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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01736
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 24, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01736
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text









Lake


Saturday, December 24, 2011


City


www.lakecityreport


Reporter
2I.I 0D IrGo 326

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o 3 -3_943


FHP's out in force this weekend


Extra troopers patrolling
area highways to ensure
holiday travel safety.

By GORDON JACKSON
giackson@lakecityreporter.comrn
When people hit the highways for the
Christmas holidays, their thoughts may be
about visiting relatives or the prospect of
receiving the perfect gift.
But traffic safety experts caution people to
be extra careful while driving this weekend


because of heavy traffic conditions that are
a way of life this time of year in the Gateway
to Florida.
And for those who believe they only need
to give their undivided attention while driv-
ing on interstate highways, that's not the
case, said Pat Riordan, spokesman for the
nine-county Florida Highway Patrol Troop B
region that includes Columbia County.
"We probably have an even mixture of
accidents on primary and secondary roads,"
he said.
The highway patrol no longer predicts the
number of traffic fatalities during holiday
weekends, but Florida typically ranks among


the states with the highest number of deadly
wrecks, according to the National Safety
Council. The organization predicts 287 traffic
fatalities nationwide between 6 p.m. Friday
and 11:59 p.m. Monday.
"We don't do those projections anymore
because it was a negative thing," Riordan
said.
Law enforcement officials throughout the
state will patrol all primary and secondary
roads during the holiday weekend. They will
be on the lookout for stranded motorists,
speeders and drunk drivers.
FHP continued on 6A


Holiday

travel tips
Here are some holiday tips
for motorists by the Florida
Highway Patrol:
Have a trip plan and let
others know when you will
leave and intend to arrive at
your destination.
TIPS continued on 6A


Ads on


school


buses?


Maybe.

Three bills filed in
Florida Legislature
could make it so.

By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE -
Advertising seems to be every-
where these days on city
transit buses, at sports stadi-
ums, on airliner tray tables and
even in public restrooms.
So why not on the exterior
of school buses?
Florida is one of 34 states that
prohibit such advertising, but
three similar bills have been
filed to lift that ban and provide
a new funding source for cash-
strapped school districts.
'We are in such tough times
financially now that we have to
look at various means to raise
money," Sen. Bill Montford
said Friday.
Critics, though, say school
bus ads could be a safety haz-
ard and legal headache.
"If I thought it was a safety
issue I would not have filed this
legislation," said Montford,
who's also CEO of the Florida
Association of District School
Superintendents.
The Legislature's Office of
Program Policy Analysis &
Government Accountability
issued a report this week that
makes no recommendation
but cites opposition to school
bus ads from the National
Association of State Directors of
Pupil Transportation Services
and Florida Association for
Pupil Transportation.
Both groups say adver-
tising intended to catch the
attention of passing motorists
also could distract them so
they wouldn't notice a bus has
stopped or that students are
getting on or off.
Montford said that shouldn't
be a problem as the ads will be
'relatively small. A House staff
analysis of a similar bill (HB 19)
says there's been no specific
research on the effect school
bus advertising has on safe-
ty. It also notes, though, that
the National Highway Safety
Administration says school
buses are eight times safer
than passenger vehicles.
The two pupil transporta-
tion groups also say it may be
difficult to control the kinds of
advertising allowed on buses
and that defending a district's
ad policy might cost more in
legal expenses than the adver-
tisements bring in.
'We're not going to put ads
for condoms and liquor on
the sides of school buses,"
Montford responded.


NATIONAL


Nun who kissed Elvis


praying for a miracle


Mother Dolores Hart pets a cat at the Abbey of Regina Laudis monastery in Bethlehem, Conn. Mother Dolores, a
cloistered nun whose luminous blue eyes entranced Elvis Presley in his first on-screen movie kiss, is praying for
a Christmas miracle. She walked away from Hollywood stardom in 1963 to become a nun in rural Bethlehem.


Former actress Delores Hart, who gave Elvis his
first on-screen kiss, left Hollywood in 1963. Now
she needs millions to save her rural Conn. abbey.


By STEPHANIE REITZ
Associated Press
n the little town of
Bethlehem, Conn., a clois-
tered nun whose luminous
blue eyes entranced Elvis
Presley in his first on-
screen movie kiss is praying for
a Christmas miracle.
Dolores Hart, who walked
away from Hollywood stardom
in 1963 to become a nun in
rural Bethlehem, Conn., now
finds herself back in the spot-
light. But this time it's all about
serving the King of Kings, not
smooching the King of Rock
and Roll. '
The former brass factory that
houses Mother Dolores and
about 40 other nuns cloistered
at the Abbey of Regina Laudis
needs millions of dollars in reno-
vations to meet fire and safety
codes, add an elevator and make
handicap accessibility upgrades.
Like 73-year-old Mother
Dolores, the order's nuns have
taken a vow of stability with the
intent to live, work and die at the
complex. The order was estab-
lished in 1947 in Bethlehem, a
small burg in Connecticut's roll-
ing western hills.
Now, the historically self-sup-
porting nuns have launched
a fundraiser for the $4 million
renovation project dubbed
"New Horizons." They don't
have much money, but they


have Mother Dolores: a starlet-
turned-supplicant whose unique
story might lure the attention
and donations of generations of
"movie fans, particularly those
who adore all things Elvis.
"This work may not lie in
my lifetime that it's finished,
but we're sure trying," Mother
Dolores said of the upgrades,

Dolores Hart was a
vivacious, quick-witted
blond when she charmed
Hollywood in the 1950s
and early '60s.

which are budgeted to run
about $2 million for the fire code
and accessibility compliance
work and another $2 million for
improvements to the housing
and other facilities.
They hope to break ground in
January.
They're not in imminent
danger of needing to move out,
but many of the older nuns can
no longer navigate the narrow
steps to the main building's third
floor and must live in another
building) And without adequate
fire escapes, the monastery has
caught the eye of local inspec-
tors, though they've worked
closely with the nuns on the
improvement plans and haven't


.ordered them to close the build-
ing.
'For Mother Dolores, the
monastery has been home since
she was a 24-year-old actress
in 1963 and walked away from
Hollywood for a life of contem-
plation and prayer as a postulant.
The abbey's chapel, work-
shops, livestock pastures and
other features are part of her
soul now, and its wood-paneled
monastery is the only home
she's known for 50 years. Its
theater holds a special place
in her heart,-harkening to the
former career that landed her
on talk shows, in magazines and
twice as Elvis Presley's co-star.
Dolores Hart was a vivacious,
quick-witted blond starlet when
she charmed Hollywood in
the 1950s and early 1960s. She
shared a kiss with Presley in the
1957 Paramount film, "Loving
You" a modest liplock over
which Mother Dolores still fields
frequent questions about wheth-
er the King was a good kisser.
"I don't know why they ask
me. It's right there on the screen
to see; it's right there for the
looking," she said Thursday.
Hart acted in 10 movies
alongside stars including
Montgomery Clift, Myrna Loy,
Connie Francis and Anthony
Quinn.
She said she was engaged to

NUN continued on 6A


Gov. Scott

has new

approach,

old goals

Taking a new tack
in achieving his
conservative aims.

By BRENDAN ARRINGTON
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Gov.
Rick Scott is going into his
second legislative session
with the same priorities -
creating jobs and making the
state more business friendly
- and a new approach.
Scott is a conservative
Republican and the Legislature
is overwhelmingly conserva-
tive Republican, but the sides
clashed at the beginning of
the year as Scott came in as
a political outsider vowing to
change Tallahassee. He sur-
rounded himself with a team
also made up of outsiders,
announced his proposed bud-
get at a tea party rally in a
central Florida church and set
an agenda that even had other
Republicans politely question-
ing if it was too much.
This year his goals are
more realistic, he announced
his budget in the Capitol with-
out a crowd waving "Don't
Tread On Me" flags and his
team now includes longtime
Tallahassee insiders. In other
words, the former CEO is rec-
ognizing that while he is gov-
ernor, passing laws isn't about
telling the Legislature what
he wants, but working with
lawmakers to achieve what
he can.
"I feel like the governor
came in with a steep learn-
ing curve and has continuously
improved," said House Speaker
Dean Cannon, who added that
Scott's new team will help.
"Individually and in the aggre-
gate, they all appear to be really
good changes and I think that
they're increasing his effective-
ness ... At least from my per-
spective, we're very pleased."
Scott still wants corporate
tax cuts, stripped down busi-
ness regulations, fewer gov-
ernment jobs and to have
many state employees con-
tribute more for their ben-
efits. He's no longer talking
about cutting corporate taxes
by about $1.4 billion in his
first two years in office.
"I didn't quite get there, did
I?" Scott said, adding that he
also didn't anticipate a bud-
get deficit this year, which is
stalling his goal to eventually
phase out the tax.
Instead of getting a rate cut,
last session he settled for rais-
ing the corporate tax exemp-
tion, which cost the state $11.7
million. This session he wants
to raise the exemption again,
which will save businesses a
total of $8.4 million.


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


72
Mostly


cloudy


WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................
People..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE SUNDAY
Wilshire Hotel Discrimination
to be razed,. claims at LCPD.


0 "' ~2~f' ~ ~.' '1 ~ ...J~ ,~" Y& ~ 2


1 1I .. .1:10 1










2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2011

Celebrity Birthdays


FLORIDAA
LO' Wednesday:
3-10-24-25-49-52
Xtra 4


X1t3J. Friday: Friday:
. Afternoon: 7-6-5 Afternoon: 8-7-2-2


,:, Thursday:
3-10-15-18-21


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



IAs Wilshire Hotel to be torn down


LOS ANGELES The 16-story
Wilshire Grand Hotel, host to U.S.
presidents, Pope John Paul II and
Hollywood's Emmy Awards, has
been preparing for demolition
after nearly 60 years in downtown.
The aging hotel at Figueroa
Street and Wilshire Boulevard is
being razed to make room for $1
billion-plus tower complex.
There will be a 45-story hotel
and condominiums with a 65-story
office tower next door.
The Wilshire Grand's longtime
guest since the 1960s, attorney
Richard Macias, will be the last
to check out. He was to leave late
Friday.
"I cherish the memories I have
had here," Macias told the Los
Angeles Times.
Macias said he will miss the
employees he has known over the
years and the escalator that car-
ries guests from Seventh Street to
the lobby.
"I would love to stay in the new
one when it's built," he said.
There was a send-off party for
employees Thursday night. The
hotel offered laid-off workers sev-
erance packages or the right to
return to their old position once
the new hotel opens.
The hotel cost $25 million to
build and featured Ronald Reagan
as master of ceremonies for the
1952 opening of what was then the-
Statler Hotel. Actresses Celeste
Holm and Mary Pickford were
also there for the opening.
Soon after the opening, the
hotel hosted the 1952 Emmy
Awards, where Sid Caesar and
Imogene Coca took home the
top acting awards. Presidents
Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F
Kennedy stayed there. So did the
pope.


No Messiah Chorus in
Lake Charles this year
LAKE CHARLES, La. For 71
years, Lake Charles singers have
assembled every December to per-
form Handel's Messiah. But this
year, too few people gathered to do
justice to the music.
"We were down to maybe 35,
40 people in the choir when we're
used to having maybe 250 people in
the choir," Collette Bulber Tanner,
whose father started the Lake
Charles Messiah Chorus in 1940,
told KPLC-TV.
Since its start, the only other year
without a performance by the group
was 2005, after Hurricane Rita hit
southwest Louisiana. Storm damage
kept the chorus from using the EG.
Bulber Auditorium at McNeese State
University, where Tanner's father,
Francis Bulber, taught music and
started the Messiah Chorus.
Membership and money have
fallen since then.
"My husband would not want the
performance to be half baked, so to
speak," said Bulber's widow, chorus
board president Patricia Bulber.
She said the, performance was
her husband's gift to the commu-
nity -- his way of keeping Christ in
Christmas. "He thought the students
at McNeese that are in music, par-
ticularly, but also the whole student
body, should be at least exposed to
this monumental work."

Struggling symphony
adds traveling shows
DENVER The struggling
Colorado Symphony Orchestra is add-
ing shorter concerts, traveling shows
and video screens at its concerts to
.help reach out to new audiences.


The changes are part of a plan, '
called "Creating a 21st Century
Orchestra," aimed at keeping the
symphony profitable. Next season's
lineup will still include traditional clas-
sical music performances at Boettcher
Concert Hall, the orchestra's home
in Denver, but the symphony is also
adding concerts by smaller chamber-
music groups, quartets and quintets
at community centers, churches and
theaters in the suburbs.
The symphony will keep its union-
ized orchestra, but the musicians have
agreed to changes allowing them to
participate in the smaller shows, The
Denver Post reported Friday. Up to 20
percent of their time can be devoted to
concerts outside of Boettcher.
"We don't know how it will all pan
out, but the musicians said, 'Hey, we'll
go with the flow,'" said cellist Matt
Switzer, who participated in the nego-
tiations.

Rapper Young Buck
could lose name in case
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Rapper
Young Buck could lose his name and
other assets in a bankruptcy case
that the rapper says is frustrating his
attempts to sign with a new record
label.
Davidson County Bankruptcy
Judge George Paine converted the
artist's bankruptcy from Chapter 11
reorganization to Chapter 7 liquida-
tion this week.
The trustee administering his
estate has said she plans to sell the
trademarked "Young Buck" name
along with other assets. The plati-
num artist, whose real name is David
Darnell Brown, told The Tennessean
he was close to signing a recording
deal with New Orleans-based Cash
Money Records.
(AP)


Author Mary Higgins
Clark is 84.
The president of
Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai,
is 54.


Singer Ricky Martin is 40.
Author Stephenie
Meyer ('Twilight") is 38.
"American Idol" host
Ryan Seacrest is 37.


Daily Scripture

"Today in the town of David a
Savior has been born to you; he is
the Messiah, the Lord. This will be
a sign to you: You will find a baby
wrapped in cloths and lying in a
manger." Suddenly a great compa-
ny of the heavenly host appeared
with the angel, praising God and
saying, "Glory to God in the high-
est heaven, and on earth peace to
those on whom his favor rests."


- Luke 2:11-14 NIV


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein Is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Rolert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecltyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon.... 754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks....... ........... $48.79
52 Weeks....................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks ......... ....... $41.40
24 Weeks ...................$82.80
52 Weeks ..................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Florida kitty cat
found in Colorado
NAPLES An orange
striped tabby cat that ran
away from its home in
Florida has been found -
more than 2,000 miles away
in Colorado.
The Naples Daily News
reports that Daniel Johns
adopted the kitty in Florida
in June and named him
Waylon. The feline escaped
through a hole in a dryer
vent and Johns thought
he'd lost Waylon forever.
It's unclear how the kitty
made its way to Colorado.
A good Samaritan found
Waylon on a snowy street
Wednesday and brought
it to the Foothills Animal
Shelter in Golden, Colo.
Workers at the shelter dis-
covered that Waylon had
a microchip and that his
'registered owner was in
Florida.
Johns says he's working
to bring Waylon back to
Florida.

Leaders do not like
elected chief plan
, TALLAHASSEE A
group of Florida business
leaders is opposing the idea
of going back to electing
the state's education com-
missioner.
The Florida Council of
100 declared its opposition
Friday.
The private group advis-
es governors and other top
legislative leaders. It sup-
ported a state constitutional
amendment requiring an
appointed commissioner
that voters adopted in 1998.
Sen. Joe Negron, a
Stuart Republican, and Rep.
Ben Albritton, a Wauchula
Republican, are sponsor-
ing proposed amendments
(SJR 96, HJR 305) that
would again make the
office elective.
Council of 100 chair-
man Steve Halverson says
appointing the commission-
er has allowed experts to


do what they do best, and
that's resulted in improved


and one of just two public
installations on the East


THE WEATHER


student performance. Coast His other installation F K I ]1
is in New York.MOSTLY OLATE
Men given double
ngiv ent be Diners injured at CLOUDY RAIN
life sentences Tiners minrena inr


JACKSONVILLE Two
men received double life
sentences for killing two
.people at a north Florida
apartment complex three
years ago.
On Thursday Superior
Court Judge Anthony
Harrison ruled that each
man must serve 30 years
for one life sentence before
they begin serving time
for the other. Officials
say 21-year-old Roderick
Devard Taylor and 23-year-
old Abdul Rahman Bessent
also were give two 20-year
sentences for aggravated
assault
The Florida Times-Union
reports that investigators
still don't know why the
victims were shot at the
Kingsland apartment com-
plex on Dec. 21, 2008.
Officials say 25-year-old
Michael Kay and 28-year-
old Phyllis Frazier were
shot to death in the apart-
ment

Art installation
new at museum
SARASOTA A unique
art installation is showcas-
ing the Florida sky at the
Ringling Museum of Art
The so-called "Skyspace"
opened Thursday. It's a
24-foot square opening in a
canopy that covers a court-
yard outside of the muse-
um. Between Jan. 5 and
March 25, museum visitors
can sit in the courtyard
at sunset and watch the
display. The exhibit, which
is part of the museum, is
open Thursday through
Sunday.
The installation is a
manipulation of the view-
er's perception of the sky
by artist James Turrell.
The Skyspace is the only
such installation in Florida,


TAMPA Two diners at
Tampa's famed Columbia
Restaurant have been
injured after they were hit
by a piece of an air condi-
tioning duct
The Tampa Tribune
reports the incident hap-
pened Friday afternoon.
According to Tampa Fire
Rescue, the men were din-
ing when they were hit by
a piece of duct work that
fell from the ceiling. The
diners, who have not been
identified, were taken to
Tampa General Hospital
with injuries that were not
considered life-threatening.
The section of the res-
taurant where the duct
work fell has been closed
off while the restaurant
remains open.

4 get named into
Artists Hall
TALLAHASSEE -
Jensen Beach actor, writer,
director and filmmaker
Ricou Browning is among
four new members who
will be inducted into the
Florida Artists Hall of
Fame.
Browning's film work
includes the James Bond
thriller "Thunderball" and
"Creature from the Black
Lagoon." His television
credits include "Flipper"
and "Seahunt.".
Others who will be
inducted into the hall in
March are Jupiter painter
Jackie Brice, Jacksonville
architect-writer Robert C.
Broward and Winter Park
opera singer Louis Roney.
Secretary of State
Kurt Browning, no rela-
tion to Ricou, announced
the selection of the new
inductees on Thursday.
(AP)


HI72LO52 23jL4


, SO' f.T [. M IA fo Sat ,rd ay,, ,cEmb


Pensacola
66/54


69/652
Tallahassee Lake City
70/53 ... 252
SGainesi
PanmaCity ,74/5
68/55


Tai
81/


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date





a7a 1p 7
Saturday







SForecasted tenpratur


79
59
67
43
85 in 1900
22 in 1989

0.00"
0.36"
33.25"
1.81"
47.61"


City
*lacksonvile Cape Canaveral
. 69/60 Daytona Beach
SBea Ft. Lauderdale
ville Datlma Beach Fort Myers
56 75J62 Galnesvllle
Ocala Jacksonville
,76/59 Key West
S Oianmdo Capt Canaveal Lake City
77/61 77/65 LMiami
p1 Naples
61 West Palm Beach Ocala
80/69 Orlando
FL Lauderdal Panama City
FLtMyersm 79/71 0 Pensacola
83/63 Naples Tallahassee
82/64 Miami Tampa
KW 8f/71 Valdosta
79/72ey West* W. Palm Beach
79/72


SUN
Sunrse today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moor ise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


Dec. Jan. Jan.
24 1 9
New First Full


7:24 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
7:24 a.m.
5:37 p.m.

7:11 a.m.
5:48 p.m.
8:04 a.m.
6:52 p.m.


On this date in
1983, a strong
ground blizzard
was raging over the
Northern Plains.
Light snow and
loose surface snow
combined with high
winds to create long
spells of whiteout
conditions and 4
to 5 foot drifts over
many roads.


3
-ati
45 rits b bulm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


AROUND FLORIDA


M I I'


Sunday
78 61 pc
78 58 pc
80/68/pc
82/62/pc
75/51/c
73/50/sh
79/70/pc
73/48/c
81/69/pc
81/64/pc
77/55/c
81/62/pc
65/49/sh
65/40/sh
67/48/c
81/60/pc
67/47/sh
78/68/pc


Monday
73 60 .r,
71 55 sr
80/68/pc
80/59/pc
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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER













OPINION


' Saturday, December 24, 2011


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


Recalling


Vaclav


Havel,


liberator

A utumn 1989 was
one of the most
exciting times
in decades. The
Berlin Wall, sym-
bol of communist tyranny, was
pulled down, bringing free-
dom to East Germany. Other
Eastern European "satellite"
states of the Soviet Union
- Poland, Czechoslovakia,
Hungary among them also
achieved their freedom.
One of the main freedom-
bringers from that period was
Vaclav Havel of Czechoslovakia.
He died Dec. 18 at age 75. After
liberation from the Nazis in 1945,
the country was occupied by
Soviet troops, who soon installed
a puppet communist regime.
In 1968, Czechoslovaks had
enough and revolted in the
"Prague Spring," named after
reforms by the country's lead-
ership aimed at ending repres-
sion. On Aug. 21, 1968, Soviet
tanks invaded, butchering 75
protesters and reinstalling a
puppet regime.
A playwright and poet, Mr.
Havel was galvanized into politi-
cal action during the Prague
Spring and his plays were
banned.
In 1989, he became a leader
of what was called the Velvet
Revolution, which finally brought
an end to the communist regime.
Hewas-the country's natural
choice to become its first post-
communist president
Set up as its own country, in
1993 the new Czech Republic
elected him president. He
served until 2003. During his
presidency, he sometimes
fought with Prime Minister
Vaclav Klaus, who succeeded
him as president That's democ-
racy. But the two also forged
free-market reforms that have
made the Czech Republic the
most prosperous of the former
Soviet satellites.
Thanks to Mr. Havel and other
heroes, communism now mostly
is a fading memory. But he
should be remembered always
in the hearts of those who love
liberty.
0 Orange County Register

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
Dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


. Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


It's been a tough year
for global dictators and
major-league bad guys.
Those who died, were
arrested or otherwise
forced from power in 2011 after
years of repressive rule include:
North Korea's Kim Jong II;
Libya's Moammar Gadhafi;
Egypt's Hosni Mubarak;
Tunisia's Zine el-Abidine Ben
Ali; Yemen's Ali Abdullah Saleh;
and Ivory Coast's Laurent
Gbagbo.
Terror chief Osama bin Laden
met his maker and alleged
Bosnian Serb "ethnic cleanser"
Ratko Mladic was captured after
more than a decade on the lam.
* *
By and large, salaries for
most of the nation's 1.2 million
federal employees are less than
they could command for similar


www.lakecityreporter.com


Don't abandon the


conservative message


several new polls come
as a jolt as they reflect
the dismal state of
mind of the American
people.
As USA Today's Susan Page
sums up the latest USA Today/
Gallup poll: the nation is "more
downbeat, more dissatisfied
with its political leadership
and more concerned about
the country's direction than
at almost any point in modern
times."
New Pew Research Center
polling shows a whopping 67
percent saying that most mem-
bers of Congress should not be
re-elected. This compared to 51
percent saying this in October
2010 before the last congressio-
nal election.
President Barack Obama's
current approval rating in the
low forties, very low for any
president at this point in his
term, along with the very sour
national mood, should point to
shaky re-election prospects for
him.
But from what I see, there
are serious reasons why
Republicans should be worried.
One is lack of excitement
Republicans feel toward their
own leading candidates.
Gallup now shows a fairly
even contest whether it is
former Massachusetts's
Gov. Mitt Romney or former
House Speaker Newt Gingrich
matched against Obama. But it
also shows most of the Obama
votes are pro-Obama whereas
most of the Romney and
Gingrich votes are anti-Obama
rather than pro-Romney or pro-
Gingrich.
Other new polling data from
Pew should deeply concern
Republicans.
Seventy seven percent agree
that there is "too much power in
hands of a few rich people and
large corporations." And only 36


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
percent say that the country's
economic system "is generally
fair to most Americans."
When the economy is the
number one issue of concern to
the American people, and when
the central issue regarding the
economy is the extent to which
government should play a role
in it, this is not good news for
those arguing for less govern-
ment.
The central economic event
of the last decade was the 2008
financial collapse.
Conservatives have made
a solid case showing that the
cause was government policies
pushing lower lending stan-
dards to promote home owner-
ship. This case was bolstered
this week by a lawsuit filed by
the Securities and Exchange
Commission against top execu-
tives at government mortgage
entities Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, claiming they concealed
the large volumes of sub-prime
mortgages they were acquiring.
But the message that gov-
ernment caused the economic
collapse does not appear to be
reaching the grass roots.
Obama has not backed off an
inch in his pitch that the cause
was inadequately regulated
business. In his recent speech
in Osawatomie, Kan., he went
on about how "Banks and inves-
tors (were) allowed to keep
packaging the risk and selling
it off."
Washington's answer to the
crisis reflects Obama's take on


things. The Dodd Frank Act
enacted a major new regula-
tory regime on banks. Yet
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
remain standing, untouched,
still sucking up taxpayer funds,
and backing practically all new
mortgages issued today.
It seems that Obama has cap-
tured public sentiment on this
central and significant issue.
Some conclude this all means
that Republicans must water
down the conservative message
and nominate a moderate.
But Americans crave answers,
clarity and leadership. This call
will not be answered by ambigu-
ity.
Obama is no moderate. If
Democrats can nominate a
hard core liberal, why can't
Republicans offer a clear con-
servative alternative?
They can and must. But let's
remember basic salesmanship.
If you've got the best product
and its not selling, the problem
is not the product but how it's
being sold.
The challenge in selling free-
dom only.increases when times
are hard and people become
fearful.
The best salesperson is one
who is totally sold on his prod-
uct
We need a conservative lead-
er who unwaveringly believes
that a return to freedom and
moral clarity is what this nation
needs. And one who can convey
this conviction and convince
worried, struggling Americans
that conservative principles are
the recipe for national revival
and will make their lives better.



* Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Lisa Hoffman
fisohoffman@shns.co'n

private-sector positions. But the
U.S. government rolls do have
their own equivalent of the "1
percent," in the parlance of the
Occupy movement.
WikiOrgCharts.com, a
website that calls itself the
Wikipedia of organizational
charts, compiled a list of the
1,000 highest paid federal work-
ers, with their salaries and job
title.


The highest paid is Dr.
Electron Kebebew, a National
Institutes of Health medical
officer, who gets a $350,000
paycheck. Another 23 in the top
100 have salaries of $300,000 or
above, according to the site's
list.
In fact, of the top earners,
68 are medical officers who,
presumably, could bring home
far more in private or com-
mercial practice. The agency
with the most highly paid
workers is NIH, with 49. The
Food and Drug Administration
employs 20 of the top paid, the
Indian Health Service, 11, the
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, eight, and the
Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp., five.

M Scripps Howard News Service


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Ever


closer to


finding


an Earth


'twin'


called it "the
beginning of an
era."
Scientists at the
Harvard-Smithsonian Center
have identified the smallest,
most Earth-size planets yet
found outside our solar sys-
tem.
The discoveries were made
by the Kepler space telescope,
on a par with the Hubble as
one of mankind's most remark-
able scientific instruments for
the exploration of space. Since
its launch in 2009, Kepler has
found 28 planets and identified
2,326 candidate planets waiting
to be confirmed.
Not only are the two most
recent discoveries Earth-size,
they orbit a star, Kepler-20,
that is remarkably like our
sun. The smaller of the two
planets, Kepler20-e, is 87
percent the size of Earth; the
other, Kepler20-f, is 3 percent
larger. And the planets appear.
to be rock, rather than the
inhospitable gas and liquid of
larger planets.
Unfortunately, for the
chances of life and habitability,
the two planets are well within
the Goldilocks zone and have
surface temperatures of 1,400
to 700 degrees. The 20-e planet
has an orbit of 6.1 days; 20-f
of 19.6 days, but even it is 20
times closer to its star than the
Earth is to the sun.
Kepler-20 is 950 light years
away in the direction of the
constellation Lyra. Distance
in space isn't what it used to
be. The spacecraft Dawn took
off in 2007 and is now 1.7 bil-
lion miles away studying the
asteroid Vesta even as the craft
is preparing to go even deeper
into space. But, still, a light
year is 6 trillion miles.
From 1,200 BC when: the
Babylonians began systemati-
cally cataloging heavenly bod-
ies, no one had seen, or been
able to prove, the existence
of an extra-solar planet until
1996..At first we discovered
mostly gas giants on the order
of Jupiter, but then found
planets that were smaller
and smaller until earlier this
month astronomers hit upon a
planet with a just-right surface
temperature of 72 degrees.
However, at 2.4 times the size
of Earth, it is likely mostly gas
and liquid.
We have gone from 3,000
years to less than 30 days in
the search for an Earth twin.
That indicates that'we are
making progress and maybe
this truly is "the beginning of
an era."
* Scripps Howard News Service

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
This is Saturday, Dec. 24, the
358th day of 2011. There are
seven days left in the year.

On this date:
In 1814 The War of 1812
officially ended as the United
States and Britain signed the
Treaty of Ghent in Belgiu
In 1943 President Franklin
D. Roosevelt appointed
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower
supreme commander of Allied
forces during World War II.
In 1968 the Apollo 8 astro-


nauts, orbiting the moon,
read passages from the Old
Testament Book of Genesis
during a Christmas Eve TV
broadcast
M Associated Press


Bad year for bad guys


. ,














FAITH



Saturday, December 24, 201 I


&


VALUES


Nww.lakecityreporter.com


God's grace: Favor


we do not deserve


The beautiful story of the
birth of our Savior is
recorded in Luke 2:1-20
(please read). This is the
second most important
time God showed His grace to us.
This is the season when the birth of
our Lord is celebrated; when He came
to earth in human form. Only two
of the four Gospels record His birth,
Matthew and Luke. Of course Luke is
more in depth.
The most important by far display of
God's grace toward mankind is the sacrifi-
cial death of His son Jesus for lost human-
ity. All four of the Gospels records the
death, burial, and resurrection; but only
two the birth.
Just what is grace? And why is it so
important to us? Grace, by definition,
is: a term employed by the Biblical
writers with a considerable variety of
meaning: (1) Properly speaking, that
which affords joy, pleasure, delight,
charm, sweetness, loveliness; (2)
Good will, loving-kindness, mercy, etc;
(3) the kindness of a master toward a
slave. Thus by analogy, it has come
to signify the kindness of God to man
(Luke 1:30). The NT writers, at the
end of their various epistles, frequent-
ly invoke God's gracious favor upon
their readers (Rom. 16:20; 24; Phil.
4:23; Col 1:19; I Thess. 5:28; et.al.). In
addition, the word "grace" is frequent-
ly used to express the concept of kind-
ness bestowed upon someone unde-
serving thereof. Hence, undeserved
favor, especially that kind or degree of
favor bestowed upon sinners through
Jesus Christ. "For God who is rich
in mercy for his great love wherewith
he loved us, even when we were dead
in sins hath quickened us together
in Christ by grace we are saved"
(Eph. 2:4,5). Grace, therefore, is that
unmerited favor of God towards fallen
man, whereby, for the sake of Christ-


who is the only begotten of the Father,
full of grace and truth (John 1:14) He
has provided for man's redemption.
He has from all eternity determined to
extend favor towards all who exercise
faith in Christ as Lord and Savior.
As we approach the New Year, when
many.are thinking about new resolu-
tions, let us consider all the great and
marvelous gifts God has bestowed upon
us because of His grace. Let us think of
how, in the coming year, we might serve
Him better. Some suggestions: maybe
supporting our churches regularly,
perhaps giving of the tithe as the Bible
teaches, perhaps sharing the Gospel
of the Lord Jesus with our friends and
neighbors, and maybe studying His
word
more. BIBLE STUDIES
I want
to take
a few
words ter. Your kind words mean
to thank. A special thanks to Todd
all ofr; and all the staff that help put
you whoe articles in print every week. I
read s and it is my prayer that
and sup-
portour Hugh Sherrill Jr.
weekly ems-hugh43@comcastnet
article in
the Lake
City Reporter. Your kind words mean
so much and are such an encoui-
agement. A special thanks to Todd
Wilson, publisher; Robert Bridges,
editor; and all the staff that help put
the articles in print every week. I
want to wish all of you the Merriest
Christmas and it is my prayer that
God, by His grace, will bestow upon
you and yours the riches of His bless-
ings in the coming year.


Hugh Sherrill is a Bible teacher at Eastside
Baptist Church.


'Dear John'


- -the


power of rejection


f you have ever received a letter
that started with the greeting "Dear
John" (unless your name really is
John) these words might make you
cringe. It is believed Americans
coined the phrase during World War II,
when large numbers of American troops
were stationed overseas for many months
or years. As time passed many of their
girlfriends back home decided to begin a
relationship with a new man rather than
wait for their return. Typically, letters
to servicemen from girlfriends would
.contain affectionate greetings, so a ser-
viceman receiving a note beginning with
a curt "Dear John" (as opposed to the
. expected "Dear Johnny",or "Sweetheart",
for example) would instantly be aware of
the letter's
HEART MATTERS purpose. At
any rate,
the phrase
is known as
the introduc-
tion to rejec-
tion...Rnot
the kind of
news we
ever look
Angie Land forward to
angieland3@windstream.net hearing.
Rejection
is a tough
thing to talk about and even tougher to
experience. Fast-forward to today and
rejection may sound like this: "I just need
my space", "It's not you, it's me" and even
"I just don't love you anymore." In their
book, "The Art of Rejection", Michael and
Hayley DiMarco write, "Rejection is a fact
of life. In fact, a healthy outlook on life
means embracing rejection. No human
always gets the job, gets the girl (or guy),
or gets a large for the price of a medium.
An older Garth Brooks song thanks God
"for unanswered prayers." The lesson:
rejection, even when we don't want or
understand it, brings better things."


How in the world could rejection bring
better things when it feels so rotten?
Look at it this way.. .relationships are a
learning process. We aren't going to get
it right the first time around and there
are only two outcomes for any relation-
ship with a person of the opposite sex:
marriage or rejection. Since we want the
relationship that results in marriage to be
permanent, we are going to have to sift
through some Mr./Mrs. Wrongs before
we find the right one for life. This means
accepting rejection as instrumental in
having mature, healthy relationships. So
if rejection is as necessary as it is unpleas-
ant, how do we handle it and keep our dig-
nity? The DiMarco's book offers a host
of healthy options you can do (and should
not do) when a boyfriend/girlfriend is
rejecting you.. .here are just a few-
Don't beg them to change their mind,
because they just might Then you are
stuck in a severely dysfunctional relation-
ship. Congratulations! You convinced
someone who doesn't want you that they
should hang around and keep you from
meeting someone better!
Do keep your mouth shut if the only
thing you want to say is going to be mean.
Don't act like they have destroyed
you, because they haven't It isn't what
happens to you, in life but what you think
about it and how you react to it that mat-
ters. A wise soul sees that rejection is just
another door eliminated in the process of
finding the one we're looking for.
Do let them know that because of
how you feel for them, you can't con-
tinue to be friends. It would be best
for you just to go your separate ways
and remember each other well.
Obviously, experiencing rejection will
never be our idea of a fun day, but with
the right perspective, it can be turned into
something positive.. .because your heart
matters.
Contact Angie Land at
angieland3@windstream.net


ADVENT CHRISTIAN
first Advent Christian
1881 SW McFarlane Ave.
386-752-3900
Sunday School: 9:45AlM


Sunday Service:
Wednesday Service:


11:00AM
7:00PM


ASSEMBLY OF GOD
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
1571 E. Duval Street, Lake City
Sunday 10:30AM & Wednesday 7:00PM
www.firstassemblylc.com

GLAD TIDINGS ASSEMBLY OF GOD
993 NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam. Bible Study 7:00PM
"A church where JESUS is Real"

BAPTIST
BEREA BAPTIST CHURCH
SR47 S* 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM & 6PM
Wednesday Eve. Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenfield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE James Ave. 386-752-2860
Sun. Bible Study 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mtg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev. Brandon G. Witt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
Sunday Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 6:00PM Prayer Service, &
Children Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake City 752-5422

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
541 N.E. Davis Street
(386) 752-1990
Ronald V. Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Mid-Week Worship 6:00PM
"In God's Word, Will & Way"






AClay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectric.com


PINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N'US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor: Ron Thompson

SALEM PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
Sunday Services 10:30 AM
Pastor Elder Herman Griffin
752-4198


SOUTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
388 S.E. Baya Drive* 755-5553
Sunday:


Bible Study
Morning Worship
Evening Worship
.Wednesday:
AWANA
Prayer & Bible Study


9:15 AM
10:30AM
6:15PM

5:45PM
6:15PM


TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SE Montrose Ave. 752-4274


Sunday School
Sun. Morn. Worship
Sunday Eve.
Wed. Prayer Meeting
Pastor: Mike Norman

THE VINEYARD
Sunday School
Sunday Worship
Sunday Night


1832 SW Tomaka Terrace
(off SW Bascom Norris Dr.)
thevineyardoflakecity.com


10AM
11 AM
6PM
7:30 PM


9:30 AM
10:30AM
6:00 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOLIC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court-~ 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30 AM,
12:30 PM (Spanish/English)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15 AM


CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.


Sunday Service
Wednesday Evening Service


11:00AM
7:30 PM


LAKE CITY CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Hwy 247 S. 755-9436
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sun. Mom. Worship 10:30 AM
Wed, Prayer Meeting 7PM

CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
Church of Christ
Directions & Times 386:623-7438
Jack Exum,Jr., Minister

CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St.* 752-5965
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 10:30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. Family Night 7 PM
Wed. Youth Service 7 PM
Pastor: Carroll Lee

EVANGEL CHURCH OF GOD
370 SW Monitor Glen 755-1939
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 10:50 & 6:30
Wed, Spiritual Enrichment 7PM
"Shock Youth Church"
Boys and Girls Clubs
Bible Study
Pastor: John R. Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City, Fl 32025 386-752-2218
Website: www.stjameslakecity.org
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sunday 8:00 & 10:00AM
Wednesday 5:15PM
Priest: The Rev. Michael Armstrong

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 1/2 miles S. of 1-75 on SR 47
755-4299


Sunday Services
(Nursery Provided)
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pastor: Rev. Bruce Alkire


9:30AM


Morrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home furnishings store
SW lkpaul JcTlTDSaiis Ine ilornicrl I nemi t Rd )
752-3910or 1-800-597-3526
lioIlSat. 8 X 5:3() 0* Clo( d Suladlay


SPIRIT OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
Hwy 90,1.5 miles West of 1-75 752-3807
Sunday Worship 9:30AM
Nursery Avail.
Wed. Pot Luck 6PM Worship 7PM-
Pastor/Reverend John David Bryant

METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship
Casual Worship Service 8:50AM
Traditional Service 11:00AM
Program opportunities available in all areas
for all ages.
For a complete schedule
contact church office at
752-4488
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday School 9:45AM Worship 11:00AM
Wed. Bible Study 7:00PM Mon. Prayer Noon
Friday Prayer 6:00-7:00PM
Pastor Rev. Fatha M. DeSue
WESLEY MEMORIAL UNITED.
1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
(Adjacent to Summers School)
Worship 8:00 & 10:OOAM
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
Sunday School 9:00AM
Nursery provided
Awana (ages 3-18) 5:30-7:30PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
www.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
U.S. 90 E. turn on Cortez (next to Quality
Ind,) right on Okinawa.
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6 PM
Wed. Night Service 7 PM
Pastor, Randy Ogburn
NAZARENE
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult, Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: Craig Henderson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place


ANDERSON COLUMBIA CO.. INC.
ASPHAIT PAVING
COMMERCIAL *LNDUSfRIAL
Site Preparaion Road Building Parking Lots
readingg & Drainage
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
Weight Loss '69 & Hair Removal '69
Accepting all Insurance, No Ins visit '50
I (386) 466-1106
Located Shands Lake City& Live Oak


PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelistic Service 6:00 PM
Youth Services- Wednesday 7:00PM
Mid-week Service- Wednesday 7:00 PM
For Info call 755-3408* Everyone Welcome
Pastor Rev. Stan Ellis

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
697 SW Baya Drive 752-0670
Sunday Worship 11:00AM
Christmas Eve December 24th
Impromptu Christmas Pageant 7:00PM
Fo children, families, and people of all ages
Lessons and Carols 7:00PM
For those who enjoys the traditional service
NURSERY PROVIDED
Pastor Dr. Roy A. Martin
Director of Music: Bill Poplin

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Celebration Service 9:30 & 11:15 AM
Wednesday Service 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave., from Hwy 90 take
Sisters Welcome Rd., go 5 miles, South,
church on left. 755-2525
Lead Pastor Lonnie Johns
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERITAGE CHURCH
Comer SR. 47 & Hudson Circle
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones 752-9119

FALLING CREEK CHAPEL
Falling Creek Road *755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
Second and Fourth Sundays 3:00 P.M.
Pastor: Rev. Cheryl R. Pingel

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Branford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 11:00AM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Wednesday 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church Everyone Welcomed
(386) 755-5197


Central States
Enterprises
Columbla County's Feed Headquarters
FEED PET, SUPPLIES LAWN & GARDEN
ANIMAL HEALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
.3 755-7050

BAYWAYjanworial service.
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
Residftial & Cotmme'nial
755-6142

North Florida
Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland,'Mayo & Keystone Heights


Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERY DAY"
US 90 WEST 5-2427

GW Hunter, Inc.
Chmn Chevron Oil
Wp Jobber



Holly, ec Inc.
"Quality work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOODU STORES
Open 7 Days a Week
10306 Duval St.. Lake City 1F.
(386) 752-0067
F:rcsl Meat, Fresh Prtduce!
"1 cn lkd all tllihi hmhilh (t hnt Muhlch lti|nnthell nM"
Ihillppenn' 4'13

RICK'S RANGEE SERVICE
Located at 25A (Old "
Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 or
386-867-2035
after hours


5A


D4VON,


Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal Mart
752-0054


g HARRY'S
n ,, Heating &Air Conditioning Inc.
Harry Mosley President

Pi~n 752-2308 n1-94









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2011


NUN: Is frequently asked whether Elvis was a good kisser, she says
Continued From Page 1A


be married before joining God's service
and leaving the acting world behind. She
broke off her engagement, though her
fiance remained a close friend and was
a frequent visitor and supporter of the
abbey until his recent death.
The nuns also received support and
help over the years from Mother Dolores'
longtime friend and fellow actress Patricia
Neal, who was buried at the abbey after
her death in August 2010.
Mother Dolores is still a voting mem-
ber of the Academy of Motion Picture
Arts and Sciences, receiving copies of
movies to watch in her small room or
cell, as they're known in the order to


help select yearly Oscar winners.
Her own movies, including the highly
popular "Where the Boys Are," were
made before stars routinely could negoti-
ate to collect later royalties, she said, so
that's not a potential source of income for
the upgrades to the abbey.
The abbey is financially independent
from the Archdiocese of Hartford and
supports itself through the sale of every-
thing from artisan cheeses and hand-
crafted pottery to recordings of its choir.
Mother Dolores even recently signed
autographs at a New Jersey convention, a
rare foray out of cloistered life as a favor
for a friend, and one that helped boost the


TIPS: Handling trouble on the highway
Continued From Page 1A


Have a cellular telephone with you if pos-
sible:
Keep your car doors locked and win-
dows rolled up.
At stop signs or traffic signals, keep a
safe distance from the car in front of you.
Leave yourself room to get out in case
you're boxed in.
Don't stop in underpopulated areas
to ask directions. Travel well-lighted and
busy streets.
Do not pick up hitchhikers. Try not
to stop if your car is blocked by someone
standing in the road. Slow down and pro-
ceed slowly around the person. If they
refuse to move, back up to safety and
proceed to the nearest police station to
report the incident
Lock your doors when you leave your
car, even if it's for a short time.
Don't advertise that you're from out-
of-town by pulling over to the curb to read
a road map.
If you are involved in a minor acci-
dent, do not get out of the car. Lower your
window slightly and ask the other party to
phone the police or follow you to the near-
est public area or police station. Some
criminals use an accident to get you to
stop and get out of the car. If you're suspi-
cious that the accident was staged, drive
directly to the nearest law enforcement
office to report the accident
When you get out of your car, carry
your purse and keep other valuables out


of sight Do not store valuables out in the
open inside a parked car.
If you have a flat tire or other car
problems, pull over to the side of the road
out of the way of traffic.
Turn on your emergency flashers. If
you have emergency roadway flares in
your trunk, position them conspicuously.
Raise the hood and tie a handkerchief
to the aerial or door handle.
If a roadside telephone or call-box is
handy, use it If not, sit in your locked car
and wait for help.
If a motorist stops to render assis-
tance, it's better to remain in the car, and
ask him to get help. (Likewise, if you see
a stranded motorist, it's better riot to stop.
Notify the police.)
If you think you are being followed,
don't drive home. You would only be tell-
ing your follower where you live.
Stay calm. As long as you think clear-
ly, you'll be in control of the situation.
Flash your lights and sound your horn
long enough to attract attention to you,
and consequently the person following
you. Drive to one of your already identi-
fied safe spots, sounding your horn and
flashing your lights. Do not leave this safe
location until you're sure your follower is
gone.
Remember, you are your best protec-
tion. If you follow these steps, you'll be
protecting the most important part of
your car YOU.


FHP: Troopers out in force this weekend
Continued From Page' lA


fundraising efforts.
Sister Angele Arbib, a coordinator of
the New Horizons renovation and fund-
raising efforts, said the order is applying
for grants and the nuns are trying to
spread the word among the abbey's sup-
porters, but are not disclosing publicly
how much they've raised so far.
Unlike some orders, the Abbey of
Regina Laudis has retained a steady num-
ber of nuns and new postulants, including
two starting in the next few weeks but
that can't continue if the housing and
other facilities keep eroding with age.
"We have focused on building our
community, which has been wonderful,
but now it's time that we really have to
address our space," said Sister Angele,
63, who left a thriving career of managing
opera singers when she was 50 to join the
order.
"None of this, not one single thing
we're doing, is an extravagance," she said
of the upgrades. "It's to make it possible
fox us to grow, for the elderly among us
to live with as much independence as
possible and to allow us to live together
in surroundings that let us continue our
service."
Sister Angele said the nuns are not in
any imminent danger of needing to move


Alpha
October 6. 1927


out, though she acknowledges they'd be
in dire straits if they had not anticipated
the problems early enough to prepare the
upgrade plans and launch the fundraising
efforts.
As word has spread of their needs,
supporters of the nuns and those who've
visited the abbey, prayed in its chapel and
picked up items in its gift shop have tried
to help in ways of their own.
Liz Carpenter, a Watertown resi-
dent who owns the Children's Dance
Workshop, said its children have raised
$600 to help through a raffle. She's been
a grateful supporter since the nuns
helped her through a cancer battle about
10 years ago and now volunteers to clean
the church once a week.
"I wanted to teach the kids that it's
important to give back," she said of their
fundraiser, "especially for a place that
does as many wonderful things as this
one does."
Tax-deductible donations to New
Horizons may be sent to the Abbey
of Regina Laudis, 73 Flanders Road,
Bethlehem, Conn., 06751. The order also
plans to soon offer online donation servic-
es through its website, www.http://www.
abbeyofreginalaudis.com.


Omega
November 30. 2011


The. amily ior
Marion L. Williams
would like to thank each and every person that has kept us in
.your thoughts, prayers, and deeds during our time of sorrow.
We have truly been uplifted through your kindness and grace.
The flowers, cards, food, hugs, phone calls, and any other acts
of kindness are appreciated more than our words can possibly
express. Please continue to keep us in your prayers as we
adjust to life without our loved one A special thank you to
Pastor Alvin J. Baker & the New Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church family, Pastor I L. Williams. the Greater Truevine
Missionary Baptist Church family. New Mt. Pisgah AME
Church family, Dr Alex Gonzales & staff, and Combs Funeral
Home staff. May God bless each of you in the days ahead.



The Family of Marion L. Williams


The FHP is participating in the Drive
Sober or Get Pulled Over program through
Jan. 2 to try and reduce the number of
alcohol-related accidents during holiday
weekends. Between Christmas and New
Year's weekends last year, FHP officials
said 35 percent of traffic fatalities were
alcohol related.
Public safety officials are urging people
to plan ahead and have a designated driver,
call a taxi, use mass transit, or call a friend
or family member to get home safety.
Anyone who sees an impaired or aggres-
sive driver is asked to call *FHP (*347).
"We're certainly going to look for
impaired driving," Riordan said.
Distracted driving from texting is also a
major concern, he said.
"They may not be impaired but they


Dr. John Clement Davis,
Sr.
Dr. John Clement Davis, Sr., 75,
of Lake City, died Wednesday
evening, December 21,2011 in
the Lake. City Medical Center
following an ex- ,
tended illness. A
native of Chief-
land, Florida, *. "*
Dr. Davis moved "
to Lake City forty-six years ago.
He was the son of the late Joe
& Lora Wynn Davis. Following
graduation Dr. Davis went on to
serve in the United States Army.
He then attended and graduated
from the University of Florida,
Florida State University and
Auburn University. He received
his Doctorate in English from
Auburn. He served for several
years as the Adjunct Professor of
English at Florida State Univer-
sity and then as The Dean of Vo-
cational Studies here at the Lake
City Community College. He re-
tired in 1997 due to his ill health.
Dr. Davis was a devoted member
of the First Baptist Church of
Lake City and had served on the
Board of the Florida Baptist As-
sociation. He was also a member
of the Lake City Masonic Lodge
#27 F&A.M.; Scottish Rite Bod-
ies; Morocco Shrine Temple;
The Order of the Eastern Star
and The Order of the Amaranth.
In his spare time, Dr. Davis en-
joyed hunting, fishing and mow-
ing his lawn.
Dr. Davis is survived by his
wife of fifty-three years, Mary
Ann Davis; his son, John Davis,
Jr. and his grandchildren, John
William Davis, Matthew James
Dtavis and Taylor Ann Davis all
of Lake City.
Memorial services for Dr. Davis
Will be conducted at 2:00 P.M.
9n Thursday, January 5, 2011 in


need to have a heightened awareness [of
the risk]," Riordan said. "Start and end
your text before you start your trip."
Drunk driving and texting while driving
have something in common besides the
added safety risk to motorists, Riordan
said.
"They're 100 percent preventable," he
said.
Extra FHP troopers, including auxiliary
and reserve troopers, will patrol roads
throughout the holidays. Many may miss
their children opening gifts Christmas
morning, or they might eat a plate of left-
overs when their shifts end.
"It's reassuring that we have people who
work through the holiday period," Riordan
said. "They're dedicated."


OBITUARIES

the First Baptist Church of Lake
City. In lieu of flowers the family
requests that memorial donations
be made to one of the following
entities: The First Baptist Church
of Lake City, 182 N.E. Justice
St., Lake City, FL 32055; Florida
Gateway College, 149 S.E. Col-
lege Place, Lake City, FL 32055
or Florida Baptist College, 5121
Kelly Road Tampa, FL 33615
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 South Marion Ave., Lake
City, FL 32025. (386)752-1234
please sign our online family
guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Diane Kaye McCrary
Diane Kaye McCrary, 62, died
Wednesday, December 21, 2011
at North Florida Regional Medi-
cal Center after an extended ill-
ness. She was the daughter of the
late Richard and Dorothy Stalk-
fleet Sindt. She was a Iowa na-
tive but had moved to Lake City
from Jefferson County, Florida
in 1975. She was a loving wife,
mother and grandmother who en-


joyed gardening, picking straw-
berries, and scrap booking, but
especially loved spending time
with her family and extended
church family at Southside Bap-
tist Church.
She is survived by her husband
Roger McCrary and son, Jason
(Katy) McCrary both of Lake
City, FL; daughter, Shayna
(Todd) Erickson of Fernandina
Beach, FL; brothers, David &
Tim Sindt both of Madison, FL;
sisters, Darlene May of Lamont,
FL and Jennifer Sindt of Talla-
hassee, FL; grandchildren, Ken-
neth McCrary, Brylen Erickson,
& Holly Erickson also survive.
Memorial services will be held
at a later date.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida, 32025, (386) 752-1954
is in charge of arrangements.
Please leave messages of love
and comfort for the family at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


., - -0 - - w
Specializgin adult medial re including

SHig Blood Pressure Low Bk Problems
bHem bisose Full Dizzlness,
SLang Disease veigo ndbalance
Gastrointestinal diagnosis and
High Cholesterol treatment
Diabetes Optifsaa'Weight
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Medicare, Blue Cross and most inrance
Plans acceptedwo*ekr copensadon
Lo-cated ithLaeCt eilxB idin
40gNW al f a i rve -ak itF

38-79-54


'TIS THE




SEASON


ORTHODONTICS
Celia S. Martin, D.M.D.
"Creating Beautiful Smiles Since 1979"


701 SW SR 47
Lake City, FL 32025


-And wish you all
the trimmings of a very
merry and festive season.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


12-2 4 AqAPPY/0o/1AYS FA;fOA, .e A US/

HAGARTHE HORRIBLE
A6AR, W4o Ateg'e v"0 i A 1A46 CHRJI TM AP Nf
Toe 0peoPj. l fog HFOR R I-ARtVEW ANP T1i4Y
ININI UP ourISPE A4LV Y ecoMr oEA'L-Y TO 167
YouR "O 0Ff p A0 60 OP6 4TI
0*30 C'e. o o


SNUFFY SMITH
WE WISH YOU A MERRY CHRISTMAS, ROAST GOOSE
[, OH, WE WISH YOU A MERRY CHRISTMAS... ,


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Wife demurs at advances

by men reconnecting online


- DEAR ABBY: I have
been happily married
for more than 20 years. I
joined an online social net-
work to keep in touch with
family, friends and my kids
who are in college. I love
the convenience, but I'm in
a quandary.
A number of men from
my past (some I dated and
some not) have contacted
me online with their phone
numbers and asked me to
call them. I was flattered at
first, but now I think phone
communication would be
inviting trouble.
I politely inform friends
who push the issue that I'm
happy to catch up online,
but out of respect for my
husband and my marriage
I don't call men who send
me their numbers. Most
of them then drop further
attempts at communication;
others do not
My problem is it con-
tinues to happen. I don't
remember being that pop-
ular when I was young, so
it has caught me off guard.
I suspended my account
several times, but reacti-
vated it because I miss the
connection with extended
family and friends.
How do I handle this? -
BLAST FROM THE PAST
DEAR BLAST: You are
handling it very well just
the way you are.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My.boy-
friend, "Ian," and I are in
our 30s. Although we have
been together for seven


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
months, his family is not
yet over his ex-wife. They
invite her for dinner, share
weekend visitation with
Ian's daughter with her,
and remind him constantly
that they are disappointed
with his decision.
Ian has moved on. He
would like to cut all ties
with his ex, but his family
won't allow it. He's afraid
if he puts his foot down
it will destroy the already
strained relationship he
has with them.
It's Ian's life, and he
has the right to choose
who he spends it with. -
INVISIBLE IN PHILLY
DEAR INVISIBLE:
Remember, because a
child is involved, Ian can-
not completely move on.
As for his parents, accept
that their grandchild's
mother will always be a
part of their lives so get
used to it. If this romance
leads to the altar, you will
meet Ian's family at some
point

DEAR ABBY: My friend
"Cailin" is very sensitive
and not very accepting.
She's also unforgiving and
tends to get into stupid


arguments about nothing. -
Since the sixth grade it has
gotten even worse.
There is a new girl in
school who seems to be a
really nice, friendly person.'
Cailin was the first one to
meet her and she wouldn't'
let anyone else sit with
them.
I told my mom about
it and she said to just sit
down with them both.
Today I did what my mom
said to do. When Cailin
saw us together, she was
steaming. She ignored me
for the rest of the day.
I don't want to keep the
new girl, just share her.
Why can't Cailin and I both
be friends with her? I'm
considering talking to the
dean of students. Would
this be OK? SHARING
FRIENDS IN'COLORADO
DEAR SHARING
FRIENDS: Cailin is imma-
ture, insecure and posses-
sive. She's afraid that if
the new girl talks to other
people, the girl will no
longer like and depend on
her. That's why she was
angry when you sat down
with them.
By all means discuss
this with the dean of stu-
dents. The dean may have
a solution that will allow
the new girl a chance to
make friends with more of
her classmates including
you.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Think about what
you are going to do or
say before you begin. A
disagreement over money
may arise if you feel you
are worth more than you
have been given. Negotiate
diplomatically if you want
to come out ahead. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): You'll get a vote of
confidence from your
peers. Enjoy the festivities
*going on around you and
use this opportunity to net-
work with someone who
can influence your future.
Your timing is good when
dealing with business, not
so good with personal mat-
ters. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Spread a little love and
joy around. The more you
interact with friends, the
more secure you will feel
about who you are, what
you have accomplished
and what's yet to come.
Look at the big picture
and outline your year
ahead.***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Negotiations or finan-
cial dealings should be
settled, if at all possible.
What you leave for next
year will not move forward
successfully until at least
the middle of the year. The
.decision is yours. Act now
or prepare to wait. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last-

22): Travel and dealing
with peers will not run
smoothly. Don't make an
impulsive decision based
on what you hear and see.
You are best to take a wait-
and-see approach to what-
ever you face. A business
arrangement is not as it
appears. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You'll have ample
opportunity to make a
good choice and to meet
someone who interests
you personally. Don't let
frustration cause you to
miss an event geared
toward professional
advancement or making
a business connection.

LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
Follow your head when
dealing with peers and your
heart when dealing with
love. Refrain from being
chintzy or putting a price
on love. An investment you
make is likely to be over
budget, but it will make
someone happy. ****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): The past will come
back to haunt you if you
visit old familiar places.
Don't regret what has
happened; it's the present
and the future that count.
Look beyond the pres-


sures of the holiday season
and play for the long run.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Travel plans ,
may be delayed. Remain
calm and avoid getting into
an argument with anyone
who is overreacting to a
situation that arises. Focus
on home and family and
on making changes that
will bring you all closer
together. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Positive changes
at home will make the
holiday season that much
better. Your keen sense
of what works and what
doesn't will lead to greater
benefits as the year ends.
Hosting an event will put
you in the spotlight ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Let your charm
lead the way. Talking to
someone you work with
or for will help you secure
your position or contracts.
Greater personal stability
will develop if you address
mistakes and move for-
ward. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): A positive attitude will
enhance your chance to
get ahead. Don't overdo
it when it comes to food,
drink or spending money.
Moderation will keep you
on the right track and posi-
tion you well for future
opportunities. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: B equals C
"R DTY XL TJU BSVRGQYOHG OTVJRJD
HJC KU C R C J 'Y SHFU JTYSRJD YT
UHY ... KU CRCJ'Y SHFU JTYSRJD."
-- OXCCZ KHYUVG


Previous Solution: "I pity the French cinema because it has no money. I pity
the American cinema because it has no ideas." Jean-Luc Godard
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-24


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


HOROSCOPES


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2011

Lake City Reporter




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In Print and Online
www.litkccityreportcr.comi


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 12-2011 -CA-000361
SEC:
CITIMORTGAGE, INC.
Plaintiff,
v.
CHRISTOPHER STEPHENSON, et
al
Defpndant(s)
NOTICE OF ACTION TO FORE-
CLOSE PROCEEDING-PROPER-
TY
TO:
ANGELA STEPHENSON, AD-
DRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE
LAST ADDRESS IS: 138 NORTH-
WEST SCARBOROUGH LANE
LAKE CITY, FL 32055
Residence unknown, if living, in-
cluding any unknown spouse of the
said Defendants, if either has remar-
ried and if either or both of said De-
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claim-
ing by, through, under or against the
named Defendant(s); and the afore-
mentioned named Defendant(s) and
such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants and such of the afore-
mentioned unknown Defendant(s) as
may be infants, incompetents or oth-
erwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action has been commenced
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing real property, lying and being
and Situated in COLUMBIA County,
Florida, more particularly described
as follows:
NE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION
27, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE
16 EAST, SOUTH OF GRADED
ROAD AND EAST OF RAILROAD
RIGHT-OF-WAY
AND
TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH RANGE
16 EAST
SECTION 27: BEGIN AT' THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF NW
1/4 OF SE 1/4, AND RUN THENCE
N 89'27'E, ALONG THE NORTH
LINE OF SAID NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4,
328.00 FEET; THENCE S 0*04" E,
1042.55 FEET TO THE NORTH-
EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF G.S. & F. RAILROAD;
THENCE N 31'38'30" W ALONG
SAID NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-
OF-WAY LINE 108.28 FEET TO
THE POINT-OF-A-CURVE AND
RUN THENCE NORTHEASTER-
LY ALONG SAID CURVE CON-
CAVE TO THE RIGHT ALONG A
CHORD BEARING N 27"47'52" W
A DISTANCE OF 583.01 FEET TO
THE POINT-OF-INTERSECTION
OF SAID CURVE WITH THE
WEST LINE OF SAID NW 1/4 OF
SE 1/4; THENCE N 0"04' W 431.49
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. SUBJECT TO EXISTING
COUNTY MAINTAINED RIGHT-
OF-WAY OF SCARBOROUGH
ROAD ACROSS TH4E NORTH
SIDE THEREOF.
LESS AND EXCEPT
A PART OF NW 1/4 OF THE SE
1/4 OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 2
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE
NW CORNER OF SAID NW 1/4
OF THE SE 1/4 AND RUN N
89*27' E -ALONG THE NORTH
LINE THEREOF, 298.00 FEET
FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE N 89"27' E
30.00 FEET; THENCE S 0'04' E,
642.55 FEET; THENCE S 89'56" W
30.00 FEET; THENCE N 0'04' W
642.30 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO EX-
ISTING COUNTY MAINTAINED
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SCARBOR-
OUGH ROAD ACROSS THE
NORTH SIDE THEREOF.
ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE NW 1/4
OF SE 1/4, SECTION 27, TOWN-
SHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST,
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE N 89'27' E
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID NW 1/4 OF SE 1/4 328.00
FEET; THENCE S 0'04' E 642.55
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING;. THENCE CONTINUE S
0"04' E 400.00 FEET TO THE
EAST RIGHT-F-WAY LINE OF
G.S. & F. RAILROAD; THENCE N
31"38'30" W ALONG SAID EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, 108.28
FEET TO THE P.C. OF A CURVE;
THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG
SAID CURVE CONCAVE TO THE
RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF
5596.58 FEET ALONG A CHORD
BEARING N 29*00'42" W 351.68
FEET; THENCE N 8956' E 226.90
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 138
NORTHWEST SCARBOROUGH
LANE, LAKE CITY, FL 32055
This action has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defense, if any,
such Morris Hardwick Schneider,
LLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose
address is 5110 Eisenhower Blvd.
Suite 120, Tampa, FL 33634 on or
before December 19, 2011, and file
the original with the clerk of this
Court wither before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
This is an attempt to collect a debt
and any information obtained may be
used for that purpose.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on the 18 day of November,
2011.
By:/s/ P. DeWitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,


9? ".1, 1"'ITITITIR;


Legal

Deputy Clerk
"In accordance with the American
with disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this hearing, should con-
tact ADA Coordinator not later than
1 (one) day prior to the proceeding at
Three Rivers Legal Services, Inc.
(Columbia), 853 SW Sisters Wel-
come Road, Lake City, FL 32056
386-752-5960 and for the hearing
and voice impaired 800-955-8770."
05529305
December 24, 31, 2011

100 Job
Opportunities
Local CPA Firm is looking for
an experienced tax return preparer.
Ideally, the candidate will be able
to prepare personal, corporate
and partnership returns.
.The seasonal time frame is
February 1 through April 17.
Send reply to Box 05080, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Lube Tech Wanted
Tools Required'
Apply @ Rountree Moore Chevy
4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, Fl. 32055
See: Jimbo Pegnetter in Service
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lie., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com

120 Medical
Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529777
Medical Billing Manager
Several years of experience in
medical office insurance coding,
and billing required. Excellent
Salary Based on Experience
Apply in confidence,
Email: mafaisal05(@yahoo.com
or Fax: 386-758-5987

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

240 Schools &
240 Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
Beautiful 8 mo. old kittens,velvet
soft white or white with a touch of
gray on head. One beautiful dark
long haired. Raised indoors, litter
trained, used to dogs. All shots in-
cluding rabies,also neutered
Sweet, playful and loving. Price
negotiable. Phone 386-961-8909
Great Christmas Gift. 4 CKC
Registered Toy Poodle puppies.
Ready Christmas Eve. Up to date
on shots. 386-719-4808
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buiy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


ACROSS
1 Catch some
rays
5 Damp
10 Silly
comedies
12 Pacify
13 Rope in
14 Pleasant
15 Inventory wd.
16 Circus routine
18 Dangerous
current
19 Royal
residence
23 Amigo of
Fidel
26 Dog tag
wearers
27 Fair (hyph.)
30 Home of the
Boilermakers
32 Gulfport
neighbor
34 Temper, as
glass
35 Lurched
36 Piercing
37 Polite word


440 Miscellaneous
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT,
120GB Playstation 3 System with
9 games, 2 wireless control, in
original box. $380, Call 386-984-
7510
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED 6r 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call Saturday.
Variety of Morgan Dollars
for sale. Call to make an
appointment 386-754-4136


450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi -
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.
630 Mobile Homes
U630 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
36-752-6422
3 BR/2 BA, 14 x 80 Singlewide,
CH & A, water, sewage & garbage
provided, 1st, last + dep., lease
required, $550 mo. 386-752-8978.
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try setting just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec. (954)818-4481
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640 Mobile Homes
6U4 0 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Maintained, 10
ac. Master has a huge closet w/
walk in shower & garden tub.
MLS 79417 $94,900 Foreclosure


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale

Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000

Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Small mobile home
2/1 886sf on a wooded lot.
Paved road frontage.
.* MLS.79413 $17,900
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Direct Sale
15K-25K off models
800-622-2832 ext 210

650 Mobile Home
650 & Land

Rental/Starter, renovated, 3/2 SW
1 ac. off41 btwn 1-10 & 75. 10
min to LC. $28,500 obo. No owner
Finance. 386-330-2316/266-3610


705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

'710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent










Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

GREUP E


Print answer here: L 1 '11
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: VERGE WRING BATTER SIMILE
Answer: Valley Ave. in Bangor is a -
"MAINE" STREET


38 Spiral
molecule
39 Bluish-gray
feline
42 Pipe down!
45 -
Wiedersehen
46 Warrior
princess
50 elt locales
53 Makes glad
55 Cafe -
56 Comment
57 Rose or iris
58' Fjord port

DOWN
1 Halftime
entertainers
2 Crafts partner
3 Tool box item
4 Mauna -
5 Stooge with
bangs
6 Charged
particle
7 Mix together.
8 Far East
cuisine
9 Kennel noise


Answer to Previous Puzzle


ANTES POWER
YEARNS BEN GN
NOUGAT LOTTOS
SPA ONO

-H E-T RI RA E
SASA PI G GY CAR
TEL IRAS PURE
HEIRESS AIRED
EMBER PALETTE
NE I L CELT SHE
ADS ARDOR YAM
EL I NUN
SKATES SIESTA
RECOUP OSMOND
AGENT MONTE


10 Not masc.
11 Floppy-eared
pooch
12 Cpls.' bosses
17 LP
successors
20 Tropical lizard


Want more puzzles?
Cheek out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


21 Basket
willows
22 Cameo,
maybe
23 Tax pro
24 Fox's'dream
date
25 Ocean-going
bird
28 Realty sign
29 Draft animals
31 Judge
32 Shorter
33 Potato st.
37 Three
before V
40 Bringing up
the rear
41 Reasons to
cram
42 Mop
43 Pull along
44 Big Island
port
47 Footnote
abbr. (2 wds.)
48 Despot who
fiddled
49 Look for
answers
51 Paulo,
Brazil
52 Youngest
Cratchit
54 Tolstoy's
name


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


BUYITil


SEITTI I


hFlIND, I


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard. I
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &,
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495.' mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


12-24











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2011


710 A Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.51 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
7 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
0 2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05529719
3 BR/2 BA, 1, 800 sq. ft, 2 car
garage, all appliances, sprinkler
system; fenced, NO PETS,
*Very clean & ready to move in.
$1,000 mo, $1,000 sec.,
$30 appl. fee. 386-752-4864.

1BR COTTAGE 10 min. on
South 41 All utilities included. +
Satellite. Yard, carport.
$650. mo. 386-758-2408
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home,
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
4 BR/2 BA in town, good neigh-
borhood, fenced yard, fireplace, no
pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.,
386-755-6916.
Available Immediately.
Rent To Own 3br/2ba home
In quiet subdivision.
386-752-5035 X 3113
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
Gorgeous Lake View 2br
Apartment. Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$600 mo, and
$600 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

75 f Business &
5 U Office Rentals
FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/1 yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal '
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Nice 4/2, 1 ac.
Granite floors. Beautiful yard &
wrap around porch. MLS 77292
$139,900. Short Sale.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 4/2, 1 ac modular
home that is in immaculate cond.
1,344sqft. New carpet, roof, a/c,
fireplace. MLS 78833 $115,000.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Well maintained.
Tiled floors, living area, open kit.
Above ground pool, guest quarters
MLS 79149 $115,000. Short Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot. on
the Suwannee. Well & anerobic
septic system. MLS.78842
$45,000 Owner Financing.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Home, over 2ac,
screened inground pool. Updated,
crown molding, new wood floors,
kit & paint. MLS 79378 $129,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 1713 sf, great
area. Arched entryways, Ig living
room w/fireplace. French doors to
patio. MLS 79418 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.4/2 Vintage home.
Updated electric & plumbing. New
carpet & CH/A. Hardwood floors.
MLS 79367 $99,000


Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Well maintained
2/2. Wood laminate floors. Lg
living room & master suite. New
countertops. MLS 76928 $89,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Vintage 4/3 2626sf.
Hardwood floors, new wdws, fire-
place. Separate 494ft guest home ,
double lot MLS 78000 $109,000,
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 1987 SF up-
graded w/wood laminate floors,
ceramic tile. 14x30 workshop, 10
xl0 storage MLS79345 $199,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, 2853SF walk-
ing to downtown, lakes, restau-
rants, Shands & VA. garage w/apt
above. MLS 79451 $140,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, open floor
plan, spacious master BR. Tile &
wood thru out. 1 yr. home
warranty MLS 78594 $169,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Huge 4/3, 2826sf
ont 5.22 ac! Flooring is tile lami-
nate in most rooms & in immacu-
late cond. MLS 79584 $215,000
Century 21, Tle-Da-rby Rogers,
Co. 752-6575. What a Creampuff!
Newer roof, 1 ac, paved road,
fenced, fireplace, very nice brick
home. MLS 79531 $65,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Brick .59 ac! 3/2,
2502sf. Lg master bath w/separate
shower & whirlpool. 2 car garage
& storage. MLS 76769 $210,000
Charming Older Home in town.
Over 1300 sq ft. with hardwood
floors. Shady comer lot.
Janet Creel. 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
Private Estate, city limits.
6br/3.5ba. 39.7 acres $994,000 or
$2,500 mo rent. Mary Brown
Whitehurst. 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2. New kitchen
counters & ceramic tile, open floor
plan. MLS# 77943 $94,500 Mary
Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 updated brick in town. New
roof, hardwoods. Glassed room
w/fantastic views. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS 78092 $249,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D. Super area,
nice back yard. Covered back
porch. New AC in 2010. Elaine K.
Tolar. 755-6488 MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Exceptional price! 3/2, 1582 sqft.
2 car garage, screened porch 1/2 ac
lot. Only $129,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 365-5678 MLS#79239
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent location! 3/2 home, large
master suite, 2 car garage.
$87,900. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 79458


Modd Hours.
Corial Homes Open Daf1
Sat 10-4 Sun. l-4pm
b, Arthur Rutenberg Call Bryan Z.acdi
,- .... ....... .. .,, .. ,..... .... (386) 752-8653
n.1 ,. f .. .I ,., ,-,. I ,. , ,. n ,


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Woodcrest, 3/2 Brick w/split floor
plan. Nice lot. Fireplace, Ig porch,
vinyl wdws. MLS# 77708 Elaine
K. Tolar $169,900 755-6488
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac, 3/2, as is $95,000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/Ist time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Newly Listed in Mayfair! Great
area close to shopping! 3/2 fresh
paint& pretty lot. Newer metal
roof & screen porch. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
Sweeping Golf Course View!
Brick 3/2 w/screen porch. South-
ern Oaks Golf Course. 1980sf.
$164,900 #79585 Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms &
O U Acreage .
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
87 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


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SPORTS


Saturday, December 24, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Page IOA


SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION

TV sports "
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Hawaii Bowl, Nevada vs.
Southern Miss., at Honolulu
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Doubleheader game

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Thursday's Game
Indianapolis 19, Houston 16
Today's Games
Oakland at Kansas City, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, I p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Denver at Buffalo, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, I p.m.
Minnesota atWashington, I p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Arizona at Cincinnati, I p.m.
San Diego at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas,4:15 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Atlanta at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. I
Chicago at Minnesota, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Buffalo at New England. I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Miami, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, I p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, I p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.

College bowl games
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 56,Arizona State 24
Today
Hawaii Bowl
Nevada (7-5) vs. Southern Mississippi
( 11-2), 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Missouri
(7-5), 4 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit'
Western Michigan (7-5) vs. Purdue
(6-6), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina State (7-5) vs.Louisville
(7-5), 8 p.m.(ESPN)

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule
Sunday's Game
No. 14 Xavier vs. Clemson/Southern
Illinois at Honolulu,TBA

Florida 82, Florida St. 64
At Gainesville
FLORIDA ST. (8-4)
James 3-8 0-0 6, White 0-2 6-6 6,
Gibson 5-11 0-0 10, Loucks 6-11 0-0 15,
Snaer 1-5 2-3 4, Dulkys 1-4 0-0 3, Peterson
1-1 0-0 2, Space 0-1 0-0 0. Miller 3-8 1-1
7,Whisnant II 4-5 0-0 I I, Kreft 0-3 0-0 0.
Totals 24-59 9-10 64.
FLORIDA (10-2)
Young 7-7 1-2 15, Murphy 4-8 2-2 12,
Boynton 5-13'2-4 14, Walker 1-7 8-10
II, Beal 7-15 3-4 21, Wilbekin 2-2 0-0
5, Yeguete 2-3 0-2 4, Prather 0-3 0-0 0,
Larson 0-0 0-0 0, Pitchford 0-0 0-0 0.
Stotals 28-58 16-24 82.
Halftime-Florida 32-24. 3-Point
Goals-Florida St. 7-23 (Whisnant II
3-4, Loucks 3-8, Dulkys 1-3, Gibson 0-1,
Snaer 0-3 Miller 0-4), Florida 10-28 (Beal
4-8, Murphy 2-5, Boynton 2-9, Wilbekln ""
1-1, Walker 1-5). Fouled Out-White.
Rebounds-Florida St. 35 (Gibson, James
6), Florida 35 (Yeguete 8).Assists-Florida
St. 9 (Loucks 4), Florida 15 (Walker 7).
Total Fouls-Florida St. 20, Florida 14.
A-I 1,125.

NBA schedule
Sunday's Games
Boston at NewYork, 12 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 2:30 p.m.
Chicago at LA. Lakers, 5 p.m.
Orlando at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Golden State,
10:30 p.m.

NBA preseason
Thursday's Games
Atlanta 92, Charlotte 75
Denver 110, Phoenix 85


End preseason


Barber's


big year


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City native Blayne Barber lines up a putt during the 2011 SE6 Championship tournament early last year, Barber was a member of the U.S. national
team in the Walker Cup.



Lake City native represents



United States in Walker Cup


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com


Blayne Barber follows through with a 5-iron on an approach s


It's been a big year for Lake City
across the national sports scene.
From the major leagues to col-
lege football Saturday's, Lake City
natives have represented well.
Blayne Barber continued to make
his name on golf's national map in
2011 by competing at the University
of Auburn and as a member of
the United States team in the 2011
Walker Cup which pits the best
amateur golfers from the United
States against the best from Great
Britain.
Though the United States lost
in the Walker Cup, Barber gained
valuable experience that he will use
as he continues toward his dream
of finishing college and making it to
the PGA Tour.
The United States, fell, 14-12,
to Great Britain and Ireland at
Scotland's Royal Aberdeen Golf
Club on Sept. 11.
Barber split his single's match
during the final round after trail-
ing Steven Brown for 13 of the first
15 holes. Barber won a three-hole
stretch from 15-17 and took a one-
hole .advantage before Brown won
the final hole to square the match.
COURTESY PHOTO Barber has earned 12 amateur
hot. top-10s over the last two years and


finished with a 2-1-1 record in the
Palmer Cup for the United States,
which beat Team Europe in the
event
"Blayne has been playing some
very strong golf this off-season,"
Auburn coach Nick Clinard said
after the Palmer Cup. "There is a
reason he is the 13th ranked ama-
teur in the world."
Barber was a 2011 Division 1
Second Team All-American after he
led the Auburn Tigers with a 70.91
scoring average. It was the second-
lowest mark in Auburn's history,
behind Buddy Gardner's 70.90 in
1976.
Barber's 13 rounds in the 60s
tied him for the most in a single
season with former Tiger Patton
Kizzire, who set the record during
the 2007 SEC Championship run
for Auburn.
Barber helped the Tigers move to
No. 1 in the Golf World/Nike Golf
Coaches' Poll for the first time in the
school's history. late in September
following a win at the Carpet Capital
Collegiate and a tie for second at
Olympia Fields. The poll's inception
was in 2001. Auburn's previous high
mark was sixth.
Barber also finished third in the
U.S. Amateur's stroke play rounds
before falling in the match-play por-
tion of the event


FROM THE SIDELINE istm as

SAll I want for Christmas


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom
finally, it's here.
The best day
of the year.
No, I'm not
talking about
Christmas. I'm talking
about my fantasy league
championship.
OK, Christmas is pretty
great too. I'm not going


to go Ebenezer on any
of you. Christmas is the
most glorious of holidays
as well.
And for Christmas I
bring you good tidings,
a Christmas carol if you
will. ...

It was the night before
Christmas and all through
the office, a reporter was
working. Some say his
work. ...novice.
What he wanted for
Christmas was not much. It
wasn't a car, a diamond. It
was no thing such.


There was only one thing
to fill his heart with glee.
His dreams were made of
fantasy.
A sport on the gridiron
with players of fury. He
watched them each Sunday,
a one man jury.
What now besets him is
a championship. Tales of
glory he wants not to slip.
And if Santa present it
under his tree. With shouts
of glory, he shall shout,
"Yippee!"
For this would be a
Christmas unlike no other,
a Christmas to unite sister


and brother.
And if you to shall ever
see a Christmas so bright,
than shall you wish a
merry Christmas unto each
gentleman, one and all and
good night.

You see, there is only
one thing I want for
Christmas and that is to be
crowned champion of my
fantasy league. Not only
would it give me a nice
little Christmas present,
but it's also present me
with bragging rights for a
year.


So, Santa if you're
reading, here's my
Christmas list:

Hold Drew Brees
under 20 fantasy points;
Let the Detroit Lions
offense play well.

It's a simple list Santa
and I've been a good boy
this year.
I guess by next week,
I'll know if I've made the
naughty list.
* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.