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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01740
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: January 1, 2012
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01740
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text












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Sunday, January I, 2012 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 285 E $ 1.00


TOP LOCAL STORIES OF THE YEAR




Heartbreak led the




headlines for 2011


A triple murder and the tragic loss
'of two local firefighters were among
the most heart-wrenching stories
we reported on last year. Three
local police officers were shot dur-
ing a September standoff but thank-
fully survived.
However, there was hopeful news
as well.


A local Life Scout, attempting to
break a world record, collected an
astounding 65,000 lbs. of food for
the local food bank.
And after a nine-month search, the
county found a new director for the
Economic Development Department,
a man with sterling credentials and
just the right skills, we believe, to


3 shot to death

in Baya home

Around midnight Feb. 2, a Lake City man shot and killed three of
his friends then scooped up the 5-year-old daughter of one ofthevic-
tims and delivered her to safety at the Lake City Police Departm:e-nt
before -turning, ...
himself in, say
authorities.
Alan Lucas
Strattan, 25,
1506 SE Baya
Drive faces
charges of
first-degree
murder in
ing deaths ~ 4
of Monica
Hudson, 27;
Michael Kevin
Tucker, 32 and FILE PHOTO


SHOOTINGS, 3A


Sheriff's officials search for evidence outside the
scene of the shootings early Feb. 3.


help move us along the path toward
full economic recovery.
In any case, here are the top local
stories of the year, unranked and
- beyond the first two, which appear
below in no particular order.
Stories continue on Page 3A.
Editor


firefighters


lost in blaze


Fulton


Burch


Two veteran Florida Division of Forestry fire-
fighters died June 20 battling a brushfire in
Hamilton County.
Joshua Burch, 31, of Lake City and Brett
Fulton, 52, of White Springs, died while fighting
the Blue Ribbon blaze on County Road 6, about 14
miles east of Jasper.
Burch and Fulton were Fl6rida Division of
Forestry rangers with the Suwannee Valley
Center in Lake City.
Two other forestry rangers were injured as
they attempted to rescue. Burch and Fulton.
The Deep Creek Community Event, slated to
be a thank you to firefighters for weeks of work.
battling area blazes, became an, opportunity for
family .members, friends and colleagues of the
fallen men to mourn their loss together.
Funeral services were June 24 for Burch and
the following day for Fulton.


FIREFIGHTERS continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter


STANDOFF


A Florida Highway Patrol trooper brandishes his weapon as Lake City Police Department officers take position during a Sept. 23 standoff with a man
who barricaded himself in his Irma Ave. home after shooting three police officers. The man, Jesse Ralph Custer, 26, later took his own life.


Monet

and Me

won't


reopen

Zoning issue means
school will stay closed
after winter break
By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@iakecityreporter.com
Monet and Me, a Lake City
performing arts private school,
will not reopen after winter
break.
After moving to a new location
in June, owner Letha Raulerson
discovered the building at
4471 West U.S. 90 in Lake City
would have to be rezonied to
allow a school
there. However,
Rauleron was
not able to
rezone in time
to meet -state
standards.
Now the
Raulerson school's con-
tents are in stor-
age and the 73 students that pre-
viously attended will finish the
school year somewhere else.
The Florida Department
of Education requires private
schools pay an occupational busi-
ness tax and obtain a Business
Tax Certificate, formerly called
an occupational license. Before
obtaining the certificate the
business must:be located in a
correctly zoned location.
Two weeks ago, Raulerson
saidshe received a notice from
the state giving her two weeks to.
meet the requirement, However,
due to the required waiting peri-
ods, rezoning would have taken
at least two months more.
The state allowed Raulerson
to be out of compliance for six
months while she worked on
re-zoning but would give her no
longer, she said.
Raulerson opened the busi-
nesses in November 2006 by
offering classes in dance, art,
music and drama. In February
2007 the school started after-
school classes. In 2008 Mqnet
and Me became a full-time
school with 38 students. The
school moved from 305 NW.
Christian Court in June to have
more space, Raulerson said.
The new location had more
room for students and activi-
ties with a theater, piano room,
kitchen and rooms for academ-
ics. Raulerson said she put about
$15,000 into the renovation of
the new location.
Monet and Me was featured
in Southern Living magazine in
November 2007. The magazine
wanted to feature North Florida
when it came across the Lake City
Reporter's article on the school
from January 2007. Monet and
Me was part of the magazine's
Florida Living: People & Places
section.
Raulerson said the school
served kindergarten to 12-grade
students and was like a home-
school in a structured environ-
ment, meeting students' individ-
ual needs.
The school employed four


SCHOOL continued on 2A


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Life .................... I D
Obituaries .............. 5A
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TODAY COMING
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11


- 4








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY. JANUARY 1. 2012


Minimum wage hike: Local folks react


By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter

A new year is here and there are a few
changes taking place within Florida laws
starting Jan. 1, changes that will put more
money in some residents' pockets.
One of the main changes in the Florida
Legislature is that the state minimum wage
rate is increasing to $7.67 an hour and tipped
employees will now earn $4.65 an hour.
This 36 cent increase will result in an
extra $14.40 per 40-hour work week, an extra
$57.60 per month.
Mike Stewart, owner of Ellianos Coffee
Company on U.S. Highway 90, said that he
was just informed about the increase in mini-
mum wage in early December.
Tom Foster, owner of Rupert's Bakery and
Cafe, said that he read about the minimum
wage increase a while ago, but isn't worried
about it because it only affects a few of his
employees.
Megan, an employee at Skip's Deli, said
that she found out about the increase in
minimum wage about a month ago from other
employees and from other people talking
about it.
"It will affect me, but I don't think it will
make a difference in the business at all," she
said.
Steve Godevas, manager at Gondolier
Italian Resaurant and Pizza, said'that he does
not think the increase in minimum wage will
affect the business's profit. He also said that
he would not need to terminate any employ-
ees.
Stewart said that like all business',
Ellianos may have to adjust their prices even-
tually.
"Overall, with the cost going up, we may
have to raise prices," he said. "But we won't
be cutting back on the staff."
Foster said, "The only bad thing about it is
that is makes the cost of goods go up."
Tori Chay, a barista at Ellianos, said she
and her fellow co-workers were just informed
about the increase in minimum wage on
Thursday.
k "We just had the flier posted on our board
about it," she said.
Chay said she is excited about the extra
money she will be making.
"It's more money, but it makes me worry if
we will have to raise our prices," she said.
Lauren Hall, assistant manager at Ellianos,
said, "I don't really feel like it affects me. I
feel like everything else in the city is going
up It kind of sucks because the increase is
both good and bad."
Both Chay and Hall said they plan to save
S extra money they will be making. Chay
said she will save the extra money for college,
a rainy day or for a vacation. Hall said she
plans to save the extra money to pay bills and
to pay for gas.
Paola Armenertos, a server at Gondolier,
said that she didn't even know the minimum
wage rate was going up.
She said that she is happy to hear about the
increase. "I can use the extra money to help
pay for day care," said Armenteros.


JASON MATHEVV WALKER L,. L "r-, P-(,.r
Tori Chay, a barista at the Ellianos Coffee Company, hands frequent customer Chris Esing a large caramel freezer with an extra shot.



SCHOOL: Performing arts private school won't reopen
Continued From Page 1A


full-time teachers and four part-time
teachers. Starting in sixth grade stu-
dents -took classes online through the
Florida Virtual School. Students' learning
was supplemented with tutoring and arts
classes, she said..
The building housed a church several
years ago, but sat vacant before Raulerson
leased it It was also annexed from the
county into Lake City limits several years
ago.
The final hearing for Raulerson's zon-
ing and land use petition had already
been submitted for approval from the
state, said Larry Lee, Lake City growth
management director. Lee said the school
was not out of compliance as far as the
city was concerned. He said the city gave
,and would continue to give the school
extensions to pay the business tax. "We
aren't looking to put her out of business,"
he said.
Extensions were not enough for the
state department of education, however,
which required a complete Business Tax
Certificate, Raulerson said.
"The city has worked very well with us,"
she said.
Raulerson said some parents are forming


their own home-school groups or enrolling
in other private schools. However, she said
she has not heard plans from every former
student Raulerson said she will tutor a few
students.
"This has been terrible for me. I've put
my heart and soul in it," Raulerson said of
the school.
Raulerson said she met with parents
individually to tell them the school would
be closing. "I felt I owed it to them to
meet personally," she said. Parents knew
Raulerson was working on
zoning but didn't know in
advance the school would
close this December, she
said. "I take full blame."
Parent Stacie Anuez
said she was sad to see the
school close. Anuez said
she enrolled her 9-year-
old son Noah at Monet
and Me this year because
it was geared towards
his interest in music. "It
seemed like a good fit for
him,".she said. She plans Monet and M
to home-school Noah for church, had 7
the rest of the year. She for good durif


has home-schooled Noah in the past and
he has attended public school.
Anuez said she would absolutely enroll
her son if Raulerson opened another school
in the future.
Financially and emotionally, Raulerson
said she isn't ready to start over again with
a new location but 'she is open to it in
the future. I've watched kids grow.
You get to know their parents. It's like
a piece of me."


JASON MATTHEW,WALKERILake City Reporter
e, a private school housed in a former
73 children enrolled this year before closing
ing the winter break.


Voice of Darth Vader
swears in sheriff friend
POUGHKEEPSIE, New York -
Not every county sheriff gets to
be sworn in by the voice of Darth
Vader.
Actor James Earl Jones performed
that duty Thursday for his longtime
friend and neighbor Adrian "Butch"
Anderson, the sheriff in Dutchess
County, New York, where Jones
lives.
Anderson's fourth term as sheriff
in the Hudson Valley county began
with Jones administering the oath of
office in place of a judge.
Jones provided the voice for the
Darth Vader character in the origi-
nal "Star Wars" trilogy. His deep,
distinctive voice also was featured in
Disney's animated film, "The Lion
King."

Elly Mae Clampett,
Barbie maker settle suit
NEW ORLEANS The actress
who played Elly May Clampett on


the "The Beverly Hillbillies" has
settled her lawsuit over a Barbie doll
that uses the character's name and
likeness.
An attorney for actress Donna
Douglas said she settled with CBS
and toymaker Mattel on Tuesday.
Douglas' lawsuit had sought at least
$75,000. Details of the settlement
were confidential.
Douglas played the tomboy for
all nine seasons of the CBS com-
edy about a backwoods family that
strikes oil and moves to Beverly
Hills.
She claimed CBS Consumer
Products Inc. and Mattel Inc. needed
her approval for the Barbie. In court
documents, CBS and Mattel said
they didn't need her OK because the
network holds exclusive rights to the
character.

Wynonna Judd to marry
for a third time
NEW YORK Wynonna Judd is
celebrating an engagement this holi-
day season.
Representatives for the 47-year-old


country singer say her boyfriend,
Cactus Moser, popped the question
on Christmas Eve.
They have been dating since 2009.
Moser, 54, is a drummer with the
country group Highway 101.
This will be Judd's third marriage.
She has two teenage children with
her first husband.

Singer, actress Kaye
Stevens dies in Florida
THE VILLAGES Singer and
actress Kaye Stevens, who per-
formed with the Rat Pack and was a
frequent guest on Johnny Carson's
'"The Tonight Show," has died at a
central Florida hospital. She was 79.
Close friend Gerry Schweitzer
confirmed that Stevens died
Wednesday at the Villages Hospital
north of Orlando following a battle
with breast cancer and blood clots.
Stevens, a longtime South Florida
resident, performed with Rat Pack
members including Frank Sinatra,
Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr.
E Associated Press


Dailv ScriDture


"Thus saith the LORD, which
maketh a way in the sea, and
a path in the mighty waters;
Remember ye not the former
things, neither consider the
things of old. Behold, I will do
a new thing; now it shall spring
forth; shall ye not know it? I will
even make a way in the wilder-
ness, and rivers in the desert."
Isaiah 43:16, 18-19 (KJV)



Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ........... .752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter. P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abLtcher@lakecrtyeporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad. call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.. 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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Rates indude 7%o sales tax.
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52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


'- ~.- -~ - ~Pdmq1Pw


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


NOTICE OF MEETING CANCELLATION

FOR THE JANUARY 3, 2012 CITY COUNCIL MEETING.


THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
WILL NOT MEET ON MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 2012 AT 7:00 P.M.
THE NEXT MEETING WILL BE HELD ON MONDAY, JANUARY 9,
2012 AT 7:00 PM IN THE CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS LOCATED
ON THE SECOND FLOOR OF CITY HALL, 205 NORTH MARION
AVENUE, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA.


AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER TOP STORIES SUNDAY, JANUARY 1. 2012


Top local stories of the year



Three LCPD officers wounded in standoff


Three Lake City Police
Department officers were
wounded in September by
a Lake City man who bar-
ricaded himself in a home
for seven hours before tak-
ing his own life.
Police responded to the


home at 391 N.W. Irma
Avenue when a neigh-
bor reported Jesse Ralph
Custer, 26, of Lake City had
entered the home in vio-
lation of a court-ordered
domestic violence injunc-
tion, issued the day before


the shooting.
Custer shot Sgt. Jason
Byrd and investigators
Mitchell Cline and David
Greear as they approached
the home. Custer then bar-
ricaded himself in the house
with multiple weapons.


Four blocks of residents
were evacuated from their
homes as multiple police
agencies responded to an
"all call" page during the
standoff.
Authorities tried calling
Custer to negotiate, but he


Pizzeria arson makes int'l news


Restaurant fires with no injuries
typically aren't international news.
But an early morning Oct. 20 blaze
that gutted a Papa John's pizzeria in
Lake City went viral, with reports
published as far as Europe.
The story became international
news after investigators accused two
managers from a nearby Domino's
pizzeria of deliberately setting the
fire as a way to reduce competition
and generate more business at their
restaurant.
Two Lake City men, Bryan
David Sullivan, 21 and Sean Everett
Davidson, 23, were charged with


arson.
Investigators said the men report-
edly built an incendiary device con-
sisting of a small kitchen clock, a
nine-volt battery and a sandwich bag-
gie containing a small amount of
gunpowder to start the fire. Instead
of sparking a fire, however, investi-
gators said the device fizzled like a
sparkler.
The men then allegedly used
an accelerant to start the fire that
charred the building's interior. One
of the suspects suffered burns on
his arms when the accelerant ignited
prematurely, police said.


Sullivan and Davidson were identi-
fied as suspects after they told others
of their plan to start a fire, police
said.
A Papa John's spokeswoman said
Jacob Wilkes, the store's owner, plans
to reopen with the next few months.
Wilkes is considered one of the res-
taurant chain's success stories, start-
ing as a delivery driver in 2003 and
working his way up to management
positions before pooling .his money
with a co-worker to buy the Lake
City franchise.


FIREFIGHTERS: Entire state was in mourning
Continued From Page 1A

Firefighters and government offi- fallen forestry rangers at the Alligator Annual Columbia County Fair, was
cials from around the state attended. Lake Public Recreation Area. The dedicated to the memory of Burch
Trees were planted in honor of the 2011 Columbia County Fair, the 57th and Fulton and their co-workers.


SHOOTINGS: State will seek death penalty
Continued From Page 1A


Nichole Cervantez, 25. Cervantez was
pregnant when she was killed.
Strattan turned a friendly get-
together into a tragedy when he
.opened fired with a pistol, say police.
Sheriff's officials believe an argtlu-
ment occurred shortly before the
shootings, but say what prompted
the shootings is unclear. A handgun,
believed to be the murder weapon,


was recovered near the crime scene.
About three weeks after the shoot-
ing, a Columbia County grand jury
indicted Strattan on three counts of
first-degree murder and one count of
killing an "unborn quick child."
Defense attorneys, successfully
challenged the indictment for the
death of the unborn child, arguing
the state never presented anyone


with specialized knowledge to prove
the viability of the fetus as defined
by state law. Strattan still faces three
first-degree murder charges.
Third Judicial Circuit State Attorney
Robert "Skip" Jarvis is attempting to
re-indict Strattan on unborn child mur-
der charge and Jarvis has also said he
plans to seek the death penalty against
Strattan in the case.


refused to answer. While
police moved a vehicle
parked near the home,
Custer released tear gas
and wore a military-style
gas mask.
Authorities attempted to
see inside the house using
a robot with audio and
visual equipment, although
Custer moved to avoid the
camera. Authorities then
used an armored bobcat-
type vehicle to open the
door and windows. At some
point Custer took his own
life, said Mark Hunter,
Columbia County Sheriff.
Custer's estranged
wife, Natalie Custer, said
she drove with her two
children to the Lake City
Police Department when
she saw his car in their


driveway that day. Had she
tried to confront Custer, "I
truly believe he would have
killed us," she said.
She said her husband
began collecting guns after
they married in 2006. He
also became more control-
ling and had a mindset that
everyone was out to get
him, she said.
Tear gas destroyed
most items in the house.
Appliances and electronics
were destroyed when the
bobcat punctured the exte-
rior walls.
All three officers sur-
vived the shooting and two
have returned to work.


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* High arid Low Risk Obsteiric 386-755-0500
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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER TOP STORIES SUNDAY. JANUARY 1. 2012


Top local stories of the year




No record, butOa



thousands fed


Jeremy Barwick attempted to
collect 600,000 pounds of non-
perishable canned and dry goods
in a one-day food drive on Sept. 24
for his Eagle Scout project.
The 15-year-old Columbia High
School student fell short of his
goal but the food drive is consid-
ered a huge success.
The drive organized entirely
by Jeremy generated more than
65,000 pounds of food enough
to fill three semi-trailers for
local food banks.
He used local media and social
network sites to generate sup-
port for his project. Supporters
from as far as Ocala and Daytona
dropped off food donations at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds
the day of the event.


Had he reached his goal, it
would have set a world record for
the most food collected in one day
for a single event
Despite not setting a new
record, Scott Elkins, manager
of the Food Bank of Suwannee
Valley, said the food drive set a
local record "many times over."
More, important, Elkins said
Jeremy helped create awareness
of the growing need to help hun-
gry people in the region.
"Jeremy has raised aware-
ness in our area about hunger
far beyond anything anyone else
has done," he said. "I think that
awareness will last years into the
future and far beyond the distri-
bution of this food."


Barwick at work at the fairgrounds near the end of his food drive.


Sheriff's office theft


case comes to an end


Two former Columbia County
Sheriff's Office employees were sen-
tenced this year in connection with
confiscated drug money that went
missing.
Former sheriffs office comptroller
Kelly Crews was sentenced to six months
probation in December. In February for-
mer sheriffs office legal assistant Pamela
Marie Foxx was sentenced to 23 months
in prison.
Foxx, 47, pleaded guilty to grand
theft of more than $100,000 and charg-
es of official misconduct. She also
received 15 years' probation following
prison. Crews, 53, pleaded no contest in
exchange for probation and withhold-
ing of adjudication ,of guilt. although
she had faced seven felony counts.
Foxx worked for the sheriff's office"
for 15 years. She admitted in 2010 to
taking money and depositing it into her


.Foxx

who handled
Phelps said.


personal account.
According to a
grand jury indictment,
between 2006 and
2008, Crews stole funds
entrusted to her by the
sheriffs office.
David A. Phelps,the
assistant state attor-
ney who prosecuted
the case, said due to
poor record-keeping
about $16,000 in cash
was never accounted
for by the sheriff's
office. Investigators
were not able to link
Crews to the stolen
money or determine
she was the only one
it at a particular time,


County votes


to privatize


EMS service


Emergency medical ser-
vices were privatized this
year when the Columbia
County Board of County
Commissioners unani-
mously approved entering
into a five-year contract
with Lifeguard Ambulance
Service of Florida to pro-
vide local EMS instead of
the county. Lifeguard took
over emergency calls in
July.
The change saved the
county $1.2 million annu-
ally in EMS subsidy costs.
During contract nego-


tiations; county firefighters
voiced their concern about
privatizing as Lifeguard
could not guarantee all
Columbia County EMS
employees would be hired.
Lifeguard was able to
hire about 40 percent of
the county's former staff
members.
Lifeguard hired 30 full-
time employees and 12 part-
time employees to work
in the county. Columbia
County EMS had about 35
employees including fill-in
positions and billing staff.


2 captains versus Lake City Police Dept.


Former Lake City Police
Department Capt. Rudolph Davis
filed a lawsuit against the LCPD in
early January after he was alleg-
edly subjected to racial discrimi-
nation and retaliation by his supe-
riors at the department.
Davis filed his case based on alle-
gations of discrimination against
former Police Chief Steven Burch,
as well as retaliation and discrim-
ination complaints filed against
police officials Bruce Charles and

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents.of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LETTERS
POLICY


current police chief Gilmore.
The trial is slated to take place
Aug. 6-10, 2012, in federal court in
Jacksonville.
On March 3 former LCPD Cpl.
John M. Spahalski, filed a com-
plaint with the EEOC against the
LCPD, alleging he was the victim
of discrimination based on dis-
ability.
Spahalski, a cancer survivor,
filed the complaint in early January
2011. His case has been assigned
to the agency Mediation Unit for
processing.
Spahalski is claiming personal
harm because on Dec. 1, 2010, he
was not considered for an inter-


view to possibly be re-hired.
Nov. 17, LCPD Capt. Robert
Smith was placed on administra-
tive leave with pay after he filed a
complaint against another LCPD
captain. City officials launched an
investigation into Smith's claims,
which center on allegations of
employment discrimination and
"internal operations disagree-
ments" with police chief Argatha
Gilmore as well as "conflict"
between Smith and Capt. John
Blanchard, according to a memo
from City Manager Wendell
Johnson.
After reviewing findings from
assistant city attorney Richard


Stadler, Johnson expanded the
probe into Smith's complaints as
part of an administrative inter-
nal affairs investigation. Details of
Smith's complaint are unknown.
Close to a week after the admin-
istrative internal affairs probe was
expanded, Smith and his attorney
filed an EEOC complaint. Smith
said he was placed on administra-
tive leave with pay for complaining
about racial discrimination in the
department and in retaliation for
his willingness to testify in the
Rudolph Davis case.
Smith and Davis are represent-
ed by the same attorney, Marie
Mattox.


Alfonso Levy passes away at 83


Lake City lost an influential edu-
cator, musician and humanitarian
July 3 when Alfonso William.Levy
died at 83 of kidney failure.
During segregation Levy was
the music director for the coun-
ty's black schools and later held
the same position for the entire
county.
Active in the community, Levy
was the musical director for many
performances at Florida Gateway
College, Columbia Little Theater
and St. James Episcopal Church.


Levy


F l orida
Gateway College
named its per-
forming arts cen-
ter after Levy in
1993.
Levy's long-
time friend and
music partner


Tony Buzzella said Levy could
have made it bigger than he did,
but chose to stay in Lake City to
make a difference.
"He was down-to-earth and very


grounded in his purpose," Buzzella
said, "and that was to educate,
entertain and bring music to the
lives of each and every citizen of
Columbia County."
"He embodied music 24/7," said
his son, Wayne Levy. "He made an
impact of setting the example for a
great leader, an impact on how to
be a great person, how to be per-
sonable, how to smile every day
and how to just love people. And
in turn, people loved him."


Water

wars

brewing

With water levels near.
all-time record lows in
springs, creeks and riv-,
ers in the region, the
900 million gallons of
water drawn daily from-.
the Floridan Aquifer is-
a growing concern to'
Columbia County resi-
dents.
A crowd of about 500,..
attended a meeting in
Lake City on Nov. 29 to
discuss a permit allow-
ing Jacksonville Electric
Authority to pump 155 .'
m"million gallons a day,:,
from the aquifer.
The majority of people
at the meeting supported
legal action to block the
electric authority's 20-
year permit granted by
the St. Johns River Water.
Management District.
But a Jacksonville lawyerr'
with expertise in envi-
ronmental issues told the
audience it's unlikely the
courts would rule against
the electric authority.
The problem with a
lawsuit is there is little.
data available to prove
the cause of low water
levels and the time to
challenge the permit was
before the it was granted,.
not after the fact.
State elected officials
at the meeting said they
plan to introduce legis-.
lation prohibiting water
districts from grant-
ing permits that could
impact another water dis-
trict. Columbia County is
in the Suwannee River
Water Management
District.
The legislation, if
approved, will help clarify
conflicting data by differ-
ent water management
districts.
Columbia County com-
missioners voted to bud-
get $250,000 to create a
work group to further
study the issue. Other
municipalities in the 14-".
county water manage-
ment district are expect-
ed to budget money to
support the study.


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


IDA now EDD; new director hired


The Columbia County
Industrial DevelopmentAuthority
was renamed the Economic
Development Department at the
first county commission meeting
of 2011.
But the name change was
more than cosmetic. When com-
missioners voted for the change
at the Jan. 6 meeting, the former
industrial development authority
was placed under county control.
Prior to change, the executive
director and staff answered to


the IDA board
of directors
17. appointed by the
county commis-
.sion.
.. The newly
formed depart-
ment has the
Quillen legal approval
to go beyond
the strict state statutes govern-
ing county industrial authorities.
A development department can
assist with commercial projects


and help existing businesses retain
jobs, for example, while an indus-
trial authority focuses on attracting
new industry to a region.
About a month after the vote,
the department's executive direc-
tor, Jim Poole, announced his
retirement, effective June 30.
Commissioners hired an
employment agency specializing
in finding qualified candidates for
the executive director's position.
County officials were selective
in hiring a replacement because


they wanted to be confident the
person they hired would be capa-
ble of handling the responsibili-
ties of the job.
It took nearly 10 months from
the time of Poole's announce-
ment on Feb. 7 until his replace-
ment, Jesse Quillen was hired as '
new executive director. Quillen
assumed control of the depart- .
ment on Dec. 5.

MORE TOP STORIES ON 5A -


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER TOP STORIES SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012


Top local stories



Sheriff asked to probe


redistricting questions


'After U.S. Census data is released once
every 10 years, new voting district lines
are drawn nationwide.
In Columbia County, the sheriff's office
was asked to investigate whether the new
lines were drawn to favor incumbent pub-
lic officials or to exclude someone from
running for office.
Initially, one map with new voting bound-
aries was drawn by the Supervisor of
Elections office. The map met all state and
federal requirements, including equalizing
the number of residents in each district
and maintaining the racial balance in a
minority voting district
Despite meeting all the legal require-
ments, some elected officials had com-
plaints about the proposed district lines.
The Supervisor of Elections office drew
three additional maps in an attempt to sat-
isfy everyone.
Instead, a fifth map drawn by county
staff was unveiled in late October, surpris-
ing some commissioners. They voted 3-2
to accept the newest map without discuss-
ing the four maps that were drawn earlier.
County Commission Chairman Jody
DuPree asked for the investigation, saying
all five maps should have been considered
at a public hearing.
The boundary lines were also ques-
tioned by Lake City businessman Matt
Vann and incumbent School Board mem-
ber Keith Hudson.
Vann, whose neighborhood was moved
from District 5 to District 1, said he sus-
pects he was moved to another district to
discourage him from running for public
office. He filed paperwork to run for the


District 5 county commission seat on Nov.
16, six days before commissioners voted to
approve new district lines.
Hudson, who has served on the school
board for 35 years, asked commissioners
to move a nearby neighborhood back to
his voting district because it contained
many longtime supporters.
The requests by Vann and Hudson were
not. discussed at the meeting because
none of the commissioners would sec-
ond Rusty DePratter's motion. After the
meeting, puPree said he regretted not
relinquishing his chairman's seat dur-
ing the meeting to second DePratter's
motion so the requests could be dis-
cussed.
SCommissioners Stephen Bailey and
Ron Williams said they don't second
motions they don't plan to support, even
for discussion purposes. Scarlet Frisina,
who was recently appointed commission
chair, said she never asked anyone to
move Vann to another district so she
wouldn't have to face him in the 2012
elections.
She said Vann knew his neighborhood
was moved to another district prior to him
filing paperwork to run against her.
Sheriff Mark IHunter said he was uncer-
tain if his office had jurisdiction. The
Florida Department of Law Enforcement
and the State Elections Commission
reviewed the complaint.
The agencies determined nothing that
would prompt a criminal investigation.
Hunter said his office has no jurisdiction
in the matter and that the complaint is a
civil matter.


FGC to offer 4-year degrees


Florida Gateway College received all
necessary accreditation last year to offer a
baccalaureate nursing program.
The program will be open to students
in Fall 2012. The FCG Board of Trustees
approved the program in March, along with
bachelor's degree programs for early child-
hood education and industrial logistics.


Dawn Lynn Pope
Dawn Lynn Pope, 57, passed
away December 21, 2011, peace-
fully in her sleep at home. Ms.
* Pope was a long time resident of
Springfield, IL; moved to Flori-
da in 2009 after her-retirement.
Dawn held a Bachelor'sDegree
in Criminology, from Governors
State College, Illinois. She re-
tired Janduary of 2009 from the
Illinois State Police Department.
Dawn is predeceased by her father
Norman Pope. She is survived by
her loving Mother; Eunice Pope,
Brothers; Michael (Donna), Eric
Pope, Nieces; Jayme, Rachel,
Nephew; Jeff, Great Neph-
ew; Austin, and many Aunts,
Uncles, Cousins and friends.
No burial arrange-
ments have been made.
Services entrusted to ICS
CREMATION & FUNERAL
HOME357NWWilksLane,Lake
City, Florida (386-752-3436.
Flora Lavon "Nonnie"
Vanlling.
Flora Lavon "Nonnie" Vandling,
81, of Lake City, FL, died on
Wednesday, December 28, 2011,
at her residence. A native of
Waycross, GA, she had lived
in Lake City, FL, most of her
life. She was a retired operator
supervisor with Southern Bell.
She was preceded in death by
her parents, Newbern Colley, Sr.
and Lucille McGuiag Colley and
stepfather Arlin 0. Jones,. and
her brother, Newbern Randall


The nursing program was accredited by
the State Board of Education in June and
the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools in December.
Once the nursing program is launched,
the college will begin working on the early
childhood education program, scheduled
to begin in Spring 2013'.


OBITUARIES

Colley, Jr., and a niece, Susan
Gragg. She was a loving aunt and
sister who loved animals, swim-
ming in the springs and music:
Survivors include: two nieces:
Jessica Gilbert (Ernest), Tampa,
FL, and, Lou Cleland (Jerry),
Oklahoma; one nephew: Chris
Colley (Helen), Lake City, FL;
great nephews: Adam Culp
(Julie), Oklahoma, Ashley
Culp (Cathy), Michigan, and
Skyler Colley, Lake City, FL;
great great. nieces and neph-
ews: Hannah, David, Joshua,
Jonathan, Anika, Chandler,
Evan, Ethan, Jerrod, and Erin.
She had many loving friends.
Graveside funeral services will


be held on Tuesday, January 3,
2012, at 1 P.M. in Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens, Lake City,
FL, with the Rev. Coy Wil-
liams officiating. There will be
no visitation before the service.'
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S. US
Hwy 441, Lake City,.FL 32025
(386-752-1954) is in charge
of arrangements. Please send
message of love and comfort to
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


PotashCorp-White Springs

Employee Service Awards 2011


As we come to the end of the year PotashCorp-White
Springs would like to recognize our employees who have
reached service milestones within the company during
2011. The strength of any organization is based upon
the knowledge, skills and abilities of its employees and
their drive to be the best at their jobs. As the General
Manager of PotashCorp-White Springs I am proud of
the dedication and work ethic of our employees and
offer my congratulations on your years of service. To
the entire PotashCorp-White Springs Family and all
our Community Stakeholders, I wish you a safe and
Merry Christmas andA Happy New Year
Terry Baker

General Manager
PotashCorp-White Springs
Hire Date Years Employee Name Job Title
11/14/1966 45 Lane, Hulon H WSU Truck Crane Operator
12/27/1966 45 Register, Herbert J WSU Flotation Operator Leaderman
1/12/1971 40 James, Jake W WSU Mechanical Leaderman
1/14/1971 40 Martin, Henry E WSU Transport Operator
1/19/1971 40 Steedley, Curtis M WSU Excavator Operator
2/1/1971 40 McLaughlin, L V WSU Excavator Operator
4/6/1971 40 McKire, David J WSU Rod Mill Operator
6/2/1971 40 Gillen, Scotty A Purchasing Supervisor
6/8/1971 40 McIntyre, Phillip W WSU Heavy Equipment Operator ,
6/22/1971 40 Law, Jonathan C WSU Mechanical Leaderman
7/27/1971 40 Hutchins, Marvin R WSU Combination Repairman
S7/28/1971 40 Hill, Daniel B Superintendant Mechanical Maintenance
8/4/1971 40 Marshall Jr, Leroy WSU Excavator Operator
9/14/1971 40 Gibbons, Andrew L WSU Wrencher I
9/15/1971 40 Keel,Edward L WSU Washer Operator Leaderman
12/14/1971 40' Anderson, Gary E WSU Excavator Operator
8/30/1976 35 Shearry, James C WSU Instrument Electrician Leaderman
10/18/1976 35 Bailey, Maenell WSU Chief Operator
10/18/1976 35 Daughtry, Harold J WSU Mechanic First Class
10/18/1976 35 Lee, Michael WSU Chief Operator-Evaporation'
10/18/1976 35 Potts, George J WSU Washer Operator Leaderman
10/25/1976 35 Patten, John F WSU Combination Mobile Mechanic
11/28/1976 35 Ourso, Susan S Senior Secretary-WSA
1/5/1981 30 Sandage, James A Senior Mines Planning Coordinator
2/3/1981 30 McCall, James R 'Quality Assiraice Technician A
2/4/1981 30 Harris, Jesse F Shift Foreman Mines
2/17/1981 30 James, Sarah F WSU Chief Operator-Filters
4/13/1981 30 Davis, Richard G WSU Utility Operator Granular
4/13/1981 30 Wilson, Larry 0 WSU Evaporator Operator
4/20/1981 30 Cheshire, Bobby R WSU Utility Operator Granular
5/11/1981 30 Johnson, Clarence WSU Utility Operator Granular
5/13/1981 30 McCullough, Scott E WSU Head Rodman Technician
Hire Date Years Employee Name' Job Title
5/18/1981 30 Morgan, Darrell E WSU Combination Mobile Mechanic
5/18/1981 30 Richards, Bryan K WSU.Track Leaderman
5/26/1981 30 Mathis, Steve W WSU Flagman Asst Locomotive Engineer
5/26/1981 30 Ruis, James F, WSU Prospect Survey Technician-Leaderman *
6/1/1981 30 Thrasher, (anova W General Foreman Production
6/22/1981 30 JOhnson, Catherlene Senior Accountant
6/29/1981 30 Lynch, Cameron R Superintendent Mine Planning/Services
8/3/1981 30 Wilson, Michael T Engineer II Mines
3/24/1986 25 McClelland Jr, Herbert J Traffic Supervisor
4/1/1986 25 Crawford, Carroll WSU Belt Tender Washer & Recovery
8/12/1986 25 Gilmer, Scott D Senior Project Engineer
6/17/1996 15 Ellis, William J Engineer Senior Environmental
11/18/1996 15 Johnson, Frank D Senior Environmental Tech
1/3/2006 5 Brinson, Travis S WSU Shipping Operator
1/3/2006 5 Daniels, Johnny L ,WSU Wrencher
1/3/2006 5 Keen, James 0 WSU B Operator Phosphoric Acid
3/13/2006 5 Bronson, Ethan R WSU Heavy Equipment Operator
3/13/2006 5 Davis, Woodrow'S WSU Mechanical Leaderman
3113/2006 5 Kight, James H WSU B Operator- Phosphoric Acid
3/13/2006 5 Smnith, Jeanice WSU Helper/Mines
3/13/2006 5 Wheeler, Brett E WSU C Operator Phosphoric Acid
3/13/2056 5 Williams, Mitchell L WSU Mechanic First Class
4/17/2006 5 Peyton, Christopher G WSU Heavy Equipment Operator
4/24/2006 5 Deese, Joshua L WSU Helper/Mines
4/24/2006 5 Dyke, Selina A WSU Flotation Operator
4/24/2006 5 Fisher, Carlton T WSU Belt Tender Chemical
4/24/2006 5 Grimes, Sue 0 WSU Belt Tender Chemical
4/24/2006 5 Kriehn, Thomas G WSU Flagman Asst Locomotive Engineer
4/24/2006 5 McCoy, Norman W WSU Large Dragline Oiler
4/24/2006 5 McGhin, StevenN WSU Material Handler Operator
4/24/2006 5 Swinson,.Justin R WSU Shipping Operator
4/24/2006 5 Williamson, Billy M WSU Belt Tender Chemical
5/8/2006 5 White, Joseph Michael Production Engineer III
6/12/2006 5 Hudson, Jason M WSU Heavy Equipment Operator
7/10/2006 5 Cameron, Richardson C Senior F:oduction Engineer
7/10/2006 5 Combass, Robert N Security Officer
7/10/2006 5 Falagan, Lynn A WSU Helper/Mines
7/10/2006 5 Garner, Joshua C WSU Material Handler Operator
7/10/2006 5 George, Charles J WSU Certified Trainee


7/10/2006 5 Kennington, Kevin L WSU HE/Reel TruckOperator
7/10/2006 5 Pierce, Deborah A WSU C Operator Phosphoric Acid
7/10/2006 5 Williams, Michael D Manager Public Affairs
8/14/2006 5 Barber, Robert N WSU Belt Tender Chemical
8/14/2006 5 Burett, Kenneth M WSU Heavy Equipment Operator
8/14/2006 5 Head, James K WSU Washer Operator
8/14/2006 5 Johnson Jr, Thomas G WSU Material Handler Operator
8/14/2006 5 Weston, Marquis M WSU Material Handler Operator
8/14/2006 5 Works, William S WSU Head Rodman Technician
10/23/2006 5 Fullbright, John D WSU Lineman First Class
10/2/2/2006 5 Hughes, Jeffery L WSU Flagman Asst Locomotive Engineer
10/23/2006 5 Meads, Chad E WSU Heavy Equipment Operator
10/23/2006 5 Sowell, Robert B WSU Wrencher
11/20/2006 5 Hulbert,JuliaM Payroll Specialist


Florida Tax Payers
please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous fallacy
of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia High
School, and Fort White High School students and alumni. All of them
are offspring of Adam and his female wife Eve and therefore are created
by God, in the image of God. (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1
End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1;
page 52 SC.912.L.15.10
http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)
I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com
In The Year of our Lord 2012
Paid for by Kenny Merriken


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012


THE WEATHER


I,



SUN



HI 75 LO 41
77 I


NATIONAL FORECAST: A low pressure system moving through the Great Lakes will generate
snow and some rain showers throughout the region. Strong winds on the backside of the sys
tern will usher much colder air into the Midwest..Wet weather is also anticipated in western
Washington today, where rain and higher-elevation snow showers are anticipated.



NAT .IONL RC~ A ~.tdyit


REGIONAL FOC M frn
Sunay's 4h/vndm ntgt's ow


P7sac/b
71/37


T assee *
75/36

Paia73/39C
73/39


* dtda
74/36
Lake City,
75/41
Gie e .
75/45
Ocala
76/48


Tampa,
76/56/


Ft Mye
79/56


82/62 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


LAK CI ALANA


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


77
47
66
42
85 in 1900
18 in 1917


0.00"
0.49"
33.38"
2.56"
48.36"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


7:27 a.m.
5:41 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5:42 p.m.


12:14 p.m.
12:37 a.m.
12:48 p.m.
1:30 a.m.


5
MODB3EI
30mInutesblxn
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+


Monday
67/39/s
65/35/s
79/48/pc
72/43/pc
61/30/s
58/30/s
74/56/pc
59/29/s
79/47/pc
74/46/pc
62/32/s
66/38/s
54/30/s
55/29/s
55/25/s
67/43/s
55/26/s
75/41/pc


Tuesday
57/41/s
54/35/s
65/49/s
62/39/s
48/22/s
46/24/s
63/52/pc
47/21/s
66/47/s
62/42/s
49/25/s
57/37/s
50/28/s
53/30/s
48/18/s
58/38/s
45/21/s
62/44/s


An exclusive
service


our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. "V. Forecasts, data and
1 9 16 23 3 1 graphics 2012 Weather
First Full Last New I fIV Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
Woat @rJa www.weatherpubllsher.com

a i


On this date in
1965, the new year
started out ver) wet
in Peoria. Ill.. where
4.413 inches of rain
fell, malirg it thle
wenest January day
on record for the
city.


. Cortu


Ciss 59pi
Olabcold Front
oI~cty uph '




Houston 0711/ -- Orlandb, Warm Front
677/55
Miam Front
82152 '
Occluded
Front


A


CITY
Albany-NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC .
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
-43/30/.02 46/30/pc Des M
55/32/0 50/26/s Detro
3/0/0 10/-2/pc El Pat
63/44/0 60/32/pc Falrbt
60/40/0 57/34/pc Green
39/32/0 38/23/pc Hartfi
63/36/0. 60/29/s Honol
39/30/.19 27/12/pc Houst
38/26/0 44/24/pc Indlar
38/34/.01 45/34/pc Jacks
45/41/.04 46/28/rs Jacks
70/51/0 72/41/s Kansa
52/49/0 54/29/pc Las V
62/48/0 64/34/s Little
49/26/0 41/20/s Los A
37/29/0 35/20/sf Memo
47/42/0 46/26/w Miami
46/38/.01 41/24/rs Minne
68/50/0 68/37/s Mobil,
69/37/0 60/34/s New 0
,75/54/0 76/51/s New
54/36/0 42/21/pc Oklah


Saturday Today


Moines
so
inks
isboro
ord
ulu
don
iapolls
on MS
onville
as City
egas
Rock
ngeles
phis
eapolls
Odeans
York
oma City


HI/Lo/Pcp.
50/33/0
44/37/.01
. 65/33/0
-22/-36/0
61/47/0,
40/34/.06
72/64/0.
73/55/0
40/37/0
69/34/0
76/50/0,
63/30/0
59/41/0
68/34/0
62/44/0
66/37/0
81/57/0
40/28/0
71/51/0
67/54/0
54, J7, 01
66/35/0


Saturday Today


HI/Lo'/W CITY
36/17Tw Omaha
39/26/sn Orlando
157/30/s Philadelphia
-27/-29/c Phoenix
62/32/s, Pittsburgh
48/30/pc Portland ME
80/65/s Portland OR
66/38/s 'Raleigh .
39/20/A Rapid City
62/34/s Reno
75/43/si Richmond
44/21/wl Sacramento
63/40/s I St. Louis
58/30/s Salt Lake City
73/53/s San Antonio
56/31/s San Diego
82/62/s San Francisco
28/11/w Seattle
70/37/pc Spokane .
71/40/pc Tampa
51 37,p Tucson
50/25/s Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
48/30/0
76/52/0
56/43/0
64/48/0
45/41/.01
36/27/.11
39/30/0
64/50/0
45/33/.05
38/26/0
63/49/0
50/40/0
57/34/0
54/29/0
73/42/0
63/48/0
53/43/0
39/32/0
31/26/0
75/59/0
67/44/0
62/46/0


HI/Lo/V
37/t5/w
77/55/s
55/36/pa
81/52/s
45'24' i
44/31/pc
45/37/po'
67/34/s
35/14/s
52/27/S
64/33/S
64/39/s
42/25/W
41/24/s
65/34/S
77/51/s
61/46/s
49/35/sh
34.. 24-C
76/56/s
76'44 -9
58/36/pd


[INTRATOA


CITY
Acapulco
Afnsterdam
Athens
Auckland
BelJing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
86/73'0
52/39/0
55/41/0
73/68/0
41/12/0
39/32/.08
86 68 '0
66/50/0
43/32/0
82/63/0
32/26/0
68/61/0
90/77/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
87'71 'pc
52/46/sh
50,.37.sh
71/63/sh
33 16,s
50/44/sh
K5 69
62/48/pc
49,44/sn
80/61/pc
32,27,pc
69/61/pc
86/75/pc


CITY,
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
48,41 0
81/68/0
55,52!0
55/28/0
72. 48 0
27/18/0
34 32 0
17/59/0
82/59,0
72/46/0
23/14/0
88/77/0
.55 45 0


Today
HI/Lo/W
55. 41 sh
77/66/pc,/
54/43/sh
57/30/s
75.46 pc
,40/29/sh
30., 24,sf
T, 58 pc
82/69, pc
66/45/pc
37.32jr
88/75/sh
55 46 sr.


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
80/70/0
54/37/0
84/72/.11
84/73/.32
82/57/0
36/16/0
90/75/0
75/63/0
63/53/0
48/37/0
36/34/0
45/30/0
36/28/,09


Today.
HI/Lo/W
79/71/ti
59/39/sb
85/72/sh'
84/72/sh
,84/58/pc;
31 18 r-,
89 .6 .
80/64/s,:
62/48/sn;
50/40/sh;
44 26.st
43/38/sh.
35 31.'pc.


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, drdrizzle, f-fair, fg=fog, h-hazy, i=ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sunny,
sh-showers, sn=snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


THIS SHOULD SI


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* Shop the dealership with a CAMPUS Pre-Approved Loan Draft
and negotiate as a cash buyer!

* Have a loan with another lender? Lower your payment by
bringing it to CAMPUS!


Accelerate your approval when you apply online at
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CAMPUS


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Apply Now!





iiN


L i S c r a 1 5 e a 9 3 v 1 1 e H s 5 4 S w a 5 t S a o
S pi n g i C o m m o n s 9 2 0 0 N I 3 9 ~ th A v e la c h u V ~ Ia 1 4 7 5 9 liN AW1 5 th n Oaw n ela 3 0 9 7 S W li e ge52 a p a st O a a 2 4 .S l e p i g l d e t M r o 1 1 5 S 9 r o r d u neIe d 7 5 U H % 4


City
0 Jadmsoyie Cape Canaveral
75/43 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytofa Beach Fort Myers
76J51 Gainesville
0 Jacksonville
Key West
Orando Cape Caaveral Lake City
77/55 75/58 MiLae City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
79/60 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
S-, 80/63 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
80/58 Mimi Tampa


- - - - - -. . . . . . .. . . . .


^HK^I^
w MONDAY


IrE;


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


WEDNESDAYH


THURSDAY


i









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
6r- j eci/ r p ot/reFore r cr,-


Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Sunday, January 1, 2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

YOUTH BASEBALL
Young Guns
tryout Saturday
The Young Guns
9-under travel baseball
team has an open tryout
set for 1 p.m. Saturday
at the Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call
manager David Williams
at (386) 697-0764.

North Florida
Blaze tryouts
The North Florida
Blaze travel baseball
team for ages 11-12 has a
tryout planned for 2 p.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423.
LCMS SOFTBALL
Conditioning
starts Wednesday
Lake City Middle
School softball
conditioning begins at
3:15 p.m. Wednesday
at the LCMS softball
field. All players must
have a current physical,
parent permission form
and drug consent form
before participating.
For details, call coach
Machon Kvistad at
623-6833.
E From staff reports

GAMES


Tuesday
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Melody
Christian Academy,
4:30 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer at Leon High,
7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Wednesday
Columbia High girls,
weightlifting vs. Fort
White High, 4:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Leon High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
basketball vs. Williston
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Thursday
Fort White High
soccer at Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (boys-5)
Columbia High girls
basketball at Stanton
Prep, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Atlantic
Coast High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High girls
weightlifting vs. Union
County High, 3:30 p.m.
Columbia High
wrestling in Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High (CYSA field),
6 p.m.
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Hamilton
County High (CYSA field),
7 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer at Newberry High,
7 p.m. (girls-5)
Fort White High
basketball vs. Interlachen
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Columbia High girls
basketball vs. Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling in Clay County
Rotary Invitational at Clay
High, TBA
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Part


of


the


Pack


COURTESY PHOTO
Packers fan Jonathan King shows the Green Bay stock certificate he got for Christmas. King is wearing his 'Cheesehead' hat while settled in among other
memorabilia including a football he bought in New Orleans when he attended the Packers' Super Bowl win.


Long-time Green Bay fan gets gift of stock


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
For most of his early life,
Jonathan King didn't
know a home. He grew
up in a military family
traveling year to year
from city to city. Ie didn't have a
home, but King always had a team.
Even in his early childhood,
King can remember his love of
the Green Bay Packers. It was
something in his blood. It was
something that was as much about
being a part of his family as his
Irish heritage.
"My first memory of the
Packers was when my dad was
stationed in Chicago," King said.
"My uncle, Steve Boyer, called my
mom to rag her about living in
Chicago."
King's mother, Patty, grew up in
Wisconsin where rooting for the
Packers was a way of life as much
as eating sausage in the state.
Living in Chicago was foreign
territory.
"I pretty much knew two things
growing up I was supposed to


"I can definitely say that I was thrilled when
Aaron Rodgers fell to us in the 2006 draft. I
knew if he could sit behind Favre for a few'
years, it would be the best thing to ever
happen to the Packers."
-Jonathan King,
Green Bay fan and co-owner


root for the Packers and I wasn't
supposed to like the Bears,"
King said.
When his grandfather died,
King didn't inherit a lot of money.
He didn't have a trust fund, but
he did gain a piece of Packer
memorabilia.
"The one thing I inherited from
my grandfather was a Green Bay
Packers bobble-head doll," King
said. "Its really cool and vintage,
from back in the day like the 50s."
His memorabilia has grown over
the years. From city to city,' King
moved with his father until
permanently finding a home in
Florida when his father retired
off the coast of Jacksonville at
Mayport Naval Station in 1995.


Before making it to Florida, the
Kings made stops in Mountain
View, Ca., San Diego, Pax River,
Md., Chesapeake, Va., and
New Orleans.
It was when King lived in New
Orleans that he saw his first
Packers game live. It wasn't just
any game. It wasn't the preseason.
It wasn't even for a divisional title.
This game was much bigger.
King's father found tickets to
the Super Bowl and would take
his son to watch Brett Favre
quarterback Green Bay to a NFL
Championship over the New
England Patriots.
"I got a Brett Favre jersey with
an official Super Bowl patch, a
game ball and it had both mine


and my dad's names on it," King
said.
His love for the Packers grew
over the years.
As he became an adult, King
found love for another
quarterback. He made the bold
prediction on draft day that Aaron
Rodgers would someday take
control of the Packers franchise
and be better than Favre.
"I can definitely say that I was
absolutely thrilled when Aaron
Rodgers fell to us in the 2006
draft," King said. "I knew if he
could sit behind Favre for a few
years, it would be the best thing to
ever happen for the Packers."
King enjoys what Favre did
for the franchise, but he hasn't
been a fan of his antics in the
recent years.
"I'm a fan of Brett Favre while
he was with the Packers," King
said. "Everything he's done after,
I could care less about. The joy he
gave me as a Packer, however, I'll
never forget."
Another moment that he'll never
PACKERS continued on 4B


Florida beats


Yale, 90-70


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE The
University of Florida bas-
ketball team bounced back
from a devastating double-
overtime loss at Rutgers
on Thursday to defeat Yale,
90-70, in Gainesville on
Saturday.
Kenny Boyton led the
Gators in scoring with 26
points.
Patric Young scored 19
points and Erik Murphy
scored 18, including five
3-pointers.
Princeton 75,
Florida State 73, 30T
TALLAHASSEE After
55 minutes of basketball,


Princeton could finally
exhale and enjoy the
moment.
The Tigers, who held
a 17-point lead going into
the second half, battled
through three overtimes to
hold off Florida State 75-73
on Friday night.
Ian Hummer had 25
points and 15 rebounds
for Princeton and Douglas
Davis also had 25 points -
including a pair of 3-point-
ers in the third overtime.
The Seminoles (8-5)
trailed 27-10 at halftime
but stormed back to tie
the game at 47 and force
overtime.
Both Florida State and
HOOPS continued on 4B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida guard Erving Walker (11) goes for a lay-up in a game against Florida
State on Dec. 27. Florida and FSU hosted Ivy League teams over the weekend with the
Gators beating Yale, 90-70, while the Seminoles fell to Princeton, 75-73, in triple overtime.


Section B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY JANUARY 1 2012


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 a.m.
VERSUS Dakar Rally, Mar del Plata
to Santa Rosa de la Pampa, Argentina
(delayed tape)
NFL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
FOX Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Dallas at New York Giants

Monday
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
I p.m.
ABC Outback Bowl, Michigan St.vs.
Georgia, at Tampa
ESPN Capital One Bowl, Nebraska
vs. South Carolina, at Orlando
ESPN2 Gator Bowl, Ohio St. vs.
Florida, at Jacksonville
5:07 p.m.
ESPN Rose Bowl, Wisconsin vs.
Oregon, at Pasadena, Calif.
8:37 p.m.
ESPN Fiesta Bowl, Stanford vs.
Oklahoma St., at Glendale,Ariz.
MOTORSPORTS
1:30 a.m.
NBCSP Dakar Rally. Santa Rosa
de la Pampa to San Rafael, Argentina
(delayed tape)
NHL HOCKEY
I p.m.
NBC -Winter Classic, N.Y. Rangers
at Philadelphia (Citizens Bank Park)
8 p.m.
NBCSP San Jose at Vancouver


FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo
Miami


y-Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


x-Baltimore
x-Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Denver
",- Oakland
San Diego
Kansas City
NATIONAL


East
W L
12 3
8 7
6 9
5 10
South
W L
10 5
8 7
4 11
.2 13
North
W L
II 4
II 4
9 6
4 II
West
W 'L
8 7
8 7
7 8
6 9


T Pct PF PA
0.800 464 321
0 .533 360 344
0.400351 385
0.333 310296

T Pet PF PA
0 .667 359 255
0 .533 302 295
0.267 224316
0.133230411

T Pct PF PA
0 .733 354 250
0.733 312 218
0 .600 328 299
0 .267 209 294

T Pct PF PA
0 .533 306 383
0 .533 333 395
0 .467 368 351
0 .400 205 335


kL CONFERENCE


East
W L
N.Y. Giants 8 7
Dallas 8 7
Philadelphia 7 8
Washington 5 10
South
W L
y-New Orleans 12 3
x-Atlanta 9 6
Carolina 6 9
Tampa Bay 4 II
North
W L
y-Green Bay 14 I
x-Detroit 10 5
Chicago 7 8
Minnesota 3 12
West
W L
y-San Francisco 12" 3
Seattle 7 8
Arizona 7 8
St. Louis 2 13
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division


T Pct PF PA
0 .533 363 386
0.533 355 316
0.467 362 318
0 .333 278 333

T Pct PF PA
0 .800 502 322
0 .600 357 326
0 .400 389 384
0 .267 263 449

T Pct PF PA
0 .933 515 318
0 .667 433 342
0 .467 336 328
0 .200 327 432

T Pct PF PA
0 .800 346 202
0.467 301'292
0 .467 289 328
0.133 166373


Today's Games
Chicago at Minnesota, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Buffalo at New England, I p.m.
N.Y Jets at Miami, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, I p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y Giants, 8:30 p.m.
End regular season

FCS championship

Friday
At Pizza Hut Park
Frisco,Texas
Sam Houston State (14-0) vs. North
Dakota State (13-1), I p.m.

College bowl games

New Mexico Bowl
Temple 37,Wyoming 15 I
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Ohio 24, Utah St. 23
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 32, San Diego
State 30
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20, FIU 10
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU 31, Louisiana Tech 24
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 56,Arizona State 24 .
Hawaii Bowl
Southern Mississippi 24, Nevada 17
Independence Bowl
Missouri 41, North Carolina 24
Uttle Caesars Pizza Bowl
Purdue 37.Western Michigan 32
Belk Bowl
North Carolina State 31, Louisville 24
Military Bowl
Toledo 42,Air Force 41
Holiday Bowl
Texas 21, California 10
Champs Sports Bowl


Florida State 18, Notre Dame 14
Alamo Bowl
Baylor 67,Washington 56

Friday
Armed Forces Bowl
BYU 24,Tulsa 21
Pinstripe Bowl
Rutgers 27, Iowa State 13
Music City Bowl
Mississippi State 23,Wake Forest 17
Insight Bowl
Oklahoma 31, Iowa 14

Saturday
Meinke Car Care Bowl
Texas A&M 33, Northwestern 22
Sun Bowl
Utah 30, Georgia Tech 27. OT
Liberty Bowl
Vanderbilt vs. Cincinnati (n)
Fight Hunger Bowl
UCLA vs. Illinois (n)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
Virginia vs.Auburn (n)

Monday
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1),
Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South' Carolina
(10-2), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
(10-3), I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
I p.m. (ESPNI)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Stanford (11-1) vs. Oklahoma State
(I 1- I), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan (10-2) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestVirginia (9-3) vs. Clemson (10-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Jan. 6
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday, Jan. 7
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday, Jan. 8
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 9
BCS National Championship
-At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Jan. 21
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs.West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Jan. 28
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South,4 p.m. (NFLN)


BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Friday's Games
Orlando 100, Charlotte 79
Indiana 98, Cleveland 91, OT
Boston 96, Detroit 85
Atlanta 105, New Jersey 98
Phoenix 93, New Orleans 78
Miami 103, Minnesota 101
Memphis 113, Houston 93
Dallas 99,Toronto 86
Milwaukee 102,Washington 81
Utah 102, Philadelphia 99
Chicago 114, L.A. Clippers 101
Saturday's Games
Denver at L.A. Lakers (n)
Indiana at Detroit (n)
Adanta at Houston (n)
New York at Sacramento (n)
Phoenix at Oklahoma City (n)
Utah at Sah Antonio (n)
Philadelphia at Golden State (n)
Today's Games
New Jersey at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 6 p.m.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

OMYOD


CYAREM




Answer:


o .... ,4 I Jumbles: POUND


Torcrto a: Or-andc, 6 p.m.
Boston at Washington, 6 p-rm.
Dallas at Minnesota, 7 p m.
LA_ Lakers at Denver, 8 p.m.
Memphis a: Chicago, 8 p.m
New Orleans at Sacramento. 9 p.m
Portland at LA_ Clippers, 9:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Golden State at Phoenix. 3:30 p.m-
Washington at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Indiana at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Detroit. 7:30 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami. 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at New York, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Milwaukee at Denver. 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Utah, 9 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Syracuse at DePaul, 5 p.m.
No. 5 North Caiolina vs. Monmouth
(NJ),3 p.m.
No. 7 Duke vs. Pennsylvania, 5 p.m.
No. 14 Marquette vs.Villanova, I p.m.
No. 18 Michigan vs. Minnesota, 4 p.m.
No. 22 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati,
7 p.m.

Florida 90,Yale 70

At Gainesville
.YALE (8-4)
Willhite 3-10 0-0 8, Mangano 11-18
0-0 26, Kreisberg 2-6 0-0 4, Morgan 4-12
0-0 10, Grace 2-5 0-0 4, Pritchard 0-0 0-0
0, Cotton 0-0 0-0 0,Anderson 0-0 2-2 2,
Duren I-I 0-0 3, Salafia 2-3 0-0 6, Martin
0-1 0-0 0, Kelley 0-0 0-0 0, Childs-Klein
0-0 0-0 0, Sherrod 1-3 1-1 3, Townsend
1-4 2-5 4.Totals 27-63 5-8 70.
FLORIDA (11-3)
Murphy 6-12 1-2 18, Young 6-10 7-8
19, Boynton 8-12 5-7 26, Walker 1-4
0-0 3, Beal 4-8 3-5 II, Rosario 4-8 0-1
9,Wilbekin 0-0 0-0 0,Yeguete 2-3 0-0 4,
Larson 0-1 0-0 0.Totals 31-58 16-23 90.
Halftime-Florida 46-35. 3-Point
Goals-Yale 11-21 (Mangano 4-6,Willhite
2-3, Salafia 2-3, Morgan 2-5, Duren 1-1,
Martin 0-1, Grace 0-2), Florida 12-21
(Boynton 5-7, Murphy 5-7, Walker 1-2,
Rosario 1-3, Beal 0-2). Fouled Out-
Salafia. Rebounds-Yale 37 (Mangano
15), Florida 32 (Yeguete 8). Assists-
Yale 19 (Grace 6), Florida 24 (Walker,
Young 5).Total Fouls-Yale 21, Florida 12.
Technical-Yale Bench.A-9,119.

Princeton 75,
Florida State 73, 30T

AtTallahassee
PRINCETON (7-7)
Darrow 2-3 3-4 8, Saunders 0-2
0-0 0, Bray 2-8 0-0 6, Davis 8-24 4-6 25,
Hummer 10-19 5-5 25, Sherburne 0-0 0-0
0, Koon 3-7 1-3 7, Connolly 2-2 0-0 4.
Totals 27-65 13-18 75.
FLORIDA ST. (8-5)
Gibson 4-8 1-1 9, Loucks 4-11 0-0 10,
Dulkys 0-3 0-0 0, James 4-7 1-6 9, Snaer
8-16 3-4 20, Peterson 1-3 0-1 2, White
2-6 2-5 6, Miller 6-15 4-5 17, Whisnant
II 0-0 0-0 0, Kreft 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-69
11-22 73.
Halftime-Princeton 27-10. End
Of Regulation-Tied 47. End Of Ist
Overtime-Tied 53. End Of 2nd
Overtime-Tied 60. 3-Point Goals-
Princeton 8-23 (Davis 5-15, Bray 2-5,
Darrow 1-2, Saunders 0-1), Florida St.
4-18 (Loucks 2-3, Snaer 1-5, Miller 1-5,
Peterson 0-1, Dulkys 0-2, Gibson 0-2).
Fouled Out-Bray, Miller. Rebounds-
Princeton 44 (Hummer 15), Florida St. 44
(Gibson 8). Assists-Princeton 12 (Bray
7), Florida St. 9 (Loucks 5). Total Fouls-
Princeton 21, Florida St. 20.A-6,670.


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
Nashville 2, St. Louis I, SO
Washington 3, Buffalo I
Ottawa 4, Calgary 3, OT
N.Y. Rangers 4, Florida I
Chicago 3, Detroit 2
Saturday's Games
N.Y Islanders 4, Edmonton I
Pittsburgh at New Jersey (n)
Carolina atTampa Bay (n)
Phoenix at Minnesota (n)
Montreal at Florida (n)
Ottawa at Buffalo (n)
Toronto atWinnipeg (n)
St. Louis at Detroit (n)
Washington at Columbus (n)
Boston at Dallas (n)
Colorado atAnaheim (n)
Vancouver at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Game
Calgary at Nashville, 6 p.m.
Monday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Philadelphia, I p.m.
New Jersey at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose atVancouver, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.



(Answers tomorrow)
POUCH STYLUS GALLON


au~iumay I Answer: Everybody liked to go to Pat Sajak's house
because he was a GOOD HOST


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING


603: 2. Frank Miller 576; 3. Adam
Aiford 552.
High handicap game: 1. Lorrie
N cajee 239: 2 Lome Geiger 235;
3. Pat Fennell 223. 1. Bill Dolly 264;
2. Marshall Campbell 244; 3. Bob
Wheeler 240.
High handicap sees: 1. Carla
Nyssen 653; 2. Joyce Hooper 641;
3. Chrissy Fancy 639. 1. Steve
Greaves 670; 2. Jesus Camacho 655;
3. Frank Miller 648.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 182,
Mark Davis 196.
(results from Dec. 20)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Quirky Quad
(46.5-25.2, 42,928 pins); 2. 4 S's
(46.5-25.2, 42,229 pins); 3. Ups and
Downs (44.5-27.5).
High handicap game: 1. Betty
Carmichael 245; 2. Yvonne Finley
234; 3. Diane Madsen 233. 1. David
Duncan 256; 2. Thomas Young 217;
3. Jerry Ellis 212.
High handicap series: 1. Joyce
Hooper 669; 2. Pat Hale 655; 3. Elaine
Nemeth 642. 1. Wayne Johns 653;


2. Ross Meyers 652; 3. Bill Price
601.
High average: 1. Elaine Nemeth
152.88; 2. Betty Carmichael 150.94;
3. Louise Atwood 150.84. 1. David
Duncan 192.76; 2. Bill Dolly 189.52;
3. George Mulligan 178.43.
(results from Dec. 22)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. McGhghy's
Navy (45-23); 2. Grady's Automotive
(43-25); 3. TAZ (37.5-30.5).
High scratch game: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 209; 2. Cheryl Jacks 201;
3. Di Drehoff 197. 1. Mark Moore 244;
2. Mark Moore 241; 3. Dan McNair
236.
High scratch series: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 585; 2. Jennifer Freeman 540;
3. Amber Tompkins 488. 1. Mark
Moore 660; 2. Dan McNair 625;
3. Bobby Trunnell 615.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
169.9; 2. Cheryl Jacks 158.61;
3. Jennifer Freeman 152.1. 1. Dan
McNair 202.1; 2. A.J. Dariano 194.29;
3. Mark Moore 191.74.
(results from Dec. 18)


COURTESY PMOIUS


Zoned in

ABOVE: Impact Zone Training Academy hosted Texas Rangers pitcher Michael Kirkman
(back row center) for a pitching camp on Dec. 23. There were 20 pitchers ages 8-13 in
attendance. Kirkman, who pitched in the 2010 World Series, worked with all the pitchers
and gave each of them individual pointers. Players had the chance to see Kirkman in action,
pitching in the bullpen just feet away. He answered all questions and signed autographs.
BELOW: Impact Zone hosted it's own Patrick Jernigan (back row center) for a Simplicity
of Catching camp on Dec. 20. Eleven catchers attended the camp. Jernigan, who played
professional independent baseball as a catcher, taught every aspect of the catching position
from the ground up. Each player' received specific instruction, individual troubleshooting and
had opportunities to ask qOestions.


ACROSS
1 First light of
day
5 Underhanded
8 Inventory wd.
12 Jai -
13 Mrs. Peron
14 Kind of
hygiene
15 Splinter group
16 Hardy
18 Emulated
20 Orchard fruit
21 Wrathful
feeling
22 Hearth
residue
23 Charlatan
26, Ice holders
29 QB Kramer
30 Back talk
31 House
addition
33 June honoree
34 Klutz's cry
(2 wds.)
35 Profound
36 Bowling
group


38 Darns
39 Diner
sandwich
40 Feel awful
41 Remove chalk
44 Gemstones
47 Beat narrowly
(2 wds.)
49 Dollop
51 FBI agent
(hyph.)
52 Mgmt. biggie
53 Record player
(hyph.)
54 Monthly
expense
55 NFL events
56 Greenish-blue

DOWN
1 German
article
2 Obi-Wan
portrayer
3 Texas town
4 Find fault
5 Flood
protection
6 Classical poet


Answer to Previous Puzzle


Tongues do it
Changes form
Stop dating
Writer
- Bellow
Besides
Caravan halts


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
i 19 I 214 16 17 8 19 110 11


19 Provoke
22 Mr. Moto
remark
(2 wds.)
23 Proof ender
24 Eurasian
mountains
25 Assistant
26 Bamboo stalk
27 Babysitter,
often
28 Luge or sleigh
30 Boarded up
32 DJ's platters
34 Stared rudely
35 Pleasure
37 Not here
38 Playing
marble
40 Garage
contents
41 Amtrak driver
42 Seven-hilled
city
43 Strong
- ox
44 Regretted
45 Mr. Wiesel
46 Davenport
48 Fall mo.
50 Puppeteer
Baird


( 2012 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


League reports
Res-..s o-' eace o,'.i ng a: Lake=
Ctf, Bowl.
SEXY SENIORS
Team sta.'-dcs: 1. Perk, Pa's
(53.5-18.5); 2. Farmers (40.5-31.5):
3. Pn Busters (39.5-32.5).
High handicap game: 1. Roberta
Giordano 234; 2. Louise A.,,ood
215; 3. Sandi Johns 210 1. Morrell
Atwood 255; 2. Vernon Black 226,
3. Ric Yates 218.
High handicap series: 1. Diane
Madsen 674; 2. Pat Hale 626:
3. Janet Nash 612. 1. Ross Meyers
660; 2. Keith Herbster 633; 3. Wayne
Johns 606.
(results from Dec. 20)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lorrie
Geiger 205; 2. Joyce Hooper 182;
3. Carla Nyssen 175. 1. Bill Dolly 247;
2. Frank Miller 211; 3. Dess Fennell
206.
High scratch series: 1. Lorrie
Geiger 550; 2. Joyce Hooper 524;
3. Carla Nyssen 494. 1. Bill Dolly


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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY. JANUARY 1, 2012


Aggies snap bowl slump


By KRISTIE RIEKEN
Associated Press

HOUSTON Ryan
Tannehill threw for 329
yards and a touchdown and
Ben Malena ran for two
more scores to lead Texas
A&M to a 33-22 win over
Northwestern on Saturday
in the Meineke Car Care
Bowl.
Northwestern led 7-3
early in the second quar-
ter before A&M reeled off
27 straight points to take a
decisive lead and then fight
off a late rally to capture
its first bowl victory since
2001.
Texas A&M broke a five-
game bowl losing streak in
a win the team dedicated to
fired coach Mike Sherman
and offensive lineman
Joseph Villavisencio, who
was killed in a car accident
last week.
Malena ran for 77 yards,
filling in for Cyrus Gray,
who missed his second
straight game with a stress
fracture in his shoulder.
Northwestern hasn't won
a bowl game 'since the 1949
Rose Bowl, a span of nine
losses.
The Aggies were up 30-7
before Brian Peters inter-
cepted Tannehill early in
the fourth quarter and
the Wildcats' Kain Colter
scored on a 1-yard run for
Northwestern's first points
since early in the second
quarter. The 2-point conver-
sion left A&M ahead 30-15.
Colter found Tim Riley in
the corner of the end zone
for on a 2-yard touchdown
pass to get Northwestern
within 30-22 with less than
six minutes remaining.
A&M responded with a
clock-eating drive capped
by a 31-yard field goal to
secure the win. Senior Jeff
Fuller, who has had a disap-
pointing and injury-plagued
year, had a key third down
catch for 29 yards on that
drive and finished with a
season-high 119 yards
receiving.


ASSOCIATED PRESS


ABOVE: Texas A&M wide
receiver Jeff Fuller (8)
catches a pass in front of
Northwestern cornerback
Jeravin Matthews (3)
during the Car Care Bowl
in Houston, on Saturday.

LEFT: Former Houston
Oilers' Earl Campbell (left)
and Bum Phillips talk before
the start of the Car Care
Bowl. Phillips was inducted
into the Gridiron Legends
during a pre-game ceremony.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kentucky's Terrence Jones pulls down a rebound during
the gameagainst Louisville in Lexington, Ky., on Saturday.


Wildcats defend

Rupp against

Louisville, 69-62
By COLIN FLY high 30 points.
Associated Press But Kidd-Gilchrist's hus-
tle and Davis' emergence
LEXINGTON, Ky.- proved to be the differ-
Freshman Michael ence with nearly a dozen
Kidd-Gilchrist had sea- NBA scouts on hand.
son-highs with 24 points Kentucky has won 44
and 19 rebounds to lead straight at home, includ-
No. 3 Kentucky in a rough- ing 43 in a row at Rupp
and-tumble 69-62 victory Arena, for the nation's
over No. 4 Louisville on longest streak ahead of
Saturday. Duke's 43. This one will
Fellow freshman, be remembered after the
Anthony Davis added teams came in with the
18 points, all in the sec-- highest combined ranking
ond half, for the Wildcats in history.
(13-1) in their annual in- With the game tied at
state rivalry game that at 40 early in the second half,
times looked more like a Louisville had a chance to
free throw shooting con- take its second lead but
test with 52 fouls. Peyton Siva never hit the
The Cardinals (12-2) rim on an 18-foot jumper.
only led at 2-0, but gave Kentucky went on a 7-0
Kentucky all it-. could run from there, with Kidd-
handle after rallying from Gllchrist hitting one of two
an early 15-point deficit- free -throws and making
before tying itjp the sec- a layup on another trip
.ond half thanks to Russ before Davis got to the
Smith, who had a career- line and made it 47-40.


BRIEFS


ADULT BASKETBALL
'The Rematch'
game on Jan. 16
The Lake City
Recreation Department
and Richardson
Community Center Annie
Mattox Park North, Inc.,
is hosting "The Rematch"
adult basketball games
between Lake City and
Live Oak players on
Jan. 16 at the Lake City
Middle School gym. The
women's game will begin
at 3:00 p.m.; the men's
game will begin at
4:30 p.m. Admission is
$5. All proceeds from this
event will go to support
youth sports programs in
both communities. The
Lake City Middle School
girls basketball team will
sell concessions. The
games are a part of the
Martin Luther King Jr.
weekend activities
sponsored by the North
Florida Leadership Council
and everyone is invited to
attend.
For details, call Mario
Coppock at 754-7096.
FLAG FOOTBALL


Registration for Christ
Central Sports flag
football for ages 5-12
continues through Jan. 13.
Cost is $40.
For details, call 365-2128.

CHS SOFTBALL
Tryout planned for
Jan. 9 at school
Columbia High's softball
tryout is 3:30 p.m.
Jan. 9 at the softball field.
All players must have
current physical, parent
consent, and drug testing
forms completed. Forms
are available at the school


office.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.

CHS 'v i.
Awards banquet
Friday at school
The Columbia High
football team's end of the
year banquet is 7 p.m.
Friday in the school
cafeteria. The banquet is a
fundraiser for the
quarterback club and attire
is semi-formal. Tickets are
on sale for $12 at Hunter
Printing.
For details, call head


coach Brian Allen a
755-8080 ext. 140.


Quarterback
meeting Jan.
The Fort White
Quarterback Club v
meet at 7 p.m. Jan.
the teacher's lounge
the high school. Pla
for the varsity banqi
under way.
For details, call Sl
Morgan at 397-4954


Lake uity ope
Lake City Columb
County Youth Baseb
registration for 2012
available at www.lcc
com. Online registrar
$75 plus a transaction
Registration also is
Friday and Jan. 13 a
Jan. 20, and 10 a.m.
4 p.m. Saturday and
14 and Jan. 21 at Soi
Sports Complex wit
of $80.
For details, call le
president Tad Cervw
365-4810 or vice-pre
David Williams at (3
697-0764.


Georgia Batmen
fielding teams
Georgia Batmen is
fielding 8-under, 9-under,
10-under and 11-under
travel baseball teams in
2012. Spots are currently
available on next year's
8-under, 9-under and
10-under teams and
additional teams may be
formed.
If interested in coaching
or playing, call Jim Bennett
at (229) 630-3736. For
details, go to
valdostabatmen. com.


t Practice group
offered for girls
A golf practice group for
Club girls ages 9-17 is proposed
10 for 4-5 p.m. Tuesday and
Thdrsdays at Quail Heights
Country Club. The group
Vill is for girls who want to
10 in learn the game and to
e at develop Lady Tigers for
inning the CHS golf program. Fee
uet is of $45 will include
instruction, range balls
hayne during practice, and a
monthly tournament.
For details, call Chet
Carter at 365-7097 or e-mail
for carter4golf@hotmail.com.


bia Lake City team.
ball seeking players
is
cyb. The Lake City Falcons
nation is semi-pro football team is
)n fee. seeking players for the
5-7 p.m. upcoming season, and
nd dancers for a dance squad.
to Players must be 18 years
Jan. old or older. Females and
uthside males are encouraged to
h a cost try out for the dance team.
For football, call Luis
ague Santiago at (386) 697-6956;
antes at for dance, call Clara at
sident (386) 697-5249.
386)
From staff reports


~Y.
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7'
~
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V


NORTH FLORIDA GLASS
- LAKE CITY, FL -
961-9900

Auto
Commercial
Residential


Mobile Services


Insurance
Claims Accepted


Residential Bath Enclosures Mirrors Table Tops
* Ventilated Shelving Window Replacement Plate Glass
Beveled Glass Auto Glass Store Front

M *o 1 W S y
S c . . B


Rcyent&DlBonOwe


Christ Central YOUTH BASEBALL
registration open Registration f


Thaks ora gea yerl


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY JANUARY 1.2012


Back to business

Preps return to action with districts looming


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. corn

High school sports starts
back this week with a sense
of urgency.
The district tournaments
for the winner sports are
two weeks away, beginning
with girls soccer the week
of Jan. 16.
Columbia High's girls
soccer was the only soccer
team to play in a tourna-
ment over the Christmas
holidays.
The Lady Tigers beat
host Buchholz High, but
lost to Flagler Palm Coast
High and Santa Fe High in
the Bobcat Invitational.
The Lady Tigers (3-11,
0-6 district) travel to Leon
High for a 7 p.m. game
Tuesday.
Both Columbia basket-
ball teams played in holiday
tournaments. The boys went
3-0 and won the Santa Fe


Classic, while the girls went
2-1 and took third place in
-the Fort White High School
Country Christmas Classic.
Both teams play at home
Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers (5-5,
0-2) face Melody Christian
Academy of Live Oak at
4:30 p.m., while the boys
(9-2, 3-0) bring in Union
County High at 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High's bas-
ketball teams play a varsity
doubleheader at home on
Wednesday.
The games are district
contests against Williston
High, with the girls starting
at 6 p.m. and the boys fol-
lowing at 7:30 p.m.
The Lady Indians (2-7,
1-2) played one game in
their holiday tournament,
losing to Hagerty High.
Fort White's boys are 5-3,
2-2.
The girls weightlifting
teams for Columbia and


Fort White have a meet
at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday in
Lake City.
It will be the third meet of
the season for both teams.
The Lady Indians are 1-1,
having split with Suwannee
High on Dec. 7 and Dec. 14
with each team winning at
home.
Columbia's boys soccer
team (5-7-1, 1-3-1) has a
district match against Leon
at 7 p.m. Wednesday in
Tallahassee.
Fort White's soccer
teams travel to Santa Fe
High for district matches on
Thursday. The boys (2-9-1,
1-5-1) play the 5 p.m. game,
while the Lady Indians
(9-5-1, 6-5-1) play at 7 p.m.
Columbia's wrestling
team was in the Valdosta
Wildcat Classic over the
holidays and will compete
in the Clay County Rotary
Invitational, scheduled to
start Friday at Clay High.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Trey Phillips (right) fights Blake Valenzuela of Keystone Heights High for
possession of the ball in the Indians' 73-32 win on Dec. 16.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tre' Simmons drives down the court in the Tigers' 43-39 district win against
Robert E. Lee High in Lake City on Dec. 9.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High wrestler Joe Fields (top) is on the way to pinning his opponent from Baker
County High in the duals tournament hosted by the Tigers on Dec. 17. Fields went 3-0 in the
meet that also included St. Augustine High and Bradford High.


HOOPS: First-ever triple overtime for Florida St.


Continued From Page 1B
Princeton had opportuni-
ties to win the game in the
first two overtimes.
The Seminoles' Bernard
James missed the front
end of a 1-and-1 free-throw
attempt with the game tied


PACKERS
From Page 1B
forget is
opening his Christmas
present this year. That's
when King became partial
owner of the Packers'
franchise.
Green Bay hadput stock
up for sell and his father
purchased a small piece for
King to hold.
It's a small piece, but it's
a piece dear to his heart.
Although he'll have no
actual control of the
franchise, there's a few
things he'd like to change.
'Ticket prices could be
more affordable," King
said. "A fan shouldn't have
to spend over 100 bucks to
go see a game in person. I
guess I have to give the
politically correct answer
now that I'm an NFL
owner, but I wish that the
refs would stay a little more
consistent with their rule
changes as well."
As far as the Packers are
concerned, there's only
one area that he can see
that needs improvement
"Aaron Rodgers tried to
bring in Marshawn Lynch
a couple of years back,"
King said. "After
seeing how well he's run in
Seattle, it's easy to say that
would have been a good
move in hindsight."
And how would he feel
about another Super Bowl?
Well, for that answer, he
took off his owner cap and
sounded more like a fan.
"It's be freaking awe-
some, man," King said.


at 53 with 1.8 seconds left in
the first overtime.
Douglas missed a 3-point-
er at the end of the second
overtime for Princeton.
The Seminoles had
two turnovers in the final


42 seconds of the third
overtime.
Florida State made just
11 of 22 free-throw attempts
- 3 of 10 combined in the
three overtime periods.
It was the Seminoles'


first triple-overtime game in
program history.
'To say that we are disap-
pointed would be an under-
statement," Florida State
coach Leonard Hamilton
said.


... ._ .. ... . .. ...



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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428


BUSINESS


Sunday, January 1,2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


CHRISTMAS RETAIL PICTURE



Tebow, Jordan gear big sellers

By GORDON JACKSON
4'ackson@lakecityreporter.com


V ake City's Christmas shopping
season didn't set any records,
but it wasn't a bust for most
merchants, either.
Local shoppers couldn't
get enough of Tim Tebow and Michael
Iordan or at least the products associ-
4ted with their names.
SHibbett Sports manager Tyler Rockey
said Christmas shoppers at Lake City
Mall quickly bought every Tebow jersey
or anything Denver Broncos almost as
fast as staff could put the merchandise
on the shelves.
Despite repeated requests for more
jerseys, ball caps or anything related to
the former University of Florida icon
and Broncos quarterback, Rockey said
his store couldn't get enough to meet
demand.
"If I had 500 Tebow jerseys, I would
have sold them all," he said.
,, And the day the Air Jordan Retro
XI Concord came out shortly before
Christmas, Rockey said he had a line of
customers waiting to pay nearly $195 a
pair with tax for the limited edition shoes
before the store opened.
"We sold out in five minutes," Rockey
said. "Now, the shoes are selling for $500
pr more online."
While Tebow and Jordan products
helped lure customers to the store,
Rockey said other sales promotions were
the reason business was up compared
to a year ago. The hot seller was shoes
because of a sale that gave customers 50
percent off shoes with the purchase of
another pair at full price.


RETAIL continued on 2C


GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
Store manager Gary Frampton works on a Valentine's Day display at the Lake City Mall's Hallmark store. Frampton said the Christmas shop-
ping season was slower than anticipated, but he is optimistic about good sales for Valentine's Day. He said it will take about two weeks to set
up the store's displays for Valentine's Day:


Stocks rising on new home

deals, job growth prospects


By PALLAVI GOGOI
AP Business Writer
NEW YORK Better news on home
sales and improved prospects for job
growth sent stocks higher on Wall Street
Thursday.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
135 points, nearly making up its 140-point
loss from the day before. The S&P 500
edged back into the black for 2011, with just
one more day of trading left in the year.


-Raul Rodriguez sweeps the floor of the New Yo
the closing bell, Wednesday, Nov. 30. A move b
,o lower the cost of borrowing exhilarated invest
te Dow Jones industrial average soaring 490 p
a global credit crisis similar to the one that follow\

The four-week average of unemploy-
ment claims fell to a three-and-a-half-year
low, an indication that hiring could pick up.
Also, the number of Americans who signed
contracts to buy homes in November rose
more than 7 percent to the highest level in
a year and a half, according to the National
Association of Realtors.
Quincy Krosby, Prudential Financial's
market strategist, said the reports were
encouraging signals for the economy
going in to 2012.
"The correlation between jobs and
housing has been crystal-clear this year,"
Krosby said. "Parts of the country where
jobs are more plentiful are the ones where
the housing market has held up."
Krosby said the correlation has become


more pronounced after the real estate
bust, when lenders became reluctant to
even consider customers for a mortgage
unless they held jobs. She said it's a
noticeable trend in many cities nation-
wide.
For instance, Boston's 1.1 percent drop
in home prices since last year was one of
the lowest among metro areas tracked by
S&P/Case-Shiller index. The city's unem-
ployment rate is 6.2 percent, much lower
than the national average of 8.6 percent.
The posi-
tive housing
news sent
the stocks of
home build-
ers sharply
higher. Masco
Corp. soared
8.4 percent,
the most in
the S&P 500.
PulteGroup
Inc. rose 6
percent and
Lennar Corp.
gained 4.6
percent.
.eThe Dow
closed at
12,287.04, a
ASSOCIATED PRESS gain of 135.63
rk Stock Exchange after points, or 1.1
y the world's central banks percent. For
:ors Wednesday, sending the year, the
points and easing fears of Dow is up 709
wed the 2008 collapse of points, or 6
percent.
The S&P 500
rose 13.38 points, or 1.07 percent, to 1,263.02.
That's just 5 points above where the index
started the year.
The technology-heavy Nasdaq compos-
ite rose 23.76 points, or 0.92 percent, to
2,613.74. The index if down 39 points for
the year.
Trading was very light as investors get
ready to close the books on 2011. Markets
will be closed Monday in observance of
New Year's Day, which falls on Sunday.
Volume on the New York Stock
Exchange was 2 billion shares, less than
half of its recent average. Gaining stocks
led losing ones four-to-one.
The euro fell to its lowest level against
the dollar in more than a year and its low-
est against the Japanese yen in a decade.









LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY JANUARY 1.2012


Back to Basis
Q When selling a stock, how
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San Ramon, Calif.
A Imagine that you buy 100
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If you eventually sell the shares
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VERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 12/29/2011) ..


Stanford archives offer window into Apple origins


By TERENCE CHEA
Associated Press


A PALO ALTO, Calf. In the interview,
Steve Wozniak and the late Steve Jobs
recall a seminal moment in Silicon Valley
history how they named their upstart
computer company some 35 years ago.
"I remember driving down Highway 85,"
Wozniak says. "We're on the freeway, and
Steve mentions, 'I've got a name: Apple
Computer.' We kept thinking of other
alternatives to that name, and we couldn't
think of anything better."
Adds Jobs: "And also remember that
I worked at Atari, and it got us ahead of
Atari in the phonebook."
The interview, recorded for an in-house
video for company employees in the mid-
1980s, was among a storehouse of materi-
als Apple had been collecting for a com-
pany museum. But in 1997, soon after Jobs
returned to the company, Apple officials
contacted Stanford University and offered
to donate the collection to the school's
Silicon Valley Archives.
Within a few days, Stanford curators
were at Apple headquarters in nearby
Cupertino, packing two moving trucks full
of documents, books, software, videotapes
and marketing materials that now make up
the core of Stanford's Apple Collection.
The collection, the largest assembly of


Apple historical materials, can help his-
torians, entrepreneurs' and policymakers
understand how a startup launched in
a Silicon Valley garage became a global
technology giant.
"Through this one collection you can
trace out the evolution of the personal
computer," said Stanford historian Leslie
Berlin. "These sorts of documents are as
close as you get to the unmediated story
of what really happened."
The collection is stored in hundreds of
boxes taking up more than 600 feet of shelf
space at the Stanford's off-campus storage
facility. The Associated Press visited the
climate-controlled warehouse on the out-
skirts of the San Francisco Bay area, but
agreed not to disclose its location.
Interest in Apple and its founder has
grown dramatically since Jobs died in
October at age 56, just weeks after he
stepped down as CEO and handed the
reins to Tim Cook. Jobs' death sparked
an international outpouring and marked
the end of an era for Apple and Silicon
Valley.
"Apple as a company is in a very, very
select group," said Stanford curator Henry
Lowood. "It survived through multiple
generations of technology. To the credit of
Steve Jobs, it meant reinventing the com-
pany at several points."
Apple scrapped its own plans for a


RETAIL: Tebow, Jordan big sellers

Continued From Page 1C


corporate museum after Jobs returned as
CEO and began restructuring the finan-
cially struggling firm, Lowood said.
Jobs's return, more than a decade after
he was forced out of the company he co-
founded, marked the beginning of one of
the great comebacks in business history.
It led to a long string of blockbuster prod-
ucts including the iPod, iPhone and
iPad that have made Apple one of the
world's most profitable brands.
After Stanford received the Apple dona-
tion, former company executives, early
employees, business partners and Mac
enthusiasts have come forward and added
their own items to the archives.
The collection includes early photos of
young Jobs and Wozniak, blueprints for
the first Apple computer, user manuals,
magazine ads, TV commercials, company
t-shirts and drafts of Jobs' speeches.
In one company video, Wozniak talks
about how he had always wanted his own
computer, but couldn't get his hands on
one at a time when few computers were
found outside corporations or government
agencies.
"All of a sudden I realized, 'Hey micro-
processors all of a sudden are affordable. I
can actually build my own,'" Wozniak says.
"And Steve went a little further. He saw it
as a product you could actually deliver, sell
and someone else could use."
The pair also talk about the company's
first product, the Apple I computer, which
went on sale in July 1976 for $666.66.
"Remember an Apple I was not particu-
larly useable for too much, but it was so


incredible to have your own computer,"
Jobs says. "It was kind of an embarka-
tion point from the way computers -had
been going in these big steel 'boxes with
switches and lights."
Among the other items in the Apple
Collection:
Thousands of photos by photogra-
pher Douglas Menuez, who documented
Jobs' years at NeXT Computer, which he
founded in 1985 after he, was pushed out
of Apple.
A company video spoofing the 1984
movie "Ghost Busters," with Jobs and
other executives playing "Blue Busters," a
reference to rival IBM.
Handwritten financial records show-
ing early sales of Apple II, one of the first
mass-market computers.
-.An April 1976 agreement for a $5,000
loan to Apple Computer and its three
co-founders: Jobs, Wozniak and Ronald
Wayne, who pulled out of the company
less than two weeks after its founding.
A 1976 letter written by a printer who
had just met Jobs and Wozniak and warns
his colleagues about-the young entrepre-
neurs: "This joker (Jobs) is going to be
calling you ... They are two guys, they
build kits, operate out of a garage."
The archive shows the Apple founders
were far ahead of their time, Lowood said.
"What they were doing was spectacu-
larly new," he said. '"The idea of building
computers out of your garage and market-
ing them and thereby creating a success-
ful business it just didn't compute for a
lot of people."


Merchants at the mall said Christmas
falling on a Sunday helped boost sales.
Shane Mathews, marketing director at
Chastain Jewelers, said sales were compa-
rable to last year.
"Christmas Eve and the day before, it
really got busy," Mathews said. "People
waited until right before the end because
they believed store owners wanted to get
rid of merchandise."
The jewelry store had one case of mer-
chandise with 50 percent off during the
holiday shopping season, but the majority
of items were sold at regular prices, he
said.
Debbie King, manager at Maurices, a
women's clothing store, said her store
was No. 1 among 26 in the three-state
district.
King attributed strong sales to her sales
team and some of the promotions in the
community such as fashion shows.
"It was great, up from last year," she
said. "Our sales were up so much."


The one merchant to report sales
slightly down from a year ago is the
Hallmark store at the mall.
Store manager Gary Frampton the two
days before Christmas were the busiest
of the holiday shopping season.
"Sale were down, but we were still
busy," he said. 'Traffic was definitely
down. I don't think consumer confidence
and the economy are there yet."
Frampton said he is already gearing up
for the next big sales period for his store,
Valentine's Day.
His staff was busy late last week dis-
mantling holiday displays and taking
inventory of the Christmas cards and gifts
that will go into storage. Frampton said
deep discounts are still available for some
Christmas merchandise that he'd rather
sell than put into storage.
"We just move from one season to the
next," he said. "It'll take about two weeks
to set up for Valentine's Day."


Murphy joins staff at


North Florida EyeCare


Submitted

North Florida EyeCare is pleased to
announce that Dr. Aria Murphy has joined
the staff. Dr. Murphy will be seeing patients
in both Lake City and Live Oak.
Drs. Ron Foreman,
Frank Broome,
Kimberly Broome and
Julie Owens welcome
Dr. Murphy. F k
Upon graduation from
Columbia High School,
Dr. Murphy continued
her education, attend- Murphy


ing Florida State University receiving
a degree inibiochemistry followed by
completing the Doctor of Optometry
program at Nova Southern University
College of Optometry in Davie.
She performed graduate work at
the Eye Care Institute in Davis, the
Filutowski Eye Institute in Lake Mary
as well as the VA Hospitals of both
Gainesville and Lake City.
Dr. Murphy will be seeing new patients
in both Lake City and Live Oak. The entire
staff at North Florida EyeCare is please to
welcome her home.


I -


onon


IAkthe Fool I


I yDmetinmI,"


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


*
*
*

















Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER STOCKS SUNDAY. JANUARY 1, 2012


Weekly Stock Exchanae Highliahts


Y NYSE
7,477.03 -41.63


Gainers ($2 or more)
iName Last Chg %Chg
ChlMMrs 6.00 +5,34 +809.1
LEndonfi 8.69 +2.29 +35.8
ChiMYVnd 2.27 +.54 +312
SimcerePh 9.40 +1.50 +19.0 l
ChiCBtood 2.65 +,36 +15.7
MaoHFSea 5.39 +.72 +15.4
!LeFON2 20.64 +2.71 +15.1
Cameltnfo 2.85 +.36 +14,5
CSVS3xlnr.Sv6l.12+7.66 +14.3
LaredoP n 22.30 +2.63 +13.4

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg!
IPSXRIK 28,79-13.02 -31.1
Molycorp 23.98 -5.06 -17.4
ETrSPlat 29.10 -5.64 -16.2
LDK Solar 4.19 -.75 -15.2
CS VS3xSlv27.46 -4.86 -15.0
ShangPhmn 7.27 -1.22 -14.4
NBGrepfA 2.88 -.44 -13.3
XuedaEd 3.49 -.51 -12.8
BiPGCrb 10.79 -1.54 -12.5
MolycppfA 56.19" -7.60 -11.9

Most Active (S1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
BkofArn 6375822 5.56 -.04
S&P500ETF3615446125.50 -.89
GenElec 1540062 17.91 -.32
SPDRFnd1291514 13.00 -.15
iShEMvkt 1249316 37.94 -.55
FordM 1183859 10.76 -.19
iShR2K 1117170 73.75 -.80
Citigrprs 1069539 26.31-1.15
iSafe 891165 49.53 +.02
Pfizr 885378 21.64 -.19

Diary
Advanced 1,313
Declined 1,805
New Highs 295
New Lows 73
Total issues 3,190
Unchanged 72
Volume 8,726,674,285


I Amex Nasdac
2,278.33 +12.63 2,605.15 -.


Gainers ($2 or more) i Gainers ($2 or m
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg 9
Bacterin 286 +.53 +22.7 VlyNBcwt 2.60 +1.05
NereComnc 225 +.35 +18.4 ACstFnh 2.85 +1.12
VoyagerOG 2.57 +.39 +17.9 Tegalrs 3.35 +1.08
Aerosonic 3.20 +.46 +16.8 Parux 5.10 +1.63
Ainmad g 2.52 +.30 +13.5 PorterBcp 2.90 +.81
AntaresP 2.20 +.23 +11.7 MoSys 4.20 +1.15
EamlCGr 7.00 +.71 +11.3 PremrExt 2.45 +.66
CT Ptrs 5.31 +.51 +10.6 CmtyFTc 3.28 +.79
Versar 3.19 +.23 +7.8 CarorTrBk 2.33 +.53
SNreamGSv 3.31 +.23 +7.5 Zogenix 2.22 +.48

Losers ($2 or more) Losers ($2 or mc
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg
Aerocniry 6.15 -1.52 -19.8 Perfuman f 10.40 -930
HKN 2.13 -.45 -17.4 SearsHIdgs31.78-14.07
RareEleg 3.25 -.61 -15.8 CrescntF 3.44 -1.16
ouestldMg 2.20 -.37 -14.4 Cyanothl h 6.95 -2.14
Flarign 6.75 -.87 -11.4 RecovErs 3.01 -.86
Geokinelcs 2.15 ,-.27 -11.2 Ambientrs 4.63 -1.23
Bamrwell 2.70 -.28 -9,4 SuperMda 2.64 -.64
EngySvcs 2.69 -.26 -8.8 RIT Tech 3.36 -.76
VinetX 24.97 -2.38 -8.7 SumFWV 2.73 -.57
BcpNJ 9.20 -.85 -8.5 Zagg 7.07 -1.38

Most Active ($1 or more Most Active (s or
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last
CheniereEn146185 8.69 +.22 PwShsQQQ106423355.83
CFCdag 88961 19.61 -.45 Microsoft 985753 25.96
NwGoldg 79922 10.08 -.04 Intel 901966 24.25
NovaGldg 78194 8.48 -.29 Cisco 865385 18.08
Rentech 76815 1.31 -.08 Oracle 840389 25.65
GoldStrg 72594 1.65 -.05 SidiusXM 799621 1.82
SamsO&G 64601 1.95 -.03 RschMotn 773608 14.50
AntaresP 55789 2.20 +.23 FrontierCm 684046 5.15
BarcUBS36 52457 42.24 -.08 MicronT 617670 6.29
VimetX 51861 24.97-2.38 Yahoo 501137 16.13

Diary Diary
Advanced 248 Advanced
Declined 254 Declined
New Highs 46 New Highs
New Lows 39 New Lows
Total issues 523 Total issues
Unchanged 21 Unchanged
Volume 322,323,571 Volume 4,174,7


Why wM YTD
Name Ex Drv Last Chg Chg g.Chg
.AMR N ... 35 -25 -412 -.5
AT&Tlnc Y .76 24024 -37 -+2 -2S
Akoa N, .'2 8.65 -29 -2.4 -3.5
ALtoZoe NY .. 324.97 -5.33 -1.6 -92
BkofAim NY .04 5.56 4 -0.7 -5.3
BobEvarns tNd 1.00 33.54 -22 -37 -'18
CNBFnPA s .66 5.78 +.12 -0.8 -6.5
CSX s NY .4 21.06 -28 -'.3 -22
Chevron NY 324 106.40 -110 -1.0 +16.6
Cisco e aN .24 18.08 -.39 -21 -10.6
Cihgrprs NY .04 26.31 -1.15 -42 -4.4
CocaCoa NY 1.88 69.97 +.03 ... +64
Detaze NY 2.45 56.35 -.15 -0.3 -23.6
DrSCSrs NY .. 26.48 +.58 +22 -43.5
DirxSCBeIlNY ... 44.84 -1.46 -32 -38.1
EMCCp- NY ... 21.54 -29 -1.3 -5.9
FamDtyr NY .72 57.66 -1.10 -1.9 +16.0
FordM NY 20 10.76 -.19 -1.7 -35.9
FronterCmNasd .75 5.15 +.03 +0.6 -47.1
GenElec NY .68 17.91 -.32 -1.8 -2.1
HoreDp NY 1.16 42.04 -.05 -0.1 +19.9
iShSdver NY ... 26.94 -1.34 -4.7 -10.7
iShEMkts NY .81 37.94 -.55 -1.4 -20.4
iSEafe NY 1.71 49.53 +.02 ... -14.9
iShR2K NY 1.02 73.75 -.80 -1.1 -5.7
Intel Nasd .84 2425 -.15 -0.6 +15.3
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 33.25 -.32 -1.0 -21.6
Lowes NY .56 25.38 +.11 +0.4 +1.2


Money Rates


Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
1,099 Treasuries
1,590 3-month 0.02 0.003
91
154 6-month 0.06 0.03
2753 5-year 0.83 0.98


4I 30-year 2.89 3.05


iName Ex Div
icOnr.s NY 2.0
ti.6ronT Nas..
Itrosot Nasd 80
SMogStn NY 2Z
NY Tenes NY
NextEraEnNY 2 20
NobdtyH f Nas .
NRicaCp NY .55
OcRPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd 24
Pemrey NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .88
Potash s NY .28
PwShsQOQNasd .46
PrUShS&PNY
RshMotn Nas ...
Ryder. NY 1.16
S&PS0OETFNY 2.58
SearsHldgs Nasd .33
SiriusXM Nasd ...
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDRFndcNY .22
TimneWnm NY .94
VangEmg NY .91
WalMarl NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48


Wly waky YTD
Last Chg .Chg SChg
O.33 0 .8 0-2 -30.7
629 -.11' -1.6 -21.6
2596 -.07 -0.3 -7.0
15 13 -.63 -40 -4.4
7.73 -.06 -08 -21.1
60.88 +.63 +1.0 +17.1
528 -22 -4.0 -34.9
482 -.10 -2.0 -53.3
93.70 -.92 -1.0 -4.5
25.65 -.41 -1.6 -18.1
35.15 -.52 -1.5 +8.8
66.35 -22 -0.3 +1.6
21.64 -.19 -0.9 +23.6
41.28 -1.29 -3.0 -20.0
55.83 -.25 -0.4 +2.5
19.29 +.20 +1.1 -18.8
14.50 +.59 +42 -75.1
53.14 -.55 -1.0 +.9
125.50 -.89 -0.7 -2
31.78 -14.07 -30.7 -56.9
1.82 +.01 +0.6 +11.7
46.29 +.39 +0.8 +21.1
2.34 +.03 +1.3 -44.7
13.00 -.15 -1.1 -18.5
38.14 +.18 +0.5 +12.3
38.21 -.52 -1.3 -20.6
59.76 -.23 -0.4 +10.8
27.56 -.23 -0.8 -11.1


Weekly Dow Jones


Dow Jones Industrials CLOSED -2.65 -139.94
Close: 12,217.56 )
1-week change: -76.44 (-0.6%) MON TUES WED
13,000


12,000

11,500

11,000

10,500


135.63 -69.48


THUR FRI


J A S O N D


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pct Min Init
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCO TotRetls Cl 142,635 10.87 +1.5 +4.3/E +8.0/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotSfldx LB 62,801 31.29 +0.8 +0.8/B -+0.21/B NL 3,000
Vanguardinstldxl LB 57,915 115.04 +1.0 +2.1/A -0.2/B NLI 5,000,000
Fidelity Contra LG 56,073 67.46 -1.1 -0.2/B +2.6/A NL 2,500
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 54,829 28.73 -1.2 -4.9/D -0.6/D 5.75 250
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 54,764 49.22 +1.4 +3.0/A +0.9/C 5.75 250
Ameecan Funds IncAmerA m MA 51,409 16.76 +2.4 +5.6/A +1.7/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 51,226 115.80 +1.0 +2.1/A -0.2/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 48,932 31.30 +0.8 +1.0/B +0.3/B NL 10,000
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 45,594 32.12 -0.6 -7.4/C -0.9/B 5.75 250
American Funds lnvCoAmA m LB 42,793 27.09 +0.7 -1.7/C -0.9/C 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 37,794 29.24 +1.3 -16.4 -3.5 NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 37,593 28.40 +1.9 +7.1/A +0.1/A 5.75 250
Dodge& Cox Stock LV 36,876 101.64 +1.1 -4.0/D -4.1/E NL 2,500
Vanguard InstPlus LB 34,626 115.05 +1.0 +2.1/A -0.2/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 34,617 2.10 +2.7 +2.8/B +2.8/C 4.25 1,000
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl 31,256 10.87 +1.5 +4.1/E +7.8/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 30,686 11.00 +1.1 +8.1/A +6.5/B NL 10,000
American Funds BalA m MA 30,568 18.21 +0.8 +4.0/A +2.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Totintl d FB 30,375 13.06 -2.6 -14.1/C -3.5/B NL 3,000
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 30,357 35.16 -2.5 -13.3/C -1.4/A -5.75 250
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 30,354 35.39 +0.3 -1.9/D +0.4/A 5.75 250
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 29,047 54.13 +1.7 +4.2/A +3.6/A NL 50,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 28,547 26.16 -1.7 -7.5/C +0.6/A 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStllns LB 28,094 31.30 +0.8 +1.0/B +0.3/B NL 5,000,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 26,981 115.80 +1.0 +1.9/A -0.3/B NL 3,000
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 25,831 10.87 +1.5 +3.9/E +7.6/A 3.75 1,000
CA -ConsealmeAocaton, CI -IntemediatleTerm Bond, ES-Europe Sto, FB -Fore g Blend,FG -Forei LargeGw, FV -Foregn
Large Value, IH -World Alocaln, LB .-Large Blend, LG -Large growth, LV -Large Value, MA 4loderale Alocation, MB 4tdCap Blend, MV-
M-Odap Value, SH -Spedalty-heath, WS -World St Total Ret Chng V with vdends reinvested. Ranic How fund pedtamed vs.
otherswitsameobjectve A sin top 20%, Einbolltom20% k ni nvt In r $neededto invest In undSourc: Moingstar.


Name DIv YId PE
AES Corp ... ... 19
AFLAC 1.32 3.1 9
AK Steel .20 2.4 ...
vjAMR
AT&T Inc 1.76 5.8 15
AblLab 1.92 3.4 19
Accenture 1.35 2.5 16
AMD 4
Aetna .70 1.7 9
AlcatelLuc ... ... ...
Alcoa .12 1.4 9
Allstate .84 3.1 40
AlphaNRs ... ... 48
AlpTotDiv .66 15.1 ...
Altria 1.64 5.5 18
AMovilLs .28 1.2 10
AEagleOut .44 2.9 16.
AEP 1.88 4.6 11
AmExp .72 1.5 12
AmlntlGrp ... ... ...
AmTower .35 87
Anadarko .36 .5
Annaly 2.43 15.2 8
Apache .60 .7 9
ArcelorMit .75 4.1 14
ArchCoal .44 3.0 13
ArchDan .70 2.4 9
ArmourRsdl.32 18.7 15
ATMOS 1.38 4.1 15
AuRico g ... ... ..
Avon .92 5.3 10
BB&TCp .64 2.5 16
BakrHu .60 1.2 13
BcoBrades .80 4.8 ...
BcoSantSA .84 11.2 ...
BcoSBrasil 1.50 18.4 ...
BkofAm .04 .7
BkAm wtB ... ... ...
BkNYMel .52 2.6 9
Barclay .36 3.3 ...
Bar iPVix ... ... ..
BarrickG .60 1.3 10
Baxter 1.34 2.7 13
BerkH B ... ... 16
BestBuy .64 2.7 8
BlockHR .80 4.9 16
Boeing 1.76 2.4 14
BostonSci ... ... 15
BrMySq 1.36 3.9 18
CBLAsc .84 5.4
CBREGrp... ... 19
CBSB .40 1.5 15
CSXs .48 2.3 13
CVSCare .65 1.6 16
CblvsNYs .60 4.2 12
CapOne .20 .5 6
CapitiSrce .04 .6 35
Carnival 1.00 3.1 13
Caterpillar 1.84 2.0 14
Cemex ... ... ...
CntryUnk 2.90 7.8 17
ChesEng .35 1.6 7
Chevron 3.24 3.0 8
Chimera .51 20.3 5
Citigrprs .04 .2 7
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.8 5
CocaCola 1.88 2.7 13
CocaCE .52 2.0 13
CogdSpen .40 9.4 ...
CompSci .80 .3.4 ...
ConAgra .96 3.6 15
ConocPhil 2.64 3.6 10
ConsolEngy.40 1.1 13
ConEd 2.40 3.9 17
ConstellEn .96 2.4 17
Coming .30 2.3 6
CovantaH .30 2.2 30
Covidien .90 2.0 12
CSVS2xVxS... ... ...


Wkly YTD Wkly.
Chg %Chg Last
-.03 -2.8 11.84
+.18 -23.3 43.26
-.13 -49.5 8.26
-.25 -95.5 .35
i+.37 +2.9 30.24
+.21 +17.4 56.23
+.34 +9.8 53.23
-.01 -34.0 5.40
-1.21 +38.3 42.19
-.03 -47.3 1.56
-.21 -43.8 8.65
-.21 -14.0 27.41
-.30 -66.0 20.43
-.05 -26.0 4.38
-.19 +20.4 29.65
-.14 -21.2 22.60
+.31 +4.5 15.29
-.26 +14.8 41.31
-.78 +9.9 47.17
-1.00 -51.9 23.20
-.43 +16.2 60.01
-.34 +.2 76.33
-.41 -10.9 15.96
-.59 -24.0 90.58
-.16 -52.3 18.19
-.31 -58.6 14.51
-.46 -4.9 28.60
+.09 -9.7 7.05
+.10 +6.9 33.35
-.11 -2.2 8.01
-.01 -39.9 17.47
-.31 -4.3 25.17
-1.25 -14.9 48.64
-.09 -17.8 16.68
-.05 -29.4 7.52
+.03 -40.1 8.14
-.04 -58.3 5.56
+.01 -88.4 .31
-.17 -34.1 19.91
-.34 -33.5. 10.99
+.84 -5.5 35.53
-.77 -14.9 45.25
-.57 -2.3 49.48
-1.44 -4.8 76.30
+.25 -31.8 23.37
+.25 +37.1 16.33
-.62 +12.4 73.35
+.11 -29.5 5.34
+.13 +33.1 35.24
-.20 -10.3 15.70
-.17 -25.7 15.22
+.25 +42.5 27.14
-.28 -2.2 21.06
-.21 +17.3 40.78
-.42 -39.9 14.22
-.81 -.6 42.29
+.19 -5.6 6.70
-.55 -29.2 32.64
-1.65 -3.3 90.60
-.05 -47.7 5.39
+.10 -19.4 37.20
-1.44 -14.0 22.29
-1.10 +16.6 106.40
-.12 -38.9 2.51
-1.15 -44.4 26.31
-2.96 -20.1 62.35
+.03 +6.4 69.97
-.27 +3.0 25.78
+.33 -26.7 4.25
-2.78 -52.2 23.70
-.20 +16.9 26.40
+.44 +7.0 72.87
-1.35 -24.7 36.70
+.05 +25.1 62.03
-.04 +29.5 39.67
-.40 -32.8 12.98
+.34 -20.4 13.69
-.49 -1.4 45.01
+1.45 -50.6 31.95


Name Div YId
CSVellIVSt s...
DCT Indl .28 5.5
DR Horton .15 1.2
DTE 2.35 4.3
Danaher .10 .2-
Deere 1.64 2.1
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DevonE .68 1.1
Dex Oneh ...
DxFnBull rs ...
DrSCBr rs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEnBear ...
DirxSCBull ... ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .40 1.7
Disney .60 .1.6
DomRescs 1.97 3.7
DowChm 1.00 3.5
DukeEngy 1.00 4.5
EMCCp ... ...
EVTxMGIo 1.14 13.8
BElPasoCp .04 .2
Elan ...
EldorGld'g .12 ...
EmersonEl 1.60 3.4
EnCanag .80 4.3
ExcoRes .16 1.5
Exelon 2.10 4.8
ExterranH ...
ExxonMbI 1.88 2.2
FstHorizon .04 .5
FirstEngy 2.20 5.0
FlagstBch ...
FordM .20 1.9
FMCGs 1.00 2.7
Frontline ... ..
Gafisa SA .29 6.3
Gap .45 2.4
GenGrPrp .40 2.7
GenMills 1.22 3.0
GenMotors ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .20 2.6
GoldFLtd .24 1.6
Goldcrp g .54 1.2
GoldmanS 1.40 1.5
Goodyear ... ...
Hallibrtn .36 1.0
HartfdFn .40 2.5
HItMgmt ...
HlthSprg ...
HeclaM .02 ...
Hertz
Hess .40 '7
HewlettP .48 1.9
HollyFrts .40 1.7
HomeDp 1.16 2.8
Honwllntl 1.49 2.7
HostHotis .20 1.4
Huntsmn .40 i 4.0
Hyperdyn
ING
iShGold
iSAstla 1.09 5.1
iShBraz 1.50 2.6
iSCan .56 2.1
iStiGer .67 '3.5
iShJapn .20 2.2
iSh Kor .70 1.3
iSTaiwn .47 4.0
iShSilver
iShChina25 .77 2.2
iSSP500 2.60 2.1
iShEMkts .81 2.1
iShB20 T 3.93 3.2
iShB1-3T .66 .8


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
... -.20 -45.5 6.51
... +.02 -3.6 5.12
55 +.16 +5.7 12.61
13 -:25 +20.1 54.45
17 -.71 -.3 47.04
12 -.93 -6.9 77.35
11 -.24 -35.8 8.09
12 -.35 -20.9 15.10
6 -.51 -21.0 62.00
... +.22 -77.7 1.66
...-2.26 -53.4 64.87
... +.58 -43.5 26.48
... +1.09 -21.0 37.35
+.17 -49.8 11.31
... -1.46 -38.1 44.84
...-1.05 -19.8 46.85
6. -.39 +29.5 24.00
15 -.20 ... 37.50
18 +.13 +24.3 53.08
12 +.17 -15.8 28.76
17 +.11 +23.5 22.00
21 -.29 -5.9 21.54
+.04 -21.7 8.25
+.37 .+93.1 26.57
13 +.75+139.8 13.74
26 -.61 -26.2 13.71
14 +.30 -18.5 46.59
33 -.24 -36.4 18.53
... +.65 -46.2 10.45
11 -.15 +4.2 43.37
... -.15 -62.0 9.10
10 -.46 +15.9 84.76
33 -.16 -32.1 8.00
14 -.08 +19.7 44.30
... -.06 -69.0 .51
5 --.19 -35.9 10.76
6 -1.53 -38.7 36.79
... ,.09 -83.1 4.29
-.01 -68.3 4.60
11 +.05 -15.8 18.55
.... +.12 -3.0 15.02
17 -.16 +13.5 40.41
4 -.23 -45.0 20.27
... .. -31.5 2.61
... +.09 -'50.2 6.55
... -44.2 7.81
2 -.51 -15.9 15.25
18 -.65 -3.8 44.25
14 -3.36 -46.2 90.43
31 -.14 +19.6 14.17
12 +.71 -15.5 34.51
7 -.55,-38.7 16.25
10 +.12 -22.7 7.37
14 -.10+105.6 54.54
13 -.24 -53.6 5.23
14 +.26 -19.1 11:72
10 -.16 -25.8 56.80
8 -.12 -38.8 25.76
5 +.06 +14.8 23.40
18 -.05 +19.9 42.04
14 -.63 +2.2 54.35
.... +.30 -17.3 14.77
7 +.15 -35.9 10.00
+.28 -50.6 2.45
-.27 -26.8 7.17
-.44 +9.6 15.23
.. -.35 -15.7 21.44
-.94 -25.9 57.39
+.20 -14.2 26.60
... -.08 -19.7 19.22
... +.04 -16.5 9.11
... -.83 -14.6 52.26
... -.21 -25.0 11.71
...-1.34 -10.7 26.94
... -.44 -19.1 34.87
... -.84 -.2' 125.96
... -.55 -20.4 37.94
... +3.36 +28.8 121.25
... +.05 +.6 84.50


New York Stock Exchange










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NEW YEAR!

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386-752-3847


www.edwardjonescom Member SPC



MAINGSES E OF INVSINGiI


.Wkly .YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cha %Cho Last


iS Eafe 1.71 3.5 ... +.02 -14.9 49.53
iShiBxHYB7.08 7.9 .. +.52, -1.0 89.43
iSR1KV 1.46 2.3 -.46 -2.1 63.48
iSR1KG .81 1.4 -.38 +.9 57.79
iShR2K 1.02 1.4 -.80 -5.7 73.75
iShREst 2.17 3.8 -.30 +1.5 56.&1
IBM 3.00 1.6 14 -.87 +25.3 183.88
IntGame .24 1.4 18 +.65 -2.8 17.20
IntPap 1.05 3.5 10 +.36 +8.7 29.60
Interpublic .24 2.5 11 +.04 -8.4 9.73
Invesco .49 2.4 11 -.13 -16.5 20.09
InvMtgCap 3.42 24.3 4 -.06 -35.7 14.05
ItauUnibH .82 4.4 ... +.02 -22.3 18.56
IvanhM g ... ... ... -.28 -22.7 17.72
JPMorgCh 1.00 3.0 7 -.32 -21.6 33.25
JanusCap .20 3.2 6 +.01 -51.3 6.31
JohnJn 2.28 3.5 16 -.40 +6.0 65.58
JohnsnCtl .72 2.3 13 +.21 -18.2 31.26
JnprNtwk ... ... 21 -.42 -44.7 20.41
KB Home .25 3.7 +.10 -50.2 6.72
KCSopf 1.00 4.1 .... -1.00 +2.1 24.25
Keycorp .12 1.6 8 -.09 -13.1 7.69
Kimco .76 4.7 74 -.47 -10.0 16.24
Kinross g .12 1.1 15 -.38 -39.9 11.40
KodiakOg ... ... 45 -.01 +43.9 9.50
Kohls 1.00 2.0 12 -.62 -9.2 49.35
Kraft 1.16 3.1 20 -.09 +18.6 37.36
LDK Solar ... ... 7 -.75 -58.6 4.19
LSICorp ... ... 11 +.04 -.7 5.95
LVSands ... ... 25 -.81 -7.0 42.73
LennarA .16 .8 '41 +.28 +4.8 19.65
UllyEli 1.96, 4.7 9 -.08 +18.6 41.56


Name Div
Limited .80
LincNat .32
LloydBkg ...
MEMC
MFAFncl 1.00
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40
MagHRes ...
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .80
Manulife g .52
MarathnO s .60
MktVGold .15
MktVRus .58
MktVJrGId 1.59
MarlntA .40
MarshM .88
Masco .30.
Mcbrmlnt ...
MeadJohn 1.04
Mechel
Medtmic .97
Merck 1.68
Mertor
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Molycorp
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
MuellerWat .07
NCR Corp ...


YId PE


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Cha Last


2.0 15 +.10 +31.3 40.35
1.6 6 -.30 -30.2 19.42
... ... +.02 -61.8 1.57
... ... -06 -65.0 3.94
14.9 7 -.20 -17.6 6.72
-.10 -63.4 3.73
... ... +.47 -29.8 10.43
1.2 12 -.02 +27.2 32.18
... ... +.72 -25.1 5.39
.9 ... -.16 -29.9 9.19
2.2 ... -.86 -43.0 35.75
... .... +.22 -38.2 10.62
2.0 7 +.05 +30.2 29.27
.3 ... -1.36 -16.3 51.43
2.2 ... -.34 .-29.7 26.65
4.9 ... +.39 -38.1 24.70
1.4 57 -.54 -29.8 29.17
2.8 19 -.12 +15.7 31.62
2.9 ... +.28 -17.2 10.48
... 14 -.42 -44.4 11.51
1.5 26 +3.44 +10.4 68.73
... ... +.13 -70.9 8.50
2.5 12 +.41 +3.1 38.25
4.5 13 -.20 +4.6 37.70
... 8 -.46 -74.1 5.32
2.4 8 +.08 -29.8 31.18
... 14 +.51 -31.3 8.68
...F24 -5.06 -51.9 23.98
1.3 9 -.63 -44.4 15.13
.4 10 -2.02 -34.0 50.43
2.9 ... +.10 -41.5 2.44
... 11 -.16 +7.1 16.46


Name Div YId PE


Nabors
NatGrid 3.00 6.2
NOilVarco .48 .7
NYCmtyB 1,00 8.1
NewfldExp ...
NewmtM 1.40 2.3
NextEraEn 2.20 3.6
NiSource .92 3.9
NikeB 1.44 1.5
NobleCorp .55 1.8
NokiaCp .55 11.4
NorflkSo 1.72 2.4
Nucor 1.46 3.7
OcciPet, 1.84 2.0
OfficeDpt ... ...
OldRepub .70 7.6
PG&ECp 1.82 4.4
PHH Corp ...
PNC 1.40 2.4
PPLCorp 1.40- 4.8
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 1.0
Penney .80 2.3
PepsiCo 2.06 3.1
PetrbrsA ,1.34, 5.7
Petrobras 1.26 5:1
Pfizer .88 4.1
PhilipMor 3.08 3.9
PlainsEx
Potash s .28 .7
PwshDB ...
PS USDBull... ...
ProLogis 1.12 3.9
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ... ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
ProUltSP .31 .7
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSSP500...
PrUltSP500 s.03 ...
ProUSSlv rs...
ProUltSlvs ... ..
ProUShEuro...
ProgsvCp .40 2.1
ProUSR2K rs... ...
Prudent 1.45. 2.9
PSEG 1.37 4.2
PulteGrp ...
RadianGrp .01 .4
RadioShk .50 5.1
Raytheon 1.72 3.6
RegalEnt .84 7.0
RegionsFn .04 .9
Renrenn
RioTinto 1.17 2.4
RiteAid
SpdrDJIA 3.26 2.7
SpdrGold ...
SP Mid 1.71 1.1
S&P500ETF2.58 2.1
SpdrHome .15 .9
SpdrS&PBk .37 1.9
SpdrLehHY3.77 9.1
SpdrS&P RB.44 1.8
SpdrRetl .50 1.0
SpdrOGEx .59 1.1
SpdrMetM .46 .9
Safeway .58 2.8
Salesforce ...
SandRdge ...
SaraLee .46 2.4
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.5
Schwab .24 2.1
SealAir .52 3.0
SiderurNac .81 9.9
SilvWhtn g .18 .6
SilvrcpM g .10
SouthnCo 1.89 4.1


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Cha Last


13 -.90
... -.49
15 -.48
11 -.03
8 +.14
14 -1.87
15 +.63
21 +.39
21 -.53
22 -1.41
... -.10
15 +.10
20 -.51
12 -.92
-.17
... -.29
16 +.59
14 +.18
9 -.90
11 -.23
... -.57
10 -1.12
22 -.52
17 -.22
.. -.76
S -.89
14 -.19
17 -27
61 +.72
13 -1.29
... -.16
... +.09
... -.33
... +.22
... +.20
.. -.68
... +.35
-.61
-1.08
... +.20
... -1.24
... +.87
... -5.05,
... +.32
12 .+.23
... +.78
6 -.80
12 +.47
.. +.23
... +.09
7 -.10
9 +.44
30 -.39
25 -.10
... +.20.
.. -.55
.. +.05
-.78
-4.32
... -1.27


-.14
+.08
: -.19
... -.50
... -.15
...-1.64
12 -.08
... +3.44
12 -.41
13 +.05
20 -.83
17 -.28
12 +.16
... +.09
19 -.62
13 +.01
20 +.39


-26.1 17.34
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... 81.46
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Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
SwstAird .02 .2 39 -.02 -34.1 8.56
SwstnEngy ... ... 18 -.95 -14.7 31.94
SpectraEn 1.12 3.6 17 -.12 +23.0 30.75
SprintNex ... ...... +.03 -44.7 2.34
SP Matlls .74 2.2 ... -.41 -12.8 33.50
SPHIthC .67 1.9 .. -.11 +10.1 34.69
SP CnSt .88 2.7 ... -.08 +10.8 32.49
SP Consum .61 1.6 ... -.16 +4.3 39.02
SP Engy 1.07 1.5 -.47 +1.3 69.13
SPDRFncl .22 1.7 -.15 -18.5 13.00
SP Minds .73 2.2 -.34 -3.2 33.75
SP-Tech .38 1.5 ... -.11 +1.0 25.45
SP Util 1.38 3.8 ... +.18 +14.8 35.98
StateStr .72 1.8 13 -.90 -13.0 40.31
StillwtrM ... ... 8 -.50 -51.0 10.46
Suncorgs .44 ... 10 +.14 -24.7 28.83
Suntech ... ... 20 -.10 -72.4 2.21
SunTrst .20 1.1 17 -.05 -40.0. 17.70
Supvalu .35 4.3 68 +.03 -15.7 8.12
Synovus .04 2.8 ... -.05 -46.6 1.41
Sysco 1.08 3.7 15 -.10 -.2 29.33
TaiwSemi .52 4.0 ... -.01 +3.0 12.91
TalismEg .27 +.27 -42.5 12.75
Target 1.20 2.3 12 -.48 -14.8 51.22
TelefEsps 2.14 12.4 ... -.08 -24.6 17.19
TenetHIth ... ... 12 +.15 -23.3 5.13
Teradyn ... ... 10 -.12 -2.9 13.63
Terex ... ... ... +.03 -56.5 13.51
Tesoro ... ... 5 -.22 +26.0 23.36
Texlnst .68 2.3 12 -.62 -10.4 29.11
Textron .08 .4 17 -.28 -21.8 18.49
3MCo 2.20 2.7 14 -.47 -5.3 81.73
TimeWam .94 2.6 14 +.18 +12.3 36.14
TollBros ... ... 85 +.29 +7.5 20.42
TotalSA 2.38 4.7 +.63 -4.4 51.11
Transocn 3.16 8.2 ... -1.92 -44.8 38.39
Tyson .16 .8 10 -.27 +19.9 20.64
UBSAG ... ...... -.36 -28.2 11.83
USAirwy ... ... 9 -.55 -49.4 5.07
US Gold ... ...... +.09 -58.4 3.36
UtdContl ... ... 12 -.98 -20.8 18.87
UPSB 2.08 2.8 18 -.28 +.8 73.19
US Bancrp .50 1.8 12 -.31 +.3 27.05
US NGs rs ... ...... -.34 -46.1 6.46
USOilFd ... ... ... -.38 -2.3 38.11
USSteel .20 .8 ... +.25 -54.7 26.46
UtdhlthGp .65 1.3 11 -.67 +40.3 50.68
ValeSA 1.76 8.2 ... -.68 -38.0 21.45
Vale SApf 1.76 8.5 .. -.38 -31.8 20.60
ValeroE .60 2.9 7 +,01 -9.0 21.05
VangTSM 1.34 2.1 -.44 -1.0 64.30
VangDivApl.17 2.1 ... -.25 +3.8 54.65
VangAIIW 1.37 3.5 ... -.15 -16.9 39.65
VangEmg .91 2.4 ... -.52 -20.6 38.21
VangEAFE1.06 3.5 .-.03 -15.3 30.63
VeoliaEnv 1.72 15.6 ... ... -62.4 11.05
VerizonCm2.00 5.0 16 +.14 +12.1 40.12
Visa .88 .9 20 -.95 +44.3 101.53
Walgm .90 2.7 11 -2.28 -15.1 33.06
WsteMInc 1.42 4.3 16 -.02 -11.3 32.71
Weathflntl ... ... 56 .+.26 -35.8 14.64
WellsFargo .48 1.7 10 -.23 -11.1 27.56
WDigital ... ... 9,-1.19 -8.7 30.95
WstnUnion .32 1.8 12 -.21 -1.7 18.26
Weyerh .60 3.2 22 +.50 -1.4 18.67
Whripl 2.00 4.2 10 -3.74 -46.6 47.45
WmsCos 1.00 3.0 21 +.31 +33.6 33.02
WmsCos wi... ... ... +.36 +8.0 27.01
WT India .16 1.0 ... -.48 -40.9 15.60
XcelEngy 1.04 3.8 16 +.44 +17.4 27.64
Xerox .17 2.1 13 -.29 -30.9 7.96
Xylem n .10 ...... +.78 +5.9 25.69
Yamanag .20 1.4 16 -.34 +14.8 14.69
YumBmds 1.14 1.9 22 -.02 +20.3 59.01


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


ATPO&G ... ......
ActivsBliz .17 1.3 19
AdobeSy ... ... 17
AkamaiT ... ... 32
AlaskCom .20 6.6 ...
AlteraCplf .32 .9 14
Amazon ... ... 91
ACapAgy 5.60 19.9 4
AmCapLtd ... ... 3
Amgen 1.44 2.2 16
A123 Sys ... ... ...
Apollolnv 1.12 17.4 ...
Apple Inc ... ... 15
ApIdMatl .32 3.0 7
AriadP ... ... ...
AnmHId .15 .5 ...
Atmel ... ... 8
Autodesk ... ... 26
AvanirPhm ... ... ...
BMCSft ... ... 13
Baidu ... ... 46
BedBath ... ... 16
BioFuelE h ... ... ...
BioSante ... ... ...
Broadcom .36 1.2 18
BrcdeCm ... ... 52
CA Inc .20 1.0 12
Cadence ... ... 25
CpstnTrbh ... ... ...
Celgene ... ... 28
CeirTher rsh... ... ...
CienaCorp ... ... ...
Cisco .24 1.3 16
Clearwire ... ... ...
CognizTech ... ... 24
Comcast .45 1.9 17
Comcspcl .45 1.9 17
Compuwre ... ... 17


+.19 -56.0 7.36
+.12 -1.0 12.32
-.02 -8.2 28.27
+.35 -31.4 32.28
-.23 -72.9 3.01
-.48 +4.3 37.10
-4.18 -3.8 173.10
+.07 -2.3 28.08
-.43 -11.0 6.73
+.52 +17.0 64.21
-.16 -83.1 1.61
-.14 -41.8 6.44
+1,67 +25.6 405.00
-.11 -23.8 10.71
+.51 +140.2 12.25
+.57 +33.3 27.67
-.15 -34.3 8.10
-.48 -20.6 30.33
+.20 -49.8 2.05
-.33 -30.5 32.78
-1.34 +20.7 116.47
+.51 +17.9 57.97
+.08 -60.9 .68
+.02 -69.4 .50
-.41 -32.6 29.36
+.03 -1.9 5.19
-.19 -17.3 20.22
-.12 +25.9 10.40
-.04 +20.8 1.16
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+.09 -47.0 1.16
-.01 -42.5 12.10
-.39 -10.6 18.08
-.02 -62.3 1.94
-.25 -12.3 64.31
-.02 +8.4 23.71
+.07 +13.8 23.56
+.01 -28.7 8.32


Name Div YId
Cree Inc ... ..
Crocs
CypSemi .36 2.1
DeckrsOut...
Delcath
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DiamndFIf .18 .6
DirecTVA ...
DonlleyRR 1.04 7.2
DryShips .12 ...
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts ... ..
Emcore If ... ...
EricsnTel .37 3.7
Exelixis .10
Expedias ...
ExpScripts ...
FifthThird .32 2.5
Finisar
FstNiagara .64 7.4
FstSolar ...
Flextm ... ...
FrontierCm .75 14.6
GeronCp ...
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC ...
HanwhaSol ...
HercOffsh ...
HimaxTch .24 24.0
HudsCity .32 5.1
HumGen
Illumina
Intel .84 3.5
InterMune ...
IvanhoeEn ...


PE


Wkly YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


24 +.38
13 -1.11
19 -.01
18-11.14
... +.20
8 -.27
.. +.03
...+3.86
13 -.47
9 -.39
... -.15
33 +.01
22 -.51
-.11
.. -.04
... +.16
... +.10
9 -1.02
17 -.56
11 -.04
23 +.04
12 +.03
6 -.94
7 -.27
34 +.03
... +.07
12 +1.64
21+12.76
34 -.56
33 -.11
... -.04
7 +.02
... -.04
... +.08
39 +1.38
10 -.15
7 +.96
... +.10


-66.6 22.04
-13.7 14.77
-9.1 16.89
-5.2 75.57
-68.9 3.05
+8.0 14.63
-78.2 7.60
-39.3 32.27
+7.1 42.76
-17.4 14.43
-63.6 2.00
-50.3 7.96
+9.0 30.33
+25.8 20.60
-20.6 .86
-12.1 10.13
-42.3 4.74
+23.0 29.02
-17.3 44.69
-13.4 12.72
-43.6 16.75
-38.3 8.63
-74.1 33.76
-27.9 5.66
-47.1 5.15
-71.5 1.48
+12.9 40.93
+8.7 645.90
+36.5 44.85
-88.0 .98
+27.6 4.44
-52.2 1.00
-50.9 6.25
-69.1 7.39
-51.9 30.48
+15.3 24.25
-65.4 12.60
-58.8 1.12


Name Div YId PE
JA Solar ... ... 3
JDS Uniph ... ... 37
JamesRiv ... ... 12
JetBlue ... ... 23
LamResrch ... ... 8
LeapWiriss ... ... ...
UblylntA ... ... 15
MarvellT ... ... 11
Mattel .92 3.3 14
MelcoCrwn ... ... 44
MicronT
Microsoft .80 3.1 9
NIl Hldg ... ... 12
NetApp ... ... 21
Netflix ... ... 16
NewsCpA .19 1.1 16
NewsCpB .19 1.0 16
NuanceCm ... ... ...
Nvidia ... ... 13
OnSmcnd ... ... 21
Oracle .24 .9 14
PMC Sra ... ... 19
PacEth rs ... ... ...
PattUTI .20 1.0 11
Paychex 1.28 4.3 20
PeopUtdF .63 4.9 23
Popular
Power-One .... 4
PwShs000.46 .8 ..
Qualcom .86 1.6 22
RFMicD 19
RAM En h ... 39
RschMotn ... ... 3
RossStrss .44 .9 18
SLM Cp .40 3.0 14
SanDisk ... 10
Satcon h ... ...
SavientPh .. ...


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD
Chg %Chg


Wkly
Last Name


Wkly YTD
Div YId PE Chg %Chg


SeagateT .72
SearsHidgs .33
Sequenom ...
Slcnware .28
SilvStd g ...
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol
Staples .40
Starbucks .68
StIDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .24
THQ
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .90
TibcoSft ...
TiVo Inc
TddentMh ...
TripAdvn ...
TriQuint
ViacomB 1.00
VirgnMdah .16
VisnChina
V'rvus
Vodafone 2.10
WarnerCh ...
Wendys Co .08
Windstrm 1.00
Winn-Dixie...
Wynn 2.00
Xrlinx .76
Yahoo
Zagg
ZionBcp .04
ZvnQa n


15 +.25
...-14.07
... +.19
15 +.01
16 +.36
... -3.79
46 +.01
14 +.01
10 -.29
28 +.57
12 -.10
18 -.14
14 +.15
... -.01
... -.01
13 -1.31
37 +.12
-.11
-.02
-.81
10 -.09
13 +.13
+.04
-.01
... +.58
... +.31
41 -.59
... +.02
22 -.02
.., +.01
26 +.49
15 -.29
20 -.06
13 -1.38
... -.05
.. +.02


Wkly
Last Name


Wkly YTD
Div YId PE Chq %Chg


AbdAsPac .42 5.7
Adventrx
AlexcoR g ...
AlidNevG ...
AmApparel ...
Anooraq g ...
AntaresP ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalnRare ..
Baldw
Banro g
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ..
Brigus grs '...
CAMAC En ...
CanoPet
CelSci ... ...
CFCdag .01 .1
CheniereEn...
ChinaShen ...
ComerstStrl.33 20.2
CrSuiHiY .32 11,0
DejourE g ...
DenisnMg ...
ElephTalk ...
ExeterR gs ...
FrkStPrp .76 7.6
GamGldNRl.68 11.9
GascoEngy...
GenMoly
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
GIPanSilvg ...
Hemisphrx ...
InovioPhm ...
IntTowerg ...
KimberR q ...


Wkly
Last Name Div
7.33 LucasEngy...
.59 MadCatzg ...
6.81 MdwGold g ..
30.28 Minefndg ...
.72 NeoStem ...
.39 Nevsung .10
2.20 NwGoldg ...
4.93 NAPallg ...
2.37 NDynMng ...
.90 NthnO&G ...
3.70 NovaGldg ...
42.24 PalatinTch ...
25.12 ParaG&S' ...
.97 PhrmAth ...
1.01 PionDrill ...
.07 PolyMetg ...
.29 Quaterrag .
8.69 Quepa sa
129 RareEle g
1.6 Rentech
6.60
2.88 RexahnPh ...
.52 Rubicon g ...
1.25 SamsO&G ...
2.65 SeabGidg ...
2.61 TanzRyg ...
9.95 Taseko
14.11 TmsatlPet ...
'23 TriangPet ...
3.09 US Geoth ...
1.65 UraniumEn...
4.80 VangTotW 1.02
.91 VantageDr ...
1.95 VimetX
.20 VistaGold ...
.43 VoyagerOG ...
4.36 WizzardSft ...
.86 YMBioq ...


Wky YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... -.04 -.9 2.31
... 5 .,. -50.0 .51
... ... -.08 +151.2 2.11
... +.15 -4.0 10.60
... ... -.05 -64.0 .51
1.8 11 -.04 -26.6 5.53
... ... -.04 +3.3 10.08
...... -.08 -63.3 2.55
...... -.02 -57.7 6.04
... 73 -.17 -11.9 23.98
...... -.29 -40.6 8.48
...... -.07 -70.2 .40
... 13 -.06 -46.4 2.14
...... +.02 -70.0 1.27
... ... -.14 +9.9 9.68
... ... +.01 -56.5 1.04
... -.06 -72.7 .54
... +.22 -76 3.32
...... -.61 -79.8 3.25
... ... -.08 +7.4 1.31
...... -.07 -66.4 .38
...... +.20 -33.8 3.78
...... -.03 +47.7 1.95
... ... -1.21 -47.5 16.11
...... -.06 -67.1 2.40
...... +.06 -48.0 2.73
... 7 +.13 -60.7 1.31
... ... +.07 -8.2 5.97
...... -.02 -69.2 .36
...... +.05 -49.3 3.06
2.4 ... -.11 -9.7 43.18
... ... -.03 -42.9 1.16
... ... -2.38 +68.1 24.97
... 4 -.10 +28.5 3.07
... ... +.39 -52.4 2.57
... -.00 -48.4 .13
... ... +.11 -29.6 1.64


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Stock Footnotes: 9 = Dividends and earrings in Canadian dollars. h= Does not meet continued-stg standards.
If = Late fiing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. it = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has splitby at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When issued. wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sates charges), m = Multiple tees are charged. NA = not available p = previousday's
net asset value, s = fund splt shares during the week.X = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gahr ra and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Last Pvs Week
3.25 3.25


Prime Rate


1.88 2.02


1n-vear


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9782 .9870
Britain 1.5509 1.5395
Canada 1.0180 1.0212
Euro .7724 .7729
Japan 77.01 77.65
Mexico 13.9728 14.0006
Switzerlnd .9385 .9415
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


I I


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


LAKE CITY REPORTER STOCKS SUNDAY. JANUARY 1, 2012











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. JANUARY 1. 2012

Lake City Reporter




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Legal

Attention Comcast Customers Im-
portant Information about your serv-
ices:
While we continue to make invest-
ments, we periodically need to adjust
prices due to increases in program-
ming and other business costs. Start-
ing February 1, 2012, the price for
Economy Internet standalone will be
$41.95. This price change applies to
the following service areas: St. Au-
gustine, Palatka,'Welaka, Lake City,
Live Oak and Alachua County.
Services not available in all areas.
Call 1-800-XFINITY for more infor-
mation.
05529774
January 1, 2012

020 Lost & Found
$200 REWARD for info leading
to return of 2 Blue Tick hounds.
Missing from Norris Rd. the week
of Christmas. Call 386-623-0200


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4 lines 6 days ch additional
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Rate applies to private individuals selling
||personal merchandise totalling S4,000 or less.
p a te m must ncu a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate


05529870
Murphy USA Job Fair
Store Managers/Asst. Managers
Job Fair at
The Holiday Inn & Suites
213 SW Commerce Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
Jan. 4th 2012 10:00am-5:00pm
*Please email resume for
immediate interview time*
hectorcastro(aSmurphyoilcorp.
corn
Location: Lake City, Fl.
Compensation:
30K-34K .salary + Monthly
commissions, paid
vacations, 401k, profit sharing

23 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Bluegrass
Nursery Inc. Shelby Co., KY.
Greenhouse and Nursery
Production & Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 02/20/2012 -
12/08/2012. Wage of $9.38/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence '
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center and reference the job order
#KY0442097.


100 Job
100 Opportunities
6 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Hayden
Landscape & Design. Inc Nelson
Co.. KY. Straw/Hay. Row Crop.
& Greenhouse/Nursery Production
and Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 03/01/2012 -
01/01/2013. 12 months of verifia-
ble experience required. Wage of
$9.38/hr. Worker guaranteed 3/4
of contract hours. Tools provided
at no cost. Free housing provided
to non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract,
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center and reference the job order
#KY0443503.
Help Wanted: Kitchen help, wait-
ers, waitresses. Experience prefer-
red. Apply at 7674 SW US Hwy
27 in Fort White. 386-497-1631
HIRING FOR MASONS &
LABORERS, Dependable,
reliable. Must have own transpor-
tation, Call 386-623-0010
Immediate Collector Position
Available. Full-time. $8/hr.
Dedicated and determined
individuals wanted. Bilingual
applicants encouraged to apply.
Apply at
www.salliemae.candidatecare.com
or Call Christine at 1-866-441-
2623 ext 4342.
Local CPA Firm is looking for
an experienced tax return preparer.
Ideally, the candidate will be able
to prepare personal, corporate
and partnership returns..
The seasonal time frame is
February 1 through April 17.
Send reply to Box 05080, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Now Hiring Restaurant Manager.
Experience preferred but will train
right person. 24 hour operation.
Send resumes to: 186 SE Newell
Dr. Lake City, FL. 32025.
2 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Raymond
Thomas DBA Thomas Academy
Farm Hardin Co., KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, Row Crop, Produce, &
Greenhouse/Nursery Production
and Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 03/01/2012 -
07/10/2012. Wage of $9.38/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at the
nearest Florida One Stop Career
Center and reference the job order
#KY0442507.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


Security Officers needed.for


100 Job
100 OOpportunities

Temporary Farm Laborer/Equip-
ment Operator. Verifiable prior
experience of 3 months or 480
hours is required. 2/15/12 through
11/15/12 at Allenberg Orchards.
Smithsburg. MD. Workers will be
operating agricultural equipment
and harvesting fruits and
vegetables. Must be able to lift
75 ibs. and work outdoors in all
weather. Wage rate is $10.60 per
hour. Work week is 40 hours. 6
days per week. 3/4 of workdays
guaranteed per 20 CFR655.122(i).
Transportation and subsistence
expenses reimbursed after 50% of
contract completed. Work tools
supplied. Group housing provided
for non-local workers. 5 job open-
ings available. Apply for this job
at your State Workforce Agency
using job listing MD0503493.

9 Temporary Fanrt Workers
needed. Employer: William &
Lynn Garnett Farm Partnership -
Christian Co., KY. Tobacco,
Straw/Hay, & Row Crop Produc-
tion and Alternative Work.
Employment Dates: 03/05/2012 -
12/15/2012. Wage of $9.38/hr.
Worker guaranteed 3/4 of contract
hours. Tools provided at no
cost. Free housing provided to
non commuting workers.
Transportation & subsistence
reimbursed when 50% of contract
is met. Apply for this job at
the nearest Florida One Stop
Career Center and reference the
job order #KY0443562.


120 Medical
120 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529826
Medical Billing Manager
Several years of experience in
medical office insurance coding,
and billing required. Excellent
Salary Based on Experience
Apply in confidence,
Email: mafaisal050()vahoo.com

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North .
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


120A Medical
120 Employment


* Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.ore
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
For its Student Loan Forgive-
ness program. Licensed Clini-
cians who serve in our approved
locations may qualify for up to
$60k in Student Loan forgive-
ness for F/T 2yr commitment.
Therapists:
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Master's Therapist in
Screening
Medical Services
RN full-time Lake City CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


170 Business
71 Opportunities
Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

240 Schools &
Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


Set y gJ si ht *
C-ii...


Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, D)rivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP Apply in person o
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com ':-g-?;' ..4"


L
or online


Land Clearing

Back Hoe. Dozer. Chopping, root
raking, bush hog. seeding, sod.
disking, site prep. ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.



FLORIDA




PROGRAMMER ANALYST
Responsible for providing programming
support and development of technology
solutions for one or more business areas
of the college. Assists as required in the
solution of operational difficulties
encountered in existing programs.
AS Degree required, Bachelor's degree
preferred. Knowledge, Skills, Abilities
Required: Ability to work independently
to resolve and maintain all aspects of
technical support. Ability to communicate
information and ideas in speaking so
others will understand. Able to accurately
provide information to supervisors,
co-workers and staff by telephone, in
written form, e-mail, or in person. Ability
Sto plan and organize. Ability to adjust to
change and be innovative.
Desirable Qualifications: Bachelor's
degree. Knowledge of SungardHE
Banner software, Oracle database
systems, Oracle Application Express
programming, PL/SQL programming, C
programming, Sharepoint programming,
Net programming and Microsoft Access
programming preferred.
SALARY: $37,500-$70,000 annually,
plus benefits.
APPLICATION DEADLINE:
Open until filled.
College application, vita, and photocopies
of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation.
Position details and applications available
on web at: www.fggc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanriS)fqc.edu

Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education
and Employment


1,


Have you read the newspaper today'






Sdays a wee you find it here



Lake City Reporter



lakecitytreportercm CURN inNTS





Vlt\ 7^010


15BUY Ii



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i"llT1T


$200 Reward for the return of a
Tree stand & Deer Camera.
Missing from the end of Lake
Jeffery in Wellborn.386- 623-0200

00 J0ob
100 Opportunities
05529823
HOLIDAY INN & SUITES
Lake City's only full service
hotel is seeking the following:
Full Time Positions:
o Night Auditor (1 la-7p)
o Night Manager (3p-llp)
Apply at: www.ihg.jobs.net
Part Time positions:
o Dishwasher (am shift)
o Security Guard (1laa-7p)
o Front Desk Agent (3p-llp)
Apply Mon-Fri 12-5pm
213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.


DWOE


$3

OeItem pr ad
4 lines 6 ays Eah dtional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
EachI tem must Indlude a price.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY. JANUARY 1.2012


310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous

8 ft x 5.5 ft wide single axle trailer
With Dump and lights.
Excellent condition $325 FIRM
386-288-8833
BEER MEISTER for sale.
$200 obo.
386-758-1991

PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control,
in original box. $280,
386-984-7510
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740


450 Good Things
to Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan Hbuse in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood

It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2br/1.5 ba Fully furnished.
Uilities, washer dryer, TV, cable
Owner non smoker. 2 mi S of V.A.
$800.mo $500. sec. 386-755-0110
3 BR/2 BA, excellent condition,
includes all appliances, garbage
pickup & water. No pets, off of
252/Pinemount, 386-752-5617.
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
NEW 72'X18'
Mobile home 3br/2ba
$625 mo. plus $625 dep.
954-258-8841


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72.500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Maintained. 10
ac. Master has a huge closet w/
walk in shower & garden tub.
MLS 79417 $94,900 Foreclosure
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Small mobile home
2/1 886sf on a wooded lot.
Paved road frontage.
MLS 79413 $17,900
Palm Harbor Homes
New 2012 Models
$15K Off All Homes
800-622-2832 ext 210

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent








2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1,2/1. Movedin special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move-in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch: Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2
8 mi NW of VA. Private wooded
acre, deck, roomy. No dogs
$600 mo + dep 386.961.9181


720 Furnished Apts.
i For Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest. Sands.
Columbia All furnished. Electric.
cable. fridge. microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person S135.
2 persons S150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
S Home For Rent

lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage. Cathe-
dral ceilings. brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer.1 ac fenced, private. some
pets. lease. 1st. last, sec, ref. Lake
City area S725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
S485. mo 485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
2br/lba newly remodeled.
On Lomond Street. No pets!
Stove & fridge incl. $350 dep.
$550. mo. 386-719-0584
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
75- Office Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515


For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762

Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.

Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor



805 Lots for Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale

BANK OWNED 32_ home with
screened in pool. fireplace.
=79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Nice 4/2. 1 ac.
Granite floors. Beautiful yard &
wrap around porch. MLS 77292
S139.900. Short Sale.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 4/2. 1 ac modular
home that is in immaculate cond.
1,344sqft. New carpet, roof, a/c.
fireplace. MLS 78833 S115.000.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Well maintained.
Tiled floors, living area. open kit.
Above ground pool, guest quarters
MLS 79149 $115,000. Short Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot. on
the Suwannee. Well &.anerobic
septic system. MLS 78842
$45,000 Owner Financing.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Home. over 2ac.
screened inground pool. Updated,
crown molding, new wood floors,
kit & paint. MLS 79378 $129,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 1713 sf, great
area. Arched entryways, Ig living
room w/fireplace. French doors to
patio. MLS 79418 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.4/2 Vintage home.
Updated electric & plumbing. New
carpet & CH/A. Hardwood floors.
MLS 79367 $99,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Well maintained
2/2. Wood laminate floors. Lg
living room & master suite. New
countertops. MLS 76928 $89,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Vintage 4/3 2626sf.
Hardwood floors, new wdws, fire-
place. Separate 494ft guest home ,
double lot MLS 78000 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 1987 SF up-
graded w/wood laminate floors,
ceramic tile. 14x30 workshop, 10
xl0 storage MLS79345 $199,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, 2853SF walk-
ing to downtown, lakes, restau-
rants, Shands & VA. garage w/apt
above. MLS 79451 $140,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, open floor
plan, spacious master BR. Tile &
wood thru out. 1 yr. home
warranty MLS 78594 $169,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Huge 4/3, 2826sf
on 5.22 ac! Flooring is tile lami-
nate in most rooms & in immacu-
late cond., MLS 79584 $215,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. What a Creampuff!
Newer roof, 1 ac, paved road,
fenced, fireplace, very nice brick
home. MLS 79531 $65,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Brick .59 ac! 3/2,
2502sf. Lg master bath w/separate
shower & whirlpdol. 2 car garage
& storage. MLS 76769 $210,000
Charming Older Home in town.
Over 1300 sq ft. with hardwood
floors. Shady corner lot.
Janet Creel. 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
Private Estate, city limits.
6br/3.5ba. 39.7 acres $994,000 or
$2,500 mo rent. Mary Brown
Whitehurst. 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2. New kitchen
counters & ceramic tile, open floor
plan. MLS# 77943 $94,500 Mary
Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 updated brick in town. New
roof, hardwoods. Glassed room
w/fantastic views. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS 78092 $249,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D. Super area,
nice back yard. Covered back
porch. New AC in 2010. Elaine K.
Tolar. 755-6488 MLS# 75198


810 Home for Sale

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Exceptional price! 3/2. 1582 sqft.
2 car garage. screened porch 1/2 ac
lot. Only S 129.900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 365-5678 MLS#79239
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent location! 3/2 home. large
master suite. 2 car garage.
S87.900. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 79458
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Woodcrest. 3/2 Brick w/split floor
plan. Nice lot. Fireplace. Ig porch.
vinyl wdws. MLS# 77708 Elaine
K. Tolar $169,900 755-6488
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac. 3/2. as is $95.000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/ist time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Newly Listed in Mayfair! Great
area close to shopping! 3/2 fresh
paint& pretty lot. Newer metal
roof & screen porch. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
Sweeping Golf Course View!
Brick 3/2 w/screen porch. South-
ern Oaks Golf Course. 1980sf.
$164,900 #79585 Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


820 Farms&
S Acreage

4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
'w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


870 Real Estate
7 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


951 Recreational
Vehicles
1993 JAYCO 5th wheel. 26 1/2
feet. Well kept. Everything works.
Owner is Non-smoker $3.000
386-755-0110


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads se prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
'60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.







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Classified Department: 755-5440


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HL I REOTR A I


" TIImEEss IIEINORIES
Celebrating with 20% to 50%
savings storewide .
Now thru Jan. 7th
1034 SW Main Blvd. (next to theoney Man) Lake City, FL 32055 1


Women's Ce 46teF o Flocida

Obstetrics and Gynecology
Chandler Mohan, MD Emad Atta, MD
Annmarie Fenn, CNM, MS
-Weight Loss/ Hair Removal/ Chemical.Peels/ 4D Baby-Ultrasounds'
( ALL $69 -
Accepting all Insurance. No Ins visit $50
(386) 466-1106
Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak


30----
336-754-5422
1137 W US.
Highway 90
Lake City,FI,
32055'


HOMfS
Since 1973 ID


IRONWOOD HOMES


Siince 1973 I


FREE
FACTORY
TOURS


LOCAL
SERVICE


Locally Built *No Freight
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LAKE'CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012


Classified Department: 755-5440


-Reporter













Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbrifdgel- keotreporte corm


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, January 1,2012


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


A winter

memory


brings with it
the opportunity
to make many
new memories.
Please come along for a
ride as I share one of my
memories...
It surely wasn't a matter
of fact that we ventured out
on that day, that day of a
green winter wonderland.
It was a decision that mea-
sured the emotional weight
of a snow-bound, cozy
home to the toasty heat
of adventure in the frozen
world out there. In the
end, after much consider-
ation, we chose to leave the
easy comfort inside.
We would be brave
explorers in that white
world, and we would make
discoveries that were grand
and new to us. Mother and
son, son and mother, two
like souls together for such
a short time. It was as if
we always knew it wouldn't
last, this fleeting spirit of
shared thoughts, unspoken
words, and vision as if seen
through one set of eyes.
Soon we were on our
way, covered and padded,
insulated and helmeted,
gliding across a white
pristine homeland that
was strangely unfamiliar.
Pinpricks of snow, blown
like thick dust from the
turning snowmobile track,
found its way through my
carelessly unzipped col-
lar. The chill made me
instinctively reach to check
the snaps and buckles of
my son's snowsuit as he
sat in front of me, cradled
between by arms.
Nodding off, he slumped
against my left arm, his
trust in me extending to
everything around me. My
arm felt cramped, but that
discomfort could never
overshadow the absolute
happiness and reverence
experienced by a mother
holding her sleeping child.
There was a deep, deep
quiet which could be heard
clearly over the steady
sound of the engine. The
snow drifts, both heavy and
light, seemed to absorb the
waves of sound and time.
As we cut the drifts, the
sprays of snow captured
everything in the moment
and buried them deeply.
And then we found what
had beckoned to us that
day. Before the frigid air
had descended from the
north, a torrential rain-
fall had flooded all the
streams. The water froze
at flood level, then receded
beneath the ice. Thick
ice, anchored to protrud-
ing trees, lay in suspended
sheets across the stream.
By lying on our stom-
achs, we could gaze at the
world below the ice. It
had a dimly lit, hazy green
glow ini that world. We
were mesmerized by that
green winter wonderland,
lush and alive, just inches
MEMORIES continued on 3D

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


JArUNJI MIAlI I I H !YlWALU'.IILOfK lO y IJUe
Lindagail White (left) and Lawanna Lumpkin congratulate their nephew Gerald Ford after Lumpkin pinned his
badge on his uniform during a swearing-in ceremony on Thursday. Ford, a former member of the Lake City Fire
Department, is now an officer with the Lake City Police Department. 'I'm so proud of him. I knew he could do it,'
Lumpkin said. 'I always knew he could do anything he wanted to.'



Trading in his



truck for a cruiser


Ten-year veteran of
fire department now
a member of LCPD.

By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter.com
A familiar face was
added to the ranks
of the Lake City
Police Department
Thursday morning.
Gerald Ford, a 10-year veteran of
the Lake City Fire Department,
was sworn in as the city's newest
police officer.
I Ford's first day as a police offi-
cer is Monday. He said becoming
a police officer was a change of
gears. "I get bored easy," he said.
"I wanted to be more interactive
with the community."
Before becoming a firefighter,
Ford said he learned people skills
working at the concierge desk
of a hotel. He also he spent four


years as a legislative aide for the
Florida House Majority Office in
Tallahassee.
"I felt I was getting soft work-
ing behind a desk," Ford said. He
spent two years as a firefighter
in Tallahassee before moving to
Columbia County.
Ford said he will miss the
camaraderie with the other fire-
fighters. "Those are my brothers
over there," said Ford of the fire
department. "I have a new set of
brothers now."
He will also miss the fire
trucks. "I like big red trucks that
go fast," said the 1990 graduate of
Hamilton County High School.
"I traded in the trucks for a
gun and a police cruiser," he said.
Ford said he will become a
part-time reservist for the fire
department. "My goal is to do
a shift a month to keep up with
friends and standards."
In his spare time, Ford raises
hogs and cows on his farm in


White Springs. "I golf too when I
can."
. Ford entered the police acad-
emy Aug. 1. He said training was
very challenging and included
grueling sessions of CrossFit, a
core strength and conditioning
program. "It ain't for the weak
or sissies," he said. "It's just like
going to fire school, it's just as
physical."
At 38 years old, Ford said
he was one of the older police
recruits, but he didn't let it bother
him. "I ran rings around them,"
he said of the younger recruits.
"Firemen are tough. That's what
made the academy easier. I was
used to being physical and active.
But it wasn't a piece of cake."
Ford said the biggest adjust-
ment for him will be the new
schedule. As a firefighter Ford
worked 24 hours and then had 48
hours off. Now as a police officer
CRUISER continued on 3D


Forrest Gump, Hannibal


Lecter join film registry


By BEN NUCKOLS
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Bambi, Forrest Gump
and Hannibal Lecter have at least one thing
in common: Their cinematic adventures were
chosen by the Library of Congress to be pre-
served in the world's largest archive of film,
TV and sound recordings.
"The Silence of the Lambs" (1991), a har-
rowing psychological thriller about the can-
nibalistic serial killer Lecter, and "Forrest
Gump" (1994), starring Tom Hanks as the
guileless hero who thinks "life is like a box
of chocolates," were critical and commercial
successes that won the Academy Award for
Best Picture. The animated Disney classic
"Bambi" is among the most beloved movies
ever made.
A majority of the 25 titles chosen this year
for inclusion in the National Film Registry are
lesser-known including silent films, docu-
mentaries, avant-garde cinema and even home
movies. The Library of Congress announced
the selections Tuesday.
The registry began in 1989 under an act
of Congress and now includes 575 films. Its
aim is not to identify the best movies ever
made.but to preserve films with artistic, cul-
tural or historical significance. Previous titles
chosen range from "The Birth of a Nation" to
"National Lampoon's Animal House." ASSOCIATED PF
This undated handout image provided by the Library of
Congress shows a Danish poster for Walt Disney's 1942
FILMS continued on 3D animated film "Bambi."


TASTE BUDDIES
I


Genie Norman and
Mary Kay Hollingsworth
TasteBuddiesLokeCity@gmail.com


Chasteen's
0
is sure

to please

Anyone who's lived
in Lake City for
more than a few
years has prob-
ably heard about
Chasteen's Downtown. Robert
and Emmy Chasteen have been
serving up delicious home
cooking for more than 33 years.
In. 1978 they began sharing
their dishes at Robert's Dock
out by the airport for families
to enjoy. After 21 years, they
wanted to slow down a bit and
moved "uptown" to downtown
where they still serve the family
favorites including great soups,
sandwiches and salads. Don't
think they have slowed down
as evidenced by the number
of people who make this their
place to meet friends and enjoy
the made to order meals.
If you work downtown and
want to stop in for a quick, deli-
cious breakfast, Chasteen's
offers a pretty hearty menu
including a breakfast sandwich
on toast or croissant, omelets,
pancakes and French toast in
addition to your standard egg
options.
Picking a favorite for lunch
is a tough one we love every-
thing on their menu! Two of our
favorite choices on the Classics
list are fried pork chops and
Chasteen's special buffalo bites.
The pork chops are the thin,
minute ones that are perfectly
fried and not greasy at all. The
buffalo bites are tender small
chunks of chicken breast, light-
ly battered and fried and tossed
in a unique and tasty mustard
based sauce that has just the
right amount of kick. The chick-
en tenders are another favorite
especially with the kids who
always want that cup of Ranch
dressing. Entrees come with
your choice of two sides and a
roll. Some of Chasteen's special
sides change daily and you bet-
ter get there before the lunch
crowd wipes them out Creamy
macaroni and cheese, broccoli
salad, broccoli casserole and
squash casserole stand out for
us and are kid's choices too.
One of our favorite salads that
they offer is the Fandangled
Salad. Feta cheese, toasted
pecans and seasonal fruit (we
like the strawberries best) are
generously layered on top of
fresh spring greens and dressed
with Emmy's special vinaigrette.
Their homemade soups are
hard to beat the cream of pota-
to is on the menu daily and is
just plain ol' comfort in a bowl.
Each day they also offer an
additional soup, all of which are
homemade. The chicken salad
is another of our favorites and
can be served as a salad plate
or in a sandwich. The broccoli
salad, potato salad and the tuna
salad are old standbys but one
never gets tired of this trio.
If you save room, be sure to
try one of Robert and Emmy's
sweet treats! Whether you opt

CHASTEEN'S continued on 3D

* Genie Norman and Mary Kay
Hollingsworth are Columbia
County residents who love good
food and fun, at home and out.
Their column on area restaurants
appears twice monthly. %
You can contact them at" :
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@ gmail.
com.











LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY. JANUARY 1. 2012


AP poll: In 2012, it


can only get better


By JENNIFER AGIESTA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Americans are
hopeful for what 2012 will bring for their
families and the country, according to a
new Associated Press-GfK poll, though
most say 2011 was a year they would
rather forget.
Nearly seven in 10 say the year gone
by was a bad one, more than double
those who consider it a success, accord-
ing to the poll. But 62 percent are opti-
mistic about what 2012 will bring for
the nation, and more, 78 percent, are
hopeful about the year their family will
have in 2012.
Jeff Wolfe, 33, of Farmington, W.Va.,
said 2011 treated him well because he
was able to find steady work as a line-
man. But for the rest of the nation,
things were "pretty rough," with so
many Americans looking for jobs, he
noted.
"For the first time since 2009,1 I worked
all year," he said. Wolfe said he lost work
in 2008 and again in 2010. But in 2011,
the father of two school-age children
said he was able to catch up on bills,
buy his wife a new car and renovate his
home.
Overall, the poll found 68 percent of
Americans described 2011 as a bad year,
compared with 29 percent who felt it was


a good one.
A partisan divide, much like the one
that ruled Washington this year, seems
the only split in public opinion on 2011.
Democrats were most likely to view 2011
positively (40 percent called it good),
while independents and Republicans
were less effusive. Beyond that, the poll
found general agreement that 2011 is
best left in the past.
Mary Burke, 57, of Ridgeland, S.C., felt
economic pain in 2011. She saw prices rise
for all of her expenses, from her light bill
to groceries. "Paying $5 for a jar of mayon-
naise is outrageous," she said.
Food and gas prices surged in 2011, but
the most recent Consumer Price Index
shows inflation leveling off. November
statistics from the government showed a
year-over-year inflation rate of 3.4 percent,
the smallest such rise since April
The AP-GfK poll found consumers are
sensing the change. Just 18 percent of
adults expect consumer prices to rise
at a faster pace in the coming year, the
lowest share to say so since the poll
first asked the question in March. Most
(51 percent) expect prices to rise at the
same rate or more slowly.
And as. the nation's economic for-
tunes overall appear to be tilting slightly
positive, the public's expectations for the
economy in the coming year are at their
highest point since spring.,


FILMS: Gump, Lecter join registry
Continued From Page 1D


"Forrest Gump" has its critical detrac-
tors but was praised for its technical
achievements, including the seamless
incorporation of the title character into
historical footage.
More than 2,200 films were nominated
for the registry this year. The National
Film Preservation Board pares them
down before Librarian of Congress James
H. Billington makes the final selections.
"Each year,; we do try to pick one of the
titles that the public nominated the most,
and 'Forrest Gump' was way up there
on that list," said Stephen Leggett, pro-
gram coordinator for the National Film
Preservation Board. "Everything on the
list is subject to dissenting opinion."
Staffers at the Library of Congress
Packard Campus for Audio Visual
Conservation in Culpeper, Va., work to
ensure that each title is preserved for
future generations, packing away origi-
nal negatives or unreleased prints into
the facility's massive vault and .collabo-
rating with other preservationists, movie
studios and independent filmmakers.
"These films are selected because of
their enduring significance to American
culture," Billington said in a statement.
"Our film heritage must be protected
because these cinematic treasures docu-
ment our history and culture and reflect
our hopes and dreams."
Leggett said he was pleased by the
inclusion of 'The Negro Soldier," a 1944
documentary produced by Frank Capra
that was groundbreaking for its real-
istic and positive depiction of African-
Americans. It became mandatory view-
ing for soldiers entering the army in the
latter stages of the war and was shown in
.commercial theaters.
"It was kind of ironic because the
official Army policy at the time was still
segregation. You had a film which was
implicitly if not explicitly promoting inte-
gration," he said.
Films must be at least 10 years old to
be considered for the registry.
The oldest movies selected this year


are both from 1912. "The Cry of the
Children" is about the pre-World War I-
child labor reform movement, and "A
Cure for Pokeritis" stars John Bunny,
regarded as the American film industry's
earliest comic superstar.
"A lot of people would argue that
the humor is kind of dated," Leggett
said of Bunny's films mostly short
domestic comedies in which he played
a henpecked husband. "He really was a
major figure at the time. It doesn't help
your reputation when people like Charlie
Chaplin and Buster Keaton come after
you."
Chaplin's first feature, "The Kid"
(1921), was also chosen for the registry.
It was a big year for actress Sally
Field, who co-starred in "Forrest Gump."
"Norma Rae" (1979), featuring her Oscar-
winning performance as a single mother
who fought to unionize a Southern tex-
tile mill, also made this year's list.
Among the other titles chosen: "The
Big Heat," a 1953 film noir starring Glenn
Ford; "The Lost Weekend," Billy Wilder's
Oscar-winning alcoholism drama; "Porgy
and Bess," starring Sidney Poitier and
Dorothy Dandridge; "Stand and Deliver,"
starring Edward James Olmos as an
inspiring East Los Angeles math teacher;
and John Ford's epic 1924 Western '"The
Iron Horse."
Among the lesser-known titles chosen
this year, "A Computer Animated Hand"
(1972) by Pixar Animation Studios co-
founder Ed Catmull was one of the earli-
est examples of 3D computer-generated
imagery. The one-minute film shows a
hand turning, opening and closing.
Documentaries picked for the registry
include "Crisis: Behind a Presidential
Commitment," which focuses on Gov.
George Wallace's attempt to prevent two
African-American students from enroll-
ing in the University of Alabama and the
response of President John E Kennedy.
"Growing Up Female" from 1971 was
one of the first films to document the
women's liberation movement


CRUISER: Former firefighter

Continued From Page 1D


he will work the day shift. He said his
body will need time to adjust to waking
up early. "I'm not used to getting up at
3:30 unless it's for a fire call," he said.
As a new officer, Ford will train in
the field for 360 hours with Lake City
Police Department senior officer Staci
Brownfield.
Ford said being a bachelor made it
easier to make the switch. While train-
ing he did not have to worry about
supporting a family.
Ford said he looks forward to work-
ing with children as a police officer.
As a firefighter he was a public educa-
tion director. "A lot of kids don't like
cops. I want to change that perspec-
tive," he said.
Medical and first responder skills
learned as a firefighter are similar to
those learned in the police academy,
he said. "A lot of times police are the
first ones on the scene."
Knowing how to work with and
approach people is also skill Ford .said
he will take from the fire department


to the police department.
Growing up, Ford wanted to become
a firefighter or a police officer. "My
mom was scared of it," he said. Ford's
parents, Martine and Vivian Young,
also live in White Springs. Ford said
his mother would still prefer him to
work behind a desk.
Safety is a big concern for both
agencies, he said. "That's what I'm all
about. I want to go home every day."
Ford's parents were unable to make
his swearing in as they were visiting
his sister in Utah who recently had a
baby.
"Both agencies are filled with integ-
rity and traditions," Ford said of the
fire and police departments. "I'm
blessed to work for the city of Lake
City. I'm not kissing up. It's the truth."
Answering fire calls was a rush for
Ford. "I'm looking forward to that
rush as a police officer."
Ford said next time he changes
careers "it will be to retire."


60th wedding anniversary


Submitted

Friends and family gathered Saturday,
December 10 at First Christian Church of
Lake City to celebrate 60 years of marriage
of Charles and Pauline Hattenstein, mar-
ried December 8, 1951.
Charles, a native of Citronelle, Alabama
and Pauline,. a native of Wagoner,
Oklahoma have been residents of Lake


City for over 40 years. They have three
children, Carol Poole, Patricia Thompson,
and James Hattenstein; four grandchil-
dren, Lori Robbins, Melanie McCubbins,
Elizabeth Gallo and Phillip Thompson; and
two great-grandchildren, Jared Cornett
and Dalton Poole.
All present enjoyed a day of bar-b-q,
cake and pleasant memories.


COURTESY PHOTO


Pauline and Charles Hattenstein.


Stop by the .

Lake City Reporter F0 I

for your complimenttady-q

engagement p.kacge.
W 41


CHASTEEN'S: A Lake City favorite
Continued From Page 1D


for one of their homemade cookies or.
go for a heartier dessert like chocolate
delight, you won't be disappointed. Cake
slices are different every day but a favor-
ite is the hummingbird cake or the coco-
nut cake. Can't get much more Southern
than these two. So, when you are trying
to decide where to meet for lunch, go
downtown and join Robert and Emmy for
a tasty repast.
Have you ever found yourself with too
much to do and too little time and you
find yourself asking the question "What's
for dinner?" Chasteen's offers take and
bake casseroles that will get you out of


that pickle in a tasty hurry. Purchasing
a squash casserole and pumpkin delight
dessert that was enough to feed an army
sure saved us a lot of time during the
recent Thanksgiving holiday. No one at
the table even guessed they were "store
bought" They are that darn good!
Chasteen's is also available for catering
small or large gatherings.
Chasteen's is located at 204 North
Marion Avenue; 386-752-7504. You can
also follow them on Facebook to see their
daily specials.
Open Monday Friday 7:30 a.m. 2:00


MEMORIES: Wintertime explorers
Continued From Page 1D


below the frozen white world. That day of
adventure is still alive in my memories.
Make some memories with your chil-
dren and explore the wonders of nature.
We have many state parks where you


can make wonderful discoveries. Visit
http://natl.ifas.ufl.edu to learn about the
conservation area on campus where you
can learn more about ecology and biotic
diversity.


4lis e S.tqe

Complimentary
Engagement Package


K


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428














LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY. JANUARY 1, 2012 3D


DEAR ABBY



A new year gives each of us


the opportunity to start anew


DEAR READERS:
Welcome to 2012! While
the last year has been
tumultuous for many of us,
a new one is here, bring-
ing with it our chance for a
fresh start.
Today is the day we
discard destructive old
habits for healthy new
ones, and with that in
mind, I will share Dear
Abby's often-requested list
of New Year's Resolutions,
which were adapted by my
mother, Pauline Phillips,
from the original credo of
Al-Anon:
JUST FOR TODAY: I will
live through this day only. I
will not brood about yester-
day or obsess about tomor-
row. I will not set far-reach-
ing goals or try to overcome
all of my problems at once.
I know that I can do
something for 24 hours that
would overwhelm me if I
had to keep it up for a life-
time.
; JUST FOR TODAY: I will
be happy. I will not dwell on
thoughts that depress me. If
my mind fills with clouds, I
will chase them away and fill
it with sunshine.
JUST FOR TODAY: I will
accept what is. I will face
reality. I will correct those
things that I can correct and
accept those I cannot.
JUST FOR TODAY: I will
improve my mind. I will read
something that requires
effort, thought and concen-
tration. I will not be a mental


Abigail Van Buren
ww.deorobby.com

loafer.
JUST FOR TODAY: I will
make a conscious effort to
be agreeable. I will be kind
and courteous to those who
cross my path, and Ill not
speak ill of others. I will
improve my appearance,
speak softly, and not inter-
rupt when someone else is
talking.
Just for today, I will
refrain from improving any-
body but myself.
JUST FOR TODAY: I will
do something positive to
improve my health. If I'm
a smoker, I'll quit. If I am
overweight, I will eat health-
fully if only for today. And
not only that, I will get off
the couch and take a brisk
walk, even if it's only around
the block.
JUST FOR TODAY: I will
gather the courage to do
what is right and take the
responsibility for my own
actions.
And now, Dear Readers, I
would like to share an item
that was sent to me by I.J.
Bhatia, a reader who lives in
New Delhi, India:


DEAR ABBY: This year,
no resolutions, only some
guidelines. The Holy Vedas
say: "Man has subjected
himself to thousands of self-
inflicted bandages. Wisdom
comes to a man who lives
according to the true eternal
laws of nature."
The prayer of St. Francis
(of which there are several
versions) contains a power-
ful message:
Lord, make me an instru-
ment of your peace;
Where there is hatred, let
me sow love;
Where there is injury,
pardon;
Where there is do ibt,
faith;
Where there is despair,
hope;
Grant that I may not so
much seek to be consoled as
to console;
To be understood, as to
understand;
To be loved, as to love;
For it is in giving that we
receive,
It is in pardoning that we
are pardoned,
And it is in dying that we
'are born to Eternal Life.
And so, Dear Readers,
may this new year bring
with it good health, peace
and joy to all of you. -
LOVE, ABBY


Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April.
19): Figure out how you want
to proceed. This can be a
stellar year if you make the
right choices. Expand your
mind and your skills, and
incorporate what you know
into something that can raise
your earning potential. -***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Too much of anything
will be a bad way to start out
the new year. A short trip
that ends in time spent with
someone you respect will
help you get a better handle
on where you should put
your time and effort over the
next 12 months. ***A
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Avoid anyone who is
pushy or a situation that is
too physically challenging.
You don't have to prove
anything to anyone, so be
yourself. Offer kindness and
intelligent conversation and
you will win favors and admi-
ration. ***-
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Emotional matters will
surface if you get into discus-
sions with someone older or
with whom you have a his-
tory. Be careful not to burn
bridges with someone you


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

may need in your corner in
the near future. Avoid impul-
sive statements. ** 2)
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Take hold of your situation
and make things happen the
way you want them to. You
can control the outcome if
you are confident and you
market your skills and ser-
vices properly. It's a new
year and a new beginning.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Spend time with people who
understand you. A problem
at home can be rectified if
you are honest about the way
you feel and what you are
doing. Start the year off right
by putting an end to what
isn't working for you. -A**
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Emotions will lead to unpre-
dictable'behavior. Try not
to upset anyone with your
words or actions. Love is
on the rise, and putting out
positive energy will bring you
the same in return. Creative
ideas will flourish. ***-
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrty Cipher cryptograms Are crated from q.rotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another. ,
TODAY'S CLUE: D equals F
"OWT UTVFK K F KV FX GHJGPX OCAGP."
- LGMP J X WTH H TP
" TBTMP KTJ UTV F K K F K V Y CLTX D M C L
XCLT CO WTM UTV F K K F K V X TKA."
- XTKTYG
Previous Solution: "Year's end is neither an end nor a beginning but a going
on, with all the wisdom that experience can instill in us." Hal Borland
2012 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 1-2


21): A change of lifestyle will
help you regain your confi-
dence and send you down
profitable avenues. Consider
revisiting a venture you
started and never finished.
Greater opportunity is head-
ed your way. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): It's a new year
and a new beginning, time
for you to implement all the
changes and plans you've
been dreaming about. Open
your doors and your heart to
the people you want to share
your future with. Love is in
the stars. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Keep a low profile
and work secretively. Now
is not the time to share your
thoughts or your plans for
the future. Listen and offer
suggestions, but don't force
your will on others. Focus on
home, assets and improve-
ments. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): You'll be very convinc-
ing. Share your thoughts and
ask for help from those you
feel have something to offer
in return. Love is in the stars,
and planning a romantic eve-
ning will start the year off on
the right foot. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Say little, listen atten-
tively and focus on how you
can contribute to something
you feel strongly about. Your
presence will be felt if you
physically pitch in and help.
Don't let last-minute changes
disrupt your plans. *-A*


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


AIN'T HE SWEET By Elizabeth C. Gorski / Edited by Will Shortz 1 2 3 14 p 7 8,6 9 1 7 8112 9I1314 15 16 17 18 !9


Across
1 Arthur Honegger's
"A Christmas
8 Staring intently
13 "Scrooged" actor
Robert
20 Add a musical
track to, e.g.
21 Destroyed
23 Noted bride of
1969
24 Model for an art
class, say
25 "Stop stalling!"
26 Approach like an
eagle
27 Baptism, e.g.
28 Kid's block
30 Cozy footwear
31 '.'I could ___
horse!"
33 Japanese stringed
instrument
34 Journalist Joseph
36 Clearly happy
39 Goes for the
gold?
40 Spice organizers
43 Lose intensity
44 Fencing position
47 Crunchy snack
bit
50 Storage units
51 Piccadilly
movers
55 Roman "olive"
56 "Make _!"
58 "Unto us ___ is
given"
59 Salt flats locale
60 Carnivore's love.
62 Components
68 Getaway
planner?
70 -Newfangled
71 Actress Andie
73 Like some lines
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554. -


74 Pola of the
silents
76 Decoration on a
91- 101.iI-Across
"7N7 Mistreat
79 Predispositions
82 Score after deuce
84 "Hairspray" role
86 Young business
partner?
90 Bay Area airport,'
in shorthand
91 With 100-Across,
image revealed
by connecting
the circled
letters
alphabetically
95 Mozart's
birthplace: Abbr.
96 "Miracle on 34th
Street," e.g.
99 Medium skill
100 See 91-,Across
101 Cold war fighter
102 2001 film in
which 91-/100-
Across is a
character
104 Horsed around?
106 Shake up
109 Special ___
111 Chess champ
Mikhail
112 "Honey in the
Horn" trumpeter
113 "___ framed!"
115 Some toy
batteries
116 Beta preceder
119 Tone quality, in
music
121 Stuck
123 Wall St. deal
126 Singer Mitchell
1'28 Bronx and
Central Park
attractions
129 ___ good turn
132 Prepare, as
eggnog
133 Partridge's
preferred tree
134 Navigational
aid


136 Fictional planet
in "Flash
Gordon"
138. "Incidentally
140 Drive-thru
sandwich order
141 Crudit6s platter
centerpiece
145 Delicious
146 Org. in Tom
Clancy novels
147 Maternity ward
figures
149 Coffee order
151 Stipulations
153 Pacino and
Bundy
154 Eponymic town,
of
Cambridgeshire
155 Mediterranean
capital
156 Skip across the
water's surface
157 Certain pass:
Abbr.
158 Radio abbr.
159 Guinness suffix
160 1-Down's
warning
161 Mandatory coll.
course
162 Capt.'s guess

Down
1 Hooded menace
2 Benefit
3 "Drat!"
4 91-/100-Across,
often
5 Nabokov novel
6 Rock's Jethro ___
7 Proficient
8 Year in San Juan
9 "The Little
SMermaid' fellow
10 Cafeteria variety'
11 Mineral in
healing crystals
12 Rocker Brian
13 Video game
island
14 W.W. II
battleship


15 Ref's decision
16 Aid for making a
91-/100-Across
17 Cyclist's offer
18 Merge
19 Vintage records
21 Fan's fixation
22 Popeye's ___'
Pea
29 Fun-house
sounds.
32 Elves, to Santa:
Abbr.
35 -12
37 Part of many a
science course
38 Mis6rables"
39 '70s TV
production co.
41 Mao
contemporary
42 "Santa Baby"
singer
45 Camaro -Z
46 Paradise
47 Bulbous plant
part
48 Butter alternative
49 Actor Foxx
52 Bickering
53 High praise
54 Storage unit
57 Friend friend
58 Deaf talk: Abbr.
61 You are: Sp.
63 Serving well?
64 Public health
agcy.
65 French pronoun
66 Have
67 Composer Max
69 Sit still?
71 Calf-length
dresses
72 Hawaiian porch
75 Stormed
78 Star of
"Gunsmoke"?
79 Cellar, in
classified
80 Get an effort
81 De ___ (anew)


83 How Santa's
reindeer are
harnessed
85 Slights, say
87 Buster?
88 Winter bird
feeder food
89 Terse reproofs
92 Radiate
93 Mob turncoat
94 B'rith
97 Cousin
98 Californie, e.g.
102 Tunisian seaport
103 Males


105 16th-century
monarch credited
wi-th presenting
91-/100-
Acrosses to
guests
107 Sr.'s test
108 Light head?
110 "The 91-/100- .
Across," for one
112 "John Adams"
airer
114 Plopped down
on Santa's lap,
e.g.
116 Slumber party
togs


117 Relaxer for
Santa
118 Recovering
after injury, say
120 Swab
122 White lie
123 Small boat
danger
124 Some pudginess
125 Arm extension?
127 Sale item abbr.
129 Fails to
130 Carry-___
131 Spies, e.g.
133 Chem. class
measures


135 Capital of
Belarus
136 Boss's notes
137 Bouquets
139 Iraq's Aziz
141 Roman 950
142 Table d'___
143 Nile deity
144 Baby boxer, e.g.
146 Bopper
148 Maven
150 Brit's oath
152 Masseur
employer


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
MAORI SPUD TAC IT WEB
ASHEN OP I NE HALVE E A R
KING JAMESAVERS ION ISO
0 R I C MRAPR IL

ALCOTT ROAR-EDAT TORY

GENTLEAMEN AMASSED IA


OUR PEPPERACORN ESP



TONYAROMAS DARTABOARD
SHERR ENAMELED BATBO

MASSEUR BLM T PROBLEM





EEN LET IT I T SIZES NOMAR
RRS E|N S TAIS STAMP


3 6 42


84


4 5 6 9


5 4 7


1 7 3


1 2 8


2 9 6 3


8 5 4 2


3 6 2 97


-V L 6 9 8 L- 9 L


9 1 L V L I 6 8










L 9 L Z 8 V 9 6


6 L 9 8 9 L Z L



L 9 E 6 Z V 8 L 9


Z 7 8 LL 9 6 S 9


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415









) LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, JANUARY 1. 2012


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