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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01735
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 22, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01735
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








L4


000015 120312 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Thursday, December 22, 201 I


Reporter


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 276 N 75 cents


Burglary conviction upheld


Local man faces 15 years
in prison after stealing
copper wire from home.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. corn
The 15-year burglary sentence of a
Columbia County man has been upheld by
the District Court of Appeals in a decision
issued Tuesday.


Defense lawyer Jeffrey Siegmeister
argued the prosecutor made a "funda-
mental error" when he misstated burglary
laws to jurors during closing arguments in
the trial of his client, William Dicks Jr.
Siegmeister argued the prosecutor, John
Durrett, paraphrased the legal definition
of a dwelling in the Jan. 7 trial as "a build-
ing with a roof designed to be occupied by
persons, together with the yard and the
outbuildings immediately surrounding it."
The prosecutor argued that Dicks, 31,
entered the dwelling when he walked into


the backyard of a trailer that he planned to
burglarize.
"A person in the backyard with the
intent to commit a theft, it doesn't matter
if they're in the backyard or if they're in
the back bedroom," Durrett said. '"They
are trespassing and they are intending to
steal. That is burglary."
Defense lawyers never objected to
Durrett's statement. Instead, Siegmeister
argued that Florida law says a yard must
be enclosed to be part of a dwelling and
that dwellings are only considered to be


the "enclosed space, of ground and out-
buildings immediately surrounding it."
Durrett argued the yard was part of the
dwelling, despite its lack of fencing.
"[Dicks] most certainly entered that
dwelling," he said. "He entered it by being
in the backyard. He entered it by being
underneath it."
Dicks was arrested on April 1, 2010 after
Bohman Kirby drove past rural land he
owned in the county and noticed fresh tire
UPHELD continued on 5A


As usual,

crime up

a bit for

holidays

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
With the holidays usu-
ally comes a small rise in
some kinds of crime, gener-
ally thefts. That's the case
this year as well, say local
authorities.
'There has been a slight
rise in the amount of break-
in and other crimes," said
Capt. John Blanchard, Lake
City Police Department pub-
lic information officer. "Not
a consistent rise, but just
like any of the other holiday
periods, we see an upswing
in the burglaries."
Residences are targeted as
well as cars, Blanchard said.
Authorities advise people to
lock their house, business and
car doors and while shopping
and to place valuable objects
left in the vehicle out of sight.
"We also expect people to
be vigilant and that means
looking around and know-
ing their surroundings and
if they see something suspi-
cious to call us," Blanchard
said. "Usually with their sus-
picions it often leads us to
finding out crimes that have
been committed or are about
to be committed."
LCPD also provides house
patrols for residents who plan
to leave their homes during
the holidays. To enroll in
the program, residents need
to complete a contact sheet
giving police information so
their residence and property
can be patrolled while they
are away from home.
Blanchard said LCPD pro-
vided the following holiday
safety tips list to give residents
a comprehensive checklist to
make sure travel safely.
LCPD holiday tips:
Have a trip plan and let
others know when you will
leave and intend to arrive
at your destination. Leave
contact numbers for friends
or neighbors and take their
numbers with you.
Have a cellular telephone
with you if possible.
Keep your car doors
locked and windows rolled
up.
At stop signs or traffic
signals, keep a safe distance
from the car in front of you.
Leave yourself room to get
out in case you're boxed in..
Don't stop in under-pop-
ulated areas to ask direc-
tions.
Don't pick up hitchhik-
ers.
Lock your car doors
when leaving your car.
When you get out your
car, carry your purse and
keep other valuables out
of sight. Do not store valu-
ables out in the open inside a
parked car.
^ aa 3a a~t ''>?i:!*.l'5^(<*^^e^i


Keeping pets out of harm's



way during the holidays


Unforeseen hazards
may await Fido and
Fluffy this Christmas.

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
This Christmas
when your home
is filled with all
the holiday trim-
mings, it may
also a be filled with hazards
for Fido and Fluffy.
Foods and decorations
can be harmful, even deadly,
to curious cats and dogs.
Pets may also be frightened
by guests during parties.
'The most common prob-
lems revolve around food,"
said Dr. Tracy Hawthorne of
Lake City Animal Hospital.
Foods toxic to animals
include chocolate, raisins,
grapes, alcohol, macadamia
nuts, garlic, onions, caf-
feinated beverages, bread
dough and sugar substitute.
'The best advice is don't
feed pets people food at all.
Period," she said. People JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
food may cause upset stom- Sweetie (left), a 1-year-old Dachshund, checks out a gift she received from Santb's.little helper, Muggsy, a 13-year-
old Pekingese. While family pets can enjoy Christmas cheer along with their human companions, dog owners should
PETS continued on 5A watch out for hazards during the holidays.


Just three
shopping
days left
Josh Norris, a sales
associate at Home
Depot in Lake City,
wraps a 7-foot Fraser
fir Christmas tree. The
store still has about 40
trees left for last-min-
ute shoppers. 'I enjoy.
smelling them,' Norris
said. 'I like the smell of
Christmas trees. People
seem a lot nicer this time
of year.'


Man steals TV set from. church, say police


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com


Center on $20,000 bond.
According to Columbia
County Sheriff's Office


A Lake City man broke into a local church reports, a deputy was dis-
and stole a television set Tuesday night, patched in reference to a
according to authorities. possible burglary at Hopeful
Bobby Joe Melton, 39, 386 SE Doe Glen, Baptist Church. He met with
was arrested on charges of with dealing in Melton complainants who said Melton
stolen property, burglary of an unoccupied and an acquaintance came to
structure while unarmed, and larceny. He was their home and asked for a ride to the church
booked into the Columbia County Detention to meet someone.


The four got into the vehicle and went to
Hopeful Baptist Church, where Melton got
out the vehicle. After a few minutes one of the
witnesses reported hearing what sounded like
a glass breaking. Shortly afterward they saw
Melton walking back to the vehicle carrying
a large flat screen television. Melton put the
television in the back of the truck and told
them to drive home.
CHURCH continued on 5A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


80
Patchy fog
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ...........
People .............
Obituaries .........
Advice & Comics .. .
Puzzles ............


..... 4A
. 2A
. 5A
. . . 3B
..... 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
'Kane' Oscar
fetches $861 K.


COMING
FRIDAY
Local news
roundup.


fp


,1 6 M ?C









2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011

Celebrity Birthdays


A$H 3. Wednesday:
\., -'Afternoon: 3-7-4


; A).f Wednesday:
l Afternoon: 8-2-0-0


Tuesday:
8-19-26-35-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Prince Harry headed to Afghanistan


LONDON Britain's Prince
Harry has said he will be deployed
to Afghanistan for a second time -
almost four years after his previous
secret mission was cut short when
details leaked, according to a news-
paper report Wednesday.
The 27-year-old Harry, who is
third in line to the throne, told
guests at a military awards cer-
emony Monday night that he would
likely return next year, The Sun
newspaper reported.
"I can't wait to get out there,"
Harry was quoted as saying.
Harry served as a battlefield
air controller in
Afghanistan for 10
weeks from Dec.
2007, but was sent
home early after
details were made
public first by an
Australian celebrity
magazine and later on
the Drudge Report Prince Harry
website.
He became the first member of
the British royal family to serve in
a war zone since his uncle, Prince
Andrew, flew as a helicopter pilot
in the Falkland Islands conflict with
Argentina in 1982.
A spokesman for St James's
Palace, who spoke on customary
condition of anonymity, would not
discuss the details of when or where
Harry could serve in Afghanistan.
He said it would be a "matter for the
military chain of command."
Britain's defense ministry said it
doesn't discuss the "deployments of
individual service personnel."
The prince returned to Britain
in November after two months of
combat helicopter pilot training in
the U.S. At the Naval Air Facility in
El Centre, California, Harry flew
Apache attack helicopters in the


desert close to the Mexican border.
During training at the Gila Bend
Air Force Auxiliary Field in south-
ern Arizona, he fired missiles and
rockets. During a brief break from
maneuvers, Harry rented a Harley-
Davidson motorcycle in Scottsdale
and rode the six-hour trip to Las
Vegas for a weekend visit

LaBelle, Michaels set to
perform in Indianapolis
INDIANAPOLIS Patti LaBelle,
Bret Michaels and En Vogue are
among the artists who will perform
in free concerts during the week
leading up to the Super Bowl in
Indianapolis.
The Super Bowl Host Committee
made the announcement Wednesday
at a news conference at Lucas Oil
Stadium, site of the Feb. 5 game.
The artists will perform on stages
along Georgia Street beginning Jan.
27. 5. A specific schedule was not
announced.
Other artists scheduled to
appear include Big Head Todd and
the Monsters, Corey Cox; Darius
Rucker, Dierks Bentley, Edwin
McCain, Fitz & the Tantrums, Fuel,
Here Come the Mummies, IU's
Straight No Chaser, LMFAO, OAR,
Railroad Earth, Sixpence None the
Richer, Umphrey's McGee and Will
Hoge. More artists are expected to
be added.
Madonna will perform at halftime.

Wynonna to perform for
sick children in Nashville
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Wynonna
Judd will perform holiday songs for
children with life-threatening medi-
cal conditions.
The event is part of Macy's


"Believe" campaign in which the
department store donates $1 to the
Make-A-Wish Foundation for each
letter to Santa Claus that is mailed
from one of its in-store letterboxes.
The foundation grants wishes to
children with life-threatening ill-
nesses.
Macy's has agreed to donate up
to $1 million in this third year of the
campaign.
Judd's Wednesday performance
will take place at Nashville's Belle
Meade Plantation. Santa will be
there too before he flies off to the
Nashville Macy's at the Green Hills
Mall to greet children.

Welles' 'Citizen Kane'
Oscar sells for $861K
LOS ANGELES The Academy
Award statuette that Ors.on Welles
won for the original screenplay of
"Citizen Kane" was auctioned for
more than $861,000 Tuesday in Los
Angeles.
Nate D. Sanders Auctions spokes-
man Sam Heller said bidders from
around the world, including David
Copperfield, vied for the Oscar.
The 1942 Oscar was thought to be
lost for decades. It surfaced in 1994
when cinematographer Gary Graver
tried to sell it The sale was stopped
by Beatrice Welles, Orson's young-
est daughter and sole heir.
Copperfield, who was outbid in
the auction, said he admires Welles
not only for his cinematic successes,
but because he, too, was a magician.
Welles hosted Copperfield's first
television special.
The auction house declined to
release the highest bidder's name.
It said only a handful of Academy
Awards have sold for nearly a million
dollars.
(AP)


Former House Speaker
Jim Wright is 89.
Actor Hector Elizondo
is 75.
Country singer Red
Steagall is 73.
Baseball Hall-of-Famer
Steve Carlton is 67.
ABC News anchor
Diane Sawyer is 66.


Rock singer-musician
Rick Nielsen (Cheap Trick)
is 65.
Singer Robin Gibb is 62.
Golfer Jan Stephenson
is 60.
Actor Ralph Fiennes
is 49.
Rhythm-and-blues sing-
er Jordin Sparks is 22.


Daily Scripture

"While they were there, the
time came for the baby to be
born, and she gave birth to her
firstborn, a son. She wrapped
him in cloths and placed him in
a manger, because there was no
guest room available for them."

Luke 2:6-7 NIV


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number .............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ...............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the peris- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No. 310-88.T vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other countes where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla. 32056.. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecltyreporter.com) Circulation .............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
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(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks ................ $26.32
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Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417 Rates indude 7% sales tax
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To place a classified ad, call 755-5440 52 Weeks................ $179.40

CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Lakeland cop dies
after being shot
LAKELAND A central
Florida police officer who
was shot in the head earlier
this week died Wednesday,
making him the seventh
officer in the state to be
killed by gun violence in
2011.
Rookie Lakeland Officer
Arnulfo Crispin, 25, was
shot Sunday night after
responding to a complaint
of some suspicious males
in a park, a police report
said. An officer who arrived
as backup found Crispin
unresponsive. Crispin
apparently was shot after
asking permission from the
men to pat them down for
weapons and drugs.
Authorities have arrested
the suspect, 19-year-old
Kyle Williams, who sur-
rendered Monday morning
at the urging of his mother.
He is being held without
bail and is scheduled to be
arraigned Jan. 24.
On Tuesday, police found
a semi-automatic handgun
in a crawlspace outside the
apartment complex where
Crispin was shot The gun
is being sent to a crime lab
for testing to determine
if it was used to shoot the
officer.
Crispin grew up in
nearby Mulberry and had
been a Lakeland officer for
just 18 months. Funeral
services are scheduled for
Tuesday.
"He served the com-
munity well," police Chief
Lisa Womack-said Tuesday
night in announcing that
Crispin was not expected to
survive. "He will be sorely
missed from this day for-
ward."
The seven gun deaths of
Florida officers this year
ties 2007 for the third most
in the state since 1900,
according to the National
Law Enforcement Officers
Memorial Fund, which
tracks officer deaths nation-
wide. The most was 10 in
1987, and there were eight


recorded in 1988.
This deadly year for
Florida officers began on
Jan. 20 when detectives
Roger Castillo and Amanda
Haworth were fatally shot
trying to arrest a fugitive in
a notoriously crime-ridden
section of Miami. Another
officer shot and killed the
suspect
Four days later, St
Petersburg officers
Thomas Baitinger and
Jeffrey Yaslowitz were
killed trying to arrest a
suspect hiding in an attic. A
U.S. marshal was wounded.
The shooter was later killed
by officers.
On Feb. 2, Greg Malloy,
a correctional officer
at the Holmes County
Correctional Facility in the
Panhandle, was killed in
a shootout while assisting
local officers in tracking a
murder suspect The sus-
pect also was killed.
St Petersburg police
lost another member on
Feb. 21 when Officer David
S. Crawford was gunned
down after stopping a teen
for questioning. A 16-year-
old boy later surrendered
and confessed to the shoot-
ing. His trial is pending.

Environmentalists
cheer funding
WEST PALM BEACH -
Environmental advocates
are cheering increased
funding for Everglades res-
toration efforts.
Despite ongoing budget
battles in Washington, the
omnibus spending pack-
age includes a modest rise
in money designated for
the Everglades. Projects
funded through the
Department of the Interior
and the Army Corps of
Engineers total about $246
million in the 2012 fiscal
year, up from about $232
million in the 2011 fiscal
year.
Everglades Foundation
CEO Kirk Fordham
says "It's nothing short


of remarkable that the
Everglades has secured
such a big win" given the
cosnt-'cuttin efforts in


THE WEATHER


Washington. PATCHY 7. ISOLATED ISOLATED CHANCE CHANCE
M FOI G SHOWERS SHOWERS S OF RAIN 1 OF RAIN
Man gets life for
toddler's murder HI 80 1.0L55 HI 79 LO56 HI 76LO 1 170L049 167L047
k __________ ^~~~,l 70 LO... _.. 49. LO -47-n~..l.,l,,l-ri a,,.,,,,.-:.. ,r--- ---^ --- ----------


TAVARES A central
Florida man has been sen-
tenced to life in prison for
the death of his girlfriend's
toddler son.
A Lake County judge
sentenced 30-year-
old David Tatara on
Wednesday. A jury found
him guilty last month of,
second-degree murder.
According to the
Orlando Sentinel, Tatara
had claimed that 15-month-
old Blake Rupe was fatally
injured in Decenmber 2008
when he fell from a play-
pen.
Prosecutors say Tatara
lost his temper and
assaulted the boy because
he wouldn't stop crying for
his mother.

DNA, prints lead to
arrest in shooting
FORT LAUDERDALE
- DNA from a soda bottle
and fingerprints from a cap
have led to an arrest in a
recent shooting of a taxi
driver in Broward County.
Broward Sheriff's
Office investigators said
Wednesday that 30-year-
old Semie Robinson is
being held without bail
on an attempted murder
charge. Authorities say
cabbie Williamson Joseph
was shot twice after pick-
ing up Robinson as a fare
on Nov. 18. Joseph is
recovering.
The assailant left
behind cooler bag contain-
ing a baseball cap and
a partial bottle of soda.
Investigators were able to
match DNA from the bot-
tle and fingerprints on the
cap to Robinson, who has a
violent criminal history.
(AP)


" :: -' ^ '*. ,City
S- *lacksonle Cape Canaveral
Tallahassee Lake City 8/60 Daytona Beach
77/61 80/55 Ft. Lauderdale
- -" inesville i Daylpa Beach Fort Myers
73/61 "Piaia City ,80/56 8062 Gainesville
73/64 Ocala Jacksonville
81/58 Key West
Orlando Cap Calaveral Lake City
81/61 79/64 i LakeCy


Tampa,
82/63


West Palm Beach
80/69


Naples
Ocala
Orlando


S Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myer 81/72 Pensacola
83/63 Naples Tallahassee
'2/64 Miami Tampa
K .We.t 80/70 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach
80/72


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year- total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


77
57
67
43
85 In 1931
19 in 1901

0.00"
0.36"
33.25"
1.63"
47.43"


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Thursday Friday







S-FomWastMeteinileratin "Feshie"topetratire
.V.M-


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.
MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset torn.


7:23 a.m.
5:35 p.m.
7:23 a.m.
5:36 p.m.

5:06 a.m.
3:44 p.m.
6:11 a.m.
4:44 p.m.


*000
Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
24 1 9 16
New First Full Last


Friday
79 64 FAc
79/62/pc
81/70/pc
84/64/pc
79/57/pc
77/59/c
80/71/pc
79/56/c
81/71/pc
82/65/pc
80/58/pc
82/63/pc
71/57/sh
69/52/sh
74/55/sh
81/65/pc
75/55/sh
80/68/pc


Saturday
78 67 pc
77/62/pc
81/71/pc
83/63/pc
76/53/c
74/56/sh
79/71/pc
76/51/sh
81/72/pc
83/66/pc
78/56/pc
80/62/pc
68/52/sh
63/48/sh
71/47/sh
81/63/pc
72/50/sh
81/68/pc


SrrAn exclusive
service
brought to
wour readers
Today's by






AV& Forecasts, data and
egraphicsv201The Weather
weather www.weatherpublisher.com
weathp J Ywww.weatherpubllsher.com


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pushed down
through the Plains
and into Mexico.
137 cities over the
central and east-
ern U.S., reported
record lows, includ-
ing 27 degrees
below zero at
Goodland, Kansas.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


Spirit of Suwannee plans New Year's bash


LIVE OAK It's the
end of 2011 and the Spirit
of the Suwannee Music
Park will close out the
year with the annual
New Year's Eve party
Saturday night, Dec.
31 with Jacksonville's X
Hale Band. The Justin
Case Band will perform
Friday night, Dec. 30.
Admission Friday
night, Dec. 30 is $5
per person with the $5
deducted from your eve-
ning's tab in the 'Music
Hall.
Saturday night is the
big night with the annual
New Year's Eve Party
with the X Hal Band of
Jacksonville.
Tickets are $60 per
couple or $30 per person
includes party favors, all
you can eat finger food
buffet during the evening
and champagne toast at
midnight (all other bev-
erages are separate). Full
service bar /make reser-
vations now for cabins
and/or the New Year's
Eve party now by calling
386-364-1683 or emailing
spirit@musicliveshere.
com.


Jacksonville's X
Hale Band headlines
the New Year's Eve.
show at the Spirit
of the Suwannee
Music Park in Live
Oak next week.


Future of casinos in Fla. may come down to jobs


By GARY FINEOUT
and JENNIFER KAY
Associated Press
MIAMI Sun-drenched Miami has
beaches, South Beach nightspots, a new
stadium for the Miami Marlins and athletic
superstars like LeBron James.
But nearly 300,000 people there are out
of work after hard hits from the recession
and the collapse of Florida's real estate
market
Now, some big-money backers are tout-
ing a new attraction that promises to boost
jobs: Casinos.
They argue Miami can become a shim-
mering East Coast version of Las Vegas,
generating a spark for the state's stalled'
economy. Miami's selling points, they
argue, could help the area transform itself
into.a serious rival to Vegas.


Malaysia-based Genting Group, which
runs a massive casino in Singapore, is
so sure about the possibility that it has
already spent nearly a half-billion dollars
to acquire property in downtown Miami,
including the iconic Miami Herald build-
ing that sits on the shore of Biscayne Bay.
The group has ambitious plan to alter the
Miami skyline with a sprawling $3.8 billion
complex designed to look like coral.
That sounds good to people like Michael
Ferrarelli, who right now just has a part-
time job at the Miami Dolphins stadium.
"With the economy the way it is and so
many people out of work right now, it's the
best way to boost the economy," Ferrarelli
said. "You're going to bring thousands of
jobs.into eaeh location."
The serious amount of money already
spent by Genting has sparked the interest
of other Las Vegas casino operators, not


to mention those who already own sports
facilities in South Florida.
This new vision for Miami, however, will
require approval from the Republican-led
Legislature and Gov. Rick Scott. Casino
backers have already begun a full-tilt lob-
bying effort and it appears the debate over
gambling will be one of the biggest issues
lawmakers deal with during the session
that starts next month.
It would be tempting to think lawmakers
are eager to go along, as Florida grapples
with a 10 percent unemployment rate.
But that's not the case.
The initial bill filed by two South Florida
legislators' calls for each company wanting
a 'casino to spend a minimum of $2 billion.
It has won the backing of builders and
contractors as well .a,ppe ,f..the. state's,big
business lobb gg obutfi. which maintains
it could mean as many as 100,000 jobs,


although backers have yet to release any
studies that back up that figure.
But a diverse coalition- ranging from
Disney World, the Florida Chamber of
Commerce and existing dog and horse
track owners worried about their future
- want lawmakers to reject the concept
They contend such a massive proposal
will harm the businesses already here
because the promises of luring thou-
sands of tourists from across the country
and world won't pan out. They point, to
Nevada's struggling economy as proof
that gambling is not what's needed to turn
around the state.
"The reason these billion dollar casinos
want to leave Atlantic City and Las Vegas
is that they know Florida is growing," said
Mak WiJson, president of the Florida
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LENDER


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Thursday, December 22, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


ONE


ONE
OPINION


The


x


factor


in North

Korea

critic A.J. Liebling wrote
a celebrated essay on
the coverage of a long- o
running Soviet dictator's
death. True to the maxim that
"big news demands big sto-
ries," American newspapers ran
yards of copy, almost all of it
speculative, because they basi-
cally had only one fact to work
with: "Stalin Dead."
I We knew very little about the
inner workings of the Kremlin
or Soviet politics, an ignorance
that persisted until the late
1980s, when, to the great sur-
prise of Western intelligence
agencies, the whole Soviet
enterprise came crashing down.
Now we are confronted with
another momentous change in
a Stalinist regime: the sudden
death of North Korean dictator
Kim Jong 11, which revealed how
little we know about that nuclear-
armed, paranoid little state.
Dear Leader Kim died about
8:30 am. Saturday. According to
The New York Times, even the
South Koreans, who presumably
have the best sources north of
the border, did not learn of the
death until 48 hours later.
The U.S. State Department
learned of the death, says The
Times, from "press reporting"
after the official North Korea
media announced Kim's pass-
ing 51 hours later.
North Korea is monitored
by spy satellites and spy planes
and is surrounded by electronic
eavesdropping posts. But this
is a nation that denies its popu-
lation any meaningful contact
with the outside world and
enforces that isolation through
omnipresent secret police.
Critical information is shared
only among a tightly disciplined
inner circle. After Kim's death,
there was no telltale increase in
phone traffic, no troop alerts,
no rush by senior politicians to
get back to the capital. '
The truth is, we don't have a
clue about the younger Kim or
what he might do. "It's scary '
how little we really know," an
Obama administration official .
told The Washington Post
* Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874 ,
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POL I.C Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
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and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
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BY MAIL: Letters, P.O' Box 1709,
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BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


What happened


to you today?


id you get up
this morning, not
looking forward
happily to the day?
Or worse; did
you worry about what loomed
ahead? Last evening, did you
feel like you didn't accomplish
anything? Without a little
thought and effort, today could
be another day that just slips
away. We're each only given
a certain number of days in a
lifetime. Wouldn't it be better if
those days'were fun, satisfying,
uplifting, and meaningful?
What if you saw every day
as an interesting and fulfilling
adventure? Would you like to
really appreciate and savor each
day? Maybe your day was good,
but it just slipped by unnoticed.
Sometimes we don't realize how
good our day really was until
later, when we take the time
to look back on it. Wouldn't it
feel good to appreciate and cel-
ebrate the day's opportunities,
the choices you made, and the
directions in which you steered
your life?
It's really easy to develop
this outlook and this attitude.
Here's what you can do. It
starts by just making a choice
to reflect on each day. Take a
couple of moments in the early
morning, and a short time at
the end of your day.
In the morning, write down


.I
Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


just a couple of things you'd
really like to do, or to get done
today. Choose activities that
are easily accomplished, satisfy-
ing, fulfilling, fun, or enjoyable.
Look for things that can take
you a step closer towards your
goals and dreams. Keep it
simple. You could take a break
to stretch and relax, walk your.
dog, straighten up your desk,
get that chore done, or make
that phone call to someone you
care about.
Near the end of your day,
when things are winding
down, take a moment to reflect
back on your day. Did you
accomplish at least one thing
you wanted to get done? Did
you enjoy something new and
different? Make a short list
of 'Today's successes," or
maybe "Good things that hap-
pened today." Psychologists
tell us that focusing on the
positive part of your day can


help develop positive thinking
strengths and a happier attitude,
and can turn around sadness,
frustration, anger, and boredom.
Remember getting that pesky
chore done, walking the dog, or
having a good conversation with
a friend and finding something
else we have in common.
Having trouble finding
enough good stuff that hap-
pened today? That's okay.
You're not primed to notice
those happy events yet You
may become more sensitized to
those good things, and be able
to notice them tomorrow. Do it
a few times, and it becomes an
automatic habit. Still struggling
a little? How about expanding
your list to include good things
that happened this week, this
month, or this year? '
Congratulations. Just by
reading this, y6u may already
be making your life a little hap-
pier. Psychological research
shows that positive attitudes
increase the quality and length
of life. Take that moment to
appreciate your small successes
and good times.

* Robert Denny is a licensed
mental health therapist, and
teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College in Lake City.
Comments welcome at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.com.


A tale of two men


V aclav Havel and Kim
Jong I1 died within
a day of each other,
but that's where
the similarities end.
The lives of the two summed up
a chief conflict of our era, with
Havel on one side and Kim on
the other. The contrast goes
further.
Let's start with Havel, a
brilliant Czechoslovakian play-
wright who helped script the
real-life, earth-shattering fall of
crippling, endlessly cruel com-
munism in Eastern Europe.
Unlike so many who scamper
at the slightest threat, he held
to principle despite constant
harassment, work prohibitions
and prison sentences.
With the Soviet Union willing
to crush the opposition with
tanks and Czech officials happy
to use other tools as necessary,
it would have been easy to give
up hope. He didn't. He stuck to
non-violent tactics and spread
his message of truth and love.
When the Soviet Union fell and
hopes materialized into realities,
this humble man became the
Czechoslovakian president and
continued in high office after
Slovakia seceded and the Czech
Republic was established.
His accomplishments
were major, but former
U.S. Secretary of State
Madeleine Albright writes in a
Washington Post opinion piece
that he "never became fully


Jay Ambrose
Speaktojay@aol.com


comfortable with the exercise
of political power." He helped
give his country freedom, but
his "preoccupation," she says,
was "use of liberty for the
right purposes." According to
her, he was "steadfast in pursu-
ing a moral universe."
Peaceful warriors like Havel
were crucial in the collapse of
wholly socialist, totalitarian dic-
tatorships, though one example
of such a place hangs on as a
foremost symbol that we are a
long, long way from the moral
universe he wanted.
Pot-bellied, 5-foot-3-inches
tall, something less than the
movie-star type he apparently
wanted to be, he compensated
with oversized sunglasses,
elevator shoes, long hair teased
sufficiently to add two inches
to the top of his physique and
slanted press reports of his
athletic prowess. The publicity
was that he got 11 holes-in-one
the first time he went golf-
ing. Unslanted reports further
remind us that he liked the
movie world so much that he


had a South Korean actress kid-
napped, along with a director.
He held a nation captive in
a slave state that did not work.
Famines killed millions while
he was in power, and a primary
way of preserving a population
to serve him was intimidat-
ing free-market states with his
nuclear arsenal.
Feed us or face the music,
he as much as said, and few
thought he was kidding.
Although details are unknown,
it seems certain North Korea
supplied the means for Syrians
to start building a nuke bomb
plant later taken out by the
Israelis in 2007. Kim was him-
self a terrorist leader. In 1987,
his henchmen bombed a South
Korean airliner, killing 104 pas-
sengers and 11 crew members.
Few are now supposing
Kim's death spells reform, and
few suppose, either, that evil
ends at North Korean borders
or that it cannot reemerge in
some places where it was previ-
ously conquered. Here's where
hope resides: people like Vaclav
Havel. We should thahk him
for the inspiration as we also
remember Kim as an example
of what threatens us.

* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


ANO
VI


THEIR
E W


An old


quarrel



troversial from the
moment it arrived
in the New World
with the first
European settlers. And, despite
the intervening four centuries,
it has intermittently remained
so ever since.
There were those early set-
tiers who thought Christmas
should be celebrated simply,
with a low-key church service.
There were those Puritans
who thought that it shouldn't
be celebrated at all, and that
those who did should be pun-
ished. And then there were
those who spent it in wine, dis-
sipation and "frollicking." Use
your imagination.
The "modern" Christmas
joined us in the 1800s, bring-
ing with it Christmas trees,
Santa Claus, reindeer, deco-
rated cards and the exchange
of elaborate presents.
This was the idealized
Christmas of nostalgia,
Currier and Ives prints
and pristine snowfalls.
Even though it never quite
existed that way, it was nice,
with a helpful assist from
Hollywood, to believe it did.
Even so, this happy pic-
ture brought with it the first
mutterings about the over
commercialization 'of what
was meant to be a religious
observance.
But, just as our colonial
ancestors quarreled over the
proper way to observe, or
not to observe, Christmas,
we their descendants as
custodians of this marvelous
country are at it again, skir-
mishing with each other over
courthouse lawns and public
parks.
For 50 years, Loudoun
County, an upscale Virginia
suburb of Washington, D.C.,
had a creche and a Christmas
tree on the courthouse lawn.
But then, invoking freedom
of religion and expression -
trust us Americans to invoke
the Constitution and "0
Come All Ye Faithful" in the
same breath came a man-
nequin of Luke Skywalker,
a skeleton Santa Claus
mounted on a cross to pro-
test consumerism, an atheist
tree decorated with tinsel
and atheist admonitions and
a parody of the Nativity put
up by something calling itself
the Church of the Flying
Spaghetti Monster.
There is no danger of any-
thing arising from the court-
house lawn with such a clatter
that Clement Moore would
leap from his bed to see what
was the matter, because there
is no room for Old Saint Nick
and his eight tiny reindeer to
set down the sleigh.
Tulsa was to have held
two holiday parades same
day, same time, several
blocks apart because the
city dropped the word
"Christmas" from the title of
its annual Parade of Lights.
Hoping to avoid controversy,
Santa Monica, Calif., went to a
lottery system to allocate dis-
play places in a local park; for
the past 57 years, 14 of the 21
spaces had gone to a coalition
of local churches. This year,
the atheists got all but three of
the places; the church coalition
got two to erect their nativities
and the third went to a Chabad
group to put up a Hanukkah
menorah.
This noisy edging and
elbowing for space in the pub-
lic square does not detract
nor diminish from the tran-
scendent message of the day:
"Peace on Earth and good
will toward men."(Complete
details in the Book Of Luke.)
Merry Christmas!


M Scripps Howard News Service


4A


I w









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


CASINOS: Presence in Sunshine State may come down to a question of jobs

Continued From Page 3A


Chamber. "It would be a
fundamental mistake for us
to fall for that bet"
There's no doubt that
Floridians already spend a
lot of money on gambling.
The state-controlled lottery
racked up more than $4
billion in sales during the
last fiscal year and this fall
ticket sales have been climb-
ing even higher.
Florida voters, concerned
about crime and other social
ills associated with addic-
tive gambling, have rejected
casinos in the past
But back in 2004 the
state's voters granted
Broward and Miami-Dade
the right to hold local ref-
erendums on whether to
add slot machines at dog
and horse tracks in those
counties. Then former Gov.
Charlie Crist negotiated a
compact with The Seminole
Tribe of Florida. It led to a
deal that gave the tribe a
five-year exclusive deal to
let them offer card games
like blackjack at their casi-
nos in Tampa and in South
Florida. *
State economists say the
existing pari-mutuels and
Indian gaming generate
another $3 billion on top of
the lottery.
Genting officials contend
that adding three new mega-
casinos could generate any-
where from $4.5 billion to $7
billion more, double what is
happening in the state now.
Colin Au, head of Genting
Americas, stood recently
before a state Senate com-
mittee and made elaborate
promises to back that fig-
ure up. He said his company
would make sure to lure
travelers from as far away
as Asia by guaranteeing to
purchase half the seats on
nonstop flights across the
Pacific. He tried to assuage
fears that his resort would


Holiday

closings

All city and county offic-
es will be closed Friday and
Monday for the Christmas
holiday. All trash in Lake
City and Columbia County
will be picked up at regu-
larly scheduled times.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Nov. 9 photo, a slot machine is shown at the Magic City Casino in Miami. Miami has
been hit hard by the recession and the collapse of Florida's real estate market. There are
nearly 300,000 people out of work in the area. That's led many to envision a plan for boosting


compete with Disney World
by saying his hotel would
sell tens of thousands of tick-
ets to the theme park.
Au also disputed claims
his resort would harm exist-
ing restaurants and hotels.
"We are- spreading the
cake all over the place," Au
said.
But this optimistic take on
casinos isn't shared by some
who follow the gambling
industry.
Janet Brashear, a Wall
Street analyst, has conclud-
ed that South Florida casi-
nos could succeed in attract-
ing tourists, possibly to the
detriment of both Atlantic
City and Las Vegas.
But Brashear, of Bernstein
Research, doubts that the
state can support what is
now envisioned. She warns
that Florida is a not a "clean
slate" and that it would have
to become larger than Las
Vegas to support a return on
the level of investment man-
dated by the legislation.
Still Badih "Bob"
Bounahra, who splits time
between Fort Lauderdale
and Belize, says he's a
poker player who would
spend more time in Florida
if mega-casinos came to the
state. He said spends more
time gambling in Las Vegas
because he can find a high-
stakes poker game anytime


he wants it as opposed to
what he finds at the Seminole
Hard Rock Hotel & Casino.
"Poker players are looking
for people to play at games,
but not to play with the same
people they see every day,"
Bounahra said. "If you go to
the Hard Rock, it's the same
players. It can get kind of so
that everybody knows you
and your game."
State economists looking
at the casino legislation have
their own trouble trying to
quantify the financial wind-
fall to state and local gov-
ernments. They have cast
doubts on the amount of
first-time tourists who would
come to Florida for desti-
nation resorts. Their initial
models suggest that at least
two-thirds of those likely to
show up at the new casi-
nos are tourists who already
come and spend money in
the state.


Then there's who run the
state's existing pari-mutuels.
They say they are sure that


if the legislation becomes
law it will put them out of
business because the cur-
rent proposal gives the new
mega-casinos a lower tax
rate and permission to run
around-the-clock gambling.
"All we're saying is, we're
the existing casino indus-
try in Florida," said Izzy
Havenick, vice president of
political affairs at Magic City
Casino. 'Treat us the same
as you're going to treat these
out of-state and out-of-coun-
try gambling interests."
The level of opposition
that has mounted against
the casino proposal so far
may doom it this year.
Senate President Mike
Haridopolos has vowed to
have his chamber take an up
or down vote on it But House
Speaker Dean Cannon, who
comes from Central Florida
and the home to Disney, has
been more skeptical about
the chances the legislation
will pass.
Scott, meanwhile, has
avoided taking a direct
stance. The governor came


into office last January prom-
ising to jumpstart the state's
economy but so far he has
merely stated that he does
not want the state budget to
be more reliant on gambling
revenue.
Thaft's not whafs on Ellen
Tringali's mind.
To her it's still about the
jobs.
Standing in line next
to Michael Ferrarelli at
a recent job fair at a jai-
alai that is expanding to
include slots and black-
jack, the 47-year-old
Hollywood resident said
she's been looking for
work since 2009. She said
she took a slot machine
repair course because the
competition for jobs in her
previous field, secretarial
work, was too fierce.
"We're hoping," Tringali
said. "It seems like the
economy the way it is, gam-
ing in South Florida seems
to be something that's pick-
ing up."
Fineout reported from
Tallahassee.


PETS: Hidden hazards during holidays


Continued From Page L

ach, diarrhea and vomiting
in pets. Some foods like
raisins are more toxic and
cause serious problems.
Hawthorne said it is bet-
ter to feed animals their
normal treats and advise
guests to do so too.
Poultry bones are soft
and splinter when ingest-
ed, said Holly Dunlop,
administrative assistant at
the Lake City-Columbia
County Humane Society.
They can obstruct a pet's
throat or perforate intes-
tines.
The Christmas tree can


CHURCH: Burglarized


Continued From Page 1A

Deputies reported the
glass in a door that led into
a small room near the east
section of the church com-
plex was shattered.
Deputies wentto Melton's
home and detained him


and an acquaintance for
questioning, at which point
Melton reportedly admitted
to the burglary. The televi-
sion set was later recovered
and returned.


also be a hazard to pets.
Cats may play with and eat
tinsel. Dogs may chew on
easy to reach ornaments.
If swallowed, both can
cause obstructions in a
pet's intestines. Electrical
cords should be kept
away from young animals,
whose chewing can lead to
an electrical shock.
Water in a Christmas
tree stand can attract pets
but the water may contain
preservatives and bacteria,
Dunlop said. Cover the
tree holder to keep ani-
mals from taking a drink.
Pet owners should
use caution when deco-
rating with live plants,
Hawthorne said. Mistletoe,
evergreens, holly and ber-
ries are toxic to pets.
Poinsettias, although not
poisonous, can irritate an
animal's mouth and stom-
ach, Dunlop said.
Depending on a pet's


personality, guests in
the home may frighten
animals. Shy or anxious
animals may hide away
from action, and noise.
Hawthorne said to make
sure a pet has adequate
food and water. If a cat is
hiding in a back bedroom,
move food, water and a
litter box in the room as
the cat may hide for a long
period of time.
Some dogs may feel
safer in a crate, especially
if they are unfamiliar with
children or large numbers
of people, she said.
Hawthorne said signs of
a problem include vomit-
ing, diarrhea, lethargy and
lack of an appetite. If you
see these signs or suspect
a problem, call your vet-
erinarian, she said. Even
on a holiday weekend, vet-
erinarians will have a mes-
sage directing pet owners
to an on-call clinic.


UPHELD: Appeal rejected; faces 15-year sentence

Continued From Page 1A


tracks leading to his property. When
he drove to an unoccupied trailer on
the property that was used from time
to time by his family, he discovered
wires leading to the meter box and
air conditioning unit were cut and the
dwelling had been burglarized.
A Columbia County deputy called
to the scene at 8:45 a.m. found pry
marks on the back door and a hole
in the skirting around the base of the
mobile home.
When the deputy returned later that
afternoon, he saw a bag of tools and
some copper wiring on the ground
that wasn't there earlier in the day.
The deputy also noticed the hole in


the mobile home skirting appeared to
have been enlarged.
Using a flashlight, the deputy
looked in the hole and discovered
Dicks wearing work gloves and try-
ing to hide behind the mobile home's
cement support blocks.
So much copper wire had been
removed, Kirby told investigators
that his trailer was no longer capable
of receiving power and all the utilities
had to be rewired.
The appeals court determined the
only question jurors needed to con-
sider was whether Dicks' presence
under the trailer amounted to his
entering or remaining in a dwelling


within the definition of the burglary
statute.
The court ruled Dicks "penetrated
the invisible, vertical plane into the
airspace of the house by crawling
under the house to gain access to the
pipes and thus entered the house."
"On this record, therefore, we con-
clude the prosecutor's comments did
not rise to the level, of fundamental
error," the ruling stated. "That is
because they did not reach down into
the validity of the trial itself to the
extent that a verdict of guilty could
not have been obtained with the assis-
tance of the alleged error."


I B WOODSTOUES* FIREPLACES SPARK SCREENS

THE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
ph 377-9535 toll free 1-800-524-2675
611 N" Main St. M-F 9:30 5:30
Gainesville Sat.9:30-_4:00


OBITUARIES


Eugenia Dozier
Mrs. Eugenia Dozier, age 49
resident of 9124 11th Ave.,
Jacksonville, FL departed this
life Sunday, December 18, 2011
nity Hospice
terminating
an illness.
Survivors
include her
daughter,
Rakita Dozier;
son, Ron-
nie Dozier; father, Milton
L. Rice; a host of other rela-
tives and friends also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Euge-
nia Dozier, will be 11:00 a.m.
Saturday, December 24, 2011 at
Zarephath Tabernacle, 1028 East
10th Street, Jacksonville, FL.
Bishop James Brant, Sr. D.D.,
Pastor; Interment will follow in
Gethsemane Memorial Garden
Cemetery. The family will re-
ceive friends at Zarephath Tab-
ernacle on Friday at 6:00 p.m.
Arrangements entrusted
to COOPER FUNERAL
HOME, 251 N.E. Washing-
ton Street, Lake City, FL.


Roy Eugene Lamberson,
Jr.
Mr. Roy Eugene Lamberson, Jr.,
50, a resident of Lake City, FL,
died on Sunday, December 18,
2011, at Ed Frasier Memorial
Hospital in Macclenny, FL. He
was born in Kodiak, Alaska to the
late Roy Eugene Lamberson, Sr.,
and Virginia Grace Marguard-
sen Lamberson. He had been an
Eagle Scout and loved fishing,
hunting, camping, the Redskins
Football team and NASCAR.
He is survived by his mother:
Grace Lamberson, Lake City,
FL; one son: Roy Eugene
Lamberson,11l Virginia; two
daughters: Karren Sayre and
Heather Redwood, Virginia
Beach; two brothers: Richard
Lamberson, Ft Lauderdale, FL
and Robert Lamberson(Nicole),
Lake City, FL; one sister: Gail
Blaher (Todd), Virginia Beach,
VA, and two grandchildren;
two nieces and one nephew.
Memorial services will
be held at a later date.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S. US
Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025
(386-752-1954) is in charge of
arrangements. Please send mes-


sages of love and comfort to
www.gatewayforestlawn. com.

David R. Main
David R. Main, 68, of Ft. White,
Florida, died Sunday, December
18,2011 at North Florida Region-
al Medical Center in Gainesville.
He was the son of the late Ralph
and Geraldine Hernandez Main.
He was a Florida native who had
lived in Ft. White for the past 6
years having moved here from
Tampa, Florida. He was a lov-
ing husband, father, grandfather,
and brother who loved fishing &
camping, racing stock cars and
farming, but especially loved
spending time with his family.
He is preceded in death by his
parents; his son, Ernie Main and
brother, Lionel Hernandez Jr.
Survivors include his loving
wife of 9 years, Sherri Main of'
Ft. White, FL; daughters, Jerri
Anne (Scott) Treppard of Ft.
Lauderdale, FL, Delia (Jeff)
Truett of Lake Park, GA, Kadee
Main of Tampa, FL and Dawn
(Tim) Lookedoo of Ft. White,
FL; brother, Michael (Joy) Her-
nandez of Wesley Chapel, FL;
sisters, Esther (Ray) Crandon-
llernandez of ClairMel City,


FL, Anneth (Dennis) Drier of
Wellington, FL, Nancy (Frank)
Truluck of Valrico, FL and
Jeanette Ivy of Tampa, FL; 9
grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 1:00 p.m. on Fri-
day, December 23, 2011 in
the chapel of Gateway-For-
est Lawn Funeral Home with
Rev. Larry Sweat officiating.
Visitation with the family will
be held one hour prior to service
time (12:00 p.m. until 1:00 p.m.)
In lieu of flowers the family asks
that donations be made to the Na-
tional Stroke Foundation 9707
East Easter Lane, Suite B, Cen-
tennial, Colorado, 80112 in his
honor. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South U.S. I lwy'441, Lake
City, Florida 32025, (386) 752-
1954 is in charge of arrange-
ments. Please leave words of
love & comfort for the family
at www.gatewayforc.silawn. corn


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Merry Christmas and Happy New Year
from your good neighbor agents.
John Kasak and John Burns.









John A. Kasak CLU CPCU John W. Burns III, Agent
State Farm Agent 234 SW Main Blvd.
Lake City, FL 32025 Lake City. FL 32056
Bus. 386-752-7521 Bus. 386-752-5866


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Dec. 23

Free breakfast
Friday December 23rd,
2011- from 7am-9am
Pinemount Baptist
Church in McAlpin
(HWY 129 South-across
from the S and S)
will be giving away free
Sausage Biscuits and "
Coffee, Juice or Milk
All for Free NO
STRINGS ATTACHED!!!!

Blood drive
December 23, Friday,
12 p.m. to 6 p.m.;
Blood Drive to Benefit
Andrew Holmes at
Guangdong Chinese
Restaurant. Each blood
donor receives a FREE
Combination Platter
from Guangdong and a
T-Shirt!

Dec. 24

Christmas candlelight
service at Faith in
Christ Church
Everyone is invited
to come and worship
Christmas Eve. At our
New church home in Lake
City Florida. The service
will begin at 11pm on
December 24th and end
with Holy Communion
at midnight The church
is located at 282 SW
Magical Terrace, just off
Pinemount/SR 252 one
block North of the Book
Store. Take Pinemount
rd SOUTH from Food
Lion, approx 1-mile, road
is on the RIGHT
Call for more info: 754-
2827.


Christmas pageant
The First Presbyterian
Church, 697 Baya Dr.,
will host an impromptu
Christmas pageant
for all ages at 7 p.m.
and have a traditional
Christmas service at 11
p.m. For information call
752-0670.

Christmas Eve church
service
The Mount Tabor
A.M.E. Church will be
hosting a Christmas
Eve church service and
celebration on Saturday,
December 24 at 6 p.m.
The community is
invited. The church is
located at 519 SW L.M.
Aaron Drive in Lake
City.
For more information
please contact George
Moultrie at 386-754-0376
or Reola Finkley at 386-
438-4803.
Pastor: Rev. Robert
Postell.

Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service
Falling Creek Chapel,
1290 NW Falling Creek
Rd., wil be having
a Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service
starting at 6:30 p.m.
Everyone is welcome.
For information call 755-
0580.

Blood drive
December 24, Saturday,
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Blood
Drive to Benefit Andrew
Holmes at the Lake City
Mall. Each blood donor
receives a FREE T-Shirt!


Christmas Eve
Services
Our Redeermer Lutheran
Church will host
candlelight services on
Christmas Eve at 7:30
p.m. There will also be
services on Christmas
day at 9:30 a.m. All are
welcome. The church is
located on Route 47, one
mile past the overpass
on the right
Dec. 25
Christmas services
Miracle Tabernacle
Church, 1190 Southwest
Sisters Welcome Rd.,
will have a Christmas
Day Worship Service
at 11 a.m. Following
the service is the
free Christmas Day
Community Dinner, at
127 Escambia St. Our
Watch Night/New Years
Eve Service begins at 9
p.m. with music, drama,
dance and the anointed
word of God. Contact
(386) 344-9915 for
information.

Christmas dinner
Miracle Tabernacle
Church will have its
sixth annual Christmas
Day Community Dinner.
The dinner is free to the
community from 12:30
to 2:30 p.m. on Sunday
Dec. 25 at the LAD Soup
Kitchen, 127 Escambia
St. Donations and
volunteers welcome.
Dec. 31
Watch-night service


We invite you to come
and worship with us at
our annual Candlelight
Service at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist
Church. The service
will begin at 5:30 p.m.
on Sunday, December
18, 2011. The church
is located at 550 NE
Martin Luther King
Street.
Our annual Watch-night
service will begin at
9:30 p.m. on Saturday,
December 31, 2011. We
invite everyone to come
and worship with us
as we praise and thank
the Lord for bringing
us through 2011 and
for allowing us to enter
2012. Pastor Alvin J.
Baker will deliver the
message.


Jan. 4


Blue/Grey meeting
Olustee meeting
The Blue/Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 14 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.


Jan. 18
Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army'
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 14 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.


Jan. 20
Community Concerts
Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.


Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program

Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.


ONGOING

Boys Club winter
program

The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program, which runs
through March 1. Fees
are $175, which includes
transportation from all
elementary and junior
high schools.
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts and crafts,
gamerooms ad special
events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutoria
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
available,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones
Way.


GET-r lakecictyreporter.com

CONNE TED

REPORTER
NEWS
WEATHER
OPINION
SPORTS
ARCHIVES
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ENTERTAINMENT

lakecityeporter.com

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Attention families of

military or overseas voters


Please contact the Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections if you or a family
member is serving in the military or will
be traveling overseas during the 2012 elec-
tion year and would like to vote absentee.
Important Military and overseas civil-


ians need to contact us as soon as possible
so they can receive absentee ballots in a
timely manner.
Phone: (386) 758-1026 x105
email: absentee@votecolumbia.com


Voter registration notice


The Presidential Preference Primary
,will be held on Jan. 31, 2012.
Books will close on Jan. 3, 2012.
If you need to make party changes to
your registration or need to register to
vote, please do so before the book closing
date.


Absentee

.ballot f


reminder

' The office of Liz. P.
,.Horne, Columbia County
Supervisor of Elections,
,would like to remind any
,voter that would like to vote
by absentee ballot to please
call our office to request an
,absentee.
Please call our office at
758-1026 ext. 105 or go to
http://votecolumbia.com/
-:and click on Absentee Form
on the Absentee page.
If you have any questions
please call the Supervisor of
"Elections office.


Any address changes or signature
updates can be made prior to election day.
Contact the Columbia County Supervisor
of Elections office at 758-1026.


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'^In Special Memory of''


Ann


Redish ,

10/25/27 to "-
12/22/10 .

365 days ago tonight your faith took
you home.
Sure seems just like it was yesterday.
By faith, we will stay strong, and sure.
We love and miss you.
We'll be seeing you!
i^.5^The family of Edgar Redis~h


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Page Editor: Robert Brdges, 754-0428




ADVERTISEMENT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


ris


as


We're open
Christmas Day!
Buffet opens 10am


Ln Lake City Mall


A-p 0 !3,


LAKE CITY REPORTER


NJ


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LAKE CITY REPORTER REGIONAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


South Hamilton

Elementary choir


performs at Disney


WHITE SPRINGS-The
South Hamilton Elementary
School choir members
became stars of their own
Disney show November 30
when they traveled from
White Springs to Downtown
Disney World Resort in
Florida to take part in a
Disney Performing Arts
Program.
Dance groups, choirs,
ensembles and marching
bands from around the world
apply to perform each year
as part of Disney Performing
Arts at both the Disneyland.
and the Walt Disney World
Resorts. Once selected, they'


are given the opportunity
to perform at the resort for
an international audience of
theme park guests. Millions
of performers have graced
the stages of the Disney
Parks in the more than 25
year history of the program.
Disney Performing
Arts offers band, choral,
dance and auxiliary per-
formers the opportunity to
learn, perform and com-
pete at the Walt Disney
World Resort. For more
information, visit www.
DisneyPerformingArts.
com or calll-800-603-0552.


UF Performing


Arts calendar


January 2012
Beijing Guitar Duo
Friday, January 13, 7:30 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Tickets: $30 (Students: $12)

Ritz Chamber Players
Sunday, January 15, 2 p.m.
University Auditorium
Tickets: $25-35 (Students: $12)

The Manhattan Transfer
Thursday, January 19, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $25-35 (Students: $12)
World Series Sponsor: American Airlines

Women Fully Clothed
Sunday, January 22, 2 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Tickets: $45 (Students: $20)
This performance contains adult content that is not suit-
able for children.

Karla Bonoff
Friday, January 27, 7:30 p.m.
University Auditorium
Tickets: $20-30 (Students: $12)

February 2012
Soweto Gospel Choir
Friday, February 3, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $30-40 (Students: $12)
Sponsored by The Gainesville Guardian

Joshua Bell, Violin
Sam Haywood, Piano
Saturday, February 4, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $45-65 (Students: $20)
Sponsored by Oak dHammock at the University of
Florida, S.EI. and Shands HealthCare

Ahn Trio with Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company
Temptation of the Muses
Thursday, February 9, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $25-40 (Students: $12)

The Official Blues Brothers Revue
Featuring Wayne Catania and Kieron Lafferty as Jake
& Elwood
Friday, February 10, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20-30 (Students: $12)
Sponsored by 92.5/95.5/107.9 WIND-FM THE CLASSIC
ROCK STATION, Best Western Gateway Grand and the
Dharma Endowment Foundation

Dala
Saturday, February 11, 2 & 7:30 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Tickets: $30 (Students: $12)

Wroclaw Philharmonic Orchestra
Jacek Kaspszyk, Artistic Director and Chief Conductor
Garrick OhIsson, Piano
Sunday, February 12, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $30-50 (Students: $12)

Noel Paul Stookey
Friday, February 17, 7:30 p.m.
University Auditorium
Tickets:' $29-39 (Students: $12)

Monty Python's Spamalot
Monday, February 20, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $40-60 (Students: $20)
Sponsored by TheSky97.3FM


Chamber Ensemble of the
Orchestra
Tuesday, February 21, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $25-35 (Students: $12)


Shanghai Chinese


Arlo Guthrie Boys Night Out
Thursday, February 23, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets:.$40-55 (Students: $15)

Ronald K Brown, Artistic Director
Evidence, A Dance Company
Saturday, February 25, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $25-40 (Students: $12)

Ariel String Quartet
Sunday, February 26, 2 p.m.
Tickets: $25-35 (Students: $12)
University Auditorium

Boston Brass
Tuesday, February 28, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $25-35 (Students: $12)


IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 124.02(1), FLORIDA
STATUTES

NOTICE IS HEREBY given of the
change of boundaries for districts of
Columbia County Commissioners, said
changes having been approved by the
Board of County Commissioners of
Columbia County, Florida at a special
meeting on Tuesday, November 22,
2011, through the adoption of County
Ordinance No. 2011-24 and Resolution
No. 2011]R-49. A certified copy of the
change of district boundaries is hereby
published pursuant to 124.02, Florida
Statutes, in the Lake City Reporter,
a newspaper published in Columbia
County, Florida:

DISTRICT 1 BOUNDARY:

ALL THE NORTH SECTION OF THE
COUNTY ABOVE THE BELOW
GIVEN LINE RUNNING FROM
THE COLUMBIA/ SUWANNEE
COUNTY LINE TO THE COLUMBIA
/ BAKER COUNTY LINE.
BEGINNING AT THE COLUMBIA
/ SUWANNEE COUNTY LINE
AND INTERSTATE 10; EAST
ON INTERSTATE 10 TO NW US
HIGHWAY 41; SOUTH ON NW US
HIGHWAY 41 TO NW MOORE RD;
WEST ON NW MOORE RD TO NW
LAKE JEFFERY RD; SOUTHEAST
ON NW LAKE JEFFERY RD
TO NORTHWEST CORNER OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231102021062;
SOUTH ALONG THE WEST
LINE OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231102021062; THEN EAST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231102021062
TO NW LAKE JEFFERY RD;
SOUTH ON NW LAKE JEFFERY RD
TO W DUVAL ST (W US HIGHWAY
90); SOUTH ON SW LAKEVIEW
AVE TO SW BALI LN; WEST ON
SW BALI LN TO SW MCFARLANE
AVE; SOUTH ON SW MCFARLANE
AVE TO THE INTERSECTION OF
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231105003000;
EAST ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231105003000 TO SW ALAMO
DR; CONTINUE EAST ON SW
ALAMO DR TO SW VALLEY WAY;
NORTH ON SW VALLEY WAY
TO SW SHORT LN; EAST ON SW
SHORT LN TO SW EL PRADO
AVE; NORTH ON SW EL PRADO
AVE TO SW MONTGOMERY DR;
NORTHWEST THEN NORTHEAST
ON SW MONTGOMERY DR TO
SW EL PRADO AVE; NORTH
ON SW EL PRADO AVE TO SW
BAYA DR; EAST ON SW BAYA
DR TO INTERSECTION OF S
MARION AVE (S US HIGHWAY
441); CONTINUE EAST ON SE
BAYA DR TO SE COUNTRY CLUB
RD; NORTH ON SE COUNTRY
CLUB RD TO E DUVAL ST (E US
HIGHWAY 90); EAST ON E DUVAL
ST TO NE BASCOM NORRIS DR
(CR 100A); NORTH AND WEST
ON NE BASCOM NORRIS DR
TO NE VOSS RD; NORTH ON NE
VOSS RD TO NE GUM SWAMP
RD; EAST ON NE GUM SWAMP
RD TO NE MCCLOSKEY AVE;
SOUTH ON NE MCCLOSKEY AVE
TO NE OKINAWA ST; WEST ON NE
OKINAWA ST TO NE BURBANK
TER; SOUTH ON NE BURBANK
TER TO NE WASHINGTON ST;
WEST ON NE WASHINGTON
ST TO NE COUNTY ROAD 245;
SOUTH ON NE COUNTY ROAD
245 TO E US HIGHWAY 90; EAST
ON E US HIGHWAY 90 TO THE
NW CORNER OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002031; SOUTH ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002031 TO THE
SW CORNER OF THE CENSUS
BLOCK; NORTHEAST FROM
THE SW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002031 TO
THE SW CORNER OF CENSUS.
BLOCK 120231103002034; NORTH
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231103002034
TO THE NW CORNER OF THE
BLOCK; NORTHEAST TO THE
NW CORNER OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002033; EAST TO THE
NE CORNER OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002035; NORTHEAST
TO THE NW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002036; EAST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231103002036
TO ITS NE CORNER; NORTHEAST
TO THE NW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002032;
NORTHEAST ALONG THE NORTH
LINE OF THE CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002032;


SOUTHEAST ALONG THE
EAST LINE OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002032 TO ITS
SOUTHEAST CORNER; WEST TO
THE NW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002141; NORTH
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231103002031
TO E US HIGHWAY 90; EAST


ON E US HIGHWAY 90 TO THE
COLUMBIA / BAKER COUNTY
LINE.

DISTRICT 2 BOUNDARY:

BEGINNING AT THE COLUMBIA /
SUWANNEE COUNTY LINE AND
W US HIGHWAY 90; EAST ON W
US HIGHWAY 90 TO SW BIRLEY
AVE; SOUTH ON SW BIRLEY AVE
TO SW COUNTY ROAD 242; EAST
ON SW COUNTY ROAD 242 TO SW
DYAL AVE; SOUTH ON SW DYAL
AVE TO SW KING ST; WEST ON
SW KING ST TO SW MAULDIN
AVE; SOUTH ON SW MAULDIN
AVE TO SW COUNTY ROAD 240;
EAST ON COUNTY ROAD 240 TO
SW STATE ROAD 47; SOUTH ON
STATE ROAD 47 TO SW HERLONG
ST; EAST ON SW HERLONG ST TO
SW TUSTENUGGEE AVE; SOUTH
ON SW TUSTENUGGEE AVE TO
SW OLD BELLAMY RD; EAST ON
SW OLD BELLAMY RD TO SW
BETHLEHEM AVE; SOUTH ON SW
BETHLEHEM AVE TO SW COUNTY
ROAD 778; WEST ON SW COUNTY
ROAD 778 TO SW US HIGHWAY 27;
SOUTH ON SW US HIGHWAY 27
TO THE COLUMBIA / ALACHUA
COUNTY LINE; WEST ALONG THE
ALACHUA COUNTY LINE TO THE
GILCHRIST COUNTY LINE; WEST
ALONG THE GILCHRIST COUNTY
LINE TO THE SUWANNEE
COUNTY LINE; NORTH ALONG
THE SUWANNEE COUNTY LINE
TO POINT 6F BEGINNING.

DISTRICT 3 BOUNDARY:

BEGINNING AT THE COLUMBIA
/ SUWANNEE COUNTY LINE
AND INTERSTATE 10; EAST
ON INTERSTATE 10 TO NW US
HIGHWAY 41; SOUTH ON NW US
HIGHWAY 41 TO NW MOORE RD;
WEST ON NW MOORE RD TONW
LAKE JEFFERY RD; SOUTHEAST
ON NW LAKE JEFFERY RD
TO NORTHWEST CORNER OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231102021062;
SOUTH ALONG THE WEST
LINE OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231102021062; THEN EAST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231102021062
TO NW LAKE JEFFERY RD;
SOUTH ON NW LAKE JEFFERY RD
TO W DUVAL ST (W US HIGHWAY
90); SOUTH ON SW LAKEVIEW
AVE TO SW BAYA DR; WEST ON
SW BAYA DR TO SW MCFARLANE
AVE; SOUTH ON SW MCFARLANE
AVE TO SW POPLAR LN; WEST
ON SW POPLAR LN TO SW WALL
TER; NORTH ON SW WALL TER
TO SW BAYA DR; WEST ON SW
BAYA DR TO W US HIGHWAY
90; WEST ON W US HIGHWAY 90
TO INTERSTATE 75; SOUTH ON
INTERSTATE 75 TO SW STATE
ROAD 47; SOUTH ON STATE
ROAD 47 TO SW COUNTY ROAD
242; WEST ON SW COUNTY
ROAD 242 TO SW BIRLEY AVE;
NORTH ON SW BIRLEY AVE TO
W US HIGHWAY 90; WEST ON W
US HIGHWAY 90 TO COLUMBIA
/ SUWANNEE COUNTY LINE;
NORTH ALONG THE COLUMBIA
/ SUWANNEE COUNTY LINE TO
POINT OF BEGINNING.

DISTRICT 4 BOUNDARY:

BEGINNING AT THE COLUMBIA /
BAKER COUNTY LINE AND E US
HIGHWAY 90; SOUTH ALONG THE
BAKER COUNTY LINE TO UNION
COUNTY LINE; CONTINUE SOUTH
ALONG THE UNION COUNTY
LINE TO THE ALACHUA COUNTY
LINE; SOUTH ALONG THE
ALACHUA COUNTY LINE TO SW
US HIGHWAY 27; NORTH ON SW
US HIGHWAY 27 TO SW COUNTY
ROAD 778; EAST ON SW COUNTY
ROAD 778 TO SW BETHLEHEM
AVE; NORTH ON SW BETHLEHEM
AVE TO SW OLD BELLAMY RD;
WEST ON SW OLD BELLAMY
RD TO SW TUSTENUGGEE AVE;
NORTH ON SW TUSTENUGGEE
AVE TO SW BUCKLEY LN;
EAST ON SW BUCKLEY LN TO
THE NW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231109011019; EAST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231109011019
TO INTERSTATE 75; NORTH
ON INTERSTATE 75 TO SW
TUSTENUGGEE AVE; NORTH
ON SW TUSTENUGGEE AVE
TO S US HIGHWAY 441; NORTH
ON S US HIGHWAY 441 TO SE
COUNTY ROAD 252; EAST ON
SE COUNTY ROAD 252 TO SE
COUNTRY CLUB RD; NORTH


ON SE COUNTRY CLUB RD TO E
DUVAL ST (E US HIGHWAY 90);
EAST ON E DUVAL ST TO NE
BASCOM NORRIS DR (CR 100A);
NORTH ON NE BASCOM NORRIS
DR TO NE VOSS RD; NORTH ON
NE VOSS RD TO NE GUM SWAMP
RD; EAST ON NE GUM SWAMP
RD TO NE MCCLOSKEY AVE;


SOUTH ON NE MCCLOSKEY AVE
TO NE OKINAWA ST; WEST ON NE
OKINAWA ST TO NE BURBANK
TER; SOUTH ON NE BURBANK
TER TO NE WASHINGTON ST;
WEST ON NW WASHINGTON
ST TO NE COUNTY ROAD 245;
SOUTH ON NE COUNTY ROAD
245 TO E US HIGHWAY 90; E ON
US HIGHWAY 90 TO THE NW
CORNER OF CENSUS BLOCK
1202311.03002031; SOUTH ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002031 TO THE
SW CORNER OF THE CENSUS
BLOCK; NORTHEAST FROM
THE SW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002031 TO
THE SW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002034; NORTH
ALONG THE WEST LINE OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231103002034
TO THE NW CORNER OF THE
BLOCK; NORTHEAST TO THE
NW CORNER OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002033; WEST TO THE
NE CORNER OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002035; NORTHEAST
TO THE NW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002036; EAST
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231103002036
TO ITS NE CORNER; NORTHEAST
TO THE NW CORNER OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231103002032;
NORTHEAST ALONG THE NORTH
LINE OF THE CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002032 ; SOUTHEAST
* ALONG THE EAST LING OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231103002032
TO ITS SOUTHEAST CORNER;
WEST TO THE NW CORNER OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231103002141;
NORTH ALONG THE EAST
LINE OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231103002031 TO E US
HIGHWAY 90; EAST ON US
HIGHWAY 90 TO THE COLUMBIA/
BAKER COUNTY LINE.

DISTRICT 5 BOUNDARY:

BEGINNING AT INTERSTATE 75
AND W US HIGHWAY 90; EAST
ON W US HIGHWAY 90 TO SW
BAYA DR; EAST ON SW BAYA DR
TO SW WALL TER; SOUTH ON
SW WALL TER TO SW POPLAR
LN; EAST ON SW POPLAR LN TO
SW MCFARLANE AVE; NORTH
ON SW MCFARLANE AVE TO SW
BAYA DR; EAST ON'SW BAYA
DRIVE TO SW LAKEVIEWAVE;
SOUTH ON SW LAKEVIEW AVE
TO SW BALI LN; WEST ON SW
BALI LN TO SW MCFARLANE
AVE; SOUTH ON SW MCFARLANE
AVE TO THE INTERSECTION OF
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
CENSUS BLOCK 120231105003000;
EAST ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231105003000 TO SW ALAMO
DR; CONTINUE EAST ON SW
ALAMO DR TO SW VALLEY WAY;
NORTH ON SW VALLEY WAY
TO SW SHORT LN; EAST ON SW
SHORT LN TO SW EL PRADO
AVE: NORTH ON SW EL PRADO
AVE TO SW MONTGOMERY DR;
NORTHWEST THEN NORTHEAST
ON SW MONTGOMERY DR TO
SW EL PRADO AVE; NORTH ON
SW EL PRADO AVE TO SW BAYA
DR; EAST ON SW BAYA DR TO
INTERSECTION OF S MARION
AVE (S US HIGHWAY 441);
CONTINUE EAST ON SE BAYA
DR TO SE COUNTRY CLUB RD;
SOUTH ON SE COUNTRY CLUB
RD TO SE COUNTY ROAD 252;
WEST ON COUNTY ROAD 252
TO S US HIGHWAY 441; SOUTH
ON US HIGHWAY 441 TO SW
TUSTENUGGEE AVE; SOUTH
ON SW TUSTENUGGEE AVE
TO INTERSTATE 75; SOUTH
ON INTERSTATE 75 TO NE,
CORNER OF CENSUS BLOCK
120231109011019; WEST ALONG
THE NORTH LINE OF CENSUS
BLOCK 120231109011019 TO
SW BUCKLEY LN; WEST ON
SW BUCKLEY LN TO SW
TUSTENUGGEE AVE; SOUTH
ON SW TUSTENUGGEE AVE TO
SW HERLONG ST; WEST ON SW
HERLONG ST TO SW STATE ROAD
47; NORTH ON SW STATE ROAD
47 TO SW COUNTY ROAD 240;
WEST ON SW COUNTY ROAD 249
TO SW MAULDIN AVE; NORTH
ON SW MAULDIN AVE TO SW
KING ST; EAST ON SW KING ST
TO SW DYAL AVE; NORTH ON
SW DYAL AVE TO SW COUNTY


ROAD 242; EAST ON COUNTY
ROAD 242 TO SW STATE ROAD
47; NORTH ON SW STATE ROAD'
47 TO INTERSTATE 75; NORTH
ON INTERSTATE 75 TO POINT OF
BEGINNING.


NOTICE OF CHANGE OF


BOUNDARIES OF DISTRICTS OF


COLUMBIA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


Autism-friendly Santas a hit


By STEPHANIE REITZ
Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn.
- Visiting the mall to
share Christmas wishes
with Santa has never been
part of Ben Borre's child-
hood, a sad but necessary
concession to the autism
that would make the noise,
lights and crowds an
unbearable torment for the
10-year-old.
Now, though, a grow-
ing number of "sensitive"
Santas in shopping cen-
ters, at community parties
and elsewhere are giving
Ben and others a chance
to meet the big guy in
autism-friendly settings
- and providing families a
chance to capture elusive
Christmas photos and
memories that families of
typical children may take
for granted.
Ohio-based Glimcher
Realty Trust recently start-
ed offering sensitive Santa
sessions in its two dozen
malls nationwide, and sev-
eral service organizations
and autism family groups
have recruited low-key
Kris Kringles who adjust
their demeanor to the spe-
cial needs of their young
guests.
"Every parent dreads
the noise and chaos of the
mall Santa scene, but this '
isn't even dreading. It's just
literally un-doable for us,"
said Darlene Borre of West
Hartford, Ben's mother.
Ben, a nonverbal fourth-
grader, is among the up to
1.5 million Americans liv-
ing with autism spectrum
disorders that can include
delays or disabilities in
communication, behavior
and socialization. They can
range from mild difficulties
to significant impairments
that make it difficult for
those children to interact
with others.
Many children with
autism are especially
sensitive to loud noises,
jangling music, crowds and
unpredictable situations,
and some parents say the
idea that they could wait
patiently in a long line to
see Santa is laughable at
best.
The Borres tried without
success a few times over
the years to grab quick
snapshots if Ben randomly
walked close enough to any
Santa they encountered,
but with mixed results.
Now, he visits an
autism-friendly Santa each
December at an informal
yearly event that Borre and
other autism families hold
at a local playground. The
sensitive Santa happens to
be Ben's grandfather, Ray
Lepak, who was compelled
to become an autism-
friendly Santa for local
families after seeing what
his daughter's family was
experiencing.
"Just because a family
has a child with special
needs doesn't mean they
don't want all the same
memories that everyone
else does," Borre said. "We
all want those same holiday
joyful moments; it just has
to be approached differ-
ently."
Ben's sister, 4-year-old
Lila, who does not have
autism, and is getting wise
to the fact that Santa and
Grandpa bear a suspicious
resemblance. But she's
not letting on to Ben, and
visiting the autism-friendly
Santa is giving the Borres
a chance to share a family
experience they otherwise
might be denied.
Lepak, 69, of Manchester
recently donned his Santa
suit plus a brand-new
beard and snow-white wig
- and met with several
Hartford-area children and
their parents at their now-
annual playground gather-


ing. He's learned over the
years how to pep it up for
siblings who don't have
autism, and how to tone
it down for children who

SANTAS continued on 10A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This Dec. 11, 2011 photo provided by Darlene Borre, shows
her son, Ben Borre, 10, of West Hartford, Conn., with an
autism-friendly Santa Claus, Ray Lepak of Manchester,
Conn., who is also Ben's grandfather. For families of many
children on the autism spectrum, a visit with Santa Claus at
Christmas can be nearly impossible --unless they're visiting
one of the growing number of "sensitive" Santas.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


SANTAS: A big hit
Continued From Page 9A


seem overwhelmed.
He starts with a few mel-
low "Ho, Ho, Ho" greet-
ings, watches for those
who are intrigued, and
smiles or beckons to them
to come closer. Many steer
clear but watch him, either
curiously or warily, while
others remain disinter-
ested.
"You'll see them watch
Santa out of the cor-
ner of their eye, then
little by little they'll come
closer, then walk away
as if you're not there,
and come back in a bit,"
Lepak said. "It's really
about following their lead
and communicating on
their terms."
Some will give him a
high five; the braver ones
might sit on his lap. At
the recent gathering, one
child had no interest at all
in Santa until he realized
that the big guy in the
bright red suit was willing
to push him on a swing
and those fleeting
moments were enough
for the boy's family to
snap pictures.
A growing number of
malls also are setting
aside special times for
sensitive Santa visits
when the shopping cen-
ters would otherwise
be closed, including the
23 shopping malls of
Glimcher Realty Trust,
based in Columbus, Ohio.
A recent autism-
friendly Santa visit at its
Northtown Mall in Blaine,
Minn., just outside of
Minneapolis, drew 55
children despite poor
weather, and last year
drew more than 100.
Linda Sell, Northtown's
marketing director, said
the two-hour window on
a recent Sunday morning


was devoid of lines and
the bustle of a regular
Santa visit. Instead, chil-
dren could play and color
nearby or walk in a safe,
contained area until their
number was called.
Sell said they also
turned off the Christmas
music, dimmed the lights,
sent maintenance workers
and other potential dis-
tractions away, and asked
parents to fill out a form
in advance to give Santa
the heads up on the boys'
and girls' wish lists.
"Some kids will sit next
to Santa. Some will want
to stand a little farther ,
away and look at him, or
sit in the chair next to
him, or have mom or dad
next to him," Sell said.
For a child on the
autism spectrum, some-
times the smallest item
or gesture can spark a
connection such as the
Northtown Mall Santa's
gold watch and the tiny
Christmas train that
rotates inside of it, for
instance, or Ray Lepak's
time as a swing-pushing
Santa at the Connecticut
parZk.
For many families,
those small moments
captured in pictures and
memories are a holiday
gift of their own: a chance
to go beyond the con-
straints of autism and
experience a Christmas
tradition with their chil-
dren that might not other-
wise be possible.
"It's so hard on some
of these families trying
to take some of the kids
out," Lepak said. "What a
feeling that is, when I'm
inside the Santa suit and
I see those little innocent
faces. They love it and it
warms my heart."


N.M. woman gives birth


in truck during snowstorm


I SANTA FE, N.M. Russell
LeFevre learned how to birth a baby
in nursing school using clamps,
blankets, a suction bulb that clears
a baby's mouth of mucus and other
medical supplies.
When his wife's water broke in the
front seat of a truck as it sped down an
icy New Mexico highway in a snow-
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hands, some jackets and shoelaces.
It was enough.
His wife, Elizabeth, gave birth to
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Russell LeFevre said that when
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkjrby@olakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Thursday, December 22, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

Legree commits
to Kentucky

Fort White High's AJ.
Legree has committed to
play football at Kentucky
according to reports.
Legree played in the
Florida Athletic Coaches
Association 57th Annual
North/South All Star
Football Classic in
Sebring on Wednesday.
Legree led the Indians
in receiving with 46
catches for 694 yards.
He was second on the
team in scoring with 12
touchdowns.
As a junior, Legree
caught 18 passes for 249
and five touchdowns.
He had 13 catches for
198 yards and scored
four touchdowns as a
sophomore.
Legree won the .Class
2A state championship in
the high jump.

UF's Rosario,
Larson scratched
GAINESVILLE -
No. 11 Florida likely will
be short-handed against
rival Florida State on
Thursday.
Coach Billy Donovan
says guard Mike Rosario
and forward Cody Larson
are doubtful to play
against the Seminoles.
Rosario missed
practice Tuesday
because of a strained
back, and Larson is
slowly working his
way back from strep
throat Donovan stopped
short of ruling them
out Tuesday, but says
it would be difficult to
expect much productivity
from either one because
they have missed so
much practice time.
Rosario and Larson
sat out Monday's victory
against Mississippi Valley
State. Rosario is a junior
averaging 9.4 points and
2.3 rebounds. Larson, a
redshirt freshman, has
played sparingly and is
averaging 1.3 points.

FSU's Shannon
out for season
TALLAHASSEE
Florida State coach
Leonard Hamilton
says forward Terrance
Shannon will have
shoulder surgery and
miss :the rest of the year.
Shannon, who hurt
his left shoulder during
a loss to Connecticut on
Nov. 26, was third on
the Seminoles in scoring
(8.6 points). He was also
averaging 4.4 rebounds.
Shannon will apply
for a redshirt this
season and would have
two years of eligibility
beginning in 2012-13.
Florida State still has
a deep frontcourt that
includes three players
who are 6-10 or taller:
Jon Kreft, Xavier Gibson
and Bernard James.

From staff reports and
Associated Press


Champs and qualifiers


CHS, FortWhite
produced several
district winners.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Weightlifting, wrestling
and track provide oppor-
tunities for individual dis-
trict champions and state
qualifiers.
Several athletes from
Columbia High and Fort
White High made the grade
during 2011.
Columbia's Timmy
Jernigan was a sectional
champion in weightlifting
and was state runner-up in
the Class 2A heavyweight
division. Jernigan tied for
total lift (bench press, clean
and jerk) with 760 pounds,
but weighed more than the
opponent which determined
the tiebreaker.
Barnibus Madison also
won the sectional and quali-
fied for state for the Tigers.
Fort White also had a
pair of sectional winners
and state qualifiers in JR
Dixon and Kurtis Norris.
Anthony Pearce also quali-
fied for state.
Tiara Robinson-Smith
was a weightlifting district
champion and state quali-
fier for the Lady Tigers.
Brett Sealey became
the first Fort White girls
weightlifter to qualify for
state.
" District champions for
Columbia track were Marcus
Amerson in the high jump
and Michaelle Charlotin in
the 1,600-meter run.
Columbia wrestlers Cole
Schreiber and Monterance
Allen were repeat district
champions. Schreiber also
won at region and placed
sixth in the state tourna-
ment. Allen qualified for
state by placing in the top
four at region.
Two teams advanced to
region competition based
on their performances in
district tournaments.
Fort White's girls cross
country team was district
runner-up to advance. Team
members were Ashley
Jones, Sydni Jones, Carolee
Marrow, Seaira Fletcher,
Marissa Fletcher, Sheridan
Plasencia and Colby Laidig.
The Lady Tigers golf
team placed third at district
to earn a trip to the region
tournament. Team mem-
bers were Darian Ste-Marie,
Ashley Mixon, Shelby
Camp, Brooke Russell and
Gillian Norris.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


ABOVE: Columbia High's
Marcus Amerson takes a shot
during a game against Robert
E. Lee High School on
Dec. 9. Amerson was the
District 2-3A champion in the
high jump during the spring.




LEFT: Fort White High
weightlifters Anthony Pearce
(from left), JR Dixon and
Kurtis Norris qualified for the
Class 1 A state tournament.
Dixon and Norris were
sectional winners.


. Reporter file photo


Baylor's Griffin is AP college player of the year


QBcomes back
from ACL in 2009
to win Heisman.
By STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press

WACO, Texas Robert
Griffin III played football
for years simply because he
was good at it.
Then Baylor's exciting.


dual-threat quarterback
tore the ACL in his right
knee and missed the last
nine games of the 2009
season. While stuck on
the sideline watching, he
realized just how much he
loved the game.
"After a knee injury like
that, a lot of times you see
guys come back and it's
not the same," Griffin said.
"So I didn't want that to


be attached to me, great
player, got hurt, never was
the same. ... My goal was
to come back better, not
only for myself, but for my
teammates."
Goal accomplished for
Griffin, who exceled while
raising Baylor out of the
Big 12 basement.
Already the winner of the
Heisman Trophy and Davey
O'Brien Award, Griffin won


AP Player of the Year onr
Wednesday.
The aspiring lawyer, who
arrived at Baylor nearly
four years ago as a 17-year-
kid after graduating high
school early, is the nation's
most efficient passer this
season, throwing for 3,998
yards with a Big 12-leading
36 touchdowns and only six
interceptions. He also ran
for 644 yards and nine more


scores.
Baylor (9-3) has a five-
game winning streak, its
longest in 20 years, going
into the Alamo Bowl next
week. With a win over
Washington, the 15th-
ranked Bears would match
the school record of 10 wins
set during MikeSingletary's
senior season in 1980.
GRIFFIN continued on 2B











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN MAACO Bowl,Arizona St. vs.
Boise St., at LasVegas
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Memphis at Georgetown
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Illinois vs. Missouri, at St.
Louis
FSN Butler at Stanford
II p.m.
FSN Kansas at Southern Cal
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
NFL Houston at Indianapolis
SOCCER
2:50 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Chelsea
at Tottenham

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
y-New England II 3 0 .786 437 297
N.Y.Jets 8 6 0.571 346 315
Miami 5 9 0.357 286 269
Buffalo 5 9, 0.357 311 371
South


y-Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


x-Baltimore
x-Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


W L T Pct PF PA
10 4 0.714343 236
7 7 0.500279 278
4 10 0.286 207 293
I 13 0.071 211 395
North
W L T Pct PF PA
10 4 0.714334236
10 4 0.714285 218
8 6 0.571 305283
4 10 0.286 195274
West
W L T Pct PF PA
8 6 0.571 292 343


Oakland 7 7 0.500 317 382
San Diego 7 7 0.500358313
KansasCity 6 8 0.429 192319
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington


x-New Orleans
Adtlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay


East
W L
8 6
7 7
6 8
5 9
South
W L
II 3
9 5
5 9
4. 10;


T Pct PF PA
0.571 348296
0 .500 334 372
0.429 342311
0 .357 252 300

T Pct PF PA
0 .786 457 306
0.643 341 281
0 .357 341 368
0.286 247401


North
W L T Pct PF, PA
y-Green Bay 13. I 0.929 480 297
Detroit 9 5 0.643.395 332
Chicgo 7 7 0500 315 293
Mihnfot $i .! .12! '0.143'294.406


,.., West,
W L
y-San Francisco II 3
Seattle 7 7
Arizona 7 7
St. Louis 2 12
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division


T Pct PF PA
0 .786 327 185
0 .500 284 273
0 .500 273 305
0 .143 166 346


Today's Game
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Oakland at Kansas City, I p.m.
Jacksonville atTennessee, I p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Denver at Buffalo, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, I p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, I p.m..
Cleveland at Baltimore, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Arizona at Cincinnati, I p.m.
San Diego at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Atlanta at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.

Coach of the Year


Coach,Team
Les Miles, LSU
Bill Snyder, Kansas State
Mike Gundy, Oklahoma State
Brady Hoke, Michigan
Lane Kiffin, USC


College bowl games

Tuesday
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20, FIU 10

Wednesday
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU vs. Louisiana Tech (n)

Today
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Boise State (II I-) vs. Arizona State
(6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Nevada (7-5) vs. Southern Mississippi
(11-2), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Missouri
(7-5),4 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Dec. 27
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Western Michigan (7-5) vs. Purdue
(6-6), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina State (7-5) vs.
Louisville (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, Dec. 28
Military Bowl
At Washington
Air Force (7-5) vs. Toledo (8-4),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas (7-5) vs. California (7-5), 8 p.m.


(ESPN)

Thursday, Dec. 29
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Florida State (8-4) vs. Notre
Dame (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Baylor (9-3) vs. Washington (7-5),
9 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
Tulsa (8-4) vs. BYU (9-3), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl "
At Bronx, N.Y.
Rutgers (8-4) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Mississippi State (6-6) vs.Wake Forest
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Oklahoma (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5),
10 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 31
Meinke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern
(6-6), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Georgia Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
UCLA (6-7) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN) '
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 2
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1),
Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina
(10-2), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
(10-3), r p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
SAt Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
I p.m.(ESPN2)
\ Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Stanford (11-1) vs. Oklahoma State
(I1-1), 8:40 p.m; (ESPN)

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I Syracuse vs.Tulane, 7 p.m.
No. 2 Ohio State vs. Miami (Ohio),
8:30 p.m.
No. 3 Kentucky vs. Loyola (Md.),
I p.m.
No. 16 Georgetown vs. Memphis,
7 p.m.
No. 6 Baylor vs. Saint Mary's (Cal) at
Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, 10:30 p.m.
No. 8 UConn vs. Fairfield, 7 p.m.
No. 9 Missouri vs. No. 25 Illinois,
9 p.m.
No. 10 Marquette vs. Milwaukee,
9 p.m.
No. II Florida vs. Florida State,
7 p.m.
No. 12 Kansas at Southern Cal,
II p.m.
No. 14 Xavier vs. Long Beach State at
the Stan Sheriff Center, Honolulu, II p.m.
No. 17 Indiana vs. UMBC, 6 p.m.
No. 18 Mississippi State vs.
Northwestern State, 8 p.m.
No. 19 Michigan State vs. Lehigh,
9 p.m.
No. 20 Michigan vs. Bradley, 6:30 p.m.
No. 22 Murray State vs. UT-Martin,
8 p.m.
No. 23 Creighton vs. Northwestern,.
8:05 p.m.

NBA preseason

Tuesday's Games
Philadelphia 101 ,Washington 94
Detroit 90, Cleveland 89
Chicago 93, Indiana 85
Oklahoma City 87, Dallas 83
Denver 127, Phoenix 110
Sacramento 95, Golden State 91



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Wednesday's Games
Miami at Orlando (n)
Toronto at Boston (n)
New Jersey at New York (n)
Memphis at New Orleans (n)
Minnesota at Milwaukee (n)
Houston at San Antonio (n)
Portland at Utah (n)
LA. Lakers at LA. Clippers (n)

BASEBALL

Collegiate Baseball poll

TUCSON, Ariz. The preseason
Collegiate Baseball poll with final 2011
records, points and last season's final rank.
Voting is done by coaches, sports writers
and sports information directors:
Record Pts Pvs
I. Florida 53-19 497 2
2. South Carolina 55-14 494 I
3. Stanford 35-22 490 14
4. North Carolina 51-16 488 5
5.Texas 49-19 485 7
6.Texas A&M 47-22 484 8
7. Rice 42-21 482 24
8.Arkansas 40-22 479 29
9. Georgia Tech 42-21 476 19
10.TCU 43-19 474 17
11. St. John's 36-22 470 -
12. LSU 36-20 468 -
13. FloridaState46-19 465 9
14. Miami 38-23 464 22
15. Louisville 32-29 460 -
16. Oklahoma 41-19 458 --
17.Arizona State 43-18 457 II
18. Georgia 33-32' 455 -
19. UCLA 35-24 454 20,
20.Arizona 39-21 452 25
21. Cal St. Fullerton41-17 449 18
22. California 38-23 447 6
23.Vanderbilt 54-12 445 4
24. Oregon State 41-19 443 10
25. Clemson 43-20 437 21
26. Stetson 43-20 435 30
27. Oregon 33-26-1 432 -
28. Baylor 31-28 430 -
29.UC Irvine 43-18 425 12
30. Southern Miss. 39-19 422 -
31. Missouri State 33-23 419 -
32. Coll. of Charleston39-22 417 -
33.Virginia 56-12 413 3
34. Ga. Southern 36-26 412 -
35.Texas State 41-23 408 -
36. UCF 39-23 406 -
37.Wichita State 39-26 403 -
38.Jacksonville 37-24 400 -
39. FIU 40-20-1 397 -
40. Southern Cal 25-31 395 -

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 3,Winnipeg 2, SO
N.Y. Rangers 4, New Jersey I
Washington 4, Nashville I
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago 2
Ottawa 4, Buffalo I
Phoenix 2, Florida I
Calgary 2, Minnesota I
Wednesday's Games
Phoenix at Carolina (n)
Montreal at Chicago (n)
Philadelphia at Dallas (n)
St. Louis at Colorado (n)
Detroit at Vancouver (n)
Tampa Bay at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Buffalo at Toronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Florida at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Detroit at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Florida at Boston, 7 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Tampa: Bay at Colorado, 9 p.m.
St. Louis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

AWARDS

Athlete of the Year


Athlete
Abby Wambach
Hope Solo
Maya Moore
Yani Tseng
Petra Kvltova
Diana Nyad
Homare Sawa
Tamika Catchings
Li Na
Maria Riesch
Danica Patrick
Pat Summitt
Caroline Wozniacki
Skylar Diggins


Votes
65
38
35
0 24
13
7
7
7
6
6
2
2
I
1


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Fr,.-zt-iN I a;-v yV 1 I H I -
PPEMIL NP 5MNT PEAL
S -- -- ~ y Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans: '

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: VODKA THEME WILLOW POCKET
Answer: When little Raymond Romano was born on
12-21-57, everybody LOVED HIM


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 8 file photo shows Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III salutes after throwing a.
touchdown pass to wide receiver Kendall Wright in the first half of an NCAA college football
game, in Waco, Texas. The Heisman Trophy winner is The Associated Press Player of the
Year.


GRIFFIN: Led Baylor to Top 25


Continued From Page 11
In his comeback from
injury last year, after get-
ting a medical redshirt that
means he's now a fourth-
year junior, Griffin helped
lead the Bears to their first
Top 25 Fanking since 1993
and their first bowl game
in the Big 12 era. Baylor
hadn't even had a winning
season in the first 14 Big 12
seasons.
That year on the sideline
was the toughest for Griffin
and the Bears, who went
from big expectations to
another losing record with-
out their star quarterback.
"You miss out mak-
ing plays and doing great
things," Griffin said. "I
missed playing, I missed
practicing, but you really
just miss your teammates."
By time Griffin played
his first game for the Bears
in 2008, when at 18 he was
the nation's youngest FBS
starting quarterback, he was
already a Big 12 champion
and NCAA All-American in
the 400-meter hurdles. He set
an FBS record by throwing
209 passes to start his career
before his first interception.
Griffin passed for 2,091
yards and 15 TDs with 843
yards and 13 more scores
rushing as a freshman.
But then he got hurt on
the opening series of the
third game of his sopho-


ACROSS
1 Wood ash
product
4 Indigo plant
8 Like the sky
12 Always, in
a poems
13 Inoculants
14 Kyrgyzstan
mountains
15 Really hungry
17 Small bay
18 Detective,
often
19 Sink
unclogger
21, Burden of
proof
23 Ovid's route
24 Wellspring
27 Skimpy top
29 Visa and
passport
30 Place for a
coin
32 Add seasoning
36 Blissful spot
38 Grad-school
exam


more season. He finished
the first half of that game
against Northwestern State
on a gimpy leg, throwing
for 226 yards and three
touchdowns to push the
Bears ahead 41-10.
He didn't take another
snap that season.
"When you don't have
something and it's taken
away from you, then all of
a sudden you appreciate
it more," coach Art Briles
said. "Everything had come
real fast for him, from sev-
enth grade on up, so what it
did, it let him slow down. It
let him appreciate the game
and understand the .game,
get a different feel for the
game, from a spectator and
from a team-member stand-
point, as opposed to always
being the focal point."
But Griffin is clearly the
centerpiece for the Bears
when he is on the field.
RG3 returned last year to
throw for 3,501 yards to lead
the Bears to a bowl game.
He already holds 46 school
records with a highlight reel
that keeps getting longer.
This season started with
a 50-48 victory over defend-
ing Rose Bowl champion
TCU,. the nation's top
defense the previous three
seasons. Griffin threw for
359 yards and five touch-
downs in that nationally


40 Itinerary word
41 He wrote
"Picnic"
43 Alpine peak
45 Expose or
reveal
47 Faculty
honcho
49 Embankment
51 Sock parts
55 Mystery writer
Paretsky
56 Cozy sofa
58 Svelte
59 Dazzles
60 Columbus
campus
61 Offshore
62 Jay's
home
63 Kan. neighbor

DOWN
1 Took off
2 Decade part
3 Columnist -
Bombeck
4 Agrees


televised game, but his
biggest play was a 15-
yard catch from receiver
Kendall Wright to convert
third-and-10 on the game-
winning drive.
"I really liked that play,"
running back Terrance
Ganaway said. "It wasn't a
touchdown, but it meant a
lot for our team right there.
That'd be my favorite play
because it helped win us
the game."
And set a tone for what
would be an incredible sea-
son for the Bears.
After a tough stretch
in October, Baylor swept
through November with
four consecutive victories.
The Bears had won only
four Big 12 games com-
bined in November the pre-
vious 15 years.
That November stretch
included their first win over
Oklahoma, a 45-38 victory
punctuated by another of
Griffin's signature plays.
Griffin threw for 479 yards
and four touchdowns, the
last when he scrambled to
his left and threw across
his body to the corner of
the end zone on the other
side of the field to Terrance
Williams for a 34-yard score
with 8 seconds left. Griffin
-also had runs of 22 and
8 yards on that winning
drive.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


NK NE W RIFID AIJ AR



SEEDED FANS





UHS CULO



PARE HOOTED

MARK DOWN URAL
MLLE RYE RI LE
G


5 First p.m. of
India
6 Vexation
7 "Shane" star
8 Moves out
9 Going solo


10 Enjoy the
taste
11 Bind
16 PC image
20 Curved bone
22 On disk
24 "A pox upon
thee!"
25 Peculiar
26 Wear and tear
28 Ms. Hagen of
films
31 Fallen tree
33 Dow Jones
fig.
34 False story
35 Road coating
37 Liberation
from
ignorance
39 Most scrawny
42 Before
marriage
44 Calligraphy
fluids
45 Down mood
46 Craggy abode
48 Gutter sites
50 Jole de vivre
52 Ponce de -
53 Freedom from
difficulty
54 Pencil
remnant
55 RR terminal
57 Feel grateful


Denver


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuIIlDriverBooks.com
S 12 13 4 15 16 17 8 19 110 1 -1


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


'SORRY, WE HAP
A LITTLE
ACCIDENT ,.
IN THE
KITCHEN I


DON'T TELL ME
HE BURNED MY
PINNER


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Abused man urged to get help

and stop suffering in silence


Ir'M
WINNING
THIS,
RIGHT?


DEAR ABBY: On Oct. 19
you printed a letter from
"Bruised and Abused,"
a man who is dating a
woman who becomes
physically violent when
they argue. I know this is
a touchy subject. I have
heard from authorities
that about half of domestic
violence occurs when a
woman throws the first
blow.
Most women believe, as
the-abusive girlfriend said,
that her attack on him isn't
violence because she's a
woman and he is a man. As
difficult as it may be, we
need to talk about the role
women play in the domes-
tic violence cycle as well as
the responsibilities of men.
I'm saving the letter from
"Bruised" to remind me. -
DONALD, A CALIFORNIA
DENTIST
DEAR DONALD: Since
I printed that letter I have
heard from readers telling
me my answer didn't go
far enough. (I advised him
to end the relationship.)
Among those who wrote
to me were doctors, mem-
bers of law enforcement
and mental health special-
ists as well as former
victims. My newspaper
readers comment
DEAR ABBY: Because
we are bigger and stronger
does not mean we don't
get abused. I was abused
by my former wife and an
ex-girlfriend before I rec-
ognized it for what it was
and got myself thehe help I
needed. Nobody else was


months in jail for every-
thing that happened.
Violence is violence
regardless of who is throw-
ing the punches. Tell that
man he needs to get out
now! God forbid he ends
up dead. BATTERED IN
ARIZONA
DEAR ABBY: It doesn't
matter if he is a boy and
she is a girl, or that he
is bigger and stronger.
Women do abuse men.
It's a crime that too
often goes unreported.
He should contact the
National Domestic
Violence Hotline (800)
799-7233 or SAFE '(Stop
Abuse for Everyone)
at www.safe4all.org. -
CLAUDIA, Ph.D., LONG
BEACH, CALIF
DEAR'ABBY: I agree
with you that the man
needs to leave "Carmen."
But something he wrote
in his letter concerns me.
He said, "I don't want to
end the relationship, but
I think it's the only way I
can make her see things
from my perspective."
Carmen's behavior isn't
something that can be
modified through a break-
up. It is something that
will require intense coun-
seling to correct, if it can
be corrected at all. The
boyfriend needs to end
things for good and run
like the wind!'- BRUCE IN
HOUSTON
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't let someone
distract you. It's important
to finish what you,-start
so you feel confident and
stress-free. Added dis-
cipline and a little extra
detail on your part will
ensure that you get what
you want. Love is' in the
stars. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Plan your actions care-
fully. Spontaneity may be
fun, but in retrospect you
will realize your impuil-
sive act was a mistake.
Someone is sure to point
out where you went wrong
and judge you for it. Think
before taking action. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Love, affection and
divulging your personal
plans for the future will
make you feel good and
enhance your life. A trip to
see someone special will
resolve any uncertainty
about your future. A part-
nership will take a favor-
able turn. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't worry about
changes going on around
you at work or regarding a
job that interests you. In the
end, you will benefit from
what's happening as long
as you don't make a fuss
or show any signs of being
unprofessional. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Social networking will
work wonders for your per-
sonal and professional life,
as well as your attitude and
confidence. The things you
say and do will enhance
a love relationship. You
don't have to overspend to
impress; just be you. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't let the festive
hustle and bustle get you
down. Emotions are run-
ning wild and tempers are
short, so make a point to
relax and enjoy the fes-:
tivities going on around
you. The choice is yours.
Choose positive over nega-
tive. **
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Take care of debts or
collect what's owed to you.
Talk is cheap and can help
you get matters under con-
trol. Love is highlighted,
and spending quality time
with someone special will
result in ideas you can
work toward together. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You'll be upset if you
haven't been managing
your money properly. Set
up a strict budget that will
help you pay down debt
and secure your financial
position. Negotiate with
a company, institution or


agency to get the best
deal. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
-22-Dec. 21): Make a last-
minute move or decision
that will spice up your life.
TRomance is highlighted,
and offering something
special to someone you
love will enhance your
relationship. Don't let
someone from your past
meddle in your affairs. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Helping others
will be good for you emo-
tionally, mentally and phys-
ically. You'll be attracted to
someone's idea. The poten-
tial to offer something
special to the public looks
positive. A financial change
is apparent **
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put in a couple
of hours at work if it will
ease stress. Don't limit
what you can do because
you are fearful of making
a mistake. Discipline is all
that's required if you want
to avoid overindulgence
and trouble. ****
, PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Conversations will
lead to upset. Avoid topics
you feel strongly about.
You will send the wrong
message and can easily
end up in an argument that
ruins a friendship. Back
off. It's not worth the loss
you will face. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos,
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: P equals W
"XWY XD KZY ZNBHYAK KZMWUA MW
CMDY MA Z N R MWU PXBHA MW
OXFB ZYNBK KZN K OXF VNW'K
FKKYB." TNJYA YNBC TXWYA


Previous Solution: "To dream of the person you would like to be is to waste the
person you are." Sholem Asch
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-22
CLASSIC PEANUTS

P65T; "FLOCK"
'AND THERE WERE IN THE SAME -\
CC/NTRq 5HEPHERP5 ABIDIN6IN O okAAtNi t
THE FIELD KEEPING WATCH O VER i V '
THE2IR- LOCK BY NiHT*." \-'


AM

Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
there for me.
If she is hitting him, he
needs to call the police. If
he has marks on him, SHE
will go to jail. Men are too
often ashamed to call the
police because men think
it reflects on their man-
hood. However, they need
Sto put that shame aside
and get the help they need.
- JOE IN MISSOURI
DEAR ABBY: I'm a
retired cop. "Bruised"
asked you if what his girl-
friend is doing is domestic
abuse. Your reply did not
mention that his girlfriend
hitting him IS domestic
abuse. It doesn't matter
if the abuser is male or
female, nor the size of the,
victim.
"Bruised" should call
the cops and report this
before she goads him into
a response that gets him
arrested. The courts can
mandate the therapy she
apparently needs. RUSS
IN HELENA, MONT.
DEAR ABBY: I was a
victim. People asked me
why I didn't fight back. I
wasn't raised to hit women.
In the end, my wife put
me in the hospital twice
and left me blind in my
left eye. She spent nine


a


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415











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Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.Ikectityrcporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
CHASE MANHATTAN MORT-
GAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff,
vs.
SHELLY GABRIELLI A/K/A
SHELLY M. GABRIELLI, et al, De-
fendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated December 21,
2011 and entered in Case No. 12-
2010-CA-000093 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein CHASE HOME FI- I
NANCE LLC SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CHASE MANHAT-
TAN MORTGAGE CORPORA-,
TION, is the Plaintiff and SHELLY
GABRIELLI A/K/A SHELLY M.
GABRIELLI; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SHELLY GABRIELLI
A/K/A SHELLY M. 'GABRIELLI
N/K/A JOSHUA GLASS; CITIFI-
NANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES,
INC. F/K/A COMMERCIAL
CREDIT CONSUMER SERVICES,
INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk
of the Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
11:00AM, on the 25th day of Janu-
ary, 2012, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 7, SUZANNE SUBDIVISION,
UNIT 4, AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,
PAGE 99, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
File_NUMBER: F10005576
Serial: 18945391
DOCID: M011010
a/k/a 175 SE MOSSEY COURT,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the. Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this court on November 22, 2011.
P.Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: s-s B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL
Invoice To: Florida Default Law
Group, PL
P. O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F10005576 CAHSEDIRECT-
CONV---Team 3
**See Americans with Disabilities
Act NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
05529679
December 22, 19, 2011


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
122009CA0004863XXXXXX
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI
TRUST SERIES 2005-FM 1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANNE T. SARGENT; et al,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN "pur-
suant to an Order or Summary Final
Judgment of foreclosure dated No-
vember 3, 2009 and an Order Reset-
ting Sale dated December 14, 2011,
and entered in Case No.
122009CA000483XXXXXX of the
Circuit Court of the Third Judicial
Circuit in and for Columbia County,
Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2005-
FM1 is Plaintiff and ANNE T. SAR-
GENT; UNKNOWN TENANT NO.
1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2;
and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at on the Courthouse Steps of
the Columbia County Courthouse,
145 N. Hemando Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055 at Columbia County;
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 18th
day of January, 2012, the following
described property as set forth in said
Order or Final Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF LOT 17,
LOCK 1, IDLEAWILE RE-PLAT,
ACCORDING TO PLAT ON FILE
ON THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT ON
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 117-A, AND RUN WEST-
ERLY ALONG A PERPENDICU-
LAR TO GWEN LAKE BOULE-
VARD, SOUTH 100 FEET TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID GWEN
LAKE BOULEVARD THENCE
SOUTH 3 DEGREES 55 MINUTES
EAST, ALONG THE WEST LINE
OF SAID GWEN LAKE BOULE-
VARD, 166 FEET RUN THENCE
SOUTH 3 DEGREES 55 MINUTES
EAST, 104.3 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE TURN
AN ANGLE RIGHT 92 DEGREES
20 MINUTES AND RUN SOUTH
88 DEGREES 25 MINUTES WEST,
208.6 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 3
DEGREES 55 MINUTE. EAST,
PARALLEL WITH SAID BOULE-
VARD, 104.3 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 88 DEGREES 25 MI-
NUTES EAST, 208.6 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 3 DEGREES 55
MINUTES WEST, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF GWEN LAKE
BOULEVARD, 104.3 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should
contact the Clerk of the Court not
later than five business days prior to
the proceeding at the Columbia
County Courthouse. Telephone 904-
758-1041 or 1-800-955-8770 via
Florida Relay Service.
DATED at Lake City, Florida, on
November 18, 2011.
P. DEWITI' CASON
As Clerk Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
05529673
December 22, 29, 2011

100 Job
10 Opportunities
Legal Secretary/Paralegal
Position for Civil Litigation.
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
send resumes to:
injuryattornevs@yahoo.dom


100 OOpportunities
Licensed Insurance Agent
Seeking Highly motivated licensed
property and casualty insurance
agent. Computer savvy, reliable
and good personality. Employee
benefit include paid holidays and
vacation time. Send resumes to:
fmcknight8 l(cox.net
Lube Tech Wanted
Tools Required
Apply @ Rountree Moore Chevy
4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, Fl. 32055
See: Jimbo Pegnetter in Service
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com
Server Network Tech needed for
local computer company. Work is
performed in the field. People
skills and dependable transporta-
tion a must. This is not an entry
level position and requires work-
ing knowledge and troubleshoot-
ing on Microsoft server platforms,
including Exchange Software.
Send resumes to: Incare of, P.O.
Box 258, Wellborn, FL 32094

120 Medical
120 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

240 Schools &
240 Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or.
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies.
Beautiful 8 mo. old kittens,velvet
soft white or white with a touch of
gray on head. One beautiful dark
long haired. Raised indoors, litter
trained, used to dogs. All shots in-
cluding rabies,also neutered
Sweet, playful and loving. Price
negotiable. Phone 386-961-8909
Great Christmas Gift. 4 CKC
Registered Toy Poodle puppies.
Ready Christmas Eve. Up to date
on shots. 386-719-4808
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances
Black side by side Whirlpool
Fridge w/ice & water.
$400. obo.
386-365-5173


402 Appliances
Frigidaire Microwave
Range Top with fan, light
& clock. $100. obo.
386-365-5173


407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170
413 Musical
Merchandise
BB KING, Lucille w/case.
$800.
Call (904)397-1037


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT,
120GB Playstation 3 System with
9 games, 2 wireless control, in
original box. $380, Call 386-984-
75"10
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call Saturday.

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3 BR/2 BA, 14 x 80 Singlewide,
CH & A, water, sewage & garbage
provided, 1st, last + dep., lease
required, $550 mo. 386-752-8978.
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try setting just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec. (954)818-4481
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.


Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale

2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Maintained 10
ac. Master has a huge closet w/
walk in shower & garden tub.
MLS 79417 $94,900 Foreclosure
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Small mobile home
2/1 886sf on a wooded lot.
Paved road frontage.
MLS 79413 $17,900
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Direct Sale
15K-25K off models
800-22-2832 ext 210

650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
Rental/Starter, renovated, 3/2 SW
1 ac. off 41 btwn 1-10 & 75. 10
min to LC. $28,500 obo. No owner
Finance. 386-330-2316/266-3610

705 Rooms for Rent

New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
.386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com


4


--mm



confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


i


mi~rag

BUY TJllc


i'SitLLI r^











Classified Department: 755-5440


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05529646
LAKE CITY
3BR/2BA 1325SF $850. mo
PRICE REDUCED $75.
MOVE IN SPECIAL OF $300.
3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825. mo
3BR/2BA 1064SF $595. mo
2BR/1BA 768SF $495. mo
IBR/1BA 500 SF $395 mo
3BR/2BA 1000SF $700 mo
2BR/1BA VACANT $495.mo
JASPER
3BR/2BA 1188SF $650 mo
PRICE JUST REDUCED
4BR/2BA 2052SF $750 mo
MADISON
2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5 BA REMODELED
$550. mo


Visit our website:
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.comn
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
Accredited'Real Estate Services
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
Accredited Real Estate
Services is a Full Service
Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals ~
Property Management ~
1 Property Sales.
LEJNDER RYTO"

Ibr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $350mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
4 BR/2 BA in town, good neigh-
borhood, fenced yard, fireplace, no
pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.,
386-755-6916.
Available Immediately.
Rent To Own 3br/2ba home
In quiet subdivision.
386-752-5035 X 3113
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
Gorgeous Lake View 2br
Apartment. Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$600 mo, and
$600 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
S Office Rentals
FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N.-Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515


For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/1 yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes.it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents ot legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Nice 4/2, 1 ac.
Granite floors. Beautiful yard &
wrap around porch. MLS 77292
$139,900. Short Sale.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 4/2, 1 ac modular
home that is in immaculate cond.
1,344sqft. New carpet, roof, a/c,
fireplace. MLS 78833 $115,000.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Well maintained.,
Tiled floors, living area, open kit.
Above ground pool, guest quarters
MLS 79149 $115,000. Short Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot. on
the Suwannee. Well & anerobic
septic system. MLS 78842
$45,000 Owner Financing.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Home, over 2ac,
screened inground pool. Updated,
crown molding, new wood floors,
kit & paint. MLS 79378 $129,900 *
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 1713 sf, great.
area. Arched entryways, Ig living
room w/fireplace. French doors to
patio. MLS 79418 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.4/2 Vintage home.
Updated electric & plumbing. New
carpet & CH/A. Hardwood floors.
MLS 79367 $99,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Well maintained
2/2. Wood laminate floors. Lg
living room & master suite. New
countertops. MLS 76928 $89,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Vintage 4/3 2626sf.
Hardwood floors, new wdws, fire-
place. Separate 494ft guest home ,
double lot MLS 78000 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 1987 SF up-
graded w/wood laminate floors,
ceramic tile. 14x30 workshop, 10
xl0 storage MLS79345 $199,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, 2853SF walk-
ing to downtown, lakes, restau-
rants, Shands & VA. garage w/apt
above. MLS 79451 $140,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, open floor
plan, spacious master BR. Tile &
wood thru out. 1 yr. home
warranty MLS 78594 $169,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Huge 4/3, 2826sf
on 5.22 ac! Flooring is tile lami-
nate in most rooms & in immacu-
late cond. MLS 79584 $215,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
'Co. 752-6575. What a Creampuffi
Newer roof, 1 ac, paved road,
fenced, fireplace, very nice brick
home. MLS 79531 $65,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Brick .59 ac! 3/2,
2502sf. Lg master bath w/separate
shower & whirlpool. 2 car garage
& storage. MLS 76769 $210,000
Charming Older Home in town.
Over 1300 sq ft. with hardwood
floors. Shady comer lot.
Janet Creel. 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate


Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
Private Estate, city limits.
6br/3.5ba. 39.7 acres $994,000 or
$2,500 mo rent. Mary Bro'wn
Whitehurst. 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2. New kitchen
counters & ceramic tile, open floor
plan. MLS# 77943 $94,500 Mary
Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 updated brick in town. New
roof, hardwoods. Glassed room
w/fantastic views. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS 78092 $249,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D. Super area,
nice back yard. Covered back
porch. New AC in 2010. Elaine K.
Tolar. 755-6488 MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Exceptional price! 3/2, 1582 sqft.
2 car garage, screened porch 1/2 ac
lot. Only $129,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 365-5678 MLS#79239
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent location! 3/2 home, large
master suite, 2 car garage.
$87,900. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 79458
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Woodcrest, 3/2 Brick w/split floor
plan. Nice lot. Fireplace, Ig porch,
vinyl wdws. MLS# 77708 Elaine
K. Tolar $169,900 755-6488


810 Home for Sale
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac, 3/2, as is $95,000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/Ist time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 719-0382
Hallmark'Real Estate
Newly Listed in Mayfair! Great
area close to shopping! 3/2 fresh
paint& pretty lot. Newer metal
roof & screen porch. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
Sweeping Golf Course Viewl
Brick 3/2 w/screen porch. South-
em Oaks Golf Course. 1980sf.
$164,900 #79585 Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms &
O2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, ownerlfin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwn'erFinancing.com

Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
7 1 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale
03 CROWN VICTORIA, LX
58,000 miles.
Very Good condition.
$8,500. FIRM 386-466-6557

06 MERCURY Moutego
26,000 miles.
Excellent condition.
$12,000 FIRM. 386-466-6557

We're on target!


UN WnntL WalRnu InUnW r T -










Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

$10,500
Call
386-623-9026

If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

Eo GeliYour


Rnnecte*


Lake City Reporter
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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22, 2011


Rodgers is 2011 AP Male Athlete of Year


By CHRIS JENKINS
Associated Press

GREEN BAY, .Wis. -
When Aaron Rodgers needs
to rekindle the feelings that
drove his rise from a junior
college quarterback to
Super Bowl MVP, he doesn't
have to look too far.
Rodgers held on to the
many rejection letters he
received from marquee col-
lege programs as he was
coming out of high school.
Even today, he leaves a few
of them sitting out at his
house.
"I chose the couple
that I thought were most
demeaning to display in
a space in my house that
really nobody is able to see
but myself," Rodgers said.
"It's something that I think
is important to keep fresh
on your mind. Maybe not
every day, but once a week
your eyes might pan across
it and you have a little laugh
about the journey you've
been on at the same
time, remembering that
there still are people out
there that you can prove
something to."
Good luck finding those
doubters now.
* Rodgers is the 2011 Male
Athlete of the Year, cho-
sen by members of The
Associated Press, after he
turned in an MVP perfor-
mance in the Green Bay
Packers' Super Bowl vic-
tory over the Pittsburgh
Steelers in February and
then went .on to lead his
team on a long unbeaten
run this season.
Rodgers received 112
votes out of the 212 bal-
lots submitted from U.S.
news organizations that
make up the AP's mem-
bership. Detroit Tigers
pitcher Justin Verlander fin-
ished second with 50 votes,
followed by tennis stand-
out Novak Djokovic (21),
Carolina Panthers rookie
quarterback Cam Newton
(6) and NASCAR champion
Tony Stewart (5).
Rodgers is one of three
quarterbacks to receive
the honor in the past five
years. The New Orleans
Saints' Drew Brees won in
2010 and the New England
Patriots' Tom Brady won
in 2007.
Rodgers says it still feels
"surreal at times" to be con-
sidered among the biggest
names in sports.
"Those guys are house-
hold names, the best of the
best," Rodgers said. "(It's)
special to win the award,
and something I'll remem-
ber."
Through 14 games this
season, Rodgers has com-
pleted 68.1 percent of his
passes for 4,360 yards with
40 touchdowns and six
interceptions. The Packers
are 13-1, and Rodgers' play
is leaving people speechless
even his coach, 'Mike
McCarthy.
"I'm running out of
things to say about him,"
McCarthy said earlier this


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Feb. 6, 2011, file photo, Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) celebrates the Packers' 31-25 win against
the Pittsburgh Steelers after the NFL Suppr Bowl XLV football game in Arlington, Texas. Rodgers is the 2011 Male Athlete of
the Year chosen by members of The Associated Press after his MVP performance in the Green Bay Packers' Super Bowl vic-
tory in February and his stellar play during the team's long unbeaten run this season.


month, after Rodgers drove
the Packers into position
for a last-second, game-win-
ning field goal to beat the
New York Giants.
Green Bay's 19-game
winning streak came to
an end at Kansas City on
Sunday, but the Packers
remain a strong favorite to
repeat as champions. That's
thanks in large part to
Rodgers' knack for mak-
ing big plays without major
mistakes.
It. has been a long and


challenging journey out
of obscurity for Rodgers,
who wasn't offered a big-
time scholarship out of
high school and had to
play a year in junior col-
lege. Then came his ago-
nizing wait on draft day,
three seasons on the bench
behind Brett Favre and a
tumultuous first year as a
starter.
If Rodgers' path to star-
dom had been smoother,
he says he,wouldn't be the
player or person he


is today.
"It's something that gives
me perspective all the time,
knowing that the road I
took was difficult. But it
did shape my character
and it shaped my game as
well," Rodgers said. "I try
and keep that on my mind
as a good perspective, but
also as a .motivator, know-
ing that it took a lot to get
to where I am now and ifs
going to take a lot to stay
where I'm at."
Strangely, earning wide-


spread respect through-
out the sports world could
become a challenge in and
of itself for Rodgers, who
draws motivation from prov-
ing himself to his doubters
and critics.
Is that becoming more
difficult?
"It would only be tougher
if you stopped remember-
ing or drawing or think-
ing about those things,"
Rodgers said. "And I think
a great competitor has to
have at least some sort of


chip on their shoulder, or
at least the attitude that you
have something to prove
every time you take the
(field)."
Unable to attract atten-
tion from a big-time college
program, Rodgers played
a year at Butte College in
Oroville, Calif., near his
hometown of Chico. His
play there eventually got
the attention of Cal coach
Jeff Tedford, and Rodgers
transferred.
Rodgers thrived at Cal
and went into the 2005 NFL
draft expecting to be taken
early in the first round. But
he didn't hear his name
called until the Packers
chose him with the 24th
overall pick.
Once in Green Bay,
Rodgers found himself
backing up Favre, a revered
Packer who didn't neces-
sarily like the idea that the
team had put his eventual
successor in place. Favre
kept fans and the franchise
on their toes every offsea-
son, flirting with the idea of
retiring but always coming
back.
Then came the sum-
mer of 2008, when ten-
sion between Favre and
the Packers' front office
finally snapped after Favre
retired, changed his mind
and asked for his job back
or a chance to play else-
where. Favre was traded
to the New York Jets and
Rodgers finally had his
chance.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420