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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01730
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 23, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01730
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






000015 120312 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Friday, December 2., ZU I I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 277 E 75 cents


Parents seek Purple Heart



for son who fell in Kosovo


Died performing
'selfless act' under
sniper fire in 1999.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. comr
p fc. Ben McGill
died Aug. 1,
1999 trying to
save fellow sol-
diers who were
under fire by a sniper in
Kosovo.
When they raised the
communications antenna
on the armored personnel
carrier to call for support,
McGill noticed the antenna
was about to touch a high-
voltage power line.
He was electrocuted
trying to pull the antenna
down before it touched the
power line and died despite
emergency medical treat-
ment.
It's possible McGill, 20,
believed the power lines
would short out the elec-
tronics and communica-
tions equipment. It's also
possible he believed the
electric current could harm
his fellow troops.
Regardless of his moti-
vation, those who served
with McGill believe his
actions were selfless and
heroic.
He was given the
Soldier's Medal posthu-
mously and his family
received all the obligatory
letters of sympathy and
thanks for his service.

MEDAL continued on 3A


Jingle Bell
Rock in
Lake City

Children pick out
toys during the
Jingle Bell Rock
Christmas Party
sponsored by the
Christian Service
Center Saturday
at the fairgrounds.
So many toys were
donated that each
child was able to
bring home several.
See more photos,
Page 6A.


ABOVE: Fort White residents Fred and Edie McGill
display a flag, ribbons and a portrait of their son,
U.S. Army Pvt. Benjamin McGill, who served as a
machine gunner and was killed during a mission in
Kosovo in 1999. LEFT: Fred McGill displays an Army
Commendation medal, an Army Achievement medal
and a medal for serving in Kosovo. Benjamin McGill
was electrocuted after attempting to pull down an
antenna attached to a Fighting Bradley transport vehicle
that came into contact with a power line after McGill's
unit was attacked by a sniper.


STATE NEWS


It's 'don't ask, don't tell' on redistricting


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Many lawmakers and
other key players in Florida's process for draw-
ing new congressional and legislative districts
have adopted their own don't ask, don't tell
policies.
That includes Senate Reapportionment
Committee Chairman Don Gaetz.
The Niceville Republican insists he doesn't
know, nor does he want to know, how the maps
proposed by- his panel will affect incumbent
members of Congress and the Legislature.
"If you were to pump me full of truth serum


1 ~ ~o 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


I could not tell you where incumbents or chal-
lengers live unless I happened to have already
known," Gaetz said.
The same goes for whether the proposed
maps will help or harm Republicans or
Democrats.
Gaetz doesn't want to know that informa-
tion because of a pair of anti-gerrymander-
ing amendments voters put into the Florida
Constitution in 2010, one each for congressio-
nal and legislative districts. Both ban drawing
lines with the intent to benefit incumbents or
political parties.
For the first time lawmakers will have
detailed guidelines they must follow when


75
Showers


WEATHER, 2A


Opinion
',Obituaries .
SAdvice & Comics.
Puzzles .. .


redrawing district lines after every 10-year
census.
Redistricting will be one of the major issues
- for some lawmakers it'll be the major issue
- the Republican-controlled Legislature will
face when it convenes its annual 60-day ses-
sion on Jan. 10. The Legislature must draw
120 House districts, 40 Senate districts and 27
congressional districts.
The session is starting two months earlier
than usual to make sure the plans are passed
and reviewed by the courts and U.S. Justice
Department in time for the 2012 elections.
LAWMAKERS continued on 3A

42A
. TODAY II
S.A PEOPLE
48 'K'.,d Iettenn
2 n. Jim -,r


Live Oak

woman

faces sex

charges

Molested boy, 15,
on two occasions,
say authorities.

From staff reports
LIVE OAK A Suwannee
County woman was arrest-
ed Wednesday .on charges
of molest-
ing a 15-
year-old
boy.
Jennifer
Denise
Markham,
33, and
the boy Markham
engaged in sexual activ-
ity twice with his consent
in August or Septeinber,
according to Suwannee
County Sheriff's Office
reports.
The boy told police he
tested positive for her-
pes and could have only
acquired it from Markham.
The boy's cousin wit-
nessed the molestation
when the cousin walked in
on Markham and the boy in
a bedroom, reports said.
Markham, 12271 177th
Road, was charged with
two counts of lewd and
lascivious battery and two
counts of lewd and las-
civious molestation. She is
being held in the Suwannee
County Jail.


POLICE

Brooksville

man jailed

following

drug arrest

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Brooksville man, travel-
ing as a passenger in a vehi-
cle involved in a traffic stop,
was arrest-
ed after
authorities
found pre-
scription
narcotics
belonging
to someone
else as well Rhoads
as drug
paraphernalia.
Thomas Shelton Rhoads,
42, 22400 Chisholm Road,
Brooksville, was charged
with possession of a con-
trolled substance, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia
and possession of a pre-
scription drug with out
a prescription. He was
booked into the Columbia
County Detention Center
on $7,000 bond.
According to Lake
City Police Department
reports, around 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday, police officer
Kevin Johns conducted a
traffic stop on a silver, four-
door Jeep, which he saw
travel past a stop bar at the
intersection of Northwest
Jefferson and Northwest
Virginia Street.
Johns reported noticing
an open 12-pack of beer on
the passenger side floor
board and once backup
officers arrived, he asked
Rhoads to get out the truck
so he could speak to him.
As Rhoads was exiting the
DRUGS continued on 3A


~iI


COMING
SATURDAY
Loc.I nr-..'
r'. i- i,'r U ',


I


7"








LAKE CITY REPORTER


DAILY BRIEFING


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


FLORIDA0
U Wednesday:
"- 3-10-24-25-49-52
x4


CAH 3. Thursday:
Afternoon: 1-8-2


Y' .- Thursday:
Afternoon: 6-7-2-7


Wednesday:
1-3-7-20-29


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Letterman: Odd holiday traditions


NEW YORK

think holiday traditions
and mistletoe, eggnog
and caroling come to
mind. David Letterman's
Christmas includes target
practice at a giant meatball, the Lone
Ranger and singer Darlene Love.
Each has become part of CBS "Late
Show" lore through the years, their
appearances anticipated by fans like
wrapped presents under a tree. The
traditions return Friday.
Comic Jay Thomas will be back to
try to knock a meatball off the top of
a Christmas tree with a football and
recount his Lone Ranger anecdote
again. Love will sing "Christmas (Baby
Please Come Home)" as fake snow
flutters to the stage.
"The best traditions are the ones
you can't plan," said Rob Burnett,
executive producer of "Late Show."
"These happened very organically
on our show and it is very silly and
'very goofy. It makes sense with the
sensibility of the 'Late Show' to be part
of our tradition."
Letterman's on-set Christmas tree
- is frequently decorated with oddities,
such as the meatball on top instead of
a star, angel or bow.
It all started one night back in 1998
when New York Jets quarterback
Vinny Testaverde was a guest He and
Letterman picked up footballs and
began tossing them at the tree, aiming
for the meatball. Watching their fail-
ures impatiently from the wings was
Thomas, former quarterback at tiny
Central Piedmont Community College
in Charlotte, N.C.
Thomas had discussed trying the
target practice with Letterman before
the show, but no one told that to stage
manager Biff Henderson. He blocked
Thomas from going out onstage.
"I fake to the right and Biff goes to
catch me and I run around him like a


In this photo released by CBS, host David Letterman, right, and comic Jay Thomas
get ready to throw footballs at the Late Show Christmas tree during the annual
Late Show Holiday Quarterback Challenge.


scramble," said Thomas, who picked
up a football and threw with laserlike
accuracy at the meatball, accomplish-
ing in one throw what the NFL quar-
terback couldn't in several.
Testaverde has been forgotten, but
Thomas is invited back each year to
see if he can repeat his feat
Around the same time Thomas
isn't sure exactly when Letterman
heard about a story Thomas told of his
time as a radio DJ in the South when
he and a friend had to give a ride to
Clayton Moore, star of television's
"Lone Ranger." We won't be spoilers;
Letterman has called it the "best story
I've ever heard."
The story, too, is repeated each
year. Thomas said he and Letterman
have never discussed why it has .
become a tradition. It just has.
"It is the craziest thing I have ever
been a part of," he said.
Thomas practices before each


appearance, taking a football into
Central Park and aiming at a particular
tree branch.
Two years ago Letterman knocked
off the meatball with his own throw
before Thomas even came out
onstage, leaving the comic whose
acting career has cooled to moan in
fake distress: "This is all I have!"
Last year Thomas needed a corti-
sone shot to make the show after he
had injured his shoulder throwing a
golf ball. 'They're shooting me up like.
a racehorse to make $760 and hit a
friggin' meatball," he said.
He's heard from plenty of people
who look forward to his annual
appearance, including a well-known
Hollywood movie director. The power
player, who Thomas wouldn't name,
confessed that he's-bipolar and often
plays a recording of the holiday show
when he's glum.
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Football Hall of Famer
Paul Hornung is 76.
Actor-comedian Harry


Shearer is 68.
Actress Susan Lucci
is 65.


Daily Scripture
And there were shepherds liv-
ing out in the fields nearby,
keeping watch over their flocks
at night. An angel of the Lord
appeared to them, and the glory
of the Lord shone around them,
and they were terrified. But the
angel said to them, "Do not be
afraid. I bring you good news
that will cause great joy for all
the people. Today in the town
of David a Savior has been born
to you; he is the Messiah, the
Lord."
-Luke 2:8-11


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number..:............752-9400
Circulation ................755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through-Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member ,Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wllson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .............. ..... $26.32
24 Weeks....................$48.79
52 Weeks................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.............. $41.40
24 Weeks.......... .....$82.80
52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
.space. And thanks for reading.


Meter reader
sues Anthony
ORLANDO -The
meter reader who discov-
ered .the remains of Casey
Anthony's young daughter'
in 2008 is suing her for
defamation.
Roy Kronk's suit was
filed Wednesday. His
attorney says Anthony's
defense team made mul-
tiple false statements,.
including that Kronk killed
2-year-old Caylee, that
he was a child snatcher
and that he moved the
remains.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports that Anthony ini-
tially reported her daugh-
ter had been abducted, but
her attorney, Jose Baez,
said during the criminal
trial that Anthony knew
her daughter had drowned
in the family pool.
Anthony already faces
lawsuits from Texas.
EquuSearch and Zenaida
Gonzalez, whose name
Anthony initially gave
authorities as a possible
abductor.
Anthony was acquit-
ted of killing Caylee and
released from jail in July.
A message left for
-.Baez wasn't immediately
"returned.

Video games won't
boost intellect
TALLAHASSEE -
Those action-packed
video games under many
Christmas trees on Sunday
morning may be loads of
fun, but don't expect them
"to improve kids' grades,
concentration, driving
skills or other cognitive
abilities, one group of psy-
chologists says.
Some researchers also
say they've found video
games such as current
top-seller "Call of Duty:
.Modern Warfare 3" won't
damage players' brains
or cause them to do real
violence.


Those relatively recent
findings conflict with other
studies on both the posi-
tive and negative potential
of gaming, but one thing
experts on all sides tend
to agree about is that
the debate and their
research is far from
over.
"Play these games
because they are fun and
you enjoy doing them, and
let's kind of wait for more
research to suggest wheth-
er or not they are actually
good for us," said Florida
State University psycholo-
gist Walter Boot.
Boot and two colleagues
say they have turned up
flaws in various studies
ascribing cognitive bene-
fits to playing video games
and that they they've been
unable to replicate the '
results. Boot, Florida State
doctoral student Daniel
Blakely and University of
Illinois researcher Daniel
Simons wrote about
their findings in a paper
published in the journal
Frontiers in Psychology
three months ago.
It "happens to be a
rather direct attack about
our work," University of
Rochester researcher
Daphne Bavelier wrote in
an email Thursday from
France where she is on
sabbatical.
Bavelier defended stud-
ies she and other scientists
have conducted that show
a causal link between
video game playing and
enhanced abilities.

Foster children
visit family
MIAMI For sev-
eral years, Department
of Children and Families
Secretary David Wilkins
and his wife "adopted" two
foster girls just for the hol-
iday season. If the Wilkins
went to Kentucky to visit -
extended family, the girls
went' with them. The girls
were included in shopping


trips, Christmas baking
and other traditions along
with the couple's three
biological daughters.
"They. were really part
of our family. They just
blended in with aunts,
uncles, cousins... and our
family was really thrilled
. to have them," said Tanya
Wilkins, who is still close
with the now grown girls.
The couple recently
shared their story in a
push to make sure foster
children will be sur-
rounded by familiar faces
during the holidays and
whenever possible be with
a relative or family friend.
Roughly 1,110 foster
children will visit rela-
tives or family friends in
Florida or in another state.
The travel arrangements
required intense coordi-
nation between judges,
.caseworkers and foster
families for court orders,
expedited background
and travel approval, DCF
officials said. The state's
private contractors often
pick up the tab for travel
expenses.

Inmate takes plea
in 1991 slaying
PUNTA GORDA A
man who is serving time
for murder will plead guilty
to six additional slaying.
According to the
Sarasota Herald-Tribune
reports, Jeremy Sly told
a Charlotte County court
on Wednesday that he will
plead guilty.
Prosecutors agree not to
seek the death penalty. Sly
will receive consecutive
life sentences.
The 41-year-old Sly is
serving a life sentence in
state prison for a different '
murder. The new charges
stem from the slaying of
a retired couple in Port
Charlotte and a North Port
family with children on the
same night in 1991.

(AP)


THE WEATHER.


f'%'SHOWERS PARTLY:
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*Vost City
71. 50 Jacksonville Cape Canav
Tallahassee Lake 1 76 Daytona Be
71 51 D, t,-, Ft. Lauderd.
SPensacola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
. 6645 PanamaCity 900 Galnesvllle
69.52 Ocala Jacksonville
79 57 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
I 1 61 b 9 63 t r Miami
Tampa Naples
0;* J 6 West Palm Beach Ocala
81 67 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama Cit
FL Myers 8- 7 Pensacola
83 63 Naples Tallahassee
81 .1 Miami Tampa
,, S2 T70 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Be
a o. .


TEMPERATURES
H.gh TrursaOy
LC%. Thrur,-3da
Normal ngh
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


81

6 7
43
82 in 1998
22 in 1901


0.00"
0.36"
33.25"
1.72"
47.52"


Surins.e tom3
Suncr,- e i.. ,
Sunni-e tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7-23 a.m.
5 3 p n- ,
7.24 a.m
5:36 p.m.


6:11 a.m.
4:44 p.m.
7:11 a.m.
5:48 p.m.


O03
Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan.
24 1 9 16
New First Full Last


7a lp 7p 1l 6ai On this date in


Friday Saturday


. Forecastied temperature


1983, bitter cold
continued over the
nation's midsection.
The temperature
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degrees below zero
at Williston, N.D., to
equal their all-time
record.


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Saturday
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An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weathercom


A-V & Forecasts, data and
y graphics 2011 Weather
m'1, yf V Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


MEDAL: Fort White parents seek Purple Heart for son who died in Kosovo
Continued From Page 1A


But his family believes the govern-
ment owes a final debt to their son a
Purple Heart.
Fred McGill, of Fort White, has sent
a letter to U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla.,
asking him to use his influence to have
the medal awarded to his son.
"It was a selfless act to save his battle
buddies," McGill wrote in the letter he
e-mailed to Nelson's office on Monday.
"He is a 20-year-old hero from the state
of Florida."
McGill said he hasn't gotten a
response yet, and may not get one until
after the holiday season. But he hopes
the senator considers the request.
"It would give us closure," McGill
said. "He saved lives by giving his life
and he knew that"
McGill said his son and four other
American soldiers who died in Kosovo
were never considered for the Purple,
Heart because it was considered a
peace-keeping mission. I
"They said it was an accident," he
said. "It was just one of those unfortu-


nate situations."
McGill said his son's former team
leader in Kosovo contacted him
recently. The former team leader
said he believes McGill is now eli-
gible for the Purple Heart because
the Department of Defense recently
changed the status of the Kosovo
peacekeeping mission.
The team leader told McGill that
soldiers who served in Kosovo are now
being considered combat veterans.
McGill said the new designation is what
makes him believe his son is now eli-
gible for the award.
His son served in a "Quick Reaction
Team" that responded to any reports
of fighting in the area. In a letter writ-
ten to his parents shortly before his
death, Ben McGill described the dan-
ger he and fellow soldiers faced every
day.
"Anytime shots are fired, we have to
go," he wrote. '"There have been snipers
trying to take shots at us, but I've been
inside a building, luckily, everytime


that's happened."
Fred McGill said it's clear his son's
unit risked their lives serving in Kosovo
and they deserve proper credit for their
service.
"These were combat situations," he
said.
Edie McGill agreed with her husband
that a Purple Heart for their son would
mean a lot to family members.
"We consider him to be a hero,' she
said. "My son wanted to make the mili-
tary part of his life. He wanted to make
it a career. He knew it was his calling."
She said her husband struggled with
grief and depression after their son's
death. VA counseling and his faith in
God helped her husband deal with the
loss, but a Purple Heart would help him
and family members know Ben McGill's
sacrifice was recognized by the govern-
ment and military.
"It would help with the closure," she
said. "At the time, we went through a
lot of emotions. You're not supposed to
bury your children.":


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Edie McGill hugs the family cat, Angel, that was
born on Aug. 1, 1999, the same date that her son
Benjamin was killed.


LAWMAKERS: Have adopted 'don't ask, don't tell' policy on redistricting
Continued From Page 1A


Besides the incumbent
and political party provi-
sions, the amendments
prohibit "the intent or
result" of denying racial
or language minorities the
opportunity to participate
in the political process or
"diminish their ability to
elect representatives of


their choice."
A second tier of standards
says districts should be com-
pact and "where feasible,
utilize existing political and
geographical boundaries."
-Most analyses of the
proposals that have been
released so far contend
that they'll give Democrats
*


Rotary toy donation


TODD WILSONILake City Reporter
Lake City Rotarians George Brannon (left) and Tom Brown
display some of the toys collected Thursday by the Lake
City Rotary Club to be donated to the Lake City Elks Lodge
Christmas Toy Drive. The Elks Lodge will pass out the toys
to underprivileged children in Lake City on Christmas Eve.


a chance to cut into the
GOP's huge majorities in
the Legislature and con-
gressional delegation but
not gain the upper hand.
There are more regis-
tered Democrats than
Republicans in Florida,
but the GOP has majori-
ties of 28-12 in the Senate
and 81-39 in the House.
Republicans. also outnum-
ber Democrats 19-6 in the
congressional delegation.
Florida is gaining two more
congressional seats next
year due to an 18 percent
population increase.
'These maps certainly
are an improvement off of
10 years ago," said Florida
Democratic Party executive
director Scott Arceneaux.
"You really can't get maps
that are worse than what
we're living under right
now."
But no matter how
they are drawn, there is a
good chance someone will
challenge them in court
and lawmakers are well
aware that anything they
say that indicates intent
contrary to the amend-
ments' instructions may
be used against the redis-
tricting plans. Some crit-
ics already say various
proposals drafted so far
by House and Senate com-
mittees would violate the
amendments.
"You do get a sense
that a lot. of legislators
have been told not to say
how they really feel," said
Democratic former Sen.
Dan Gelber, a Miami Beach
lawyer representing the
Fair Districts Florida coali-
tion that sponsored the
amendments. "It's a new
age in a sense.... I think the
Legislature is trying to feel
its way around."


That wasn't necessary 10
years ago when Democrats
challenged the I current
redistricting plans drawn
up by the Legislature,
which then also had GOP
majorities in both houses.
The legislative maps,
but not the congressional
plan, automatically go to
the Florida Supreme Court
to make sure they com-
ply with the state consti-
tution. Gov. Rick Scott, a
Republican, has veto power
over the congressional
map but not the legislative
plans.
All maps also must be
reviewed by the Justice
Department to make sure
they comply with the federal
Voting Rights Act because


of past racial discrimina-
tion in five of Florida's 67
counties.
Until the Fair. District
amendments were passed
the Florida Constitution
required little more than
the districts be- contiguous
and adhere to the one-per-
son, one-vote concept
Based on that limited
criteria, the Supreme
Court upheld the House
and Senate maps drawn in
2002. The justices rejected
Democratic complaints that
the districts were obviously
gerrymandered to benefit
Republicans.
A panel of three federal
judges, though, in 2002
ordered lawmakers to
redraw the Florida House


map because it reduced the
number of Hispanic voters
in a South Florida district.
That revision also required
changes to two neighbor-
ing districts.
It's not only majority
Republicans who are watch-
ing their tongues, acknowl-
edged House Democratic
Leader Ron Saunders of
Key West. .
"We've asked our mem-
bers, for example, in the
redistricting meetings to
not offer a lot of off-the-
cuff comments because
it'll look different in a
deposition or videotape,
and we don't necessar-
ily, want to be laying the
groundwork for the other
side,"' Saunders said.


'Giving Tree' at Publix


DRUGS: Brooksville man arrested
Continued From Page lA


officer reported seeing sev-
eral open beer cans lying
on the passenger side floor-
board.
Rhoads told Johns he was
attempting to find his work
truck which was "some-
where" in the area being
driven by an unknown
man.
The vehicle's driver
consented to a vehicle
search and Johns report-
edly found a cigarette
box in the passenger
door that contained sev-
eral loose pills, later
identified as Paxil and
Klonopin (a schedule IV
narcotic).





o I

Resauan


The driver and Rhoads
were then handcuffed and
read their Miranda rights,
but Rhoads said the pills
belonged to him and said
he took the pills from the
driver.
As officers continued
the search, a glass pipe
was found in Rhoads' trav-
el bag. Johns explained to
Rhoads that being arrested
and asked Rhoads whether
he had any other illegal
items.
Rhoads told the officer
he had something in his
boot and after removing
Rhoads' boot, the Johns
reportedly found a second


glass pipe.
Rhoads was placed in
the back of the patrol car
.and taken to jail without
incident.



Hang.On
a minute .- ; 1

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copy of the.
Lake City Reporter
when they drop off&
pickup their cleaning
1hi "I sl t~e |ae


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City Publix employees and customers provided gifts for children served by three local
community agencies. Publix coordinated the effort through the United Way of Siwannee
Valley to identify children served by Another Way, Children's Home Society and.Guardian
ad Litem and to provide Christmas gifts for the children identified by the agencies. Pictured
with the Publix 'Giving Tree' are Sarah Fulkner; Sha Musgrove; Larry Rossignol, store man-
ager; and Erica Harriss.




SOT*'

INTERALMDCN
is plesedto.anouce -e.aditin o
Loi eoeMN RP N-
toou ratie


Accepting New Patients
Specializing in adult medical care including:
* Primary Care Arthritis
* High Blood Pressure Low Back Problems
* Heart Disease Full Dizziness,
* Lung Disease vertigo and balance
* Gastrointestinal diagnosis and
* High Cholesterol treatment
* Diabetes Optifast Weight
* Women's Health Loss System
Medicare, Blue Cross and most insurance
plans accepted, worker compensation


LoctedintheLae Cty MedilexBuidin
40g alo aeDie aeCtF

_____________386-719______-2540


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428
















Friday, December 23, 201 I


ONE


ONE
OPINION



Of God


and


grinches


A long with the
Christmas season
comes the annual
uprising of athe-
istic Grinches
determined to spoil it. They
might get some satisfaction
out of wrecking a few nativity
scenes, but their long-range
goal of expunging religion from
American society isn't going to
happen: The search for God is
innate.
Early in December, the
Freedom from Religion
Foundation targeted a religious
display on the courthouse
lawn in Henderson County,
Texas. The Wisconsin-based
atheist organization stated
that the display violated the
U.S. Constitution and should
be removed. County Judge
Richard Sanders and a major-
ity of county commissioners
pushed back and refused.
Some scientists contend the
faith-oriented aspect of human
nature is encoded in our DNA.
Geneticist Dean Hamer of the
U.S. National Cancer Institute
made that argument in a book
in 2005 titled "The God Gene:
How Faith is Hardwired into
our Genes." He hypothesized
that a certain gene labeled
VMAT2 is responsible for the
human urge to have spiritual or
mystical experiences. Believers
have used that scientific theory
to conclude that the presence
of a God gene is proof that
God exists, a proposition hotly
disputed by nonbelievers.
Nevertheless, the ongoing
argument simply bolsters the
observation that the search for
an answer to "the God ques-
tion" is ever present in the
human consciousness.
Try as they may, atheists in
communities across America
won't succeed in deploying
their obsession with deny-
ing God to shatter the innate
faith of their fellow country-
men. Rather than'giving them
the satisfaction of playing the
Grinch and spoiling the spirit of
the season, it's better to simply
wish them a Merry Christmas
and blessed New Year.

* Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission wiU be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brarinon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two.
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


OPINION


www.lakecityreporter.com 4A


ANOTHER
VIEW



'My Tim


Tebow


Problem'



was Tim Tebow,
there was George '
Washington. It is
well documented
that the act of Te-bowing (i.e.,
kneeling in prayer) was done
by our nation's first president.
Painter Arnold Friberg's
"Prayer at Valley Forge"
immortalized Gen. Washington
in the snow-covered woods,
bent down on one knee and
praying for God's assistance.
In the grim days of America's'
War for Independence, with
weary soldiers up against
long odds, the nation needed
a come-from-behind fourth-
quarter victory. Time and.time
again when it really mattered
- Washington (who did have
his defeats) came through in
the clutch.
Most Americans are
familiar with Emanuel
Gottlieb Leutze'spainting
of Washington crossing the
Delaware. Less known today.
is the spiritual backdrop
to the story, mostly due to
politically correct public
schools' animus toward
religion. On Dec. 25, 1776
- the day Christians cel-
ebrate the birth of Christ
- Gen. Washington set in
motion a surprise attack
that would help give birth
to our great nation. The
battle of Trenton began
the day after Christmas. It
followed a string of losses
for the Continental Army,
and Washington's victory
over the. Hessian soldiers
'stationed there came at
precisely the right moment.
At the time, and by millions,
to this day, it was seen as
divine intervention that an
event so central to the birth,
of this nation was tied to the
birth of Jesus.
Like Washington, Mr. Tebow.-
is a "general" who isn't sup-
posed to win. Like Washington,,
Mr. Tebow is an optimist
who fuses a fierce drive to
succeed with unconventional
tactics to secure victory. He
motivates his "troops" with
unwavering faith in the ability
to. overcome obstacles. And
like Washington, Mr. Tebow is
humble, fortified by belief in a :
power much higher than him-
self. The football star might
only be an athlete, but he's
a warrior in the fight against
rabid secularization in society.
Today, however, there are'
Americans who mercilessly
mock and fear champions of
faith in the public sphere.
"My Tim Tebow Problem,"
an article in Jewish Week
Online by Rabbi Joshua
Hammerman (conveniently
pulled down after it caused an
uproar), encapsulates that hos-
tility. "If Tebow wins the Super
Bowl, against all odds, it will
buoy his faithful, and embold-
ened faithful can do insane
things, like burning mosques,
bashing gays and indiscrimi-
nately banishing immigrants,"
he ridiculously claimed. "While
America has become more
inclusive since Jerry Falwell's .
first political forays, a Tebow
triumph could set those efforts
back considerably."
Despite the erosion of
our freedoms, America is
still the last great beacon
of liberty for mankind. This
Christmas, it's appropriate to
say a prayer of thanks that
Washington was in charge of
war efforts when our inde-
pendence was on the line,
and then we can thank God
that we still live in a country K


where Mr. Tebow and Mr.
Hammerman can both prac-
tice their religions freely.
N Washington Times


Had Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio,
slammed himself
over the head with
a frying pan on
the House floor, he would have
done more for the Republican
cause than what transpired
Tuesday. The convoluted GOP
response to the Senate's pay-
roll-tax-cut extension hands
Democrats a truckload of
skillets with which to smack
Republicans until November
2012.
The good news is that two
words can rescue Republicans
from this fine mess.
Boehner fundamentally is
correct: While a one-year tax
cut provides limited relief,
the Senate's two-month tax
cut is beyond silly. It merely
schedules yet another tire-
some House-Senate showdown.
ZZZZZzzzz.
But Boehner's ham-handed
response is potentially cata-
strophic for GOP electoral pros-
pects.
As I advised Monday on
NationalReview.com, Boehner
should have deleted the Senate
bill's end date, "February 29,"
2012, and inserted "December
31." Period. Otherwise, it
should have remained intact.
This simple amendment
would have forced President
Barack Obama to credit
Republicans for giving him what
he wanted. "It would be inexcus-
able for Congress not to further
extend this middle-class tax cut
for the rest of the year" 2012,
Obama said Dec. 17. If Senate
Democratic leader Harry Reid
and his colleagues then defied
Obama and let a middle-class
tax cut languish, that would be
their hole to dig. I
This two-word amendment
would shield Republicans
from the "do-nothing" label
that Obama hopes will stick.
If Senate Democrats did noth-


J ust think, folks. I
couple of weeks:
will be just anoth
Midwestern state
the central focus
arre world of politics.
As the rest of us try to
blot out the zany world ot
Washington and the cree
ness of the presidential r,
immersing ourselves in h
spirit, the people of Iowa
to decide what they're go
to do on Jan. 3 when they
tell their friends and neig
bors whom they prefer. P
Gingrich? Romney? Santo
Bachmann? Huntsman? F
None of the above?
For a nation with 312 r
people, isn't it strange thz
thousand people getting
er in living rooms, school
and church basements in


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmail.com
ing, this would expose them as
the obstructionists who have
scuttled or ignored at least 15
GOP House initiatives to ener-
gize the economy and encour-
age job creation. Making the
Senate bill a one-year measure
also would preserve language to
compel Obama to decide on the
Keystone XL Pipeline within 60
days and, thus, choose between
unionists (who favor the pipe-
line) or environmentalists (who
hate it).
Rather than accomplish these
objectives with a two-word
amendment, however, Boehner
has created a migraine that
could become a malignancy.
. Boehner led the GOP House
into a scheme whereby they'dis-
patched Republicans to a confer-
ence committee to negotiate a
better deal with senators. One
problem: Harry Reid refuses to
name any Senate negotiators.
Even if Reid cooperated, Senate
Democrats would battle to
resurrect a tax on millionaires,
delete the Keystone provision
and promote other liberal priori-
ties.
* Democrats and their media
allies now will hammer
Republicans for a "middle-class
tax increase." Some 160 million
Americans will see their taxes
rise by $1,000 on Jan. 1. Having
squandered its budget-cutting
qualifications during the fiscally
un-toilet-trained Bush-Rove
administration, the GOP now
will watch its tax-cutting creden-
tials get shredded. Even worse,
Democrats will argue that
Republicans spent December


le?
media hoopla that sur-
the Iowa caucuses and
w Hampshire primary
ordinary. No political
r ignores them. And yet,
)ve little. For example,
uckabee won Iowa four
go, and Hillary Clinton
w Hampshire.
13 GOP debates this
e field is still in flux.
ooks as if libertarian
il may edge out Newt
h and Mitt Romney
But of one thing you
sure Paul will not be
inee of the Republican
August in Tampa, Fla.

)s Howard columnist
Featters has covered
e House and national
since 1986.


New Hampshire

n a 75 peop
Iowa The n
.er cold rounds
e, not ., the New
of the ,s is extra
1 V reporter
*7 they pro
f Mike Ht
pi- Ann McFeatters years ag
ace by amcfeatters@notionalpress.com won Ne
holiday After
have of our smaller states will decide year, th
ing the "frontrunner" in the GOP It now 1
I race by electing delegates to 99 Ron Pau
county conventions, not even 1 Gingric
haul? percent of the nation's delegates in Iowa.
orum? to the GOP nominating conven- can be s
Perry? tion? the no
Isn't it weird that then every- Party in
million body in the political world runs
at a few to New Hampshire, anotherScrip
togeth- one of our smaller states, to Ann Scripc
4 gyms see what happens in midnight the Whit
one voting in Dixville Notch, an politics s
unincorporated village of about


2010 extending the 2001 and
2003 tax cuts "for the rich," and
then devoted December 2011 to
sinking a tax cut for the middle
class.
Some 2.5 million unemployed
Americans.will see their ben-
efits lapse on Jan. 1. On New
Year's Day, doctors will suffer
a 27 percent reduction in pay-
ments for seeing Medicare.
patients. Seniors will find it
harder, not easier, to identify
physicians willing to treat them.
Republicans will take the
blame for letting legislation
gather dust that addressed
these matters.
Democrats must be drool-
ing. Republicans soon will find
themselves on the wrong side
of middle-class taxpayers, the
unemployed and senior citi-
zens. The Left and Occupy Wall
Street will holler about this
all year long. And Republican
candidates from presidential,
to congressional, to state-level
nominees will be in jeopardy.
All of this needlessly reinforces
every stereotype of Republicans
as cold, cruel and concerned
only for the wealthy.
It would be far better for
Republicans to put Barack
Obama and Harry Reid at log-
gerheads and force Obama to
choose between unions and
environmentalists regarding the
Keystone XL pipeline. Boehner
can do this by abandoning the
contraption that he has created,
reconvening the House and
sending the Democratic Senate
its own bill with a simple, two-
word change. And to that lightly
amended measure, Boehner
should attach a card that reads:
"Your inove, Harry."

N Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a mediafellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


Boehner hands


Democrats a gift


Thank you, Iowa and










Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Dec. 23

Free breakfast

Friday December 23rd,
2011- from 7am-9am
Pinemount Baptist
Church in McAlpin
(HWY 129 South-across
from the S and S)
will be giving away free
Sausage Biscuits and
Coffee, Juice or Milk
All for Free NO
STRINGS ATTACHED!!!!


Blood drive

December 23, Friday,
12 p.m. to 6 p.m.;
Blood Drive to Benefit
Andrew Holmes at
Guangdong Chinese
Restaurant. Each blood
donor receives a FREE
Combination Platter
from Guangdong and a
T-Shirt!


Dec. 24

Christmas candlelight.
service at Faith in
Christ Church

Everyone is invited
to come and worship
Christmas Eve. At our
New church home in Lake
City Florida. The service
will begin at 11pm on
December 24th and end
with Holy Communion
at midnight. The church
is located at 282 SW
Magical Terrace, just off
Pinemount/SR 252 one
block North of the Book
Store. Take,Pinemount
rd SOUTH from Food
Lion, approx 1 mile, road


is on the RIGHT
Call for more info: 754-
2827.

Christmas pageant

The First Presbyterian
Church, 697 Baya Dr.,
will host an impromptu
Christmas pageant
for all ages at 7 p.m.
and have a traditional
Christmas service at 11
p.m. For information call
752-0670.

Christmas Eve church
service

The Mount Tabor
A.M.E. Church will be
hosting a Christmas
Eve church service and
celebration on Saturday,
December 24 at 6 p.m.
The community is
invited. The church is
located at 519. SW L.M.
Aaron Drive in Lake
City.
For more information
please contact George
Moultrie at 386-754-0376
or Reola Finkley at 386-
438-4803.
Pastor: Rev. Robert
Postell.

Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service

Falling Creek Chapel,
1290 NW Falling Creek
Rd., wil be having
a Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service
starting at 6:30 p.m..
Everyone is welcome.
For information call 755-
0580.


Blood drive


December 24, Saturday,
9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Blood
Drive to Benefit Andrew
Holmes at the Lake City
Mall. Each blood donor
receives a FREE T-Shirt!

Christmas Eve
Services

Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church will host
candlelight services on
Christmas Eve at 7:30
p.m. There will also be
services on Christmas
day at 9:30 a.m. All are
welcome. The church is
located on Route 47, one
mile past the overpass
on the right

Dec. 25

Christmas services

Miracle Tabernacle
Church, 1190 Southwest
Sisters Welcome Rd.,
will have a Christmas
Day Worship Service
at 11 a.m. Following
the service is the
free Christmas Day
Community Dinner, at
127 Escambia St. Our
Watch Night/New Years
Eve Service begins at 9
p.m. with music, drama,
dance and the anointed
word of God. Contact
(386) 344-9915 for
information.


Christmas dinner

Miracle Tabernacle
Church will have its
sixth annual Christmas
Day Community Dinner.
The dinner is free to the


community from 12:30
to 2:30 p.m. on Sunday
Dec. 25 at the LAD Soup
Kitchen, 127 Escambia
St. Donations and

volunteers welcome.

Dec. 31
Watch-night service

We invite you to come
and worship with us at
our annual Candlelight
Service at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist
Church. The service
will begin at 5:30 p.m.
on Sunday, December
18, 2011. The church
is located at 550 NE
Martin Luther King
Street.

Our annual Watch-night
service Will begin at
9:30 p.m. on Saturday,
December 31, 2011. We
invite everyone to come
and worship with us
as we praise and thank
the Lord for bringing
us through 2011 and
for allowing us to enter
2012. Pastor Alvin J.
Baker will deliver the
message.


Jan. 4

Blue/Grey meeting

Olustee meeting
The Blue/Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 14 at the Central
Building to plan,for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

.from Aquatics Center.


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Jan. 18

Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army
is meeting 5:30 p.m.
Sept. 14 at the Central
Building to plan for
Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across

from Aquatics Center.

Jan. 20

Community Concerts

Mark & Clark perform
7:30 p.m. Jan. 20 at
the Levy Performing
Arts Center. Identical
twins Mark & Clark
play head to head on
identical custom-built
baby grand pianos.
They have enthralled
audiences around the
world with everything
from musical comedy to
dramatic interpretation
of the classics all with
the flash of Liberace,
a lot of Jerry Lee
Lewis, and the piano
artistry of Ferrante
and Teicher. Ticket and
membership information
is available at www.

communityconcerts.info.



Feb. 11

Founder's Day
Program

Merry Christmas and
a Happy New Year


from Columbia County
Chapter Bethune-
Cookman University
Alumni.
You are cordially invited
to our Founder's Day
Program on February
11, 2012, 4:00 pm at the
Holiday Inn. Dr. Trudie
Kibbee Reed, President
of Bethune-Bookman
University will be our
speaker. Dress attire is
semi-formal or church
attire.



ONGOING

Boys Club winter
program

The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program, which runs
through March 1. Fees
are $175, which includes
transportation from all
elementary and junior
high schools.'
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts and crafts,
gamerooms ad special
events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutoria
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
available,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones -
Way.


UW of Suwannee Valley gets HUD grant renewal


Submitted

U.S. Housing and Urban Development
Secretary Shaun Donovan announced
Tuesday, December 20, the award of fund-
ing to keep local homeless assistance
programs offering critically needed hous-
ing and services to homeless persons
and families in the coming year. United
Way of Suwannee Valley's application for
HUD renewal funding was among those
included in the announcement. United
Way of Suwannee Valley annually gener-
ates and submits the application as the
lead agency, for the Homeless Services
Network of Suwannee Valley, the federally
and state recognized homeless coalition
serving the local United Way's service


area of Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette and
Suwannee counties.
The application submitted by the local
United Way in the 2011 McKinney-Vento
homeless assistance competition garnered
renewal funding for two projects initiated
through the local United Way's original
2004 HUD homeless assistance applica-
tion. The two projects receiving renewal
-funding include United Way of Suwannee
Valley's implementation of the Homeless
Management Information System (HMIS)
and Volunteers of America of Florida's
scattered-site supported housing units.
United Way of Suwannee Valley received
a one-year renewal of $32,146 to maintain
an HMIS system. "HMIS is a HUD-man-


dated web-based system which collects
data for aggregate reporting and prevents
duplication of services from between mul-
tiple agencies," explained Jenn Sawyer,
United Way of Suwannee Valley HMIS
coordinator. Jennifer Lee, United Way of
Suwannee Valley Homeless Coordinator,
stated the system provides an additional
benefit beyond data collection. '"The sys-
tem allows homeless service providers
who are participants in the homeless coali-
tion to enter client data to provide for com-
munity coordinated case management,"
she explained.
While HUD requires local homeless
coalitions to maintain a homeless informa-
tion management system for .homeless


service providers to receive grant funds,
the local United Way minimized expenses
associated with this requirement, so funds
would be available to provide services.
"Recognizing the very small amount of'
funds available to our four-county home-
less coalition catchment area, when we
implemented the system locally, our
United Way coordinated with United Way
of Northeast Florida to participate in the"
Northeast. Florida Information Network
HMIS system," explained Rita Dopp, exec-
utive director of United Way of Suwannee
Valley. United Way sought to meet the


UWSV continued on 6A


OBITUARIES


Issac Dixop, Jr.
Mr. Issac Dixon, Jr. was called
home to be with his heavenly
Father on Friday, December
16, 2011. Mr. Dixon was born
March 25, 1932 in Live Oak,
Florida to Is-
sac Dixon, Sr.
and Essie Mae
Coald in o n.
Both preceded
him in death.
He worked
most of his life
in the, Pulp-
wood Industry.
He was employed with South-
ern Resin and Southern Woods.
He is also preceded in death by
two brothers, Eddie Dixon and
John L. Dixon; three sisters,
Margaret Dixon, Louise Dixon
and Alberta Brown; son-in-law,
Anthony Givens and broth-
er-in-law, Leroy Thompson.
Cherishing memories and left
to celebrate his life, a devoted
wife of 55 years, Jannie Lee


Dixon, Margaretta, Florida;
seven daughters, Shirley Givens,
Wanda (Pastor Vernon) Paige,
both of Sanderson, Florida Caro-
lyn Dixon, Margaretta, Florida,
Harriet (Jamal) Herring, Dar-
lene Dixon, both of Macclenny,
Florida, Claretha Dallas, King-
sland, Georgia, Ann (Daniel)
Bellamy, McRae, Georgia; five
sons, Issac Dixon, III, Charles.
Dixon, Jermaine Dixon, Dan-
iel Dixon, all of Margaretta,
Florida, Robert (Tammy) Dixon,
Macclenny, Florida; two broth-
ers, Dan Dixon, Ezekiel Dix-
on, both of Lakeland, Florida.
Funeral services for Mr. Dixon
will be 11:00 Friday, December
23, 2011 at Emmanuel Church
of God In Christ, Macclenny,
Florida. Viewing will be held
one hour prior to the service..
Arrangements entrusted
to COMBS FUNERAL
HOME. 292 NE Washing-
ton Street. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals".


Dorothy Dennis Hagler
Mrs. Dorothy Dennis Hagler,
88, of Lake City, passed away
peacefully on Thursday, De-
cember 22, 2011 in the Haven
Hospice Suwannee Valley Care
Center following an extended
illness. A native of Fort White,
Mrs. Hagler. liad lived most of
her life in Columbia County. She
was the daughter of the late Lu-
ther and Beulah Tompkins Den-
nis. Mrs. Hagler was a member
of the Columbia High School
graduating Class of 1941. Mrs.
Hagler worked as a seamstress
and owned and operated the
"Lindy Lu" Restaurant here in
Lake City for many years. She
had also managed the restau-
rants at both the Golf Hammock
Country Club in Sebring, Florida
and the Quail Heights Country
Club here in Lake City. She was
a member of the Quail Heights
Country Club, The Red Hat
Society and the Wesley Memo-


rial United Methodist Church.
Mrs. Hagler was a very talented
seamstress and was passionate
about golfing. She was preceded
in death by her parents and her
siblings, Narvilla Germany,
Mary Glass and Harvey Dennis.
Mrs. Hagler is survived by her
three sons; Dennis Hagler (Car-
olyn) of Jacksonville, Florida;
Randall Haglerk (Barbara) 'and
Kerry Hagler (Jacquie) both
of Lake City. Six grandchil-
dren, Eric Hagler, Brooke Ha-
gler Frye, Tyler Hagler, Lauren
Hagler, Michael Hagler and
Candice Carter and four great-
grandchildren, Zachary Ha-
gler, Kameron Hagler, Brayden
Frye and Christopher Peloni.
Funeral services for Mrs. Hagler
will be conducted at 2:00 P.M.
on Tuesday, December 27, 2011
in the Chapel of the Dees-Parrish
Family Funeral Home with Rev.
Louie Mabrey officiating. Inter-
ment will follow in the Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens. The
family will receive friends from


NOON until 2:00 on Tuesday in
the chapel of the funeral home.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 South Marion Ave., Lake
City, FL 32025. (386)752-
1234 please sign our on-
line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Diane Kaye McCrary
Diane Kaye McCrary, 62, died
Wednesday, December 21, 2011
at North Florida Regional Medi-
cal Center after an extended
illness. She was the daughter
of the late Richard and Doro-
thy Stalkfleet Sindt. She was a
Iowa native but had moved to
Lake City from Jefferson Coun-
ty, Florida in 1975. She was a
loving wife, mother and grand-
mother who enjoyed gardening,
picking strawberries, and scrap
booking, but especially loved
spending time with her fam-


ily and extended church fam-
ily at Southside Baptist Church.
She is survived by her husband
Roger McCrary and son, Jason
. (Katy) McCrary both of Lake
City, FL; daughter, Shayna
(Todd) Erickson of Femandina
Beach, FL; brothers, David &
Tim Sindt both of Madison, FL;
sisters, Darlene May of Lamont,
FL and Jennifer Sindt of Talla-
hassee, FL; grandchildren, Ken-
neth McCrary, Brylen Erickson,
& Holly Erickson also survive.
Memorial services will
be held at a later date.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida, 32025, (386) 752-1954
is in charge of arrangements.
Please leave messages of love
and comfort for the family at
www.gatewayforestlawn. com'
Obituaries are paid advertise-.
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


Jingle Bell Rock in Lake City


Christian Service Center brightens the holidays

for local families with Santa, toys, food.


From staff reports

food brightened
the Christmas
season for 228
local children
and their families Saturday.
The Christian Service
Center hosted the Jingle
Bell Rock Christmas Party
for families struggling to
make ends meet. Children
were able to pick out
two new toys and several
used toys at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds. The
party was an extension
of the center's Christn as
basket program, where
families received food
Wednesday and Thursday.
Several businesses,
churches and organiza-
tions contributed to the
center's events, including:
Kiwanis Club of Lake City,
Pepsi, Dollar'General, First
United Methodist Church,
Little Caesars Pizza,
Hungry Howie's, Parkview
Baptist Church and New
Life Christian Fellowship.


COURTESY PHOTOS


ABOVE LEFT, RIGHT: Children talk to Santa during a Christmas party at the fairgrounds sponsored by the Christian Service Center.


Children perform in a skit during the Christian Service Center's Christmas party.


COURTESY PHOTO
Children were able to pick out for toys Saturday during the
Jingle Bell Rock Christmas Party.


COURTESY PHOTOS'
LEFT: A woman and child embrace was they wait in line to attend the Christian
Service Center's Christmas party Saturday. ABOVE: Families pick out toys.


UWSV: Housing and Urban Development grant renewed, agency announces
Continued From Page 1A


HUD requirements in the most cost effi-
cient manner possible. By engaging in a
system utilized by multiple local homeless
coalitions, each is able to benefit from the
economies of scale and minimize the costs
of the HMIS implementation to utilize
remaining HUD funds for direct client
services.
United Way of Suwannee Valley's HUD
application included a Volunteers of
America of Florida project which received
a one-year renewal of $125,789 for scat-
tered-site supported housing for chroni-
cally homeless individuals, predominantly
veterans. The grant provides for eleven
units.
The grants announced are being award-
ed through HUD's Continuum of Care pro-
grams. HUD is quickly providing renewal


grants to local programs to prevent any
interruption in federal assistance and will
announce funding relative to new project
applications early in 2012. United Way
of Suwannee Valley included in its HUD
application two new projects submitted by
Another Way.
"Our local United Way continues to focus
on unmet community needs and opportu-
nities to address these needs," said Dopp.
"Only as a result of a successful Homeless
Management Information System imple-
mentation are homeless assistance agen-
cies eligible to apply for state or federal
grants to assist those who are homeless or
at risk of homelessness.
Mike McKee, president of the United
Way of Suwannee Valley Board of
Directors, noted the local United Way is


somewhat unique in the amount of grant
funds secured for the benefit of commu-
nity agency services. "These grant funds
enable our United Way to expand commu-
nity resources in support of targeted com-
munity impact areas. While it may not be
uncommon for a local United Way to seek
grant funds, the amount of grant funds lev-
eraged by our United Way in comparison
to its community fundraising campaign is
unusual. Our board of directors is very
proud of these accomplishments."
United Way of Suwannee Valley is a
community impact and fundraising orga-
nization which, utilizing volunteers on all
levels, advances the common good by
identifying unmet community needs and
seeking to alleviate those needs through
United Way of Suwannee Valley initiatives


and the funding of 22 affiliated health and
human service agencies.
United Way of Suwannee Valley serves
as the lead agency for the Homeless
Services Network of Suwannee Valley,
which serves the counties of Columbia,
Suwannee, Lafayette and Hamilton. The
network includes agencies and individuals
interested in the services available to those
who are homeless or at risk of homeless-
ness. Those interested in participating in
the local homeless coalition are invited to
attend the monthly meetings conducted at
the Columbia County Public Library West
Branch at 4 p.m. on the second Tuesday of
each month. The location of the meetings
at the Library's West Branch is intended
to facilitate the participation by those
throughout the coalition's service area.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428'









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Friday, December 23,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS
I mw


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@Iakecityreporter.com

Practice

news for

Packers
y source
for all
things,
Green
Bay
suffered through the
Packers' first loss of the
season on Sunday.
He did say if the Pack
had to lose, out of district
and conference was the
way to do it.
With Green Bay's
injuries on the offensive
line, is it possible Lake
City's Sampson Genus
might get a call?
Seems the Packers
went out and signed
Herb Taylor, who has
not played in the league
since 2009.
Genus remains on the
practice squad, which
includes Tori Gurley.
Gurley was offered a spot
on their active roster by
the Minnesota Vikings,
but turned it down to
stay with Green Bay.
It's likely the wide
receiver has an eye on
Donald Driver's spot
next year. The Packers
sweetened the pot by
raising his weekly salary
to active roster level.

Diana Nyad, 62, tried
again this year to swim
from Cuba to Florida.
Nyad has made the
trek from the Bahamas
to Florida and around
Manhattan Island, but
the 90-mile trip from
Cuba has evaded her.
Nyad first tried from
Cuba in 1978, when she
was 28. She was profiled
in the defunct New Times
magazine in June 1978.
The thing that stuck
with me from the article
was when Nyad spoke of
standing on the beach in
Cuba knowing she was
in better shape than any
person on the planet.
When Fort White beat
First Academy in football,
the Orlando school was
celebrating its state
championship in Class
3A volleyball. It was the
fourth consecutive state
title for First Academy.
In Fort White's Class
4A, Berkeley Preparatory
won the state title.
District 5 winner Santa
Fe beat Mount Dora in
the opening round, but
lost to Trinity Catholic,
which had eliminated
District 5 runner-up
Keystone Heights in the
opening round.
In Columbia High's
Class 6A, District 5
winner Gainesville High
beat Lecanto, Springstead
and Edgewater before
losing to eventual state
champion Leon.
District 5
runner-up Vanguard
lost to Springstead in the
first round.
Other volleyball
state champions were:
8A-East Lake, 7A
- Martin County, 5A
- Merritt Island, 2A
- Lake Worth Christian,
1A Lafayette.
1 Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


major


ambition


New dad Kirkman looks to stay at big-league level


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
Being a Major League
player is impressive, but
Michael Kirkman had more
than baseball on his mind
in 2011.
Kirkman's wife, Lorie,
recently gave birth to twins,
Anna and Ellie.
The girls are 6 weeks old
and Kirkman reports mom
and daughters are doing
fine.
As for the baseball sea-
son, it was less satisfying
than 2010 when Kirkman
played in the World Series
with the Texas Rangers.
Kirkman began this season
at Round Rock, the Rangers'
Triple A farm club and had
several stints with the big
club.
"Overall, it wasn't what I
had in mind," Kirkman said.
"I went back and forth four
times in the first month of
the season I was hit in the
elbow in spring training and
something was not right.
It took me a while to get
going."
Kirkman posted his first
big-leagueQwin this -season
(June 2 over Cleveland), but
also his first loss."
He appeared in 15 games
and pitched 271 innings
with 21 strikeouts and 12
walks. His ERA was a disap-
pointing 6.59.
Compare 2010, when
Kirkman pitched 16%'
innings in 14 games with
16 strikeouts and 10 walks,
and an ERA of 1.65.
Kirkman was left off
the postseason roster for
the Rangers, but. he did
attend the three World
Series games at Arlington
Stadium.
The loss to St. Louis,
when Texas was twice with-
in one strike of winning the
KIRKMAN continued on 2B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida's Erving Walker (11) gets tangled up with Okaro White
(10) while driving down the court in a game against Florida
State Thursday. The Gators defeated the Seminoles 82-64.


ASSOCIATED PRESS


ABOVE: Texas Rangers
reliever Michael Kirkman
pitches against the
Minnesota Twins during the
ninth inning of the Rangers'
9-3 win in Minneapolis on
June 10.



LEFT: Cleveland Indians'
Kosuke Fukudome is hit by
a pitch from Texas Rangers
pitcher Michael Kirkman in
a game in Arlington, Texas,
on Sept. 13.


Gators bounce


Seminoles, 82-64


Florida uses big.
2nd half to beat
FSU in Gainesville.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Bradley Beal scored 21
points, Patric Young added
15 and No. 11 Florida beat
rival Florida State 82-64
Thursday night
The Gators (10-2) extend-
ed their winning streak to
five and their home winning
streak to 12.
Florida State had no
answer for Young inside
and did little to slow down
Beal's long-range shoot-
ing and slicing drives.
Seemingly more complex
for the Seminoles (8-4) was
Florida's press. The result
was a third consecutive loss
in the series.
The Seminoles finished
with 19 turnovers, includ-
ing eight in the opening 10
minutes of the second half.
All those errors helped fuel
a decisive 15-2 spurt that
turned a two-point game
into a lopsided affair.
Luke Loucks led Florida
State with 15 points and


Terry Whisnant added 11.
Florida had all five start-
ers in double figures for the
second consecutive game.
Kenny Boynton had 14
points, Erik Murphy added
12 and Erving Walker
chipped in 11.
Beal and Young were the
key, though.
Beal made 7 of 15 shots,
including 4 of 8 from 3-point
range. Young hit all seven
of his shots, making the
most of his low-post moves
and hook shots.
Young even added a
highlight-reel moment dur-
ing the big second-half run.
He blocked Bernard James'
baseline drive with his left
hand, briefly pinned the ball
against the backboard and
then managed to cradle it in
his hand. He followed with
a dunk on the other end
that pushed Florida's lead
to 44-36.
The Gators were just get-
ting started, too.
Will Yeguete made a
layup, Young capped a nifty
reverse pivot with a baby
hook and then Beal took
over. The freshman had
a baseline dunk, then a 3
from the elbow that made
it 53-38.


Florida State overcame a
horrendous start to make
it close in the first half.
The Seminoles missed
11 of their first 12 shots
and trailed 14-2 before set-
tling into a rhythm midway
through the first
The 'Noles used an 11-0
run to slice into the lead,
and got plenty of help from
Florida in keeping it close.
The Gators missed their
first seven free throws
- continuing a trend that
has plagued coach Billy
Donovan's team all season
- and missed nine of their
first 12 shots from 3-point
range. Walker got things
turned around from the
charity stripe. Walker made
Florida's final five attempts
in the first half.
The Gators finished 16 of
24 from the free-throw line.
Florida played shorthand-
ed again, with guard Mike
Rosario out for the second
consecutive game. Rosario
missed several days of prac-
tice because of a strained
back and was unavailable.
Forward Cody Larson
missed Florida's last game
with strep throat He was
available, but only played
the final few seconds.












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011 Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 -W. Kentucky at Louisville
9 p.m.
ESPN Baylor vs. West Virginia, at
Las Vegas
II p.m.
ESPN2 Diamond Head Classic,
semifinal, at Honolulu

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


y-New England
N.Y. Jets
Miami
Buffalo


y-Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


x-Baltimore
x-Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


East
W L
II 3
8 6
5 9
5 9
South
W L
10 4
7 7
4 10
1 13
North
W L
10 4
10 4
8 6
4 10


T Pct PF PA
0.786 437 297
0.571 346315
0 .357 286 269
0.357 311 371

T Pct PF PA
0.714 343 236
0 .500 279 278
0.286 207 293
0.071 211 395

T Pct PF PA
0.714 334 236
0.714 285 218
0 .571 305 283
0.286 195 274


West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 8 6 0.571 292 343
Oakland 7 7 0.500 317382
San Diego 7 7 0.500358313
Kansas City 6 8 0.429 192319
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L .T Pct PF PA
Dallas 8 6 0.571 348 296
N.Y. Giants 7 7 0 .500 334 372
Philadelphia 6 8 0 .429 342 311
Washington 5 9 0 .357 252 300
South
W L T Pct PF PA
x-New Orleans II 3 0.786 457 306
Atlanta ,9 5 0.643 341 281
Carolina 5 9 0 .357 341 368
TampaBay 4 10 0.286247401
North


W .L
y-Greeq Bay 13 I
Detroit 9 5
Chicago 7 7
Minnesota 2 12
West
W L
y-San Francisco 11 3
Seattle 7 7
Arizona 7 7
St. Louis 2 12
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division


T Pct PF PA
0 .929 480 297
0 .643 395 332
0 .500 315 293
0.143 294 406

T Pct PF PA
.0.786 327. 185
0 .500 284 273
0 .500 273 305
0.143 166 346


Thursday's Game
Houston at Indianapolis (n)
Saturday's Games
Oakland at Kansas City, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, I p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Denver at Buffalo, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, I p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, I p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Arizona at Cincinnati, I p.m.
San Diego at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Sunday's Game
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Atlanta at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. I
Chicago at Minnesota, I p.m.
Carolina at New Orleans, I p.m.
Detroit at Green Bay, I p.m.
San Francisco at St. Louis, I p.m.
Tennessee at Houston, I p.m.
Buffalo at New England, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Miami, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, I p.m.
Dallas at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.


FORT WHITE FOOTBALL

Quarterback Club

meeting Jan. 10
The Fort White.
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Jan. 10 in
the teacher's lounge at
the high school. Planning
for the varsity banquet is
under way.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

LCMS SOFTBALL

Conditioning

begins Jan. 4

Lake City Middle School
softball conditioning begins
at 3:15 p.m. Jan. 4 at the
LCMS softball field. All
participants must have a
current physical, parent
permission form and drug
consent form before
participating.
For details, call Machon
Kvistad at 623-6833.

YOUTH BASEBALL

North Florida

Blaze sets tryout

The North Florida Blaze
travel baseball team for
ages 11-12 has a tryout


Washington at Philadelphia, I p.m.
San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Seattle at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.

Player of the Year

Player, Team Votes
Robert Griffin III, Baylor 43
Andrew Luck, Stanford 7
Tyrann Mathieu, LSU 5
Trent Richardson,Alabama I

College bowl games

New Mexico Bowl
Temple 37,Wyoming 15
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Ohio 24. Utah St. 23
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 32, San Diego
State 30
Beef'O'Brady's Bowl
Marshall 20, FIU 10
Wednesday
Poinsettia Bowl
TCU 31, Louisiana Tech 24

Thursday
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Boise State vs.Arizona State (n)

Saturday
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Nevada (7-5) vs. Southern Mississippi
(I -2), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Missouri
(7-5),4 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Western Michigan (7-5) vs. Purdue
(6-6), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina. State, (7-5) vs.
Louisville (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, Dec. 28
Military Bowl
At Washington
Air Force (7-5) vs. Toledo (8-4),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas (7-5) vs. California (7-5), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)

Thursday, Dec. 29
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Florida State (8-4) vs. Notre
Dame (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Baylor (9-3) 's. Washington (7-5),
9 p.m. (ESPN)
Friday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
AtDallas
Tulsa (8-4) vs. BYU' (9-3), Noon.
(ESPN) .-
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Rutgers (8-4) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Mississippi State (6-6) vs.Wake Forest
(6-6);6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Oklahoma. (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5),
10 p.m. (ESPN),.

Saturday, Dec. 31
Meinkq Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern
(6-6), Noon (ESPN) .
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Georgia Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)


BRIEFS


planned for 2 p.m. Jan. 7 at
Southside Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423.


Registration for'

Lake City open

Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

GRVEE


@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

GWINR




ATBERT /




SEILIM

1 _^ /


Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
UCLA (6-7) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3:30 p.m.


(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 2
TicketCity Bowl


(7-5),


At Dallas
Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1),
Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina
(10-2), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
(10-3), I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
1 p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendalq,Ariz.
Stanford (11-1) vs. Oklahoma State
(I 1-1),8:30 p.m.(ESPN)

BASKETBALL*

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 4 Louisville vs.Western Kentucky,
7 p.m.
No. 6 Baylor vs. West Virginia at
Orleans Arena, Las Vegas, 9 p.m.
No. 13 Wisconsin vs. MVSU, 5:30 p.m.
'No. 14 Xavier vs.Auburn or Hawaii at
the Stan Sheriff Center, Hionolulu, II p.m.
or 1:30 a.m.
No. 15 Pittsburgh vs.Wagner,.8 p.m.
No. 21 UNLV vs. California, 5 p.m.
Sunday's Game
No. 14 Xavier vs. TBD at the Stan
Sheriff Center, Honolulu,TBA

NBA preseason

Wednesday's Games
Orlando 104, Miami 100
Boston 81,Toronto 73
NewYork 88, New Jersey 82
New Orleans 95, Memphis 80
Minnesota 85, Milwaukee 84
San Antonio 97, Houston 95
Utah 92, Portland 89
LA Clippers 108, LA. Lakers 103
Thursday's Games
Charleston at Atlanta (n)
Denver at Phoenix (n)
End preseason

HOCKEY

NHL schedule: :- -

Wednesday's Games
Phoenix at Carolina (n)
Montreal at Chicago (n)
Philadelphia at Dallas (n)
St. Louis at Colorado (n)
Detroit atVancouver (n)
Tampa Bay at San Jose (n)
Thursday's Games
Buffalo at Toronto (n)
N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Florida at Ottawa, (n)
Columbus at Nashville (n)
Montreal at Winnipeg (n)
Detroit at Calgary (n)
Minhesota at Edmonton (n)
Anaheim at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Florida at Boston, 7 p.m.
Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh atWinnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Colorado, 9 p.m.
St. Louis at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Calgary atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m. ,
Saturday's Games
No games scheduled


registration for 2012 is
available at www.lcccyb.
com. Online registration is
$75 plus a transaction fee.
Onsite registration begins
Jan. 6 at Southside Sports
Complex with a cost of $80.
For details, call president
Tad Cervantes.

From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


BOWLING


League reports

Results of league bowlirig at Lake
City Bowl:
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(50.5-17.5); 2. Farmers (39.5-28.5);
3. Pin Busters (38.5-29.5).
High handicap game: 1. Vy Ritter
226; 2. Roberta Giordano 211;
3. Joyce Crandall 207. 1. Ric Yates
'243; 2. Wendal Shay 224; 3. Wayne
Johns 220.
High handicap series: 1. Pat Hale
622; 2. Diane Madsen 612; 3. Janie
Posey 601. 1. Ross Meyers 659;
2. Earl Hayward 634; 3. Vernon Black
620.
(results from Dec. 13)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Lorrie
Geiger 202; 2. Joyce Hooper 197;
3. Susie Camacho 193. 1. Bill Dolly
236; 2. Steve Fancy 206; 3. Tom
Sewejkis 196.
High scratch series: 1. Lorrie
Geiger 560; 2. Susie Camacho 554;
3. Joyce Hooper 488. 1. Bill Dolly
614; 2. Steve Fancy 576; 3. Mark
Koppa 568.
High handicap game: 1. (tie)
Chrissy Fancy, Joyce Hooper 236;
3. Staci Greaves 224; 4. (tie) Lorrie
Geiger, Gloria Dennis 222. 1. Dan
Cobb 240; 2. (tie) Willie Frazier,
George Walters, Bobby Robinson
233; 5. Steve Greaves 231.
High handicap series: 1. Susie
Camacho 698; 2. Lorrie Geiger 653;
3. Cathey Creel 603. 1. Bill Dolly
668; 2. Steve Fancy 660; 3. Adam
Alford 654.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 185,
Mark Davis 196.
(results from Dec: 13)
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Oddballs
(44-24);, 2. The Sandbaggers (43-25);
3. Legal Ladies (38-30).
High handicap game: 1. Sharon
Tufning 246; 2. Pat Warne 232;
3. Diane Madsen 218.
High handicap series: 11. Judy
Daniels 609; 2. Jo Anne Carr 605;
3. Vicki Baker 600.
(results from Dec. 13)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Ronsonet
Buick/GMC (337.5-142.5);
2. Rountree-Moore (278-202); 3. Team
12 (272.5-207.5).
High scratch game: 1. Wally
Howard 279; 2. Zech Strohl 269;


COURTESY PHOTO

First-place freshman

Lauren Snipes of Lake City won.the freshman' girls
competition in the 5th Annual High School Singles
Championship at Boardwalk Bowl in Orlando on Saturday.
After bowling five games, Snipes entered the semifinals as
the No. 1 seed. She captured the gold medal by taking the
best two-of-three matches in the semifinal and final.
Snipes averaged 168 pins per game while going undefeated
for the tournament. She is congratulated by USBC Hall of
Fame member Pat Costello (left) and USA Bowling National
Coach of the Year Richard Shockley.


3. J.J. Hilbert 267.
High scratch series: 1. Zech Strohl
742; 2. Wally Howard 735; 3. Dale
Coleman 685.
High handicap game: 1. Teo Parra
282; 2. Wally Howard 279; 3. Carl
McGhghy 275.
High handicap series: 1. Zech
Strohl 742; 2. Wally Howard 735;
3. Teo Parra 692.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
226.69; 2. Robert Stone 218.88;
3. Wally Howard 212.84.
(results from Dec. 12)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Quirky Quad
(45.5-22.2); 2. 4 S's (43.5-24.5);
3. BMW (41-27).
High handicap game: 1. Roberta
Giordano 225; 2. (tie) Elaine Nemeth,
Ruth Lott 224. 1. Ross Meyers 254;
2. Jim Hawkins 240; 3. Earl Hayward
231.
High handicap series: 1. Vy
Ritter 627; 2. Janie Posey 624;
3. (tie) Debbie Walters, Pat Hale 609.
1. Sandy Sanders 639; 2. Jim Burnett


628; 3. Bill Price 614.
High average: 1. Elaine Nemeth
151.56; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 151.39; .
3. Louise Atwood 150.96. 1. David
Duncan 191.8; 2. Bill Dolly 190.1;
3. George Mulligan 179.24.
(results from Dec. 15)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. McGhghy's
Navy (41-23); 2. Grady's Automotive
(40-24); 3. TAZ (37.5-26.5).
High scratch game: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 193; 2. Norma Yeingst 183;
3. Chrissy Fancy 181. 1. Mark Moore
266; 2. John McFeely Jr. 224; 3. Allen
Personette 213.
High. scratch series: 1. Norma
.Yeingst 536; 2. Chrissy Fancy 528;
3. Cheryl Jacks 493. 1. Mark Moore
609; 2. Dan McNair 604; 3. Allen
Personette 597.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
171.25; 2. Cheryl Jacks 156.33;
3. Jennifer Freeman 150.35. 1. Dan
'McNair 201.71; 2. A.J. Dariano
194.29; 3. Mark Moore 189.56.
(results from Dec. 11)


KIRKMAN: Mini-camp in January


Continued From Page 11

series, was more devastat-
ing than the previous year.
"It doesn't get any closer
than that," Kirkman said.
"The series was definitely
lost in Game 6."
The Rangers have a mini-
camp at Arlington, Texas, in
mid-January and Kirkman
got his notice to attend.
"They evaluate how you


are doing," Kirkman said.
"It is for the young guys,
and -me and a couple of
others will be going."
Kirkman was the Pacific
Coast League pitcher of the
year. and a Triple A all-star
in 2010 as a starter. He has
been used in relief by the
Rangers in the past two
seasons.


"I finished up strong,"
Kirkman said. "That is all
I cojdgontrol and all they
will really look at."
Columbia High retired
Kirkman's No. 16 baseball
jersey in a ceremony at the
spring alumni game.
Kirkman played for-the
Tigers and graduated from
CHS in 2005.


rCaob wa l.. ak.ecityreporter.com
fld Ads Onli" s--R REPORTER


1
6
11
13
14
15

16
17
18

21
23
26
27


ACROSS '37 Seashell
Poker stakes seller
Might 38 Blurbs
Longs for 39 Deep devotion
Not harmful 40 Fall veggie
Chewy candy 41 New Haven
Jackpot student
games 42 Sister
Hot tub 44 Chases the
Lennon's wife puck
Film speed 47 Nap
no. 51 Get back
Kind of bank 52 Donny or
Hardtop 53 Marie
Util. bill 53 FBI
Retirees' operative
eittik s 54 Carlo


28 Safe to drink
29 Wealth
recipient
31 Hung in the
sun
32 Grill
remnant
33 Paint holder
35 Sedaka or
Diamond
36 Early Briton


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: JOIST DAFFY SCULPT PIMPLE
Answer: The quarterback did this after being presented
with the endorsement deal PASSED IT UP


12-23


DOWN
1 Rand of
fiction


Answer to Previous Puzzle


LYE ANI L VAST
EER SERA ALAA
FAMISHED CO VE
TRACER DRANO

FOUNT TUBE
IDS SLOT SALTE



BARE DEAN

LEVEE ANKLES
SARA LOVESEAT
THIN A WES OSU
ASEA NEST NEB


2 Opposite of 7 Not deceived
"paleo" by
3 Sweater letter 8 Common
4 Joule sense
fractions 9 "I" trouble
5 More grouchy 10 MD assistants
6 Shaggy flower 12 aCllar naeess


13 PC journals
18 Goddess of
wisdom
19 Looked as if
20 Excuses
22 Huffed and
puffed
23 Polite bow
24 Ms. Franklin
25 Use a coupon
28 Chart shape
30 Family mem.
31 Large-
heartedness
34 Maria
Conchita -
36 Fruit dessert
39 Walrus hunter
41 Famed prep
school
43 Verne's
captain
44 Tijuana "Mrs."
45 Gunpowder
holder
46 Unreturnable
serve
48 Dad, to
Grandpa
49 Rubble-maker
50 Citrus drink


SCOREBOARD


1%UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421




ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


rist


as


Oft


We're open
Christmas Day!
Buffet opens 10am


386-752-1670


* Located in the Lake City Mall


r


. %N


LAKE CITY REPORTER











Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


DILBERT
TO REACH OUR GREEN
GOALS, EMPLOYEES MUST
ALWAYS USE THE BLUE
RECYCLING BINS FOR
COMPANY DOCUMENTS.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


WEE WIS you A WE KNOW WHERE YOU I...SO HAVING MY WALLET PICK
EV CHR IsSMUs BE PLETY GENEROUS WE4 WAS NEVER SO ENTER
SFRE'S A CUp 1-,O o
IF YOU WAN019, A
TOS I E'

-.OlbII


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


1st wife has heard enough of

young replacement's chatter


DEAR ABBY: After 19
years of marriage, my hus-
band left me for a younger
woman. I found out later
0-- C that they had been dating
tW for several years. They
46eMSNT, moved in together immedi-
aw ately after our separation,
and she was pregnant at
li2i the divorce hearing. They
had a baby boy eight
F months later.
^' At every event with my
" -., kids, they come together
with their son and she
steers the conversation to
CLEA her life, what's going on,
oD CLEAN etc. I have tried to be silent
rAINING!
ANN', and civil, but she ruined
my daughter's high school
graduation by gossiping
,- and giggling behind me
and the kids the entire
event.
I am trying not to be
a bitter ex, but I have
had to bite back some
nasty words to both of
them. Any suggestions
on how to deal with a
.F miserably blended family?
LIJK BLENDED FAMILY IN
BATON ROUGE, LA1
DEAR "BLENDED"
FAMILY: Yes, and please
don't think I am without
sympathy. The surest way
f to deal with your miser-
.,' ably blended family is to
make a conscious decision
to get on with YOUR life.
If you're not interested in
A what the woman has to
1 say, get up and move away.
No one says you must lis-
ten to her prattle. Develop
4 your own interests and
activities, and meet some
new friends. The stronger


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
and more independent
you become, the better off
you'll be. Trust me.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I have
been in a relationship with
"Anita" for four years. She
moved in with me two
years ago and our home
life has been wonderful.
We are a unique couple.
We have discussed mar-
riage, but neither of us
believes,in the tradition.
I'd like to show Anita
how much I love her, as
well as show others we're
in a serious relationship.
An engagement ring
would be a way to show
it However, the term
"engagement" would not
be accurate because we do
not plan to marry.
Can you suggest another
symbol or even another
term for a ring to show
unity without indicating
the eventuality of mar-
riage? ROMANTIC IN
OHIO
DEAR ROMANTIC:
How about calling Anita's
ring a commitment ring?
Or give her a pendant with
a sweet message engraved
on the back? Or a wrist-
watch engraved with,
"Love ya 'til the end of


time," or "... 'til time runs
out" Another way to indi-
cate to others that you're
together but don't believe
in "tradition" would be to
hold a commitment cer-.',
emony and invite friends.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: There is
an issue driving a wedge
between my wife and me.
I have always believed '
that my casual shirts (in:
fact, all my shirts) should
be worn tucked into my
'slacks. My wife feels they
should be left out. I think
I look better with them
tucked in. She feels differ-
ently.
Abby, you can save
our marriage if you'll let;
us know who is right.
To tuck, or not to tuck
- that is the question.
And, by the way, she.
says I should mention :'
that I have a bodacious
waistline, which means
I could lose 40 pounds.
- FRIAR "TUCKED" IN
LONGMONT, COLO.
DEAR "TUCKED": Your
wife is your best friend and
she is right (If you doubt it,
consult a men's hab'erdashi-
er.) By leaving your shirt !:
out, you would appear to be
a few pounds thinner. When
you tuck it in, your 'boda-
cious" waistline is accentii
ated by a horizontal line, :
which makes you appear to
be heavier.

E Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Bdx 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST

~IF T JUST TTL YOU WHf9AIL


S\ / ALL- |


. OUT OF IT



FOR BETTER OR WORSE


ITS 6 o06OCK INT-H--
MoRNING- MoM AN'
DYD nRE 03TAas
PlUPK&TlE7RlS-HRLY


THEY'RE UP-THMNK
GOODNESS .-WUE'VE
5EE.M AWRKE SMNCE
^. ^k.^-)FIVE! .-]


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Stick to your budget.
Don't get caught up in the
moment and forget about
your debts and responsi-
bilities. Offering your time,
skills and knowledge is
more than enough. Love
is highlighted. Put time
aside for someone special.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Your curiosity will
help you wiggle your way
into an interesting conver-
sation. When opportunity
knocks, be ready to take a
leap of faith. Not everyone
you are close to will back
your decision. Prepare to
deal with complaints.***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't let obstacles
stand in your way. If you see
something you want, grab it
and keep moving. Love is in
the stars, and taking a short
trip will enhance any rela-
tionship you encounter. An
impulsive decision will alter
your life. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Finish what you start.
Offer help to those in need.
Last-minute expenditures
should be avoided. It's not
what you give others that
will count in the end; it's
how you go about it A self-
less. act will enhance your
reputation. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Plan to have some fun.


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Travel, last-minute shop-
ping and a little romance
should fill your day. Your
high-spirited and boister-
ous personality will lead
the way, but don't let over-
indulgence cost you when
dealing with authority fig-
ures. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You'll have to be care-
ful what you say and do
if you want to avoid criti-
cism. Don't meddle and-
refuse to fight. Getting out
of the house will ease the
tension and can be put to
good use picking up last-
minute items. **
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Appreciate your
peers. Offer festive cheer
and good wishes for the
holidays. Your gesture
will set the stage for build-
ing stronger alliances. A
shopping spree will lead-
to unique, creative and
cost-efficient items. Love is
highlighted. ****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Don't feel obligated
to do something costly to
prove your love. Stick to
your budget and figure out
a way to wow the people
around you with simple
and thoughtful gestures.
Consider making a change


to your professional goals.

- SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Emotions will
mount, especially if you
have taken on too much.
Revisit your to-do list and
see what corners you can
cut. Love and friendship'
should be your top priority.
It's what you give from the
heart that counts. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Keep secrets. A
surprise will have a greater
impact if no one except
you knows about it. A cou-
ple of changes at home will
help you build your assets
and bring great comfort
and pleasure to those you
love. Think big. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): A few finishing'
touches, and you will be
ready to face whatever
comes your way. A chance
to show what you have to
offer will lead to a better
position. Refuse to let any-
one .take control. Market
your skills and prepare to
move forward. ****
PISCES' (Feb. 19-March
20):, The hectic pace will get
to you. Try not to venture
too far from home and you'll
avoid aggressive individu-
als. Focus on finishing odd
jobs and preparing for the
festivities. Time to relax and
enjoy the ones you love will
pay off. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: T equals F
"Z VZRA ROB TDBMNC NZMBHK
WBNKPLB Z R CIKL MF HFMBA. Z VZRA
RCB KHBDZNKM N"ZMBHK WBNKPLB ZR
CKL MF ZSBKL." GBKM-JPN OFSKDS


Previous Solution: "One of the hardest things in life is having words in your
heart that you can't utter." James Earl Jones
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-23

CLASSIC PEANUTS
D JODTEF! M E A6Vw\lV |TARTE?I OIPiMINERi6HT I T RATECWRND!
^ IJU$TB9 T lN6TRAVELT DURIN& 501 [ OULDN'T AVE TO I ^ 7


TO SATISFY OUR
CORPORATE SECURITY
GUIDELINES, NEVER PUT
COMPANY DOCUMENTS
8 IN THE BLUE RECYCLING
BINS.


1 YOU READ I DON'T
THOSE SAMEE KNOW
POLICIES HOW TO
TO US LAST GET RID
EEK. OF GET RID
OF THEM.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011










.Classified Department: 755-5440


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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KAREN COOLEY MOTSCHALL,
Case No.: 11-290-CP
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
KAREN COOLEY MOTSCHALL,
deceased, whose date of death was
November 4, 2011, and whose social
security number is XXX-XX-4874,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Columbia County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
P.O. Box 2069, Lake City, Florida
32056-2069. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estateon whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM. ,
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AF-
TER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication .of this
notice: December 16,2011.
Attorney for Personal Representative
HARDIN & ASSOCIATES, P.A
BENJAMIN W. .HARDIN, JR.,
ESQ.
Fl. Bar No.: 0500763,
JULIE LANDRIGAN BALL, ESQ.
Fla. Bar No.: 0768731
P.O. Box 3604
Lakeland, FL 33802
Personal Representative
KERRY J. DUGGAN
3131 Bellflower Way
.Lakeland, FL 33811
05529590
- December 16, 23, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC. SALE: AU-
TO EMPORIUM OF LAKE CITY
INC. gives Notice.of Foreclosure of
Lien and intent to sell these vehicles
on 01/04/2012, 10:00 am at. Auto
Emporium of Lake City Inc.
2832 SE Main Blvd, Lake City FL.
32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes. AUTO EM-
PORIUM OF LAKE CITY INC. re-
serves the right to accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
4M2DU55POVUJ21257
1997 Mercury
05529605
December 23, 2011
Notice is, hereby given per Florida
Statue 98.075(2):
Last known address of:
Jeffrey Bryan
154 SW'Prestige Way
Lake City, FL 32024
Michael Rosario
153 NE Colvin Ave
Lake City, Fl 32055
Owens, Kenneth
770 SW Symphony Lp #102
Windsong Apts
Lake City,Fl 32055


Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Legal

Jonetra S. Johnson
438 SE Allen PIApt 201C
Lake City, FL 32025
David A. Myers
432 NW Rebel PI
Lake City, Fl 32055
Jennifer M. Collifis
10462 Rosemount Dr.
Tampa, Florida 33624
Inez D. Lee
1900 SW Bim St
Lake City, Florida 32024
is potentially ineligible to be regis-
tered to vote. Please respond within
30 days of publication of this notice
by contacting the Supervisor of Elec-
tions Office at the address or phone
number below. If no response is re-
ceived within 30 days of this publi-
cation, it may result in determination
of ineligibility by the supervisor and
removal of the registered voter's
name from the statewide voter regis-
tration system.
Published one time in the Lake City
Reporter
Elizabeth "Liz" P. Home
Columbia County Supervisor of
Elections
971 W. Duval Street, Suite 102
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 758-1026
05529728
December 23, 2011

100 Job
10vv Opportunities
4 Temporary Farm Workers
needed. Employer: Kermnit & Ray
Lewis Coffey Partnership, Wayne
Co, KY. Tobacco, Straw/Hay,
Row Crop, Produce, & Green-
house/Nursery Production and
Alternative Work., Employment
Dates: 02/15/2012- 12/15/2012.
Wage of $9.48/hr. Worker
guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours.
Tools provided at no cost.
Free housing provided to non
commuting workers. Transporta-
tion & subsistence reimbursed
when 50% of contract is met.
Apply for this job at the nearest
Florida One Stop Career Center
and reference the job order
#KY0442239.
Licensed Insurance Agent
Seeking Highly motivated licensed
property and casualty insurance .
agent. Computer savvy, reliable
and good personality. Employee
'benefit include paid holidays and
vacation time. Send resumes to:
S fmcknight8l<@cox.net
Lube Tech Wanted
Tools Required
Apply @ Rountree Moore Chevy
4316 W US Hwy90
Lake City, Fl. 32055
See: Jimbo Pegnetter in Service
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com

120 Medical
0 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529777
Medical Billing.Manager
Several years of experience in
medical office insurance coding,
and billing required. Excellent
Salary Based on Experience
Apply in confidence,
Email: mafaisal05(&yahoo.com
or Fax: 386-758-5987

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


240 Schools &
Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
Beautiful 8 mo. old kittens,velvet
soft white or white with a touch of
gray on head. One beautiful dark
long haired. Raised indoors, litter
trained, used to dogs. All shots in-
cluding rabies,also neutered
Sweet, playful and loving. Price
negotiable. Phone 386-961-8909
Great Christmas Gift. 4 CKC
Registered Toy Poodle puppies.
Ready Christmas Eve. Up to date
on shots. 386-719-4808
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT,
120GB Playstation 3 System with
9 games, 2 wireless control, in
original box. $380, Call 386-984-
7510
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call.Saturday.
Variety' of Morgan Dollars
for sale. Call to make an
appointment 386-754-4136


450 Good Things
450 toEat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake.City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood

.It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.


630 fMobile Homes
630 for Rent

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3 BR/2 BA, 14 x 80 Singlewide,
CH & A, water, sewage & garbage
provided, 1st, last + dep., lease
required, $550 mo. 386-752-8978.
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between 1-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
Clean 2br/2ba on 5 acres. Nice un-
furnished MH w/well water. Coun-
try setting just north of LC. $400.
mo. 1st, last & sec. (954)818-4481
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

4 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Maintained, 10
ac. Master has a huge closet w/
walk in shower & garden tub.
MLS 79417 $94,900 Foreclosure
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Small mobile home
2/1 886sf on a wooded lot.
Paved road frontage.
MLS 79413 $17,900
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Direct Sale
15K-25K off models
800-622-2832 ext 210

Mobile Home
650 &Land
Rental/Starter, renovated, 3/2 SW
1 ac. off 41 btwn 1-10 & 75. 10
min to LC. $28,500 obo. No owner
Finance. 386-330-2316/266-3610

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652


'71 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time, Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mYflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
I VFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly.
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730g Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05529646
LAKE CITY
3BR/2BA 1325SF $850. mo
PRICE REDUCED $75.
MOVE IN SPECIAL OF $300.
3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825. mo
3BR/2BA 1064SF $595. mo
2BR/1BA 768SF $495. mo
1BR/1BA 500 SF $395 mo '
3BR/2BA 1000SF $700 mo
2BR/1BA VACANT $495.mo
JASPER
3BR/2BA 1188SF $650 mo
PRICE JUST REDUCED
4BR/2BA 2052SF $750 mo
MADISON
2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5 BA REMODELED
$550. mo


Visit our website:
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
Accredited Real Estate Services
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
Accredited Real Estate
Services is a Full Service
Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals -
Property Management ~
Property Sales.


05529719
3 BR/2 BA, 1,800 sq. ft, 2 car
garage, all appliances, sprinkler
system, fenced, NO PETS,
Very clean & ready to move in.
$1,000 mo, $1,000 sec.,
$30 appl. fee. 386-752-4864.

lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $350mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwarmeevalleyproperties.com
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828


confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


* ADvantage









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2011


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/1IBA w/CH/A. Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
4 BR/2 BA in town, good neigh-
borhood, fenced yard, fireplace, no
pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.,
386-755-6916.
Available Immediately.
Rent To Own 3br/2ba home
In quiet subdivision.
386-752-5035 X 3113
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
Gorgeous Lake View 2br
Apartment. Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$600 mo, and
$600 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
v Office Rentals
FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/1 yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
, All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-;
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Nice 4/2, 1 ac.
Granite floors. Beautiful yard &
wrap around porch. MLS 77292
$139,900. Short Sale.
Brittany Stoeekert 397-3473
Results Realty. 4/2, 1 ac modular
home that is in immaculate cond.
1,344sqft. New carpet, roof, a/c,
fireplace. MLS 78833 $115,000.


810 Home for Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Well maintained.
Tiled floors, living area, open kit.
Above ground pool. guest quarters
MLS 79149 $115,000. Short Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot. on
the Suwannee. Well & anerobic
septic system. MLS 78842
$45,000 Owner Financing.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Home. over 2ac,
screened inground pool. Updated,
crown molding, new wood floors,
kit & paint. MLS 79378 $129,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 1713 sf, ,r:- i.
area. Arched entryways, Ig hi ir,
room w/fireplace. French doors.to
patio. MLS 79418 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.4/2 Vintage home.
Updated electric & plumbing. New
carpet & CH/A. Hardwood floors.
MLS 79367 $99,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Well maintained
2/2. Wood laminate floors. Lg
living room & master suite. New
countertops. MLS 76928 $89,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Vintage 4/3 2626sf.
Hardwood floors, new wdws, fire-
place. Separate 494ft guest home,
double lot MLS 78000 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 1987 SF up-
graded w/wood laminate floors,
ceramic tile. 14x30 workshop, 10
x10 storage MLS79345 $199,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, 2853SF walk-
ing to downtown, lakes, restau-
rants, Shmnds & VA. garage w/apt
above. MLS 79451 $140,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, open floor
plan, spacious master BR. Tile &
wood thru out. 1 yr. home
warranty MLS 78594 $169,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Huge 4/3, 2826sf
on 5.22 ac! Flooring is tile lami-
nate in most rooms & in immacu-
late cond. MLS 79584 $215,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. What a Creampuff!
Newer roof, 1 ac, paved road,
fenced, fireplace, very nice brick
home. MLS 79531 $65,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Brick .59 ac! 3/2,
2502sf. Lg master bath w/separate
shower & whirlpool. 2 car garage
& storage. MLS 76769 $210,000
Charming Older Home in town.
. Over 1300 sq ft. with hardwood
floors. Shady comer lot.
Janet Creel. 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Coldwell Banker.Bishop Realty
Private Estate, city limits.
6br/3.5ba. 39.7 acres $994,000 or
$2,500 mo rent. Mary Brown
Whitehurst. 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2. New kitchen
counters & ceramic tile, open floor
plan. MLS# 77943 $94,500 Mary
'Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 updated brick in town. New
roof. hardwoods. Glassed room
w/fantastic views. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS 78092 $249,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D. Super area,
nice back yard. Covered back
porch. New AC in 2010. Elaine K.
Tolar. 755-6488 MLS# 75198
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Exceptional price! 3/2, 1582 sqft.
2 car garage, screened porch 1/2 ac
lot. Only $129,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 365-5678 MLS#79239
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent location! 3/2 home, large
master suite, 2 car garage.
$87,900. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 79458
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Woodcrest, 3/2 Brick w/split floor
plan. Nice lot. Fireplace, Ig porch,
vinyl wdws. MLS# 77708 Elaine
K. Tolar $169,900 755-6488
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac, 3/2, as is $95,000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/lst time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Newly Listed in Mayfair! Great
area close to shopping! 3/2 fresh
paint& pretty lot. Newer metal
roof & screen porch. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
Sweeping Golf Course View!
Brick 3/2 w/screen porch. South-
ern Oaks Golf Course. 1980sf.
$164,900 #79585 Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms &
Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
7a Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


IV OVE IN

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