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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01738
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 30, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01738
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





19 A"
000015 120312 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Re


orter


Vol. 137, No. 283 E 75 cents


Officer blamed in K-9 death


Despite initial difference of
opinion, two vets concluded
Trooper died of heat stroke.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City Police Department officer has
been given a written reprimand following a
departmental investigation into the death of


a K-9 officer under his supervision.
Officer Kevin Johns was cited for neglect
of duty in the July 22 death of K-9 officer
Trooper.
Johns said he returned home after an
absence of. less than two hours to find
Trooper dead in his outdoor chain-link
kennel, according to-a press release issued
by LCPD on July 23.
LCPD Chief Argatha Gilmore assigned
Capt. Robert Smith to conduct an internal
affairs investigation into the Trooper's


death. In his findings, Smith stated,
"Officer Johns placed K-9 Trooper in a 10'
x 10' wide, chain-link fence kennel, which
stood 6' tall, which had no roof or cover-
ing; with very limited shade of nearby
trees."
According to the July 23 press release,
Trooper was off-duty at his residence, con-
tained in his kennel and showed no abnor-
mal behavior when Johns left around 11:30
a.m. Johns returned around 1:10 p.m. and
found Trooper was dead, the release said.


The Florida Automatic Weather Network
in Alachua County recorded the outside
temperature during the time period in
question, according to the report. Trooper
was in his kennel when the temperature
was 91.9 degrees with a heat index in
excess of 100 degrees. The dog did have
access to water, authorities said.
Trooper was a 7-year-old Malinois, cer-
tified in drugs and narcotics detection.
TROOPER continued on 3A


Old-style

light bulbs

aren't going

anywhere

just yet

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Standard 100-watt incandescent light
bulbs have been hot items at the Home
Depot in Lake City recently.
But instead of buying the familiar
packages containing two or four light
bulbs, customers have been buying
boxes containing 16 of the high-watt
bulbs at the store in anticipation of a
federal law passed by Congress in 2007
banning their sale.
One display at the Home Depot
store reminds customers to "Stock up
Now" in anticipation of when the 100-
watt bulbs are no longer sold, store
manager Albert Husenaj said. And in
some instances, he said customers
are buying two or more boxes of the
traditional style 100-watt bulbs while
supplies last.
"Once people hear the news, it's
one of the things bringing them in,"
Husenaj said. "Some people like the
way the old incandescent light bulbs
work."
Originally, the legislation passed
by Congress and signed by President
Bush was intended to go into effect Jan.
1. But lawmakers approved new legis-
lation in mid December that delays the
ban until Sept. 30. After the deadline,
merchants can sell their remaining
inventory until it's gone.
The legislation requires manufactur-
ers to produce light bulbs that are at
least 30 percent more energy efficient
as a way to reduce power use, green-
house gas emissions and U.S. depen-
dence on foreign energy sources.
Incandescent light bulbs burn out
much faster and consume more ener-
gy than the new standards, which is
why they are being phased out, start-
ing with 100-watt bulbs. On Jan. 1,
2013, 75-watt incandescent bulbs can
no longer be imported or manufac-
tured. And on Jan. 1, 2014, 60- and 40-
watt incandescent bulbs will no longer
be available.
The phaseout is estimated to save
consumers as much as $6 billion a
year, according to the Department'of
Energy. Similar bans on incandescent
light bulbs have already been enacted
in Europe, Japan, Russia, Brazil and
other parts of the world to save energy
costs.
Florescent, cork-screw shaped CFL
bulbs are more expensive but they
consume less energy and last at least
twice as long as incandescent bulbs.
The newest LED bulbs are even
more costly as much as $25 each.
The price is expected to go down
as more companies manufacture the
LED bulbs, which even more energy
efficient than CFL bulbs, according to
studies.
And LED bulbs, which contain no
mercury, have a 15-year life span.
Despite the savings, some stud-
ies indicate more than 10 percent of
Americans say they plan to stockpile
100-watt incandescent bulbs before
they are phased out
None of the Home Depot customers
BULBS continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293


72


5 HURT IN CRASH


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
First responders tend to one of the drivers involved in a two-car crash Thursday shortly before noon on Southwest Wall Terrace and
Southwest Baya Drive. Five of those involved were taken to local hospitals. Further details were not immediately available.



BP money buys sports towels, more


By MELISSA NELSON and
MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press
PANAMA CITY BEACH Sports tow-
els and fleece blankets. A poker tourna-
ment. A $1 million Christmas display. A
prom for senior citizens. BP gas card give-
aways. A "most deserving mom" contest.
And advertising, lots of advertising.
Florida Panhandle officials made the
mix of eyebrow-raising purchases with $30


POLICE

Police: Burglary

suspect needed

money for gifts

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City man who said he had a drug
problem and needed money to buy his family
Christmas presents was arrested at a local sal-
vage yard for stealing copper
wire, reports show.
. Steven Brian Seale, 30, 210
NW 9th Street, High Springs,
was charged with burglary, lar-
ceny, dealing in stolen property
and criminal mischief (property
damage). He was booked into
Seale the Columbia County Detention
Facility on $21,000 bond.
According to Columbia County Sheriff's Office
reports, on Wednesday deputy David Jones and
Cpl. Todd Lussier went to Waltrip Salvage and


.&/ ,


SUBSCRIBE TO Mostly sunny
THE REPORTER
Voice: 755-5445
Fax 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A


SUSPECT continued on 3A


Opinion .
" People
.' .- Obituaries .
Advice & Comics
Puzzles ...


million BP gave them earlier this year to
help tourism recover from 2010's disas-
trous Gulf oil spill.
The money allowed seven area tour-
ism bureaus to try promotions they could
never have afforded otherwise, and it has
propelled the Panhandle's visitor counts
to record numbers this year following a
disastrous season right after the spill. The
question now is what happens when the
BP money dries up, most likely next April.
The grants doubled and tripled the tour-


ism-promotion budgets in these Panhandle
counties, and officials worry the boost in
visitors may prove fleeting.
"It is one thing to have your numbers go
up when a tremendous amount of money
is being put, not only in our economy, but
in all of north Florida," said Curt Blair,
executive director of the Franklin County
Tourist Development Council. "We will see
after April whether part of this was a real
BP continued on 3A


Lake scene


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
An egret soaks in some sun while resting on a log at Watertown Lake Wednesday.


-IA
2A
3B
... 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
New Year's Eve
40 years straight.


COMING
SATURDAY
Local news
roundup.


Friday, December 30, 20 I1


www.iaKecityreporter.com










2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011


FLORID A' kM..) A>
SWednesday: AH 3. Thursday: Thursday:
S3-14-40-42-45-51 Afternoon: 1-7-3 Afternoon: 7-6-9-7
x2


Wednesday:
3-4-7-10-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



40 years rocking New Year's Eve


NEW YORK

Clark's New Year's Eve
special was created to give
young people an alterna-
tive to a seasonal institu-
tion, bandleader Guy Lombardo.
Now Clark's annual show is the
institution.
"New Year's Rockin' Eve," with
Clark and Ryan Seacrest, pays tribute
to its own history during a sprawling,
nearly six-hour program Saturday
night. The celebration takes up all
of prime time on ABC, breaks for a
half-hour of local news, then comes
back on the air for two and a quarter
hours that includes the ball dropping
in New York City's Times Square to
mark the beginning of 2012.
"I'm looking forward to it being
2:15 (a.m. on Sunday)," said Larry
Klein, who has been producing the
show since 1977.
Clark's special shows no sign of
slippage, after collecting its biggest
audience in five years last year. The
18.8 million people who were watch-
ing ABC during the last half-hour of
2010 and first half-hour of 2011 were
more than NBC and Fox's audience
combined, the Nielsen ratings com-
pany said.
The show isn't designed to be a
recap of the year in music, but that's
almost what it turns out to be, Klein
said.
In all, 29 separate musical perfor-
mances are planned.
This year's headliner is Lady
Gaga,'who gets the prime slot in
Times Square in the moments before
midnight. Justin Bieber, Pitbull, Hot
Chelle Rae, Florence + The Machine,
Gym Class Heroes, Nicki Minaj and
Taio Cruz are among the other fea-
tured performers from New York and
Los Angeles. Beyonce is scheduled
to perform from London, where she's


ASSOCIATED P
Dick Clark, right, and Ryan Seacrest are shown in this image released by ABC.


on tour.
It may not seem so from that line-
up, but Klein said booking the show
is a challenge because performers
frequently are offered some of their
most lucrative gigs of the year on
New Year's Eve. What Clark has to
offer is exposure to a large audience
not often seen this side of "American
Idol."
And it's unique. Klein remembers
Jennifer Lopez's exhilaration a few
years back after performing in Times
Square despite wearing a skimpy out-
fit and being pelted by freezing rain.
"No matter how much I can try
to explain to people what it's like to
be in Times Square live, I can't do it
justice," he said. "You have to experi-
ence it once in your life."
During the first two hours, ABC
will show clips of performances from
past New Year's Eve specials, which
Klein describes as a fascinating trip


through hair, clothing and musical
styles. Stars of Clark's first "Rockin'
Eve" included Al Green, Helen Reddy
and Three Dog Night.
New Year's Eve also marks the *
annual appearance of Clark, once a
ubiquitous presence on television. A
stroke makes.it difficult for Clark to
communicate, but he doesn't want to
miss this show, Klein said.
"Dick is still Dick Clark," he said.
"His communication is a little bit
more difficult, but he's still involved
in contemporary music. He listens
to a lot, he knows a lot, he's still
involved in the production. This is
very important to him. This is one of
his children."
Among the other big broadcasters,
NBC and Fox will both be in Times
Square on New Year's Eve, too. CBS
hands its late-night schedule to its
local affiliates.
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Singer-musician
Michael Nesmith is 69.
Singer Davy Jones is
66.
"Today" show co-host


Matt Lauer is 54.
Golfer Tiger Woods
is 36.
NBA player LeBron
James is 27.


Daily ScriDture


"[Jesus Comforts His Disciples]
Do not let your hearts be trou-
bled. You believe in God; believe
also in me. My Father's house
has many rooms; if that were
not so, would I have told you
that I am going there to prepare
a place for you? And if I go and
prepare a place for you, I will
come back and take you to be
with me that you also may be
where I am."
-John 14:1-3


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ...............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson,.... 754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service:
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.,
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks...... ............ $41.40
24 Weeks................$82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Robber writes
letter to victims
KISSIMMEE -
Authorities say a central
Florida robber wrote an
apology to his victims,
saying he broke into their
cars on Christmas Eve
to feed his crack cocaine
habit.
Kissimmee police
say 22-year-old Renault
Fernandez-Escapa became
remorseful within hours
of his arrest Saturday on
multiple charges, including
car burglary. Police say his
pockets were filled with
stolen coins and a wallet
when they arrested him.
Fernandez-Escapa's
letter states Christmas
Eve is a time to be with
loved ones. And that's
exactly where he says he
should've been instead of
searching for unlocked
cars to steal items to fund
his drug habit.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports -the man told police
he was smoking crack
because he no longer has
contact with his family.
Records show he's been
previously charged with
burglary.

Marine recovers
after shooting
DEERFIELD BEACH
- A U.S. Marine Corps
officer who survived
tours of duty in Ira'q and
Afghanistan without a
scratch is recovering after
being shot in Florida while
trying to sell a gold neck-
lace that his fiance had
advertised on Craigslist.
Two men have been
charged with attempted
murder in the shooting of
Lt. Col. Karl Trenker, 48.
A Marine Corps spokes-
man said Thursday that
Trenker is in stable condi-
tion and recovering well
from the Dec. 21 shooting.
"I can't believe this,"
Trenker told WSVN-TV. "I.
go to Iraq and Afghanistan


multiple times, and I
haven't been shot or blown
up, and I'm here at home
in Florida, and here I am
riding in an ambulance
with a bunch of gunshot
wounds."
Trenker added that he
used his fingers to plug
the bullet holes and stop
the bleeding. Authorities
say he was hit three times.
According to a Broward
Sheriff's Office report,
Trenker and his four of
his children drove from
Miramar to Deerfield
Beach to meet a man pur-
portedly named "Galven"
at an apartment complex.
The man had responded to
the Craigslist ad placed by
Trenker's fiancee.
Two men later identi-
fied as James Flounory
and Jeff Steele, both 20,
approached Trenker's
truck, robbed him of
the necklace at gunpoint
and ran off, according to
authorities. TrenRer gave
chase on foot until Steele
turned and fired several
shots from a .22-caliber .
handgun, hitting Trenker
in the torso, the police
report said.
Two 911 calls were
released Thursday, with
one unidentified man tell-
ing a dispatcher, "I don't
know what's going on,
man, but I know there
were gunshots."
A second caller is
recorded talking briefly
with Trenker, at one point
asking his age as directed
by the dispatcher and then
remarking, "He's in great
shape." Later, the caller
ads: "He's got two bullets
in him."
Sheriff's deputies arrest-
ed Flournoy and Steele
a short time later, partly
on the strength of a state-
ment given by Trenker's
12-year-old son. Both are
charged with attempted
murder and robbery with a
firearm, and both are jailed
without bail. Court records
did not list an attorney for
either man.


Giraffe born at
Busch Gardens
TAMPA A baby
giraffe has been born at
Busch Gardens in Tampa.
Tampa Bay's Fox 13
News reports the 5-foot-
7, 127-pound female was
born on Tuesday.
The calf and her mother,
Tesa, are currently out of
guest view and being mon-
itored by zoo staff. They
will keep tabs on how well
the baby is nursing and
growing. In about three
months, the two will be
placed with other animals
at the park's Serengeti
Plain.
Tesa has given birth
to four other calves at
the park. There are now
18 reticulated giraffes at
Busch Gardens.

Fatal crash closes
Interstate 95
PORT ORANGE -
The northbound lanes of
Interstate 95 were closed
following a .crash involv-
ing three tractor-trailers
and a passenger vehicle.
One person was confirmed
dead.
The Florida Highway
Patrol says the accident
happened about 3:25
a.m. Thursday near Port
Orange in Volusia County.
All lanes of the interstate
were briefly closed follow-
ing the fiery crash that
involved at least three trac-
tor-trailers and one car.
FHP spokeswoman Kim
Montes says a mail truck,
a log truck and a truck
carrying some kind of
chemical were involved.
The other vehicle had
three people inside. The
driver of the chemical
truck was killed. She says
the remaining injuries
range from minor to seri-
ous.
Traffic was being divert-
ed onto State Road 44.

(AP)


THE WEATHER


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SUNDAY


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MOSTLY PATCHY MOSTLY SUNNY SUNNY
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HI72LO HI 75 LO49 HI75LO43 HI 62 L32 H158L30
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Valdosta
69/49 *
Lake City,
72/46
Gainesville *
70/45
Ocala *
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71/


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


, Friday


64
38
66
43
82 in 1946
23 in 2010


0.00"
0.49"
33.38"
2.36"
48.16"


lacksonvile
,68/50


Daytona Beach
70'50
0


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Galnesville
Jacksonville


Saturday
72, 54, s
73/53/s
77/63/s
78/57/s
75/50/pc
70/53/s
77/68/pc
75/49/pc
78/66/s
78/57/s
76/50/s
74/54/s
73/57/s
70/56/s
73/49/s
76/55/s
72/49/pc
76/62/s


Sunday
;3, 57.
74/53/s
78/64/pc
78/57/pc
75/46/s
73/48/s
78/69/pc
75/43/s
77/65/pc
78/57/s
75/48/s
77/57/s
70/45/s
71/41/pc
72/41/s
75/55/pc
70/40/s
77/60/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com


5b/t5b


SUN
Sunrise.today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrse today
Moonset today
Moonrse tom.
Moonset tornm.


7:26 a.m.
5:40 p.m.
7:27 a.m.
5:41 p.m.


11:12 a.m.
11:44 p.m.
11:43 a.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
1 9 16 23
First Full Last New


7p la 6a
Saturday


Forecastedl temperature Feels e" temperaltre


Orn ir,- ldae in
1983, many cities
from the southern
Plains to the Ohio
Valley reported
record low tempera-
tures for the day.
Baton Rouge, La.,
recorded its coldest
week on record.


4


45 mmestob bu
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


AV& Forecasts, data and
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Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather J www.weatherpubllsher.com


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Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
72/50 70/51 Lake City
Miami
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51 West Palm Beach Ocala
74/60 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 76/60 Pensacola
73/54 0 Naples Tallahassee
72/55 Miami Tampa
Key West 75/63 Valdosta
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011


BP. Money pays for poker tournaments, million-dollar Christmas displays
Continued From Page 1A


recovery ... or if we see fall-off. ... Whether
we've done that or if we've just propped up
the market."
BP announced the $30 million tourism
grants in April. While the agreement for
the $30 million doesn't prevent Florida
from pursuing any claims against BP or
others, officials there decided a week
later not to join other Gulf states in a law-
suit against Transocean, the owner of the
Deepwater Horizon rig at the heart of the
spill.
Florida's tourism spending spree isn't
the first time that BP money has allowed
government officials to snag items from
their wish lists.
Separately, BP had already poured
hundreds of millions of dollars into the
four Gulf states in the months after the
oil spill with few strings attached.
The Associated Press documented ear-
lier this year how some of the $754
million given to local governments had
been spent on tasers, SUVS and pick-
up trucks, rock concerts, an iPad and
other items with no direct connection
to the oil spill.
In all, BP has given $150 million to
Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi
for tourism promotion since the oil spill,
with the Sunshine State getting the lion's
share $62 million.
In the case of the more-recent payout,
Florida Panhandle counties have allocated
more than $23 million of the $30 million
through September, with $13.5 million
used on for television, digital, radio and
print advertising. The counties have also
spent millions on a variety of attention-
grabbing gimmicks, The Associated Press
found through public records requests and
interviews.


Some wonder whether the most extrava-
gant promotions such as Panama City
Beach's $1 million Christmas display -
are worth it.
"It wasn't all that busy out here last
weekend," Charles Walsingham, a beach-
side merchant near the display, said a
few days after the Christmas lights were
turned on and the ice rink opened in
early December. 'There weren't that many
people over there skating and that is a lot
of money to spend."
The seven counties spent $2.5 million on
promotions alone.
In Pensacola, the BP money paid
for $30,000 worth of sports towels and
another $30,000 worth of fleece blankets
given out at local sporting events. In
neighboring Perdido Key, officials spent
$300,000 on American Express gift cards
for overnight visitors. They also pur-
chased $12,500 worth of BP gas cards for
tourists who present receipts showing
they've stayed in the area, essentially
putting BP funds back into the compa-
ny's pocket.
Alison Davenport, chair of the Perdido
Key Chamber and Visitors Center, said
the goal is to get tourists driving to the
area next spring. "We ,had no hesitation
in choosing BP gas cards over any oth-
ers since BP's grant money has made the
incentivized travel promotion possible,"
she said.
Okaloosa County, home to Destin and
Fort Walton Beach, is giving away a trip
to the Super Bowl and tickets to the BCS
championship football game to drive traf-
fic to its Facebook page. South Walton
Beach also is giving away BCS tickets on
Facebook.


TROOPER: Officer held responsible
Continued From Page 1A


Johns reported he had left the dog in simi-
lar conditions on prior occasions.
Trooper's body was taken to a veterinar-
ian for a necropsy, which initially identified
the cause of death as heat exhaustion, later
amended to heat stroke.
Capt. John Blanchard, Lake City Police
Department public information officer,
said the veterinarian thought the dog
wasn't in the kennel long enough to cause
heat stroke, even though that is listed as
the cause of death.
The necropsy results were later reviewed
by a second veterinarian, who initially had
a different opinion but later determined
heat stroke was the cause as well.
Blanchard did not identify the veterinar-
ians.
"They were considered authorities,"
he said. The necropsy was done in
Gainesville.
The Lake City Police Department does
not have a specific set of rules governing
the housing of K-9 officers.
"In our policy I don't believe there is
anything that exactly outlines what is the
consistency of a kennel," Blanchard said,
noting department officials are consider-
ing adopting such a standard. "That is
certainly. part of the investigation and
review."
Blanchard said the investigation took
five months to complete because of the
number of people who had to be contacted
as well as the administrative investigation
review.


"Because of the Florida Policeman Bill
of Rights, generally until the disciplinary
part of the investigation is done, it's still
an active investigation, therefore it would
not be released," he said. "When it comes
to an investigation with a police officer,
the investigation internally, as well as the
disciplinary part of it are related, so that's
why there is a longer time period in some
cases."
Smith is now on leave in an unrelated
matter.
The written reprimand added to Johns'
personnel file is documentation showing
that there was a violation of department
policy. It will remain in his file.
Johns was not suspended during the
investigation. He was given his written
reprimand Wednesday. Blanchard said the
reprimand does not exempt Johns from
being a department K-9 handler in the
future.
"He would have to go through the same
review process as any K-9 handler again,"
Blanchard said. "All of that would be con-
sidered administratively, as well as any
internal affairs complaints so he would
be evaluated in that same process."
The investigation was completed and its
finding forwarded to Gilmore. The policy
violation of neglect of duty was sustained
by Gilmore.
"When the chief made her decision on
the findings, that was just part of the pro-
cess and that was done some time ago,"
Blanchard said.


SUSPECT: Needed gifts, say police
Continued From Page 1A


Scrap where the owner said he suspected
Seale of burglarizing his business and was
attempting to scrap more copper wire.
When the officers arrived at the estab-
lishment they placed Seale in handcuffs
and removed a large knife from a case on
his side.
The deputy spoke to an employee in the
business office who said they reported a
burglary that had taken place on Dec. 26.
Authorities then spoke to Seale about
the burglary after he was read his Miranda
rights. Reports indicate Seale told authori-
ties he had a drug problem and needed


money to buy his family Christmas pres-
ents. He said he drove to the business and
parked his car in front of the business next
door and walked behind the business, cut
the fence and walked inside.
Seale said he pulled the cords down
from the camera in the back area, walked
up to the car port area and grabbed the
cooper wire and walked it out to the road
before putting it in his vehicle.
Seale was arrested and taken to jail.


BULBS: Will be around a while longer
Continued From Page 1A


buying 100-watt incandescent bulbs are
upset about the upcoming ban, Husenaj
said.


"They're buying them for two reasons,"
he said. "It's a good buy and some people
just prefer 100-watt incandescent bulbs."


ASSCUAltIU PKRES
In this photo taken Dec. 13, Ray Palmer, director of the Pensacola Sports Association, dis-
plays a sports towel and fleece blanket in Pensacola, Fla. The items were part of a tourism
promotion funded British Petroleum (BP) as restitution for the 2010 Gulf oil spill.


Police seek armed robber

in High Springs holdup


From staff reports
HIGH SPRINGS High Springs Police
Department officials are looking for a
gunman who robbed a convenience store
Thursday morning.
According to High Springs Police
Department officials around 6 a.m.
Thursday a man walked into the Sunrise
Food Store, pulled a small handgun and


demanded cash from the clerk.
The suspect is described as a black
man, 5'10" 6', weighing about 250 pounds,
wearing a dark blue or purple sweat suit
and flip-flops.
Anyone with information please contact
the High Springs Police Department at
(386) 454-1415.


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OPINION


Friday, December 30, 2011


ONE


ONE
OPINION


The 2012


economy


is at the high-
est level it's been
since the recession
officially ended in
February. Many financial ana-
lysts share the optimistic out-
look. An Associated Press poll
of economists projected higher
growth for the U.S. economy in
2012. The bad news is that the
positive growth figure is con-
Stingent on Europe's economic
situation remaining relatively
stable and that's not likely.
Though U.S. consumer con-
fidence is up, December's 64.5
score is far from the 90 found
in a stable economy. The truth
behind the headlines is that the
prospects for 2012 are bleak.
That's because the European
situation remains precarious.
Instead of focusing on true
fiscal reforms, Eurocrats are
expanding credit They remain
fixated on short-term fixes that
don't address the root cause of
their economic problem: mas-
sive overspending.
Despite the uptick in con-
sumer confidence, the economic
fundamentals aren't encourag-
ing. The U.S. housing market
remains depressed in much of
the country. Nineteen of the 20
markets covered by the Case-
Shiller indices reported price
drops in October, according to
the most recent report Eighteen
reported a drop for the year,
with the average home home in Atlanta
losing 12 percent of its value.
Nationwide, the drop averaged
3 percent not exactly a hopeful
sign that robust economic recov-
ery is around the corner.
Fewer than a qtiarter of
employers are planning to make
new hires, and 7 percent are
planning to let go of employees.
There are steps the federal
government should take to help.
Congress needs to ask Fed
Chairman Ben S. Bernanke
about the Fed's entanglement
with the ECB. Congress should
rein in the regulatory agencies
that have created uncertainty
in the business community.
Washington needs to adopt long-
term tax and entitlement reforms
to restore the confidence of the
markets. Lawmakers should
work toward the smaller govern-
ment voters indicated they want
That's the path to recovery and
prosperity.
Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


A tax break that helps


break the nation


The Democrats win,
the Republicans
lose, the payroll
tax is reduced for a
couple of months,
unemployment benefits are
extended, and you'd be better
off avoiding many of the com-
mentators on the subject.
.Reducing a tax already insuf-
ficient for its purposes only
worsens a horrific situation,
with no comparable offsetting
benefit.
Yes, the extension of the tax
cut will put about $20 a week
in the average worker's pocket,
but this does not then translate
into macroeconomic rescue.
Temporary tax cuts have only
very slight temporary pluses,
as recent and past experiences
demonstrate.
A worthy Social Security
adjustment would require l o
effect whatsoever on anyone
immediately, and no serious
hurt to anyone in the long run.
It would simply require some
fixes in a formula slowing
the growth in initial benefits,
additional means testing, a
higher cap on contributions and
perhaps some retirement-age
changes.
The House Republicans
passed a plan that would lower
the payroll tax by 2 percentage
points for a year along with


some relatively meager decreas-
es in federal spending. The
Senate Democrats originally
wanted a tax hike that would
further slow job growth for a 12-
month payroll tax decrease.
The Senate Democrats
then made a deal with Senate
Republicans for a two-month
payroll tax decrease. The
Republican demand was that
Obama would have to decide on
whether we can have a harm-
less, job-providing pipeline help-
ing to answer our energy needs.
He's held off for fear of offend-
ing environmentalist or unions.
When the House Republicans
did not want to go along with
the bargain, it seemed like
almost everyone including
one prestigious newspaper in a
supposedly impartial front-page
story said they just didn't
know how to compromise. Yes,
they did. The usual procedure
in a case like this is for the
House and Senate bills to go


to a conference committee that
tries to work out something
agreeable to one and all.
Instead, it was Obama and
Senate Majority Leader Harry
Reid who said it was the two-
month bargain or nothing,
which hardly kept some com-
mentators from yelling loud
and hard about the proletariat-
despising, Tea Party plutocrats
in the House. Even Senate
Republicans grew obnoxious.
The House gave up half-hearted
adherence to doing what at least
had some spending relief merit
and instead went along with a
plan that would open theway to
more American wreckage down
the road.
What happens next is that
the White House and Senate
Democrats will call for a 10-
month extension with anti-job
tax hikes oncremore as the cost,
and Republicans will be made
to look like they favor the rich
over average folks.
Hear this, average folks. The
only real justification for any tem-
porary reduction of the payroll
tax would be significant, long-
term, courageous adjustments in
Social Security, and minus that,
you are being endangered and
treated like fools.

* Jay Ambrose is a columnist liv-
ing in Colorado.


Inevitably when the year
ends, we are treated to
a list of new words that
have regularly entered
the lexicon in the pre-
vious 365 days. This year
"Tebowing" to get down and
pray regardless of what others
are doing is new to the lan-
guage.
Well, at the beginning of 2012,
I suggest reintroducing a marvel-
ous and helpful word into usage
in the year ahead: suitor.
A suitor is defined in the World
English Dictionary as:
1. A man who courts a woman;
2. A person who brings a suit
in a court of law;
3. A person who makes a
request or appeal for anything.
All very helpful.
Now, let's make the connection
with George Clooney (stay with
me here): I fully believe that if
women the world over stopped
sleeping outside of marriage with
the self-declared "I'm never going
to get married again" movie star,
he would be quick to wed again.
Instead, of course, he gets
involved in years-long dating rela-
tionships until the woman he is
with gets tired of waiting and hop-
ing that she's "different" They
break up, and he goes on to the
next one.
Now, to connect the dots: This
same scenario gets repeated in
more mundane ways countless
times in our culture every day, to
the frustration of women every-
where who want to get married.


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com
Or, who want to wed in a more
timely way than their boyfriends
do.
Once, courtship was about
finding a marriage partner.
Period. In fact, the term "to
court" describing men and
women pairing off for marriage
- came from the notion of a man
"pressing his suit" as he would
in court, making his case to his
intended that he would be a good
husband.
Now, dating, which has
replaced courtship, could be
about anything. So what's a girl
to do when she wants to get mar-
ried and is not sure about her
boyfriend's intentions?
I'd suggest not sleeping with
him until marriage and openly
declaring "I'm dating to get mar-
ried," for starters.
But whatever one thinks of
such ideas, here's a surefire way
to really clarify things: I pro-
pose that this be the year for
adult, marriage-minded women
to ditch the meaningless term
"boyfriend." Rather, I suggest
resurrecting the old-fashioned
term "suitor."
Remember how a man court-


ing a woman is "pressing his
suit" for her hand? Perfect.
If she starts referring to and
introducing her significant other
as her "suitor," this will tell her
what she needs to know.
(She might have to show him an
online dictionary, but so be it.)
Is he happy to have friends and
family believe he is pursuing her
for marriage? Does he embrace
the terminology or does he
wince at it? Does he want to keep
her as his "girlfriend," suggest-
ing the term "suitor" may be a
little, you know, strong? Even if
he is thinking about marriage, is
he put off by the understanding
that as the man he ought to be
- and we women want him to be
- taking the lead in pursuing his
beloved?
I'm persuaded that using the
term "suitor" can give a girl a
lot of useful data in her rela-
tionships, very early on. (And
when, less commonly, the roles
are reversed and the fellow
isn't sure of her intentions? Try
introducing yourself as her suit-
or, or her as your "intended,"
and see what happens.)
And yes, I think the next mar-
riage-minded girl who links up
with George Clooney should
try using the term "suitor" to
describe his relationship to her
- and see what happens. She
may save herself a lot of time.

0 Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


ANO
VI


4A


TH ER
EW


Tehran's


moment


of truth


Islamic Republic
of Iran continue to
rattle their scimi-
tars, threatening a
crisis in the Strait of Hormuz.
Bring it on.
Iran is under increasing
pressure to abandon its nucle-
ar program. The United States
is about to ban commerce
with Iran's central bank. The
European Union is consider-
ing a new round of economic
sanctions and joining the U.S.
oil embargo against Iran. Saudi
Arabia has decided to increase
production to fill the gap
should Europeans stop buying
Iranian oil..
In response, Tehran is threat-
ening to stop all Persian Gulf
oil shipments. "If they impose
sanctions on Iran's oil exports,"
Iranian First Vice President
Mohammad Reza Rahimi said
Tuesday, "then even one drop
of oil cannot flow from the Strait
of Hormuz."About 17 percent
of the world's imported oil a
third of oil transported by sea
goes through this strategic
chokepoint
Iran's threat makes no eco-
nomic sense. Closing the strait
would shut off Iran's main
source of income and deny
its people necessary imports
such as gasoline, food and con-
sumer goods.
Closing the strait makes
even less military sense. Iran
would assume the role of the
aggressor and lose whatever
international legitimacy it has.
Perhaps Tehran thinks disrupt-
ing the regional seaborne oil
trade is a justifiable response
to an oil embargo or other
aspects of economic warfare.
There are, however, significant
legal ramifications for initiating
the use of overt military force
in an international waterway.
The United Nations could
authorize member states to
take whatever means neces-
sary to reopen the strait,
and even if permanent U.N.
Security Council members
Russia or China decide to veto
such a resolution, NATO or an
ad-hoc international coalition
could legally take action.
Once a military response is
authorized, Iran would pay a
devastating price. Reopening the
strait would involve operations
spanning the entire Gulf. Iran's
navy comprising eight light
surface warships, two dozen
nonnuclear submarines and
numerous small attack boats -
would quickly be destroyed. Any
air assets in the theater would
be eliminated. Land-based anti-
ship missile batteries would be
hunted down and bombed. Iran
may be able to conduct a few
successful attacks on coalition
ships or aircraft, but none of this
would leave the outcome of the
crisis in doubt
Iran would be branded an
international aggressor state
and be subject to a variety of
tougher sanctions and military
actions. A theaterwide response
to the strait closure would
involve airstrikes on military
and leadership targets through-
out the country, and the crisis
could be a useful pretext for
international action against
Iran's nuclear program. The
precedent was established with
Iraq's 1990 invasion of Kuwait,
after which the U.N. Security
Council passed Resolution 687,
which, among other things,
established a mechanism for
robust enforcement of the
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty
and led to the dismantling of
Saddam Hussein's original
nuclear program.
If Iran wants to commit sui-
cide, then by all means, close
the Strait of Hormuz right
away.


* Washington Times


www.lakecityreporter.com


'Suitor' beats 'boyfriend'

if you're marriage-bound









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Dec. 31

Watch night service


New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church's annual
watch-night service will
begin at 9:30 p.m. on
Saturday, December
31, 2011. We invite
everyone to come and
worship with us as we
praise and thank the .
Lord for bringing us
through 2011 and for
allowing us to enter
2012. Pastor Alvin J.
Baker will deliver the
message.
The church is located
at 550 NE Martin Luther
King Street.



New Year'a Eve
concert


New Years's Eve concert
at Lulu Advent Christian
Church, Saturday, Dec.
31 at 7 pm. featuring
Mr. Gary Honneger on
keyboard. Candlelight
Communion Service
following. Come and
share the New Year's
celebration with us.
Refreshments and
fellowship afterwards.


Watch night service


Truevine Baptist Church
will have a watch night
service on Dec. 31
starting at 10 p.m. The
public is invited to
attend to help lift up the
Name of Jesus.Looking
to see you. May God
continue to bless you
and yours. Thank you
in advance, Dr. Antonio
Carlisle, Pastor.


service on December
31 at 9:00 p.m. Please
make plans to come and
fellowship with us on,
this joyous evening of
praise and worship with
the St. Paul family. Yours
in Christ, Rev. Alvin L.
Greene, pastor.


Watch night service

Olivet Missionary /
Baptist Church will
be having night watch
service on Saturday,
Dec. 31 starting at 7:00
p.m. until 8:45 p.m.
Everyone is invited. The
church is located on 901
Davis St., Rev. Ronald V.
Walters is the pastor.



Jan. 4'

Blue/Grey meeting

Olustee meeting
The Blue/Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Jan. 4
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Newcomers
Friendship Luncheon


The January
Friendship Luncheon
of The Lake City
Newcomers and Friends
will be at Casa Del Sol
on US 90 on January
4th at 11:30 a.m. All
members, guests and
friends are welcome. For
more information call
Rose Taylor at 755-2175
or Barbara Test 754-
7227.


Watch night service Jan. 8


The New Mt. Pisgah
A.M.E Church, 345
NE Washington St.,
will have a watch night
service on Saturday,
Dec 31 at 10:30 p.m.
The public is invited to
fellowship with us in
praising God. The New
Year message will be
delivered by the pastor,
Joy Gallmon.


Watch night service


The Day Spring
Missionary Baptist
Church will be having
watch night service
on Saturday, Dec. 31,
beginning at 9:30 p.m.
The New Year message
will be delivered by
the pastor, Rev. Aaron
Thomas Lewis, Sr.
Everyone is invited to
come out and be a part
of this worship and
praise service as we give
thanks to God for his
blessings and for our
Lord and Savior Jesus
Christ. The church
is located at 849 N.E.
Congress Ave.


Watch night service
St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church will be
having Watch Night


134th church
anniversary

The New Mt. Pisgah
A.M.E Church, 345 NE
Washington St., church
family invites you to
share in our 134th
church anniversary on
Sunday Jan. 8 at 4 p.m.
The speaker will be the
Rev. Lantz Mills of New
Day Spring Day Church
and the theme is faith,
hope and love. *


Jan. 11


Lake City Newcomers and
Friends Monthly Luncheon

The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcmers
!and Friends will be
/'held at 11:00 a.m. on
Wednesday, Jan. 11th
at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a
fun day.

Jan. 15

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program.

On Sunday, January
15, 2012 4:00 p. m.,
the Columbia County
NAACP Branch will
host its 28th annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Observance Program at .
Trinity United Methodist
Church, located on
MLK, Jr. Street, in Lake
City, Florida.
Speaker for this
memorable occasion is
Bishop Russell Allen
Wright of Panama City,
Florida.
You, your family, and
friends are cordially
invited to attend this
historical occasion
honoring a man who
lives forever in our
hearts. Remember,
that's the Third Sunday,
January 15th 4 p.
m, at Trinity United
Methodist Church.
Glynnell Presley,
Secretary
John F. Mayo, NAACP
President/CEO

Jan. 18

Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.



Jan. 19


Voices that Change

Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from


Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet,
facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit
for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.


Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark.
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.

communityconcerts.info.



Feb. 1

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building .
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.



Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.

Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program

Merry Christmas and


a Happy New Year
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.


Community Concerts

The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3
p.m. Feb. 25 at the
' Levy Performing Arts
Center. This elite
singing ensemble from
the University of North
Florida performs world
music, vocal jazz, and
other choral gems.
Each singer is chosen
by audition for solo-
quality excellence and
enthusiasm. Award-
winning director Cara
Tasher has served
around the world
as chorus master,
guest conductor,
clinician, and soprano
soloist. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.



March 7

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is having a Wrap-up
meeting 5:30 p.m. March
7 at the Central Building
for the Olustee Festival
2012. The building is
located at 409 SW St.
Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.


March 9.

Community Concerts

Carpe Diem String
Quartet performs 7:30
pm March 9 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Carpe Diem plays their
classical string quartet
repertoire as well as
Gypsy, tango, folk, pop,
rock & jazz. Their 2009
album was Grammy


OBITUARIES


Gwendolyn Lorene Mill6r
Ms. Gwendolyn Lorene Miller,
90, died Tuesday evening De-
cember 26, 2011 following an
extended illness. She was the
daughter of the. late George Ru-
fus and Neva Mae Haines Ray.
She had made Lake City her
home since 1930 after moving
here from Deland, Florida. She
owned and operated the Shoe
Box Shoe Store" in downtown
she also worked as a desk clerk
at the Blanche Hotel. She was
an avid gardener and her great-
est joy in life was loving and
spoiling her grandchildren. She
was preceded in death by her
husband Cecil Myron Pete"
Miller a daughter Gwen Doug-
*lass, and a brother William Ray.
She is survived by one son Cecil
Myron Miller, Pyett, AR; four


grandchildren Brenda Douglass,
. Laurie Douglass-Barr, Rachel
Miller and Ezra Miller antd four
great-grandchildren Brittney
Douglass, Savannah Barr Miller,
Reya Goodnow and Adrik Miller.
Cremation arrangements are un-
der the direction of Dees-Parrish
.Family Funeral Home. Interment
will take place at a later date in
Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens
Cemetery. DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME
is in charge of all arrangements,
458 South Marion Avenue Lake
City, FL. 32025. (386) 752-
1234. Please sign guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com..

Velmer Emerson White
Velmer Emerson White, 84, a
resident of Lake City, Florida


passed away December 28, 2011
at North Florida Regional Medi-
cal Center, Gainesville, Florida.
Mr. White was born in Worton,
West Virginia and moved to Lake
City in 1982. He is the son of
the late Burton White and Nora
Lee Jarrell White. He served
the Lord as a member of Ath-
ens Baptist Church, Lake City,
Fl. and a veteran of WWII serv-
ing in the United States Marine
Corp. He was employed with a
telephone communications com-
pany as a technician. Survivors
include his loving wife of sixty
years, Dasiy Dot White, Lake
City, Fl. Two daughters, Mar-
sha Harris and Melissa Welsted.
One brother, Douglas White
and one sister, Kathleen Moore.
Five grandchildren, Jonathan
Harris., Justin Harris, James Ty-
ler Anderson, Heather Kelly and


Laurn Anderson. Four great-
grandchildren, Cheyenne Harris,
Syvannah Harris, Blake Kelly
ind Madison Kelly. Funeral ser-
vices for Mr. White will be con-
ducted Saturday, December 31,
2011 at 11:00 A.M., at Athens
Baptist Church with Rev. Walter
Vowman officiating. Visitation
with the family will be at the
church prior to the service from
10 to 11 A.M. Interment will
follow at the church cemetery.
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 sw Main Blvd., Lake City,
Fl. is in charge of all arrange-
ments. Please sign guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome. net

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Jan. 20


Community Concerts
Feb. 25


listed for Best Classical
Album, Best Chamber
Music Performance,
Best New Artist, and
Best Engineered Album-
Classical. We believe
that their electrifying
style will keep you
engaged from beginning
to end. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.


May 20


Community Concerts

The Jacksonville
Symphony Orchestra
performs 3 p.m. May 20
at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. The full
Jacksonville Symphony
Orchestra presents
a rousing "Patriotic
Pops Spectacular"
program featuring
popular works by John
Williams, Gershwin,
Bernstein; Berlin,
Sousa, and other season
favorites. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
comunityconcerts.info


ONGOING

Boys Club winter
program


The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program, which runs
through March 1. Fees
are $175, which includes
transportation from all
elementary and junior
high schools.
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts.and .crafts,
gamerooms ad special
events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutorial
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
available, ,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones
Way.

Flag football tryouts


Flag Football, Christ
Central Sports.
Registration now thru
January 13. Age 5-12.
Fee: $40. Call Ronnie for
more info 386-365-2128.



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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011


Last shuttle flight is Fla.'s top story


By MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press

ORLANDO The end
of the space shuttle pro-
gram after more than three
decades of flights to low-
earth orbit launched past
Gov. Rick Scott's shakeup
of state government and
the Casey Anthony murder
trial as Florida's top story
of 2011, according to a poll
of newspaper editors con-
ducted by The Associated
Press.
Atlantis' rolling stop on
a Kennedy Space Center
runway in July marked
the end of the 30-year-old
space shuttle program. It
was a moment of celebra-
tion and apprehension for
NASA's thousands of work-
ers and contractors, many
of whom lost jobs with the
last shuttle flight.
The end of the mission
ushered in an era of unprec-
edented uncertainty for
Florida's Space Coast, the
site of every shuttle launch,
as well as for the nation's
space agenda. U.S. astro-
nauts must now depend on
Russian Soyuz vehicles for
rides to the space station in
the near future, and NASA
is outsourcing the logistics
of sending supplies and
astronauts to the space sta-
tion to private companies.
Thousands of skilled space
workers are now looking
for jobs in a state with a
10 percent unemployment
rate.
Florida's governor played
a role in half the stories
chosen for the top 10.
The Florida newspaper
editors voted Scott's tak-
ing over the governor's
office, and his subsequent
efforts to shake up state
government with a pro-
business agenda, as the
year's No. 2 story. After
becoming governor in
January, Scott-successfully
pushed for the elimina-
tion of several state agen-
cies dealing with growth
management, labor, trade
and economic development
and cobbled them togeth-
er into the Department of
Economic Opportunity.
Environmentalists and
planning advocates criti-
cized the dismantling of
the growth management
agency, saying it will open
the door to sprawl and pol-
lution.

These news items round-
ed out the top 10 stories of
the year:
3. The trial and acquittal of
Casey Anthony on charges
of murdering her 2-year-old
daughter Caylee captured
the attention of the nation
during the summer. National
television shows provided
hourly updates and round-
the-clock commentary on
the criminal proceedings,
and Orlando's local tele-
vision stations broadcast
the trial live gavel-to-gavel.
Even after she was released
from jail and her legal saga
appeared to be over, she was
ordered to return to Florida
to serve out a year of proba-
tion at an undisclosed loca-
tion for an unrelated check
fraud charge.
4. Shortly after he became
governor in January, Scott
pushed to shut down the
main pension plan to new
state employees, and he
wanted public employees to
contribute 5 percent of their
salary to help cover pension
costs. Legislators instead
settled for a 3 percent con-
tribution rate that public
employee unions are now


challenging in the courts.
5. After a disastrous tour-
ism season following the
Gulf oil spill in 2010, tour-
ism along Florida's Gulf
Coast rebounded to record
levels. Local tourism boards
were aided by millions of
dollars in BP money that
allowed them to try promo-
tions they had never done
before. In some Panhandle
counties, visitor counts
were up by 20 percent
. 6. Even though Florida is
regarded as "ground zero"
for the nation's prescription
drug problem, Scott had
his doubts about a state
prescription drug tracking
system aimed at closing
down "pill mills" that sell
painkillers and other medi-
cations to drug dealers
and addicts. He took office
wanting the drug data-
base scrapped, but he later
relented after facing opposi-
tion from Florida Attorney
General Pam Bondi and
some state lawmakers. The
system started operating in
September.
7. The beating death of
Florida A&M University
drum major Robert
Champion after a November
football game revealed
a culture of hazing at the
Tallahassee-based school
and created a public aware-
ness of hazing rituals at
schools around the nation.
In the wake of Champion's
death, FAMU President
James Ammons repelled
two attempts to put him on
administrative leave. Band
director Julian White was
fired by Ammons but then
placed on administrative
leave, and four students
were dismissed by the uni-
versity but then allowed to
return to classes, pending
the investigations.
8. Scott signed into law a
merit pay requirement for
new teachers. Once the law
goes into effect in 2014,
new teachers will be given
one of four performance
ratings, half of which will
be based on student growth
on tests. The ratings will
be used in determining
pay. The law also got rid
of teacher seniority dur-
ing layoffs. The statewide
teachers union has filed a
lawsuit claiming the law is
unconstitutional because
it changed the way teach-
ers are paid and evaluated
without going through col-
lective bargaining.
9. Scott signed into law
an election bill that reduces
the number of early voting
days, slaps new require-
ments on groups conduct-
ing voter registration drives,
requires voters changing
out-of-county addresses at
the polls to cast provisional
ballots and makes it more
difficult to get citizen initia-
tives on the ballot. GOP
lawmakers who sponsored
the bill said the changes
will prevent voting fraud,
but opponents say it will
suppress turnout of minori-
ties and others who tend to
vote Democratic. '
10. A federal judge
in Pensacola ruled that
President Barack Obama's
massive health care over-
haul was unconstitutional,
saying the federal govern-
ment had overstepped its
authority to regulate inter-
state commerce by requir-
ing all Americans to carry
health insurance. Three
other federal judges have
upheld the law and a fourth
has ruled against it, leaving
it up to the U.S. Supreme
Court to determine its con-
stitutionality.


MR,
1' l:.-%,1-,, '. I .



-..,, -'r-.*. , _, -










-' +.' . -
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this May 16 photo taken with a cell phone by Stefanie Gordon aboard a passenger flight from New York to Palm Beach, the,
space shuttle Endeavor is shown as it streaks toward orbit shortly after liftoff. Gordon says she had just awakened from a nap
on the flight when the pilot announced the shuttle might come into view.


In this July 17 file photo, Casey Anthony, center, walks out of the Orange County Jail with her attorney Jose Baez, left, during
her release in Orlando. Anthony was acquitted of murder in the death of her daughter, Caylee.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, December 30, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Jan. 10
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Jan. 10 in
the teacher's lounge at
the high school. Planning
for the varsity banquet is
under way.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

CHS FOOTBALL
Banquet planned
for Jan. 6
The Columbia High
football team's end of
the year banquet is
7 p.m. Jan 6 in the school
cafeteria. The banquet is
a fundraiser for the
quarterback club and
attire is semi-formal.
Tickets are on sale for
$12 at Hunter Printing.
For details, call coach
Brian Allen at 755-8080
ext. 140.

YOUTH BASEBALL
Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
available at www.lcccyb.
com. Online registration
is $75 plus a transaction
fee. Onsite registration
begins Jan. 6 with a cost
of $80.
For details, call
president Tad Cervantes
at 365-4810.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Registration for
Boys Club hoops
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
accepting registration for
its basketball
program. Cost is /845.
Three leagues afe
offered: Training, ages
6-7-8; Jr. Varsity,, ages 8-9-
10; Varsity, ages
11-12-13-14. Practices are
twice weekly /vith games
on Saturday /except
Training LeAgue).
For details, call 752-
4184.

YOUTH BASEBALL
North Florida
Blaze tryouts
The'North Florida
Blaze'travel baseball
team for ages 11-12 has
a tryout planned for 2
p.m. Jan. 7 at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423
or Jamie Sosa at 867-
9039.

GOLF
Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
available at www.lcccyb.
com. Online registration
is $75 plus a transaction
fee. Onsite registration is
5-7 p.m. Jan. 6, 13 and 20,
and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan.
7, 14 and 21 at Southside
Sports Complex with a
cost of $80.
For details, call presi-
dent Tad Cervantes at
365-4810 or vice-presi-
dent David Williams at
(386) 697-0764.


* From staff reports


Seminoles


rally to beat


Notre Dame


FSU comes from
14 down to beat
Fighting Irish.
Associated Press

ORLANDO Florida
State rallied from a 14-point
second-half deficit and used
a pair of touchdown passes
by EJ. Manuel and two field
goals from Dustin Hopkins
to slip past Notre Dame 18-
14 in the Champs Sports
Bowl on Thursday night
The victory was FSU's


fourth straight bowl win.
FSU receiver Rashad
Greene, who caught one of
Manuel's touchdown pass-
es, was named the game's
MVP.
The No. 25 Seminoles
started four freshman on
their offensive line and
gave up five sacks, but
FSU's defense picked off
Notre Dame quarterbacks
Tommy Rees and Andrew
Hendrix three times and
also piled up four sacks of
NOLES continued on 2B


Tigers to


Columbia to face
Union County
again today.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High split
wins during the opening
day of the Fort White High
Christmas Tournament
The Lady Tigers fell to
North Florida Christian,
53-36, in the opening game,
but Columbia rebounded to
beat Union County High,
54-48 in the late game.
The win against Union
County sets up a rematch
today in the third-round
game for both teams of
Lady Tigers at noon today.
Fort White High lost in
its only game in the tourna-
ment The Lady Indians fell
to Haggerty High, 43-21.
Haggerty will meet
North Florida Christian
in the championship at
1:30 p.m. today.
Columbia was led by
Stephanie Silva' with 15
points in the loss against
North Florida Christian.
Rosanna Jenije6scored 27
points to lead NoAth Florida
Christian.
Desma Blake and Cemise
Armstrong had five points
CHS continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees (left) is stopped after a short gain by Florida State
safety Lamarcus Joyner (20) during the first half of the Champs Sports Bowl NCAA college
football game, Thursday in Orlando.


meet twice


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Sierra Vanderpool dives for a loose ball during the first half against Union County High in the Fort White
Christmas tournament on Thursday. .


Veteran coach Hamilton

seeking right combination


Seminoles yet to
pick up key win
this season.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State coach Leonard
Hamilton is still hunting for
the right combination after
a dozen games into the sea-
son.
The tall starting lineup
Hamilton featured the past
several weeks has come up
short, putting more pres-
sure on his veteran team to
finish strong in quest of a
fourth consecutive NCAA
appearance.
The once-ranked
Seminoles have been
plagued with turnovers and
poor shooting. Those defi-
ciencies have been costly.
Florida State (8-4) has
yet to defeat a ranked team
while losing to four of
them. The Seminoles were


hammered 82-64 at No. 10
Florida in their last outing
on Dec. 22.
Hamilton is making some
changes in hopes of curing
some of the early season
ailments Friday when the
Seminoles host Princeton
(6-7), the first Ivy League
school to visit Florida
State.
"We'll go more with
a three-guard lineup as
opposed maybe to a three
forward lineup," Hamilton
said. '"We want to get a little
more in sync."
A couple of highly
recruited North Carolina
prep stars, freshman Terry
Whisnant and sophomore
Ian Miller, are slated for
additional playing time
in hopes of cutting down
turnovers and boosting
the offense, where junior
Michael Snaer leads the
team with as 12.4 average.
Snaer, however, is shoot-
ing just 38.7 percent from
the field. Bernard James is


the only other Seminole in
double figures with a 10.2
scoring average and the
lone player making more
than 50 percent of his shots.
James has struggled at the
free throw line, where he
has made only 45 percent of
his tries this season.
"We've got some pretty
good parts," Hamilton said.
"We don't have it all quite
put together."
Although the Seminoles
shooting percentage if just
43 percent without James,
who gets most of his points
at close range, the most
troubling bugaboo has been
turnovers. Florida State has
averaged 18.8 turnovers a
game.
"You've kind of got to
look at yourself in the mir-
ror," said senior point guard
Luke Loucks, who leads the
team in assists with 43. "It's
time to evaluate where we're
at and move forward."
FSU continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Xavier Gibson (1) jams the ball through the
basket with teammate Bernard James (5) watching during
the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against
Florida in Gainesville on Dec. 22.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
BOXING
II p.m.
SHO Super middleweights, Andre
Dirrell (19-1-0) vs. Darryl Cunningham
(24-2-0); light heavyweights, Luis Garcia
(11-0-0) vs. Alexander Johnson (12-0-0);
middleweights, Jermain Taylor (28-4-1) vs.
Jessie Nicklow (22-2-3), at Cabazon, Calif.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon
ESPN -Armed Forces Bowl, BYU vs.
Tulsa, at Dallas .
3:20 p.m.
ESPN Pinstripe Bowl, Rutgers vs.
Iowa St., at New York
6:40 p.m.
ESPN Music City Bowl, Mississippi
St. vs.Wake Forest, at Nashville,Tenn.
10 p.m.
ESPN Insight Bowl, Iowa vs.
Oklahoma, at Tempe.Ariz.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -W. Michigan at Duke
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -WestVirginia at Seton Hall
NBA BASKETBALL
10:30 p.m.
WGN Chicago at LA. Clippers


FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England 12 3 0.800464321
N.Y. jets 8 7 0.533 360 344
Buffalo 6 9 0.400351 385
Miami 5 10 0.333 310 296
South
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Houston 10 5 0.667.359255
Tennessee 8 7 0.533 302 295
Jacksonville 4 II 0.267 224 316
Indianapolis 2 13 0.133 230 411
North
W I T P-t PD PA


x-Batimore
x-Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Denver
Oakland
San Diego
Kansas City


II 4
II 4
9 6
4 I1
West
W L
8 7
8 7
7 8
6 9


0 .733 354 250
0.733 312218
0 .600 328 299
0.267 209 294

T Pct. PF PA
0 .533 306 383
0.533 333 395
0.467 368 351
0 .400 205 335


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 8 7 0 .533 363 386
Dallas 8 .7 0.533 355 316
Philadelphia 7 8 0.467 362 318
Washington 5 10 0 .333 278 333
South
.. .. o-;.v ,--^-T F^WTA
y-New Orleans 12 3 0 .800 502 322
x-Atlanta" 9 6 0 .600 357 326
Carolina 6 9 0.400 389 384
Tampa Bay 4 II 0.267 263 449
North
W L T Pct PF PA
y-Green Bay 14 I 0.933 515 318
x-Detroit 10 5 0.667 433 342
Chicago 7 8 0.467 336 328
Minnesota 3 12 0.200 327 432
West
W L T Pct PF PA
y-San Francisco 12 3 0 .800 346 202
Seattle 7 8 0.467301 292
Arizona 7 8 0.467 289 328
St.Louis .2 13 0.133 166,373
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sunday's Game
Green Bay 35, Chicago 21
I Monday's Game
New Orleans 45,Atlanta 16
Sunday, Jan. I
Chicago at Minnesota, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Buffalo at New England, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Miami, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, I p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona; 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atanta, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.

Season passing yardage

Player, Team Year Yards
x-Drew Brees, NO 2011 5,087.
Dan Marino, Mia 1984 5,084
Drew Brees, NO 1008 5,069
x-Tom Brady, NE 2011 4,897
Kurt Warner, StL 2001 4,830
Tom Brady, NE 2007 4,806
x-Through 15 games

College bowl games

Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20, FIU 10
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU 31, Louisiana Tech 24
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 56,Arizona State 24
Hawaii Bowl
Southern Mississippi 24, 'Nevada 17'

Monday
Independence Bowl
Missouri 41, North Carolina 24

Tuesday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
Purdue 37,Western Michigan 32
Belk Bowl
NC State 3 1, Louisville 24

Wednesday
Military Bowl
At Washington
Toledo 42,Alr Force 41
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas 21, California 10

Thursday
Champs Sports Bowl
Florida State 18, Notre Dame
14


Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Baylor (9-3) vs. Washington (7-5),
9 p.m. (n)

Toay
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
Tulsa (8-4) vs. BYU (9-3), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Rutgers (8-4) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi State (6-6) vs.Wake Forest
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Inslght.Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Oklahoma (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5),
10p.m. (ESPN)
Saturday
Meinke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern
(6-6), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Georgia Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
ULberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
UCLA (6-7) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fll-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 2
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1),
Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina
(10-2), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
(10-3), I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
I p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Stanford (I I-I) vs; Oklahoma State
(1I -I), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Jan. 3
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan (10-2);vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)
"'Wedesda, Jan.4
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestVirginia (9-3) vs. Clemson (10-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN).

Friday, Jan. 6
Cotton Bowl
At Arllngton,Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday, Jan. 7
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Alk.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5). Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday, Jan. 8
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 9
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans.
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama, (I -1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Florida 2012 schedule

Sept. 1: Bowling Green
Sept.8: at Texas A&M
Sept. 15: at Tennessee
Sept. 22: Kentucky
Oct. 6: LSU
Oct. 13:atVanderbllt .
Oct. 20: South Carolina
Oct. 27: vs. Georgia (Jacksonville)
Nov. 3: Missouri
Nov. 10: La.-Lafayette
Nov. 17:Jatcksonville St.
Nov. 24: at Florida St.

BASKETBALL




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to form four ordinary words.

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NBA schedule

Wednesday's Games
Indiana 90,Toronto 85
Miami 96, Charlotte 95
Atlanta 101,Washington 83
Cleveland 105, Detroit 89
New Orleans 97, Boston 78
Oklahoma City 98, Memphis 95
San Antonio I 15, LA Clippers 90
Denver 117, Utah 100
Philadelphia 103, Phoenix 83
Golden State 92, New York 78
Thursday's Games
New Jersey at Orlando (n)
San Antonio at Houston (n)
Dallas at Oklahoma City (n)
Chicago at Sacramento (n)
Denver at Portland (n)
NewYork at LA. Lakers (n)
Today's Games
Orlando at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey atAtlanta,-7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Miami at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Houston at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Washington at Milwaukee, 8130 p.m.
Philadelphia at Utah, 9 p.m.
Chicago at LA. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 7 Duke vs. Western Michigan,
7 p.m.
No. 8 Missouri at Old Dominion,
7 p.m.'
No. 20 Murray State at Eastern Illinois,
8 p.m.
No. 23 Virginia vs.Towson, 7 p.m.
No. 25 San Diego State vs. Redlands,
10 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. 2 Ohio State at No. 13 Indiana,
6 p.m.
No. 3 Kentucky vs. No. 4 Louisville,
Noon
No. 9 UConn vs. St. John's at the XL
Center,'Hartford, Conn., Noon
No. 10 Florida vs.Yale, 2 p.m.
No. I I Wisconsin vs. Iowa, I p.m.
No. 12 Georgetown vs. Providence at
Georgetown, 2 p.m.
No. 15 Mississippi State vs. Utah State,
2 p.m.
No. 16 Michigan State at Nebraska,
3 p.m.
No. 17 Kansas vs. North Dakota,
4 p.m.
No. 19 UNLV at Hawaii, 8 p.m.
No. 21 Creighton at Wichita State,
6 p.m.
No. 24 Harvard vs. Saint Joseph's,
4 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. I Syracuse at DePaul, 5 p.m.
No. 5 North Carolina vs. Monmouth
(NJ).3 p.m.
No. 7 Duke vs. Pennsylvania, 5 p.m.
No. 14 Marquette vs.Vlllanova. I p.m.
No. 18 Michigan vs. Minnesota, 4 p.m.
No. 22 Pittsburgh vs. Cinrcinhati,
7 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Calgary 2, Columbus I, SO
Pittsburgh 4, Carolina 2
Montreal 6, Ottawa 2
Tampa Bay 5, Philadelphia I
RFlorida 5,Toronto 3
Detroit 3, St. Louis 2
Winnipeg 4, Colorado I
Wednesday's Games
Nashville 2, Minnesota 1, SO
New Jersey 3, Buffalo I
Washington 4, N.Y. Rangers I
Los Angeles 2, Chicago 0
Boston 2, Phoenix I, OT
Vancouver 3, San Jose 2, OT
Thursday's Games
Calgary at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh (n)
Toronto at Carolina (n)
Montreal at Tampa Bay (n)
Edmonton at Minnesota (n)
Los Angeles at Winnipeg (n)
Columbus at Dallas (n)
Phoenix at Colorado (n)
Vancouver at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
Buffalo at Washington, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Edmonton at N.Y. Islanders, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at New Jersey, 3 p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Montreal at Florida. 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
St. Louis at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Washington at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 8 p.m.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: CT -11 1
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SPOIL BRASH BUTTER TYRANT
I Answer: After they installed his new courtroom chair,
the judge wanted to TRY IT OUT


12-30


NOLES: Rally to beat Notre Dame

Continued From Page 1B


its own.
Notre Dame shuffled
between Rees and Hendrix
throughout the game, but
both struggled to get the
Irish points inside the red
zone.
After some stagnant
offense on both sides in
the first half, FSU trailed
14-0 early in the third quar-
ter before finding some
momentum through the
air.
The Seminoles closed
the gap to 14-9 with an 18-
yard touchdown pass from
Manuel to Bert Reed to
open the fourth quarter,:
but failed on their 2-point
conversion attempt.
They took the lead
just 1:32 later after Nigel
Bradham intercepted a
Hendrix pass inside the
Notre Dame 20 to set up an
18-yard touchdown catch
by Greene to make it 15-14
with just over 13 minutes
to play following another
failed 2-point try.
The Seminoles added
their second field goal of.
the game a series later.
Notre Dame punted on its


next touch, but pinned FSU
inside its own 5 and forced
a quick three-and-out.
A poor punt by the
Seminoles and a face mask
penalty on the return gave
the Irish the ball on the
FSU 28 with 3:56 to play,
but Rees was picked off in
the end zone with 2:48 left
and FSU was able to all
but run out the remaining
clock.
Notre Dame took a 14-0
lead on its opening drive of
the second half by capping
a 9-play, 62-yard drive with
a 5-yard touchdown pass
from Rees to Michael Floyd.
Floyd fought Seminoles cor-
nerback- Greg Reid for the
ball on to play, juggling it
multiple times before finally
getting his hands around it.
Reid stayed down on the
turf after the play and left
the game with concussion
symptoms.
FSU bounced right back
with a 77-yard kickoff
return by Lamarcus Joyner,
but Notre Dame's fifth sack
of the night on Manuel
helped force the Seminoles
to settle for a 42-yard field


goal by Hopkins.
Notre Dame's defense
was responsible for the lone
score of the first half.
The Irish forced a quick
punt on FSU's opening pos-
session of the game, and
used a 41-yard return by
Floyd and a series of runs
by Cierre Wood to set up
a first-and-goal inside the
5-yard line.
But the threat ended just
a play later when Rees was
picked off by Joyner in the
end zone.
The Seminoles' ensu-
ing drive lasted only one
play itself, with Devonta
Freeman fumbling a pass
from Manuel into the hands
of Notre Dame safety Zeke
Motta, who then returned it
29 yards for the touchdown.
Both offenses struggled
to find any traction in the
opening 30 minutes. Along
with each team's turnovers,
Florida State's offense
gained only 104 total yards
to Notre Dame's 91.
The Seminoles also failed
to covert on any of their
seven third-down attempts,
while allowing four sacks.


FSU: Hamilton looking for ACC wins


Continued From Page 1B

Hamilton, who is 184-121
midway through his 10th
season at, Florida State,
is confident the team will
bounce back similarly the
way it did last year at about
this pointfollowing disheart-
ening back-to-back losses
at Auburn and Virginia
Tech in the Atlantic Coast
Conference opener.
Snaer doesn't want to
limp into conference play
again.-
"We've got to go into con-
ference with a little bit of'
momentum," Snaer said.


'We can't afford to lose any
(more) games."
SHamilton plans to tweak
his lineup some Friday
against Princeton and next
Wednesday versus Auburn
in the Seminoles final non-
conference tune-ups to
shore up the offense. Florida
State begins its ACC sched-
ule in early January with
road games at Clemson and
Virginia Tech before host-
ing No. 5 North Carolina
on Jan. 14.
Florida State finished
23-11 last year and is 70-


31 over the past three
seasons, trailing only
Duke and North Carolina
in ACC competition and
returned nine experienced
players from a team that,
advanced to the NCAA's
round of 16.
The Seminoles haven't
been able, to replace their
top scorers from last year,
Chris Singleton and Derwin
Kitchen.
"Someone has to step
up,". Hamilton said. "We'll
keep trying to see what
works best."


CHS: Plays Union Cbunty again

Continued From Page 1B


each in the Lady Indians' loss.
Columbia jumped out
to a 21-15 halftime lead
before Union County took
the edge heading into the
fourth quarter. Columbia
rebounded to come away
with the 54-48 win.
Justice Campbell led the


ACROSS
1 Mist
5 And, to Fritz
8 Back when
11 Hormone
producer
13 Mail-motto
word
14 Fleshy
mushroom
15 Large Asian
feline
16 Sir Walter
Scott novel
18 Pert lass
20 Brandish
21 According
to -
23 Mao -tung
24 Web suffix
25 Links org.
27 Roll dice
31 Do a takeoff
32 Iffy attempt
33 Novelist
Ferber
34 Volcano
fissure
36 Siberian river


way with 19 points in the
contest Benisha Clark fin-
ished with 14 points.
The teams will play for
third place today.
"We need to come out and
play aggressive," Columbia
head coach Tera Perry
said. 'We had a mix going


38 Flee in haste
39 Latin I verb
40 Big Board
letters
41 Harry's
successor
42 Finger
opposite
44 Meter reader.
46 Abbot's
underling
49 Tint or shade
50 Mean
52 Gung-ho
56 Picnicked
57 Mork's planet
58 Took the car
59 Pothole filler
60 Humorist
Bill -
61 Dance move


DOWN
Alt.
Cassius
Clay
Zig opposite
Adversary


in and out and we didn't
know what was going to be
the hot group on the floor
until the last quarter. We
have to get the right mix
earlier and be aggressive to
get the job done."
Columbia' is 5-4 on the
season.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


GO ERN ALLPRO
OPERAS BAIT ED
PERIL LAID
SNTT ELAN
MAL TIED OUI
POLISH USURP

OLE DEAL ESS
VANS ALTO
ERRS MAYAN
MO VEIN PAJAMA
PR .1IMPS CHALET
HORSE TAX ES


5 DOS
alternative
6 30-day mo.
7 Attracts
8 Joint
problem
9 Earth sci.


10 Kind of
column
(hyph.)
12 Dental
equipment
17 Reunion
attendee
19 Far-out planet
21 Aspirations
22 Ominous
signs
23 Hot sauce
24 Stalactite site
26 Big steel town
28 Improvise
(hyph.)
29 Winding
30 Tractable
35 Wyoming
range
37 Stood against
43 Hunter
constellation
45 Grizzlies
46 Jr.'s exam
47 Coolidge or
Hayworth
48 Disney CEO
Bob -
49 Little child
51 Potato snack
53 Obtained
54 Time to
celebrate
55 Good name,
for short


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30, 2011


DILBERT
I'M EXCITED BECAUSE
I HAVE A MEETING IN
A FELW MINUTES WITH
AWESOME BOB.


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Desperate daughter wants

to break free of needy mom


DEAR ABBY: I'm a 25-
year-old woman with no
future. I am the youngest
of three daughters. My
parents are divorced and
my sisters are both mar-
ried. Mom has no income
of her own, so it's mainly
me.
I have come to realize
that I'll never be able to
have an apartment of my
own or fully live my life
because of her. She's con-
trolling and always finds a
way to make me feel guilty
about going out or enjoy-
ing myself. I have never
had a relationship because
she has always found a
way of sabotaging any rela-
tionship I'm in.
I think she's bipolar,
but she doesn't believe in
medication or that it's even
real. I feel as if I'm being
forced to take care of her,
and when I finally have a
chance to have a real life,
it will be too late.
I have discussed this
with my sisters, but they
haven't helped. I'm very
depressed and don't know
what to do. If I bring this
up with Mom, she gets
angry and won't talk to
me for days. Please help
me find a way out. -
TRAPPED IN CHICAGO
DEAR TRAPPED: Your
umbilical cord was sup-
posed to have been sev-
ered 25 years ago, at birth.
You are an adult individual
who deserves happiness
and freedom from this




ARIES (March 21-April
19): A little shopping spree
will help boost your con-
fidence with a product or
look you put together to
enhance your appearance.
Love is highlighted, and
spending time socializing,
networking or enjoying
interesting activities will
pay off. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Share what you know
with someone you respect
and you will get valuable
suggestions that will fit
into your plans. Don't
worry about being a little
pushy. As long as you are
complimentary, your ques-
tions and directness will be
accepted. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20).: Added responsibil-
ity will impress someone
who has the potential to
help you and influence
your future. Be careful
not to let your emotions
get involved. The more
controlled you are in your
handling of a situation, the
more marketable you will
become. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): A little downtime
with family or friends will
do you good. Open your
doors and enjoy the plea-
sure of catering to others.
The impression you make
will lead to some interest-
ing offers that will help
you excel in the new year.
*****


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
attachment to your mother.
She may not believe in
doctors and therapists and
that's her privilege as long
as she's not a danger to
herself and others. But that
doesn't mean you shouldn't
talk with a mental health
professional about this
unhealthy situation.
Your sisters haven't
helped you because they
have their freedom and
don't want to share the
responsibility you have
been carrying alone. And
your mother doesn't want
to let go of you because
if she does, she'll have to
assume responsibility for
herself.
Please act now. Your
escape hatch is the door
to a therapist's office. You
deserve a life, so go there
and get one.

DEAR ABBY: I recently
found out that my boy-
friend of three years the
only man I have ever been
with cheated on me with
a woman I thought was a
good friend. I love him and
have decided to take him
back and fight for what
we had. He assured me


that he wants to be only
with me, that what he did
was "stupid" and he has
learned his lesson.
Abby, although I have
forgiven him, I can't bring
myself to forgive HER. I
have never been someone
who holds a grudge, but I
have so inuch hate for her
that it scares me. I did get
professional help, but it
didn't work.
I don't want to be like
this. This is not who I am.
I'm worried about how I
might react when I see her.
I can't avoid her since we
work in the same industry.
Why can I forgive him
but not her? MOVING
FORWARD IN TEXAS
DEAR MOVING
FORWARD: Probably
because having invested
three years in the "only
man you have ever been
with," you don't want it to
have been for nothing so
you're directing the anger
you still feel toward HIM at
the woman you would like
to imagine seduced him.
(Remember, it takes two to
tango.) Also, you may still
regard her as a threat
While you may have for-
given your boyfriend, do
not forget what happened.
A man who cheats and
blames it on "stupidity"
may do it again with some-
one else.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Greater security and a
chance to develop better
relationships are apparent
if you are serious about
doing your share and find-
ing complimentary ways to
work alongside the people
who mean the most to you.
Love is in the stars. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Emotional matters
will skyrocket, bringing
situations you may have
been avoiding into the
forefront Don't back away,
or you will send the wrong
impression. Deal with mat-
ters head-on so that you
can move on. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Approach the changes
you want to make with
caution. Not everyone will
be in favor of your plans.
Consider a colorful way of
expressing your ideas and
how you see them unfold-
ing. Include a positive view
of how it will affect loved
ones. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-
Nov. 21): Get out and
spend time with people
who share your interests.
Common ground will
spark ideas or a way you
can resurrect something
you need help finishing.
A favor and a promise
are heading your way.


SAGIITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll face
opposition over emotional
matters that surface. Avoid
anyone who wants to cor-
ner you or tries to take
advantage of you. Take
time out to make some
personal improvements
that will help deter any
interference. Do what's
best for you. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): A change at home
will bring you great joy.
Invite old friends over to
share your good fortune.
Past experience coupled
with what you have to con-
tribute presently will lead
to a brighter, more secure
future. Home improve-
ments will pay off. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Don't overdo it
Taking on too much, over-
spending arid overindulg-
ing will be your downfall.
Pace what you do carefully
and avoid letting someone
you spend time with talk
you into something you
know you shouldn't do.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Say little and avoid
repercussions. Not every-
one will be on your side.
Don't let your emotions
give away your true feel-
ings. Keep your thoughts a
secret Make love, not war.
Actions will truly speak
louder than words. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: K equals 0
"N LCWWXD AH UNS GXNDS CGYX AH
TRX VLCAXMXJ PORANKTX N LCMX AH
ETJALXJ ALX NUXC HE WXCBX."
- SCJJ XAA PHJJNR

Previous Solution: "Women are not forgiven for aging. Robert Redford's lines
of distinction are my old-age wrinkles." Jane Fonda
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-30


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
hfiPoV NEW o ERR!! HEY, JHer--s -cToHN?
IIOULD OLD MUAN1ME a -RE'S RE-
eeg&f5EMN -


iOH!WNflmrnflRE YOU
DO DOWN -THE-RE
r ON THE FLOOR
l Z--k ??!t


IUh-.-SHOMEBODy
tSHED ME ON-rt'
S-FS SES ..... fIN'.
I DiFOPPP-D
MY LIP8......


EVERYTHING HE DOES
IS rUST A LITTLE BIT
MORE AWESOME THAN
WHAT ANYONE ELSE
DOES.


HE'S RUNNING LATE
BECAUSE THE DRY
CLEANER COULDN'T GET
STHE SUSHI STAINS
- OUT OF HIS FLYING
WINGSUIT. AWESOME!
I AEOE


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415










Classified Department: 755-5440


lIMWI


SEiLhL T


FIND IT


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
FILE NUMBER: 11-292-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF GENEVIEVE
SUMMERS BUIE NELSON, FOR-
MERLY GENEVIEVE SUMMERS'
BUIE,,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
GENEVIEVE SUMMERS BUIE
NELSON, formerly GENEVIEVE
SUMMERS BUIE, deceased, whose
date of death was November 5, 2011,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Columbia County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Post Office Box 2069, Lake City,
Florida 32056-2069. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims or demands
with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE is
December 30, 2011.
Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-
tatives
DARBY & PEELE
HERBERT F. DARBY
Florida Bar No. 0017901
285 Northeast Hernando Avenue
Post Office Drawer 1707
Lake City, Florida 32056-1707
telephone: 1-386-752-4120
Co-Personal Representatives
By:/s/ GEORGE A. BUIE, III
2403 Coventry Avenue,
Lakeland, Florida 33803
By:/s/ ELIZABETH PATRICIA
BUIE WITT"
1825 SW Paloma Court
Lake City, Florida 32025 ,
05529779
December 30, 2011
January 6, 2012

100 Job
1 Opportunities

-5529823
HOLIDAY INN & SUITES
Lake City's only full service
hotel is seeking the following:
Full Time Positions:
Night Auditor (1 la-7p)
o Night Manager (3p-l Ip)
Apply at: www.ihg.jobs.net
Part Time positions:
Dishwasher (am shift)
o Security Guard (1 la-7p)
Front Desk Agent (3p-1 1p)
Apply Mon-Fri 12-5prm
213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.
Help Wanted: Kitchen help, wait-
ers, waitresses. Experience prefer-
red. Apply at 7674 SW US Hwy
27 in Fort White. 386-497-1631

Local CPA Firm is looking for
an experienced tax return preparer.
Ideally, the candidate will be able
to prepare personal, corporate
and partnership returns.
The seasonal time frame is
February 1 through April 17.
Send reply to Box 05080, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Lube Tech Wanted
Tools Required
Apply @ Rountree Moore Chevy
4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, Fl. 32055
See: Jimbo Pegnetter in Service
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lie., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services


100 Job
Opportunities
4 TEMP Nursery Workers needed
1/30/12 10/15/12. Workers will
plant, cultivate, harvest, propagate,
grade, store, ship container & field
grown horticultural products.
Workers will handle a variety of
bare root products.
Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Work tools, supplies, equip.
provided at no cost. Free housing
provided for non-commuting
workers. Transportation &
subsistence reimbursed to worker
upon completion of 50% of con-
tract. $10.34/hr. Random drug
testing at employer's expense.
Worksite location in Mount Airy,
MD. Report or send a resume to
the nearest FL Agency of
Workforce Innovation office &
ref. job order #MD219947 or call
850-921-3466. Snell Greenhouses
Mount Airy, MD

Medical
120 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529826
Medical Billing Manager
Several years of experience in
medical office insurance coding,
and billing required. Excellent
Salary Based on Experience
Apply in confidence,
Email: tnafaisal05(a1yahoo.com

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

17O Business
71 Opportunities
Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

240 Schools &
Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

420 Wanted to Buy'
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 Garage Sales

ESTATE SALE Thurs.- Sat. 9-?
116 Polk Ave off Country Club.
100 Ceramic molds, kiln, 3 wheel
golf cart, tools, fum., lots of stuff.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
BEER MEISTER for sale.
$200 obo.
386-758-1991

PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control,
gi original box. $280,
386-984-7510
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't.call Saturday.
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Thndem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740

45 Good Things

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.Ilakecityreporter.com


460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
J3 0 for Rent
2br/1.5 ba Fully furnished.
Uilities, washer dryer, TV, cable
Owner non smoker. 2 mi S of V.A.
$800.mo $500. sec. 386-755-0110

3 BR/2 BA, excellent condition,
includes all appliances, garbage
pickup & water. No pets, off of
252/Pinemount, 386-752-5617.
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

A640 Mobile Homes
64 0 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Maintained, 10
ac. Master has a huge closet w/
walk in shower & garden tub.
MLS 79417 $94,900 Foreclosure
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Small mobile home
2/1 886sf on a wooded lot.
Paved road frontage.
MLS 79413 $17,900

705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January Ist availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.,
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsors rms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2
8 mi NW of VA. Private wooded
acre, deck, roomy. No dogs
$600 mo+ dep 386.961.9181


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
7J30 Home For Rent
lbr/1.5ba Country Cottage, Cathe-
dral ceilings, brick fireplace, wash-
er/dryer, 1 ac fenced, private, some
pets, lease. 1st, last, sec, ref. Lake
City area $725 mo. Smoke Free
environment. 352-494-1989
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386,-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,coricrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
Nice 3br/2ba brick Close in
$745.mo rent $550. sec.
Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo; and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business&
/ U Office Rentals

0552;789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor


805 Lots for Sale .
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-.
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate


Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Nice 4/2, 1 ac.
Granite floors. Beautiful yard &
wrap around porch. MLS 77292
$139,900. Short Sale.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 4/2, 1 ac modular
home that is in immactilate cond.
1,344sqft. New carpet, roof, a/c,
fireplace. MLS 78833 $115,000.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Well maintained.
Tiled floors, living area, open kit.
Above ground pool, guest quarters
MLS 79149 $115,000. Short Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot. on
the Suwannee. Well & anerobic
septic system. MLS 78842
$45,000 Owner Financing.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Home, over 2ac,
screened inground pool. Updated,
crown molding, new wood floors,
kit & paint. MLS 79378 $129,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 1713 sf, great
area. Arched entryways. Ig living
room w/fireplace. French doors to
patio. MLS 79418 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.4/2 Vintage home.
Updated electric & plumbing. New
carpet & CH/A. Hardwood floors.
MLS 79367 $99,000


810 Home for Sale
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Well maintained
2/2. Wood laminate floors. Lg
living room & master suite. New
countertops. MLS 76928 $89,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Vintage 4/3 2626sf.
Hardwood floors, new wdws, fire-
place. Separate 494ft guest home ,
double lot MLS 78000 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 1987 SF up-
graded w/wood laminate floors,
ceramic, tile. 14x30 workshop, 10
xl0 storage MLS79345 $199,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, 2853SF walk-
ing to downtown, lakes, restau-
rants, Shands & VA. garage w/apt
above. MLS 79451 $140,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, open floor
plan, spacious master BR. Tile &
wood thru out. 1 yr. home
warranty MLS 78594 $169,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Huge 4/3, 2826sf
on 5.22 ac! Flooring is tile lami-
nate in most rooms & in immacu-
late cond. MLS 79584 $215,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. What a Creampuff!
Newer roof, 1 ac, paved road,
fenced, fireplace, very nice brick
home. MLS 79531 $65,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Brick .59 ac! 3/2,
2502sf. Lg master bath w/separate
shower & whirlpool. 2 car garage
& storage. MLS 76769 $210,000
Charming Older Home in town.
Over 1300 sq ft. with hardwood
floors. Shady comer lot.
Janet Creel. 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
Private Estate, city limits.
6br/3.5ba. 39.7 acres $994,000 or
$2,500 mo rent. Mary Brown
Whitehurst. 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2. New kitchen
counters & ceramic tild, open floor
plan. MLS# 77943 $94,500 Mary
Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 updated brick in town. New
roof, hardwoods. Glassed room
w/fantastic views. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS 78092 $249,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D. Super area,
nice back yard. Covered back
porch. New AC in 2010. Elaine K.
Tolar. 755-6488 MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Exceptional price! 3/2, 1582 sqft.
2 car garage, screened porch 1/2 ac
lot. Only $129,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 365-5678 MLS#79239
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent location! 3/2 home, large
master suite, 2 car garage.
$87,900. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 79458
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Woodcrest, 3/2 Brick w/split floor
plan. Nice lot. Fireplace, Ig porch,
vinyl wdws. MLS# 77708 Elaine
K. Tolar $169,900 755-6488
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac, 3/2, as is $95,000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/ist time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate


Newly Listed in Mayfair! Great
area close to shopping! 3/2 fresh
paint& pretty lot. Newer metal
roof & screen porch. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
Sweeping Golf Course View!
Brick 3/2 w/screen porch. South-
ern Oaks Golf Course. 1980sf.
$164,900 #79585 Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

82O Farms &
2O Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down. $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.lahndnfl.com

Q870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

f951 Recreational
951 Vehicles
1993 JAYCO 5th wheel. 26 1/2
feet. Well kept. Everything works.
Owner is Non-smoker $3,000
386-755-0110


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


M


lmI