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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01739
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 31, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01739
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






000015 120312 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Saturday, December 31, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 284 E 75 cents


Play it safe tonight, say police


New Year's Eve a
good time to be
'extra cautious.'

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. corn
An employee at USA Taxi in
Lake City doesn't expect to work
late tonight, -even though New
Year's Eve is typically a busy time
for taxi drivers in other munici-
palities.
"Lake City doesn't get busy on
New Year's Eve," Julio Alverez
said. "It's deader than a doornail.
The economy's bad and people
are on fixed incomes here."
Those who do attend parties
or go to bars in Lake City typical-
ly rely on friends for rides home,
or they walk, Alverez said.
While he hopes to work to the
wee hours giving rides to people
ringing in the New Year, Alverez
said he is uncertain how late he'll
work tonight.
"I'll be open until midnight and
then, if I don't see any action, I'll
be going home," he said.

SAFE continued on 3A


A bit
of the
bubbly
Tesha Boutwell,
a Lake City Food
Lion associate,
unloads a case
of Champagne
in preparation for
New Year's Eve.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Fresh start:


Local folks


share their


resolutions

By GABRIELLE BELLAMY
Special to the Reporter
As the clock strikes 12 tonight, a new year
will start and many will plan to start fresh:
"A new year, a new me." Starting fresh may
include a list of resolutions for the new year.
Of those who still make New Year's resolu-
tions, most stick to the same
*old plans to lose weight, quit
smoking or to enjoy life more.
SFor example, Jim Oney said
he wants to be happier, next


Oney


year.
An issue with making "New
Year's resolutions is keeping
them.
Heather Blair said she makes


the same resolution each year.
"I want to exercise and eat right and improve
my organizational skills," she said.
Blair said she has the same
resolution every year because
she never achieves it.
"I think people don't keep
resolutions because it has to
be more of a lifestyle change,"
she said.
Stephanie Tyson said her
resolution for 2012 is to lose Blair
weight
"I hope that one year I11
actually keep one," she said.
For encouragement, Tyson
said she and her co-workers
are setting a bet at work to see
who can stick with their resolu-
tion and lose the most weight.
"In general, people don't
keep their resolutions because
they set really high goals that
Tysonthey don't achieve within a
few weeks, or because they are
lazy," Tyson said.
Condrita Henderson said she is still com-
pleting her list of resolutions, but one thing
she would like to accomplish in
2012 is to be more patient.
Henderson said she chose
this because she has two young
children and also teaches.
"I plan to work on my resolu-U
tion as much as I can, but with-
in limits," she said. Patience is
something you have to work Henderson
on daily."
Mike Landis plans to eat less
and lose weight as a part of his New Year's
resolution.
"I'm doing it just to feel better," he said.
RESOLUTIONS continued on 3A


State was plenty, weird in 2011


Local pizzeria arson
among oddities noted
in Florida this year.

By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Did you hear
about the giant Lego man that washed
up on Siesta Key beach? What about the
man who walked into a bar, ordered a
beer and disappeared for 30 minutes to
rob a bank, only to return and finish his
drink? Or how about the puzzling story


of the baby grand piano that showed up
on a sandbar near Miami?
That's Florida, where weird is an
everyday event.
Over the past year, a 92-year-old
woman fired four shots at a neighbor
who refused to kiss her, a Delray Beach
man cut off a piece of a dead whale that
washed ashore planning to eat it -
and an 8-year-old girl gave her teacher
some marijuana and said: "This is some
of my mom's weed."
The piano was a mystery for about
a month. On Jan. 1, 2011, the charred
instrument showed up on a Biscayne
Bay sandbar,, a couple hundred yards


from shore. A 16-year-old student even-
tually admitted he put it there as part
of an art project A day after it was
removed, someone set up a table with
two chairs, place settings and a bottle
of wine.
It's still not clear how the 100-pound,
8-foot-tall Lego man washed ashore. The
local tourism bureau hoped to use Lego
man to promote the area, but the man
who found it has placed a claim on it.
He can keep it if the owner doesn't col-
lect it before early next year. As for the
bar-bank robber, he was arrested at his
WEIRD continued on 3A


Trading his
fire truck for
a cruiser

Lake City Mayor
Stephen Witt (left)
swears in Officer Gerald
Ford, the newest mem-
ber of the Lake City
Police Department, on
Thursday at City Hall.
Ford is a former member
of the Lake City Fire
Department. Ford said
it feels good to become
one of Lake City's finest.
'I have a desire to serve
and to still be an active
member of the com-
munity,' Ford said. 'It's
in my blood. I make this
uniform look good.' See
story in Sunday's Lake
City Reporter.


Verizon reverses on $2 payment fee


By PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer

NEW YORK After a customer
backlash, Verizon Wireless on Friday
dropped a plan to start charging $2 for
every payment subscribers make over
the phone or online with their credit or
debit cards.
In a statement on its website Friday,
the company said "customer feedback"
prompted the decision to drop the "con-
venience fee" it wanted to introduce on
Jan. 15.


Verizon wanted to steer people to
electronic check payments, which are
cheaper, and automatic credit card pay-
ments, which are more reliable.
A petition on Change.org against the
fees had gathered more than 95,000
names by Friday afternoon, a day after
Verizon, the country's largest cellphone
company, announced the fees. The peti-
tion was set up by Molly Katchpole,
who earlier this year started a success-
ful campaign to make Bank of America
drop a $5-per-month fee for debit-card
use.
Payment processors for power com-


panies usually charge "convenience
fees" of up to $5 for every payment
made by phone or online, but cell-
phone companies haven't taken the
step yet. The furor against Verizon
hints that they may have to wait fur-
ther.
Verizon Wireless serves 91 million
phones and other devices on accounts
that pay the company directly, and
more who pay indirectly through
other companies. It's a joint venture
of Verizon Communications Inc. of
New York and Vodafone Group PLC
of Britain.


I ,,in!CALLUS:- .- .
(386) 752-1293 / A
SUBSCRIBE TO Patchy a.m. fog
THE REPORTER: Patchy .m. fog
Voice: 755-5445
i : .JI... Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A
4h t', ^/J' -WM ^ ; ~ -' .-.*M&'' W|4-u*i'( i.


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Opinion . .. .. .
People .
Advice & Comics ..
Puzzles


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE SUNDAY
Perry, Brand Top 10 local
splitting up. stories of 201 I.









2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2011


FLORIDA' W dn s a4y
IV Wednesday:- H Friday: Friday:
3-14-40-42-45-51 \t.. Afternoon: 1-4-7 % -. Afternoon: 3-0-3-3
x2


LOS ANGELES Russell Brand is
divorcing Katy Perry after 14 months
of what appeared to be a storybook
marriage.
"Sadly, Katy and I are ending our
marriage," Brand said in a statement
released to The Associated Press on
Friday. "Ill always adore her and I
know well remain friends."
Brand, 36, offered no other details,
but in papers filed Friday in Los
Angeles Superior Court, the British
comedian cited irreconcilable differ-
ences.
He and the 27-year-old pop singer
were married in October 2010 at
a resort inside a tiger reserve in
India, and their mutual affection had
become a rather sweet feature of the
Hollywood celebrity circuit
The couple announced their
engagement in January 2010 after
meeting at the 2009 MTV Video Music
Awards, where Brand hosted and she
performed.
The comedian, who once struggled
with substance abuse, was effusive
about his bride while promoting proj-
ects earlier this year, saying marry-
ing Perry has "given me much more
strength in what I do."
"For a long while, what I do pro-
fessionally was all that mattered to
me really," he said in March. "Now I
think, well, whatever I do, I'll just go
back to her, and that's incredibly com-
forting."
A representative for Perry, whose
name is listed as Katheryn Elizabeth
Hudson in the divorce papers, did
not immediately return a call seeking
comment
The Internet had been abuzz
recently with rumors about possible
trouble for thecouple after they were
seen during the holidays without their
wedding rings.
Perry's run of No. 1 singles earned
her the distinction of becoming MTVs


W7Cli-


Thursday:
2-27-28-31-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Perry, Brand split after 14 months


RIVERSIDE, Calif Etta James'
manager says the terminally ill blues
singer is breathing on her owin after
being taken off a respirator.
Lupe De Leon says Friday that the
change in her condition is great news
and that the singer's blood pressure is
normal.
De Leon says James was put on a
respirator when she was hospitalized in
Southern California on Dec. 21 because
she was having trouble breathing.
James has been diagnosed with
terminal leukemia and is suffering
from dementia. She has been receiving


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 19 photo, British actor Russell Brand and wife Katy Perry arrive for the
European premiere of "Arthur," in London.


first artist-of the year earlier this
month.


mostly at-home care.
Earlier this month, a judge set aside
$350,000 for her medical care.


NEW YORK After bringing back
George Stephanopoulos to replace
Christiane Amanpour on Sunday's
"This Week" political talk show,
ABC is making a change behind the
scenes as well.
The network's news president,
Ben Sherwood, said Friday that Jon
Banner will replace Rick Kaplan
as the show's executive producer.
Banner was a longtime producer of
"World News" before taking on a
wider role recently at ABC News.
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Actor Sir Anthony
Hopkins is 74.
Actress Sarah Miles
is 70.
Rock musician Andy
Summers is 69.
Actor Sir Ben
Kingsley is 68.
Producer-director
Taylor Hackford is 67.
Fashion designer
Diane von Furstenberg is
65.
Actor Tim Matheson


is 64.
Pop singer Burton
Cummings (The Guess
Who) is 64.
Singer Donna
Summer is 63.
Actor Joe Dallesandro
is 63.
Rock musician Tom
Hamilton (Aerosmith) is
60.
Actor Val Kilmer is 52.
Pop singer Joe
McIntyre is 39.


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online.... www.iakectyreporter.comn
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of'
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau:of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All matelal herein Is property of the Lake
.City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or
in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter P.RO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecltyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10.30 a.m., next'day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued:
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ...................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks ................ $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Ex-lesbian couple
seeks rights
ORLANDO A Florida
. appellate court says two
former lesbian partners
both have parental rights
to a daughter who was
born with one mother
donating the egg and. the
other mother giving birth
to the baby.
The Fifth District Court
of Appeal in Daytona
Beach last week over-
turned a lower court deci-
sion that had been made in
favor of the birth mother.
The appellate court says
the biological mother's
constitutional rights to
equal protection and pri-
vacy were violated with the
lower court decision. The
Brevard County judge said
in his ruling he had felt
constrained by Florida law
and was hoping the appel-
late court reversed his
decision.
The appellate court has
asked that the Florida
Supreme Court weigh in,
given the importance of
the matter.

Man kicked off
due to Facebook
SARASOTA A Florida
man has been removed
from a civil trial jury after
sending a Facebook friend
request to one of the
defendants.
The Sarasota Herald-
Tribune reports Jacob
Jock arrived for jury duty
Dec. 12. He was placed in
a jury pool for a personal
injury lawsuit from a traf-
fic accident-case. That's
when he used his phone to
access Facebook and see if
he knew anyone involved.
Jock says he acciden-
tally sent a friend request
to one of the defendants,
Violetta Milerman.
He was selected to serve
on the jury and Milerman
informed her attorney
about the friend request
the next day. Jock was dis-


missed.
Senior Circuit Judge
Nancy Donnellan admon-
ished him for violating
her instructions on not to
discuss the case or use the
Internet to find informa-
tion.

Soldier charged
in son's murder
CRESTVIEW- A ,
Panhandle soldier and his
fiance face charges of
child abuse and neglect
in the death of the man's
2-year-old son.
The Northwest Florida
Daily News reported
that 27-year-old Army
Sgt Grant Sherwin and
his fiancee, 26-year-old
Nichole Marie Allen, were
arrested late Thursday
after Allen's son was
found dead by emergency
responders. .
The boy's twin sister
was taken into protective
custody.
According to inves-
tigators, emergency
crews went to the home
Wednesday evening after
the couple called 911.
Emergency workers told
police that they found
2-year-old Logan malnour-.
ished and with numerous
bruises on his body.

Man shot after he


MIAMI BEACH A
Miami Beach police
officer fatally shot a
man who authorities say
refused to put down his
gun in a dispute early
Fiiday.
Police spokeswoman
Deborah Doty said the
officer was called regard-
ing a disturbance in
South Beach at about
4:45 a.m. Two groups
of people had gathered
across the street from the
Mansion nightclub. When
the officer arrived he saw
a man with a gun.
Witnesses told investi-


gators the officer asked
the man repeatedly to
put down the gun but he
refused, Doty said.
The officer, who has
not been identified, fired
twice, striking the man in
the torso. He was taken
to Jackson Memorial
Hospital, where he later
died.

Injured man steals
ambulance, caught
TAMPA While rescue
workers were attending to
a patient, someone drove.
away in their ambulance
parked outside a Tampa
home.
Police say it drove away
with its lights flashing
about 10:30 p.m. Thursday.
A GPS unit tracked the
ambulance and Tampa
police stopped the suspect
without incident.
Police say 39-year-old
Hubert Lee Credit told
them he had been beaten
up by four men. He decid-
ed to drive himself to the
hospital in an ambulance.
Police say Credit had
a puncture wound on his
head and was taken to
Tampa General Hospital
for treatment. Credit now
faces auto burglary and
grand theft auto charges.
Jail records did not list an
attorney for Credit.


body leads to jail
ST. PETERSBURG A
man faces charges of fail-
ing to report a'death to
the medical examiner after
deputies say he wrapped
his brother's body in black
trash bags and left him in
the trash bin at a mobile
home park.
Pinellas County Sheriff's
deputies arrested 52-year-
old Ricky Boutwell early
Friday after a woman who
was taking her trash out
saw the body under a dis-
carded mattress.
(AP)


THE WEATHER


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75/54 Lake Clty
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nm Bech Ocala
/61 0, Orlando
iderdale Panama City
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Miami Tampa
78/64 Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


LAKECITYALMANA


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7a lp
Saturday


- Frecastedlemperature


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.,
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonride torn.
Moonset tom.


r 72
38
66
43
83 In 1990
19 in 1961

0.00"
0.49"
33.38"
2.46"
48.26"


7p la
Sunday


"Fmklille"tnpetinr


7:27 a.m.
5:41 p.m.
7:27.a.m.
5:41 p.m.

11:43 a.m.

12:14 p.m.
12:37 a.m.


0036O
Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
1 9 16 23
First Full Last New


On this date in
2008, southwestern
Lower Michigan
finished one of the
snowiest months
on record. Monthly
snow totals over
the region included
88.7 inches at Hart
and 68.6 inches
at Muskegon,
Michigan.


5

30nm isbt.ui
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
'^ ''^


75/56, s
76/51/s
77/60/s
79/55/s
74/45/pc
74/46/s
77/67/pc
75/41/pc
77/62/s
76/59/s
75/47/pc
77/55/s
70/40/s
69/38/pc
73/37/s
76/54/s
72/37/pc
76/61/s


67i/47.pc
65/41/pc
75/51/pc
72/43/pc
61/34/s
61/37/s
74/57/pc
61/31/s
75/53/pc
74/48/s
64/37/s
64/43/pc
54/31/s
54/31/s
54/26/s
67/41/pc
54/27/s
73/54/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


S1 Forecasts, data and
; 0t- graphics 0 2011 Weather
l'o Y Central, IP, Madison, Wis.
weateJ www.weatherpubllsher.com


GtConnected


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Daily Scripture
"I have told you these things, so
that in me you may have peace.
In this world you will have trou-
ble. But take heart! I have over-
come the world."

John 16:33 NIV


Etta James gets better,
taken off respirator Executive change at
ARC's 'This Week'


AROUND FLORIDA


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WEIRD: Sunshine State produced plenty of odd new stories in 2011
Continued From Page 1A


watering hole, not too long
after the holdup.
Author Tim Dorsey,
whose novels include
Florida strangeness both
real and fantasy, said
the state is an odd place
because of its diverse, high-
ly transient population.
'There's pockets of
strangeness all over the
country, but here it's a
baseline lifestyle. There,
it's the aberration. There,
it's the tail end of the bell
curve. Here, it's the peak
of the bell curve," Dorsey
said.
It's probably why Lego
man received more media
attention than the $1.25
million worth of cocaine
that washed up on a beach
south of Port Canaveral in
September and the $2.2 mil-
lion in cocaine that washed
up on a Fort Pierce beach
the next month. There are
a lot of odd qrug stories in
Florida.
Like the Boynton Beach
Police Department's 2010
"Officer of the Year" who
was accused of selling
drugs in 2011. Or the mari-
juana found growing on the
property of Oak Hill's 84-
year-old mayor.
There were also several
younger Floridians that
contributed to this year's'
odd news.
In Palm Beach County,
an elementary school
teacher opened an end-of-
the-year gift from an 8-year-
old student's grandmother
- and found toiletries
and a loaded handgun. A


Tampa woman upset with
her 15-year-old son's bad
grades forced him to stand
on a street corner with a
sign that read: "Honk if I
need an education."
A 15-year-old Florida
Keys girl who is a big fan
of the 'Twilight" books and
movies was afraid that her
mother would get upset by
the bite marks her boy-
friend gave her after they
acted out her vampire fan-
tasy. She made up a story
about being attacked;
doubtful investigators got
her to tell the truth.
Deputies arrested an
18-month-old's father after
they found the man passed
out in his mobile home
while the toddler was in the
yard picking up beer cans
and drinking from them.
Pasco County deputies,
said a woman walked into a
bank with a 3-year-old boy
and robbed it. A homeless
man held up a Tampa bank,
fled on a city bus and hand-
ed out stolen cash to pas-
sengers. Police say a man
robbed a Gainesville credit
union then began throwing
money from his car as he
fled on Interstate 75.
And while he didn't rob
it, an unhappy Palm Coast
bank customer left quite
a deposit. He urinated in
a drive-through bank tube
and drove off.
Animals always account
for a fair share of odd
news. At the Miami air-
port, a Brazilian trying to
get through security was
caught with several baby


pythons and tortoise hatch-
lings in his underwear. A
woman found a 7-foot alli-
gator in her bathroom, and
a man stored his dead cou-
gar in a freezer.
Wildlife officers arrested
two men with sacks con-
taining about 260 alliga-
tor hatchlings near Lake
Apopka. A 10-foot gator
attacked an Alachua County
sheriff's cruiser, damaging
the front bumper as the
office waited for a trapper.
A Jupiter condominium
association is requiring
residents to pay for DNA
testing for their dogs so
they can track down who
doesn't pick up their pooch-
es' poop. Offending poop is
mailed to Tennessee where
a company seeks a match.
A dog ate $1,000 in cash
a St. Augustine couple left
on a table.
Among creatures found
in Florida pools were an
alligator, a python, a bear
and a retired racehorse.
A Fort Pierce woman
came to her husband's res-
cue when a cow attacked
him, ramming the animal
several times with a pickup
truck and then picking up
a pistol and shooting it in
the face.
In an unusual crime sto-
ries, two managers of a
Lake City Domino's Pizza
were charged with burning
down a rival Papa John's as
a way to increase business.
Two deaf men using sign
language were stabbed at a
Hallandale Beach bar when
another costumer thought


they were flashing gang
signs.
Police in St. Petersburg
said two would-be carjack-
ers forced a couple out of
their car at gunpoint, but
then ran away after they
couldn't figure out how to
drive a stick shift.
A North Naples man who
was pulled over for a traf-
fic violation called 911 and
reported a shooting nearby
to get out of a ticket. He
still got a ticket and was
also charged with making
a false 911 call.
A Lake County jail
inmate discovered a glitch
in the phone system that
reimbursed him twice for
calls that didn't connect, so
he made a lot of them and
hung up. He earned more
than $1,250, which he used
to post bond. Later that day,
he was charged with grand
theft.
Investigators found a
piece of severed finger
inside a glove near a house
that had been set on fire
and used it to track down
the arsonist.
In other odd fiery news,
a man in Fort Lauderdale
injured himself when he
was smoking a cigarette
while using an oxygen
machine and the unit
exploded. A Fort Walton
Beach man set his house
on fire while smoking a
cigarette and cleaning his
foot with rubbing alcohol.
A Boynton Beach man
splashed rubbing alcohol
on his roommate's boxer
shorts and set them on fire


because he was late with
the rent In similar fashion,
but perhaps for a different
reason, a Marion County
woman was charged with
setting her boyfriend's gen-
ital area on fire.
A Flagler County woman
who bought what she
thought was a novelty ciga-
rette lighter called authori-
ties when it turned out to be
a real, though not live, gre-
nade. Police in Greenacres
evacuated a neighborhood
when a woman digging in
her yard uncovered a World
War II-era grenade and a
Jacksonville man found a
World War II-era bazooka
round while tearing down
a shed
A celebrity boxing pro-
moter sued Jose Canseco
when the former baseball
star sent his identical twin
Ozzie to the bout instead.
A Pensacola Toyota deal-
er lost a $7.5 million law-
suit filed by an Iranian-born
competitor. The lawsuit
said the dealer told custom-
ers that his competitor was
funneling money to terror-
ists and called his business
"Taliban Toyota."
A South Florida man
accidentally threw out his
wife's engagement ring
then went to the dump the
next day and sifted through
a 9-ton pile of trash. He
found it.
Not that romance always
flourished in Florida. A
Broward County woman
was arrested after holding
a steak knife to her hus-
band's throat and demand-


ing he sign divorce papers.
A Gainesville woman
was arrested after her ex-
boyfriend accused4 her of
throwing an urn with his
mother's ashes through
a window and an Orange
County man lay down in
front of a car to try to stop
his girlfriend from leaving
after a fight. But the driv-
er didn't see him and he
was run over. Panama City
police say a man crashed
through a Waffle House
while trying to run over
his wife, a waitress at the
restaurant.
Deputies said a Walmart
employee in Naples pepper
sprayed a coworker and
then bit the tip off her fin-
ger after hearing a rumor
that the victim was sleep-
ing with the attacker's hus-
band.
And in just plain odd
news, an Ocala ice cream
shop got rid of its cos-
tumed mascot a wav-
ing vanilla cone because
passers-by kept mistaking
him for a hooded Ku Klux
Klansman.
Also, a woman with two
uteruses gave birth to
twins in Clearwater- one
from each.
And speaking of uterus-
es, a Democratic lawmaker
accused the House speaker
of admonishing him for say-
ing the word during floor
debate, a charge Speaker
Dean Cannon denied. Still
Democratic lawmakers and
others around the Capitol
began wearing pink buttons
that simply said "UTERUS."


Newt Gingrich weeps, Mitt Romney attacks Ron Paul


By DAVID ESPO and
SHANNON MCCAFFREY
Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa
- Former House Speaker
Newt Gingrich wept Friday
as he recalled his late
mother's end-of-life illness-
es, a moment of poignan-
cy in a notably negative
Republican presidential
Iowa caucus campaign with
four unpredictable days yet
to run.
"I do policy much eas-
ier than I do personal,"
Gingrich told an audience
of women as he tried to
regain his composure. The
tears flowed as the former
speaker was responding to
questions about his mother
from a pollster and long-
time political ally.
Gingrich's emotional
moment came as his rivals
engaged in traditional cam-
paign tactics, and as polls
suggested large numbers
of Iowa Republicans could
change their minds before
caucuses Tuesday night
provide the first test of the
2012 campaign.
Former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney sought
to marginalize his closest
pursuer in most polls, say-
ing, "I don't think Ron Paul
represents the mainstream
of Republican thought with


regards to issues, particu-
larly in foreign policy."
Paul gave no ground. "I
really can't conceive" of inter-
vening militarily to prevent
Iran from acquiring nuclear
weapons, he said, unequivo-
cally restating his position
'on an issue on which he
differs with Romney and his
other rivals.
Former Pennsylvania
Sen. Rick Santorum, claim-
ing momentum based on
recent polls, told reporters
he recently hid the best
fundraising day of his can-
didacy' Yet he also drew
criticism from Texas Gov.
Rick Perry for advocating
earmarks during two terms
in the Senate.
Minnesota Rep. Michele
Bachmann. became the lat-
est presidential hopeful to
hold a campaign event with
Iowa Rep. Steve King -
and the latest to hear him
say he wasn't ready to give
his endorsement
Whatever the impact of
Gingrich's tears on the race
for the White House, the
episode seemed destined
to be replayed endlessly
on televisions, personal
computers and hand-held
devices.
That was the case near-
ly four years ago, when
Hillary Rodham Clinton
appeared to choke back


tears while campaigning
in New Hampshire a few
days before the state's
Democratic presidential
primary. The episode also
became the subject of
intense political analysis.
Clinton won the primary in
an upset a few days later.
Gingrich was surging in
the polls a little more than
a week ago, but was hit by
a barrage of negative ads
and has been struggling
in recent days. Normally
a combative politician, he
shed tears as he appeared
before a group of mothers
and responded to a ques-
tion from Frank Luntz, a
Republican pollster and
longtime ally of the former
speaker.
Asked about his mother
and an event in his life that
influenced his policies and
views, Gingrich recalled
her as happy and having
friends before she ended.
up in a long-term care facil-
ity suffering from bipolar
disease, depression and
physical ailments.
"My whole emphasis
on brain science comes in
directly from dealing with
the real problems of real
people," he said, his face
distorting as he began to
cry. "And so it's not a theo-
ry. It's, in fact, my mother,"
he said.


Kathleen "Kit" Gingrich
died in 2003. She was 77.
Romney, who leads in
most polls in Iowa, criti-
cized Paul in an interview
with Fox News Channel.
"I don't think Ron Paul
represents the mainstream
of Republican thought with
regards to issues, particu-
larly in foreign policy,"
he said, referring to the
Texan's statement that
he would oppose military
action to prevent Iran from
acquiring nuclear weap-
ons.
At the same time he
said Paul was outside the
GOP mainstream, Romney
pledged to support who-
ever wins the party's nomi-
nation to oppose President
Barack Obama in the fall.
Campaigning later in
western Iowa, Paul said he
would probably have dif-
ficulty voting for any of the
other Republicans in the
race if they win the party
nomination. "They all are
part of the status quo," he
said.
After months of campaign-
ing and millions of dollars
in television commercials,
the polls depicted a race as
unsettled and unpredictable
as any in the four decades
since Iowa's caucuses
became the kickoff event in
presidential campaigns.


A pair of surveys in the
last five days suggested
upwards of a third of all
potential caucus-goers had
not firmly settled on a can-
didate of choice.
The same polls made


Romney the front-runner,
and his decision to leave
for a quick trip to New
Hampshire and then return
to Iowa and stay through
caucus night projected
optimism.


RESOLUTIONS: Fresh start
Continued From Page 1A


He said he plans to accomplish his
resolution by eating better foods and
working outmore.
"I hope I can stick with it," he said.
"I've been able to stick with my reso-
lutions pretty good in the past."
Kirti Chaudhari's New Year's reso- Landis
lution is to increase sales at his busi-
ness.
"I want to make a bigger profit,"
he said.
Chaudhari said this was his first
year making a New Year's resolu-
tion.
Marsha Lundin plans to travel
more, which includes taking a trip Chaudhari
with her mom and some friends to
Pennsylvania.
"I'm tracing my family roots. I want
to find out more about my family,"
she said.
Lundin said she has been looking
up her family's history on her pater-
nal side for the past three years and
that she is excited to finally take this
trip. Lundin


SAFE: Use designated driver, don't advertise NewYear's Eve plans online
Continued From Page 1A


For those who want to tempt fate by not
planning ahead for a ride home after a night of
partying, local law enforcement officials said
that could be a costly mistake.
Lt. Pat Riordan, a Florida Highway Patrol
spokesman, said extra troopers will be on coun-
ty roads, including the DUI Wolfpack.
'"They will be looking for impaired driving,"
he said. "A taxi ride is a lot cheaper than a DUI
arrest The million-dollar question is is it worth
it to alter the rest of your life?"
And it's not just the prospect of a DUI that
should concern people. Riordan said an esti-
mated one-third of all fatal wrecks are alcohol
related.
Lt. Joe Lucas,; a Columbia County deputy,
said the sheriff's office will have extra patrols
on county roads. He said people should plan
ahead for what they will do after the party's
over.
Law enforcement officials recommend a taxi,
designated driver or calling a sober friend for a
ride home.
"It's the time of year when you want to be extra
cautious," Lucas said. "When you drink, drink
socially, be sensible and know when to stop."


Besides planning ahead how to get home,
law enforcement officials have some advice for
anyone going to a bar or restaurant for a party
tonight.
They recommend bringing only what you
need in your handbag or wallet, such as driver's
license, cash and only one credit card. Don't
take department store credit cards, gift cards or
other valuables you might normally carry.
Avoid sharing your New Year's Eve plans on
social media sites because you are publicly tell-
ing others that you won't be home.
Avoid being on the road between 8 p.m. and 2
a.m. because that's when most New Year's Eve
accidents occur.
Do not leave drinks unattended. Finish it
before you hit the restroom or dance floor.
Eat food and drink water or non-alcoholic
beverages between alcoholic ones.
Watch for intoxicated pedestrians on the way
home.
If you are walking, do not go alone as you
may be setting yourself up for an attacker.
Call police if you see anything suspicious or
illegal.
It's also the responsibility of those throwing a


party to watch out for their guests, Lucas said.
Law enforcement officials recommend mak-
ing sure all smoke alarms are working and have
fresh batteries.
Have phone numbers handy for a taxi com-
pany, emergency contacts and poison control.
Have guests turn their keys to you upon
arrival and put them in a secure place to ensure
everyone has a safe ride home.
Have two colors of cups: One for adult bever-
ages and one for non-alcoholic ones.
If cups are unattended for a while, dump
them, especially if children or pets are around.
Do not serve alcohol to minors, even in the
presence of parents. It could result in criminal
charges.
Have plenty of food and snacks available so
guests aren't drinking on an empty stomach.
Stop serving alcohol at a pre-determined
time and stick to it. t
Extinguish all burning candles before the
end of the party.
Be prepared to let guests stay the night as an
alternative to driving them home after drink-
ing.
And have a safe, happy New Year!


Iette & Von

?*
q









From your

Hubby &

"Butter


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Saturday, December 31, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


ONE
OPINION


'Occupy,'

'pragmatic,'

words of

the year?


recently
announced that
its top word
of the year is
"pragmatic." Is it too punny of
us to note that it was a logical
choice?
The word was looked up so
many times on the company's
online dictionary that publish-
ers had no choice but to be, as
the word is defined, practical,
realistic, hardheaded, sensible,
matter-of-fact or down-to-earth
about the decision.
It is a word that we are so
often asked to be, and so often
by people who do it much too
well, at times at the expense of
compassion Congress, CEOS
and other authority figures, just
to name a few.
But we're not sure that this
is the season to emphasize,
as John Morse, president and
publisher of the dictionary com-
pany told the Associated Press,
"practicality over frivolity."
For this is the time of year in
which we are fanciful and some-
times foolish and whimsical
and other words also found
in Merriam-Webster that
indicate we've reverted to child-
hood, at least for a time.
"Austerity" was 2010's top
word. In 2009, it was "admonish."
And, as you might recall, "bail-
out" was the big one for 2008.
Sadly, other words making the
top 10 list this year include some
we'd rather not use in reference
to ourselves or friends: ambiva-
lence, insidious and vitriol.
We have other wordsmiths
out there who designate words
of the year. A good bet for the
American Dialect Society is
"occupy," not so much because
people need to look it up for
a definition but because it is
a word in the American con-
sciousness. According to AP,
the group's annual choice
refers to a word that "mem-
bers consider widely used,
demonstrably new or popular
and reflects the year's popular
- discourse."
Which "occupy" does.

Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Youths' support for


Ron Paul misplaced


In the 20-plus years that.
I have worked as a con-
servative activist, I've
spoken on almost 200
university campuses
- usually to Republican and con-
servative groups.
Over time, have observed
changes in attitude among
many young Republicans and I
believe these shifts help explain
the rise of Ron Paul.
When I first started lectur-
ing early in the 1990s, leading
heroes of Republican youth
were Ronald Reagan and
William E Buckley Jr.
Individual freedom, respect
for constitutional limitations
on government and traditional
values was the message. There
was a sense of purpose. America
was a "shining city on a hill,"
as Reagan so often quoted the
Puritan pilgrim John Winthrop.
Now, increasing numbers of
my campus hosts ask that I not
talk about "values." Leave out
the stuff about marriage, family
and abortion, please, and jur#
talk about the economy.
The materialism and moral
relativism that created our left-
wing culture is now infecting
our youth on the right. Young
Republicans may be pushing
back on government, but too
often their motivation is like
that of their left-wing contem-
poraries: a sense of entitlement
and a desire to claim rights,
with little interest in corre-
sponding personal responsibili-


Star Parker
parker@urboncure.org
ties.
David Yepsen, who directs
the Paul Simon Public Policy
Institute at Southern Illinois
University Carbondale, recently
described Ron Paul's success
as a "resurgence of the libertar-
ian and isolationist wings of the
Republican Party," resulting
from "hard times and unpopular
wars."
But overlooked is the impor-
tant role of youth.
Among registered
Republicans and Republican-
leaning independents who sup-
port Paul, 67 percent are under
age 34. Among supporters for
former Massachusetts Gov.
Mitt Romney and former House
- Speaker Newt Gingrich, such
youths account for 37 percent
and 20 percent, respectively.
And youth have been critical
in Paul's ground organization. I
watched this play out when Paul
won the straw poll at the Values
Voter Summit in Washington,
where I spoke last October.
Busloads of youthful Paul
supporters arrived just to hear
his speech and to pay and regis-
ter so that they could vote. They


put him over the top.
They have little interest in
a Reagan-like "shining city on
a hill" message, or talk about
a threatening "evil empire"
abroad.
To the contrary, they are
excited by the "leave me alone"
candidate who thinks the rest
of the world is not our busi-
ness. Apparently, they share
Paul's indifference to the loom-
ing threat of a nuclear Iran or
the almost complete absence
of freedom in most Islamic
nations.
Self-centered materialism,
which leads our youth to sup-
port such indifference- to global
realities, is also driving the col-
lapse of the American family.
Census Bureau statistics
show that today 20 percent of
Americans ages 18 to 29 are
married. Fifty years ago, 59 per-
cent of them were.
In his farewell speech,
Reagan issued a warning to the
nation: "Are we doing a good
enough job teaching our chil-
dren what America is and what
she represents in the long his-
tory of the world?" *
I doubt that Ron Paul's vision
of America is what Reagan had
in mind.


* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


Orthodoxy doesn't justify

oppressing women


Did it ever occur to
you that men who
practice a radical
form of whatever
religion they pro-
fess have one thing in common:
a distrust of women that mostly
manifests itself in abusiveness
to one degree or another? They
use the term "orthodoxy" to jus-
tify the most bizarre demands
on their mothers, sisters, wives
and lovers.
Muslim radicals in many
societies enforce incredible
dress codes on females who
wander around like specters in
black shrouds, some with only
their eyes showing. In many
villages in the Middle East, a
woman seen without such garb
is subjected to severe punish-
ment and Allah help her if she
is the victim of a sexual assault
or strays from the dictates of
family arrangements with the
opposite sex. Stoning is on the
list, if male relatives don't do
her harm first for the sake of
family honor.
Even in some American
Christian churches and syna-
gogues, wqmen are excluded
from holding office or partici-
pating in policy decisions. They
also must adhere to codes in
dress and behavior that even
Christ would find disturbing.
They literally have few rights


Dan K.Thomasson
outside their subservient wifely
duties in and out of bed.
All this occurred to me,while
reading a story about an "ortho-
dox" group of Jewish radicals
who put up official-looking signs
in their Israeli neighborhoods
that prohibit women from walk-
ing on the same side of the street
as the sect's house of worship.
Since Israel considers itself
a modern, democratic country
where freedom is granted to
everyone, government officials
did not take this obvious public
relations disaster kindly and
ordered the signs removed.
Once they were gone, however,
the ignoramuses made card-
board replicas and a large ban-
ner with red lettering and put
them up again. The justification
for the sidewalk ban was that
men would be uncomfortable
if they had to confront women
outside the synagogue.
Clearly, the Israeli govern-
ment is concerned about the sit-
uation in Beit Shemesh, where


religious zealots assaulted tele-
vision crews and faced off with
police, pelting them with rocks
and eggs. The confrontation
reportedly was driven by media
reports that they earlier had spit
upon and insulted young school-
girls for what they considered
insufficiently modest dress.
As we enter the 13th year of
the new century, there have
been some gains in women's
rights. But the fact that Iran
now is requiring women to be
swathed from head to toe leads
me to believe that maybe the
setbacks equal the gains. There
is even a growing official con-
cern in Israel about the growing
influence of religious zealots in
public life. Israel, with its love
of western culture and freedom,
could be expected to be the last
place this would occur.
Americans are facing death in
Afghanistan every day to assure
that an oppressive regime of
religious crazies doesn't return
to overturn the gains made by
women who they once treated
like chattel, denying them edu-
cation, the right to work, equal
protection under the law and
any modern benefits of free-
dom. From that standpoint, it is
a noble cause.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


ANOTHER
VIEW



Hands


off the


Internet



again is about
to expand the
ability of federal
bureaucrats to cen-
sor the Internet. Earlier this
month, the House Judiciary *
Committee began marking up
the Stop Online Piracy Act, a
bill designed to force domain
registrars and search engines
such as Google to erase any
mention of websites the attor-
ney general declares "rogue."
Hollywood, one of the big-
gest campaign backers of judi-
ciary committee members, has
been pushing the legislation
to make what it calls "foreign
infringing websites" disappear.
Tinseltown is desperate to pin
the blame for its dismal per-
formance on pirates. This year,
fewer movie tickets were sold
than at any point since 1996.
Studio executives would have
us believe the $500 billion drop
in domestic box-office receipts
has nothing to do with what's
playing at the theater or inter-
est in legitimate alternatives to
the cinema.
The top 10 flicks for 2011
consisted of eight sequels
and remakes plus a pair
of movies based on comic
books. Gucci-wearing lob-
byists have convinced
their favorite members of
Congress that instead of
forking over $8 to view
these retreads on the silver
screen, the public has been
downloading first-run films
off the Internet in droves to
watch on their tiny computer
monitors. The Motion Picture
Association of America says'
such activity costs the major
studios billions of dollars a
year and more legislation is
needed to restore the indus-
try.
Of course, it's already
illegal to use a camcorder
or other device to record
a movie in a theater, and
such laws are often taken to
absurd extremes. In 2007, a
19-year-old girl was arrested
at the Ballston Common
mall in Arlington for record-
ing 20 seconds' worth of the
film 'Transformers" that she
intended to share with her
brother. Congress made it a
felony to copy "any part" of
a motion picture, with those
convicted facing up to three
years in jail and a $250,000
fine.
Upping the ante by giving
the administration expedited
ability to shut down websites at
the request of major campaign
contributors is going too far.
If the motion-picture industry
spent less time in Washington
and more time coming up
with original ideas, its product
might be more appealing to
consumers, who have more
entertainment options at their
disposal than ever.
Video-game maker
Activision bragged earlier this
month that sales of the latest
edition of Call of Duty reached
$1 billion within 16 days,
crushing this year's top film
and beating 2009's blockbuster
"Avatar." The public spent a
total of $18.6 billion feeding
their PlayStations and Xboxes
last year $8 billion more than
went to movie studios. That
proves there's plenty of money
to be made as long as the con-
tent is of high quality.
Congress shouldn't enact
draconian statutes that
threaten the First Amendment
simply.to provide cover for an


industry in need of a major
injection of newfound creativ-
ity.

* Washington Times


4A













FAITH



Saturday, December 31, 2011 v


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


This week as I was study-
ing for a sermon I will be
preaching tomorrow, I was
reminded that it is about half
way through the school year
and soon students will be receiving a
mid-term evaluation, commonly known
as a Report Card. I wondered if God
gave us a report card for this past year,
would we like it or not
Looking in the Book of Hebrews
Chapter 13, I noted some things I
found in that chapter that I believe to
be important to God and He just might
be grading us on. Several chapters are
devoted to the doctrinal teaching of the
Word, but the last chapter is devoted to
a practical application of the truths, to
be translated into action.
First, we have in verse 1 "Let brother-
ly love continue". How is your brother
love, has it increased or diminished this
past year? Believe it or not "brotherly
love" has a bearing on almost every-
thing else we have done or will do.
Second is your hospitality. Verse 2
says "Do not forget to entertain strang-.
ers". This does not mean to be carless.
This day and age we must be careful
of those who seek to enter our homes.
The word stranger is "Philonexia" and
means "dear ones".
The third one is sympathy. Verse
3 "Remember the prisoners as if *
chained with them-those who are
mistreated". Today around the world
many Christians are persecuted and
jailed for their belief. Do we feel for,
pray for the lonely and bereaved?
Do we spend time trying to comfort
them?
The fourth is "Personal Purity".
Verse 4 "Marriage is honorable
among all, and the bed undefiled;
but the fornicators and adulterers
God will juage". This is a plea to
keep the body pure. Fornication is
sex before marriage and we all know
what adultery is. Purity in the home,


the husband honoring the wife,
and the wife reverencing her hus-
band, should be the norm for every
Christian home. Young people, no
matter what the world says, we are
to "flee youthful lust (II Tim 2:22)"
and keep our body pure for your wife
or husband.
The fifth is contentment. Verses 5
and 6 "Let your conduct be without
covetousness; be content with such
things as you have. For He Himself
has said, 'I will never leave your nor
forsake you.'" The apostle Paul wrote
in Philippians 4:11 "Not that I speak
in regards to need, for I have learned
that whatsoever state I am to be con-
tent".
The
most BIBLE STUDIES
miser-
able
people I
know are
those
who do ..
not know t
content-
ment .
Makes Hugh Sherrill Jr.
no dif- ems-hugAl43@comcostnet
ference
how
much money they have or how much
popularity, they just can't find content-
ment Yet the most content people I
know, many have very little. Some are
even sickly. They are sweet Christians
that rejoice in the Lord because of IHis
ever present help.
So, as we close out 2011, may I suggest
that we think about the things we would
like higher marks on in this coming year;
and with Gdd's help we can achieve those
higher marks.


Hugh Sherrill is a Bible teacher at Eastside
Baptist Church.


Don't spend the


game on the bench


Remember how much you
wanted to be picked for the
team when you were a kid?
I grew up with a cousin
who was great at every
sport. He could rua faster and kick
the ball farther than anyone on our
playground. That usually meant he
always got to be a captain no mat-
ter what we played. I wasn't jeal-
ous though. It actually worked out
well for me, because when he was
captain, I knew I would be one of
the first ones chosen for his team...
not because I was a great athlete,
but because we were family, and he
looked out for me.
We all understand the importance
of being
HEART MATTERS chosen for
the team,
for the
job, or
by that
special
person we
want to
spend the
rest of our
Angie Land life with.
ongieland3@windstream.net. It makes
us feel.
valuable.
In Ephesians 1:4, the Bible gives us
clearly the foundation of our worth:
"For He (God) chose us in Him
before the creation of the world to be
holy and blameless in His sight."
Being chosen because of our abili-
ties, our looks, or what we can bring
to the table might temporarily make
us feel important, but what happens
when our abilities start to wane with
age or illness and our looks are not
what they used to be. What hap-
pens when we don't have so much
to offer? God chose us for a totally
different reason: He loves us, and He
has much to offer. Like my cousin


picking me for the team, God doesn't
choose us because we are the best,
but because He is,and we are valu-
able to Him.
This verse tells us that He chose
us to be holy. This word does not
mean perfect or sinless. It means set
apart for a relationship with God for
a specific purpose. Ephesians 2:10
adds, "For we are God's workman-
ship, created in Christ Jesus to do
good works, which He has prepared
in advance for us to do." This is great
news! Not only are we chosen, God
has something prepared for all of us
to do... a plan and a purpose for our
life that fits us, no matter what our
abilities are. This means we don't
have to spend the game sitting on
the bench!
The second part of this verse says
that we are to be blameless in His
sight. Doesn't that sound good...and
impossible? "Blameless in His sight"
'is a reminder that our relationship
with God comes only through Christ,
who died for our sins and paid the
price for them. He did that because
we are valuable to Him, and He
wants you and me on His team...
because your heart matters!

Blessings, Angie


Heart Matters is a weekly column
written by Angie Land, Director of the
Family Life Ministries of the Lafayette
Baptist Association, where she teaches
Bible studies, leads marriage and
family conferences and offers Biblical
counseling to individuals, couples and
families. Contact Angie with ques-
tions or comments at angieland3@
windstream. net


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
First Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AM
Sunday Service: 11:00AM
Wednesday Service: 7:00PM

ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E. Duval Street, Lake City
Sunday 10:30AM & Wednesday 7:00PM
www.firstassemblylc.com

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road,
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunafly W.rsrnip 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:OOAM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
'In God's Word, Will & Way"

PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Woriltip 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson





'lay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.,
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor: Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive *755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Wednesday
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15 PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274
Sunday School 10 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. 6 PM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7:30 PM
Pastor: Mike Norman

THE VINEYARD
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sunday Worship 10:30 AM
Sunday Night 6:00 PM
1832 SW Tomaka Terrace
(off SW Bascom Norris Dr.)
thevinevardoflakecity.comn

CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court- 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15AM, 10:30 AM,
30 PM (SpanisriEngicnt)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00 AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM

LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S.* 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Morn. Worship 10:30AM
Wed. Prayer Meeting 7 PM


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386-623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister


CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service. 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen *755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed, Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway -

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, Fl 32025- 386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sunday 8:00 & 10:OOAM
Wednesday 5:15PM
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1,2 miles S. of 1-75 on-SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For alleges at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 9:30AM
Nursery Avail,
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM
Pastor/Reverend John David Bryant





Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
l'.'ine i.' r ri line ..l
S W ..' , ., , ,, = , , ,I ... .. .. ..
752-3910 or 8()-597-.3526
Mon -Sat. 8:(X)-5'30 ClOed Sunday


METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School 9:45AM Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Bible Study 7:00PM Mon. Prayer Noon
Friday Prayer 6:00-7:00OPM
Pastor Rev. Fatha M. DeSue

WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:00AM
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Awana (ages 3-18) 5:30-7:30PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind.) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn

NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place

PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St.
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO., INC.
ASPIIIAT PAVING
COMMERCIAl, INDUSTRIALL
Sile Ireparatioii Road Buildling Parking I.os
Grading & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


/ OBSTETRICS &GYNECOLOGY
Weight Loss 69 & Hair Removal '69
Accepting all Insutance, No Iihs visit s5C
S,,'- (386)466-1106
Located Shonds LakeCity&Live Oak

Youth Services- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service Wednesday 7:00 PM
For info call 755-3408. Everyone Welcome
Pastor Rev. Stan Ellis

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday Worship 11:00AM
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor: Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Celebration Service 9:30 & 11:15 AM
Wednesday Service I 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755-2525
Lead Pastor: Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:OOAM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


S Central States
Enterprises
Columbia County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET' SUPPES lAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAl. IIFALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELLS POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY. FL.
386-752-8098




s?, 755-7050

BAYWAYjanitorial Services
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residential & Commercial
755-6142

. North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights,


Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US 90 WEST 755-2427

GWHunter, Inc.
.evron Chevron Oil
W0g Jobber



HO Inc.
"Quality /work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Open 7 l)ys a \\Week
1036 -. Dut\ail St.. Lake City FL.
(386) 752-0067
FIrcsh Meat. rcsh Produce'
I ca1 do ,ll Iht1 t [t1, u, h ( hrist whicl sirtrl/ihnclh mil e"

RICK'S CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A (Old ,
Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours


Your report card


for 2011- Part I


1B HARRY'S
W =wA c-udot Healing & Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley, President

PULn 752-2308 wsng


;. ^ .- "V '' % ".'': q^ .'" "a'








Lake City Reporter


Stpry ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


SaturdayDecember 3 1, 20 1 1


www.lakecityreporter.com 6A


SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN Meineke Car Care Bowl,
Texas A&M vs. Northwestern, at
Houston
2 p.m.
CBS Sun Bowl, Georgia Tech vs.
Utah, at El Paso, Texas
3:30 p.m.
ABC Liberty Bowl, Cincinnati vs.
Vanderbilt, at Memphis,Tenn.
ESPN Fight Hunger Bowl, Illinois
vs. UCLA, at San Francisco
7:30 p.m.
ESPN Chick-fil-A BowlVirginia vs.
Auburn, at Atlanta
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ,
Noon
CBS National coverage, Louisville
at Kentucky
ESPN2 -Virginia Tech at Oklahoma
St.
2 p.m.
ESPN2 Providence at
Georgetown
4 p.m.
ESPN2 Illinois at Purdue
FSN UCLA at California
6 p.m.

ESPN2 Ohio St. at Indiana
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Gonzaga at Xavier
10 p.m.
ESPN2 Oregon at Washington
MEN'S COLLEGE HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS Boston U. at Notre
Dame
SOCCER
7:30 a.m. --
ESPN2 Premier League, Blackburn
at Manchester United
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
FSN -Arizona at Arizona St.

FOOTBALL,

NPL schedule

Sunday
Chicago at Minnesota, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, I p.m.
- San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Buffalo at New England, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Miami, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, I p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, I p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Today's Games
Denver at L.A. Lakers, 3:30 p.m.
Indiana at Detroit, 6 p.m.
Atlanta at Houston, 7 p.m.
NewYork at Sacramento, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Utah at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Golden State, 9 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Today's Games
Edmonton at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Montreal at Florida, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Toronto atWinnipeg, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Washington at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.


CHS takes


rematch over


Union County


Lady Tigers best
team with same
name, 32-21.

By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High and Union
County High's Lady Tigers
basketball teams were back
at it after a 24-hour break
on Friday.
Columbia won the initial
contest with a 53-36 win
against Union County.
On Friday, the teams
played with third place in the
Fort White Country Classic
on the line. Columbia would
again come out on top, but
this time it was a more
defensively-paced contest,
The Lady Tigers finished


off Union County with the
32-27 win.
Justice Campbell was
named MVP for the Lady
Tigers during the tourna-
ment.
Stella Harris led
Columbia with 14 points in
the contest.
Haggerty High defeated
North Florida Christian,
53-34 to take home the tour-
nament title.
Mariah Gaines was the
tournament MVP. She
scored 27 points to lead
Haggerty to victory.
Columbia High is 6-4 on
the season.
The Lady Tigers will
return to the regular sea-
son at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday
as they host Union County
High once again.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Courtney Park dives for a loose ball against Union County High on Thursday
in Fort White.


Tigers take


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Morris'Marshall comes down with a rebound for the Tigers in a game played
earlier this season.


FROM THE SIDELINE


Brandon Finley
Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreporter'com


I


f ever there was
a fitting regular-
season finale, it's the
showdown between
the Denver Broncos


tourney




Columbia


dunks




Eastside


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn

Columbia High capped
off the 2011 Hitchcock's
Challenge at Santa Fe High
with a tournament victory.
The Tigers took out West
Gadsden, 66-53, in the semi-
finals to set up a champion-
ship game against Eastside
High.
Columbia couldn't get the
baskets to fall in the first
half as the Tigers trailed 20-
13 at the half, but rallied for
a 50-45 victory.
Marcus Amerson led the
'way with 22 points in the
contest.
"It was a defensive game
and we started out slow,"
Columbia coach Horace
Jefferson said. "The game
was going to be determined
by our intensity and exe-
cution. I the first half, we
didn't have either. It was
uncharacteristic of our
team."
Columbia had a slow
time getting started in both
games. The Tigers led 35-
30 at the half against West
Gadsden before heating up
in the second half.
A host of Tigers chipped
in, on the scoring to push
Columbia to the victory. *
Morris Marshall led the


way with 13 points. Nigel
Atkinson and Monte Tisdale
had 11 points each.
Laremy Tunsil had nine
points and Amerson had
six.
"Laremy came up much
bigger under the basket,"
Jefferson said. "He prob-
ably had seven or eight
rebounds."
Columbia's Javonta6
Foster didn't come up big
in the scoring, but he came
up big in the control of the
game.
"If we were flying a plane,
he was the pilot and he
would have flew us through
the Bermuda triangle,"
Jefferson said.
Foster was named the
tournament's MVP.
Jefferson also said the
crowd performed valuably.
"They were with us every
night and we won over the
crowd," he said.
Columbia is 8-2 on the
regular season.
The Tigers will
return to action at 7:30
p.m. on Tuesday when
Columbia hosts Union
County High.
Columbia travels to
Atlantic Coast at 7:30 on
Thursday and hosts Union
County High at 7:30 p.m. on
Saturday.


Tebow's final test comes Sunday


and Kansas City Chiefs.
Let's be real though.
This game has much less
to do with the two teams
playing in it than it does
the quarterbacks. Sunday's
clash for a division
championship is much less
Broncos and Chiefs than
it is Tim Tebow and Kyle
Orton.
After struggling to a 1-4
start, the Broncos let go
of Orton for everyone's


favorite poster boy and
Tebow responded by
guiding Denver to seven
wins in his first eight
starts.
Things were looking up
for Tebow enthusiasts.
The last two weeks -
things have turned sour.
During the Broncos'
six game winning streak,
many of Tebow's flaws
were overlooked because
of the results on the field.


During the last two weeks,
Tebow's looked much
more Clark Kent than
Superman.
Tebow has tried to
downplay the fact that this
game is much more about
.him than it is the teams.
"I think it's the Denver
Broncos and Kansas City
Chiefs," Tebow said.
Let's face it. Even if the
Broncos win the division,
they aren't going anywhere


in the playoffs.
This game is about
how Tebow responds to
adversity. It's the first
time things have went
wrong this season. Can
he right that ship? Can
he outperform the guy he
replaced? Can he prove
that he's capable of being
a long-term option in the
NFL?
Sunday could provide
some of those answers.


%.Fg %%Oo"JF - -- -- I -









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Friend fears middle-schooler's

romance is headed for trouble


DEAR ABBY: My friend
"Kayla" and I are 12 and in
seventh grade. Recently,
Kayla informed me that
she has acquired a new
boyfriend. I didn't mind
when she showed me all
his lovey-dovey texts. I
thought they were ador-
able.
When I asked Kayla
why her boyfriend didn't
sit with us at lunch, she
laughed and said, "Oh,
he doesn't go to school
here. He's a junior in high
school." That's why I'm
writing.
Kayla is telling me that
she and "Jacob" are mak-
ing out, and their texts
are getting progressively
worse. Plus, Kayla has said
her parents are taking her
and Jacob to a concert.
The concert is out of town
and they will be renting a
hotel room. I'm worried
for my friend.
Am I incorrect for
thinking this is wrong?
- WORRIED FRIEND IN
WASHINGTON STATE
DEAR WORRIED
FRIEND: I agree with you
that at 12, Kayla is too
young to have a 16-year-
old boyfriend. That her
parents give her enough
unsupervised time with
him that they're involved
in makeout sessions is also'
troubling. If this continues,
Kayla could become preg-
nant and Jacob could be
accused of statutory rape -
even if Kayla was a willing
participant
Talk to your mother


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
about what's going on,
She may want to chat with
Kayla's parents about this
and mention the texts
Jacob is sending their
daughter.

DEAR ABBY: I have a
question that may seem
odd, but I hope you can
give me an answer.
I know children can
tell when a parent favors
one sibling over another.
What about cats? I adopted
two cats not littermates
- from a shelter. While I.
love them both, one drives
me crazy and the qther is
a sweet lovebug. Naturally,
I prefer the sweet, cuddly
one.
Can the kitty that
drives me nuts tell that
I prefer his "sister" over
him? LOVE 'EM BOTH,
REALLY, ALBANY, N.Y.
. DEAR LOVE 'EM
BOTH: While I'm more
of a people expert than
an animal behavior-
ist, let me share this.
Cats and dogs, after
thousands of years of
living so closely with
us humans, are indeed
sensitive to human emo-
tions. They can tell when
we're happy, when we


are nervous and when
we're depressed. If you
lavish affection and/or
treats on one and not
the other, it can create
jealousy. .
You don't know the
history of the cats you
adopted. It's possible
the one that makes you
"crazy" had less human
contact than "Lovebug" or'
was mistreated in some
way. With patience and
positive reinforcement
he may come around, so
please don't give up on
him.

DEAR ABBY: One
of my brothers, "Carl,"
walked away from our
.family 18 years ago. My
parents are elderly and
in poor health. When
they pass, how do we
refer to this sibling in the
obituary? DRAWING A
BLANK IN OHIO
DEAR DRAWING A
BLANK: The entire fam-
ily history does not have
to be revealed in the
obituary. All it should say
is, "Survivors include:
daughter Wendy, (hus-
band, if there is one)
of Ohio; son George,
(wife); and son Carl." If
you know where Carl is,
include the information.
If not, his name should be
enough.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Emotions are running
high, and it will take little
for you to express exactly
how you feel. Relationship
difficulties could arise if
you don't think before you
speak. Make love, not war,
and ring in the new year
with peace. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll be tempted to
overindulge, and this can
lead to problems with"
friends. Let someone else
do the driving or stick close
to home. Avoid kicking off
the new year with anyone
who can negatively affect
your financial future. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll dazzle every-
one with your sparkle and
charm. Speak up and fill
everyone in on your plans
for the coming year. Your
enthusiasm will inspire the
people you meet and lead
to greater popularity for
months to come. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Impulsive action by
you or on the part of some-
one close to you will make
for an interesting but chal-
lenging adventure. Look
out for your best interests
and don't be afraid to
speak up if you don't like
what someone is doing.

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): Travel and enjoy the


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

festivities. Love is high- .
lighted. Having fun'should
be your game plan, but be
careful not to overindulge
or overspend in the pro-
cess. It's unnecessary and
it won't help you start the
new year on the right foot.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll have a problem
with someone close to
you. Don't flirt or send
the wrong signals. You are
best to keep things low-
key and welcome the new
year with a good outlook
and a responsible attitude.

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Get out and enjoy the
company of friends; rela-
tives or your lover. Engage
in activities that suit your
mood and will contrib-
ute to the way you want
to begin the new year.
Keeping things simple will
be advantageous. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Spread a little festive
cheer. Getting together
with people you enjoy
sharing ideas with will
help you start this year
on a high note, as long as
you don't overindulge in
the process. Sound mind,
conscious acts and good


times. *****
SAGrITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll be the
life of the party. Take the
spotlight and'show every-
one what you have to offer.
Your presence will set the .
stage for opportunities in
the new year. A personal
change will make a huge
difference to your attitude
and confidence. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Don't give in to
impulsive actions or get
too close to anyone who ,
is unpredictable. Protect
your home, your assets
and your loved ones from
the perils that go along
with people who are over-
indulgent or shrewd. Stick
close to home. **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Love is in the stars.
Your suggestions will be
well-received and make
your end-of-year celebration
exemplary. Positive changes
to the way you live your
life and how you earn your
living are headed your way.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't let anyone bully
you into doing something
you don't want to do. Follow
your intuition and avoid any,
situation that feels perilous. '
Don't let what others do
influence you or the way
you celebrate the new year. '
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: Y equals X
"RSOF'T SXA ET XSEGBSF OX SXA XPF
O JSLEXXEXL JMG 0 LPEXL PX, ZEGB
OKK GBS ZETAPV GBOG SYHSFESXWS
WOX EXTGE KK EX MT." BOK JPFKOX AX j

Previous Solution: "I happen to dig being able to use whatever mystique I have
to further the idea of peace." Garrett Morris
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-31


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
DON'T Go IN DADDY He SAYS He CARNT
ROOM, LIZ. HES' STfIND ANyNOISE.
NOT FEELING WELL! ~ // -
Ik c1lNv To
111 dHim I


CLASSIC PEANUTS
TVULUER (
( TRAVEL5..,. (
PART ONE.. 1
CHAPTER ONE,.'


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









Classified Department: 755-5440


BUY-T'N


SELL 1,lT


iaFINDIT^


LAKE CITY REPORTER' CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


I ADvantage


[ e soa MercandseI


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You can call us at 755-5440,
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You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com
Fl- 0


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Call by:
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Advertising copy is subject to
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reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
Ilcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 12-2011-CA-000361
SEC:
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
CHRISTOPHER STEPHENSON, et
al
Defendants)
NOTICE OF ACTION TO FORE-
CLOSE PROCEEDING-PROPER-
TY
TO:
ANGELA STEPHENSON, AD-
DRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE
LAST ADDRESS IS: 138 NORTH-
WEST SCARBOROUGH LANE
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Residence unknown, if living, in-
cluding any unknown spouse of the
said Defendants, if either has remar-
ried and if either or both of said De-
fendant(s) are dead, their respective
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claim-
ing by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s); and the afore-
mentioned named Defendant(s) and
such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendant(s) as
may be infants, incompetents or oth-
erwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been commenced
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing real property, lying and being
and situated in COLUMBIA County,
Florida, more particularly described
as-follows:
NE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION
27, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE
16 EAST, SOUTH OF GRADED
ROAD AND EAST OF RAILROAD
RIGHT-OF-WAY
AND
TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH RANGE
16 EAST
SECTION 27: BEGIN AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF NW
1/4 OF SE 1/4, AND RUN THENCE
N 89"27'E, ALONG THE NORTH
LINE OF SAID NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4,
328.00 FEET; THENCE S 0'04" E,
1042.55 FEET TO THE NORTH-
EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF G.S. & F. RAILROAD;
THENCE N 31'38'30" W ALONG
SAID NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-
OF-WAY LINE 108.28 FEET TO
THE POINT-OF-A-CURVE AND
RUN THENCE NORTHEASTER-
LY ALONG SAID CURVE CON-
CAVE TO THE RIGHT ALONG A
CHORD BEARING N 27'47'52" W
A DISTANCE OF 583.01 FEET TO
THE POINT-OF-INTERSECTION
OF SAID CURVE WITH THE
WEST LINE OF SAID NW 1/4 OF
SE 1/4; THENCE N 0'04' W 431.49
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. SUBJECT TO EXISTING
COUNTY MAINTAINED RIGHT-
OF-WAY OF SCARBOROUGH
ROAD ACROSS THE NORTH
SIDE THEREOF.
LESS AND EXCEPT
A PART OF NW 1/4 OF THE SE
1/4 OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 2
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NW CORNER OF SAID NW 1/4
OF THE SE 1/4 AND RUN N
89'27' E ALONG THE NORTH
LINE THEREOF, 298.00 FEET
FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE N 89'27' E
30.00 FEET; THENCE S 0*04' E,
642.55 FEET; THENCE S 89*56" W
30.00 FEET; THENCE N 0-04' W
642.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO EX-
ISTING COUNTY MAINTAINED
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SCARBOR-
OUGH ROAD ACROSS THE
NORTH SIDE THEREOF.
ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE NW 1/4
OF SE 1/4, SECTION 27, TOWN-
SHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE N 89*27' E
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4 328.00
FEET; .THENCE S 0'04' E 642.55
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING; THENCE CONTINUE S
0'04' E 400.00 FEET TO THE
EAST RIGHT-F-WAY LINE OF
G.S. & F RAILROAD; THENCE N
31'38'30" W ALONG SAID EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, 108.28
FEET TO THE P.C. OF A CURVE;
THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG
SAID CURVE CONCAVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
5596.58 FEET ALONG A CHORD
BEARING N 29'00'42" W 351.68
FEET; THENCE N 89'56' E 226.90
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING,
COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 138
NORTHWEST SCARBOROUGH
LANE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defense, if any,
such Morris Hardwick Schneider,
LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose
address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd,
Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or
before December 19, 2011, and file
the original with the clerk of this
Court wither before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.


Land Clearing .

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

This is an attempt to collect a debt
and any information obtained may be
used for that purpose.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on the 18 day of November,
2011.
By:/s/ P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
"In accordance with the American
with disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this hearing, should con-
tact ADA Coordinator not later than
1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at
Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(Columbia), 853 SW Sisters Wel-
come Road, Lake City, FL 32056
386-752-5960 and. for the hearing
and voice impaired 800-955-8770."
05529305
December 24, 31, 2011,


020 Lost & Found
$200 REWARD for info leading
to return of 2 Blue Tick hounds.
Missing from Norris Rd. the week
of Christmas. Call 386-623-0200
$200 Reward for the return of a
Tree stand & Deer Camera.
Missing from the end of Lake
Jeffery in Wellbom.386- 623-0200

100 Job
100 Opportunities
U5529823
HOLIDAY INN & SUITES
Lake City's only full service
hotel is seeking the following:
Full Time Positions:
Night Auditor (11 a-7p)
Night Manager (3p-11llp)
Apply at: www.ihg.jobs.net
Part Time positions:
a Dishwasher (am shift)
o Security Guard (11lla-7p)
o Front Desk Agent (3p-l ip)
Apply Mon-Fri 12-5pm
213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.
Help Wanted: Kitchen help, wait-
ers, waitresses. Experience prefer-
red. Apply at 7674 SW US Hwy
27 in Fort White. 386-497-1631
HIRING FOR MASONS &
LABORERS, Dependable,
reliable. Must have own transpor-
tation, Call 386-623-0010
Local CPA Firm is looking for
an experienced tax return preparer.
Ideally, the candidate will be able
to prepare personal, corporate
and partnership returns.
The seasonal time frame is
February 1 through April 17.
Send reply to Box 05080, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Now Hiring Restaurant Manager.
Experience preferred but will train
right person. 24 hour operation.
Send resumes to: 186 SE Newell
Dr. Lake City, FL. 32025.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com

12i Medical
120 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
05529826
Medical Billing Manager
Several years of experience in
medical office insurance coding,
and billing required. Excellent
Salary Based on Experience
Apply in confidence,
Email: mafaisal05( yahoo.com
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

17T Business
Oiv opportunities
Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

240 Schools &
240v Education __
05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2.170

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE Thurs.- Sat. 9-?
116 Polk Ave off Country Club.
100 Ceramic molds, kiln, 3 wheel
golf cart, tools, furn., lots of stuff.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous'
BEER MEISTER for sale.
$200 obo.
386-758-1991

PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control,
in original box. $280,
386-984-7510
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
,Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call Saturday.
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740

45 0 Good Things
450 to Eat ng
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.'
386-752-6896


REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


1

5
9
12

13

14

15
16

18
20
21



22
23
26
30
33


ACROSS
Command, to
Fido
- shui
-Student stat
Jazzy
Fitzgerald
Horror-film
servant
Resinous
substance
Cat calls
Glassed-in
porch
Grab
Expensive fur
"The
Mammoth
Hunters"
heroine
Set a price
Ritzy boat
Wapitis
Practical joke
A night in
Paris
Cut calories
Wanted GI
Stuffed shirt


460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.
630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2br/1.5 ba Fully furnished.
Uilities, washer dryer, TV, cable
Owner non smoker. 2 mi S of V.A.
$800.mo $500. sec. 386-755-0110
3 BR/2 BA, excellent condition,
includes all appliances, garbage
pickup & water. No pets, off of
252/Pinemount, 386-752-5617.
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640 Mobile Homes
64v for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonts rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Maintained, 10
ac. Master has a huge closet w/
walk in shower & garden tub.
MLS 79417 $94,900 Foreclosure




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I NUPDO I


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Small mobile home
2/1 886sf on a wooded lot.
Paved road frontage.
MLS 79413 $17,900

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent


2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

[David! Great to see you.
Make yourself at home. N
S Great party\ 1


I A I I k A F E YBOpY UKD TO GO I
A TO PAT SAJAKS HOUSE
GLANOL I A-
S Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: COACH INPUT PELVIS SCURVY
Answer: Ben Franklin was able to invent bifocals
because he was a VISIONARY


39 Treat
somebody
40 Humdrum
41 Like dry skin
43 State further
45 Per person
48 Keep
occupied
51 Weep over
53 Ladies' man
56 Lectern
57 Do batik
58 Uppity one
59 Whodunit
suspect
60 New England
cape
61 Mediterranean
landmark
62 Early movie
dog


DOWN
1 Finishes a
skirt
2 "Maria -"
3 Longtime
Denver QB
4 Finally


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com
2 13 14 = 5 16 |7 |8 I9 |10 |


12-31


Answer to Previous Puzzle


H ZE UND
GLAND N 0 CEP
Ti ER I VANHOE
MIN X W i= I nL
HOY E T],
CO LmPGA C S
AlPE STAB E N
E T URAL A
TE CABB
TL






S I GNI A E GER
ATE RORK DROVE
TAR NYIE STIE


10 Newman or
Simon
11 Zenith
17 Gathered
leaves
19 "Misery"
co-star
'22 Room under a
roof
24 Golden oldie
"Stupid -"
25 Al the trumpet
player
27 Sass
28 Large parrot
29 Pig's digs
30 Schmooze
31 Cobbler's tool
32 - few
rounds
36 Tibet's capital
38 Clarified
butter
42 Honda rival
44 Like gold
46 Turns up
47 Regular
routine
48 Heavy-metal
band
49 BLT spread
50 Exploited
51 Rum-laced
cake
52 Ibsen heroine
54 Mich.
neighbor
55 Max Sydow


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


5 Cast a fly
6 Vanity
7 Cambodia's
Lon -
8 Meadow
feature
9 Smug


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


I


:i











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale


Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind'Ken's off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/tresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2
8 mi NW of VA. Private wooded
acre, deck, roomy. No dogs
$600 mo + dep 386.961.9181

072 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer,l ac fenced, private, sorne
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225


Nice 3br/2ba brick Close in
$745.mo rent $550. sec.
Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534 -

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals

05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
.also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicesi office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space:.avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

LAKE CITY REPORTER
.. ..


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale

BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Nice 4/2, 1 ac.
Granite floors. Beautiful yard &
wrap around porch. MLS 77292
$139,900. Short Sale.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 4/2,1 ac modular
home that is in immaculate cond.
1,344sqft. New carpet, roof, a/c,
fireplace. MLS 78833 $115,000.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Well maintained.
Tiled floors, living area, open kit.
Above ground pool, guest quarters
MLS 79149 $115,000. Short Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot. on
the Suwannee. Well & anerobic
septic system. MLS 78842
$45,000 Owner Financing.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Home, over 2ac,
screened inground pool. Updated,
crown molding, new wood floors,
kit & paint. MLS 79378 $129,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 1713. sf, great
area. Arched entryways, Ig living
room w/fireplace. French doors to
patio. MLS 79418 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.4/2 Vintage home.
Updated electric & plumbing. New
carpet & CH/A. Hardwood floors.
MLS 79367 $99,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Well maintained
2/2. Wood laminate floors. Lg
living room & master suite. New
countertops. MLS 76928 $89,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Vintage 4/3 2626sf.
Hardwood floors, new wdws, fire-.
place. Separate 494ft guest home,
double lot MLS 78000 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 1987 SF up-
graded w/wood laminate floors,
ceramic tile. 14x30 workshop, 10
xl0 storage MLS79345 $199,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, 2853SF walk-
ing to downtown, lakes, restau-
rants, Shands & VA. garage w/apt
above. MLS 79451 $140,000


Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, open floor
plan, spacious master BR. Tile &
wood thru out. 1 yr. home
warranty MLS 78594 $169,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Huge 4/3, 2826sf
on 5.22 ac! Flooring is tile lami-
nate in most rooms & in immacu-
late.cond. MLS 79584 $215,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. What a Creampuff!
Newer roof, I ac, paved road,
fenced, fireplace, very nice brick
home. MLS 79531 $65,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Brick .59 ac! 3/2,
2502sf. Lg master bath w/separate
shower & whirlpool. 2 car garage
& storage. MLS 76769 $210,000
Charming Older Home in town.
Over 1300 sq ft. with hardwood
floors. Shady comer lot.
Janet Creel. 71'9-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
Private Estate, city limits.
6br/3.5ba. 39.7 acres $994,000 or
$2,500 mo rent. Mary Brown
Whitehurst. 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2. New kitchen
counters & ceramic tile, open floor
plan. MLS# 77943 $94,500 Mary
Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 updated brick in town. New
roof, hardwoods. Glassed room
w/fantastic views. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS 78092 $249,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D. Super area,
nice back yard. Covered back
porch. New AC in 2010. Elaine K.
Tolar. 755-6488 MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Exceptional price! 3/2, 1582 sqft.
2 car garage, screened porch 1/2 ac
lot. Only $129,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 365-5678 MLS#79239
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent location! 3/2 home, large
master suite, 2 car garage.
$87,900. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 79458


- I


Corial Homes
by Arthur Rutenberg


Jasmine
\'l it Ill mJIl m
"\ -, rr_,.r-.L lr
lhiPr,,I r.,-ir


Model Hours:
Tuesday-Friday 12-5
Sat. 11-3 Sun 1-4pm

9565 1 Call Bryan
Zecher


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-623-9026

If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




Call Mar


G- Connected
, 0I



ORS|


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Woodcrest, 3/2 Brick w/split floor
plan. Nice lot. Fireplace, Ig porch,
vinyl wdws. MLS# 77708 Elaine
K. Tolar $169,900 755-6488
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac, 3/2, as is $95,000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/Ist time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Newly Listed in Mayfair! Great
area close to shopping! 3/2 fresh
paint& pretty lot. Newer metal
roof & screen porch. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
Sweeping Golf Course View!
Brick 3/2 w/screen porch. South-
ern Oaks Golf Course. 1980sf.
$164,900 #79585 Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
/870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
1993 JAYCO 5th wheel. 26 1/2
feet. Well kept. Everything works.
Owner is Non-smoker $3,000
386-755-0110

We're on target!


., +,. ..?.;. ;


......................


Classified Department: 755-5440







10A LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2011


shrimp and
6rab boil


.Includes large, easy-to-peel
shrimp, blue crab, diced celery,
lemons, and seasonings.


new england
seafood boil
Littleneck clams, mussels,
lobster tails, Italian sausage,
red potato wedges, and corn
in a blend of chicken broth
and spicy tomato-vegetable
juice seasoned with tarragon
and bay leaf.


shrimp boil
Includes large, easy-to-peel
shrimp, diced celery, lemons,
and seasonings.