 3. 2012 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Sugar Bowl, Michigan vs.
Virginia Tech, at New Orleans
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Michigan St. at Wisconsin
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally, San Rafael to
San Juan,Argentina (delayed tape)
NHL
8 p.m.
NBCSP Detroit at Dallas
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Liverpool
at Manchester City

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo


y-Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


y-Baltimore
x-Pittsburgh
x-Cincinnati
Cleveland


y-Denver
San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City


East
W L T Pct PF PA
13 3 0.813 513342
8 8 0.500377363
6 10 0.375329313
6 10 0.375372434
South
W L T Pct PF PA
10 6 0.625 381 278
9 7 0.563325317
5 II 0.313243329
2 14 0 .125 243 430
North
W L T Pct PF PA
12 4 0.750 378 266
12 4 0.750 325 227
9 7 0.563 344 323
4 12 0.250218307
West
W L T Pct PF PA
8 8 0 .500 309 390
8 8 0.500406377
8 8 0.50043598433
7 9 0.438212338


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


y-N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Dallas
Washington


y-New Orleans
x-Atlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay


East
W L T Pct PF PA
9 7 0 .563 394 400
8 8 0.500396 328
8 8 0 .500 369 347
5 II 0.313 288367
South
W L T Pct PF PA
13 3 0.813 547 339
10 6 0.625402350
6 10 0.375 406 429
4 12 0.250 287 494
North


W L T Pct PF PA
y-Green Bay 15 I 0.938 560 359
x-Detroit 10 6 0 .625 474 387
Chicago 8 8 0.500 353 341
Minnesota 3 13 0.188 340449
-West
W L T Pct PF PA
y-San Francisco 13 3 0 .813 380'229
Arizona 8 8 0.500312348
Seattle 7 9 0.438321 315
St. Louis 2 14 0.125 193407
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sunday's Games
Chicago 17, Minnesota 13
New Orleans 45, Carolina 17
Green Bay 45, Detroit 41
San Francisco 34, St. Louis 27
Tennessee 23, Houston 22
New England 49, Buffalo 21
Miami 19, N.Y Jets 17
Jacksonville 19, Inrldianapolis 13
Philadelphia 34,Washington 10
San Diego 38, Oakland 26
Kansas City 7, Denver 3
Arizona 23, Seattle 20, OT
Atlanta 45,Tampa Bay 24
Baltimore 24, Cincinnati 16
Pittsburgh 13, Cleveland 9
N.Y.Giants 31,Dallas 14
End of Regular Season

NFL playoffs

Wild Card
Saturday, Jan. 7
Cincinnati at Houston, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 8
Atlanta at New'York Giants, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Denver, 4:30 p.m.
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 14
Atlanta, N.Y. Giants or New Orleans
at San Francisco, 4:30 p.m.
Cincinnati, Pittsburgh or Denver at
New England, 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15
Pittsburgh, Denver or Houston at
Baltimore, I p.m.
Detroit, Atlanta or N.Y. Giants at
Green Bay, 4:30 p.m.

Season high points

Most points scored by a team in an
NFL regular season:
589 New England, 2007
560 Green Bay, 2011
556 Minnesota, 1998
547 New Orleans 2011
541 -Washington, 1983
540 St. Louis, 2000
526 St. Louis, 1999
522 Indianapolis, 2004
518- New England, 2010
513-Houston, 1961
513 Miami, 1984
513 New England, 201 I
510 New Orleans, 2009
505 San Francisco, 1994
503 St. Louis, 2001
501 Denver, 1998

Season passing yardage

Player,Team Year Yards
Drew Brees, NO 2011 5.476
Tom Brady, NE 2011 5,235
Dan Marino, Mia 1984 5,084
Drew Brees, NO 2008 5,069
Matthew Stafford, Det 2011 5,038
Eli Manning, NYG 2011 4,933
KurtWarner, StL 2001 4,830
Tom Brady, NE 2007 4,806


NFL career rushing


(x-active)
1. Emmitt Smith
2.Walter Payton


3. Barry Sanders
4. Curtis Martin
5. x-LaDainian Tomlinson
9. Jerome Becttis
7. Eric Dickerson
8.Tony Dorsett
9.Jim Brown
10. Marshall Faulk


15,269
14.101
13,684
13,662
13,259
12,739
12,312
12.279


NFL career receptions


(x-active)
I.Jerry Rice
2. x-Tony Gonzalez
3. Marvin Harrison
4. Cris Carter
5.Tim Brown
6.Terrell Owens
7. Isaac Bruce
8.x-Hines Ward
9. Randy Moss
10.Andre Reed


.1,549
1,149
1,102
1,101
1,094
1,.078
1,024
1,000
954
951


College bowl games

Holiday Bowl
Texas 21, California 10
Champs Sports Bowl
Florida State 18, Notre Dame 14
Alamo Bowl
Baylor 67,Washington 56
Armed Forces Bowl
BYU 24,Tulsa 21
Pinstripe Bowl
Rutgers 27, Iowa State 13
Music City Bowl
Mississippi State 23,Wake Forest 17
Insight Bowl
Oklahoma 31, Iowa 14
Meinke Car Care Bowl
Texas A&M 33, Northwestern 22
Sun Bowl
Utah 30, Georgia Tech 27, OT
Liberty Bowl
Cincinnati 31 ,Vanderbilt 24
Fight Hunger Bowl
Illinois 20, UCLA 14
Chick-fil-A Bowl
Auburn 43,Virginia 24

Monday
TicketCity Bowl
Houston 30, Penn State 14
Capital One Bowl
South Carolina 30, Nebraska 13
Outback Bowl
Michigan State 33, Georgia 30, 30T
Gator Bowl
Florida 24, Ohio State 17
Rose Bowl
Oregon 45,Wisconsin 38
Fiesta Bowl
Stanford vs. Oklahoma State (n)

Today
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan (10-2) vs.VirginiaTech (I1-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestyVgiia (9-3) vsCemson (10-3),
8 p.m. (E )".

Friday
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham, Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 9
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

FCS championship

Friday
At Pizza Hut Park
Frisco,Texas
Sam Houston State (14-0) vs. North
Dakota State (13-1), I p.m.


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Sunday's Games
Cleveland 98, New Jersey 82
Miami 129, Charlotte 90
Orlando 102,Toronto 96
Boston 94,Washington 86
Minnesota 99, Dallas 82
Denver 99, L.A. Lakers 90
Chicago 104, Memphis 64
Sacramento 96, New Orleans 80




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square, .'
to form four ordinary words.

CLUMH I E


2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. -0
All Rights Reserved.

EAVOB
I- I-r I r I



FUIMNF __




SLOENS I


1 /__ 1 ^ / \ _


LA Clippers 93. Pordtland 88
Monday's Games
Phoenix 102, Golden State 91
Washington at Boston (n)
Indiana at New Jersey (n)
Orlando at Detroit (n)
Atlanta at Miami (n)
Toronto at New York (n)
San Antonio at Minnesota (n)
Oklahoma City at Dallas (n)
Milwaukee at Denver (n)
New Orleans at Utah (n)
Today's Games
Charlotte at Cleveland, 7 pnm.
Atlanta at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m,
Sacramento at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Milwaukee at Utah, 9 p.m.
Houston at.LA. Lakers, 10-30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Washington at Orlando, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Charlotte at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Orleans, 8 p.n).
Memphis at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at LA Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Kentucky vs. UALR, 7 p.m.
No. 6 Ohio St. vs. Nebraska, 6:30 p.m.
No. 7 Missouri vs. Oklahoma, 8 p.m.
No. 8 UConn at Seton Hall, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Michigan St. at No. 18
Wisconsin, 7 p.m.
No. I I Louisville vs. St John's at
Madison Square Garden, 7 p.m.
No. 13 Florida vs. UAB, 7 p.m.
No. 22 Harvard at Fordham, 7 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
No. I Syracuse at Providence, 9 p.m.
No. 5 Duke atTemple, 7 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown vs. No. 20
Marquette, 7 p.m.
No. 14 Kansas vs. No. 23 Kansas St.,
8 p.m.
No. 19 Murray State vs. Eastern
Kentucky, 8 p.m.
Thursday's Games
No. 12 Indiana vs. No. 16 Michigan,
9 p.m.
No. 17 UNLV at Cal State Bakersfield,
10 p.m.
No. 24 San Diego State vs. San Diego
Christian, 10 p.m;
No. 25 Gonzaga vs. Pepperdine, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. I Syracuse vs. No. 20 Marquette,
4 p.m.
No. 2 Kentucky vs. South Carolina,
4 p.m.
No. 3 North, Carolina vs. Boston
College, 2:30 p.m.
No. 4 Baylor at Texas Tech, 1:45 p.m.
No. 5 Duke at Georgia Tech, Noon
No. 6 Ohio St.at lowa,,3 p.m.
No. 7 Missouri at No. 23 .Kansas St.,
1:30 p.m.; .: .
No. 8.JConn at Rutgers, 8 p.m.
No. 9 Georgetown at West Virginia,
Noon
No. II Louisville vs.' Notre Dame
at 4 p.m.
No. 13 Florida at Tennessee,
11 a.m.
No. 14 Kansas at Oklahoma, 2 p.m.
No. 15 Mississippi St. at Arkansas,
9 p.m.
No. 19 Murray St. at Austin Peay,
8 p.m.
No. 20 Kentucky vs. South Carolina,
4 p.m.
No. 21 Virginia vs. Miami, 6 p.m.
No. 22 Harvard vs. Dartmouth, 2 p.m.
No. 25 Gonzaga vs. Santa Clara,
8 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. 12 Indiana at Penn St., Noon
No. 16 Michigan vs. No. 18 Wisconsin,
1:30 p.m.


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Sunday's Game
Nashville 5, Calgary 3
Monday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 3, Philadelphia 2
New Jersey at Ottawa (n)
San Jose atVancouver (n)
Edmonton at Chicago (n)
Colorado at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Edmonton at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay atToronto, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Washington, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Winnipeg at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota atVancouver, 10 p.m.
San Jose atAnaheim, 10 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Ans:

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: MOODY TIPSY BAFFLE CREAMY
Answer: After getting into an argument with the news
anchor, the weatherman STORMED OFF


Ducks outlast Badgers,



45-38, in Rose Bowl


By GREG BEACHAM
Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. -
Oregon's incredible offense
busted up Wisconsin and
the record books on the
way to the Ducks' first Rose
Bowl victory in 95 years.
Darron Thomas passed
for 268 yards and three
touchdowns, freshman
De'Anthony Thomas
scored on runs of 91 and 64
yards, and the No. 6 Ducks
earned their first bowl vic-
tory under coach Chip
Kelly, holding off Wisconsin
45-38 Monday night in the
highest-scoring Rose Bowl
ever played.
And it wasn't over until
the Badgers ran out of time
at the Oregon 25, unable
to spike the ball in time to
stop the clock for a last-
gasp fling.
.Lavasier Tuinei caught
eight passes for 158 yards
and two TDs for the Ducks.
The Rose Bowl had never
seen this many points, beat-
ing the record 80 scored
by Washington and Iowa
in 1991. '


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wisconsin's Louis Nzegwu grabs an Oregon fumble and
returns it for a touchdown during the first half of the Rose
Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., on Monday.


GATORS

From Page 1B

Rainey came off the
left end and blocked Ben
Buchanan's punt Seldom-
used linebacker Graham
Stewart scooped it up
at the 14-yard line and
scored the first touch-
,down of his career.
It was Rainey's sixth
blocked punt of his career,
breaking the school and
SEC record.
Rainey also ran for
71 yards on a warm and
sunny day in Jacksonville.
John Brantley completed
16 'f 22 passes for 132
yards, with a touchdowns
'and an interception. He
had a 17-yard strike to
Deonte Thompson in the
first quarter.
Jeff Demps added 31
yards on the ground.
Ohio State wasn't
nearly as effective.
Miller completed 18 of.
23 passes for 1,62 yards
and two touchdowns. He
also ran 15 times for 20
yards.


- Answer to Previous Puzzle


5 Lose
focus
6 Underwater
shocker
7 Cattail
8 Good smell


9 Logger's need
(2 wds.)
10 Bewildered
response
11 Non-flying
bird
19 Faked out the
goalie
21 Yale athlete
24 Chevalier film
26 Nonsense
27 Strongly
encourage
28 Klondike -
30 Place a wager
31 Gas burner
32 Hula
accompaniment
33 Faint (2 wds.)
35 Office worker
of yore
40 1 in. = 2.54 -
41 Exclusively
43 Poet W.H. -
45 Incite (2 wds.)
46 Annie's
pooch
48 Pack down
49 River
sediment
50 Unclad
51 Morsel
52 Baton Rouge
campus
54 52, to Livy


18,355
16,726


APTop 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college basketball poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records
through Jan. I, total points and previous


ranking:


R


I. Syracuse (60)
2. Kentucky (5)
3. North Carolina
4. Baylor
5. Duke
6. Ohio St.
7. Missouri
8. UConn
9. Georgetown
10. Michigan St.
I 1. Louisville
12. Indiana
13. Florida
.14. Kansas
15. Mississippi St.
16. Michigan
17. UNLV
18.Wisconsin
19. Murray St.
20. Marquette
21.Virginia
22. Harvard
23. Kansas St.
24. San Diego St.
25. Gonzaga


record
15-0
13-I.
13-2
13-0
12-1
13-2
13-0
12-1
12-1
13-2
12-2
13-1
1 1-3
10-3
S13-2
12-2
15-2
12-3
14-0
12-2
12-1.
12-1

12-2
11-2


Pts Prv
1,618 I
1,554 3
1,451 5
1,389 6
1,354 7
1,277 2
1,255 8
1,199 9
1,072 12
992 16
977 4
974 13
753 10
663 17
644 15
641 18
611 19
506 II
454 20
447 14
292 23
269 24
229 -
196 25
121 -


Others receiving votes: Creighton
86, Ohio 28, Stanford 12, Pittsburgh 8,.
Vanderbilt 8, Xavier 8, Cincinnati 6, New
Mexico 6, Purdue 6, Saint Louis 6; Texas
A&M 4, Saint Mary's (Cal) 3, California 2,
Seton Hall 2,Alabama I,Wagner I.


ACROSS
1 "Big Blue"
4 Driver with a
handle
8 Hurt all over
12 ORD
regulators
13 Nautical
position
14 Baba au -
15 Memo'abbr.
16 Bedroom
slipper
17 Waikiki's
island
18 Thataway
20 Prefix for half
22 Netizen
23 Ger. or Fr.
25 Japanese
drama
29 Bro or sis
31 Feint
34 Mouths, in
zoology
35 Herb or
guru
36 Was very
thrifty


USA Today/ESPN Top 25

The top 25 teams in the USA Today-
ESPN men's college basketball poll, with
first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Jan. I, total points and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pvs.
I. Syracuse (30) 15,0 774 I
2. Kentucky (I) 13-1 739 3
3.Duke 12-1 -679 5
4. North Carolina 13-2 670 6
5. Baylor 13-0 638 7
6. Missouri 13-0 620 8
7. Ohio State 13-2 593 2
8. Connecticut 12-1 580 9
9. Georgetown 12-1 515 12
10. Louisville 12-2 454 4
I Michigan State 13-2 442 17
12 Indiana 13-1 423 15
13..Michigan 12-2 368 -,- 16
14. Florida I1:-3. 367 :Lj -
15. Kansas 10-3 318 1...
16. Mississippi' State 13-2 300 14'
17.UNLV 15-2 263 20
18. Murray State 14-0 236 21
19.Wisconsin 12-3 230 II.
20. Marquette 12-2 196 13
21. Harvard 12-1 156 23
22. Kansas State I 1-1 127 25
23.Virginia 12-1I 125 24
24. Creighton 11-2 67 19
25. San Diego State 12-2 60 NR
Others receiving votes: Gonzaga 57;
Saint Mary's 17; Vanderbilt -16; Middle
Tennessee 9; New Mexico 9; Stanford 7;
Pittsburgh 6;Alabama 3; Purdue 3; Seton
Hall 3; Saint Louis 2; Southern Mississippi
2; Illinois I.


37 Bilko's mil.
rank
38 Taunt
39 Jeans go-with
40 Dairy product
42 Shut with
force,
44 Singles
47 Depose
49 Motto
51 Wide st.
53 Never
tell -
55 Lion's quarry
56 Um-hmm
(2 wds.)
57 Factory
58 Strange
59 Go sour
60 Commiseration
61 PBS "Science
Guy"


DOWN
Up in the air
Marshy inlet
City conduits
Tourist's tote


SCOREBOARD


COLLEGE POLLS


AWNIOVVIM D S


SECT IG OROUS
LAI I_ ORAI]E

SUAI CH S 0UTS

LEA U E MEES




ERASE RUBIES

NT E T


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, JANUARY 3. 2012


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS












LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2012


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE.


GARFIELD


B.C..


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Fate of frozen embryos

puts couple at crossroads


YOU MIGHT
I'' WANT TO
SURE I PICK A
EMAILED DEFENSE
YOU. THAT'S LESS
CHECKABLE-

p.


DEARABBY: My husband
and I have been married 11
years. We went through eight
years of fertility treatments
before having our twins.
When they were a year old,
we discovered I was pregnant
with our third child. The
twins are now 2 1/2 and the
baby is almost a year old.
For the first time in our
marriage, my husband and I
are at an impasse. We have
two embryos left and need
to decide what to do. We
either use them or destroy
them. I think we need
to give the embryos the
chance they were meant to
have. However, my husband
is concerned only with the
financial side of it as we
have been living on one sal-
ary and things are tight
My heart aches over
this. Do I do what I believe
is right and stand by my
religious and moral beliefs,
and take the chance my
husband will resent me for
the rest of our marriage?
I'm afraid I'll resent him
if I have to destroy them.
- DEADLOCKED IN NEW
JERSEY
DEAR DEADLOCKED:
I discussed it with Diane
Goodman, the past
president of the Academy
of California Family
Formation Lawyers, who
suggests a third option.
Your embryos could be
donated for embryo adop-
tion by a couple who have
been unable to conceive,
and who would love to
raise them. For more infor-


visit Al-Anon (listed in your
phone directory) and Adult
Children of Alcoholics
(adultchildren.org). That
you want to help her is laud-
able, but it's important that
you fully understand what
you're letting yourself in for
if you do.
Much as you might wish
to, you cannot "fix" other
people only they can do
that The Serenity Prayer
from AA says it clearly:
"God, grant me the serenity
to accept the things I can-
not change, the courage to
change the things I can, and
the wisdom to know the dif-
ference." It applies to you.

DEAR ABBY: My ex-wife
died recently. Our middle-
aged daughter, who grew
up in her mother's care, was
unhappy that I chose not to
attend the funeral. Not only
would plane fare have been
a financial burden, my ex
and I hadn't communicated
with each other for more
than 30 years. Was I wrong
for not being there? -NO
'DISRESPECT, MESA, ARIZ.
NO DISRESPECT:
Funerals aren't for the
deceased as much as
they are for the living. I
can only guess that your
daughter felt she needed
your emotional support
during that sad time, and
that would explain her
reaction to your absence.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't let the past
come back to haunt you.
Be upfront and deal vith
any issue that could dai-'
age your chance with
someone interesting who
could help you get ahead
personally or professional-
ly. Love is highlighted, and
a commitment is apparent

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll pick up valuable
information easily and be
able to turn it into a mon-
eymaking commodity if
you are quick to react to
an opportunity you come
across. Emotions will
surface due to a misunder-
standing with a colleague
or loved one. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Spend time-and money
making self-improvements
that will help you feel more
confident and will allow
you to offer what you can
to someone interested in
forming a partnership with
you. The more you know,
the greater control you will
have. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't let a bully dictate
to you. You may have to call
in a favor in order to cut
ties with someone who is
making your life difficult
Good fortune is apparent if
you show strength of char-
acter and stand up for your
rights.****


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You will excel if you keep
things simple, to the point
and under budget Keep
your feelings to yourself
and focus more on being
diplomatic about what.
you want and how you are
going to go about getting
it**
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You will excel intel-
lectually by expanding
your interests, knowledge
and friendships. The more
you engage in new events
and activities, the further
ahead you will get as the
year progresses. Someone
from your past will offer
help. *****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Do something that will
make you feel good about
you. Self-improvement
projects or spending time
with someone who boosts
your ego will help you gain
confidence and give you
the courage to go after
your personal and profes-
sional goals. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Be careful when deal-
ing with emotional situa-
tions. Something could go
wrong with your home and
security if you aren't on
top of what everyone else
is doing. Don't take chanc-


es. Play to win. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't let what
others say or do cause
you grief or ling out the
worst in you. Arguing:will
be a waste of time and will
make you look bad. Focus
on making changes at
home that will make your
life easier. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Make decisions
that will improve your
home and your lifestyle.
It will be beneficial to
raise your standards to
call attention to what you
do differently and more
efficiently. An opportunity
to start something new
will pay off financially.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't take on or
divulge too much. Your
plans will turn *out far bet-
ter if you work diligently
on your own, controlling
the outcome as you pro-
ceed. Someone from your
past is likely to hurt your
reputation if given the
chance. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Mix the old with the
new and you'll discover
what you should be striv-
ing to obtain in the future.
You will get the help you
need if you call in favors
and ask people with spe-
cific talents' to join your
quest. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: F equals W
"WH PSWRGMTRC WH HMV'XCMEMGL
MH, MG EWO PSEDVS W GYWAMGMDO
GNWG HGWOAH MO GNS FWL DT
SKXCDYWGMDO." C W R YW OLYD

Previous Solution: "The beginning is always today." Mary W. Shelley
"Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end." Seneca
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-3


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
nation, you should contact
an attorney who special-
izes in family formation,
or contact the Snowflakes
Frozen Embryo Adoption
and Donation Program.
Its phone number is 714-
693-5437 and its website is
www.nightlight.org.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I am 29
and met my birth mother
last month for the first
time. "Angie" is an alco-
holic and has cirrhosis of
the liver. When I met her
she was in rehab and had
been sober for two weeks.
Two days after she was
released she was arrested
for DUI.
It's obvious that my
birth mother has a major
addiction, and my heart
breaks for her because she
has no support system.
Should I reach out and
help her or continue on
with my life? My friends
and family are afraid I'll
get hurt, but it's hard to
sit back and do nothing. -
- CONFUSED AND TORN
IN ST. LOUIS
DEAR CONFUSED AND
TORN: Before involving
yourself any further with
Angie, take some time to


THEY JEST KINDA GIT LOST IN TH'
24-HOUR NEWS CYCLE!! <(LI


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, JANUARY 3, 2012

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


Legal

Public Auction to be held
February 4, 2012 at 8AM at
Ozzie's Towing & Auto, LLC 2492
SE Baya Ave. Lake City FL, 32025.
(386)719-5608
Following Vin Numbers:
06 Chevy
Vin# 1G1AK55F067866184
05529872
January 3, 2011


020 Lost & Found

$200 REWARD for info leading
to return of 2 Blue Tick.hounds.
Missing from Norris Rd. the week
of Christmas. Call 386-623-0200

$200 Reward for the return of a
Tree stand & Deer Camera.
Missing from the end of Lake
Jeffery in Wellborn.386- 623-0200

100 Job
Opportunities

05529870
Murphy USA Job Fair
Store Managers/Asst. Managers
Job Fair at
The Holiday Inn & Suites
213 SW Commerce Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
Jan. 4th 2012 10:00am-5:00pm
*Please email resume for
immediate interview time*
hectorcastro murphvoilcorp.
com
Location: Lake City, Fl.
Compensation:
30K-34K salary + Monthly
commissions, paid
vacations, 401k, profit sharing

Activities Coordinator (P/T, Tu-F)
Computer literate with a desire to
provide creative activities for
senior adults. Level II background
screen req'd. Must be able to drive
company van when needed. start-
ing pay $8.00 an hour. Call Leona
for more info at 386-755-0235

12 Temp Farm Workers needed
1/30/12-7/16/12. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, frost
protect, prune, grade, & pack
produce. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. Tools, supplies, &
equipment provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Pay rate is the highest of $9.12/hr
or applicable piece rates depending
on crop activity. Worksite
location in Edgefield Co, SC.
Random drug testing at employer's
expense. Applicants should report
or send a resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & reference job order,
#SC517515 or call 850-921-3466.
Beirry Plantation N. Augusta, SC
Help Wanted: Kitchen help, wait-
ers, waitresses. Experience prefer-
red. Apply at 7674 SW US Hwy
27 in Fort White. 386-497-1631
HIRING FOR MASONS &
LABORERS, Dependable,
reliable. Must have own transpor-
tation, Call 386-623-0010
Immediate Collector Position
Available. Full-time. $8/hr.
Dedicated and determined
individuals wanted. Bilingual
applicants encouraged to apply.
Apply at
www.salliemae.candidatecare.com
or Call Christine at 1-866-441-
2623 ext 4342.
Local CPA Firm is looking for
an experienced tax return preparer.
Ideally, the candidate will be able
to prepare personal, corporate
and partnership returns.
The seasonal time frame is
February 1 through April 17.
Send reply to Box 05080, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Now Hiring Restaurant Manager.
Experience preferred but will train
right person. 24 hour operation.
Send resumes to: 186 SE Newell
Dr. Lake City, FL. 32025.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO. MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


100 Job
100 Opportunities
4 Temp Beekeepers needed
1/30/12-5/28/12. Must have 3
months verifiable experience
worjng as a beekeeper, must have
a vaid driver's license. Workers
will raise bees to produce honey &
pollinate crops. No smoking will
be permitted. Guaranteed 3/4 of
contract hours. All tools, supplies,
equipment provided at no cost.
Free housing provided for non-
commuting workers. Random
drug testing at employer's
expense. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of
contract. $8.97/hr. Worksite in
Poplarville, MS. Applicants report
or send a resume to the nearest FL
Agency of Workforce Innovation
office & refer job order #
MS44445 or call 850-921-3466.
Selby Honey LLC
12 Temp Beekeepers needed
1/30/12-9/30/12. Must have 3
months exp. working w/honeybees
& possess a valid driver's license.
Have no fear of bees, not allergic
to bee stings or pollen. Will raise
honeybees to produce bees and
queen bees for resale. Guaranteed
3/4 of contract hours. All tools,
supplies, equipment provided at no
cost. Free housing provided for
non-commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed to worker upon
completion of 50% of contract.
Random drug testing at employer's
expense. $9.12/hr. Worksites in
Evans, Tattnall, Bulloch, Bryan,
Candler Co's GA. Applicants
report or send a resume to the
nearest FL Agency of Workforce
Innovation office & ref. job order
# GA7987803 or call 850-921-
3466. Wilbanks Apiaries -
Claxton, GA

20n Medical
120 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

170 Business
1 Opportunities '
Sun6co gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

240 Schools &
24 Education
05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Jasmine
Vi:;t the m-,od io
2T1he Prser't ar
Laurell ikt
22" Belllower Drive


Corial Homes
,, "rtlur Iuer, t:e irg
SA tur Ri cincru Home, I" : "; -'- ~


Tucday-Frday 12-5
Sat. 10-4
Sun. 1-4pm
Call Br)an Zccher
(386) 752-8653


440 Miscellaneous
8 ft x 5.5 ft wide single axle trailer
With Dump and lights.
Excellent condition $325 FIRM
386-288-8833

BEER MEISTER for sale.
$200 obo.
386-758-1991


PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control,
in original box. $280,
386-984-7510


TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740

450 Good Things
5 y to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.
6 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
3BR/2BA SWWH op 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo Ist.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250

Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841

SMobile Homes
640 for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K Off All Homes
800-622-2832 ext 210

ROYALS HOMES
Check out our Website
www.royalshomesales.com
386-754-6737

ROYALS HOMES
Don't Confuse a Cheap Price
for a Good Deal
386-754-6737
Think Outside the Box!
Call one of our Sales People
Cathy, Charlie, Bo
Royals Homes
386-754-6737


--H 11







Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


-o G' t Your



Vicle Sold,


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or'352-377-7652
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2
8 mi NW of VA. Private wooded
acre, deck, roomy. No dogs
$600 mo + dep 386.961.9181

720 Furnished Apts.
20U For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
s'. Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat'& huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
2br/lba newly remodeled.
On Lomond Street. No pets! i
Stove & fridge incl. $350 dep.
$550. mo. 386-719-0584


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/intemet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Forrner Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762

Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.

Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


Adoption

ARE YOU PREGNANT? Childless
couple offers unending love/financial
security. Stay-at-home mom / devoted
dad. EXPENSES PAID. www.adoption-
is-love.com. Lorraine & Daniel (866)944-
4847 (HUGS). Adam B. Sklar, Esq.
Lic#4388542

Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of
advertising! 122 weekly newspapers, 32
websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to
diversify your advertising with Advertising
Networks of Florida (866)742-1373

Education

ALLIED HEALTH career training-
Attend college 100% online. Job placement
assistance. Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call
(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

Financial Services

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!!
$$$ As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit.
Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++within
48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY
PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-
8321 www.lawcapital.com


Help Wanted


Driver- Start out the year with Daily Pay
and Weekly Home Time! Single Source
Dispatch. Van and Refrigerated. CDL-
A, 3 months recent experience required.
-(800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com

Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos. CDL Class
A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.
meltontruck.com

Drivers: RUN 5 STATE REGIONAL!
Get Home Weekends, Earn Up to 39/Mi,
1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. req'd. SUNBELT
TRANSPORT, LLC (800)572-5489 ext.
227


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone .number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.
820Farms &
20 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
8OI Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER















Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds & ,
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Land For Sale


20 Acres-Live On Land NOW!! Only
$99/mo. $0 Down, Owner Financing,
NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso,
Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free
Color Brochure. (800)755-8953 www.
sunsetranches.com

7 ACRES WITH LAKE FRONTAGE.
Buy Off-Season- BARGAIN only $39,900!
(was $89,900) Wooded setting, dockable
shoreline, on 4 season recreational lake!
Boat, ski, fish, camp, more. Paved rds,
power, phone. Excellent financing. Won't
,last, call now (866)952-5302

Miscellaneous

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer available.
Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified.
Call (877)206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.
com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for
hands on Aviation Maintenance Career.
FAA approved program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing available CALL
Aviation Institute ofMaintenance (866)314-
3769

Schools & Instruction

Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3
week accelerated program. Hands on
environment. Nationwide certifications and
Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-
1690




ANF
"ADVE .,,. ',I.E rA F r OF F R,,_





SWeek of January 2, 2012 J


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ISLL IT


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