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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01733
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 29, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01733
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






000015 120312 *3***3 DIT 6
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


y


Reporter


Thursday, December 29, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 282 0 75 cents


LEGISLATURE




Reapportionment is Job One


Expansion of gambling
also on agenda, though
may get little attention.

By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE For most lawmak-
ers, drawing new boundaries for legisla-
tive districts that help keep them in office
will be priority No. 1 in the once-a-decade


session devoted to reapportionment.
Aside from that, it's unclear what else
will get done in the 60-day legislative ses-
sion that begins Jan. 10. Although lawmak-
ers are required to pass a budget, they
could decide to call a special session later
in the spring in hopes of a rosier forecast
from economists.
Although a highly public battle waits
on the expansion of gambling in Florida,
many legislators are reluctant to tackle it
in an election year. They'll also be looking
for ways to crack down on the massive


amount of fraud that plagues both the
automobile and personal property insur-
ance marketplaces.
It's shaping up as a bountiful session for
lobbyists, who have dramatically increased
their influence at the Capitol over the past
generation. The parties with interests at
stake in the gaming and insurance fights
have bankrolled some of the city's most
prominent wheelers and dealers.
Those issues and others could wait until
lawmakers figure out their own political
routes. That path may be a bit trickier than


in the past for the Legislature where
Republicans have overwhelming advan-
tages of 28-12 in the Senate and 81-39 in
the House as voters approved constitu-
tional amendments banning gerrymander-
ing. No longer can lawmakers draw legis-
lative or congressional districts where the
obvious aim is to help the majority party or
an incumbent.
The reapportionment process is often
time-consuming and usually not pretty.
SESSION continued on'3A


Options


are few


for tree


disposal

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
For traditionalists, an
artificial Christmas tree is
never a consideration.
But by now, that nice,
fresh Christmas tree that
was painstakingly selected
earlier this month has prob-
ably lost much of its luster,
not to mention many of its
needles.
Now, it's time to remove
the lights, tinsel and orna-
ments and decide how to
dispose the tree.
In Lake City, residents
are asked to put their trees
near the curb on regularly
scheduled days for yard
waste pickup, which may
not coincide with days gar-
bage is picked up.
Officials at Southland
Waste Systems, the com-
pany contracted to pick
up trash in Lake City, rec-
ommend residents follow
normal guidelines for yard
waste pickup.
Trees must be cut into
pieces if they are taller than
six feet or have a truck
larger than six inches in
diameter. And discarded
Christmas trees cannot
weigh more than 40 pounds,
Southland officials said.
Trees picked up in city
limits will be taken to a site
where they are ground up
in a chipper and recycled.
In unincorporated areas
of Columbia County, resi-
dents are asked to put trees
by the curb on their regu-
,larly scheduled trash pick-
up day, officials with Veolia
Environmental Services
said.
Trees picked up by Veolia
will be taken to the county
landfill for disposal, officials
said.
Another option is for res-
idents to call the Florida
Forest Service and request
a burn, permit if weather
conditions are favorable.
The state Department
of Agriculture encourages
people to recycle trees, if
possible, rather than burn.
But if someone wants to
burn their old tree, the
department makes the fol-
lowing recommendations:
Check local ordinances
and requirements for burn-
ing.
Only burn if significant
rainfall has occurred in the
past three to four days.
Never burn on windy or
high fire danger days.
Only burn between 9 a.m.
and one hour before dark.
TREES continued on 3A


S, .. JASON MfIATIHELWWAL I..'. l,- s-'
Josh Norris, a sales associate at Home Depot in Lake City, saws the jil..'n i of a 7-foot Fraser fir Christmas tree before it
goes to a customer.


Getting a feel for the game


JAOUN MATI I tevw wALr/t.riLakie uity Reponer
Mickey Willcox (left) watches as his grandson, Jeremy Erickson, 9, makes a putt at The Country Club at Lake City. 'The
three things you've got to know about golf is that it is about honesty, integrity and patience,' Willcox said.


Serious


injuries


in crash

O'Brien, Cross
City women are
taken to hospital.

From staff reports

Two people were sent
to the hospital with seri-
ous injuries as the result
of a three-vehicle collision
on State Road 247 Tuesday
afternoon.
Jessie M. Vaugh, 19, of
O'Brien. and Evelyn Kato
Harvey, 64, of Cross City,
were taken to Lake City
Medical Center for treat-
ment of their injuries.
The crash occurred
around 1:45 p.m. near the
intersection of Troy Road.
According to Florida
Highway Patrol reports,
Harvey was northbound
in a 2006 Dodge Van. Also
headed north were a 2002
Toyota pickup truck driv-
en by Vaugh and a 1996
Suzuki Sidekick driven by
Lisa Calhoun Craig, 37, of
Cross City.
All three vehicles were
approaching the intersec-
tion when Craig's vehicle
slowed for other traffic and
Vaugh's vehicle slowed in
response.
Harvey told authorities
that when she realized
Vaugh was stopped, she
steered right, though the
left side of her vehicle hit
the backof Vaugh's.
The impact drove the
front of Vaugh's vehicle into
the rear of Craig's.
Vaugh's vehicle then
spun counter clockwise and
overturned on its left side,
coming to rest on its roof
facing south.
Harvey's vehicle con-
tinued onto the roadway's
shoulder striking eight pole
reflectors and a tree.
CRASH continued on 3A


Paul gets front-runner's welcome in Iowa


By DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent
NEWTON, Iowa Texas Rep. Ron Paul
received a welcome befitting a man with a
suddenly serious chance to win next week's
Iowa Republican presidential caucuses as he
arrived in the state Wed.esday for a final burst
of campaigning.
His rivals attacked him, one by one.
If the 76-year-old libertarian-leaning conser-
vative was bothered, he didn't let it show. He
unleashed a television commercial that hit Mitt
Romney and Newt Gingrich. In his remarks,
he lumped all his rivals into one unappealing
category.
'There's a lot of status quo politicians out
there," Paul told a crowd of a few dozen poten-


tial caucus-goers who turned out to hear him
on the grounds of the Iowa Speedway. "If you
pick another status quo politician nothing's
going to change."
The audience applauded, but by day's end,
it appeared that yet another contender might
be rising.
According to public and private polls, former
Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum is gaining
ground in the final days of the race, yet another
unpredictable turn in a fast-. 1.inini' caucus
campaign. "We have the momentum," he pro-
claimed.
The politicking was unending.
Two politically active pastors in Iowa's robust
evangelical conservative movement disclosed
an effort to persuade either Santorum or Rep.
Michele Bachmann of Minnesota to quit the


race and endorse the other.
"Otherwise, like-minded people will be
divided and water down their impact," said
Rev. Cary Gordon, a Sioux City minister and a
leader among Iowa's social conservatives.
There was no sign either contender was
interested.
For months, Romney has remained near or
at the top of public opinion surveys in Iowa,
as Bachmann, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, busi-
nessman Herman Cain and former House
Speaker Newt Gingrich rose briefly to chal-
lenge him.
Romney has bent without breaking in the
face of each challenge, benefitting from his
own well-funded campaign, attack advertise-
ments funded by deep-pocketed allies and the
missteps of his challengers.


CALLUS: 65
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO Mostly sunny
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445 EATHER 2A
SFax: 752-9400 'WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
SAdvice & Comics ......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


4 >.
, ; *


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Cheetah, or
an imposter?


COMING
FRIDAY
Local news
roundup.










2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011

Celebrity Birthdays


FLORIDAK 4
10M Wednesday: Q!.3. Wednesday: t Wednesday:
le N/A .. Afternoon: 3-2-0 Afternoon:1-7-6-1


Tuesday:
4-9-21-34-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Death of Tarzan's sidekick questioned


PALM HARBOR A Florida ani- I
mal sanctuary says Cheetah, the 1
chimpanzee sidekick in the Tarzan '
movies of the early 1930s, has died
at 80. But other accounts call that
claim into question.
Debbie Cobb, outreach director
at the Suncoast Primate Sanctuary
in Palm Harbor, said Wednesday
that her grandparents acquired
Cheetah around 1960 from "Tarzan"
star Johnny Weissmuller and that
the chimp appeared in Tarzan films
between 1932 and 1934. During that
period, Weissmuller made "Tarzan
the Ape Man" and "Tarzan and His
Mate."
'But Cobb offered no documenta-
tion, saying it was destroyed in a r
1995 fire.
Also, some Hollywood accounts
indicate a chimpanzee by the name A file phot
of Jiggs or Mr. Jiggs played Cheetah as Tarzan,
alongside Weissmuller early on and and Cheel
died in 1938. scene fror
In addition, an 80-year-old chim- A* pe Man.
panzee would be extraordinarily
old, perhaps the oldest ever known. Wile
According to many experts and While
Save the Chimps, another Florida played th
sanctuary, chimpanzees in captiv- Tarzan m
ity generally live to between 40 and that thioses sa
60, though Lion Country Safari in lookthat this lke
Loxahatchee, Fla., says it has one impostor
that is around 73.impostor
A similar claim about another af
chimpanzee that supposedly played ally share
second banana to Weissmuller was Weissmul
debunked in 2008 in a Washington gone," Ro
Post story. Cobbs
Writer R.D. Rosen discovered that kidney fa
the primate, which lived in Palm U
Springs, Calif., was born around 95 in whi
1960, meaning it wasn't oldest ion burnI've I
enough to have been in the Tarzan. an Ive r
movies of Hollywood's Golden Age. firstreie
that starred Olympic swimming star here was
Weissmuller as the vine-swinging, wae afw
loincloth-wearing Ape Man and wasa full
Maureen O'Sullivan as Jane. Movies h
Movies h


o shows Johnny Weissmuller
, Maureen O'Sullivanas Jane,
tah the chimpanzee, in a
m the 1932 movie Tarzan the


a number of chimpanzees
e sidekick role in the
movies of the 1930s and '40s,
id in an email Wednesday
atest purported Cheetah
* a "business-boosting
as well."
raid any chimp who actu-
ed a soundstage with
ller and O'Sullivan is long
sen said.
aid Cheetah died Dec. 24 of
ilure and was cremated.
tunately, there was a fire in
ich a lot of that documenta-
ed up," Cobb said. "I'm 51
known him for 51 years. My
bmbrance of him coming
when I was actually 5, and
n him since then, and he
-grown chimp then." ,
storian and Turner Classic
ost Robert Osbourne said


the Cheetah character "was one of
the things people loved about the
Tarzan movies because he made
people laugh. He was always a regu-
lar fun part of the movies."
In his time, the Cheetah character
was as popular as Rin Tin Tin or
Asta, the dog from the "Thin Man"
movies, Osbourne said.
"He was a major star," he said.

In up-and-down news
year, Fox still prevails

NEW YORK It was a good year
in the ratings for cable news net-
works. Or a rough one. It depends
on your perspective.
Fox News Channel continued
its dominance, with an average
viewership that exceeded CNN and
MSNBC combined in prime time and
for the entire day, the Nielsen rat-
ings company said Wednesday. Fox
typically had 1.87 million viewers in
prime time this year. The top 13 pro-
grams in cable news all aired on Fox.
Yet Fox was alone among the
cable news networks in losing
viewers down 8 percent in prime
time and 5 percent for the full day,
Nielsen said. The 2010 midterm elec-
tion year was particularly engaging
for Republicans, who make up a big
part of Fox's audience.
CNN was up 17 percent in prime-
time viewership with a revamped
lineup that includes a double dose of
Anderson Cooper and Piers Morgan
replacing Larry King. CNN is third
behind Fox and MSNBC in prime.
time but second for the day as a
whole.
CNN's rivals acknowledge its
gains but are quick to point out that
last year represented CNN's worst
year ever in the ratings.
.(AP)


ABC newscaster Tom
Jarriel is 77.
Actress Mary Tyler
Moore is 75.
Actor Jon Voight is 73.
Country singer Ed
Bruce is 72.
Singer Marianne
Faithfull is 65.


Actor Ted Danson is
64.
Singer-actress Yvonne
Elliman is 60.
Actress Patricia
Clarkson is 52.
Comedian Paula
Poundstone is 52.
Actor Jude Law is 39.


Daily Scripture
"Come to me, all you who are
weary and burdened, and I will
give you rest."

Matthew 11:28 NIV

Thought for Today

"Sin cannot be undone, only
forgiven."

Igor Stravinsky, Russian-born composer


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number .........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter)r an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
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All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson....754-0418
(twilson'@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
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(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
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Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
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Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion,-please call the
executive'editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Pair honor son's
life with park
WELLINGTON-Six
years. Thafs how long
Scott Williamson lived.
Six. Short Years.
Born in 19,68 with severe
cerebral palsy to Del and
Barbara Williamson, Scott
never crawled or walked in
his blink-of-an-eye life. His
body couldn't metabolize
food properly, so it often
took his mother hours to
feed him. Scott weighed
only 20 pounds when he
died in 1974.
"There were some tough
nights," Barbara said. "He
lived on love."
But more than three
decades later, Scotts mem-
ory lives and breathes in
Wellington at Scott's Place,
a barrier-free playground
where kids with disabilities
can play alongside children
without disabilities.
The 1-acre, equestrian-
themed park, located
near the Wellington Town
Center complex on Forest
Hill Boulevard, opened
March 1, 2010. About 75
percent of the equipment
in Scott's Place is acces-
sible to kids with special
needs, including a series
of ramps and stations that
have games built into
them.
Extra-wide sidewalks
and ramps give wheel-
chairs access to all areas
of the park. Classic-looking
playground equipment
(slides and swings) has
been modified to provide
handicap accessibility.
"I'd like to think Scott
would be pretty happy and
proud," Del said, although
his son probably would not
have had the motor skills
to be able to play at the
park named in his honor.
But the Williamsons
sometimes would take
Scott to a park, buy him ice
cream or ride the swings
and slide with him. "We
weren't ashamed to go out
in public with him," Del
said. "We treated him as


we would have treated any
child. We took him wher-
ever we went" '
Scott, born 2 1/2 months
premature, was a twin. His
brother, David, never made
it home. He died seven
days after he was born.
The Williamsons donat-
ed $250,000 to the village
for Scott's Place. General
Electric, where Del worked
for 45 years, ponied up
$100,000. Home Depot
donated another $10,000.
Total price for the park:
$492,118.

Family back for 1st
time since 1997
ST. PETERSBURG In-
the early morning hours
of Sept 26, 1997, a car hit
a man in Lakeland and
then drove off, leaving
him unconscious and near
death.
The man had no identi-
fication. He was flown to
Tampa General Hospital,
and after surgery for
internal injuries and head
trauma, he spent eight
months in a coma. People
scanned missing persons
reports and concluded he
was most likely James Lee
Dailey. He agreed, and
insisted he had family in
Pensacola and Detroit
No one could reach his
family, though. For the
better part of 14 years,
Dailey has sat in a wheel-
chair and, through slurred
words, told anyone who
would listen about his
sister, Charlie Mae, and
four other siblings, and
about his son, James, and
his daughters. But none of
them came to see him, and
no one was sure they even
existed.
Until this Christmas.
Pat Erickson works
for Aging Solutions Inc.,
a nonprofit agency that
looks after people who
are declared wards of the
state because they have
no money and no family
or friends who step for-


ward to care for them. The
state has paid for Dailey's
care since 1997. Aging "
Solutions acts as his guard-
ian.
Erickson visits Dailey
once every two months at
the Rehabilitation Center
of St Pete. There have
been several attempts to
locate Dailey's family, and
Erickson herself tried a
few years ago by look-
ing for relatives on the
Internet and trying to call
them, to no avail.
This fall she tried again.
This time she mailed out
letters. One of the letters
got to someone who called
someone else who called,
Charlie Mae Chaney in
Detroit
Chaney, 65, has been
looking for her brother for
17 years. He was a drifter.
He never had a job, and he
did a lot of drugs, and he
drarik a lot, and he spent'a
lot of time in jail. When he
disappeared, many of her
relatives figured he was
dead. But Chaney always
held out hope her little
brother was still alive.
always held out hope
her little brother was still
alive.
When she heard he was
in the rehab center, she
called every relative she
could find. She.tracked
down his son in Houston,
and bought him a bus
ticket to meet her in
Pensacola. She flew down
from Detroit, and from
there they drove across
the state, collecting rela-
tives along the way. They
had more than a dozen
by the time they reached
a St. Petersburg hotel on
Christmas Eve.
On Christmas morning
they piled into two rented
vans and drove to the
rehab center to give James
Lee Dailey the surprise of
his life.
Pat Erickson was con-
cerned that seeing the
whole gang at once would
shock Dailey.
(AP)


THE WEATHER


MOMOSTLMOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY | MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY'


HI 65 LO33 HI71 1039L HI74LO ill HI7.042 H1I68L037


. ...




Pensacola / 3 P
64/50 aa
64/.


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


tCity
..,'.. -43 C
64 acksoville Cape Canaveral
ee Lake Cit 63/40 Daytona Beach
65/33 a," Ft. Lauderdale
SGainesville a Beadi Fort Myers
a Cty '65/340 6444 Galnesville
50 0ala Jacksonville
66/35 K e West
II 3 Oriando Cap C Canaveral Key West
67/47 65150 Lake City
Miami
6a7 "6 Naples
67/50/ West Palm Beach Ocala
72/61 e Orlando
i FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myei, 74/62 0 Pensacola
71/54 Naples I Tallahassee
o70/55 Mlami Tampa
K eW, t ,74/63 Valdosta
S KeyWes6 W. Palm Beach


61
37
66
43
82 in 1971
21 in 2010

0.00"
0.49"
33.38"
2.26"
48.06"


7a Ip 7p la
Thursday Fr






castedd tn "lt
Foecastateepmpeare "Fee lie'


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.


.7:26 a.m.
5:39 p.m.
7:26 a.m.
5:40 p.m.


MOON ult
Moonrise today 10:41 a.m. rac
Moonset today 10:50 p.m. for
a"
Moonrise tom. 11:12 a.m. to
Moonset tom. 11:44 p.m.


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. .6V
1 9 16 23 i
First Full Last New lo\
wea


6a On this date in
iday 1972, a late-sea-


central and north
central Oklahoma.
Behind the weather
system, heavy snow
buried eastern
Nebraska through
'tinpa~re the next day.


4

45 mnubes to L
Today's


ra-violet
liation risk
the area on
scale from 0
10+.


Friday
S70 50
11/47/s
78/64/pc
77/59/pc
70/40/s
68/47/s.
77/68/pc
71/39/s
78/66/pc
76/61/pc,
71/42/s
72/49/s
70/52/s
68/48/s
70/43/s
72/53/s
69/41/s
76/61/pc


Saturday
'3,55 4
i2/511s
80/67/s
80/57/pc
73/43/s
69/49/s
78/70/c
74/41/s
79/67/pc
80/61/s
74/44/s
75/52/s
69/52/s
72/50/pc
71/44/s
76/58/pc
70/43/s
77/65/pc


AROUND FLORIDA


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.corn


S Forecasts, data and
Graphics 2011 Weather
m y Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
father www.weatherpubllsher.com





Lae Connected

L -.-


b.M mummmamm-0









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


Deal to sell Gainesville Sun is final


NEW YORK The New York Times
Co. said Tuesday that it will sell its group
of 16 small, regional newspapers to Halifax
Media Holdings -LLC for $143 million.
The newspapers being sold include The
Press Democrat in Santa Rosa, Calif.; the
News Chief in Winter Haven, Fla.; and
The Tuscaloosa News in Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Halifax Media is based in Daytona Beach,
Fla., and owns the Daytona Beach News-
Journal.
"The sale of our Regional Media
Group will enable The New York Times
Company to continue our transforma-
tion to a digitally focused, multiplatform
media company," said New-York Times
Co. Chairman Arthur Sulzberger. Last
year, the group accounted for 11 percent
of The Times Co.'s $2.4 billion in annual


revenue, according to the company's,
annual report.
The Times Co., like many newspaper
publishers, has struggled in recent years
as advertisers shift from newspapers to
cheaper alternatives on the Internet. It is
trying to supplement its digital advertising
push by charging readers for unrestricted
access to its content on the Web, Apple
Inc.'s iPad and mobile phones.
The company had said on Dec. 19
that it was in advanced talks to sell the
regional newspapers to Halifax Media.
That announcement came four days after
the company said CEO Janet Robinson will
step down at the end of the year.
The sale is expected to close in a few
weeks, and The Times Co. will record
an after-tax gain on the sale in the first


quarter of 2012. It estimates that the net
after-tax proceeds from the sale will be
about $150 million, which it plans to use
for general corporate purposes.
Other newspapers included in the deal
are: Sarasota Herald-Tribune in Sarasota,-
Fla.; The Ledger in Lakeland, Fla.; Star-
News in Wilmington, N.C.; Herald-
Journal in Spartanburg, S.C.; Star-Banner
in Ocala, Fla.; The Gainesville Sun in
Gainesville, Fla.; The.Gadsden Times in
Gadsden, Ala.; The Courier in Houma,
La.; Times-News in Hendersonville, N.C.;
Daily Comet in Thibodaux, La.; The
Dispatch inr Lexington, N.C.; Petaluma
Argus-Courier in Petaluma, Calif.; and
North Bay Business Journal in Santa
Rosa, Calif.
"The strong local news coverage these


papers provide represents not only an
important community service, but, in
our eyes, a good investment," Michael
Redding, Halifax Media's CEO, said in
Tuesday's announcement.
* Privately held Halifax Media lists among
its investors Stephens Capital Partners
LLC and Redding Investments.
The New York Times Co. publishes
its namesake newspaper as well as The
Boston Globe and other newspapers. It
also owns About.com.
Its shares added a penny to $7.77 in
extended trading following the announce-
ment. They had ended the regular trading
session down 3 cents at $7.76.

Associated Press


SESSION: Redistricting is Job One; gambling is on legislative agenda as well
Continued From Page 1A


"Believe me there are politics involved
here," Senate President Mike Haridopolos,
R-Merritt Island, said.
The results also can be unpredictable.
Democrats were in charge 20 years ago
when the legislative and congressional
boundaries were redrawn but that
didn't stop Republican takeover of state
government
The legislative maps, but not the con-
gressional plan, go to the Florida Supreme
Court to ensure they comply with the state
constitution. Gov. Rick Scott, a Republican,
has veto power over the congressional
map but not the legislative plans.
The maps must also be reviewed by the
U.S. Justice Department to make they're in
accordance with the federal Voting Rights
Act because of past racial discrimination in
five of Florida's 67 counties.
But beyond redistricting, there appears
to be less tension between Scott and the
legislative leadership this year.
Scott, who fared well in his first session
last spring, appears to have adopted a more
conciliatory approach overall and he's
more comfortable with the veteran politi-
cians he deals with in the Legislature.,
A top priority for Haridopolos is getting
a pair of emotion-packed bills passed that
would compensate two men whose lives
were turned upside down by government
mistakes.
'One would benefit Eric Brody, who suf-
fered brain damage and paralysis when he
was 18 after a speeding Broward County
sheriff's deputy running late to work
- crashed into his car in 1998. The other


would pay $810,000 to William Dillon, who
spent 27 years in prison for a Brevard
County murder he didn't commit.
Both claims bills died in the final
moments of the 2011 session, largely vic-
tims of some 11th-hour political games-
manship.
. Scott and some lawmakers also want to
find ways to make the state university sys-
tem more effective and boost the number
of students graduating with degrees in sci-
ence, technology, engineering and math.
House Speaker Dean Cannon, though,
said lawmakers may do no more than just
start the conversation in 2012 without act-
ing on this complex issue.
Scott has made a turnabout on educa-
tion spending. Last session, he proposed
deep cuts as part of his drive to reduce
taxes in hopes of jump-starting Florida's
economy. Now, Scott wants an additional
billion dollars for education in the budget
year that begins next July 1.
However, Senate Democratic Leader
Nan Rich of Weston said it was "disingenu-
ous" for the governor to claim he's propos-
ing a $1 billion increase when schools are
losing $634 million next year due to expir-
ing federal stimulus and jobs bill money
while more students come into the public
schools system.
The mundane, but critical battle for
dollars will be closely watched again in a
year as lawmakers face a $2 billion budget
shortfall.
Scott, who once ran the nation's largest
chain of hospitals, suggested that savings
could be realized by cutting what the state


spends reimbursing hospitals for taking
care of patients enrolled in Medicaid. He
also would like to close a handful of state
prisons, eliminate 4,500 state jobs and
require all state employees to pay the
same for health insurance.
The governor and his Republican
cohorts in the Legislature have said they
will not raise taxes in order to help offset
the projected budget shortfall.
And that could tempt some legislators
to get behind a strong push by builders,
contractors and business lobby Associated
Industries of Florida to expand gambling


across the state that still suffers from
double-digit unemployment.
Disney World, the Florida Chamber of
Commerce and owners of dog and horse
track owners are among those opposed to
more gaming in Florida.
. Scott waded into the' annual pyrotech-
nics that surround the solvency of the
state-backed Citizens Property Insurance
Corp. and the fraud that has led to sky-
rocketing increases for Florida drivers
required to carry personal injury protec-
tion (PIP) by challenging legislators to fix
them.


CRASH: Two are seriously hurt
Continued From Page 1A
Harvey was charged with careless driv- of Lake City, China C. Calhoun, 15, of
ing and driving with a suspended license. Thomasville, Ga. and Taylor R. Craig, age
Craig suffered minor injuries, not provided, of Cross City were unjurt,
Her passengers Thelma T. Byrd, 55, FHP said.



TREES: Few options for disposal
Continued From Page 1A


Clear the area of combustible materials.
Remove decorations before you burn.
Cut the tree into manageable sections,
as necessary. . .
Do not leave the fire until it is complete-
ly burned out.


Keep a water hose and shovel nearby.
Only burn in areas at least 25 feet from a
forested area, 25 feet from your home and
150 feet from-your closest neighbor and 50
feet from any paved public roadway.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Thursday, December 29, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


ONE


ONE
OPINION


There's

no app for

common

sense

n ambulance's
siren cut through
the din of rush-
hour traffic and
motorists began.
clearing a lane on busy K
Street in Washington, D.C. The
emergency vehicle eased into
an intersection only to be
stalled by a young guy ambling
through the crosswalk, oblivi-
ous to the wailing, the flashing
lights and appalled onlookers'
flailing arms.
The neon-green wires dan-
' gling from his ears identified
him as a dreaded pedestriann."
The incident occurred a
few weeks before the National
Transportation Safety Board's
call, earlier this month, for
states to outlaw cellphone use
while driving.
Distracted pedestrians also
can pose problems for public
safety though those on foot
are more likely to incur the
consequences.
Human brains and bodies
"are not designed to concentrate
on six things at once," Howard
Mell, a spokesman for the
American College of Emergency
Physicians, told Scripps Howard
News Service. "When we're mov-
ing around missiles cars we
need to pay attention."
While no federal agencies col-
lect data on the incidence of inju-
ries and even deaths involving
pedestrians distracted by MP3
players and cellphones, anec-
dotal evidence is mounting.
Such incidents have given
rise to legislative efforts in
some communities and states
including Arkansas, Illinois
and New York to curb how
and when pedestrians use their
devices. Most have been unsuc-
cessful, derided as "nanny
state" interference.
Common sense can be in
short supply; pedestrians wear-
ing headphones or thumbing
keypads still step into traffic.
Maybe it's time for public
shaming, the equivalent of
stocks -,perhaps a magnetic
field that confines offenders to
a corner until they disconnect
from a device and re-engage
with their surroundings. Is
there an app for that?
Scripps Howard News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County.
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
SWe believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
Sget things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
(dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
SLetters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


When my kids
went off to play,
I'd say, "Have
fun!" How
many people
have told you "Have fun" lately?
Do you wake up in the morning
and tell your self "Have fun?"
Or, do you have a more seri-
ous message like "another day
I have to get up early, and do
what I need to do just to make a
living?" Or worse, "the start of
another dreaded day."
Those last two messages are
rather extreme, but it's too easy
to give your self negative mes-
sages early in the day, or to give
yourself no message at all. Is
your day fun? Do you really
enjoy the way you spend your
day? Or, is your day routine,
boring, stressful, unpleasant, or
maybe even painful? How's that
working for you?
What is this thing called fun?
Wikipedia defines fun as: "a
source of enjoyment, amuse-
ment, or pleasure; playful, often
noisy, activity." Or when used
as an adjective, "to behave play-
fully."
I watched an interview on
CNN the other day with Rita
Moreno. You might remember
her from "Westside Story."
She looks and speaks great at
80 years old. 'She was asked,
"Do you feel like you have it all


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


now?" She responded, "The
way to have it all, is to love it
all." I agree, and I'd add, "The
way to have it all is find a way to
do what you love doing, all day
long."
If you had a choice, would
you rather have a fun, satisfy-
ing, productive, happy, and
meaningful day, or a boring,
stressful, or painful day? It
turns out that we do have a
choice. Every second of our,
lives is a choice, an opportunity,
for how to spend that time.
Granted, we may need to make
a living,to pay our bills. We may
feel we owe our time and efforts
to our family, employer, or the
bank. We may be in a nursing
home. We may even be in pris-
on. Even within these limits,
every moment in our lives gives
us a choice of what to do with it.
We can choose how we think.
Positive thoughts build positive


attitudes. We can choose our.
actions, our behavior. We can
even choose what we want from
life, our goals, our directions,
and what life is all about.
How do we do it? You did
it. You're still reading. If you
agree that life is all about choic-
es, then you're in the driver's
seat.. Sure, like driving a car,
you still have to follow the rules.
You take some risks, and some-
times get in a fender-bender.
But the alternative may be to
just sit there with your engine
off, going nowhere. You could
choose a life-long mission, "to
boldly go where you've never
gone before" (paraphrased from
"Star Trek") and to make your
life all it can be.
Ready? Turn the key. Decide
what you want in your life right
now, this week, this year, this
lifetime. Where do you go from
here? That's up to you. What
do you love to do? With whom
do you want to be? Where d6
you want to be? What do you
want to have? What do you
want your life to be about?
E Bob Denny counseled
troubled youth and families
for more than 15 years. He
teaches psychology classes at
Florida Gateway College. Your
comments are welcome at bob.
denny8@gmail.com.


Watch that banana peel, Newt


Newt Gingrich is slip-
ping in the polls,
partly a result of
the banana peel he
stepped on in the
latest debate of Republican pres-
idential candidates. The banana
peel had a name. It was Freddie
Mac, and the issue was what
Gingrich did to earn $1.6 million
from this government-backed
company that helped wreck the
economy.
Michelle Bachman said he
lobbied on its behalf, and the
great intellectual wit this
man of fire, facts and fluency
- replied er, uh, hmm, not true,
not true, gobble, gobble,
gobbledygook, his usually red
face turning skull white. When
Gingrich was done, it seemed
members of a previously cheer-
ing audience had all gone to the
bathroom at the same time. The
applause abstention was thun-
derous.
One lesson is that, if he
should in fact end up with the
GOP nomination for president,
conservatives could no longer
look forward to his debat-
ing President Barack Obama.
Despite this former House
speaker's quick recall and abil-
ity to score rat-a-tat points while
his opponent is still figuring out
the day of the week, there is a
surefire technique for rendering
him a stumble-tongue.
Embarrass him with the
truth.
Since it has long been the
Gingrich style to balance any
accidental common sense with
exceptional weirdness, there are
plenty of embarrassing truths
out there, such as the Freddie
Mac contracts. Actually, those


-



Jay Ambrose
Speaktojoy@aol.-com
contracts were less weird than
mercenary. Gingrich says he
was supplying Freddie Mac
with analysis of all the ways
it was going wrong. Snicker,
snicker. Even if technically not
a lobbyist, he was lending his
name to a company pursuing a
catastrophic mission getting'
people to buy homes they could
not afford.
So a bunch of you got poorer
and Newt got richer, and so
did a number of Fannie and
Freddie executives arranging to
buy recklessly sold mortgages
from banks and resell them to
Wall Street. In lawsuits filed by
the Securities and Exchange
Commission, some of those
executives now stand accused
of failing to fess up about the
extent of risk to investors, but
let's get back to the debate and
the subject of weirdness.
During the debate, Gingrich
said his White House would
ignore Supreme Court rulings
it regarded as unconstitutional.
He said, as president, he might
well get rid of some federal
judges he did not like and that
he would hope to see others
subpoenaed by Congress to
explain their wayward deci-
sions. Even if you agree that the
courts .routinely ignore explicit
meanings of laws and the


Constitution, you can still under-
stand that the fix Gingrich has
in mind would cause unbeliev-
able havoc seriously endanger-
ing rule of law.
Has Gingrich backed up
from this horrifying campaign
promise? No. He made it worse
by spelling out a harassing tech-
nique that super-liberals could
obviously emulate when they
were in power. Meanwhile, he
said he is sick and tired of all
the negative ads by several of
his opponents in the upcoming
Iowa caucuses, as though he
had never turned negative, once
even to the extent of dreading
Mitt Romney's saving jobs by
cutting out waste in businesses.
And this from someone who
pretends to understand econom-
ics?
There is a lot to regret in
presidential campaigns going on
forever and ever, haranguing us
morning, noon and night, but
there is this, too: Candidates,
with the help of anxious oppo-
nents and a probing press,
reveal themselves given voters
with half an ear unclogged.
Sometimes voters do not rely
on ears. Sometimes they mostly
dream, as in the election of
Obama. But Gingrich, with that
interesting personality of his,
disrupts dreams, and suddenly
we see him in bold relief, and
some react by saying to poll-
sters no, no, on second thought,
no.

* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


ANOTHER
VIEW


Obama's

Muslim

outreach

Ift's no longer news that
President Obama's vaunt-
ed outreach to Islam has
been a bust. Numerous
polls over the past three
years have shown that after
a brief flurry of enthusiasm,
regard for the United States
among the world's Muslims
has declined precipitously. In
some key countries, dislike for
America is even lower than it
was at the end of the administra-
tion of George W. Bush, whom
liberal critics deemed culturally
illiterate.
The State Department
recently illustrated why reach-
ing out has been such a failure.
In mid-December, Secretary of
State Hillary Rodham Clinton
participated in a three-day
international conference called
the Istanbul Process regard-
ing the implementation of
United Nations Human Rights
Council.(UNHRC) Resolution
16/18, adopted in March. The
resolution ostensibly seeks to
combat religious intolerance
and was a U.S.-sponsored alter-
native to language pushed by
the Organization of the Islamic
Conference (OIC) that would
have imposed global blas-
phemy laws against critics of
Islam. Resolution 16/18 calls
on states to "foster religious
freedom and pluralism" and
- in typical Obama administra-
tion apologetic style stop reli-
gious profiling, which purport-
edly is a widespread American
vice.
In her keynote speech at
the conference, Mrs. Clinton
noted a study by the Pew
Forum on Religion and Public
Life that found "70 percent
of the world's population
lives in countries with a high
number of restrictions on
religious freedom." What she
left out was that the 2009 Pew
report "Global Restrictions
on Religion" found that most
states that had "high" or "very
high" religious restrictions
were countries with Muslim
majorities. The research also
revealed, "On average, restric-
tions are highest in the Middle
East-North Africa, where
the median score for the 20
countries (4.9) is considerably
higher than for the 35 coun-
tries in the Americas (1.0),
the region with the lowest
median score." In other words,
whatever problems of religious
intolerance UNHRC Resolution
16/18 seeks to address, they
are endemic among Muslims,
not in the pluralistic West.
Mrs. Clinton also bemoaned
the prevalence of religious- and
culturally based discrimina-
tion against women, which is
characteristic of many Muslim '
countries. Likewise, homosexual
conduct is a capital offense in
Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Iran and
Afghanistan and is subject to
harsh punishment in most of the
Middle East, which runs coun-
ter to Mr. Obama's Dec. 6 order
for the U.S. government to fight
for homosexual "rights" abroad.
Despite all this, White House
pandering to Islam is non-
stop. Last week, the Defense
Department approved a policy
allowing those in JROTC to wear
Islamic headscarves (hijabs)
during training and formations.
This policy is harmful for unit
cohesion because introducing
special privileges disrupts the
spirit of shared sacrifice and
responsibility that should be
inculcated in cadets. It also rais-
es important First Amendment
establishment clause issues
because government is acting
to benefit a single group solely
on the basis of religion. It's not
clear which will budge when Mr.


Obama's commitments to liber-
alism and groveling to Islam are
at odds.
* Washington Times


4A


Have some fun!









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


M Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
DuvalSt., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Dec. 31
Watch night service

We invite you to come
and worship with us at
our annual Candlelight
Service at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist
Church. The service
will begin at 5:30 p.m.
on Sunday, December
18, 2011. The church
is located at 550 NE
Martin Luther King
Street.


Watch night service


St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church's annual
watch-night service will
begin at 9:30 p.m. on
Saturday, December
31, 2011. We invite
everyone to come and
worship with us as we
praise and thank the
Lord for bringing us,
through 2011 and for.
allowing us to enter
2012. Pastor Alvin J.
Baker will deliver the
message.


New Year'a Eve
concert


New Years's Eve concert
at Lulu Advent Christian
Church, Saturday, Dec.
31 at 7 pm. featuring
Mr. Gary Honneger on
keyboard. Candlelight
Communion Service
following. Come and
share the New Year's
celebration with us.
Refreshments and
fellowship afterwards.


Watch night service

Truevine Baptist Church
will have a watch night
service on Dec. 31
starting at 10 p.m. The
public is invited to
attend to help lift up the
Name of Jesus.Looking
to see you. May God
continue to bless you
and yours. Thank you
in advance, Dr. Antonio
Carlisle, Pastor.



Watch night service


The Day Spring
Missionary Baptist,
Church will be having
watch night service
on Saturday, Dec. 31,
beginning at 9:30 p.m.
The New Year message


will be delivered by
the pastor, Rev. Aaron
Thomas Lewis, Sr.
Everyone is invited to
come out and be a part
of this worship and
praise service as we give
thanks to God for his
blessings and for our
Lord and Savior Jesus
Christ. The church
is located at 849 N.E.
Congress Ave.


Watch night service



St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church will be
having Watch Night
service on December
31- at 9:00 p.m. Please
make plans to come and
fellowship with us on
this joyous evening of
praise and worship with
the St. Paul family. Yours
in Christ, Rev. Alvin L.
Greene, pastor.


Watch night service

Olivet Missionary
Baptist Church will
be having night watch
service on Saturday,
Dec. 31 starting at 7:00
p.m. until 8:45 p.m.
Everyone is invited. The
church is located on 901-
Davis St., Rev. Ronald V.
Walters is the pastor.



Jan. 4

Blue/Grey meeting

Olustee meeting
The Blue/Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Jan. 4
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.


Newcomers
Friendship Luncheon


The January
Friendship Luncheon
of The Lake City
Newcomers and
Friends will be at Casa
Del Sol'on US 90 on
January 4th at 11:30
a.m. All members,
guests and friends are
welcome. For more
information call Rose
Taylor at 755-2175 or
Barbara Test 754-7227.



Jan. 11


Lake City Newcomers
and Friends Monthly
Luncheon


The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcmers
and Friends will be
held at 11:00 a.m. on
Wednesday, Jan. 11th
at the Guangdong
Restaurant in the Lake
City Mall. Our program
will be The Geriatric
Players from Lifetime
Enrichment Center.'
Lunch is $10. Plan to
attend. It should be a
fun day.


Jan. 18

Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Jan. 18 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.



Jan. 19


Voices that Change

Vocal Impressionist
Michael Kelley presents
Voices that Change from
Elvis to Kermit the frog.
A night of fun Thursday,
January 19, 2012 at
the Columbia County
Fairgrounds banquet
facility. Showtime is at
6:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Tickets
are $10. This is a benefit
for the Christian Service
Center and tickets are
available at the Center
Hilton and Washington
St.



Jan. 20

Community Concerts

Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
'twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano


artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.

communityconcerts.info.


Feb. 1


Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 1
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.



Feb. 8

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Feb. 8
at the Central Building
to plan for Olustee 2012.
The building is located
at 409 SW St. Johns St.
across from Aquatics
Center.

Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program

Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year
from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.



Feb. 25

Community Concerts

The UNF Chamber
Singers perform 3
p.m. Feb. 25 at the
Levy Performing Arts
Center. This elite
singing ensemble from
the University of North
Florida performs world
music, vocal jazz, and
other choral gems.
Each singer is chosen
by audition for solo-
quality excellence and
enthusiasm. Award-
winning director Cara
Tasher has served


OBITUARIES


Joyce Ann Davis
Mrs. Joyce Ann Davis, 55, died
early Tuesday, morning, De-
cember 27, 2011 after an ex-
tended illness
at Shands Lake
Shore Hospi-
tal. She was f
the daughter of
the late Johnny
Udell Johnson
and Juanita
Ruth Wagoner
Johnson. She had made Lake
City her home since 1987 after
moving here from Huntington,
WV. She was of the Baptist faith
and enjoyed reading and spend-
ing time with grandchildren.
She is survived by her hus-
band of twenty -years Mark
Davis, Lake City, FL; one son
Brandon Davis, Lake City, FL;
three daughters; Lora Meadows
(Bubba Ray) Lake City, FL; Tif-
fany Rowe (Pat), Lake City, FL;
and Jasmine Davis, Lake City,
FL; one brother Jan Johnson,
Lake City, FL; two sisters Jea-
nette Fairchild (Jim) Lake City,
FL; Judy Chapman (Wes) Lake
City, FL; three grandchildren;
Seth, Ariana and Trevis. And
a host of extended family and
friends that she loved dearly.
Visitation with the family will be
held Friday December 30, 2011
from 2pm-4pm, at Mizell's Fu-
neral Home, 365 NW Washing-
ton Street, Lake City, FL 32055
MIZELL'S FUNERAL HOME
is in charge of arrangements.


Dawn Lynn Pope
Dawn Lynn Pope, 57, passed
away December 21, 2011, peace-
fully in her sleep at home. Ms.
Pope was a long time resident of
Springfield, IL;- moved to Flori-
da in 2009 after her retirement.
Dawn held a Bachelor's Degree
in Criminology, from Governors
State College, Illinois. She re-
tired January of 2009 from the
Illinois State Police Department.
Dawn is predeceased byher father
Norman Pope. She is survived by
her loving Mother; Eunice Pope,
Brothers; Michael (Donna), Eric
Pope, Nieces; Jayme, Rachel,
Nephew; Jeff, Great Neph-
ew; Austin, and many Aunts,
Uncles, Cousins and friends.
No burial arrange-
ments have been made.
Services entrusted to ICS
CREMATION & FU-
NERAL HOME 357 NW
Wilks Lane, Lake City,
Florida (383-752-3436.

Jewell Junior Thrower
Mr. Jewell Junior Thrower, 72,
went home to be with the Lord
on December 26, 2011. Mr.
Thrower was
ary 17, 1939
in Colum-
bus, Georgia.
Both parents
preceded him
in death. He
was honor-
ably discharged -
from the United
States Army. ,. ?
Left to cherish <


memories, a devoted wife of
over 50 years Virginia Throw-
er; children, Jimmy, Matthew
and Vivian; brothers, James,
Raymond, Darrell, Irvin and
Roger; sisters, Betty, Jean and
Wanda; twelve grandchildren;
two, great-grandchildren; hosts
of other relatives and friends.
The family will receive friends
Saturday, December 31, 2011
from 6:00 8:00 P.M. in the
Chapel of Combs Funeral


Home. Interment 11:00 A.M.
Tuesday, January 3, 2012 in the
Jacksonville National Cemetery.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Wood Heat-No Fuel Surcharges

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around the world
as chorus master,
guest conductor,
clinician, and soprano
soloist. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.



March 7

Blue/Grey meeting

The Blue Grey Army
is having a Wrap-up
meeting 5:30 p.m. March
7 at the Central Building
for the Olustee Festival
2012. The building is
located at 409 SW St.
Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.


March 9


Community Concerts

Carpe Diem String
Quartet performs 7:30
pm March 9 at the Levy
Performing Arts Center.
Carpe Diem plays their
classical string quartet
repertoire as well as
Gypsy, tango, folk, pop,
rock & jazz. Their 2009
album was Grammy
listed for Best Classical
Album, Best Chamber
Music Performance,
Best New Artist, and
Best Engineered Album-
Classical. We believe
that their electrifying
style will keep you
engaged from beginning
to end. Ticket and '
membership information
is available at www.
communityconcerts.info.

May 20


Community Concerts


The Jacksonville
Symphony Orchestra
performs 3 p.m. May 20
at the Levy Performing
Arts Center. The full
Jacksonville Symphony
Orchestra presents
a rousing "Patriotic
Pops Spectacular"
program featuring
popular works by John
Williams, Gershwin,
Bernstein, Berlin,
Sousa, and other season
favorites. Ticket arid
membership information
is available at www.
comunityconcerts.info


ONGOING

Boys Club winter
program



The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program, which runs
through March 1. Fees
.are $175, which includes
transportation from all
elementary and junior
high schools.
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts and crafts,
gamerooms ad special
events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutorial
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
available,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones
Way.


Flag football tryouts


Flag Football, Christ
Central Sports.
Registration now thru
January 13. Age 5-12.
Fee: $40. Call Ronnie for
more info 386'365-2128.


G www.Iakecityreporter.com



C 09I*i*EIW T


e IMEW,


* -O PF=1IICI3m


* AIRCH*IVElIS


* "COMMVIUIVIL.MITY

* NL-%TRETAItIpolVIIMNT.


^. wwwjI lakecityreporter.corn


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 .









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


COURTESY PHOTO
First Federal Way agency representatives and First Federal executives. Agencies represented are American Red Cross; Arc of North Florida; Boys & Girls Club of Suwannee County; CARC;
Columbia Couoty Public Library's Adult Literacy Program; Children's Home Society; Columbia County Senior Services; Guardian Ad Litem (Voices for the Children), Columbia and Suwannee
Counties; Habitat for Humanity Columbia County; Happy House; Haven Hospice; Homeless Services Netwok of Suwannee Vallye; Lake City Humane Society; Love, Inc.; March of Dimes;
Pregnancy Care Centers of Lake City and Live Oak; Salvation Army; Suwannee County Parks & Recreation;.Suwannee Valley 4C's; Suwannee Valley Humane Society; Take Stock in
Children/FGC; United Wayi and Vivid Visions. Agencies not pictured are American Cancer Soceity, Boy Scouts of America and Suwannee County Animal Shelter.



First Federal collects $54,000 for local causes


Submitted
This year, First Federal Bank of Florida
employees donated $27,000 to local com-
munity agencies through First Federal's
employee contribution program, First
Federal Way. The $27,000 donation facili-
tated a match of the, same amount by First
Federal for a total of over $54,000 contrib-,
uted to community agencies. Through
First Federal Way, employees elect to
contribute a portion of their paycheck to
one or more participating non-profit agen-
cies. At the end of each year, First Federal


matches the total contribution and awards
it to the selected agencies.
"First Federal Bank is proud of our
generous, compassionate 'employees,"
said a spokesperson. "Our employees
continued to give back to their commu-
nities this year, despite a weak economy.
For some First Federal employees like
Shawn Bailey and Heather Markham,
they chose to contribute to agencies
that have touched their lives and the
lives around them. Other employees like
Kathy Baird, are proud to be a part of


First Federal's commitment to the con-
tribution to be more than they are able
to give alone."
At a recent check presentation, Keith
Leibfried, President and CEO of First
Federal, expressed gratitude to the differ-
ent agencies for all the dedicated services
they provide to our community,
"I am also grateful to the First Federal
employees who gererously shared their
hard earned income and to First Federal's
Board of Directors for authorizing a match
of our employees," Leibfried said. "Most


importantly, 'I ani grateful to the loyalty of
our customers who enable us to be such a
good community partner."
First Federal Bank of Florida offers
a comprehensive portfolio of products
and services for personal and business
customers, and is committed to helping
local communities flourish. Founded in
1962, First Federal has 18 branches locat-
ed in Amelia Island, Bonifay, Bradenton,
Chipley, Dowling Park, Jasper, Lake City,
Live Oak, Macclenny, Marianna, Mayo,
Sarasota and Yulee.


Do a

good

turn

The Boy Scout slogan says,
"Do a good turn daily." In
that spirit, Boy Scouts from
Troop 85 gave out candy
at the "Jingle Bell Rock"
Christmas party presented
by the Christian Service
Center of Lake City recently.
The candy was awarded to
Jeremy Barwick who entered
a photo contest for "doing a
good turn" sponsored by the
Goetze Candy Company.
Pictured with the children are
(from left) Jake Ayers, Jarrett
Moehl, Robert Frier and
Jeremy Barwick.


Time for New Year's resolutions, say local money advisors


Once again, it's time to make New Year's
resolutions. In addition to hitting the gym,
learning that second language and getting
better organized, Lake City-area
Local Edward Jones financial advisors,
- there are four in Lake City say, "Why
not also consider making a few financial
resolutions?"
What types of financial resolutions might
one consider? Edward Jones suggests:

Contribute more to your retirement
accounts. A new year means that you are
one year closer to retirement To help
yourself build resources for the lifestyle


you've envisioned as a retiree, try to boost
your contributions to your 401(k) or other
employer-sponsored retirement plan.
You can do this if you get a salary
increase and devote at least part of it
to your 401(k). At the same time, try to
"max out" on your Individual Retirement
Account (IRA).,For 2012, you can con-
tribute up to $5,000 to an IRA, or $6,000 if
you're 50 or older.
Reduce your debts. Look for ways to
cut down or consolidate your debts.
It may not be easy, but it's worth the
effort because the lower your debt
load, the more money you'll have avail-


able to invest for the future.
Build an emergency fund. If you don't
already have an emergency fund contain-
ing between six and 12 months' worth of
living expenses, start building one soon.
Keep the money in a liquid vehicle ? one
that's separate from your everyday check-
ing and savings accounts. Without such
an emergency fund, you may be forced to
dip into your long-term investments to pay
for unexpected costs, such as a major car
repair, a new furnace or a large medical
bill.
Don't overreact to volatility. In 2011,
the financial markets have been volatile,


with big gains followed by big drops fol-
lowed by big gains? A true roller-coaster
pattern. Try not to let large, short-term
price movements influence your invest-
ment decisions. Many of the factors that-
cause jumps or declines are not that rel-
evant to long-term results ? And as an
investor, you want to focus on the long
term. Concentrate on building a portfolio
that's suitable for your individual goals and
risk tolerance.
Be aware of different types of risk. For
many investors, "investment risk" strictly
means the possibility of losing principal
when the value of an investment drops.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


Against odds, Lipitor became top seller


By LINDA A. JOHNSON
AP Business Writer

TRENTON, N.J. -
Lipitor, the best-selling
drug in the history of phar-
maceuticals, is the block-
buster that almost wasn't.
When it was in develop-
ment, the cholesterol-low-
ering medicine was viewed
as such an also-ran it almost
didn't make it into patient
testing.
By the time Lipitor went
on sale in early 1997, it was
the fifth drug in a class
called stations that lower
LDL or bad cholesterol.
The class already included
three blockbusters, drugs
with sales of $1 billion a
year -or more. Normally,
that would make it very
tough for a latecomer to
sway many doctors and
patients to switch.
But a 1996 study showed
Lipitor reduced bad .cho-
lesterol dramatically more
than the other stations, from
thevery start of treatment
and even more so over
time. A striking graph of
those results helped Lipitor
sales representatives turn
it into the world's best-sell-
ing drug ever, with more
than $125 billion in sales
over 14 1/2 years.
Nicknamed "turbostatin,"
Lipitor became the top-
selling station barely three
years after it was launched.
It's provided 20 percent to
25 percent of Pfizer Inc.'s
annual revenue for years.
But after nearly a decade
as the top-selling drug,
Lipitor is set to be toppled.
in 2012 after getting its first
generic rivals four weeks
ago.
It's a run not likely to.be
repeated.
Back in the early 1980s,
the public was just start-
ing to learn what choles-
terol was. There was little
evidence that controlling it
with medication could be
so crucial in preventing
disability and early death,
and the coming epidemic,
of obesity and diabetes in'
an aging population wasn't
foreseen.
At the time, heart
attack prevention basically
amounted to telling patients
to eat more oatmeal and
skip the steak.
Lipitor creator Warner-
Lambert, a midsized
drugmaker best known
for consumer health prod-
ucts including Listerine,
Benadryl allergy pills and
Halls cough drops, got a.
late start in what turned


Bruce Roth, Vice President of Discovery Chemistry at Genentech, is photographed on the Genentech campus in South San Francisco, Calif. Lipitor, the
best-selling drug in the history of pharmaceuticals, is the blockbuster that almost wasn't."There was a lot of controversy at Warner-Lambert as to whether we
should even take our molecule into the clinic" for human testing; Roth says. "It was kind of a big risk ... It's millions of dollars."


into a surprisingly fast-
growing market.
Merck & Co. had a
decade lead with Mevacor,
launched in 1987. By 1994,
its successor drug, Zocor,
along with Bristol-Myers
Squibb Co.'s Pravachol and
Novartis AG's Lescol, had
crowded the market
"Those other companies.
didn't even take us seri-
ously. They didn't think we
could be a viable contend-
er," said Adele Gulfo, then
head of cardiovascular mar-
keting at Warner-Lambert
Co. who now heads Pfizer's
primary care drugs busi-
ness.
Doctors said they were
"quite satisfied with the
medicines we have," she
recalled recently.
Given that, jnarketing
executives at Warner-
Lambert were projecting
Lipitor sales of $300 million
a year at best, recalls the
drugs's inventor, chemist
Bruce D. Roth.
"I wish someday you
guys could make us a drug
we could sell," the market-
ers told his team, recalls
Roth, a research vice presi-
dent for Genentech, a bio-,


tech pioneer now owned by
Swigs drugmaker Roche.
They had, but didn't see
it
'"There was a lot of
controversy at Warner-
Lambert as to whether we
should even take our mol-
ecule into the clinic" for
human testing, Roth says.
"It was kind of a big risk ...
It's millions of dollars."
But senior 'management
was persuaded in 1990 to at
least fund the initial round
of testing on a couple of
dozen employee volun-
teers.
The results were far bet-
ter than what had been
seen in the animal tests.
"It tremendously, incred-
ibly outperformed the other
stations Roth says. "It was
as good at its lowest dose
as the other stations were at
their highest dose."
So Warner-Lambert part-
nered with much-larger
Pfizer Inc., considered the
industry's .top marketer,
first to help fund the expen-
sive late-stage testing of the
drug in people and then to
promote Lipitor after it was
launched. Pfizer bought out
Warner-Lambert in 2000 to


block two other companies
trying to acquire it and get
control of Lipitor.
Pfizer benefited from
some lucky timing: Lipitor
went on sale in 1997, the
year. the Food and Drug
Administration first allowed
drug ads targeting consum-
ers.
So Pfizer spent tens of
millions on ads, including
-on the popular drama "ER,"
first .urging patients to
"Know Your Numbers" and
then showing patients dis-
cussing how Lipitor helped'
them get their cholesterol
numbers below guideline
goals.
Meanwhile, health
groups kept lowering
the cholesterol targets in
national guidelines, mak-
ing millions more patients
good candidates for station
treatment, as new research
showed the link between
cholesterol levels and con-
sequences such as heart
attacks. All those new
patients boosted sales for
the whole station class, par-
ticularly Lipitor.
The Lipitor promotion
team set new standards
for a marketing campaign.
They repeatedly visited
family doctors as well as
cardiologists, and blan-



:'FLORIi
H ,L..,. Former



t. J ..'
". ', -, ,


keted patients with data
showing that Lipitor was
best at lowering cholester-
ol. They stressed to doc-
tors nervous about safety
that Lipitor's lowest dose
worked as well as rivals'
highest doses. They gave
free samples of the white
pills and sometimes bought
lunch for the office staff.
In another savvy move,
Lipitor was priced below
rival drugs.
The company contin-
ued research on Lipitor,
through this year conduct-
ing more than 400 studies,
costing roughly $1 billion
and including more than
80,000 patients. The stud-
ies have shown how Lipitor
helped patients with heart
problems, diabetes, stroke
risk and other conditions,
by preventing heart attacks
and strokes 'and reducing
plaque buildup in arteries.
Even with Zocor,
Pravachol and Mevacor all
going generic several years
ago, and AstraZeneca PLC's
Crestor joining the mar-
ket in 2003, Lipitor sales
have remained strong. It's
the only brand-name drug
among the 20 most-dis-
,pensed drugs in the U.S.,
according to data firm IMS
Health.


But Pfizer, the world's
largest drugmaker by rev-
enue, has struggled to
develop another runaway
blockbuster. Its bid to cre-
ate a next-generation station
flamed out in 2007 when
it had to abandon heavily
touted compound torce-
trapib after roughly $800
million in testing, because
it raised heart attack and
stroke risk.
In recent years, Pfizer
has focused on creating
other, types of drugs and
on another unprecedented
strategy this one for
hanging onto Lipitor reve-
nue until June, when multi-
ple new generic Lipitor ver-
sions will join one sold by
Ranbaxy Laboratories and
the authorized generic from
Watson Pharmaceuticals
Inc. Pfizer is offering
patients and insurance
plans big discounts and
rebates, including cards
giving patients a $4 month-
ly copayment, if they stay
on Lipitor until then.
But branded Lipitor is by
.no means history.
Its patent is. still in force
in many major foreign
countries and Pfizer is pro-
moting it heavily in emerg-
ing markets such as China.


)APAIN AND REHABILITATION CENTER
rly Comprehensive Pain Management of North Florida
www.cpmhf.com


I


ASSOCIATED PRESS
The drug Lipitor is displayed at Medco Health Solutions Inc., in.Willingboro, N.J. Lipitor,
the best-selling drug ever, was viewed as such an also-ran that it almost didn't make it into
patient testing. But Lipitor reigned for nearly a decade as the top-selling drug. It's set to be
toppled after getting its first generic rivals four weeks ago


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CONNETE O
REPORTER
* NEWS
* WEATHER
* OPINION
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* ARCHIVES
* CLASSIFIED
* COMMUNITY
* ENTERTAINMENT


CONNETED.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


Preventive care: It's free, except when it's not


By CARLA K. JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO Bill
Dunphy thought his colo-
noscopy would be free.
His insurance company
told him it would be cov-
ered 100 percent, with no
copayrrient from him and no
charge against his deduct-
ible. The nation's 1-year-old
health law requires most
insurance plans to cover all
costs for preventive care
including colon cancer
screening. So Dunphy had
the procedure in April.
Then the bill arrived:
$1,100.
Dunphy, a 61-year-old
Phoenix small business
owner, angrily paid it out
of his own pocket because
of what some prevention
advocates call a loop'iole.
His doctor removed two
noncancerous polyps. dur-
ing the colonoscopy. So
while Dunphy was sedated,
his preventive screening
turned into a diagnostic
procedure. That allowed
his insurance company to
bill him.
Like many Americans,
Dunphy has a high-deduct-
ible insurance plan. He
hadn't spent his deductible
yet. So, on top of his $400
monthly premium, he had
to pay the bill.
"That's bait and switch,"
Dunphy said. "If it isn't
fraud, it's immoral."
President Barack
Qbama's health overhaul
encourages prevention
by requiring most insur-
ance plans to pay for pre-
ventive care. On the plus
side, more than 22 million
Medicare patients and
many more Americans,
with private insurance have
received one or more free
covered preventive ser-
vices this year. From can-
cer screenings to flu shots,
many services no longer
cost-patients money.
But there are confusing
exceptions. As Dunphy
found out, colonoscopies
can go from free to pricey
while the patient is under
anesthesia.
Breast cancer screen-
ings can cause confusion
too. In Florida, Tampa Bay-
area small business owner
Dawn Thomas, 50, went for
a screening mammogram.
But she was told by hospital
staff that her mammogram
would be a diagnostic test
not preventive screen-
ing --.because a previous
mammogram had found
something suspicious. (It
turned out to be nothing.)
Knowing that would
cost her $700, and know,
ing her doctor had ordered
a screening mammogram,
Thomas stood her ground.
"Either I get a screening
today or I'm putting my
clothes back on and I'm
leaving," she remembers
telling the hospital staff. It
worked. Her mammogram
was counted as preventive
and she got it for free.
"A lot of women ... are
getting labeled with that
diagnostic code and having
to pay year after year for
that," Thomas said. "It's a
loophole so insurance com-
panies don't have to pay
for it." ,
For parents with several
children, costs can pile up
with unexpected copays for
kids needing shots. Even
when copays are inexpen-
sive, they can blemish a
patient-doctor relationship.
Robin Brassner of Jersey
City, N.J., expected her
doctor visit to be free. All
she wanted was a flu shot.
But the doctor charged her
a $20 copay.
"He said no one really
comes in for just a flu shot.
They inevitably mention
another ailment, so he
charges," Brassner said.


As a new patient, she didn't
want to start the -relation-
ship by complaining, but
she left feeling irritated.
"Next time, I'll be a little
more assertive about it,"
she said.
How confused are doc-
tors?
"Extremely," said Cheryl


Gregg Fahrenholz, an Ohio
consultant who works with
physicians. It's common for
doctors to deal with 200
different insurance plans.
And some older plans are
exempt.
Should insurance now


At least one state is tak-
ing action. After complaints
piled up in Oregon, insur-
ance regulators now are
working with doctors and
insurers to make sure
patients aren't getting sur-
prise charges when polyps


businessman, recalled how
he felt when he got his
colonoscopy bill, like some-


thing "underhanded" was
going on.
"It's the intent of the


law is to cover this stuff,"
Dunphy said. "It really
made me angry."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill Dunphy poses for a photo in Phoenix. Dunphy, a 61-year-
old small business owner, thought his colonoscopy would be
free under the nation's,year-old health care law. But when
the doctor removed two non-cancerous polyps, turning a
preventive screening into a diagnostic procedure, it allowed
his insurance company to bill him $1,100. "That's bait and
switch," Dunphy said. "If it isn't fraud, it's immoral."


pay for aspirin? Aspirin
to prevent heart disease
and stroke is one of the
covered services for older
patients. But it's unclear
whether insurers are sup-
posed to pay only for doc-
tors to tell older. patients
about aspirin or whether
they're supposed to pay
for the aspirin itself, said
Dr. Jason Spangler, chief
medical officer for the non-
partisan Partnership for
Prevention.
Stop-smoking interven-
tions are also supposed to
be free. "But what does
that mean?" Spangler
asked. "Does it mean coun-
seling? Nicotine, replace-
ment therapy? What about
drugs (that can help smok-
ers quit) like Wellbutrin or'
Chantix? That hasn't been
clearly laid out."
Butthe greatest source of
confusion is colonoscopies,
a test for the nation's sec-
ond leading cancer killer.
Doctors use a thin, flexible
tube to scan the colon and
they can remove precan-
cerous growths called pol-
yps at the same time. The
test gets credit for lowering
colorectal cancer rates. It's
one of several colon cancer
screening, methods highly
recommended for adults
ages 50 to 75.
But when a doctor
screens and treats at the
same time, the patient
could get a surprise bill.
"It erodes a trust rela-
tionship the patients
may have had with their
doctors," said Dr. Joel
Brill of the American
Gastroenterological
Association. "We get
blamed. And it's not our
fault,"
Cindy Holtzman,
an insurance agent in
Marietta, Ga., is telling cli-
ents to check with their
insurance plans before a
colonoscopy so they know
what to expect.
"You could wake up with
a $2,000 bill because they
find that little bitty polyp,"
Holtzman said.
Doctors and preven-
tion advocates are asking
Congress to revise the law
to waive patient costs -
including Medicare copays,
which can run up to $23.0
for a screening colo-
noscopy where polyps are
removed. The American
Gastroenterological
Association and the
American Cancer Society
are pushing Congress fix
the problem because of the
confusion it's causing for
patients and doctors.


are removed.
Florida's consumer ser-
vices office also reports
complaints about colo-
noscopies and other pre-
ventive care. California
insurance broker Bonnie
Milani said she's lost
count of the complaints
she's had about bills cli-
. ents have received for
preventive services.-
"'Confusion' is not the
word I'd apply to the medi-
cal offices producing the
bills," Milani' said. "The
word that comes to mind
for me ain't nearly so
nice."
When it's working as
intended, the new health
law encourages more
patients to get preven-
tive care. Dr. Yul Ejnes,
a Rhode Island physician,
said he's personally told
patients with high deduct-
ible' plans about the ben-
efit. They weren't planning
to schedule a colonoscopy
until they heard it would
be free, Ejnes said.
If too many patients get
surprise bills, however, that
advantage could be lost,
said Stephen Finan of the
American Cancer Society
Cancer Action Network.
He said it will take federal
or state legislation .to fix
the colonoscopy loophole.
Dunphy, the Phoenix


PRIMARY
CARE
MEDICINE
Preventative Care
*Physicals est of
the Best
Geriatric Care 5 Years
Women's Health
Diabetes Management
386.754.DOCS (3627)
www.primarycaremedic.com


. a,h s, I Me t a.sh k thy'" nk.t, r ,.l P- A ....
S '. --" ,. "
.- .. ., . . .. . ., : ::


* Physical Therapy
* Hand Therapy/
Splinting
* Osteoporosis Program
* Balance Disorders


386.755.3164


I Most al lI II I n t I mItith In h uI


PHYSICIANS
IMAGING





LAKE CITY



* MRI
* Ultrasound
* X-Ray
* CT-64- Slice Scanner
* Digital Mammography
* Bone Density
386.487.3970


NAU


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


GSEEB I E


I Arp tn Np Pt i I










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday. December 29. 201 1


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

LCMS SOFTBALL
Conditioning
begins Jan. 4
Lake City Middle
School softball team
conditioning begins at
3:15 p.m. Jan. 4 at the
LCMS softball field. All
players must have a
current physical,
parent permission form.
and drug consent form
before participating (no
exceptions).
For details, call coach
Machon Kvistad at
623-6833.
CHS FOOTBALL
Banquet planned
for Jan. 6
The Columbia High
football team's end of
the year banquet is
7 p.m. Jan 6 in the school
cafeteria. The banquet is
a fundraiser for the
quarterback club and
attire is semi-formal.
Tickets are on sale for
$12 at Hunter Printing.
For details, call coach
Brian Allen at 755-8080
ext. 140.
CHS SOFnBALL
Tryout planned
for Jan. 9
Columbia High's
softball tryout is
3:30 p.m. Jan. 9 at the
softball field. All players
must have current
physical. parent consent,
and drug testing forms
completed. Forms are
available at the school
office.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is-
available at www.lcccyb.
com. Online registration
is $75 plus a transaction
fee. Onsite registration
begins Jan. 6 with a cost
of $80.
For details, call
president Tad Cervantes
at 365-4810.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
*.Columbia High girls
basketball vs. North
Florida Christian School,
Union County High in
Fort White High 'School
'Country Christmas
Classic, 11 a.m., 5 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Hagerty
High in Fort White
High School Country
Christmas Classic,
12:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
basketball in Santa Fe
High holiday tournament,
TBD
Columbia High
wrestling at Valdosta (Ga.)
Wildcat Invitational, TBA


Big year for signing


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Timmy Jernigan signed a scholarship with Florida State University on Feb. 2 while his cousin Malachi Stockton, 5, looked on. The signing
aired live on ESPNU from the high school's auditorium.

Jernigan inked deal with Florida State


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
It was a big year for
seniors in Columbia County
on the sports front Eight
athletes signed college
scholarships to continue
their sports dreams at the
collegiate level.


Leading the charge was
Columbia High's Timmy
Jernigan. Jernigan was
the second person from
Columbia County to sign a
scholarship in 2011 after Fort
White High'sJustinKortessis
signed with St Johns River
Community College to play
baseball on Jan. 21.


Jernigan was the biggest
recruit to sign last year as
the No. 2 defensive tackle
coming out of high school
in the country according to
Rivals..com.
Jernigan became the next
in a pipeline of Columbia
athletes to choose Florida
State including current


Tigers' head coach Brian
Allen, Reinard Wilson,
Kendyll Pope and Jerome
Carter.
"I couldn't live to impress
everybody," Jernigan said
at the signing. "That wasn't
the agenda God had sent
for me. I definitely followed
my heart and my heart was


in Tallahassee."
Jernigan will wrap his
freshman season with the
Seminoles today as Florida
State takes on Notre Dame
in the Champs Sports Bowl
in Orlando at 5:30 p.m.
FortWhite's ZackBentley
SIGNINGS continued on 2B


Usual suspects lead


SPro Bowl rosters


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 11 file photo, Baltimore Ravens linebacker
Ray Lewis reacts during an NFL football game against the
Pittsburgh Steelers in Baltimore.


Brady, Lewis
joined by new
names this year.
By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press
NEWYORK-The usual
names Tom Brady, Ray
Lewis, Troy Polamalu, Tony
Gonzalez are headed for
Hawaii, barring a trip to the
Super Bowl.
Joining them at the
Pro Bowl will be the not
quite so familiar, from Rob
Gronkowski to Jimmy
Graham, from Marshal
Yanda to Earl Thomas.
The thrill is equal, wheth-
er ift's eight-time invitee
Ed Reed or his Baltimore
Ravens teammate, newcom-
er Yanda.
"I am ecstatic, that is
really the only thing I can
say," said Yanda, a backup
at guard to New England's
Logan Mankins and Brian
Water. "This-is such a great


honor, something that
I never really expected.
When I made it to the NFL,
I was so happy to be on
a team and playing in the
league, and now, to be a
part of a Pro Bowl team is
something very special."
Or as old hand safety
'Reed put it Tuesday, "It
is definitely an honor and
blessing.. To come back
after an injury last year and
to be voted by my peers and
fans is special."
There are seven Ravens
on the AFC squad, equaling
the number of Green Bay
Packers for the NFC. But
they didn't lead their con-
ferences in voting by play-
ers, coaches and fans.
Brady is one of eight
Patriots and Patrick Willis
one of eight 49ers to make
the Jan. 29 game.
"It's awesome," said
49ers punter Andy Lee, one
of four Bay Area kickers to
make it "I think everybody
is deserving. I think some


guys are deserving 1kho
aren't going. Hopefully we
won't be there, hopefully
we'll be in the Super Bowl."
Players who make the
Super Bowl will be replaced
on the Pro Bowl rosters.
Still, its a sunny, balmy
consolation prize to journey
to Honolulu.
"It's a nice honor,"
Texans running back Arian
Foster said. "People that
love watching the game,
people that love playing it
and also coaches that have
been around it for 20-some-
odd years ... ift's the high-
est compliment you can
get in this league is when
you're voted in by people
who know the game. It's
just fun."
Brady is one of seven
starters from New England
(12-3). The others are
receiver Wes Welker,
tight end Gronkowski,
defensive tackle Vince
PRO BOWL continued on 6B











2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
5:30 p.m.
ESPN Champs Sports Bowl, Florida
St. vs. Notre Dame, at Orlando, Ra.
9 p.m.
ESPN -Alamo Bowl, Washington vs.
Baylor, at San Antonio
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Florida at Rutgers
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Vanderbilt at Marquette
II p.m.
ESPN2 BYU at Saint Mary's (Calif.)
FSN UCLA at Stanford
NBA
8 p.m. '
TNT Dallas at Oklahoma City
.b:s0 p.m.
TNT NewYork at L.A. Lakers

FOOTBALL

NFL standings.'


y-N
N.Y
Buff
Mian


y-Hc
Tenn
Jack
India


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
ew England 12 3 0.800464321
.Jets 8 7 0.533 360 344
alo 6 9 0.400 351 385
l1 .5 10 0.333 310296
South
W L T Pct PF PA
ouston 10 5 0.667359255
nessee .8 7 0.533 302 295
sonville 4 II 0.267 224 316
anapolls 2 13 0.133230411
North


x-Baltimore
x-Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


W L:
ir 4
II 4
9 6
4 II
West


iT'Pct PF PA'
0.733 354 250
0.733 312 218
0 .600 328 299
0.267 209 294


W. L T Pct PF PA
Denver 8. 7 0.533 306 383.
Oakland. 8 7 0.533 333 395
San Diego 7 8 0.467368351
Kansas City 6 9 0.400 205335
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
S W L T Pct'PF PA'
N.Y. nts 8 '7 0.533 363386
Dallas 8 7 0.533 355 316
Philadelphia 7 .8 0 A67 362 318
Washington 5 10 0 .333 278 333
South


y-New Orleans
x-Atlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay


W L
12 3
9 6
6 9
4 11


T Pct PF PA
0.800 502 322
0 .600 357 326
0 .400 389 384
0 .267 263 449


North
W L T Pct PF PA-
y-Green Bay 14 I 0.933 515 318
x-Detroit 10 5 0 .667 433 342
Chicago ,...,, 7 .8,. 0. 467 336.328
Minnesota 3 12 0 .200 327 432
West,
/ W L T Pct PF PA
y-San Francisco 12 3 0 .800 346 202
Seattle 7 8 0.467 301 292
Arizona 7 8 0 .467 289 328
St. Louis 2 13 0.133 166373
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sunday's Game
Green Bay 35, Chicago 21
Monday's Game
New Orleans 45,Adanta 16
Sunday, Jan. I
Chicago at Minnesota, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Buffalo at New England, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Miami, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, I' p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 8:30 p.m.

Season passing yardage


Player, Team
x-Drew Brees, NO
Dan Marino, Mia
Drew Brees, NO
x-Tom Brady, NE
Kurt Warner, StL
Tom Brady, NE
x-Through 15 games


Yards
5,087
5,084
5,069
. 4,897
4,830
4,806


College bowl games

Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20, FlU 10
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU 31. Louisiana Tech 24,
MAACO Bowl
Boise State 56,Arizona State 24
Hawaii Bowl
Southern Mississippi 24, Nevada 17

Monday
Independence Bowl
Missouri 41, North Carolina 24

Tuesday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
Purdue 37,Western Michigan 32
Belk Bowl
NC State 31 I, Louisville 24

Wednesday
Military Bowl "
At Washington
Air Force (7-5) vs. Toledo (8-4),
(n)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas (7-5) vs. California (7-5), (n)

Today
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Florida State (8-4) vs. Notre
Dame (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Baylor (9-3) vs. Washington (7-5),
9 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas


Tulsa (8-4) vs. BYU (9-3), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Rutgers (8-4) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Mississippi State (6-6) vs.Wake Forest
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
At Tempe,Ariz.
Oklahoma (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5),
10 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday
Meinke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern
(6-6), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Georgi. Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN),'I.
*' Fight Hunger B1ow
At San Francisco
UCLA (6-7) vs. Illnois (6-6), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
AtAtlanta
Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 2
TlcketClty Bowl
At Dallas '
Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1),
Noon(ESPNU)
A Capital One Bowl
.'At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina
(10-2). Ip.m.(ESPN)
'Outback Bowl
.AtTama '
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
S(10-3),.l p.m.(ABC) '.. ,
Gator Bowl'.
At Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
I p.m.(ESPN2) B
Rose Bowl '
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN). .
Fiesta Bowl
At GlendaleAriz.
Stanford (11-1) vs. Oklahoma State
(I I-I), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Jan. 3
Sqgar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan (10-2) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, Jan. 4
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestVirginia (9-3) vs. Clemson (10-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Jan. 6
SCotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday, Jan. 7
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday, Jan. 8
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 9
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Florida 2012 schedule

Sept. I: Bowling Green
Sept. 8: at Texas A&M
Sept. 15: at Tennessee"
Sept. 22: Kentucky
Oct. 6: LSU
Oct. 13: atVanderbilt
Oct. 20: South Carolina
Oct. 27: vs. Georgia (Jacksonville)
Nov. 3: Missouri
Nov. 10: La.-Lafayette
Nov. 17:Jacksonville St.
Nov. 24: at Florida St.

BASKETBALL

NBA schedule

Tuesday's Games
Atlanta 106, New Jersey 70
Miami 115, Boston 107


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


Milwaukee 98, Minnesota 95
Portland 101, Sacramento 79
LA. Lakers 96, Utah 71
Wednesday's Games
Indiana at Toronto (n)
Miami at Charlotte (n)
Washington at Atlanta (n)
Cleveland at Detroit (n)
Boston at New Orleans (n)
Oklahoma City at Memphis (n)
LA. Clippers at San Antonio (n)
Utah at Denver (n)
Philadelphia at Phoenix (n)
New York at Golden State (n)
Today's Games
New Jersey at Orlando, 7 p.m.
San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Denver at Portland, 10 p.m.
New York at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 5 North Carolina vs. Elon, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Florida at Rutgers, 7 p.m.
No, 14 Marquette vs. Vanderbilt,
9 p.m. .
No. 17 Kansas vs. Howard, 8 p.m.
No. 18 Michigan, vs. Penn State,.
7:30 p.m. r
No. 24 HIarvard at Boston College,
7 p.m..
Friday's Games
No. 7 Duke vs. Western Michigan,
7 p.m.
*No. 8 Missouri at Old Dominion,
.7 p.m.
Np.20 Murray State at Eastern Illinois,
8 p.m.,
No. 23 Virginia vs.Towson,7p.m.
No. 2S San Diego State vs. Redlands;
10 p.m:
Saturday Games
No. 2. Ohio State at No. 13 Indiana,
6 p.m.
'No. 3 Kentuckyvs. No. 4 .Louisville,
Noon. '
SNo. 9 UConn vs. St. John's at the XL
Center, Hartford, Conn., Noon
No. 10 Florida vs.Yale, 2 p.m.
No. 11 Wisconsin vs. Iowa, I p.m.
No. 12, Georgetown vs. Providence at
Georgetown, 2 p.m.
No. 15 Mississippi State vs. Utah State,
2-p.m.
No. 16 Michigan State at Nebraska,.
3 p.m..
No. 17 Kansas vs. North Dakota,
4 p.m.
No. 19 UNLV at Hawaii, 8 p.m.
No. 21 Creighton at Wichita State,
6 p.m.
No. 24 Harvard vs. Saint 'Joseph's,'
4 p.m.
Sunday's Games
No. I Syracuse at DePaul, 5 p.m.
No. 5 North Carolina vs. Monmouth
(NJ), 3 p.m.
No. 7 Duke vs. Peqnsylvania, 5 p.m.
No. 14 Marquette vs.Villanova, I p.m.
No. 18 Michigan vs. Minnesota, 4 p.m.
No. 22 Pittsburgh vs. Cincinnati,
7pm-. .

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Colorado 4, Minnesota 2
Buffalo 4,Washington 2
N.Y. Rangers 3, N.Y. Islanders 0
Carolina 4, New Jersey 2
St. Louis 5, Dallas 3
Detroit 4, Nashville I
Chicago 4, Columbus I
Vancouver 5, Edmonton 3
Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 3
Anaheim 3, San Jose 2
Tuesday's Games
Calgary 2, Columbus I, 50
Pittsburgh 4, Carolina 2
Montreal 6, Ottawa 2
Tampa Bay 5, Philadelphia I
Florida 5,Toronto 3
Detroit 3, St. Louis 2
Winnipeg 4, Colorado 1
Wednesday's Games
Buffalo at New Jersey (n)
N.Y. Rangers at Washington (n)
Minnesota at Nashville (n)
Los Angeles at Chicago (n)
Boston at Phoenix (n)
Vancouver at Sat Jose (n)
Today's Games
Calgary at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Mbntreal at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
Buffalo atWashington, 7 p.m.
Calgary at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville'at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I I Z -- -- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: M

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SORRY FENCE VALLEY OUTFIT
Answer: After watching so many horror movies in a
row, they were this "FEAR-FULL"


SCOREBOARD


Continued From Page li


signed with Weleyan
College in Kentucky on
a football scholarship as
well.
More players are
expected to sign from both
schools this February.
Columbia had the only
person to sign a volley-
ball scholarship this year
with Beth Williams ink-
ing the dotted line to play
with Broward Community


ACROSS
1 Type of pool
6 From the top
11 Wield
authority
12 .NFLer's honor
(hyph.)
13 Met.
productions
14 Prepared a
trap
15 Jeopardy
16 Fixed the
table
17 Grumpy mood
19 Zest for life
23 de mer
26 Deadlocked
28 Monsieur's
affirmative
29 Nail enamel
31 Seize power
33 Cowboy meet
34 Fighting fish
35 Pamplona
cheer
36 Merger or
buyout
39 Hairpin curve


College.
Softball has been the
most fruitful sport to help
players receive college
scholarships this year. Four
players that currently play
for the Lady Tigers and
Lady Indians have already
signed deals.
Stephanie Pilkington
was the first to sign as
she decided to play softball
for South Alabama on Nov.


40 FedEx trucks
42 Low voice
44 Blows it
46 Pyramid
builder
51 Get settled
(2 wdS.)
54 Kind of party
55 Dolls up
56 Ski lodge
57 Palomino, for
one
58 Surcharges

DOWN
1 Be gloomy
2 In charge of
3 Garr of
"Tootsie"
4 Paperless
exams
5 Hosp. workers
6 Jai -
.7 Coast along
8 Fitting
9 Fury
10 Auction
signal


13. Taylor Douglass signed
a week later, to play for
Francis Marion University.
Both will play for Columbia
this season.
Fort White has two
players on its roster this
year that also signed soft-,
ball scholarships. Alison
Wrench and Cecile Gomez
signed scholarships to
Thomas and Jacksonville
Universities, respectively.


Answer to PRevious Puzzle


LYRICS HOLEU
PRANKS OHENR
SANG TAN CST
DOSIO
DAVID LAPSED
AMEND PEARS
BAR GE OPRAH
HASSLE SALTY



Z OMBIE LOTIO
AN NALS EVENLY
POISE ASST


11 Elephant
party
12 Diminish
16 52, to Livy
18 degree
20 Oafs
21 Mystiques


22 Pinches off
23 Lettuce
24 Pilgrim suitor
25 Commit
perjury
27 Proper, as
respect
29 B.C. or N.S.
30 Piece of turf
32 Sault Marie
34 Lunch
counter order
37 Makes a
salary
38 Hirt and
Pacino
41 Comes
Across as
43 Old cattle
town
45 Ready to pick
47 Trojan War
hero
48 Sturdy lock
49 "Mister Ed"
actor
50 Natalie's
father
51 Speed meas.
52 El Dorado loot
53 Caesar's man
54 Interest amt.


@ 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


12-29


SEC rolls out 2012 schedule


based on divisional play
Associated Press
Associated Press There remain plenty of kick off the SEC season
kinks to work out for 2012, against Florida, they still
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. though, play Arkansas while host-
The Southeastern Texas A&M is under a ing LSU and Missouri and
Conference has unveiled 10-year contract to play visit Auburn, Mississippi
its 2012 football schedule Arkansas in Dallas, and State and Alabama on Nov.
with its two newest mem- Razorbacks coach Bobby 10.
bers Missouri and Texas Petrino said recently the The Missouri Tigers
A&M opening play Sept Aggies want a home-and- visit South Carolina,
8, and Alabama will visit home series now that both Florida, Tennessee and
LSU in a rematch of the teams are in the SEC. Texas A&M, though they
Bowl Championship Series Texas A&M will be the host Vanderbilt, Alabama
national championship home team for the Sept. 29 on Oct 13 and Kentucky.
Nov. 3. game for which the site has LSU will visit Auburn
Missouri will play the yet to be decided. It will on Sept. 22 to kick off its
2012 season in the SEC be the first league game SEC schedule before visit-
East and hosts Georgia on between these teams since ing Florida. LSU also must
Sept 8. Texas A&M will 1991 when both were in the visit Arkansas on Nov. 24
be in the West and hosts Southwest Conference. in the final week of the
Florida. The first confer- Arkansas released an 11- SEC season.
ence game will be Aug. 30 game schedule with the Florida will play
when South Carolina visits Razorbacks busy trying Southeastern Conference
Vanderbilt to line up a final non-con- newcomers Texas A&M
SEC commissioner Mike ference opponent. Texas and Missouri during the
Slive praised the league's A&M's current schedule 2012 season, part of a
-transition team and' ath- has 10 opponents listed. realigned schedule that
letic directors for handling Missouri has three non- has the Gators ending the
what he called "significant conference games to be regular season with three
logistical challenges" in decided, while Auburn has noi-conference games.
putting together the sched- its non-conference oppo- The Gators open the sea-
ule released Wednesday. nents lined up, including son Sept 1 at home against
The 2012 SEC schedule Climson in the Chick-Fil-A Bowling Green, and then
follows divisional play of Kickoff Classic with dates travel to College Station,
eight games withgsix inside. yet to be set. Texas, to face the Aggies
,the division and two out- ."Unfortunately, there in their SEC debut Florida
side. The SEC champion- are still several issues to- plays at Tennessee on
ship:game will be Dec. 1 in be resolved in our 2012 Sept 15, and then gets six
Atlanta. football schedule, but 'we of their next eight games
David Williams, wanted to get as. much at home. The Gators host
Vanderbilt's vice .chanel- information to our fans .as Kentucky, LSU, South
lor in charge of athletics, possible so.they may begin Carolina and Missouri,
said adding Texas A&M planning for next season,' and play at Vanderbilt
.and. Missouri. made it Arkansas athletics director and against Georgia in
challenging to put this Jeff Long said, in a state- Jacksonville.
together consistent with ment "We are pleased to Florida's final three
the league's desire to keep .have at least seven home games are against non-
an eight-game conference games, and possibly eight conference opponents:
schedule. as part of a very competi- UL-Lafayette, Jacksonville
"Fans. should keep tive .2012 football sched- State and at Florida State.
in mind that this league ule." Selling tickets for those
schedule is only for the Texas A&M's entry into final two home games could
2012 season ...," Williams the SEC will. be challeng- be a challenge if the Gators
said in a statement ing. The Aggies not only aren't in the SEC hunt



SIGNINGS: 4 sign softball scholarships


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE .


DEAR ABBY


Serial job-changer has no

business in the military


I'm a 19-year-old woman,
hardworking and married
to my best friend. Life is
amazing!
'So what's my problem?
I burn out of jobs quickly.
I'll start a job and abso-
lutely love it, but within
six months the things that
I once loved about the job
start to drive me crazy.
Within a year, I hate my
job and put in my two-
week notice. It's not that I
have problems finding jobs
- I'm well-groomed, speak
well and I'm enthusiastic.
I have recently consid-
ered enlisting in the Air
Force. (My husband is on
active duty.) I am abso-
lutely thrilled about it, but
I'm afraid I'll eventually
start hating my job and it's
something Fll be stuck with.
How do I overcome this? -
WANTS TO ENLIST
DEAR WANTS TO
ENLIST: Please stop and
re-read your letter. Are
you aware that you're talk-
ing about work the way
a schoolgirl talks about
romance blind, grand,
passion until reality sets in,
then on to the next one?
A job isn't like6that,
While it can be reward-
ing on many levels, when
the novelty fades it is still
WORK. There are good
days and ones that are less
so, co-workers who are a
pleasure and some who are
a challenge. Sometimes ifs
stimulating and sometimes
it's an effort
Years ago there was a
letter in this column that .


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
read: "Dear Abby: I joined
the Navy to see the world.
I've seen it. Now how. do I
get OUT?" I don't want a
letter like that from you.
Military life is rewarding,
but it can also be demand-
ing, frustrating and danger-
ous. It requires making a
commitment and sticking
with it even after the going
gets tough. With your short
attention span and low toler-
ance for frustration, I don't
recommend you take ANY
job that requires a signed
contract guaranteeing you
won't leave.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My friend
and I have a massage
therapist, "Shelby," whom
we hire on a regular basis
because she does an excel-
lent job. However, its hard
to get a completely relaxing
massage because she likes
to talk the whole time.
,What's the nicest and
most polite way to inform
Shelby that we prefer
peace and quiet so we
can enjoy the massage?
- RUBBED THE WRONG
WAY IN COLORADO
DEAR RUBBED THE
WRONG WAY: Shelby is
not your buddy; she's a
professional who has been


hired to perform a service.
When you make your next
appointment and she starts
talking; say, "Shelby, when
you talk during the mas-
sage, it makes it difficult
for me to relax. Right now,
I need to completely relax,
and conversation is distract-
ing." If that doesn't clearly
- and politely convey your
message, then you need
to find a massage therapist
who is less verbal,
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I hired
a pet sitter to stay in my
home for two days to care
for my dog. (I have used
him in the past) After 24
hours of no response to
my texts or phone calls, I
asked a neighbor to check
on my dog..The sitter.
never showed up. My dog
had been left alone with no
food or walks.
Should I alert his other
clients about what hap-
pened? I have this person's
client e-mail list It's possible
that other pets were also
neglected. ANGRY PET
OWNER IN HOUSTON
DEAR ANGRY: Pet sit-
ting is a sacred obligation,
and if the sitter\is for some
reason unable to fulfill that
responsibility, there should
be a backup plan in place
in case of emergency.
Unless your sitter had a
life-threatening emergen-
cy, by all means warn the
other clients
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


I HAV NEVERKENUP I WAT ca91- IeHAT 141IISACiUAL U
THIG FREAKIGFIHIUlf' I PARTOF 114F- EAME P oU WOUlP A
ON A WEEKENP! NORMAW(JOIlN LATER
SIN PFRaFZS S. .THISis.


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


T P065 EV gRUN
FOROFFICe?
v DON'T LIc Tf I
~ / "VTTIN6'
vmocs$
AI


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't leave anything
to chance. Do your due
diligence to avoid ending
up in a precarious position.
Ask questions and look
carefully at any little detail
that may lead to a bigger
problem in the future.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Let everyone know
what you are planning to
do. If you are open now
you will not have to face
opposition later. Putting
time and effort into some-
thing you want to pursue
as a moneymaking venture
will pay off. ****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Confess how you feel
and what your plans are
for the future. This is the
perfect time of year to
make long-term decisions
that can benefit you. Love
is in the stars, and plan-
ning a romantic evening
will pay off. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): A little effort will go a
long way if you fix up your
residence or do things that
make your family happy. A
strong, confident attitude
will win you the respect
required to take a step for-
ward, both personally and
professionally. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Changing location or get-
ting together with people


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

you don't see often will be'
enlightening. The ideas
that come to mind and the
plans you formulate with
someone you get a good
vibe from will be inspiring.
***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Short trips will help
you get a better idea of the
possibilities that exist You
can make significant head-
way regarding changes
you should make in the
near future. Networking
will pay off, but keep your
plans a secret. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Showing emotion and
letting others see where
you are coming from, what
you want out of life and
how you intend to move
forward will invite honest
opinions, as well as attract
the attention of someone
special. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't overload your
plate with responsibilities
that don't belong to you.
Discuss personal plans
with the one you love or
those you spend the most
time with and you will be
able to work toward a com-
mon goal. Relax and enjoy
peace and quiet *****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.


22-Dec. 21): Don't let your
emotions get the better
of you. Think matters
'"through'before you decide
to share your thoughts.
Not everyone will agree
with your plans, and some
may even try to stand in
your way. Take care of
your own interests first.
**
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): Your home is
your castle and it must be
protected. Take time to
reorganize and plan for
what needs to be done to
protect your assets, lessen
your financial load or make
your life easier emotion-
ally, physically and finan-
cially. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Make plans to
get out with someone you
enjoy spending time with.
Do what you can to add to
your looks and your mental
outlook. Love is in the stars,
and sharing your future
plans will lead to interesting
decisions. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Emotions will be diffi-'
cult to contain but will also
help you say what needs
to be said in order to clear
the air. Communication is
a must if you want to solve
problems, make the neces-
sary alterations and move
forward with your life.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: A equals B
"PECGD ZBG DEY TEBWHKGD T E B
ZWH DW. BEAGBY B G R TEBR'U VHDGU
ET RHUYHDXY H E D ZBG CF EVR-ZWG


PB H D LVG U."


- NZDG TEDRZ


Previous Solution: "Anyone who thinks I'm not scared out of my mind
whenever I do one of my stunts is crazier than I am." Jackie Chan
@2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-29


CLASSIC PEANUTS
I SHOULDN'T .
BE OUTEIDE I
.APL(WIN6 LIKE I I


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









Classified Department: 755-5440


BU-I


SELLii


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
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Legal

Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of BARN-
YARD JUNCTION at 7629 SW US
HWY 27., FORT WHITE, FL.,
32038
Contact Phone Number: 386-497-
1631 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: LAURA BLAKE
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ Laura Blake
Name: STUART STRICKLAND
Extent of Interest: 50%
by:/s/ Stuart Strickland
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me
this 23rd day of December, A.D.
2011.
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05529790
December 29, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
122009CA0004863XXXXXX
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS
TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI
TRUST SERIES 2005-FM1,
Plaintiff,
'vs.
ANNE T. SARGENT; et al,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order or Summary Final
Judgment of foreclosure dated No-
vember 3, 2009 and an Order. Reset-
ting Sale dated December 14, 2011,
and entered in Case No.
122009CA000483XXXXXX of the
Circuit Court of the Third Judicial
Circuit in and for Columbia County,
Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE MLMI TRUST' SERIES 2005-
FM1 is Plaintiff and ANNE T. SAR-
GENT; UNKNOWN TENANT NO.
1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2;
and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT TO, THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE
ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN
DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at on the Courthouse Steps of
the Columbia County Courthouse,
145 N. Hernando Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055 at Columbia County,
Florida, at,11;00 a,m. on the 18th
day of Jan ury,.2012, the following
described property as set forth in said
Order or Final Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF LOT 17,
LOCK 1, IDLEAWILE RE-PLAT,
ACCORDING TO PLAT ON FILE
ON THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK
OF THE CIRCUIT COURT ON
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 2,
PAGE 117-A, AND RUN WEST-
ERLY ALONG A PERPENDICU-
LAR TO GWEN LAKE BOULE-
VARD, SOUTH 100 FEET TO THE
WEST LINE OF SAID GWEN
LAKE BOULEVARD THENCE
SOUTH 3 DEGREES 55 MINUTES
EAST, ALONG THE WEST LINE
OF. SAID GWEN LAKE BOULE-
VARD, 166 FEET RUN THENCE
SOUTH 3 DEGREES 55 MINUTES
EAST, 104.3 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE TURN



-IEW



Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


Legal

AN ANGLE RIGHT 92 DEGREES
20 MINUTES AND RUN SOUTH
88 DEGREES 25 MINUTES WEST,
208.6 FEET; ,THENCE SOUTH 3
DEGREES 55 MINUTE., EAST,
PARALLEL WITH SAID BOULE-
VARD, 104.3 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 88 DEGREES 25 MI-
NUTES EAST, 208.6 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 3 DEGREES 55
MINUTES WEST, ALONG THE
WEST LINE OF GWEN LAKE
BOULEVARD, 104.3 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
In accordance with the Americans
Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should
contact the Clerk of the Court not
later than five business days prior to
the proceeding at the Columbia
County Courthouse. Telephone 904-
758-1041 or 1-800-955-8770 via
Florida Relay Service.
DATED at Lake City, Florida, on
November 18 ,2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
05529673
December 22, 29, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE.
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.: 12-2011-CA-000355
Division:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NATION-
AL ASSOCIATION, TRUSTEE
POOLING AND SERVICING
AGREEMENT DATED AS OF AU-.
GUST 1. 2006 SECURITIZED AS-
SET BACKED RECEIVABLES
LLC TRUST 2006-HE1 MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIF-
ICATES, SERIES 2006-HE1
Plaintiff,
v.
MELODY L. MAY A/K/A MELO--
DY LYNN MAY; RICHARD AR-
THUR DUBOIS; CITIFINANCIAL
EQUITY SERVICES, INC,; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTH-
ER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING AN INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT(S). WHO ARE NOT KNOW
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTH-
ER CLAIMRkNTS,
Defendants,
NOTICE OF ACTION
Melody L. May a/k/a Melody Lynn
May and Richard Arthur Dubois
Last Known Address: 222 North
West Kobie Way
Lake City, FL 32055
Current Address: Unknown
Previous Address: 136 SE Shallow
Creek Gin
Lake City, FL 32025 3206
ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING INTEREST BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST A NAMED DEFEND-
ANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN-
TEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTH-
ER CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida:
LOT 1 AND THE NORTH 1/2 OF
LOT 2 BLOCK 2, RUBY PARK
SUBDIVISION, SECTION 20,
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 17
EAST RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 112, IN THE
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT'S
OFFICE ON COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA .
This property is located at the Street
address of: 222 North West Kobie
Way, Lake City, FL 32055
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses on or before Janu-
ary 24, 2012 a date which is within
30 days after the first publication, if
any, on Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A.,


Legal

Plaintiff's attorney, whose address is
350 Jim Morgan Blvd., Suite 100,
Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442, and
file the original with this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's attorney,
or immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Com-
plaint or petition.
This Notice shall be published once a
week for two consecutive weeks in
The Lake City Reporter.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
the court on December 16, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
CLERK OF THE COURT
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Yashmin Chen-Alexis, Esquire
Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A.
350 Jim Morgan Blvd, Suite 100.
Deerfield Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954)354-3544
Facsimile: (954)354-3545
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, If you are a person with
a disability who needs any accom-
modation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Persons with a
disability who needs any accommo-
dation to participate should call the
ADA Coordinator, Jacqiietta Brad-
ley, P.O. Box 1569, Lake City, FL
32056, 386-719-7428, within two (2)
working days of your receipt of this
notice; if you are hearing impaired
call (800)955-8771; if you are a
voice impaired call (800)955-8770.
05529776
December 29, 2011
January 5, 2012
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVILACTION
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
CHASE MANHATTAN MORT-
GAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff,
vs.
SHELLY GABRIELLI A/K/A
SHELLY M. GABRIELLI, et al, De-
fendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated December 21,
2011 and entered in Case.No. 12-
2010-CA-000093 of the Circuit
Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit
in and for COLUMBIA County,
Florida wherein CHASE HOME FI-
NANCE LLC SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CHASE MANHAT-
TAN MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION, is the Plaintiff and SHELLY
GABRIELLI A/K/A SHELLY M.
GABRIELLI; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF SHELLY GABRIELLI
A/K/A SHELLY M. GABRIELLI
N/K/A JOSHUA GLASS; CITIFI-
NANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES,
INC. F/K/A COMMERCIAL
CREDIT CONSUMER SERVICES,
INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk
of the Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS OF THE COLUMBIA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE at
1:00AM, on the 25th day of Janu-
ary, 2012, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
LOT 7, SUZANNE SUBDIVISION,
UNIT 4, AS PER PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4,
PAGE 99, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
File NUMBER: F10005576
Serial: 18945391
DOC ID: M011010
a/k/a 175 SE MOSSEY COURT,
LAKE CITY, FL 32025
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this court on November 22, 2011.
P.Dewitt Cason
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: s-s B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL
Invoice To: Florida Default Law
Group, PL
P. 0. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
F10005576 CAHSEDIRECT-
CONV---Team 3
**See Americans with Disabilities
Act NOTICE
In accordance with the Americans


Legal

with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the Deputy Court Adminis-
trator whose office is located at 3301
East Tamiami Trail, Building L, Na-
ples, Florida 33962, telephone num-
ber (813) 774-8124; 1-800-955-8771
.(TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service, not later than
seven (7) days prior to this proceed-
ing.
05529679
December 22, 29, 2011

100 Job
100 Opportunities

BARTENDER NEEDED Must
have experience and be reliable.
Must have own phone and own
car. 386-752-2412
Help Wanted: Kitchen help, wait-
ers, waitresses. Experience prefer-
red. Apply at 7674 SW US Hwy
27 in Fort White. 386-497-1631
Local CPA Firm is looking for
an experienced tax return preparer.
Ideally, the candidate will be able
to prepare personal, corporate
and partnership returns.
The seasonal time frame is
February 1 through April 17.
Send reply to Box 05080, C/O
The Lake City Reporter, P.O.
Box 1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Lube Tech Wanted
Tools Required
Apply @ Rountree Moore Chevy
S4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, Fl. 32055
See: Jimbo Pegnetter in Service
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota,'Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lie, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com

120 Medical
Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
-(904)566-1328-


Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

170 Business
170 Opportunities
Sunoco gas station /Diesel Truck
Stop /Convienent Store for lease.
Call 813-495-8461 for more infor-
mation. Available Februaruy 1st.

240 Schools &
2 Education

05529830
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies'

Beautiful 8 mo. old kittens,velvet
soft white or white with a touch of
gray on head. One beautiful dark
long haired. Raised indoors, litter
trained, used to dogs. All shots in-
cluding rabies,also neutered
Sweet, playful and loving. Price
negotiable. Phone 386-961-8909


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 Garage Sales

ESTATE SALE Thurs.- Sat. 9-?
116 Polk Ave off Country Club.
100 Ceramic molds, kiln, 3 wheel
golf cart, tools, furn., lots of stuff.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
BEER MEISTER for sale.
$200 obo.
386-758-1991


PS 3 System with 9 games,
2 wireless control,
in original box. $280,
386-984-7510
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also heed ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call Saturday.
TRAILER 7'X18' Flat bed,
Tandem Axle trailer, 2 foot Dove
Tail, w/Aluminum tool box $1,700
Call 386-758-6800 or 752-4740

450 Good Things -
S to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pimemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville.
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver inder 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

63Of Mobile Homes
for Rent
3 BR/2 BA, excellent condition,
includes all appliances, garbage
pickup & water. No pets, off of
252/Pinemount, 386-752-5617."
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640\ Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896


-- -


confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


t










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Maintained, 10
ac. Master has a huge closet w/
walk in shower & garden tub.
MLS 79417 $94,900 Foreclosure
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivdrs Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Small mobile home
2/1 886sf on a wooded lot.
Paved road frontage.
MLS 79413 $17,900

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent







2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom '
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
.Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free :
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hIkup.
386-754-1800. www.mflapts.com
Winter Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint.'Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
X-CLEAN SECOND STORY 2/2
8 mi NW of VA. Private wooded
acre, deck, roomy. No dogs
$600 mo + dep 386.961.9181

072 Furnished Apts.
i Fo6r Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, inicrowave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
1BR COTTAGE 10 min. on
South 41 All utilities included. +
.Satellite. Yard, carport.
$650. mo. 386-758-2408
2br Apartment.
Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
'386-344-2170
2Br w/ Retreat & huge Family
Room. Porch, fenced,concrete
drive, carport. Turner Ave.
$800.mo Avail Jan. 386-256-6379
.3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/IBA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
Nice 3br/2ba brick Close in
$745.mo rent $550. sec.
Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$550 mo, and
$550 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
Office Rentals


05529789
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762


750 Business &
S Office Rentals
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale


3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with ,
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Nice 4/2, 1 ac.
Granite floors. Beautiful yard &
wrap around porch. MLS 77292
$139,900. Short Sale.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 4/2, 1 ac modular
home that is in immaculate cond.
1,344sqft. New carpet, roof, a/c,
fireplace. MLS 78833 $115,000.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Well maintained.
Tiled floors, living area, open kit.
Above ground pool, guest quarters
MLS 79149 $115,000. Short Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
ResultsRealty. Beautiful lot. on
the Suwannee. Well & aerobic
septic system. MLS 78842
$45,000 Owner Financing.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Home, over 2ac,
screened inground pool. Updated,
crown molding, new wood floors,
kit & paint. MLS 79378 $129,900


Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 1713 sf, great
area. Arched entryways, Ig living
room w/fireplace. French doors to
patio. MLS 79418 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers,
Co. 752-6575.4/2 Vintage home.
Updated electric & plumbing: New
carpet & CH/A. Hardwood floors.
MLS 79367 $99,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Well maintained
2/2. Wood laminate floors. Lg
living room & master suite. New
countertops. MLS 76928 $89,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Vintage 4/3 2626sf.
Hardwood floods, new wdws, fire-
place. Separate 494ft guest home,
double lot MLS 78000 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 1987 SF up-
graded w/wood laminate floors,
ceramic tile. 14x30 workshop, 10
xlO storage MLS79345 $199,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 2853SF walk-
ing to downtown, lakes, restau-
rants, Shands & VA. garage w/apt
above. MLS 79451 $140,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, open floor
plan, spacious master BR. Tile &
wood thru out. 1 yr. home
warranty MLS 78594 $169,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
* Co. 752-6575. Huge 4/3, 2826sf
on 5.22 ae! Flooring is tile lami-,
nate in most rooms & in immacu-
late cond. MLS 79584 $215,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
*Co. 752-6575. What a Creampuff!
Newer roof, 1 ac, paved road,
fenced, fireplace, very nice brick
home. MLS 79531 $65,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Brick .59 ac! 3/2,
2502sf. Lg master bath w/separate
.shower &'whirlpool. 2 car garage
& storage. MLS 76769 $210,000
Charming Older Home in town.
Over 1300 sq ft. with hardwood
floors. Shady comer lot.
Japet Creel. 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
Private Estate, city limits.
6br/3.5ba. 39.7 acres $994,000 or
$2,500 mo rent. Mary Brown
Whitehurst. 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2. New kitchen
counters & ceramic tile, open floor
plan. MLS# 77943 $94,500 Mary
Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 updated brick in town. New
roof, hardwoods. Glassed room
w/fantastic views. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS 78092 $249,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D. Super area,
nice back yard. Covered back
porch. New AC in 2010. Elaine K.
Tolar. 755-6488 MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Exceptional price! 3/2, 1582 sqft.
2 car garage, screened porch 1/2 ac
lot. Only $129,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 365-5678 MLS#79239
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent location! 3/2 home, large
master suite, 2 car garage.
$87,900. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 79458


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Woodcrest, 3/2 Brick w/split floor
plan. Nice lot. Fireplace, Ig porch,
vinyl wdws. MLS# 77708 Elaine
K. Tolar $169,900 755-6488
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac, 3/2, as is $95,000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/lst time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Newly Listed in Mayfair! Great
area close to shopping! 3/2 fresh
paint& pretty lot. Newer metal
roof & screen porch. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's &'3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
Sweeping Golf Course View!
Brick 3/2 w/screen porch. South-
ern Oaks Golf Course. 1980sf.
$164,900 #79585 Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


820 "Farms &
820| Acreage


4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com

Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
,386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
7 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

951 Recreational
^951 Vehicles
1993 JAYCO 5th wheel. 26 1/2
feet. Well kept. Everything works.
Owner is Non-smoker $3,000
386-755-0110


cii make snj' t)'
e smae $h

ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only

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we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
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* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



To et ou


Connected


Classified Department: 755-5440








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2011


PRO BOWL: Game mixes familiar faces with new names in annual meeting
Continued From Page 1B


Wilfork, defensive end
Andre Carter, Waters and
Logan Mankins. Special-
teamer Matthew Slater is
the other New England rep-
resentative. .
Linebacker Willis, defen-
sive end Justin Smith, cor-
nerback Carlos Rogers and
tackle Joe Staley will start
for the NFC from the 49ers
(12-3), who had only Smith
and Willis make the Pro
Bowl last year.
Green Bay's Rodgers is
the starting NFC quarter-
back, backed by record-set-
ting Drew Brees of New
Orleans (12-3).
"It does have special sig-
nificance, because when I
was voted in in 2009, I was
the third guy and I was
very thankful to be voted in,
and got the opportunity to
start because of some inju-
ries and guys not going,"
Rodgers said. "It's great to
be voted in as a starter, that
means a lot to me and it's a
special honor."
Four of the NFL's big-
gest headline makers this
season did not get voted
in by players, coaches and
fans: Lions defensive tackle
Ndamukong Suh, Steelers
linebacker James Harrison,
Panthers rookie quarter-
back Cam Newton, and
Denver quarterback Tim
Tebow.
Suh might have lost
support after drawing a
two-game suspension for
stomping an opponent, and
Harrison's one-game sus-
pension for his helmet-to-
helmet hit on Browns quar-
terback Colt McCoy might
have reduced his support.
Fifteenfirst-time Pro Bowl
selections made the NFC
squad, including Rogers,
Staley and safety Dashon
Goldson of the 49ers.-
Thirteen AFC players were
first-time selections, includ-
ing Gronkowski, Carter
and Slater of New England.
Carter is on injured reserve
(left quadriceps) and won't


.... I N ,,: I I
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In these 2011 file photos, New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady (left) and Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron
Rodgers look to pass during NFL football games. Brady and Rodgers were announced as Pro Bowl starters for the AFC and
the NFC, respectively. Brady is one of eight Patriots to make the Pro Bowl. Seven Packers were named to the team.


play.
"If you look around the
NFC, you see a.ton of amaz-
ing and talented players at
tight end," said the Saints'
Graham, the starter at the
position and a first-time
Pro Bowl player. "And to
be thought of in that com-
pany by my peers, the head
coaches and the fans who
follow the NFL is some-
thing I take seriously."
Fourteen teams from
each conference were rep-
resented, with St. Louis (2-
13) and Washington (5-10)
drawing blanks in the NFC,
Buffalo (6-9) and Tennessee
(8-7) shut out in the AFC.
Pittsburgh (114), New
Orleans and Chicago (7-8)
each had five representa-
tives.
Three rookies were cho-


sen: Denver linebacker Von
Miller, Cincinnati receiver
A.J. Green, and Arizona cor-
nerback Patrick Peterson,
selected as a kick return
specialist. He has tied an
NFL record with four punt
runbacks for TDs this sea-
son.
"As I've said before, A.J.
is the best first-round draft
pick that I've ever been
around," Bengalp coach
Marvin Lewis said. "He
has shown the other play-
ers in this league, and the
fans, that he deserved this
honor. I have not seen a
receiver better than he is at
getting to the ball."
NFC special-teamers
included two 49ers: Lee and
record-setting kicker David
Akers; Peterson; and Corey
Graham of Chicago.


For the AFC, the Raiders'
Sebastian Janikowski is the
kicker, Shane Lechler the
punter. The kick return
specialist is Pittsburgh WR
Antonio Brown, and the spe-
cial-teams player is Slater.
NFC starters will be,
Rodgers, Eagles run-
ning back LeSean McCoy,
Packers fullbackJohn Kuhn,
Graham, Panthers center
Ryan Kalil, Saints guards
Jahri Evans and Carl Nicks,
Eagles tackle Jason Peters
and Staley, Cardinals wide
receiver Larry Fitzgerald
and Lions wide receiver
Calvin Johnson on offense.
"I think it's the fact that
I'm versatile at fullback,"
Kuhn said when asked why,
he was selected. "I can play
the traditional fullback role
and lead block, and the


coaches also entrust the
ball-carrying opportunities
that I have. I think the com-
bination of the two of those
really gets my name out
there."
On defense, it will be
Vikings end Jared Allen and
Eagles end Jason Babin,
Cowboys tackle Jay Ratliff
and Smith, Packers outside
linebacker Clay Matthews
and Cowboys outside line-
backer DeMarcus Ware,
inside linebacker Willis,
Packers cornerback
Charles Woodson and
Rogers, Seahawks safety
Earl Thomas and Cardinals
safety Adrian. Wilson.
AFC starters will be
Brady, Ravens running
back Ray Rice and fullback
Vonta Leach, Gronkowski,
Steelers center Maurkice


Pouncey, Mankins and
Waters at guard, Browns
tackles Joe Thomas and
Dolphins tackle Jake Long,
Welker and Steelers wide
receiver Mike Wallace.
On defense, it will be
Broncos end Elvis Dumervil
replacing Carter, Colts end
Dwight Freeney, Wilfork
and Ravens tackle Haloti
Ngata, Miller and Ravens
outside linebacker Terrell
Suggs, Lewis, Jets corner-
back Darrelle Revis and
Broncos cornerbackChamp
Bailey, Steelers safety Troy
Polamalu and Reed.
"What makes it special
to me now is I'm in my
13th year, and you don't see
guys going to the Pro Bowl
this late in their career,"
Bailey said. "For me to be
able to do it, it feels good,
and it feels like I've got a lot
more left. It feels good that
I'm still playing at a high
level."

Long out
DAVIE Miami
Dolphins left tackle Jake
Long has been placed on
injured reserve with a right
arm injury, meaning he'll
miss the team's final game
Sunday against the New
York Jets.
The move Wednesday
came one day after Long
was chosen a Pro Bowl
starter for the third con-
secutive year. He endured
an injury-plagued season,
including a back ailment
that forced him to miss two
games after he started the
first 61 games of his career.
Long suffered the arm
injury in ..the first quarter
of Saturday's loss at New
England.
To fill Long's spot on the
roster, the Dolphins signed
running back Richard Medlin
from the practice squad. He
signed with New England as
a rookie free agent in August
and was released at the end
of training camp.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420