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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01727
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 18, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01727
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




I A"I F
000016 120312 FL -r2ON 3
I, B OF FLORIDA ,-TTORy
PO BOX 117007
205 SOA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 3261i- p9"43


Re


orter


Sunday, December 18, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 273 1 $1.00


1Ui i I i. i .II -r '*I iy pc- rc ,i.
A member of the Alachua County bomb disposal unit
deploys a remote controlled device used td investigate
suspicious objects. The press was not allowed near
when the device later opened three suspicious packag-
es, wrapped as Christmas gifts, and found them empty.



'Gifts bring


out bomb


squad near


courthouse

By TONY BRITT
rOrirt@13kecit) report er. corn
Three packages rapped as Christmas gifts and
left alongside a road behind the courthouse brought
out the Alachua County bomb squad and partially
blocked access to nearby Lake DeSoto for more than
six hours Saturday.
The packages, opened by a remote controlled
robot, were empty.
Capt John Blanchard, Lake City Police Department
public information officer, said a call was made to the
police station at 10:18 a.m. Saturday by a citizen who
saw three packages at Northeast Lake DeSoto Circle
and Northeast Justice Street while walking around


PACKAGES continued on 3A


JOEL ADDINGTON/Baker County Press
Bettie Starling buys stamps at the Olustee post office,
set to be shuttered next month by the U.S. Postal
Service.


Catalyst prospect



may spur growth


Jobs, $150 million
investment could
be6in the works.

By GORDON JACKSON
glackson@lakecityreporter.corn
Ongoing negotiations
with a potential tenant at
the North Central Florida
Catalyst Site have officials
from Plum Creek, the
property's owner, optimis-
tic about the 500-acre site's,
future.
A decision is! expected,
possibly as early as the
end of December, for the
unnamed company to sign
an agreement to move to the
site, located off U1.S. 90 just
east of Lake City Airport,
said Allison Megrath,'real
estate manager for Plum
Creek. .
"They're in active discus-
sions right now," Megrath
said. "They want to turn
dirt in June and be fully
operational in December
2013. It's a very good proj-
ect"
The projectwould include
a $150 million capital invest-
ment at the site and create
50 new jobs with an average
salary of $50,000, said Dale
Williams, Columbia County
CATALYST continued on 3A


Allison Megrath, a real estate manager with Plum Creek, updates Columbia County Economic
Development Department Director Jesse Quillen about the RACEC Catalyst Site Thursday.
The RACEC Catalyst'
S... Site, located just east
"- -' "", of the Lake City Airport,

K owned by Plum Creek,
SCiy RACCatai yst SW sthe largest private land
"- ', owner in Flonrida.An
2 -additional 2,090 acres
'* |L. of surrounding Plum
SCreek land could also be
= developed as part of the
project to spur economic
_____growth in the region.
Dave Kimler/L, eH, ', .irt/ 1


Fort White High
drama students take
their acting off-stage

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
L ong prairie dresses may
not be fashionable for
high school students,
but Fort White drama
students don them
regularly.
The students are training to
be historical re-enactors dur-
ing February's Olustee Festival,
and docents for the Lake City-
Columbia County Historical
Museum.
Last year the Thespians' Guild
at Fort White High School opened
the festival with a production of
"Our American Cousin," the play
President Abraham Lincoln was
attending when he was assassi-


Loss of post office

means loss of social

center for Olustee

By JOEL ADDINGTON
Baker County Press
OLUSTEE-The Olustee post office will be shut-
tered next month as the United States Postal Service
continues to consolidate operations nationwide in
reaction to falling mail volumes and budget pres-
sures.
The contract office, the smallest of four in Baker
County, serves 65 post office box customers and
more than 1,000 delivery customers along two rural
routes, USPS spokesman Stephen Seewoester said
earlier this month.
OLUSTEE continued on 3A


l!!l! 6 I:),1 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


-, Opinion .. .......
Business
O bituaries ... .....
Advice .... .
' Puzzles


nated. They also performed a Civil
War version of "Romeo and Juliet"
at the school.
Without money for costumes
and props, the students borrowed
materials from the museum and
local re-enactment groups, said
Jeanie Wilks, drama and English
teacher at Fort White High
School.
This year instead of a produc-
tion, Wilks said, about 100 stu-
dents will donate their time to
the community as docents and
re-enactors.
Wilks said the idea occurred
to her last summer when she had
a hard time returning items bor-
rowed from the museum. Run by
volunteers, the museum is open
limited hours. The students' vol-
unteer hours will help more of the
community experience the muse-
um, located at 157 SE Hernando
Ave in Lake City.
ROLES continued on 3A


JASOUN MAI I Tn W WALir, n/aKe ,uly nRepuire
Fort White High School drama students
Michael Hamrick, 18, and Emily Milton, 16,
portray a couple from 1865 while rehearsing
their parts in class on Friday.


Christmas lights of Columbia
LEFT: Christmas decorations at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City.
ABOVE: A festive home along St. Johns Street in Lake City. See more
photos of Christmas lights in today's Life section, inside.


is(on:
;' r l
*r !


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
F' J.30I er-n"plo ,ee
crt h._- ,e7 al


COMING
TUESDAY
,'orniplete rit,
,:cOuncl ,:,.. ,:-r age


Learning history as they live it


6635
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A








2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011





Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Wednesday: Wednesday:
4-21-28-44 9 3-15-18-20-21 Afternoon: 4-4-6 Afternoon: 1-3-2-1 1-3-4-9-33-38 2-24-46-52-56 19


AROUND FLORIDA


Secret Santas help pay off Christmas layaways


Cross Florida,
secret Santas
are bringing
some extra holi-
day joy to fami-
lies by paying their layaway
bills for Christmas toys.
From Hialeah to the
Panhandle, unsuspecting
families are getting phone
calls or arriving at the lay-
away counter to find out
Their bill has been paid. At
. a Kmart near Orlando, one
man helped pay the bills of
more than 50 families. At
a store in Pensacola, good
Samaritans have helped
.nearly a dozen.
"People cry," said Wally
Silvagnoli, the store man-
ager at a Kmart in Winter
Garden. "It touches your
soul."
Managers at several
stores across the country
have reported a wave of
generosity as anonymous
donors come in wanting
to help pay layaway bills.
Florida has been no excep-
tion: Store managers say
more families are using
layaway to pay for gifts bit
by bit as they struggle to
make ends meet, and good
Samaritans are stepping in
to make sure the toys end
up under the tree.
"People feel good about
doing something good for
someone else, and it's really
catching on," said Alba
Strong, manager of a Kmart
in Hialeah. I
Strong called up three
, families this week to let
them know an anonymous
donor had paid their lay-


away bill. One didn't believe
it and hung up. The other
two were ecstatic.
'They're like, 'Really?
Who did that?" Strong
recalled. "They were really
shocked."
In Winter Garden, about
15 miles west of Orlando,
Silvagnoli said one man
came in after hearing
reports about families hav-
ing trouble keeping up
with their payments. He
said the man wanted to do
something for his commu-
nity and did not wish to be
identified.
Silvagnoli said the man
paid nearly all the bills
for 50 to 100 families,
leaving just one or two
dollars remaining on
their accounts. The good
Samaritan was still arri-ang-
ing the payments when
some of the families came
in, Silvagnoli said. One
woman suspected he was
the one who had paid off
her account.
"It has to be you,"
Silvagnoli recalled her say-
ing, in tears.
The woman hugged
the man and thanked him.
Silvagnoli said he hadn't
seen anything like it before,
and that the experience left
him with a feeling of hope.
'There are always people
who have a good heart to
help the community," he
said.
Dan Eppler, the manager
of a Walmart in Pensacola,
said four or five secret
Santas have come in to
pay the layaway bills of


Warning against
deceptive sites
TALLAHASSEE The
state is warning drivers
of deceptive websites that
people into paying a fee
to access online motorist
services.
The Florida Department
of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicles issued a *
warning Friday to cus-
tomers about the official-
looking websites that
require a surcharge. The
state site does not require
a surcharge for any of its
websites.

GOP debate
scheduled Jan. 26


~; ~ -- -
ASSO
In this Thursday photo released by the Florida Keys News Bureau, adult and studei
finalize a 60-foot-wide outdoor mural in Key Largo that depicts Henry Flagler's Flori


Over-Sea Railroad.


Christmas toys for about 10
families there so far. One
of those helped was Sara
Chaimowitz, a single moth-
er. She told the Pensacola
News Journal that her
grandmother had died days
before, and she and her
father had spent about $900
in savings for the cremation.
Chaimowitz wasn't sure if
she'd be able to pay off the
remaining $60 for her son's
Christmas presents.
When she went to check
her layaway balance on
Tuesday, she was told she
only owed a penny.


Panhandling
mother charged
ST. PETERSBURG.- A
St Petersburg woman has
been arrested after her tod-
'der reportedly wandered
into traffic while she was
panhandling.
The St Petersburg Times
reports Bridgette Patricia
Baldyga was arrested
Thursday and charged with
child abuse and possession
of a controlled substance.
Police say the 18-year-old
woman was panhandling.


OCIATED PRE
nt artists
da Keys


on a busy road when at
some point her 22-month-
old daughter wandered into
traffic. A passing motorist
told police he had seen the
child collecting money.
Baldyga was holding a
sign saying she had been
laid off and couldn't find
a job. She told police she
needed money to provide
for her daughter, but denied
the toddler was panhandling
and wandering in traffic.
Police say she had sever-
al Xanax pills in her pocket
Baldyga's mother is now
caring for the toddler.


MIAMI A conserva-
tive Hispanic political group
is teaming up with the
Republican Party of Florida
to sponsor a presidential pri-
mary debate on Jan. 26.
That's just five days
before the Jan. 31 Florida
primary.
The state party
announced Friday the ,
Hispanic Leadership
Network as co-sponsor
of the debate that will be
aired on CNN and CNN en
Espanol.
The group wants to
persuade Hispanic voters
in swing states including
Nevada, Florida and New
Mexico that conservative
candidates are better suited
to fix the nation's struggling
economy.
(AP)
...-> ,*:. .-


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Jerry's 'Method to the Madness'


LOS ANGELES
Gregg Barson is a documentar-
ian, not a comedian. But when Jerry
-Lewis let him know that more than a
dozen people were waiting in line to
tell his story, Barson offered a per-
suasive punch line.
"Yeah, but they're not me," was
.Barson's comeback, followed by a
'momentary quiver of fear that he'd
gone too far with the veteran star.
"He said, 'I like that You know
why? Because you remind me of
me,'" Barson recalled. That chutz-
pah-fueled exchange led to "Method
to the Madness of Jerry Lewis,"
which debuted Saturday on Encore.
Other airings include 11:30 a.m.
Sunday and 8 p.m. Tuesday.
The film focuses on what makes
the 85-year-old and still working
Lewis tick as a performer and
filmmaker. Those looking for dish on
his family life or breakup with stage
and screen partner Dean Martin or
abrupt departure from the Muscular
Dystrophy Association telethon he'd
nurtured for nearly five decades
won't find it here.
Barson, who describes himself
as being "in heaven" whenever
he caught a Lewis film on TV as a
youngster, said his intent was to
focus on Lewis' career from vaude-
ville on and his contributions to com-
edy and movies.
Younger people without exposure
to Lewis' work likely consider him
as "that telethon guy. Hopefully, the
film will open their eyes as opposed
to thinking he did one thing one day
a year," Barson said.
During more than three years of
filming, Barson had near-complete
access as he followed Lewis from
his yacht in San Diego to his home
in Las Vegas to concert dates and to
the Cannes Film Festival in France,
the country that idolizes Lewis as a
cinematic genius.
He was good company, Barson.
said. "He's always up, funny and
playful .... The sparkle, he didn't put
in on for the camera. He's being
real."
"Method to the Madness," which
opens with Jerry Seinfeld, Eddie


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 7 photo released by Starz, director John Landis, left, and comedian
Jerry Lewis pose after the Encore Original premiere of "Method to the Madness of
Jerry Lewis"


Murphy and other comedians anoint-
ing Lewis as comedy royalty, is an
unabashed valentine. It is also a
reminder that Lewis inspired rock-
star levels of fan devotion, and of
how impressively "The Bellboy"
.(1960) and many other films starring
and written and directed by Lewis
ruled the box office.

Beach Boys announce
50th anniversary tour
NEW YORK-- It's almost winter,
but get ready for some surf and sun:
The Beach Boys are reuniting.
The founding members of the
classic rock group Brian Wilson,
Mike Love and Al Jardine -
announced Friday they are getting
back together to celebrate their 50th
anniversary. They're working on a
new album and also plan a 50-date
tour that will take them around the
world.
"This anniversary is special to
me because I miss the boys, and it
will be a thrill for me to make a new
record and be on stage with them


again," Wilson said in a statement
The group also includes Bruce
Johnston and David Marks, both of
whom have been with the band for
decades.
The Rock and Roll Hall of Famers
gave birth to the California rock
sound. Back then, the band mem-
bers were Love, Jardine, Wilson and
his two brothers Carl and Dennis
Wilson, who have since died. With
songs like "Good Vibrations," "I
Get Around" and "California Girls,"
the quintet embodied the fantasy of
West Coast beach life. Their albums,
particularly "Pet Sounds," influenced
rockers of their generation and
beyond.
But Wilson suffered mental prob-
lems that caused him to withdraw
from the band, and there were years
of animosity between Love and,
Wilson, who are cousins, as well
as lawsuits among members of the
band. Still, they have gotten back
together over the years, including
for their 40th anniversary in the last
decade.

(AP)


Director Steven
Spielberg is 65.
Actor Brad Pitt is 48.
Actress Katie Holmes


("Dawson's Creek'") is 33.
Singer Christina
Aguilera is 31.


Daily Scripture
But after he had considered
this, an angel of the Lord
appeared to him in a dream
and said, "Joseph son of David,
do not be afraid to take Mary
home as your wife, because
what is conceived in her is
from the Holy Spirit. She will
give birth to a son, and you are
to give him the name Jesus,
because he will save his people
from their sins."
Matthew 1:20-21


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ...............7.55-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakectyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .................. $26.32
24 Weeks ............... $48.79
52 Weeks ................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................... $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

Due to inaccuate information provided by the Columbia
County Sheriff's Office, the names of two suspects were
misspelled in stories on Page 1A in Saturday's edition of the
Lake City Reporter. The correct spellings are: Anwar Rasheed
Nixon and James Edward Robinson.


Celebrity Birthdays









Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


OLUSTEE: Post office will be closed
Continued From Page 1A


But for residents of this
rural community in the
western county, the federal
agency's problems mean
little compared to the loss
of what Olustee postmaster
Glenda Owen described as
the neighborhood's "com-
munications center."
She recalled the day
someone came in and men-
tioned. they'd just seen a
group of cows wandering
on US 90. The 23-year post
office manager immedi-
ately knew whose cows
they likely were and who
to call to help corral them
to safety.
According to Owen, an
Olustee native, as well as
other neighborhood resi-
dents who visited the small
white building on Ocean
Street with an American
flag outside the. morning of
Dec. 6, the community will
lose more than the rough-
ly 170 mailboxes located
there.
Retired men who arrive
promptly at 8 am to pick up
their mail and swap town
gossip will not have a con-
venient place to congregate
and socialize.
Bettie Starling will have
a difficult time keeping
up with town happenings,
too. The Olustee resi-
dent'moved there in 2003
and stops by the' post
office two or three times
a month to buy stamps,
ship packages and chat
with Owen.
"We'll, miss it," said
Starling. "I don't have the
time to run around the
neighborhood and talk with
all of the women. I'm used
to coming here and talking
to Glenda."
"This is where a lot of
people get their informa-
tion about what's going on
in town," said Owen, adding
later that one local resident
calls her "the dispatcher."
"They come in and sit


PACKAGES
Continued From 1A

the lake.
'They appeared to be
wrapped as Christmas pres-
ents," Blanchard said.
Blanchard said authori-
ties attempted to find the
owner of the packages but
were unsuccessful.
'"There are several people
that are known in the area
that during the holidays they
leave packages out for peo-
ple," he said.
However, those items -
clothes, mostly aren't usu-
ally wrapped as Christmas
gifts, he said.
The bomb disposal unit
arrived just after 2 p.m. to
determine the nature of the
packages.
Local authorities blocked
many of the entrances to the
area.
The bomb squad X-
rayed the packages, deter-
mined they were empty, and
destroyed them sometime
before 5 p.m..
The Chances for Children
office is located near Lake
DeSoto. Sandy Tice, the
agency's program direc-
tor, was hosting the annual
Christmas party that day.
A police officer told her the
children wouldn't be allowed
to use the road around the
lake for train rides until they
were sure it ws safe.
Tice said she was told if
it became anything too seri-
ous they would evacuate the
area.
'The kids had a great
time without the train," she
said. "The train is always
something special for us
but this didn't disrupt their
Christmas."

*(i:M'.4'n, I):lIi; :


FUIT CA K E
$30001


around and talk. It's not
like that at the other post
offices," she said.
* Olustee post office box
renters have two options
after the closing apply
for rural route delivery or
a new box at the Sanderson
post office, where the lobby
is open 24 hours a day,
Seewoester said.
USPS contracted with
Owen, whose family owns
the post office building,
to operate the office.
The contract expires
December 31 and has not
been renewed.
Seewoester said any 2012
rent paid for post office
boxes will be refunded and
that stamps can be pur-
chased directly from rural
route carriers.
Retiree Earl Odom has
lived 2.5 riles from the
post office off CR 231 S.
since 1974. He and about
10 neighboring residenc-
es have applied for rural
route delivery, but they
have yet to gain approval,.
he said.
"I hate to see it close,"
Odom said of the post
office. "When you get deliv-
ery, your mail is not as


secure ... But most of all,
it's a damn tradition."
Owen agreed.
"The worse thing is,
we're losing our identity
as a community ... Not so
much for the new people
that have moved here, but
the ones that have been
here their whole lives," she
said.
For Owen, who's spent
more than two decades
running the post office, the
closing is also a sign of how
Olustee is changing.
"People don't all go to
the same church anymore,"
she said. "Everything is so
modern nowadays. People
used to walk the streets
and sit on their porches
and just visit. Now, you can
drive past somebody on the
street and you have no idea
who they are."
."It's really sad," said
Owen.
The recently widowed
Owen isn't sure what she'll
do to occupy her mornings
after the closure, but she's
got some ideas, namely
fishing and volunteering.
"I don't know what I
would volunteer at, but I'd
like to do that," she said.


ROLES: Learning, living history
Continued From Page 1A


Playing the role of historical re-
enactor requires a different kind of
learning, said Wilks, who has per-
formed as a re-enactor with the Blue-
Grey Army for 11 years during the
Olustee Festival and Battle.
"They have to know their history
deeper," she said. The stage is a
protected area, with a rehearsed and
predetermined script. Re-enactors
and docents have to know their char-
acter and the time period very well
as museum or festival guests ask
questions.
Each student was able to chose a
historical character, either real or
fictional, to portray. Students then
researched their character, devel-
oping a portfolio on the time
period's customs and events.
After winter break, students
will have about a month to
rehearse before the festival.
Some students will' portray
other generations speaking
about their fathers and grand-
fathers who fought in the Civil
War while others will portray
people from the Civil War.
Some students are making
outfits for their character,
while others are borrow-
ing them from re-enactment
groups and the museum.
"They really have built quite Fort
a community," said Harry Fr t
Joiner, drama and English tells tl
j


teacher at-Fort White High School.
The school has three drama classes
and other students who perform as
an extracurricular.
Acting builds confidence, he said.
"Confidence and the ability to handle
yourself in public are to me critical
skills," he said. "Their individual
gifts and talents become known."
"It's really street performance
instead of stage performance," said
Joiner, who will perform as a fiction-
al chaplain.
"The kids just adore her. They
flock to her," he said'of Wilks.
The students will perform Feb.
17 and 18 -from noon until 4 p.m. in *
Wilson Park.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
White High School student Latoddra Mason, 15,
he story of Aunt Aggie and her boneyard.


CATALYST: Potential tenant could bringjobs, $150M investment

Continued From Page 1A


manager,
A second business would
also move to the site to sup-
port the first business. That
company would employ
about 30 people with an
average salary of about
$70,000.
Williams said the Plum
Creek project will be
time consuming for the
county's new Economic
Development Department
director Jesse Quillen.
He estimated Quillen will
spend at least 20'percent of
his time working with Plum
Creek officials to develop
the site.
"You'd be surprised how
much time I spend on this,"
Williams said.
Plum Creek representa-
tives will continue to take
the lead on all current -
and future negotiations
with prospective tenants.
Quillen said his role is to
market the site.
"It's important for a com-
munity to have a product to
market," he said. "We think
we have something unique
there to-offer."

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY
The site in Lake city is
one of four in the state that
were established as central
hubs for potential econom-
ic development.
Representatives from
14 regional counties in
the state-designated Rural
Area of Critical Economic
Concern, commonly called
a RACEC, identified a site
in Lake City and another in
Suwannee County as cata-
lyst sites.
Megrath said her compa-
ny was asked if they would
be willing to designate tim-
berland near Lake City for
development. The site was
selected because of its loca-
tion near major roads and
interstate highways, an air-
port, rail lines, utilities and


available workforce.
Lake City manager
Wendell Johnson said $18
million was designated for
a new wastewater treat-
ment plant on the west side
of town, but lack of growth
in the city makes the plant
there unnecessary. Instead,
the money may be used to
build a facility east of town
to accommodate the cata-
lyst site.
"There are no issues
other than no transmission
lines for sewage," Johnson
said. "We have the money
to expand utility services.
Infrastructure is the key to
economic development"
The 500-acre site is part
of a 2,590-acre tract owned
by Plum Creek that was
designated mixed use for
the project Nearly 3,400
additional acres of Plum
Creek property currently
used as timberland are also
available for developmefit if
the catalyst site needs the
land, Megrath said.
Legislation passed in
2010 also designates cata-
lyst sites as Enterprise
Zones, making businesses
who locate there eligible
for a variety of tax credits
and incentives. They are
also eligible for a break
in fees for utility hookups,
permits and taxes.
New businesses may
also be eligible fast track-
ing to speed up processing
paperwork and for state
job-training programs,
Megrath said.
"We do think we have
something unique to offer,"
she said.
An inland port to handle
increased freight traffic at
the Port of Jacksonville
may also be established at
the Catalyst Site.
"It lends itself to be an
ideal location," she said.
If the site is developed,
commercial businesses
such as restaurants, gas


stations, supply stores and
auto repair shops could
open nearby, she said. The
.site is also approved for 300
housing units.
Plum Creek officials also
plan to apply for the site
to be designated a foreign
trade zone, which Megrath
said is another incentive for
businesses.
Businesses operating in
the zone don't pay taxes on
materials used in the manu-
facturing of their products
until they are assembled.
Megrath said the Port
of Jacksonville has already
been given approval to
expand their foreign port
zone to Columbia County.
She said Plum Creek offi-
cials plan to wait until
they get a formal commit-
ment froni a tenant before
applying for the foreign
port zone designation
from Port of Jacksonville
officials.
The -designation triggers
a five-year deadline for a
business at a catalyst site to
start manufacturing opera-
tions, she said.
If an agreement is
reached with the unnamed
company in negotiations to
move to the site, Megrath
said Plum Creek officials
will apply for the foreign
port zone designation.

WORK AHEAD
A potentially important
component to the project
is a proposed rail spur that
would cut through 1,500
feet of Osceola Forest to
the catalyst site.
Megrath said her com-
pany is currently in the
study phase for a permit
application. One study has
already determined there
are no cultural or historical
resources such as Native
American burial mounds
along the proposed route
that would connect the cat-


alyst site to a CSX Railroad
line running parallel to U.S.
90.
"There was nothing dis-
covered by the team that
*can't be mitigated," she
said.
The other -alternative
would be to build a rail
line around the state forest
instead of through it, but at
a cost of about $1 million a
mile to build new tracks, it
would be costly, she said.
The county has asked for
a wetlands study to deter-
mine the environmental
impact of building a spur
through the forest.
CSX would build the
tracks, but Megrath said
the railroad would not pay
the cost of laboror materi-
als.
"I'm not certain who will
pay for the rail lines," she
said. "They [CSX] are defi-
nite partners in this proj-
ect."
Megrath expressed con-
fidence a spur through the
forest will be approved.


"I'm very confident
because this has been
designated a catalyst site,"
she said. "We're definitely
going through an analysis
right now."
A rail connection to the
catalyst site may help con-
vince some businesses to
move here, but the lack
of rail access isn't a deal
breaker for many busi-
nesses.
"It's an important com-
ponent but it's not crucial,"
Megrath said. "With or
without it, this project is
moving forward."
While she is uncertain
how many jobs will even-
tually be created at .the
catalyst site, Megrath is
confident the project will
impact employment and
add to the county tax
base.
"The number of jobs
depends on the industries
that locate there," she
said. "Enterprise zones
give incentives .for busi-
nesses."


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Florida Tax Payers

please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous fallacy
of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia High
School, and Fort White High School students and alumni. All of them
are offspring of Adam and his female wife Eve and therefore are created
by God, in the image of God. (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1
End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1;
page 52 SC.912.L.15.10
http://fcat.fldoe.orq/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)

I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The.Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com

in The Year of our Lord 2011
Paid for by Kenny Merriken


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











OPINION


Sunday, December 18, 201 I


OUR ANOTHER


OUR
OPINION



Simple,


sound


advice -


again


We're impressed
thus far with
the county's
new Economic
Development
Department director, in particu-
lar the frankness he displayed
at his first meeting with the
EDD board.
Given the tools, he'll deliver,
Jesse Quillen told board mem-
bers.
That means, among other
things, the ability to act fast at
times, without having to ask
permission on every small
detail.
"If I'm given that freedom,
I'll be successful here," Quillen
said. "If not, we've got a prob-
lem."
We were equally pleased
with the response of Quillen's
boss, County Manager Dale
Williams.
"I haven't heard anything
that Jesse said that is an issue,"
said Williams, who promnised
Quillen would have all the
power he needed to perform
his duties. *
Makes perfect sense to us.
Just a few Weeks back we
defended Williams' autonomy
when some on the county com-
mission wanted to strip him
of his power to hire whom he
pleased for key posts.
Let the man ,do his job, we
said. If he doesn't perform to
your liking, let him go.
Same simple principle applies
here.
We're pleased to see it in play
once again.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Sunday, Dec. 18,
the 352nd day of 2011. There
are 13 days left in the year. -
On this date:
In 1940, Adolf Hitler ordered
secret preparations for Nazi
Germany to invade the Soviet
Union.
Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers,
This mission will be accomplished
.through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


A few years ago, I
ran a column about
fruitcakes, the
original of the free
gifts no one can
return and my mama's special
fruitcake recipe. It generated
probably the most email of
any column I ever wrote, not
to mention comments from
people I ran into. I even had
the high honor of it hanging
on the wall at Atlantic Seafood.
To this day, I don't know which
Charlie Taylor enjoyed most,
my mama's "old family" fruit-
cake recipe, the liquid contents
thereof or the column. He never
did say. Be that as it may, I'm
sure mama would be proud to
know her recipe graced the wall
of an aromatic fish house in
Fernandina Beach.
I don't know how fruitcake
ever came to be so maligned.
I love the stuff. They date
back to the Roman times, you
know. Centurions used them
to chock the wheels of their,
chariots. During the Dark
Ages, villagers used fruitcakes
to help determine whether
someone was a witch or not. A
fruitcake was put on one side
of a scale and the accused was
set on the other side. If the
fruitcake side sank, and the
story goes that it always did,
"the poor soul on the other side
who floated was deemed to be
a witch and drowned in a vat
of scalding hbt eggnog.
The cake was fairly boring
until colonists introduced it to
the New World, where it was
served to some Indigenous
People at an early Christmas
celebration. One of the tribal
elders took the Puritan-in-Chief
aside and told him, ya know,
boss man, this stuff wouldn't
be half bad if you'd tell your
women to doctor it with a little
hooch. And because Prohibition


Joe Palmer
treysurf@comcastnet


was still light years away, cooks
all over America, from little old
granny ladies to professional
bakers began sousing their
fruitcakes in every alcoholic
beverage from ale to white light-
ning.
My sweet mama, God rest
her soul, was a champion fruit-
cake maker and soaker. Her
fruitcakes were so potent that
one slice could cause chaos
and bacchanalian behavior
in an AA meeting. There was
enough bourbon in a whole
cake to turn a platoon of
Marines comatose. The cops
used to set up DUI check-
points a few blocks from our
house. Each cake came with
a business card from the local
bail bondsman and a lawyer.
Mama started constructing
her highly flammable ingredi-
ents around September. After
she baked it and let it breathe
a few days, she wrapped it in
a towel and then soaked the
towel in fine bourbon. She put
the wrapped cake in a hat box ,
and let it steep a few days and
then removed it and drenched
the towel again. By December,
you couldn't light a grill ,
within 500,feet of it unless you
planned to start New Year's
fireworks celebrations a few
weeks early.
Mama passed away two years
ago. She wasn't much on writing
down her recipes but I caught
up with her one time and asked


her for her fruitcake recipe. I'm
a teetotaler these days and can't
have any but I figured I'd pass
it along just in case: Best I can
recall, it went something like
this:
Cup of water, cup of sugar,
flour, 4 large eggs, 2 cups dried
fruit, teaspoon of salt, cup of
brown sugar, lemon juice, nuts,
one quart of Jack Daniels. .
Cooking instructions: Sample
whiskey and check quality. Take
a large bowl. Check whiskey
again. To be sure it's of high
quality, drink one level cup.
Repeat. Turn on electric mixer.
Beat a cup of butter in a large
fluffy bowl. Add sugar and beat
again. Make sure whiskey still
okay. Cry another tup. Turn
off eclectic mixter. If fried
druit gets stuck on beaterers,
pry loose with a drewscriver.
Sample whishkey again for ton-
sisticity. Sift salt. Something. Sift
lemon juice. Strain nuts. Add
table. Grease oven. Turn cake
tin 350 degrees. Don't forget to
beat off turner. Throw out bowl.
Check whishkey again and go
to bed.
Warning! Do not drive or
operate vehicles, heavy machin-
ery, light machinery, sewing
machinery, slot machinery hors-
es, bicycles or telephones after
indulging. Do not try singing.
Don't tell jokes. There's noth-
ing in this recipe that will make
you pretty, handsome, witty or
smart. Don't call old friends at
2:00 a.m.
And if you should happen to
have too much of my mama's
fruitcake and get a DUI, call
mama's lawyer and talk with
him. He will refer you to a good
bail bondsman.


* Columnist Joe Palmer lives
in Fernandina Beach.


Smokers may lose space


One of the last legal
loopholes for fed-
eral workers who
smoke would be
closed under a
measure newly introduced in
the House.
Since a 1997 Clinton adminis-
tration executive order, smoking
has been banned in most areas
of many federal buildings. But,
until 2008, smoking was allowed
in some indoor and outdoor des-
ignated areas.
That year, the General
Services Administration the
federal bureaucracy's building
caretaker decreed smokers
could only light up outside and
no closer than 25 feet from
entrances and exits.
Turns out, that order applied
only to federal buildings owned


Lisa Hoffman
lisahoffman@shns.comrn


by the GSA. Left out were
thousands of privately owned
workplaces in Washington and
across the country leased to the
GSA
Rep. Susan Davis, D-Calif.,
wants to tamp out that distinc-
tion, introducing a bill that
would make the 25-foot ban
apply to all federal buildings
owned, leased or otherwise
used by an agency of the execu-


tive branch of government
But, because the House,
Senate and White House are
not under the GSA's domain,
neither Davis' bill, nor any GSA
no-smoking rules, would apply
to those employees.
That doesn't mean you
can smoke in those places.
President Barack Obama who
says he is a reformed smoker
- has deemed the White House
smoke free. And the House and
Senate restrict smoking. But
there remain places on Capitol
Hill such as a balcony off the
House floor where smoking
is permitted. Few expect House
Speaker John Boehner, a long-
time cigarette hound, to do any-
thing about that.
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Mullahs:


Repent


or die


Nadarkhani, the
Iranian Christian
cleric facing death
for the crime of
apostasy against an Islamic
faith he never held, has been
given a temporary stay of
execution. Iran's top judge,
Ayatollah Sadegh Larijani,
instructed presiding Judge
Ghazi Kashani to delay carry-
ing out capital punishment for
a year in order to give time
for Mr. Nadarkhani to recant
Christianity and become a
Muslim.
The Iranian regime may be
responding to international pres-
sure. Mr. Nadarkhani's case has
become a prominent cause for
the religious-rights community.
His story was first reported by
Christian and Iranian dissident
websites, then by Western
media outlets. On International
Human Rights Day, Dec. 9,
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton called on
"every government to release all
prisoners of conscience immedi-
ately and unconditionally, includ-
ing Pastor Yousef Nadarkhani,
Father Thadeus Nguyen Van Ly
[a Vietnamese Catholic priest],
and the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize
winner Liu Xiaobo [dissident
writer in prison in China]."
Mr. Nadarkhani was
arrested in his home city of
Rasht in October 2009 for
questioning Islamic control of
religious instruction of Iranian
children. He was first charged
with illegal protest and later
with the more serious crimes
of apostasy and evangelizing
Muslims. He was convicted in
September 2010 and sentenced
to death. His wife was given
life in prison, and his attorney,
Iranian human-rights lawyer
Mohammed Ali Dadkhah,
was convicted separately
of "actions and propaganda
against the Islamic regime,"
sentenced to nine years in
prison and barred from practic-
ing law for a decade.
Mr. Nadarkhani appealed
the death sentence, which
was affirmed by Iran's
Supreme Court in June 2011.
Prosecutors acknowledged he
had never been a Muslim as
an adult buit said the apostasy
law still applies because he has
"Islamic ancestry." Hearings
were held in September to give
Mr. Nadarkhani the oppor-
tunity to recant his faith and
avoid execution. When asked
to repent his Christian beliefs,
Mr. Nadarkhani replied,
"Repent means to return. What
should I return to?" The court
pressed that he should return
"to the religion of your ances-
tors, Islam." Mr. Nadarkhani
said, "I cannot"
The delay in carrying out
the sentence buys time for the
Iranian regime, in hopes that
Mr. Nadarkhani will either sub-
mit to Islam or be forgotten by
the international community
and be executed in secrecy,
unnoticed. Ift's unlikely he will
succumb to pressure. In a 2010
prison epistle, he discussed at
length the centrality of suffering
and sacrifice to his faith. The
true believer, he wrote, "does
not need to wonder for the fiery
trial that has been set on for him
as though it were something
unusual, but it pleases him to
participate in Christ's suffering.
Because the believer knows he
will rejoice in his glory."
Mr. Nadakhani counsels
those following his case
to, "Retain your souls with
patience. For there is no man
that doeth anything in secret"
Iran's mullahs should be cer-


tain that if they sacrifice him
on the gallows, the world will
know, and sit in judgment
* Washington Times


www.lakecityreporter.com


DOn't drink and



drive the fruitcake








Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at.
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Dec. 18
'We Have Our Savior'
The First Presbyterian
Church, 697 Baya Dr.,
will have a worship
service at 11 a.m.
with the musical "We
Have Our Savior." For
information call 752-
0670.

One of Us
A Christmas musical
presented by the Adult
Choir, Sunday night,
Dec. 18 ay 6 p.m. at
First Baptist Church,
182 NE Justice Street,
Lake City.
Rev. Chris Phillips,
Minister of Youth, Rev.
Ken Baxley, Minister of
Music.

The Heart of
Christmas
Everyone is invited
to a free musical
performance of "The
Heart of Chtristmas"
on Sunday, Dec. 18 at 6
p.m. It will be performed
by the choir at Wesley
Memorial United
Methodist Church under
the direction of Nancy
Metzger.
The church is at
1272 SW McFarlane
Ave., next to Summers
Elementary School in
Lake City.

'Glorious Impossible'
The combined music
ministries of Pine
Grove Baptist Church
and Southside Baptist
Church present "Glorious
Impossible" Saturday,
December 17,at-7;00-, ,
p.m., Southside Baptist
Church, 388 S.E. Baya
Drive and Sunday,
December 18 at 6:00
p.m., Pine Grove Baptist
Church, 1989 N. Hwy
441.
Admission is free,
but seating is limited.
For advanced tickets
or further information,
please call: Pine Grove
Baptist Church, 386-
752-2664 or Southside
Baptist Church, 386-755-
5553.
Nursery will be
provided for up to four
years old.

Candlelight service

We invite you to come
and worship with us at
our annual Candlelight
Service at New Bethel


OBITUARIES

Robert James King
Robert James King, 65, of Lake
City, FL, passed away on Friday,
December 16, 2011, at Shands
at Gainesville, FL. He was born
in Jacksonville, FL to the late
Robert B. King and Dixie Hurley
King. He had served in the U.
S. Navy and was a salesman.
A loving father and brother, he
also loved NASCAR, football,
hunting, fishing and motorcycle .
racing.
Survivors include his mother:
Dixie King Doncaster, Lake
City, FL; two sons: Robert
King, Jr. (Amanda) and Byron
King, both of Jacksonville, FL;
one sister: Patti Aldous (Skip),
Lake City, FL, favorite niece:
Tricia Mackey; nephew: Greg
Mackey; and four grandchildren.
Graveside funeral services will
be conducted on Monday, De-
cember 19, 2011, at Greenlawn
Cemetery in Jacksonville, FL, at
10:00 A.M. with Rev. Louie Ma-
brey officiating. Visitation with
the family will be on Sunday,
December 18, 2011, from 5 P.M.
to 7 P.M. at the funeral home.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S. US
Hwy 441, Lake City, FL 32025


Missionary Baptist
Church. The servi
will begin at 5:30 p
on Sunday, Decem
18, 2011. The chui
is located at 550 NI
Martin Luther Kinj
Street.
Our annual Watch-
service will begin
9:30 p.m. on Satur
December 31, 2011
invite everyone to
and worship with u
as we praise and th
the Lord for bring
us through 2011 an
for allowing us to e
2012.
Pastor Alvin J. Bal
will deliver the me

Dec. 19

EEOC monthly
meeting
The NAACP
- Columbia Count
will host the U.S.
Equal Employmer
Opportunity
Commission at its
monthly meeting.
Join us to learn al
the EEOC's latest
initiatives, and to
Tampa Field Offic
Director Georgia
Marchbafiks.
The meeting'will 1
held Monday, Dec
6:00 pm at Richar
Community Cente
255 Coach Anders
Lake City.
For further


ice
).m.
ber
rch
E
g


information, contact
Glynnel Presley, (386)
752-4074.

Dec. 21


Christmas Cantata
night
at Bethel AME Church
day, will be celebrating their
I. We Third Annual Christmas
come Cantata at 6:00 p.m. on
is Dec. 21, 2011. Lots of
"ank singing and praising
ng God. Come one and all.
ad For more information
enter contact Sha'leda Mirra
at 984-6618 or Lena
ker
ssage. Lofton 754-4694.

Dec. 23

Free breakfast
Friday December 23rd,
ty 2011- from 7am-9am
at Pinemount Baptist
Church. in McAlpin
(HWY 129 South-across
from the S and S)
willbe giving away free
)out Sausage Biscuits and
Coffee, Juice or Milk
meet All for Free NO
,e
STRINGS ATTACHED!!!!
be
19 at Dec. 24
dson
r, Christmas candlelight
s Way, service at Faith in
Christ Church
Everyone is invited


to come and worship
Christmas Eve
At our New church home
in Lake City Fldrida.
The service will begin
at 11pm on December
24th and end with Holy
Communion at midnight
The church is located at,
282 SW Magical Terrace,
just off Pinemount/SR
252 one block North of
the Book Store.
Take Pinemount rd
SOUTH from Food Lion,
approx 1 mile, road is on
the RIGHT
Call for more info: 754-
2827.

Christmas pageant
The First Presbyterian
Church, 697 Baya Dr.,
will host an impromptu
Christmas pageant
for all ages at 7 p.m.
and have a traditional
Christmas service at 11
p.m. For information call
752-0670.
Christmas Eve church
service
The Mount Tabor
A.M.E. Church will be
hosting a Christmas
Eve church service and
celebration on Saturday,
December 24 at 6 p.m.
The community is
invited. The church is
located at 519 SW L.M.
Aaron Drive in Lake
City.'
For more information
please contact George


Moultrie at 386-754-0376
or Reola Finkley at 386-
438-4803.
Pastor: Rev. Robert
Postell.
Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service

Falling Creek Chapel,
1290 NW Falling Creek
Rd., wil be having
a Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service
starting at 6:30 p.m.
Everyone is welcome.
For information call 755-
0580.

Dec. 31

Watch-night service

We invite you to come
and worship with us at
our annual Candlelight
Service at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist
Church. The service
will begin at 5:30 p.m.
on Sunday, December
18, 2011. The church
is located at 550 NE
Martin Luther King
Street.
Our annual Watch-night
service will begin at
9:30 p.m. on- Saturday,
December 31, 2011. We
invite everyone to come
and worship with us
as we praise and thank
the Lord for bringing
us through 2011 and
for allowing us to 'enter


2012.
Pastor Alvin J. Baker
will deliver the message.


ONGOING


Boys Club winter
program


The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program, which runs
through March 1. Fees
are $175, which includes
transportation from all
elementary and junior
high schools.
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts and crafts,
gamerooms ad special
events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutoria
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
available,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones
Way.


^Akrs Imas


5' ', -


fOm our 51Mmi/f to.


Pd
4


Nettles Sugar Cured
Whole Smoked
Picnics

$149,
1lIb

Nettles
Pork Chops



$100061b. box
., ... . ..........., ,
Boneless
New York Strips
$599 b
Whole or Half Loin
Whole or Half Loin j


Nettles Sugar Cured


Whole Smoked


Hams
.l .'1."swn .,"-< ., **< .>TBlall' ?^' fTW !(.z-- .'eO t"'/'w t-** 'yt- ;. ^ w,. i^'u..-'i",


Nettles
Smoked
Turkeys

$2499


Nettles
Smoked
Hog Jowl

$199
Ib

Boneless Skinless
Chicken Breast


1:4
F'


(386-752-1954) is in charge
of arrangements. Please send
message of love and comfort to
www.gatewayforestlawn.com.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Nettles Whole Bone-In
Smoked
Turkey Breast


349lb J

Boston Butt
Pork Roast

$169 lb

2 Pack
-. .--
Semi Boneless
Ribeyes


$699b
Whole or Half Loin ,


$169lb


Fieldale Farms Premium
Chicken Wing
Portions


$79951b bag

Bone-In
Pork Loins



Whole or Half Loin


Georgia Red
Sweet Potatoes



$1400 401b. box


fo Nettles Sausage
lt 190 SW CR 240
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 752-2510
Store Hours: Monday Saturday 8am 6pm

PRICES GOOD 12-19-11 THRU 12-24-11
SNAP EBT DEBIT.
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED


$1A99 bg
1V 1O01b. bag


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


an


b
q










LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


THE WEATHER




SUNNY MOSTLY INCR. : CHANCE CHANCE
H I LO SUNNYIJ CLOUDS 7; -7STORMS -STORMS!


HI166LO J. HI71LO HI77LO 17L-' I 76L0L 5:
', I s -,' --." .__ _ _ H1 6 L- f- -i H"


* Pensacola
E 2 44


Tallahassee .
65 35


SValdosta
64,'37
Lake City.
66 35


Gainesville *
Panama City 66 38
64 44 Ocala
67 4-


Tampa S
71", 1


FL Myer
75 52


City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
62 42 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
oj' 54 Gainesvllle
S Jacksonville

Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
60 51 9 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
;'5 6.; Orlando
* FL Lauderdale Panama City
rs i7 65 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
76 55 Miami Tampa


Key West
75 67


77 64 Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


.Z I,


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
LOw Sa,3urdoa
rNormal high
ljor rr,.3i low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


74
49
68
44
85 in 1956
25 in 1968


0.00"
0.36"
33.25";
1.30"
47.10"


SUN
Sunnse toda3
Sunset tmSa
Sunnse tomn
Sunsei torm


7-21 a.m.
5:33 p n,
7:21 a.m.
5.34 pnm.


MOON uItr.a- 3 JeI
Moonnse today 12:42 a.m. raiatio r,
Moonset today 12:39 p.m. ior tr e are--a
Moonrise tom. 1:46 a.m. a sc .i-e I'ron,
Moonset tom. 1:18 p.m. .


OOO,
Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan. 16 ,
24 1 9 16 0 )
New First Full Last
weather "


Monday
71 f.5 .' .
7,,' 59 .
75 64
3 .1 .
h' 53 1
7* ,3 c ,:



S.i 5' ;

6l 50 r. .

76 51 .4
69 J1, :
, I '. 5
66 57 *


.9 4 7 (:
SJ .6 r .


Tuesday




r, 56. p,:








' 6 1 &,:
7 0 5. r

_ 1 :rh
'5 6,


-If .


Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpubllsher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: Low pressure will be responsible for clouds and showers from south-
ern California into Nevada. Some higher elevation snow will be possible over mountains as
well. Southern texas will continue to have a chance of wet weather with a chance of showers
and thunderstorms.


$ ia w ., ~, : ; ; ? -. ^ l.d t, <- z -i ^ -- *-E '- V -sS S S ;/ -. r ;,- .* -' ..


ra inc ztThr.-I.3 -~.tn-n-"r.Ljrrrw,-.r-


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES'


Saturday Today


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Boise
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne *
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Hi/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
36/31/0 30/20/s Des Moines
44/26/0 46/30/pc Detroit
37/22/0 32/19/sn E Paso
53/43/0 56/35/s Fairbanks
42/36/0 42/33/pc Greensboro
44/29/0 52/23/c Hartford
51/37/0 56/37/s Honolulu
38/16/0 43/20/pc Houston
37/21/0 42/23/pc Indianapolis
41/37/0 32/23/s Jackson MS
34/24/0 37/35/sn Jacksonville
65/54/0 58/36/s Kansas City
36/34/6 44/28/s Las Vegas
51/43/0 53/33/s Little Rock
45/15/0 51/21/pc Los Angeles
31/28/.06 43/35/pc Memphis
38/32/0 44/31/s Miami .
34/30/.15 38/36/pc Minneapolis
62/52/0 59/35/s Mobile
57/33/0 58/50/c New Orleans
77/57/0 67/54/s New York
39/18/0 57/24/s Oklahoma City


Saturday
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
84/73/0
46/36/0
66/53/.05
72/59/0
37/9/0
39/33/.23
82/59/0
70/50/0
39/34/0
81/64/0
37/32/.24
64/57/0
86/75/0


Today,
HI/Lo/W
88/72/s
41/34/sh
62/47/pc
63/58/sh
35/21/s
38/33/sn
85/65/pc
72/52/s
33/22/rs
77/61/c
40/36/rs
69/59/s
86/72/pc


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


High: 81, Fort Myers, F


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W Cl
38/26/0 47/32/s On
31/28/0 38/36/pc Or
50/42/0 61/34/pc Ph
-5/-10/0 10/2/c Ph
48/35/0 51/28/s Pi
43/27/0 33/21/s Pc
77/70/0 81/68/s. Pc
59/50/0 65/53/pc Ra
34/24/0 46/34/s. Ra
52/40/0 63/39/s Re
73/52/0 62/42/s RI
49/22/0 54/41/s Sa
51/36/0 55/38/sh St
53/28/0 60/39/pc Sa
65/52/0 62/48/pc Sa
48/29/0 59/40/s Sa
80/66/0 77/64/s Sa
32/20/.02 42/27/s Se
58/49/0 62/47/s Sp
57/52/0 62/49/s Ta
40/36/0 37/32/s Tu
55/25/0 62/44/t Wi


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
57/41/0
75/66/0
43/30/0
50/34/0
64/43/0
25/18/0
37/30/0
77/61/0
82/68/0
68/43/0
32/25/0
84/73/0
45/36/0


Today
Hi/Lo/W
60/39/sh
76/67/pc
42/33/sh
48/28/s
69/42/s
21/17/pc
33/29/sn
* 79/63/t
81/70/pc
70/49/s
28/23/pc
84/72/t
40/32/pc


1s 1


20 n Io




-..mm F,' w==.= 0

-. 40s & ,
l a--;-1 02 I.n,,'1
S Charlolte IT 1 i

50s ie |






570s Miami 'ory
6 7754
Oc0 laed
Front '


la. Low: -18. Angel Fire, N.M.


Saturday Today,'


TY
maha
lando
hilladelphla
phoenix
ttsburgh
ortland ME
ortland OR
aleigh
apid City
eno
chmond
icramento
. Louis
alt Lake City
in Antonio
in Diego
in Francisco
cattle
pokane
mpa
[cson
ashlngton


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Hl/Lo/Pcp.
49/24/0
77/56/0
42/33/0
69/54/0
32/30/0
34/25/.02
39/36/0
49/41/.10
53/19/0
38/18/0
43/34/.02
49/30/0
46/27/0
31/18/0
56/49/0
61/48/0
52/39/0
41/33/0
34/29/0
78/60/0
65/53/0
42/38/0


HI/Lo/W
52/28/s,
69/54/s4 -
1 '29'p .'
-.; 13 :r
3'6 2 oC '
.,"' 21 :
1,: 37 p.
51c* :,

50 22. 5-
J.6 28 -'
57 '3?0"
54 J2 5-
3, 24 p|,


51. 441 ,

34, 2i".e;
70/51/0-

43/32/pc-:


Saturday Today.
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI,, Lo, W
91/73/.08 86/73/t1
61/43/0 54/38/sh:'
83/71/.01 82/75/pc
82/72/0 82/74/pc
82/55/0 85/56/s.
28/12/0 35/25/s ,-
86/77/0 86/76/t
72/63/0 72/64/c
68/53/0 72/50/s';
50/36/0 51/38/sj
30/19/0 3J *9 p~
46/36/0 y:, ,:' ;
43/37/.12 36/32/c


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c-cloudy, dr=drizzle, f-fair, fg=fog, h-hazy, i=ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sunny,
sh=showers, sn=snow, ts=thunderstorms, w=windy.


1AS,


a i
IF
IN


I w%-~ae tpre~o


i u









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, December


18,201 I1


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
YOUTH BASEBALL
10-under travel
team tryout
The Columbia Timber
Rattlers 10-under
baseball travel team has
a tryout at 2:30 p.m.
today at Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call Todd
Gustavson at 365-2133.

North Florida
Blaze tryout
The North Florida
Blaze travel baseball
team for ages 11-12 has a
tryout set for 2 p.m.
Jan. 7 at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Jamie
Sosa at 867-9039 or Tim
Williamson at 234-0423.

Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is
available at www.lcccyb.
com. Online registration
is $75 plus a transaction
fee. Onsite registration is
5-7 p.m. Jan. 6, 13 and 20,
and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Jan. 7, 14 and 21 at
Southside Sports
Complex at a cost of $80.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810 or
David Williams at
(386) 697-0764.

Georgia Batmen
fielding teams
Georgia Batmen is
fielding 8-under, 9-under,
10-under and 11-under
travel baseball teams in
2012. Spots are
currently available on
next year's 8-under,
9-under and 10-under
teams and additional
teams may be formed in
each age group (age
cutoff date is May 1).
If interested in
coaching or playing,
call Jim Bennett at
(229) 630-3736. For
details, go to
valdostabatmen. corn.
YOUTH GOLF
Holiday camp
at Quail Heights
Quail Heights Country
Club head pro Pete
Sands and Chet Carter
are offering a holiday
golf camp at the club for
juniors ages 6-17 from
8:30-41:30 a.m. Monday
through Friday. Cost is
$60 ($20 for
additional family
members). Groups will
be divided based on skill
level and number of
participants. The
fundamentals of golf, full
swing, short game and
course management will
be covered.
For details, call Carter
at 365-7097, Sands at
(850) 519-0302 or the pro
shop at 752-3339.
LCMS SOFRB.L
Conditioning
begins Jan. 4
Lake City Middle
School softball
conditioning begins at
3:15 p.m. Jan. 4 at the
LCMS softball field. All
participants must have a
current physical,
parent permission form
and drug consent form
before participating (no
exceptions).
For details, call
Machon Kvistad at
623-6833.


M From staff reports


Life


in the fast


Book by Jim Webb


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
In Jim Webb's softball
world, "squashing
the bug" and
"slamming the door"
are bad, while being
stubborn is good.
Webb, the former
softball coach at Lake City
Community College, has
recently written the book
"Learning to Pitch Softball
II.
Subtitled "Things every
pitcher, catcher and coach
should know," the book is
a follow-up of sorts to one
written by Webb in the
early 1980s.
Webb explains the new
book is not a re-write,
but rather an attempt
at inspiration for young
pitchers and coaches
based on his 30 years of
coaching. His first book
was written during the
middle of his pitching
career and was one of the
first to closely examine
fastpitch pitching.
This book has plenty on
the mechanics of pitching,
with chapters on "The
Components of Speed,"
"Control Issues" and "Ball
Movement."
Webb explains how
arm speed, wrist snap,
use of feet and legs and
timing relate to speed and
offers drills to help. His
breakdown on control
offers tips on wild high
and low and to the sides.
He tells where to pitch
batters depending on their
approach to hitting. Ball
movement takes in the rise,
screwball, curve, change-
up and two types of drop.
Webb gives tips to
parents and coaches, in
which he, suggests "being
stubborn" is a good trait
for those wanting to be a
pitcher.
In addition to lessons
learned in his coaching
career. Webb pays tribute .
to several coaches who
have influenced him.
A section is devoted
to Lake City Community
College coaching legend
Jean Williams.
Webb begins with
"My coaching was truly
blessed to know this
lady," and continues with
his interview and hiring
to take over the Lady
Timberwolves when the
school moved to fastpitch.
Webb tells of being
touched at the retirement
party for Williams.
"She was a friend, and
someone I admire for her
wisdom, understanding


gives


COURTESY PHOTO


RIGHT: Jim Webb discusses
pitching with Katya Eronina,
a member of the Russian
national team, in Moscow.
Eronina was a Division II
first-team all-American at
Armstrong Atlantic University
in Georgia.




ABOVE: The author when
coaching at Chadron State
College in Nebraska.


lane


lessons on pitching, believing


COURTESY PHOTO


Reporter file photo
Lake City Community College's 1997 state champion and national runner-up team is featured in Jim Webb's book
'Learning to Pitch Softball I1' in the chapter, 'I Believe in Miracles.' Members of the 1997 team are (front row, from left)
Michelle Hildenbrand, Angela Lauramore, Sara Pacheco, TeRay Warneke, Holly Ellison and Amy Jackson.
Back row (from left) are coach Jean Williams, head coach Jim Webb, Tiffany Mathews, Erin Giebeig, Jennifer Russell,
Leslie Allen, Shawnte Vallejo, Christa Allen, Derby Buchanan and coach Charlie McCullough. Williams, Pacheco and Warnke


WEBB continued on 3B also are featured in the book.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Will Yeguete (15) jabs Arizona's Solomon Hill (44) in the eye as
Yeguete and Erving Walker (11) are tripped up while defending Hill on Dec. 7.


Gators blow out


TAMU in battle


of top-25 teams


By STEVEN WINE
Associated Press
SUNRISE Kenny Boynton
sank six 3-pointers and No. 13
Florida built an early 16-point lead,
then coasted past No. 22 Texas
A&M 84-64 Saturday.
Boynton finished with 22 points.
Erving Walker had 16 points and
six assists, and Bradley Beal added
16 points for Florida.
The Gators came into the game
leading the nation in 3-pointers and


ranked third in scoring, and they
showed why from the start Florida
took leads of 7-0, 18-2 and 35-14. At
halftime it was 50-25, with Florida
outscoring Texas A&M 21-0 from
3-point range.
The scoring spree came against
an Aggies team that had been
allowing only 51 points a game.
The Gators (8-2) won for the first
time in three games this season
against teams that are in the Top
25. Texas A&M (8-2) had a six-
game winning streak snapped.










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
EXTREME SPORTS
2 p.m.
NBC -Winter DewTour, Nike Open,
at Breckenridge, Colo.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5:30 p.m.
FSN -Virginia at Oregon
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8 p.m. ,
NBC Baltimore at San Diego
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
FSN Southern Cal at Texas A&M
8:30 p.m.
ESPN UConn at Baylor

Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
10 p.m.
FSN Southern Miss. at Arizona St.
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Pittsburgh at San Francisco
NHL HOCKEY
8 p.m.
VERSUS -Anaheim at Dallas

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East /
W. L T Pct PF PA
New England 10 3 0.769 396 274
N.Y.Jets 8 5 0".615327270
Buffalo 5 8 0.385 288 341
Miami 4 9 0 .308 256 246
South _
-W L T PctPF PA
Houston 10 3 0.769 330 208
Tennessee 7 6 0.538266251
Jacksonville 4 10 0 .286 207 293
Indianapolis 0 13 0.000 184 382
North
W L'T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 10 3 0.769320202
Pittsburgh 10 3 0.769 282 J198
Cincinnati 7 6 0.538 285 270
Cleveland 4 9 0.308 178 254
West '
W L TPctPF Pet PF PA
Denver 8 5 .0.615 269 302
Oakland 7 6 0 .538 290 354,
San Diego 6 7 0.462 324 299
Kansas City 5 8 0.385 173305
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 7 6, 0.538 324 349
Dallas 7 6 0 .538 317281,
Philadelphia .5 S. 0..385 297 292
Washington 4 9 0 .308 229 290
South
W L T Pct PF PA
x-New Orleans 10 3 0.769415286
Atlanta 9 5 0.643 341 281
Carolina 4 9 0.308313355
Tampa Bay 9'4 9 0.308232370
North


y-Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


W -L
13 0
8 5
7 6
2 II
West
W L


T Pct PF PA
01.000 466 278
0.615 367 305
0 .538 301 255
0.154 274 364

T Pct PF PA


y-San Francisco 10 3 0.769 307 182
Arizona 6 7 0 .462 253 288
Seattle 6 7 0 .462 246 259
St. Louis 2 ,I1 0.154 153326
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Thursday's Game
Atlanta 41,Jacksonville 14
Saturday's Gamd
Dallas at Tampa Bay (n)
Today's Games -
New Orleans at Minnesota, I p.m.
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, I p.m.
Carolina at Houston, I p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Miami at Buffalo, I p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 22
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 24
Oakland at Kansas City, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, I p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Denver at Buffalo, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, I p.m.
Minnesota atWashington, I p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Arizona at Cincinnati, I p.m.
San Diego at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 25
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 26
Atlanta at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.

FCS playoffs

Semifinals
Friday
Sam Houston State 31, Montana 28
Saturday
Georgia Southern at North Dakota
State (n)

Division II playoffs

Championship
Saturday
Pittsburg State 35,Wayne State 21

Division III playoffs

Championship
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Friday


Wisconsin-Whitewater
Union 10


13, Mount


NAIA playoffs

Championship
Saturday
St. Xavier (III.) vs. Carroll (Mont.) (n)

College bowl games

Saturday
New Mexico Bowl
Temple 37,Wyoming 15
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
Utah State vs. Ohio (n)
New Orleans Bowl
La.-Lafayette vs. San Diego State (n)

Tuesday
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg
Marshall (6-6) vs. FlU (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)

Wednesday
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
TCU (10-2) vs. Louisiana Tech (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN) \

Thursday
MAACO Bowl
At LasVegas
Boise State (I I-1) vs. Arizona State
(6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl'
At Honolulu
Nevada (7-5) vs. Southern Mississippi
(I -2),8 p.m,(ESPN)

Monday, Dec. 26
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La. ,
North Carolina (75) vs. Missouri
(7-5), 4 p.m. (ESPN)
Tuesday, Dec. 27
Uttle Caesars PizzaBowl
At Detroit '
Western Michigan (7-5) vs. Purdue
(6-6),4:30 p.m. (ESPN2) .. ,
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.: .
North ; Carolina State (7-5) vs.
Louisville (7-5). 8 p.rif (ESPN)'

Wednesday, Dec, 28
Military Bowl
AtWasnington .
'Air, Force (7-5). Vs. Toledo (8-4),
4:30 pm: (ESPN) .
Holiday! Bowl
SAt San Diego :
STexas (7-5) vs. California (7-'5), 8 pm.,
(ESPN) : ,.. ,,

Thursday,.Dec.29 ,
Chamrrps Sports Bowl'
At Orlando
Florida State (8-4) vs. Notre
Dame (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
'Baylor (9-3) vs. 'Washington (7-5),
9 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
Tulsa. (8-4) vs. BYU (9-3), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
S At Bronx, N.Y .'
SRutgers (8-4) Vs. Iowa State (6-6);
3:30 p.m. (ESPN) :.
.Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Mississippi State (6-6) vs.Wake Forest
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Oklahoma (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5),
10 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 31
Meinke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern
(6-6), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl '
At El Paso,Texas
Georgia Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS) .
Uiberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3),
3:30 p:m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
UCLA (6-7) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 2
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1),
Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


I EGWIH l


@2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.

YEPPP I




BLNIEB




LALDAB
1 \ /
_^ __^ ._


At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina
(10-2), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
(10-3). I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
I p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Stanford ( 1-1) vs. Oklahoma State
(1I1-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Jan. 3
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan (10-2) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, jan. 4
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestVirginia (9-3) vs. Clemson (10-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Florida prep playoffs

State Championships
Friday
S Class 7A
Manatee 40, First Coast 0
Class SA
Miami' Norland 38,Wakulla 0
Saturday
Class 6A
Armwood 40, Miami Central 31
Class 8A
Plant vs. Miramar (n)

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 8 Xavier vs. Oral Roberts, I p.m.
No.9 UConn vs. Holy Cross at the XL
'Center, Hartford, Conn., I p.m.
S.No. 10 Missouri vs. William & Mary,
3.p.m.

NBA preseason
Friday's Games .
Chicago 95, Indiana 86
Philadelphia 103,Washington 78
Cleveland 91, Detroit 87
New Orleans 97, Memphis 90'
Saturday's Gameps
New York 92, NewJersey 83
San Antonio at Houston (n)
Milwaukee at Minnesota (n)
Sacramento at Goldqn State (n)
Today's Games
Boston at Toronto, I p.m.
Orlando at Miami, 6 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Monday's Games
Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Utah at Portland, 10 p.m.
LA. Clippers at LA. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
SDallas 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
Carolina 4,Vancouver 3
Los Angeles 2, Columbus I
Philadelphia 4, Montreal 3
Tampa Bay 5, Calgary 4, OT
St. Louis 4, N.Y.j angers I
Nashville 4, Detroit 3
Washington I,Wlnnipeg 0
Phoenix 4, Edmonton 2
San lose 5, Colorado 4
Friday's Games
Florida 3, Calgary 2, SO
Buffalo 5,Toronto 4
Ottawa 6,'Pittsburgh 4
New Jersey 6, Dallas 3
Chicago 4,Anaheim I
Saturday's Games
Boston 6, Philadelphia 0
Vancouver at Toronto (n)
New Jersey at Montreal (n)
Buffalo at Pittsburgh (n)
Anaheim at Winnipeg (n)
Los Angeles at Detroit (n)
Tampa Bay at Columbus* (n)
SSt. Louis at Nashville (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Minnesota (n)
N. Rangers at Phoenix (n)
Washington at Colorado (n)
Edmonton at San Jose (n)
Today's Gaines
Carolina at Florida, 5 p.m:
Calgary at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Columbus at St. Louis, 7 p.m.
Monday's Games
Montreal at Boston, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Vancouver, 10 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

i I Just love L i
h'r\A, ~/*t \


MIDDLE SCHOOL ROUNDUP



Two state titles for LCMS


From staff reports


The next few days in
Lake City Reporter sports
will be devoted to standout
performances by teams and
individuals during 2011.
Lake City Middle School
produced a pair of state
championships during the
year.
Lake City's 4x800 relay
team of Bernita Brown,
Samantha Ziegaus, Nicole
Morse and Emma Tucker
won the middle school
state championship in the
spring.
The foursome was joined
by Jillian Morse, Bridget


Morse and Grace Kolovitz
to win the middle school
cross country state cham-
pionship in the fall.

LCMS, RMS wrestling

Lake City and Richardson
middle school's wrestling
programs are providing a
feeder system for Columbia
High. The Tigers have
eight freshman on their
2011-12 team.
Lake City won its
invitational tournament on
Dec. 10, and has a record
of 7-1. Jason Langston is
in his fourth year as head
coach and Dean Wise is an


assistant coach.
Jeremiah Hook has been
head coach of the Wolves
for four years. Josh Hook
and Greg Poole are assis-
tant coaches. There are 23
wrestlers on the Richardson
squad.
Wrestlers from both
schools will. practice with
the Tigers over Christmas
break. Several Falcons
attended summer camps
with CHS wrestlers and the
Wolves hope to participate
next year.
Lake City is hosting a
duals tournament on
Jan. 7 and Richardson is in
the field.


Photos courtesy of Snapshotz 'n' More Photography
ABOVE: Members of the 2011 Lake City Middle School girls soccer team are
(front row, from left) Jessica Birchard, Ashley Nobles, Ashton Lee, Chase Broome,
Sarryn Davis and Darby Sessions. Second row (from left) are Alexandra Herrera,
Kyrsten Giebeig, Jaidyn Rogers, Samantha Jackson, Alix Lloyd, Tatum Morgan,
Katelynn Hicks, Brittney Lee and Emma Sambey. Back row (from left) are head coach
Bill Griffin, Savannah Amparo, Carlie Carswell, Tori Jackson, Morgan Jackson,
Emily Harvey, Sabrie Stampe, Ally Robinson, Willow Russell-Martinez, Zoey Denmark
and assistant coach Tracy Lee.


BELOW: Members of the 2011 Lake City Middle School boys soccer team are
(front row, from left) Will Vickers, Josh Lewis, Joe Beach, Caleb Strickland and
Clayton Steinruck. Second row (from left) are Andrew Heaton, Chase Innocenti,
Trent Morrison, Brock Edge, Branden Powell, Dillan Ward, Brant Nelson, Hunter Houston
and Chase Erickson. Back row (from left) are assistant coach Brandon Kuykendall,
Josh Kurtz, Jacob Strickland, Jake Thomas, Dustin Carwile, Braxton Treverrow,
Nathan Conley, Spencer Robinson and head coach Billy Jennings.


ACROSS:.
1 W-2 collectors
4 Oak's coat
8 Circuit
11 Grant foe
12 Vietnam's
capital
13 Vane dir.
14 Raked over
the coals
16Had lunch
17 Wraiths
18 Sherpa's land
20 Mini-guitar
21 Jeans go-with
22 Actor-
Reeves
25 Orange flower
29 Came in
second
30 Oola's guy
31 Ms. Farrow
32 USN rank
33 Brown the
bandleader
34 Propane
holder
35 Probate
concerns


8 Deep bells
9 Carnival city
10 Bunny bound
n1 Competed in
slaloms
14 Maine export
18 Orders for
dinner
19 Toadies
il Give -
whirl
i2 Implored
i3 Autumn mo.
i4 Shorten the
grass
5 Free ticket
i6 Recipe qty.

DOWN
1 Misfortunes
2 Make hay
3 Freinht hauler


Answer to Previous Puzzle


P E S PROM
E VI L LEO VIVA

SERA CALICOES
TREND RID TNT


IMA J UDE OMOO
MIGNON CAULK




OWS FBI SO R Y

WA TERLOG YO Y
ELMO ANY LOAD
SETS ISMl ETNA


4 Moisten with 9 Thin Man's
drippings terrier
5 Busy insects 10 Potato skin
5 Busy insects 12 17-syllable
6 Canape poem
topper 15 Main force
7 Chili bean 19 Fish without
8 Pounce scales


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: LC IIIITIII
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: GOOSE GOURD SAFARI INLAND
Answer: The TV series about the pirates had -
GOOD RAIDINGG"


12-19


21 Last bugle
call
22 "Fish Magic"
artist
23 Untold
centuries
24 Off. helper
25 Performs
26 Statuesque
model
27 Ding-a- -
(airhead)
28 Chatters away
30 Dairy-case
item
34 -turvy
36 Still exist
37 Neaten
(2 wds.)
38 Spoil (2 wds.)
40 Yard tools
41 Wedge
42 Green
Hornet's valet
43 What "vidi"
means
(2 wds.)
44 Hangs back
45 Portable
shelter
46 Mythical
archer
47 Invitation
addendum
50 MLB stat


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


Khan wants Jags to


become international


By MARK LONG
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE The
NFL's newest owner has
a long-term vision for the
small-market Jacksonville
Jaguars.
And it includes a broad-
based audience.
Shahid Khan wants the
team to expand its fan base,
even if it means playing
overseas.
Khan, born in Pakistan,
visited Jacksonville on
Friday for the first time
since buying the franchise
for $760 million. He spoke
to coaches, front-office per-
sonnel and just about every-
one else in the football facil-
ity, and got a big kick out of
the team mascot donning
an oversized mustache in
honor of the new owner.
Khan said all the right
things: He reaffirmed his
commitment to keeping the
team in Jacksonville; talked
about'bringing a champion-
ship to the city; and even
asked employees for input
on how to improve the long-
term viability of the fran-
chise.
But the most interesting
aspect of his introductory
news conference was his
desire to create an interna-
tional fan base.
"The NFL is going to be


developing an international
fan base. Why. shouldn't
it be the Jaguars?" Khan
said. "In all honesty, inter-
nationally,' they don't know
the difference between the
Jaguars and the Steelers."
Khan said the reason out-
going owner Wayne Weaver
had been reluctant to play
in London was because of
"moveophobia," the fear
that fans would take it as
a sign the franchise was
in jeopardy of relocating.
Khan is so confident things
'will work in Jacksonville
that he has no concerns
about playing overseas.
"I'm very open," he said.
"I think it would serve
Jacksonville well to play a
game or two overseas, to
get the name Jacksonville
out If you look at some of
the international premier
league teams, they have a
huge fan following overseas
in the Middle East, India,
Pakistan, Malaysia, etc.
"I think the NFL, in the
long run, will probably be
doing something like that
Why shouldn't we be one of
the flag carriers?"
Although the Jaguars
haven't blacked out a game
since 2009, they have strug-
gled to fill EverBank Field
the last two seasons, often
needing to find creative
ways to sell tickets to keep


games on local television.
Playing in London or
elsewhere would lower sea-
son-ticket prices and possi-
bly improve the chances of
enticing new fans in a tough
economy.
Nonetheless, Khan
reiterated what NFL
Commissioner Roger
Goodell said two years ago:
Jacksonville can't be a via-
ble franchise with 40,000 or
50,000 fans in the stadium.
"They can't support an
NFL team with 40, 50,000,"
Khan said. "We're gonna
do everything to get them.
You gotta fill the stands. A
football team doesn't work.
It's not just the money. You
need the enthusiasm, the
fan support, you need the
energy. You need the ener-
gy for the players."
It could help that there's
a buzz around the franchise
for the first time in years.
With Khan's deep pock-
ets and general manager
Gene Smith searching for
a new coach, the Jaguars
feel they're poised to end
the staleness that set in
with longtime coach Jack
Del Rio, who was fired last
month.
Khan said money is not
a factor when it comes to
replacing Del Rio.
"Cheapness and the NFL
don't go together," he said.


Norland defeats Wakulla


in state championships


ORLANDO Randy
"Duke" Johnson scored
five touchdowns as
Miami Norland defeated
Crawfordville Wakulla 38-0
in the Florida High School
Athletic Association Class
'5A football finals.
Johnson scored four
rushing touchdowns Friday,
adding a 69-yard kickoff in
the second quarter to put
Norland up 23-0 at halftime.
His final carry was a 40-
yard touchdown run.
The 5-foot-9, 175-pound
running back had 130
yards rushing and 54 yards
receiving.
Norland (15-0) was
equally good on defense as
the Vikings yielded just 58
yards and five first downs
to an overmatched Wakulla


(12-3) team.
Quarterback Tony
Thomas was 9-of-12 for 125
yards while wide receiver
Darren Owi caught four
passes for 69 yards. Deonte
Hutchinson led Wakulla
with tvo catc-es for 25
yards -while linebacker
Tamrick Holmes had a
game-high 14 tackles.

Bradenton Manatee 40,
Jacksonville First Coast 0

ORLANDO Cord
Sandberg had 180 yards
passing and a touchdown
to lead Bradenton Manatee
to a 40-0 victory over
Jacksonville First Coast in
the Florida High School
Athletic Association Class


7A championship game.
Sandberg added 78
rushing yards and anoth-
er touchdown as Manatee
(13-2) dominated Friday,
gaining 429 yards. Manatee
running backs Leon Allen
and Anthony Lauro each
accounted for over 120
yards-of offense.
Lauro hauled in a 44-yard
touchdown pass on a 3rd
and 11 to give Manatee a 14-
0 lead in the second quarter.
Allen caught a 39-yarder in
the third quarter that led to
Lauro's second touchdown
- a 10-yard run.
First Coast (13-1) was
overwhelmed by a Manatee
defense that recorded five
sacks. First Coast was held
to minus-71 yards rushing
and eight first downs.


Donovan signs 3-year


contract extension


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE-- Florida
coach Billy Donovan has
signed a three-year contract
extension that should keep
him in Gainesville through
the 2015-16 season.
Donovan agreed to the
extension in October, add-
ing to the six-year deal he
signed in 2007 that pays


him $3.5 million annually.
Donovan has led the
Gators to two national titles,
three Final Four appear-
ances and 11 NCAA tourna-
ment berths in 15 seasons.
His career record is 402-169,
including 367-149 at Florida.
Donovan's base salary
will be $220,000 from 2014-
17, plus nearly $2.7 million
coming from an activities


agreement that includes
television and radio 'pro-
grams/sponsorships, and
basketball camps.
His incentives include
$50,000 for a Southeastern
Conference regular-season
title, $37,500 for making
the NCAA tournament and
$50,000 for a top-10 finish
in the AP poll. He also has
graduation incentives.


WEBB: Won Championship in 1997


Continued From Page 1B

and commitment," Webb
writes.
In a final chapter, "I
Believe in miracles," Webb
tells of former students
who excelled including
LCCC players Lisa
McNeley, Rachel Riddell,
Sara Pacheco, TeRay
Warneke, Kelly Zielstra
and Michelle Rowe.
He highlights the 1997
Lady Timberwolves
who won the state
championship and were
runner-up in the national
tournament
In his six seasons
at LCCC, the Lady
Timberwolves won three
-state championships, were
state runners-up three
times and national
runners-up twice.


Mickey Dean served as
an assistant at Lake City
under Webb and won a
national title after taking
over the team when Webb
left in August 2000. Dean
wrote about the book:
'"The coach, player
and parent can all get
something useful from
this book. It teaches life
lessons as well as pitching
mechanics."
And from McNeley:
"This book is a must-have
for any pitcher wanting to
be great"
Webb went to
Culver-Stockton
College (Missouri) after
leaving Lake City, and
subsequently headed
programs at Southeastern
Community College (Iowa)


and Chadron State College
(Nebraska). He was an
assistant at Troy University
and head coach at Elba
High in Alabama before
retiring in June.
Webb still gives private
pitching lessons and his
career statistics back up
his knowledge. He threw
45 no-hitters and six
perfect games, and once
struck out 18 batters in a
seven-inning game.
Learning to Pitch
Softball II is published
by Summertime Books
in Elba, Ala., and can
be ordered at www.
summertimebooks.
net. Books also can be
purchased through Webb
at P.O. Box 179, Elba, AL
36323.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Dec. 11 file photo, Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow rushes against the
Chicago Bears in Denver. The secret about the Broncos' incredible two-month run under
Tim Tebow and a dominant defense is this: the seven teams they've beaten are a
combined 39-52. Now comes the New England Patriots (10-3), and the chance to prove
they're not just a curiosity but a contender.

Broncos, Tebow see

Patriots as big barometer


By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- The Denver Broncos
haven't been to the play-
offs since 2006, so they're
in no position and certain-
ly no mood to judge the
quality of the opponents
they're dispatching with all
this last-minute magic.
They're 7-1 since Tim
Tebow took over and start-
ed engineering a series
of outrageous second-half
comebacks. Those oppo-
nents, though, have a com-
bined record of 39-52.
With Tom Brady and
the powerful New England
Patriots (10-3) coming to
town Sunday,-the Broncos
(8-5) see this as a chance
to prove they're not just a
curiosity but a contender.
"Yeah, well, we need to
prove it to ourselves," star
cornerback Champ Bailey
said. 'We've played against
some teams that were kind
of struggling. We'd like to
go put it together against
a top-quality quarterback
like Brady."
It's not just Tebow
who's facing what could
be his toughest test since
he started the final three
games last season and
then supplanted an ineffec-


tive Kyle Orton in October
after a 1-4 start
Denver's dominant
defense, which has two hic-
cups against the multi-
faceted Lions and Packers,
faces another formidable
challenge in the Patriots,
led by Brady, who's thrown
for 33' touchdown passes,
15 of them to big tight
end Rob Gronkowski and
nine to Wes Welker, who
already has 100 catches. .
,"He's getting them all
the ball," said Broncos
safety Brian Dawkins.
"Nobody's really starving
for catches."
And so, the AFC East-
leading Patriots are feast-
ing on opponents, putting
up an AFC-best 31 points
a game.
That kind of firepower
means the AFC West-lead-
ing Broncos' notoriously
slow-staiagfh offense will
have to. keep pace, and
given New England's
defensive shortcomings,
this game could turn into
a shootout.
Only twice have the
Broncos piled up points
since Tebow took over
in October. They put up
38 at Oakland and 35 at
Minnesota. But six 'times
they've failed to even score
20 points with Tebow start-


ing.
That's why so many see
this game as the Broncos'
best barometer yet
The Patriots have the
pedigree the Broncos used
to have when they, too,
were a perennial playoff
team. But Denver hasn't
punched its ticket to the
postseason party since los-
ing to Pittsburgh in the
AFC championship game
following the 2005 season.
"Obviously New England
has been a team that's
been in the playoffs for the
last decade or whatever.
So they've got a lot of play-
ers who've been there,"
Broncos pass-rusher Elvis
Dumervil said. "They're
the team that's always
been in the playoffs. We
want to establish ourselves
as that team. This is a good
challenge for us."
The Broncos have long
been .Brady's bugaboo,
beating him five times in
six tries, including a 27-13
win on Jan. 14, 2006, when
Bailey returned a game-
changing interception 100
yards, helping hand Brady
his first playoff loss and
ending New England's
10-game postseason win-
ning streak and a shot at
an unprecedented third
straight Super Bowl title.


Lake City Reporter


MCC-L-


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Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420




LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


rist


as


We're open
Christmas Day!
Buffet opens 10am


386-752- 16


9 Located in the Lake City Mall


rl


AdmL. m









Story ideas?
Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter



BUSINESS


Sunday, December 18, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


COUNTY TOURISM


Harvey Campbell
386-758-1397

Looking to a
prosperous
year ahead
n behalf of
the Columbia
County Tourist
Development
Council staff,
Paulette Lord, Brenda
Clemente and Harvey
Campbell, we wish all of
you a Merry Christmas
and best wishes for a safe
and prosperous 2012.
Please express to your
staff members our appre-
ciation for the outstanding
hospitality they exhibited
to our visitors this year.
This was an important
reason our industry had a,
successful 2011.
Tourist Development
Council cancels
December meeting
The Columbia County
Tourist Development
Council traditionally has
cancelled its December
board meeting due to the
holiday and many mem-
bers being out of town or
CAMPBELL continued on 2C


Employee


.4


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreoort er com
Lake City native was honored this
weekend in Nashville, Tenn. as the
national employee of the year for
CCA, a private corrections
A company.
Khalid Rentz, a senior corrections officer
at Lake City Correctional Facility, was chosen
from more'than 60 facilities and 17,000 CCA
employees.
"I'm just honored," said Rentz. "I'm glad to
have the opportunity to shed some positive
light on my city. I really do love this town."
Rentz is a graduate of Columbia High
School. While there he played defensive tack-
le on the football team with former linebacker
Brian Allen, now the school's football coach.
"Corrections found me," Rentz said. "People
said you are a big guy and you seem to be
good with people."
Rentz began his career in correction in
1998 and was promoted to senior correctional
officer and security threat group coordinator
in 2007.
As the prison's gang coordinator, Rentz col-
lects information on gangs, stays up to date
on gang trends and keeps gang populations
even. At times he works with gang members
individually. Rentz also decodes inmate mail
and cleans up graffiti.
About one third of inmates at the prison are
gang members, he said.
"It's a growing phenomena," said Rentz of
gang activity. Corrections officers have to stay
a step ahead of gangs or it gets out of control.


4u %


Lake City corrections
officer chosen from
among 17,000 CCA


f t e Year employees nationwide
-- - 4 -"


LAURA HAMPSON I Lake City Reporter
Khalid Rentz (right), a senior corrections officer and security threat group coordinator at Lake City
Correctional Facility, stands with Shirley Cox, administrative supervisor at the prison. Rentz was
named the national employee of the year for CCA, a private prison company.
flrd eatetofCretoshv


"We try to be the most forward thinking facil-
ity."
Proactive measures and help from the


Florida Department of Corrections have
helped slow down gang activity in prisons.
EMPLOYEE.continued on,2C


0


LAKE CITY-COLUMBIA COUNTY

u CHAMBER k
BELONG ENGAGE LEAD PROSPER




THINK


Lake CIR Seporter












Lake City Reporter


COMMUNITY
CANCER CENTER
OF NORTH FLORIDA


GAINESVILLE LAKE CITY
(386) 755-0601 cccnf.com


4








LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


WeCan Be l1 The Motley Foo I a
Financially Irrational T l 0


Q What's behavioral economics?
J.O., Greensburg, Pa.
Alt's a fascinating field mixing
psychology and economics
and exploring how we often don't
act in rational ways.
I For example, in "Why Smart
People Make Big Money Mistakes
and How to Correct Them" (Simon
& Schuster, $15), Gary Belsky
and Thomas Gilovich present this
scenario:
You're in a furniture store and
you want to buy a $100 lamp.
It's on sale for $75 at a store five-
blocks away. Do you walk the five
blocks to save $25? You also want
to buy a dining room set priced at
$1,775. Five blocks away, it's sell-
ing for $1,750. Do you walk the
five blocks to save $25?
Oddly enough, even though the
same amount of savings is at stake,
people'are more likely to walk five
blocks for the lamp than for the
dining room set.
This irrationality extends to
our investing, too, such as when
we leae mone min a losing stock
in the hope of eventually getting
our money back. instead of simply
mo\ ing the remaining funds to
a more promising stock.
There are many great books
on the topic, such as "Predict-
ably Irrational" by Daniel Ariely
(Harper Perennial, $16).
**
Q How can I tell if a
company is owned by
another company? T.R.
Appleton, Wis.
A Call and ask its investor
t"relantions department, or
visit its website and look for a
link titled something like "About
Us." "Company Profile" or "Our
History." A Google search might
also work.
You may be surpnsed which
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EMPLOYEE: Lake City corrections officer wins top honor nationwide


Continued From Page 1C
"It's a lot better now," he said.
"I keep the gangs from victim-
izing the guys that just want to do
their time and go home," he said.
Rentz said he also works to
ensure his young children, Kyra,
Khaliah, Jayron and Rico, are never
bullied into joining a gang.
Rentz said he contributed
to Florida Department of Law
Enforcement training manuals on
gangs. Rentz heads up the prison's
gang task force and trains employ-
ees at the prison, which houses
men ages 19 to 24 years old, who
are serving up to 10 years.
"Most of these guys get a second


chance," he said.
"Ifs a pretty interesting job," he
said. What you see on. "Lockup,"
the MSNBC prison documentary
series, is true but it's not all the
time, Rentz said..
Rentz said his favorite part of
the job is speaking to high school
students about gangs. A music
lover, Rentz said he keeps up with
current slang, which surprises stu-
dents.
Rentz said he warns students
about mimicking certain styles.
Gangs have ways to identify each
other and mimicking a style may
tell a gang that you are involved in


gang activity too, Rentz said.
When an inmate is injured in an
altercation, their gang membership
flies out the window. "All you see is
just a kid. Thafs scared. That's a
human being."
Rentz said he becomes some-
thing like an uncle to many incar-
cerated men. "I can be rough on
them, but its only when neces-
sary." ,
He said he often helps gang
members find an outlet in prison
education programs. "We are really
trying to help them be a better per-
son," he said of the inmates.
Rent4 said he credits his success


to his childhood, his church and
pastor Isadore Williams. "That's
the reason why I'm blessed."
"I had a perfect upbringing,"
Rentz said. His mother, Shirley
Rentz, retired after working for
Three Rivers Legal Services. His
father, Carl Rentz, drove a train for
CSX and was first African American
engineer in North Florida.
Rentz plays drums at the his
church, Philadelphia Baptist
Church. "Its a little white church
way back in the woods."
Leaving high school, Rentz
said he was a party animal but his
upbringing taught him when to


stop.
Being named the national
employee of the year is a big
accomplishment, said Shirley Cox,
adminisdtative supervisor at Lake
City Correctional Facility.
"He has trained us all so well,"
she said. "I'm more knowledgeable
about gangs than r e eVer been."
The company flew Rentz and
his girlfriend to Nashville on
Wednesday and paid for their hotel
while the couple attended company
conferences and award programs
this weekend. 'To be chosen is a
great honor for me and this facil-
ity," Rentz said.


CAMPBELL: Looking to a prosperous year ahead


Continued From Page 1 C
with family activities. As a
result the regularly sched-
uled meeting for Wednesday,
December 21 has been can-
celled and the next regular
TDC meeting will be held on
Wednesday, January 18 at
12 noon. A meeting location
will be announced at a later
date. It is expected the Sports
Advisory Council, appointed
by the Board of County
Commissioners, will make a
formal recommendation at ..
that meeting for proposed
improvements and enhance-.
ments at the Southside


Recreation Complex.

Bed tax collection
jump in Septembe
According to the F
Department of Reven
Option Tourist Devel
Tax (bed tax) collect
were $43,070 for Sep
of 2011, an increase
$7,515 for the same r
in 2010. Collections f
nine months of the ci
calendar year are $45
compared to $378,448
same period last year
collections for the ye
$77,172.
According to Smith
Reports, occupancy f
hotels was up 10.8% f


October of this year with
Average Daily Rate (ADR) up
4.2%.
Room revenues for lodging
was up 15.1%. These numbers
are for comparison of this
year to that of October, 2010.
For the 10 months of the cur-
rent calendar year, occupancy
is up 6.9%, Average Daily Rate
is up 8.3% and total room rev-
enues have increased 16.0%.


New marketing
projects for 2012


A busy New Year gets
underway in January. Listed
s take a below are some of the key
wr new projects that are in the
planning stages.
lorida The 34th Annual Olustee
aue, Local Battle Festival & 36th Olustee
lopment Battle Reenactment are
ions upcoming during the week-
tember end of Feb. 17-19. In addition
of to having an information
month booth at the event, we will
or the be conducting interviews
current with focus groups and doing
55,620 a research project in both
8 for the downtown Lake City and at
r. Total the Olustee Battlefield. The
ar are up results of that research will
be made available to.the
h Travel industry. In addition to First
or local Federal Bank of Florida, the
or Blue-Grey Army is pleased


to announce the addition of
Lifeguard Ambulance Service
as a new sponsor.
A new van wrap is planned
for early in the upcoming
year. The current van wrap
is now six years old and is
starting to become brittle. We
have been soliciting quotes
for the new wrap and are
pleased to learn that costs
have come down significantly
over the past several years.
Brochures for the Olustee
Battle Festival and additional
-electronic photo frames are
currently being distributed
and should be in all proper-
ties in the Suwnanee River
Valley area.


Planning for proposed
sports initiatives is
nearing completion
A subcommittee formed
by the Tourism Development
Council and Board of County
Commissioners in the late
summer is nearing completion
on a series of recommenda-
tions for capital improvements
at the Southside Recreation
Complex. It is expected that
the report will presented at
the January 18th TDC meet-
ing and subsequently will
be delivered to the Board of


County Commissioners.
In terms of 2012, we
already have 14 tournaments
scheduled through the first-
half of the calendar year and
expect to have another busy
year.
Tourism Day
is upcoming in
Tallahassee
Due to the early start of
the 2012 Florida Legislative,
planning has been extremely
accelerated for the annual
Tourism Day. The 2012 event
will be held on Wednesday,
January 18 with legislative
overviews from several state-
wide organizations such as
the Florida Restaurant and
Hotel Association. A reception
will be hosted on Wednesday
evening for everyone reg-
istered for Tourism Day.
Registration for the event
is $35 for VISIT FLORIDA
members. You are cordially
invited to participate in this
important event. For addi-
tional information please don't
hesitate to call our office at
386-758-1397.

N Harvey Campbell is the exec-
utive director of the Columbia
County Tourist Development
Council. He can be reached at
386-758-1397.


The next Ann

Coulter? RI student's

column is a hit

Associated Press
SCARBOROUGH, Maine -A 20-year-old
college student has developed a following
and gotten at least five marriage proposals
after writing a column about her experi-
ences with welfare recipients as a Wal-Mart
cashier. She says she wants to be the next
Ann Coulter.
Christine Rousselle, who attends
Providence College in Rhode Island, wrote
on the website The College Conservative
about her experiences working as a teen-
ager at a Wal-Mart store in her hometown
of Scarborough, Maine.
In the column this week, Rousselle
described customers using welfare money
to buy toys, lobsters and jewelry, and welfare
recipients yakking on expensive iPhones.
She suggested that a hot dog stand operator
used food stamps to supply his business.
She came to a startling realization after a
Massachusetts customer showed her a wel-
fare card with former Massachusetts Gov.
Michael Dukakis' signature. That meant
the man had been on welfare as long as
Rousselle had lived, since she was born
in 1991, the same year Dukakis' last term
ended.
Readers have left more than 2,000 com-
ments and shared it thousands of times on
Facebook.
Rousselle told the Bangor Daily News
(http://bit.ly/vqDBud) that her former
Wal-Mart co-workers largely have applaud-
ed her for pointing out what has frustrated
them for years.


I


.. .. . .. .. .. t


A F"












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


The Week in Review


rZ~- ~


S KCOTS OF LocAL INTE T


WeeKlv DOW Jones


. . . . . . . . . . . . ..c xc anI g,
YV~UU7 ~Lu~I~5..I~IUII~ I IU*~*S~ ~ If ___________________________________________


SNYSE 3 Amex Nasdaq
,237.66-265.22 2,204.91 -87.00 2,555.33 -91.52


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last' Chg %Chg
RSC Hidgs 17.95 +5.92 +49.2 EstnLtCap 2.92 +.73 +33.3 LiveDeal 5.09 +3.74 +277.0
MortonsR 6.85 +1.85 +37.0 Argan 16.90 +2.36 +16.2 IstaPh 6.68 +2.74 +69.5
DirDGIdBr 41.35 +9.59 +30.2 Aerosonic 3.05 +.31 +11.3 Helios rsh 2.33 +.91 +64.1
DrDNGBear21.92 +5.00 +29.6 Vicon 3.55 +.35 +10.9 Synovis 27.90 +9.18 +49.0
CSVS3xlnG58.15+12.63 +27.7 Orbital 4.37 +.39 +9.8 Lantronix 2.51 +.76 +43.4
CSVS3xInSIv50.84+9.65 +23.4 SparkNet 3.60 +.30 +9.1 eGainCom 6.21 +1.76 +39.6
Seaspan 13.15 +2.47 +23.1 NTS RIty 3.38 +.28 +9.0 AsureSoft 6.25 +1.73 +38.3
ChinaDEd 2.44 +.42 +20.8 Lannett 4.12 +31 +8.1 Cryptologic 2.16 +.54 +33.3
DrxBRICBr 33.89 +5.61 +19.8 HMG 4.47 +.33 +.0 SwsBc 6.00 +1.20 +25.0
Fortegran 6.38 +1.04 +19.5 Glowpoint 2.36 +.16 +7.2 ZoiliMed 61.17+12.00 +24.4

Losers ($2 or more) Losers ($2 or more) Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Sequansn 2.28 -1.62 -41.5 TanzRyg 2.28 -.85 -27.2 Endocyten 3.06 -7.94 -72.2
Skyline 4.40 -2.60 -37.1 ASpecRlty 5.00 -1.40 -21.9 AmpioPhm 4.27 -3.21 -42.9
K12 18.90 -9.75 -34.0 PionDrill 8.98.-2.34 -20.7 InterMune 11.09 -6.21 -35.9
Hyperdyn 2.22 -1.01 -31.3 IntTowerg 3.68 -.92 -20.0 DiamndFIf 27.02-13.54 -33.4
PennVa 4.48 -1.92 -30.1 ExtorreG g 7.51 -1.79 -19.2 ImpedSgr 3.30 -1.52 -31.5
CastleAM 8.90 -3.49 -28.2 RareEleg 3.96 -.93 -19.0 FstSolar 31.91-13.76 -30.1
DirDGldBII 20.92 -7.38 -26.1 CoastD 2.11 -.49 -18.8 MisnNEn h 2.01 -.85 -29.7
IDT Corp 9.74 -3.30 -25.3 QuestRM g 2.30 -.50 -17.9 Inhibitex 10.45 -4.29 -29.1
DrxDNGBull36.13-12.03 -25.0 ExeterRgs 2.58 -.56 -17.8 GlobusMar 3.00 -1.22 -28.9
LenderPS 14.30 -4.48 -23.9 SeabGldg 18.42 -3.96 -17.7 PlumasBc 2.15 -.77 -26.4

Most Active ($1 or more) Most Active ($1 or more) Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkotAm 10378239 5.20 -.52 CheniereEn429928 8.36-1.16 Intel 3329278 23.23-1.78
S&P500ETF9716175121.59-3.69 NwGold g 239297 10.07 -.74 PwShs QQQ291621954.86-2.00
GenElec 4927555 17.01 +.17 GoldStrg 213199 1.63 -.43 Microsoft 2740542 26.00 +.30
SPDRFnd4642517 12.54 -.48 NovaGIldg 211155 9.01 -1.84 Cisco 2698514 17.94 -.94
iShEMkts 3348652 37.52-1.85 AntaresP 182706 1.81 -.87 SiriusXM 1779796 1.77 +.02
Pfizer 2870874 21.03 +.47 YMBiog 145765 1.46 -.12 RschMotn 1645906 13.44-3.02
iShR2K 2778481 72.26-2.28 Rentech 143455 1.49 -.06 Oracle 1606271 29.21-2.48
Citigrp rs 2638587 26.03-2.74 CFCdag 122990 20.44-1.51 Zynga n 1157907 9.50
FordM 2458486 10.25 -.78 VantageDri 121379 1.06 -.09 MicronT 1146936 5.68 -.21
JPMorgCh2082592 31.89-1.29 AlIdNevG 121363 32.09 -.38 Yahoo 1019264 14.96 -.98

Diary Diary Diary
Advanced 939 Advanced 169 Advanced 743
Declined 2,218 Declined 335 Declined 1,959
New Highs 191 New Highs 38 New Highs 81
New Lows 167 New Lows 54 New Lows 285
Total issues 3,196 Totalissues 519 Total issues 2,761
Unchanged 39 Unchanged 15 Unchanged 59
Volume 20,281,221,010 Volume 522,644,982 Volume 9,666,833,609


WKly WKly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg


vjAMR NY ... .65
AT&TInc NY 1.76 28.85 -.18
Alcoa NY .12 8.81 -.83
AutoZone NY ... 326.00 -3.82
BkofAm NY .04 5.20 -.52
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 31.83 -.27
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.92 -.51
CSXs NY .48 20.41 -.91
Chevron NY 3.12 100.86 -3.39
Cisco Nasd .24 17.94 -.94
Citigrp rs NY .04 26.03 -2.74
CocaCola NY 1.88 67.44 -.13
Delhaize NY 2.45 54.92 -3.19
DrSCBr rs NY ... 29.29 +2.44
DirxSCBuI NY ... 41.74 -4.34
FamilyDIr NY .72 57.92 +.24
FordM NY .20 10.25 -.78
GenElec NY .68 17.01 +.17
HomeDp NY 1.16 40.42 +.19
iShSilver NY ... 28.85 -2.48
iShChina25NY .85 34.53 -1.77
iShEMkts NY .84 37.52 -1.85
iS Eafe NY .1.68 48.34 -2.71
iShR2K NY 1.02 72.26 -2.28
Intel Nasd .84 23.23 -1.78
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 31.89 -1.29
Lowes NY .56 25.02 +.05
McDnlds NY, 2.80 97.49 -.54


... -91.7
-0.6 -1.8
-8.6 -42.8
-1.2 +19.6
-9.1 -61.0
-0.8 -3.4
-3.3 +.7
-4.3 -5.2
-3.3 +10.5
-5.0 -11.3
-9.5 -45.0
-0.2 +2.5
-5.5 -25.5
+9.1 -37.5
-9.4 -42.4
+0.4 +16.5
-7.1 -39.0
+1.0 -7.0
+0.5 +15.3
-7.9 -4.4
-4.9 -19.9
-4.7 -21.2
-5.3 -17.0
-3.1 -7.6
-7.1 +10.5
-3.9 -24.8
+0.2 -.2
-0.6 +27.0


NWkly a n Ly lu
Name Ex Div Last hg %Chg %Chg


MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .80
MorgStan NY .20
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobltyH If Nasd
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .88
Potash s NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .46
PrUShS&PNY
RschMotn Nasd ...
Ryder NY 1.16
SpdrGold NY ...
S&P500ETFNY 2.46
SearsHIdgsNasd .33
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .20
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.48
WellsFargo NY .48
Zynga n Nasd


5.68 -.21 -3.6 -29.2
26.00 +.30 +1.2 -6.8
14.98 -1.40 -8.5 -44.9
7.36 -.42 -5.4 -24.9
57.87 +.39 +0.7 +11.3
5.50 -.86 -13.5 -32.2
4.68 -.48 -9.3 -54.7
89.27 -5.13 -5.4 -9.0
29.21 -2.48 -7.8 -6.7
32.64 -.94 -2.8 +1.0
64.71 -.48 -0.7 -.9
21.03 +.47 +2.3 +20.1
39.41 -1.35 -3.3 -23.6
54.86 -2.00 -3.5 +.7
20.70 +1.17 +6.0 -12.9
13.44 -3.02-18.3 -76.9
50.76 -2.26 -4.3 -3.6
155.23-11.17 -6.7 +11.9
121.59 -3.69 -2.9 -3.3
46.16 -10.47 -18.5 -37.4
1.77 +.02 +1.1 +8.6
44.55 -.01 ... +16.5
2.25 -.22 -8.9 -46.8
12.54 -.48 -3.7 -21.4
34.59 -.01 ... +7.5
58.27 -.05 -0.1 +.0
25.98 -.93 -3.5 -16,2
9.50


Stock Footnotes: g = DMdends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership, wd = When distributed, wi =
When Issued, wt= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets, d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. If = front load (sales charges), m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available, p = previous day's
net asset value, s= funds s hares during the week. x = lurI a,, o .i',nn,.ii.:. dur, r m ire et Galners and
Losers must be.worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at lh Most Actievs n.u: t, ,.nr, .1, I+e: ii ruuI. .r
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25, 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.003 0.008
6-month 0.04 0.04
5-year 0.80 0.89
10-year 1.85 2.06
30-year 2.85 3.11


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia 1.0040 1.0085
Britain 1.5499 1.5501
Canada 1.0384 1.0358
Euro .7678 .7686
Japan 77.87 77.91
Mexico 13.8879 13.8964
Switzerind .9372 .9405
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones Industrials
Close: 11,866.39
1-week change: -317.87 (-2.6%)
13,000


12,500

12,000


11,500

11,000

10,500-


AA


J ...... .. . ...... .. ...... .


-16287 -6643 -11 46 45.33 -2.4


-162.87 -66.45 -131.46 45.33 -2.42


MON TUES WED THUR FRI











. .. ... N .......
..... .....g ... .....: .. ... ....... ..... N ". . ... .D


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pet Mln Init
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCOTotRetls CI 142,635 10.90 +0.7 +51/E +7.9/A, NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStldx LB 62,801 30.51 -1.4 -0.8/B -0.5/B NL 3,000
Vanguard Instldxl LB 57,915 112.14 -1.2 +0.2/A -1.0/B NL 5,400,000
Fidelity Contra x LG 56,073 65.88 -3.2 -1.9/B +1.9/A NL 2,500
American Funds GrIhAmA m LG 54,829 28.25 -2.8 -6.0/D -1.3/D 5.75 250
American Funds CapIncBuA m IH 54,764 48.67 -0.1 '+1.4/A +0.6/C 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 51,409 16.54 +0.7 +3.8/A +1.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 51,226 112.89 -1.2 +0.2/A -1.0/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 48,932 30.52 -1.4 -0,7/8 -0.4/B NL 10,000
American Funds CpWfdGrlA x WS 45,594 31.19 -2.4 -9.5/C -1.4/B 5.75 250
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 42,793 26.45 -1.7 -3.8/D -1.5/C 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox InfiStk FV 37,794 29.06 -3.6 -17.6/E -3.8/A NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA x LV 37,593. 27.46 -0.2 +4.2/A -0.7/A 5.75 250
Dodge &Cox Stock LV 36,876 99.13 -0.6 -6.2/D -4.7/E NL 2,500
Vanguard InstPlus LB 34,626 112.15 -1.2 +0.2/A -0.9/B NL 200,000,000
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 34,617. 2.05 -0.3 +1.8/C +2.3/D 4.25 1,000
PIMCO TotRetAdm b CI 31,256 10.90 +0.7 +4.8/E +7.6/A NL 1,000,000
vanguardTolBdAdml CI 30,686 11.06 +0.6 +8.7/A +6.4/B NL 10,000
American Funds BalA m MA 30,568 17.93 -0.7 +3.0/A +1.9/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Totlnt d FB 30,375 13.09 -4.0 -15.2/C -3.9/B NL 3,000
American' Funds EurPacGrA m FB 30,357 34.85 -3.8 -14.6/B -1.7/A 5.75 .250
American Funds FnlnvA m LB 30,354 34.29 -1.9 -3.7/D -0.3/A 5.75 250
Vanguard WelltnAdm 'MA 29,047 53.35 +0.1 +2.8/A +3.0/A NL 50,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 28,547 25.77 -3.2 -8.9/C +0.2/A 5.75 250
Vanguard TotSIllns LB 28,094 30.53 -1.4 -0.7/B -0.4/B NL 5,000,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 26,981 112.86 -1.2 0.0/A -1.1/B NL 3,000
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl 25,831 10.90 +0.7 +4.7/E +7.4/A 3.75 1,000
CA -Consenatve Allocation, Cl -Intennediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stck, FB .Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV en
La.e Value, IH -World Atocaion, LB -Loe Blend, LG -Lag LV Large 'lue, MA -Moderae Alocatoe, MB M4Cap Ben, MV
M ap Value, SH -Spedaity-heath, WS -World Stock. Total Retun: Chng in V wilh dividends reinvested. Rankc How lund perfomredvs.
others with same objective: A s in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. M. init Invt Miniurn $ needed tonvest In uid. Source: Morningstar.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.32 3.2
AGL Res 1.80 4.4
AK Steel .20 2.7
vjAMR
AT&T lnc 1.76 6.1
AbtLab. 1.92 3.5
Accenture 1.35 2.5
AMD
Aetna .70 1.7
Agilent
AlcatelLuc ...
Alcoa .12 1.4
Allstate .84 3:2
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.64 5.6
AMovilLs .28 1.3
AEagleOut .44 3.0
AEP 1.88 4.7
AmExp .72 1.5
AmlntlGrp ...
AmTower .35
Ameriprise 1.12 2.4
AmeriBrgn. .52 1.4
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 2.9
Annaly 2.51 15.3
Apache .60 .7
ArcelorMit .75 4.4
ArchCoal .44 3.1
ArchDan .70 2.5
AssuredG .18 1.4
ATMOS 1.38 4.2
AuRicog ...
Avon .92 5.5
BB&TCp .64 2.7
BHP BilILt 2.02 2.9
BakrHu .60 1.3
BcoBrades .80 5.0
BcoSantSA .84 11.7
BcoSBrasil 1.65 21.8
BkofAm .04 .8
BkNYMel .52 2.7
Barclay .36 3.4
Bar iPVix ...
BarrickG .60 1.3
Baxter 1.34 2.8
BerkHB ... ....
BestBuy .64 2.8
BlockHR .80 5.2
Boeing 1.76 2.5
BorgWam ...
BostonSci ... ...
BrMySq 1.36 4.0
CBRE Grp ...
CBS B .40 1.6
CSX s .48 2.4
CVS Care .50 1.3
CblvsNY s .60 4.7
Cameron ....
CdnNRs gs .36 ...
CapOne .20 .5
CapitlSrce .04 .6
Carnival 1.00 3.0
Caterpillar 1.84 2.1
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 4.1
CntryUnk 2.90 8.2
ChesEng .35 1.5
Chevron 3.12 3.1
Chicos .20 1.9
Chimera .57 21.2
Citigrp rs .04 .2
Coach .90 1.6
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
CocaCE .52 2.0
Comerica .40 1.6
ConAgra .96 3.8
ConocPhil 2.64 3.9


18 -.36 -5.6 11.50
9 -2.87 -27.5 40.91
15 +1.53 +14.4 41.01
... -1.09 -54.1 7.52
... -91.7 .65
15 -.18 -1.8 28.85
19 +.32 +14.6 54.89
16 -4.56 +11.7 54.15
4 -.41 -37.3 5.13
8 -.52 +32.4 40.39
12 -1.87 -19.2 33.46
... -.23 -50.0 1.48
9 -.83 -42.8 8.81
39 -.49 -17.1 26.44
46 -3.83 -67.3 19.62
18 +.36 +18.4 29.14
10 -.68 -22.5 22.23
15 -.23 -.3 14.59
11 -.07 +10.2 39.66
12 -1.92 +9.2 46.88
... -.75 -51.6 23.36
86 +.55 +14.5 59.14
10 -.55 -19.1 46.55
14 +.38 +7.7 36.75
... -7.22 -4.2 72.94
12 -1.04 -9.3 34.16
8 +.25 -8.6 16.37
9 -8.74 -25.6 88.74
13 -1.65 -55.0 17.16
12 -1.22 -59.2 14.32
8 -1.42 -7.9 27.70
4 -.30 -26.0 13.10
14 -.12 +5.0 32.75
... -.92 -3.2 7.93
10 +.14 -42.5 16.72
15 +.26 -8.5 24.05
... -5.26 -24.9 69.78
12 -4.46 -19.7 45.93
-.94 -21.1 16.00
... -.75 -32.8 7.16
... -.64 -44.3 7.57
... -.52 -61.0 5.20
9 -.48 -36.7 19.12
...-1.44 -36.1 10.55
...-1.61 +3.7 39.00
10 -4.88. -15.5 44.93
13 -2.29 -5.0 48.08
16 -2.48 -6.2 75.13
8 -4.92 -32.4 23.19
15 -.56 +29.0 15.36
14 -.92 +8.8 71.01
14 -6.80 -13.8 62.35
14 -.20 -32.1 5.14
17 +.76 +29.2 34.22
18 -.44 -26.6 15.04
14 -1.80 +30.4 24.84
13 -.91 -5.2 20.41
15 -.82 +8.0 37.55.
11 -1.48 -46.1 12.75
19 -5.47 -6.3 47.55
... -2.02 -21.5 34.89
6 -2.68 +2.0 43.39
34 +.16 -9.9 6.40
14 -.13 -26.5 33.87
13 -8.77 -6.9 87.20
... -.04 -51.2 5.03
15 -.61 +22.3 19.22
16 -.46 -23.6 35.26
7 -1.68 -11.3 22.98
7 -3.39 +10.5 100.86
13 -.48 -13.6 10.39
5 ... -34.5 2.69
7 -2.74 -45.0 26.03
19 -4.86 +4.1 57.59
12 -.13 +2.5 67.44
13 -.36 +3.0 25.78
12 -1.66 -41.4 24.74
15 -.25 +12.7 25.45
9 -3.55 +.4 68.40


Wkly YTD Wldy
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ConEd 2.40
ConstellEn .96
Coming .30
Covidien .90
CSVellVSt s...
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
Danaher .10
Darden 1.72
Deere 1.64
DeltaAir
DenburyR
DevonE .68
DxFnBullrs
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEnBear
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .40
Disney .60
DofnRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
EMC Cp ..
EOG Res .64
Eaton s 1.36
EIPasoCp .04
EldorGid g .12
EmersonEl 1.60
EnCana g .80
ExcoRes .16
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbt 1.88
FedExCp .52
FstHorizon .04
RrstEngy 2.20
FordM .20
ForestOil s" ....
FMCG s 1.00
Gafisa SA .29
GameStop ...
Gannett .32
Gap .45
GenGrPrp .40
GenMills 1.22
GenMotors ...
GenOnEn ...
Genworth
Gerdau .20'
GoldFLtd .24
Goldcrp g .54
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
HCA HIdn ..
Hallibrtn .36
HarmonyG .08
HartfdFn .40
HlftMgmt ..
Heckmann
HeclaM .02
Hertz
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HollyFrfs .40
HomeDp 1.16
Honwillntl 1.49
HostHotIs .20
Hunlsmn .40
Hyperdyn ..
ICICIBk .63
ING
iShGold
iSAstIa 1.06
iShBraz 3.42
iShGer .67
iSh HK .42
iShJapn .17
iSTaiwn .29


17 +.54 +20.6
17 -.40 +27.2
6 -.71 -32.3
11 -1.02 -5.1
... +.22 -49.5
52 -.66 +.6
12 -.15 +13.5
17 -.55 -1.7
13 +.47 -5.9
11 -4.69 -11f.3
12 +.52 -28.4
11 -1.50 -21.7
5 -5.94 -23.0
-6.14 -57.6
...+2.44 -37.5
+3.67 -10.8
... +1.80 -41.3
... -4.34 -42.4
... -7.25 -29.7
6 -.51 +30.8
14 -.64 -5.8
17 -.12 +18.6
11 -.74 -22.8
17 +.15 +18.0
22 -1.25 -2:6
24 -6.07 +6.9
11 -2.16 -16.9
... +.11 +81.5
29 -1.45 -19.3
15 -2.41 -14.1
33 -.57 -36.8
... -1.87 -49.6
11 -.74 +2.9
10 -1.18 +9.6
15 +1.65 -8.7
31 -.40 -37.0
14 -1.34 +17.3
5 -.78 -39.0
12 -4.00 -52.7
6 -2.74 -38.4
... -.43 -62.4
9 -.86 +2.0
6 -.42 -14.4
11 -.55 -17.0
... +.40 -6.2
15 -.70 +11.6
4 -AOO -45.3
.-.14 -35.2
-.49 -52.4
-.49 -47.3
2 -.95 -15.3
19 -4.15 +.3
14-11.35 -46.4
30 -.97 +14.6
... +.39 -30.5
11 -2.32 -22.2
... -1.60 -5.7
6 -1.83 -40.9
9 -.27 -26.2
... +.58 +34.0
14 -.94 -51.1
13 -.26 -21.9
10 -4.06 -29.0
8 -1.94 -38.6
4 -.42 +10.4
17 +.19 +15.3
14 -.90 -.1
... -.43 -22.3
7 -.44 -37.9
... -1.01 -55.2
...-3.00 -50.0
... -1.10 -31.3
-1.11 +12.0
... -1.26 -14.0
...-3.36 -26.4
... -1.58 -22.4
... -.47 -19.3
.. -.35 -17.0
... -.29 -25.1


TAKE CHARGE


OFYOUR FUTURE.


Create and implement a strategy designed to help you
achieve your long-term financial goals.


Do sormneli-g positive for yourself. Call today for a no-cost,

no-obligation portfolio review. Together, we can create.a strategy

that's right for you based on your current situation, objectives

and risk tolerance.


Steve Jones, CFP*
S ', Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847


www.edwardjones.com Me"mtr iPC




MA91NG SEN5E OF INVESTING


Div YId PE


iShSilver
iShChina25 .85
iSSP500 2.45
iShEMkts .84
iShB20 T 3.87,
iSEafe 1.66
iShR2K 1.02
iShREst 2.18
ITW 1.44
IngerRd .64
IBM 3.00
IntPap 1.05
Interpublic .24
Invesco ..49
ItauUnibH .84
IvanhM g 1.48
JPMorgCh 1.00
Jabil .32
JanusCap .20
Jefferies .30
JohnJn 2.28
JohnsnCtl .72
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25
Keycorp .12
Kinross g .12-
KodiakO g ..
Kohls 1.00
Kraft 1.16
LSI Corp ...
LVSands
LennarA .16


Wkly YTD Wkly
Cha %Cho Last


... -2.48
... -1.77
... -3.68.
... -1.85
+5.61
-2.71
-2.28
+.04
11 -1.13
... -2.41
14-10.99
9 -.48
11 -.49
10 -1.54
... -1.15
-.. -4.99
7 -1.29
11 -1.23
6 -.52
9 -.30
16 -.23
12 -2.99
19 -1.55
... -.88
7 -.20
16 -1.27
42 -.37
11 -2.08
20 -.21
10 -.31
24 -2.44
39 -.87


+4.4 28.85
-19.9 34.53
-2.7 122.78
-21.2 37.52
+30.0 122.32
-17.0 48.34
-7.6 72.26
-.9 55.45
-13.9 46.00
-34.9 30.65
+25.1 183.57
+2.0 27.79
-14.4 9.09
-20.0 19.24
-24.9 17.94
-26.' 16.79
-24.8 31.89
-3.3 19.42
-54.0 5.96
-53.8 12.31
+4.0 64.30
-24.2 28.96
-50.3 18.35
-46.5 7.22
-18.9 7.18
-36.2 12.09
+33.5 8.81
-10.2 48.82
+15.8 36.49
-9.5 5.42
-9.6 41.53
+.1 18.77


Name DIv
LillyEli 1.96
LincNat .32
LyonBasA 1.00
MBIA ...
MEMC ...
MFAFncI 1.00
MGIC
MGM Rsts...
Macys .40
MagHRes ...
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .80
Manulife g .52
MarathnO s .60
MarathP n 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MktVJrGld 2.93
MarlntA .40
MarshM .88
Masco .30
McDrmlnt ...
Mechel ..r
Medtmic .97
Merck 1.68
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
MKors n
MitsuUFJ
MobileTele 1.06
Molycorp
Monsanto 1.20


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
4.8 9 +1.26 +15.7 40.53
1.7 6 -1.53 -33.4 18.51
3.1 6 -1.13 +8.0 32.05
... ... +.57 -1.1 11.86
... ... -.59 -66.0 3.83.
14.3 8 +.15 -14.5 6.98
... ... -.21 -65.0 3.57
... ... -.74 -37.4 9.29
1'.3 11 -1.66 +22.6 31.03
... ... +.12 -34.4 4.72
.9 ... -1.95 -31.6 8.97
2.3 ... -2.40 -44.2 35.05
... ... -.99 -41.3 10.09
2.2 6 -.95 +21.8 27.38
3.1 ... -2.92 -18.1 31.96
.8 ... -5.15 -14.3 52.68
.7 ... -.77 -29.3 26.80
11.4 ... -3.37 -35.8 25.62
1.4 56 -1.36 -31.2 28.56
2.9 18 -.64 +11.3. 30.42
3.3 ... -.23 -27.6 9.16
... 13 -.88 -50.3 10.29
... ... -1.07 -69.4 8.95
2.7 11 -.62 -4.8 35.30
4.6 13 +.99 +.6 36.25
2.4 8 -1.56 -32.0 30.23
... 13 -.14 -34.0 8.33
-.4 24.10
-.24 -22.9 4.17
7.4 12 -.74 -31.6 14.28
... 27 -2.79 -47.0 26.43
1.8 23 -3.09 -2.2 68.14


WIdy YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
MonstrWw ... ... 34 -.26 -67.4 7.71
MorgStan .20 1.3 9 -1.40 -44.9 14.98
Mosaic .20 .4' 10 -2.39 -37.0 48.12
NCR Corp ... ... 11 -.91 +5.3 16.18
NYSE Eur 1.20 4.6 11 -.72 -12.5 26.23
Nabors ... ... 12 -1.24 -28.6 16.74
NatGrid 3.00 6.3 ... -.11 +7.0 47.49
NOilVarco .48 .7 15 -7.87 -2.6 65.53
NYCmtyB 1.00' 8.4 10 -.06 -36.5 11.97
NewmtM 1.40 2.3 14 -4.76 +1.2 62.18
NextEraEn2.20 3.8 15 +.39 +11.3 57.87
NiSource .92 4.1 20 +.28 +27.9 22.53
NobleCorp .55 1.8 23 -2.44 -14.5 30.60
NokiaCp .55 11.8 ... -.48 -54.7 4.68
NorflkSo 1.72 2.5 14 -3.97 +11.1 69.82
Nucor 1.46 3.7 20 -1.62 -11.0 38.99
OcciPet 1.84 2.1 11 -5.13 -9.0 89.27
OfficeDpt ..... ... -.26 -60.6 2.13
OilSvHT 1.82 1.2 ...-10.88 -21.4 110.47
PG&ECp 1.82 4.6 16 +1.74 -16.4 39.98
PNC 1.40 2.5 9 -.82 -9.3 55.09
PPLCorp 1.40 4.9 11 -.33 +9.2 28.74
Pandoran ... ...... +.65 -39.4 10.55
PatriotCoal ... ...... -.99 -54.1 8.90
PeabdyE .34 1.0 10 -3.74 -48.5 32.98
Penney .80 2.5 20 -.94 +1.0 32.64
PepsiCo 2.06 3.2 16 -.48 -.9 64.71
PetrbrsA 1.34 5.8 ... -2.56 -32.5 23.08
Petrobras 1.26 5.1 ...-2.89 -35.3 24.49
Pfizer .88 4.2 13- +.47 +20.1 21.03
PhilipMor 3.08 4.1 16 +.02 +29.2 75.60
PitnyBw 1.48 8.1 8 -.49 -24.2 18.34
PlbfnsEx ... ... 55 -2.98 +2.6 32.96
Potash s .28 .7 12 -1.35 -23.6 39.41
PS USDBull... ... ... +.37 -1.0 22.49
ProShtS&P ... ...... +1.21 -4.6 41.82
PrUShS&P .......... +1.17 -12.9 20.70
ProUltQQQ ... ...... -5.98 -3.4 78.65
PrUShQQQrs... ... ... +3.19 -19.1 47.06
ProUltSP, .31 .7 ...-2,71 -9.4 43.55
ProUShL20... ...... -1.83 -51.6 17.94
ProUSSP500... ...... +1.21 -24.6 14.63
PrUIISP500s.03 .1 ... -5.22 -19.6 54.89
ProUSSIvrs... ... ...+1.99 -63.0 14.52
ProUShEuro... . ... +.96 -1.4 20.03
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.1 12 +.35 -6.0 18.67
ProUSR2Krs... ...... +2.34 -18.4 41.00
Prudent 1.45 3.0 6 -2.32 -18.1 48.07
PulteGrp ... ...... -.56 -23.4 5.76
QksilvRes ... ... 3 -1.26 -54.1 6.77
RSC HIdgs ... ...... +5.92 +84.3 17.95
RadianGrp .01 .5 ... -.34 -74.7 2.04
RadioShk .50 5.2 7 -1.81 -47.9 9.63
Raytheon 1.72 3.8 8 -.04 -1.0 45.51
RegionsFn .04 1.0 23 -.12 -43.0 3.99
RioTinto 1.17 2.5 -3.67 -33.9 47.40
RiteAld ... ...... -.03 +38.2 1.22
SpdrDJIA 3.16 2.7 -3.20 +2.2 118.22
SpdrGold ... ... .-11.17 +11.9 155.23
SPMid 1.71 1.1 -... 5.53 -5.7 155.22
S&P500ETF2.46 2.0 .. -3.69 -3.3 121.59
SpdrHome .15 .9... -.96 -7.2 16.13
SpdrLel-3bl... ... ... +.01 ... 45.84
SpdrRetl .50 1.0 ...-1.79 +6.5 51.49
SpdrOGEx .59 1.2 ... -4.55 -5.0 50.09
SpdrMetM .42 .9 .. -4.54 -28.9 48.88
Safeway .58 2.8 12 -.50 -8.5 20.57
StJude .84 2.5 11 -2.22 -22.9 32.95
Saks ... ... 23 +.09 -10.7 9.56
Salesforce ... ......-16.82 -18.9 107.06
SandRdge ... ... 10 -.89 -7.7 6.76
SaraLee .46 2.5 13 -.42 +52 18.42
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.5 20 -7.24 -19.9 66.91
Schwab .24 2.2 16 -1.12 -36.6 10.85
SemiHTr 2.15 2.2 ...-1.75 -10.5 29.12
SiderurNac .81 10.7 ... -.80 -54.6 7.57
SilvWhtn g .18 .6 20 -4.20 -25.3 29.18
SouthnCo 1.89 4.2 19 -.01 +16.5 44.55
SwstAirld .02 .2 40 +.27 -32.9 8.71


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.12
SprintNex ...
SP Matls .82
SP HthC .64
SP CnSt .85
SP Consum .61,
SP Engy 1.08
SPDR Fncd .20
SP Inds .69
SPTech .36
SP Util 1.36
StarwdHtl .50
StateStr .72
StillwtrM ..
SuccessF ...
Suncor gs .44
SunTrst .20
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
TaiwSemi .52
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
TeckRes g .80
TelefEsp s 2.14
TenetHIth ...
Teradyn
Terex
Tesoro
Texinst .68
Textron .08
ThermoFis ..
3M Co 2.20
TimeWarn .94
TollBros
Total SA 2.38,
Transocn 3.16
Travelers 1.64
Tyson .16
UBSAG ...
USAirwy
US Gold ..
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UtdContl ...
UPS B 2.08
UtdRentals
USBancrp .50
US NGs rs ...
USOlIFd ...
USSteel .20
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UnumGrp .42
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Vale SApf 1.76
ValeroE .60
VangEmg .82
VeriFone
VerizonCm 2.00
Visa .88
VulcanM .04
Walgm .90
WsteMInc 1.42
Weathflntl ...
WellPoint 1.00
WellsFargo .48
Wendys Co .08
WDigital ...
WstnUnion .32
Weyerht .60
WmsCos 1.00
WT India .18
Xerox .17
Yamana g .20
YumBmds 1.14


19 -3.30 -10.5 33.49
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82 -1.11 +3.5 19.66
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... -.56 -61.2 3.13
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47 +.10 +22.6 27.89
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..-.46 -42.5 6.89
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7 -.89 -15.0 20.58
...-1.71 -39.0 21.09
...-1.45 -33.2 20.19
7 -.63 -11.2 20.52
...-1.80 -20.2 38.40
23 -7.80 -8.8 35.18
16 +.35 +8.4 38.78
20 +.25 +38.4 97.44
... +5.23 -12.6 38.78
12 -.09 -12.4 34.13
15 -.66 -15.9 31.00
52 -1.47 -40.7 13.51
8 -1.55 +14.2 64.95
10 -.93 -16.2 25.98
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Nasdaq Most Active


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Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


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Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Comcspcl .45 1.9 16 +.61 +11.8 23.15
Compuwre ... ... 17 -.61 '-31.1 8.04
CreeInc ... ... 24 -2.04 -67.0 21.75
CypSemi .36 2.2 19 -1.75 -10.1 16.71
Dell Inc ... ... 8 -.76 +10.9 15.03
Dndreon ... ... ... -.39 -78.3 7.57
DiamndFIf .18 .7 ...-13.54 -49.2 27.02
DirecTVA ... ... 13 -3.96 +5.4 42.10
DishNetwk 2.00 ... 9 -.05 +31.1 25.78
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E-Trade ... ... 32 -1.19 -51.8 7.72
eBay ... ... 22 -1.24 +9.2 30.40
ElectArts, ... ... ... -1.77 +23.5 20.23
Endocyten ... ......-7.94 -60.4 3.06
EricsnTel .37 3.9 ... -.63 -18.7 9.37
Expedia .28 1.0 17 -.52 +11.5 27.98
ExpScripts ... ... 17 -2.47 -19.5 43.52
FithThird .32 2.7 10 -.44 -17.8 12.07
Finisar ... ..., 22 -.74 -46.6 15.F
FstNiagara .64 7.5 12 -.23 -39.2 8.50
FstSolar ... ... 5-13.76 -75.5 31.91
Flextm ... ... 7 -.11 -26.2 5.79
FocusMda ... ... 16 -3.31 -11.5 19.40
FrontierCm .75 15.2 33 -.24 -49.4 4.92
GTAdvTc ... ... 5 -1.01 -21.6 7.15
GileadSci ... ... 11 -1.85 +2.5 37.16
Google ... ...20 -1.46 +5.4 625.96
GreenMtC ... ... 35-13.18 +37.7 45.26
HercOffsh ... ... ... -.03 +19.8 4.17
HudsCity .32 5.3 +.07 -52.9 6.00
HumGen ... ...... -.55 -70.7 6.99
Illumina ... ... 35 -1.46 -57.5 26.91
Inhibitex ... .... -4.29 +301.9 10.45
Intel .84 3.6 10 -1.78 +10.5 23.23
InterMune ... ... 6 -6.21 -69.5 11.09
JA Solar ... ... 3 -.35 -81.6 1.27
JDS Unioh ... ... 34 -1.27 -34.2 9.53


Name Div
Jam'esRiv ..
JetBlue ..
JiveSoftn ...
KLA Tnc 1.40
LamResrch ..
UbtlntAh ...
UnearTch .96
lululemngs...
Magma
MarvellT
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .88&
MelcoCrwn ..
MicronT
Microsoft .80
Nil HIdg
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
NorTrst 1.12
Novlus
NuanceCm
Nvidia
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd
Oracle .24
PMC Sra
Paccar .72
PacEth rs
PattUTI .20
PeopUtdF .63
Perrigo .32
Polycom s ..
Popular
PwShsQ000.46
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Qualcom .86


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 12 -1.17 -73.1 6.81
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... ... ... +.3 15.10
3.0 9 -2.96 +19.2 46.04
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... 15 -.58 -2.2 15.43
3.3 12 -1.26 -16.2 28.97
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... ... -.03 +43.1 7.17
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3.3 14 -.78 +9.9 27.95
3.5 15 -.57 +6.0 25.04
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3.1 9 +.30 -6.8 26.00
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... 27 -.82 -30.8 13.52
1.6 21 -2.57 +6.3 52.61


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Cho %Chg Last


RFMicD ...
RschMotn ...
RiverbedT ...
SLM Cp .40 3.0
SanDisk
Sanofi rt
SavientPh ...
SeagateT .72 4.7
Sina
SiriusXM
SkywksSol ...
SonoSite
Staples .40 2.8
Starbucks .68 1.6
StlDynam .40 3.2
SusqBnc .12 1.5
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .24 1.6
THQ
Tellabs .08 2.1
TevaPhrm .90 2.1
TibcoSft
TriQuint
UrbanOut ... ...
VertxPh
ViacomB 1.00 '2.3
VirgnMdah .16 .8
ViroPhrm ...
Vodafone 2.10 7.7
WamerCh ...
Windstrm 1.00 8.6
Wynn 2.00 1.9
Xilinx .76 2.4
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04 .3
Zvynan


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Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AbdAsPac .42 5.9
AdeonaPh ...
Adventrx
AlexcoR g ...
AlldNevG
AmApparel ...
AntaresP
Aurizong
AvalRaren ...
Banrog ...
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ... ...
Brigusgrs ...
CanoPet
CeISci ... ...
CFCdag .01 ...
CheniereEn...
ChinaShen ...
ClaudeRg ...
ClghGlbOpl.08 10.6
DejourEg ...
DenisnMg ...
ElephTalk
ExeterRgs ...
FrkStPrp .76 7.2
GabGldNR 1.68 11.4
GascoEngy ...
Gastargrs...
GenMoly ...
GoldResrc .60 2.8
GoldenMin ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ... ...
GtPanSilvg ...
ImpOil gs .44 ...
InovioPhm ...
IntTower q ...


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+.02
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-.41
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MinesMgt ... ...... -.28 -47.6 2.19
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NAPallg ... ... ... -.52 -62.4 2.61
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PhrmAth ... ... ... -.01 -70.7 1.24
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Rubicon g ... ...... -.37 -36.6 3.62
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TanzRyg ... ... ... -.85 -68.8 2.28
Taseko ... ... ... -.45 -51.4 2.55
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TriangPet ... ... ... -.66 -19.1 5.26
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WTDrfChn .15 -.02 +.8 25.58
WizzardSft ... ... ... -.01 -48.0 .13
YMBio q -... ... ... -.12 -37.3 1.46


AMEX Most Active


ActivsBliz .17 1.4
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ... ....
Alexza
AllscriptH ... ...
AlteraCp If .32 .9
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 19.3
AmCapLtd ..
Amgen 1.44 2.4
Apollolnv 1.12 18.0
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatI .32 3.1
ArenaPhm ... ...
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .15 .6
ArubaNet ...
athenahlth ...
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.58 3.1
AvagoTch .48 1.7
AvanirPhm ... ...
Baidu ... ...
BioSante ...
BlueCoat ...
Broadcom .36 1.3
Broadwdt ... ...
BrcdeCm .... ...
CA Inc .20 1.0
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
ChrmSh ...
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .24 1.3
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .45 1.9


...... ,,it


-.1- ... -.1 --.IV -1, 1


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I










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


lIB.UYI


SELL Tfc


laFfINDIIiT


1One Item per ad d s e
4 lines 6 days s ditio|nal
Rate applies to private Indivduals selling
personal merhandise totalling $100 or less
This s a non-refundable rate.




One Hem per ad $1 r
4 lines 06 days iach additional
li'ne$ $10 j
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Item per ad J16
4 lines 6 days tahaddt sna|
Rate applies to private ndivIdual selling
persona merchandise tostalling $, or less.
Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Hem per ad $23
4 lines 6 days TE i"add tiona
Rate applies to private Indivduealus olg
personal mercha e totalling $2500 or .
Each Item must Include apricea
S This a a non-refundable rate.


ad
One Item per ad
4 lines 6 days Each additional
Rate applies to private ndividuals selling
Each Item must include a price
This Is a non-refundable rate s




One Item per ad $|
4 lines 6 days Eahaddiasst
Rate appcieb o Pri.ale individuals ald g
paru'o.ar mmarcharr.feIlotilinS6 uisor h ia sur
To's a a ..-I -"tura ra a"


41"les 750
3 days $175
'Inludes 2 Signs Eac dlt lif'e3165


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
.4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line ,
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com .





Ad Is to Appear Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon., l0:00a.m. Mon., 9:00am.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed., 9:00am.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 am. Thus., 9:00am.
Saturday Fri., 10:001am. fri, 9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 10:01 a.m. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


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or classify all advertisements under
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be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
. Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION ,
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
PAUL HENNESSEY II AND CAR-
OLINE HENNESSEY AND UN-
KNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
Case No. 12-2010-CA-000059
Division
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on De-
cember 1, 2011, in the Circuit Court
of Columbia County, Florida, I will
sell the property situated in Colum-
bia County, Florida described as:
COMMENCE AT THE SW COR-
NER OF SE 1/4 OF NW 1/4, SEC-
TION 33, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST, AND RUN N 7
DEGREES 50' EAST, 418.6 FEET;
THENCE S 89 DEGREES 55'
EAST, 30378 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING; RUN
THENCE N 7 DEGREES 56' EAST,
311.6 FEET TO THE SOUTH LINE
OF ST. JOHNS STREET; THENCE
S 88 DEGREES 35' EAST, 70.33
FEET; THENCE S 7 DEGREES 59'
WEST, 309.8 FEET; THENCE N 89
DEGREES 55' WEST, 70.16 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
SAID LAND BEING WHOLLY
WITHIN THE SAID SE 1/4 OF NW
1/4, SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 3
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
and commonly known as: 1110 SE
SAINT. JAMES ST., LAKE CITY,
FL 32025; including the building,
appurtenances, and fixtures located
therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on January
18, 2012 at 11:00 a.m..
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the us pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 1st day of December,
2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: s-s B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
SEAL
Invoice to:
Edward B. Pritchard
(813) 229-0900 x1309
Kass Shuler, P.A.
P.O. Box 800
Tampa, FL 33601-0800
05529510
December 18, 25, 2011

020 Lost & Found


Found Gray Dog.
Call to identify.
386-752-7374, 386-984-7333 or
352-264-8168 Leave message.
FOUND: Saturday night. US 90
on Ramp to 1-75 (1) wrapped
package. 386-965-0485 and
describe if it's yours.
LOST PYGMY GOAT, Fri. 12/9,
between Peacock Terrace/Price
Creek Rd. & 252. Male, Rust Col-
or, very friendly, 386-961-9188

100 Job
100 Opportunities

Looking for physically Fit and out-
going individuals with cleon driv-
ing & clean'criminal history. Call
386-752-2112 Mon. Fri. 8a-5p.

05529598
Residential Mortgage Loan
Processor- Processes
Conventional, FHA, VA, and
Rural Development Loans held
in the Bank's portfolio as well
as loans sold on the secondary
market. Automated underwriting
experience with LP/DU
required. Need 2-5 years of
Mortgage Lending experience.
Please email your resume to
jobs(acolumbiabankflorida.com
E.O.E./M/F/H/V.


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

05529585
FT Administrative Assistant
position available with
First Federal Bank of FL.
Performs various secretarial and
administrative services. Ability
to multi-task and strong
attention to detail with complete
confidentiality. Previous execu-
tive administrative experience
required, 3+ years. Must be
proficient in Microsoft Word,
Excel and Outlook. Must be able
to type at least 40 wpm.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal Branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City, FL 32056 or emailed
to Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer

05529596
Credit Analyst i
The Credit Analyst is responsi-
ble for spreading corporate and
personal financial statements,
tax returns of commercial clients
and reviewing credit bureau
reports. A qualified applicant
will prepare written
presentations for loan approval
committees and possess strong
analytical and computer skills.
We offer a competitive benefit
package in a favorable
working environment.
Please e-mail your resume to
jobstgcolumbiabankflorida.com
E.O.E./M/F/H/V.

05529654
RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE
ASSISTANT
White Springs, Florida
seeking a personable and cheer-
ful individual to join our team.
Verifiable job history. Strong
computer skills. Good commu-
nication skills. Able to operate
fax, copier and scanner
machines. Able to complete
duties without constant
supervision. Must be flexible
and team player. POSITION
NEEDS TO BE FILLED
IMMEDIATELY. Please e-mail
resume to: hr speced.org

Legal Secretary/Paralegal
Position for Civil Litigation.
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
send resumes to:
injuryattomeys@yahbo.com

Licensed Insurance Agent
Seeking Highly motivated licensed
property and casualty insurance
agent. Computer savvy, reliable
and good personality. Employee
benefit include paid holidays and
vacation time. Send resumes to:
fmcknight81 (cox.net


Looking for exp. plumber for serv-
ice work and wide range of duties.
Must be. dependable and some
weekends are a must. Please fax
resume to 386-752-5613 or email
to leaht(dependableplumbing.net

Lube Tech Wanted
Tools Required
Apply @ Rountree Moore Chevy
4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, Fl. 32055
See: Jimbo Pegnetter in Service

Part time. CNA Needed for Home
Care. Could develop into more
hours. Please call for info.
386-755-1730

Payment Processer position
available in a fast paced growing
company. Must have 6-12 months
clerical experience data entry,
knowledge of excel and word, and
the ability to multitask. Please
send resume to Pioneer Credit
Recovery, PO Box 3116 Lake City
Fl 32056, Attn: Sarah Drew

Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
'Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


100 Job
100 'Opportunities

Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com

Server Network Tech needed for
local computer company. Work is
performed in the field. People
skills and dependable transporta-
tion a must. This is not an entry
level position and requires work-
ing knowledge and troubleshoot-
ing on Microsoft server/platforms,
including Exchange Software.
Send resumes to: Incare of, P.O.
Box 258, Wellborn, FL 32094


120 Medical
120 Employment

05529560
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529568
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
For its Student Loan Forgive-
ness program. Licensed Clini-
cians who serve in our approved
locations may qualify for up to
$60k in Student Loan forgive-
ness for F/T 2yr commitment.
Therapists:

LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred

* Case Management
(adult & child)
* Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
* Master's Therapist in
Screening
Medical Services
* RN full-time Lake City CSU
* PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
* Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

05529591
II .I Ih II' ,'
\ir ir \ira .

Contract Weekend Physical
Therapist. Perry, Florida
850-584-0635
dianam@doctorsmemorial.com
DFWP/EEO/M-F/D/V


2 Schools &
240 'Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

Great Christmas Gift. 4 CKC
Registered Toy Poodle puppies.
Ready Christmas Eve. Up to date
on shots. 386-719-4808

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


402 Appliances

Black side by side Whirlpool
Fridge w/ice & water.
$400. obo.
386-365-517.3

Frigidaire Microwave
Range Top with fan, light
& clock. $100. obo.
386-365-5173


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$80.00'
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

Musical
413 Merchandise

BB KING, Lucille w/case.
$800.
Call (904)397-1037


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.



440 Miscellaneous


Director of Allied Health Chuck Norris Total Gym. Exer-
Programs (RN) wanted at North cise system w/DVD. Used 4 times
Florida Community College. for demo. Like New. Paid $1,650.
See www.nfcc.edu for details. Asking $800 obo. 386-365-6048



Set your sights


-E.1
BETTER, .






Apply in person or online
S.. miM


440 Miscellaneous

k Exercise Machine.
g G[~~ ic.t Christmas Gift.
W, Has all parts. Cost over
I i'' 151 Good condition.
$500. obo.
'2r3 336-397-3335
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call Saturday.
Unique, Hand crafted, award
winning, Fabric play house.
Detachable accessories for
decorating inside & out. Pull apart
frame w/carry bag. Large enough
for 2 small kids. Tell Santa Early
$75.00 386-752-5104

SGood Things
450 to Eat
PECAN HALVES $7.501b.
386-755-1937.,
If no answer,
please leave message.
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood

It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
S for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 -,$650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2br/lba, CH/A, near school,
$500 month, + deposit, no pets!,
pls leave message 386-365-1920
or 386-454-7764 after 6pm
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280







Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services

A2Z of Lake City, Inc. Avail.
Dec 1. Prof. 'House Cleaning Svcs.
Employees: Fingerprinted, Drug
screen & Bonded. 386-752-5655


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Maintained, 10
ac. Master has a huge closet w/
walk in shower & garden tub.
MLS 79417 $94,900 Foreclosure
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 3/2 DWMH, .91
ac in Three Rivers Estates. Well
maintained that shows pride of
ownership. MLS 78905 $120,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Small mobile home
2/1 886sf on a wooded lot.
Paved road frontage.
MLS 79413 $17,900
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832. ext 210

705 Rooms for Rent
New furnished studio apt in a
home, private entrance & bath, in-
cludes all utilities, trash, cable, frig
and pest control. $450 per month
plus deposit; January 1st availabil-
ity. 386-752-2020 SW Lake City

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2.
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


710 f Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05529646
LAKE CITY
3BR/2BA 1325SF $850. mo
PRICE REDUCED $75.
MOVE IN SPECIAL OF $300.
3BR/1.5BA 1040SF $825. mo
3BR/2BA 1064SF $595. mo
2BR/1BA 768SF $495. mo
1BR/1BA 500 SF $395 mo
3BR/2BA 1000SF $700 mo
2BR/1BA VACANT $495.mo
JASPER,
3BR/2BA 1188SF $650 mo
PRICE JUST REDUCED
4BR/2BA 2052SF $750 mo
MADISON
2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5 BA REMODELED
$550. mo


Visit our website:
wwvw.NorthFioridahomeandland.com
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
Accredited Real Estate Services
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
Accredited Real Estate
Services is a Full Service
Real Estate Office.
We do: Rentals ~
Property Management ~
Property Sales. [
LWEE Rm.lii

05529665
3 BR/2 BA, 1, 800 sq. ft, 2 car
garage, all appliances, sprinkler
system; fenced, NO PETS, -,-
Very clean & ready to move in.
$1,000 mo, $1,000 sec.,
$30 appl. fee. 386-752-4864.

lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $350mo.
386-590-0642 or.386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
3BR/2BA on 2 ac.
$850. mo. plus $600. Deposit.
386-438-0599 or
386-752-2765
4 BR/2 BA in town, good neigh-
borhood, fenced yard, fireplace, no
pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.,
386-755-6916.


Available Immediately.
Rent To Own 3br/2ba home
In quiet subdivision.
386-752-5035 X 3113
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.


Office fbr Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/1 yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500.

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
... the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S,of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172

BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Nice 4/2, 1 ac.
Granite floors. Beautiful yard &
wrap around porch. MLS 77292
$139,900. Short Sale.
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. 4/2, 1 ac modular
home that is in immaculate cond.
1,344sqft. New carpet, roof, a/c,
fireplace. MLS 78833 $115,000.


Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Well maintained.
Tiled floors, living area, open kit.
Above ground pool, guest quarters
MLS 79149 $115,000. Short Sale




) n- .,


73 Unfurnished
730Home For Rent
Gorgeous Lake View 2br
Apartment. Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$600 mo, and
$600 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
5 v Office Rentals

05529267
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.


810 Home for Sale
Brittany Stoeckert 397-3473
Results Realty. Beautiful lot. on
the Suwannee. Well & anerobic
septic system. MLS 78842
$45,000 Owner Financing.
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Home, over 2ac,
screened inground pool. Updated,
crown molding, new wood floors,
kit & paint. MLS 79378 $129,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.3/2, 1713 sf, great
area. Arched entryways, Ig living
room w/fireplace. French doors to
patio. MLS 79418 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575.4/2 Vintage home.
Updated electric & plumbing. New
carpet & CH/A. Hardwood floors.
MLS 79367 $99,000
Century 21, The larby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Well maintained
2/2. Wood laminate floors. Lg
living room & master suite. New
countertops. MLS 76928 $89,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Vintage 4/3 2626sf.
Hardwood floors, new wdws, fire-
place. Separate 494ft guest home ,
double lot MLS 78000 $109,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/3 1987 SF up-
graded w/wood laminate floors,
ceramic tile. 14x30 workshop, 10
xl0 storage MLS79345 $199,900
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. 3/2, 2853SF walk-
ing to downtown, lakes, restau-
rants, Shands & VA. garage w/apt
above. MLS 79451 $140,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
SCo. 752-6575. 3/2, open floor
plan, spacious master BR. Tile &
wood thru out. 1 yr. home
warranty MLS 78594 $169,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Huge 4/3, 2826sf
on 5.22 ac! Flooring is tile lami-
nate in most rooms & in immacu-
late cond. MLS 79584 $215,000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. What a Creampuff!
Newer roof, 1 ac, paved road,
fenced, fireplace, very nice brick
home. MLS 79531 $65;000
Century 21, The Darby Rogers
Co. 752-6575. Brick .59 ac! 3/2,
2502sf. Lg master bath w/separate
shower & whirlpool. 2 car garage
& storage. MLS 76769 $210,000
Charming Older Home in town.
Over 1300 sq ft. with hardwood
floors. Shady comer lot. '
Janet Creel. 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Coldwell Banker Bishop Realty
Private Estate, city limits.
6br/3.5ba. 39.7 acres $994,000 or
$2,500 mo rent. Mary Brown
Whitehurst. 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Remodeled 2/2. New kitchen
counters & ceramic tile, open floor
plan. MLS# 77943 $94,500. Mary
Brown Whitehurst 386-965-0887
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 updated brick in town. New
roof, hardwoods. Glassed room
w/fantastic views. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS 78092 $249,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3/2 in Woodcrest S/D. Super area,
nice back yard. Covered back
porch. New AC in 2010. Elaine K.
Tolar. 755-6488 MLS# 75198


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Exceptional price! 3/2, 1582 sqft.
2 car garage, screened porch 1/2 ac
lot. Only $129,900. Lori Giebeig
Simpson 365-5678 MLS#79239
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Excellent location! 3/2 home, large
master suite, 2 car garage.
$87,900. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 79458
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Woodcrest, 3/2 Brick w/split floor
plan. Nice lot. Fireplace, Ig porch,
vinyl wdws. MLS# 77708 Elaine
K. Tolar $169,900 755-6488
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac, 3/2, as is $95,000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Investor/lst time buyer? Azalea
Park. 3br w/carport. Only $57,900.
Price pending short dale approval.
#79521 Robin Williams 719-0382
Hallmark Real Estate
Newly Listed in.Mayfair! Great
area close to shopping! 3/2, fresh
paint& pretty lot. Newer metal
roof & screen porch. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
toriap in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
Sweeping Golf Course View!
Brick 3/2 w/screen porch. South-
ern Oaks Golf Course. 1980sf.
$164,900 #79585 Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home 'Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancirig.com

Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
70 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles.

99 Honda XR80R Dirt Bike, like
new, Garage kept, original equp.
Must see to appreciate. A new bike
at 1/2 the price. Great XMAS pres-
ent. $1200. firm. 386-965-6938,

940 Trucks
2003 CHEVY SILVERADO,
2-WD EXT CAB, 125,000 miles,
well maintained, great shape,
$6,500, Call 386-397-0571


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during thefirst 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad,
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms Mnd conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


iG* Yo


1~~~


Is


Have you read the newspaper today




6 days a week you'll find it here...


Lake City Reporter


lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine


386-752-1293


Advertise your Garage Sale
with the Lake City Reporter

ONLY $17s0
4 Lines 3 Days 2 Free Signs
(386) 755-5440


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must Include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


Classified Department: 755-5440


950 Cars for Sale
03 CROWN VICTORIA, LX
58,000 miles.
Very Good condition.
$8,500. FIRM 386-466-6557
06 MERCURY Montego
26,000 miles.
Excellent condition.
$12,000 FIRM. 386-466-6557
2010 HONDA ACCORD LX
Blue w/Grey interior. One owner.
23,000 miles. $21,800.
Call 386-292-5763

952 Vans & Sport
952 Util. Vehicles
2002 Chevy Tahoe 2WD, Leather,
Seats 7, 225,K mi, maintained,
shocks & AC compressor re-
placed. $7,000 obo. 386-965-6938.

Clear the Clutter &
Make Some Cash!






LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


- r>0


To aU6eL($SJ


* .J~i.


Obstetrics and Gynecology
Chandler Mohan. MD* eEmad Atta. MD


Annmarie Fenn, CNM, MS
Weight Loss/ Hair Removal/ Chemical Peels/ 4D Baby Ultrasounds
. Accepting lALL $69
=-' Accepting all Insurance. No Ins visit $50


(386) 466-1106
Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak


4I Q'
4. -
A-t


TImkeess ITlEIC RIES
S" Zebra Ottoman
Jlj.JJ'^I/ Small $59 each
/ o" 8$198 each
386-466-1888
1034 SW Main Blvd. (next to the Money Man) Lake City, FL 32055


[tBucks Rountree Moore Toyota Buck." U


B TOYOTA
Please present Rountree
Moore Toyota Bucks at
time of purchase No cash
value No reproductions
of the Rountree Moore
Toyota Bucks is allowed
Not valid with any other
coupon One coupon per
customer Fees, tax,
& shop supplies not
included


-- - ......


Time~ss


_V


4


A ..-- .


M~EHmoRiES "-


CZ Jewelry

5%0% O


UNCONDITIONAL LIFETIME GUARANTEE


/ 386-466-1888 On All Blue Luster ASPEN DENTAL GROUP
r 1386-466-1 oo 888 3._. .w.__elaeitc
. r 1034SW Main Blvd., (nextto the Money Man)Lake City,FL 32055 -' J- -


e (Pecan) eason!i


Shelled Pecans


I8 .75 k.


pharmacy


Sugar 'n' Spice Pecans
Ingredients
3/4 cup corn syrup
4 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup water
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 pounds pecan halves
Directions
Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil.
In a large heavy saucepan over medium heat, combine corn syrup, sugar, and water. Stir mixture only
until sugar is completely moist and mixture reaches 242 degrees F on a candy thermometer. At that
point, without stirring, immediately remove from heat and add cinnamon. Stir until mixture settles or
stops boiling. Stir pecans into mixture all at once. Stir until all pecans are coated completely. Pour out
onto a cookie sheet and allow to cool. Break into pieces and serve.
.-------- -------------------------------------------
i Si.-.iitI li M


Baya East
780 SE Baya Dr.
386.755.6677


Baya West
1465 W. US Hwy. 90
386.755.2233


THINK

FIRST


Recipe courtesy Paula Dean Food Network


771


Classified Department: 755-5440


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Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@akecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, December 18, 2011


www.iakecityreporter.com


Section D


A motorist coasts past Brad Wheeler's residence at 197 NW Brookside Court where Christmas characters welcome visitors to the drive-through dis-
play. At the end of the tour visitors can make donations to Happy House Inc. and the Christian Service Center,


WNW.,
'


Get ready.to ooh and aah. This time of year, homes and parks
across Columbia County are twinkling with thousands of,
Christmas lights. Those lights, along with inflated Santas and
nativity scenes, are the perfect reason to load up in the car for a drive
around town. Your neighbors spend hours untangling and hanging
lights for that gingerbread house look, so they probably won't mind
the oohs and aahs are you drive by. See more lights on Page 2D


JAUSN MI I "lEW M LWLrKnILake Cuiy leponTer' JoUn mAMi nrEw wmLnE ..JaKe y rnepoutr
Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer is seen silhouetted inside an inflatable snow A nativity scene is shown as part of a drive-thru Christmas lights dis-


globe outside of a home at 197 NW Brookside Court.


play at a home at 197 NW Brookside Court.


Looking out for our well-rooted friends


There are many
things vying for
our time and atten-
tion this time of
year. Holiday fes-
tivities center on activities with
2- and 4-legged friends, but
what about the nameless oth-
ers so well rooted in our lives?
Patiently waiting outside are
faithful houseplants, ready to be
brought indoors for the chilly
months ahead.
There are a few precautions
to take when moving plants
indoors. Because conditions
are so much different than out-
doors, plants may experience
severe wilting or leaf loss if the
move is made too suddenly.
Plants need help in adjusting to
indoor light, humidity and tem-
perature.
Gradually adapt plants over a


one to two week
period by moving
them to a porch
or shaded area
before moving
them into your
home. Or you
can move them
in and out for a
couple days at
a time. Water
requirements will
be much lower,
too, so start cut-
ting back on
water.


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle
Demoresi
dndemorest@ufl.ed


Be sure to check out the
leaves and soil for any insect
pests that might be stowaways.
By placing the pot in a tub of
room temperature water for 15
minutes, pests residing in the
soil will be forced out. If you
have a heavily infested plant,


consider repot-
ting it into sterile
soil or discarding
it.


Fungus gnats
are often a prob-
lem with house-
plants, especially
in constantly
moist soil that is
high in organic
t matter. Although
u the tiny insects
can't bite, and
they don't harm
humans or pets, they can injure
plants. The adults are weak fly-
ers, but they can multiply quick-
ly and become quite annoying in
the home.
Adult fungus gnats are dark,
small, and can be seen walking
on the soil surface. An adult
lives less than a week, but lays


up to 300 eggs in the soil. Tiny
white "maggots" with dark
heads hatch and begin feeding
in the soil on decaying material
and plant roots. This life cycle
lasts about four weeks, but it's
continuous inside where it stays
warm.
You can easily control this
little pest by letting the soil dry
between watering and by elimi-
nating dead plant material. So
spread a little cheer and bring
your houseplants in for the
holidays. For more information
call the UF Master Gardeners at
752-5384, or visit www.solutions-
foryourlife.com
* D. Nichelle Demorest is a hor-
ticulture agent with the Columbia
County Extension of the University
of Florida Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


TASTE BUDDIES


Genie Norman and
Mary Kay
Hollingsworth
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com


Taste

Buddies go

pig pullin'

If you are traveling
north of Jacksonville on
1-95 and your tummy's
talking' to ya, take Exit 29
(Jeykll/St. Simons) and
head a bit east. Start looking
on ydur left and soon you'll see
nestled among a thicket of tall
pines a small, rustic country
cabin called the Georgia Pig.
Built from two old barns trans-
ported from North Georgia
over 40 years ago, this primitive
food spot has plenty of parking
and lots of picnic tables.
When you walk through the
door via the ramp, the smell of
oak and hickory overwhelms
all your senses. On the left a
large brick oven is filled with
all kinds of meat smoking away.
The menu features good
ol' southern barbeque that
includes pork, ribs, sausage
and beef. Don't even hesitate
... order the barbeque pork
sandwich. The pork is sliced
and then chopped and piled
high on a large bun sprv_ d:i*fth
their amazing secret sauce.
The bun is pressed and toasted,
quite unique, but results in a
really crispy surprise. If you're
feeling adventurous, add the
delicious coleslaw to your sand-
wich or get it on the side, and
then get ready for a meltingly
tender, tongue overloading
experience, all for just $4.75.
In front of the ordering coun-
ter, a long table hosts a ton of
different kinds of hot sauce,
paper towels and other condi-
ments. The, pork sandwich
really doesn't need a thing
it's perfection. Oh, and yes,
they have some of the best
.Brunswick stew this side of.
that little town just north of the
Pig. Your typical sides include
potato salad, macaroni salad
and baked beans.
In talking with the owner,
we learned that many notables
have stopped by and enjoyed
this taste of the South including
former Presidents George H.
Bush and Jimmy Carter. the
Other guests have included
Marty Stuart, Davis Love,
Rickie Schroeder, David Allen
Coe, Charlie Daniels band,
Smashing Pumpkins and Dale
Earnhardt. A mixed bunch
for sure the Pig offers up
barbeque that appeals to
just about everyone. John
Madden has held two NFL
Hall of Fame inductions on the
front porch and recently the
Real Housewives of Atlanta
dropped by. So, you just never
know who you might be sitting'
next too when you stop at the
Georgia Pig.
I've been going there for
years and even remember in
olden days having to use the
restroom and being able to see
the ground through the slats
in the floor. Today there's
new flooring but it still has the
rustic feel and does include air
conditioning to help ease the
hot summer South Georgia

BUDDIES continued on 2D
Genie Norman and Mary Kay
Hollingsworth are Columbia
County residents who love
good food and fun, at home
and out. Their column on area
restaurants appears twice
monthly. You can contact them at
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@ gmail.
com.








2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011



It's beginning to look a lot like poetry


By TROY APPLYING
Associate Professor of English,
Florida Gateway College

My daughter turned two this month,
and as part of her weekly schedule
she and I spend a lot of time studying
prosody, the analysis of poetic meter
and rhythm. Over the past few weeks we
have spent considerable time examining
works of anapestic and iambic tetram-
eter, and she is getting quite good at it,
if I do say so myself.
Don't worry-I'm not torturing my
toddler: with ancient rhymes. Anapestic
and iambic tetrameters are the rhyth-
mic patterns most often used by my
daughter's favorite poet, Dr. Seuss.
Poetry, like lumber, is measured in feet.
A poetic foot is not distance, however; it
is simply the smallest unit of a rhythmic
pattern: bah-DUM bah-DUM, or DUM-
bah-dah DUM-bah-dah, for example.
Each one of these patterns gets its own
cool name; the bah-DUM, an unstressed
syllable followed by a stressed syllable,
is called an iamb. Thus poems using
this pattern are called iambic poems.
Similarly, two unstressed syllables fol-
lowed by a stress-bah-bah-BUM, bah-


bah-BUM-is an anapest,
which forms anapestic
poetry.
All this is too abstract,
however. All you need to
know about the study of
poetic meter (called pros-
ody), you can learn from
Dr. Seuss. The three-beat
pattern of stressed and Troy Ap
unstressed syllables in troy.ppling@fgc.
an anapestic foot can be
seen in Mr. Brown Can
Moo, Can You?, which is currently my
daughter's favorite poetic work. It con-
tains such lines as, "He can sound like
a clock, he can tick, he can tock." If we
emphasize the stress patterns, it looks like
this: "he can SOUND like a CLOCK, he
can TICK, he can TOCK" See the pattern?
Also, note that there are four sets (or feet)
of these three beat sections. Tetra means
four in Greek, so four anapests in a line is
anapestic tetrameter. Dr. Seuss, whose real
name was Theodore Geisel, also liked to
use iambic meter, having the two-syllable
unstressed-stressed pattern, such as in
his famous Green Eggs and Ham: "I DO
not LIKE them IN a BOX, I DO not LIKE
them WITH a FOX," etc.


ec


owl Since it is getting close
to Christmas, though, per-
haps some more seasonal
examples bf anapestic
and iambic meter are in
order. The classic poem
"A Visit from St Nicholas"
by Clement Clarke Moore
takes this form, as we can
piing see from the first lines:
du "Twas the NIGHT be-fore
CHRIST-mas and ALL
through the HOUSE, not
a CREA-ture was STIR-ring, not E-ven a
MOUSE." Three-beat bah-bah-BUM pat-
tern? Check. Four feet per line? Check.
Anapestic tetrameter? Done.
A Christmas carol with an iambic form
is "It Came Upon a Midnight Clear: "It
CAME u-PON a MID-night CLEAR, that
GLOR-ious SONG of OLD." (In fact, many
old hymns and carols are based on iambic
feet; songs written in Common Meter,
such as "Amazing Grace" and countless
others, are actually alternating lines of
iambic tetrameter and trimester.)
Billy Collins, former Poet Laureate of
the United States, laments in his poem
"Introduction to Poetry" that all his lit-
erature students want to do is "tie the


poem to a chair with rope / and torture
a confession out of it" to "find out what it
really means." That's not what my kids
and I do. We read Dr. Seuss and watch
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer or The
Little Drummer Boy for the pleasure of
listening to artfully-crafted rhymes and
rhythms. We have fun with the sounds of
the language. That's what I encourage you
to do. As you encounter poems this sea-
son, whether it be reading with your kids,
singing carols by the fire, or listening to
Alvin and the Chipmunks sing on your MP3
player (the song about the hula hoop, by the
way, is another kind of poetic foot a trochee,
which has a stressed syllable combined with
an unstressed one--"WANT a PLANE that
LOOPS the LOOP"), keep an ear out for
those patterns. You will be surprised at how
many you find.
As for my daughter and me? I think
tonight's syllabus calls for some tro-
chaic poetry ("Hark! The Herald Angels
Sing!"), some more anapestic tetrameter
(The Cat in the Hat), and some mixed
meter (Frosty the Snowman) just for
fun.

STroy Appling can be reached at (386) 754-
4369 or at troy.appling@fgc.edu.


LIGHTS: Christmas lights of Columbia County

Continued From Page 1D


JAMOwn mm iA w ncMiTW ALr/Lf akeity Repurti
In the photo above, lights bring this scene to life as it adorns the front
lawn o,f a home on Pinemount Road. In the photo at left, .a trio of angels
sings in front of the decorated home of Joe and Mildred Miller at 235 SW
Little Road.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
In the photo at left, an angel is seen
tooting a horn in front of a home along
Pinemount Road.


Birthday girl helps other children


By LAURA ANDERSON SHAW
Associated Press

GENESEO, Ill. Most
9-year-olds want a party
complete with presents,
cake and ice cream for their
birthdays.
Emma Slaymaker simply
wanted to feed hungry kids.
Emma, of Geneseo,
turned 9 on Dec. 3 and spent
her birthday celebration
packaging meals with her
own Kids Against Hunger
Your Quad Cities party at
The Center in Davenport on
Dec. 4.
"I'm here today packag-
ing meals for hungry kids,"
Emma said in a soft, shy
voice, adding that it was
what she wanted to do in
lieu of a standard birthday
party.
The idea "just kind of
came to me," she said.
Along with her parents,
Misty and Mike; brother,
Alex, 6; grandparents,
and family friends, Emma
donned a hair net and an
apron and got ready to pack.
John Kessler, the found-


days. Did we mention
you can also eat out
under the pines, which
just seems to make it
some of the best bar-
beque around. Craig
Claiborne (N.Y. Times
Food Editor) on a com-
ment sheet wrote "Fifth
time around and just as
good." So, even Yankees
like this keeper.
The Georgia Pig is
open seven days a week


er/president of Kids Against
Hunger Your Quad Cities
spoke to the group, explain-
ing what they would do and
why they were there.
"One. Two. Three. Four.
Five. Six," counted Mr.
Kessler. Every six seconds,
"somewhere in the world,
a child dies of hunger," he
said, adding that those chil-
dren usually are 5 years old.
Mr. Kessler said Emma's
birthday party would feed
1,600 hungry children
in Haiti, Honduras or
Nicaragua, with 10 percent
of the food staying in the
Quad-Cities.
For some hungry kids,
it's the "only meal they'll get
that day," he said..
In countries such as Haiti,
Mr. Kessler said some fami-
lies get by making mud pies
with salt, oil and mud. While
there's no nutritional value
to them, they help stop the
hunger pains, he said.
"Thanks to people that
have it in their hearts,
people like Emma, we're
feeding a lot of these kids,"
Mr. Kessler said.
Emma's mom said she


and only closed on
Christmas, Thanksgiving
and Easter. If you didn't
get a belly full, the Pig
sells their barbeque
by the pound and they
sell that amazing secret
sauce by the bottle.

Hours:
Mon Thurs 11:00 8:00
Fri & Sat 11:00 9:00
Sunday 11:00-7:00
Telephone: 912-264-6664


wasn't surprised when
Emma told her packaging
meals was how she wanted
to spend her birthday
party. Ms. Slaymaker said
when the family lived in Des
Moines, they participated in
a few packaging events.
"She (Emma) loves to do
it," she said.
Ms. Slaymaker said
Emma once saw a food
packaging experience from


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Dennille Folsom
"AJ" Andrew Decker
December 31, 2011

Jazan Nabinger
Blaiyze Neeley
January 21, 2012
->

Jaci Chapman
Chris Ward
April 14, 2012
We know exactly what they
want in a wedding or shower
gift. We update their list as gifts
are purchased, and gift wrap.

SWARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS

156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


start to finish, from help-
ing fill the bags herself to
watching a video of a group
delivering that very food to
starving, children in anoth-
er country.
It "really stuck with her,"
Ms. Slaymaker said.
With her small group of
party guests, Emma got
to work, moving through


a variety of the positions
in the food bag assembly
line. The front of the line
added ingredients such
as soy, dehydrated veg-
etables, vitamins and rice
before passing the bag to
be weighed. Once it was
of correct weight, the bag
was sealed and loaded into
a box.


It "just makes you feel
good," Emma said.
Mr. Kessler said while the
Quad-Cities' Kids Against
Hunger has held food pack-
aging events for bridal par-
ties and other special events,
Emma's was the first birth-
day packaging party.
I "It's so sweet," Mr.'
Kessler said.


BUDDIES: Taste Buddies.

go pig pulling' in Georgia

Continued From Page 1D


Complimentary
EngagemeltPackage 0
.. .: --. .








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Poem echoes mom's legacy


of selfless devotion to others


DEAR ABBY: My
mother, Eleanor, passed
away last Aug. 30. She
spent her long life help-
ing others.
During her eulogy, .I
described her by say-
ing, "Her best lesson,
the one she modeled
for us, is that a selfless
life devoted to family
and others, is the high-
est example of God's
work here on Earth."
After the funeral, my
brother mentioned that
the one thing Mom had
wanted read during her
service was an item she
had saved from a col-
umn of yours that was
published in 1999.
It eloquently captures
the essence of bigotry
and lack of compassion
in our society.
Although we have
made *significant
inroads on eradicating
prejudice, -I found it
still timely.
Would you please
print it again? --
ELLIE'S DAUGHTER
IN SEATTLE

DEAR DAUGHTER:
I am honored that your
mother found some-
thing she saw in my
column to be so mean-
ingful. Please accept my
sympathy for her pass-


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com

ing. I agree that the
poem, which is attrib-
uted to James Patrick
Kinney, is worth shar-
ing again.

THE COLD WITHIN

Six humans trapped
in happenstance
In dark and bitter
cold,
Each one possessed a
stick of wood,
Or so the story's told.
Their dying fire in
need of logs
The first woman held
hers back,
For of the faces
around the fire,
She noticed one was
black.
The next man looking
across the way
Saw not one of his
church,
. And couldn't bring
himself to give
. The fire his stick of
birch.
The third one sat in


tattered clothes
He gave his coat a,
hitch,
Why should his log
be put to use,
To warm the idle
rich?
The rich man just sat
back and thought
Of the wealth he had
in store,
And how to keep what
he had earned,
From the lazy, shift-
less poor.
The black man's face
bespoke revenge
As the fire passed from
sight,
For all he saw in his
stick of wood
Was a chance to spite
the white.
The last man of this for-
lorn group
Did naught except for
gain,
Giving only to those
who gave,
Was how he played the
game.
The logs held tight in
death's still hands
Was proof of human sin,
They didn't die from the
cold without,
They died from the cold
within.



* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April THE LAST WORD
19): Get to work on ideas
you have been considering. Eugenia Word
A moneymaking opportunity
is apparent if you offer a Letting emotions take over
service based on one of your will lead to changes that will
skills. An unexpected change not give rise to a fun-filled
involving a long distance festive season. **
arrangement may take you LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
by surprise. *** Interacting with friends, rela-
TAURUS (April 20-May tives and neighbors will pro-
20): Get in touch with some- duce exciting ideas and plans
one from your past whom for the future. Travel to see
you can't stop thinking someone you miss. A last-
about The festive season is minute shopping spree will
a great time to reunite with lead to a great surprise for
old friends. Travel to be with someone you love. ****
people you love. Be open VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
with your thoughts, inten- Do whatever it takes to keep
tions and. plans. *** fromentering a no-win situ-
GEMINI (May 21-June ation with someone you live
.20): Look, see and do. You with or care for. Get out and
can stabilize your world if do something you enjoy, or
you make some minor adjust- spend time with someone fun
ments. Don't let anyone who can offer understanding.
ments. Don't let anyone
tamper with your financial
situation. Keep close tabs on LIRA (sept 23 t 22):
what you spend and where Traveling, sharing good
you leave your possessions. times with friends and tying
Think beforeyou speak. up loose ends before the year
T befro comes to a close should be
CANCER (June 21-July high on your list. A good idea
22): Don't count on getting will spark interest regarding
22)Do't cou o ga way you can bring in extra
help at home. Do what needs can bring in extra
to be done and take the cred- cash. ***
it for the work you put in.

CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by feorous people. past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
'TODA Y'S CLUE: A equals D
" WOLGMVS LDR NWZS W 50-50 ENWOES
DT U S G G M 0 U HODVSG NMOU YMUNG,
G NSY S H, W .90% XYDPWPMCMGL:
LDR'CC USG MG FYDO U." WOAL
YD DOS D 0 S L
Previous Solution: "It doesn't seem to have made a lot of difference to my
audience that I'm as bald as a billiard ball!" James Taylor
0 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-19


21): Getting together with
friends or relatives will bring
back memories. Too much of
anything will be difficult to
overcome. Don't overspend,
overdo or overindulge.
Emotional openness will help
heal old wounds. Put the past
behind you. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Look at your
personal and professional
situation and make choices
that will improve both in the
new year. Don't let anyone's
upset or anger influence your
decision to do what's best for
you. You need a change of
scenery. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Consider your options,
but don't reveal what you
plan to do. Keeping secrets
will spare you the grief of
someone meddling in your
affairs. Enjoy what you have
and the people you love with-
out complicating matters.**
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Do what you can to help
others and you will help
yourself. A contract you've
been considering can now
be put in place. The commit-
ment you make will lead to
greater responsibilities and
interactions with new people.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Wait and see what
everyone else does and
says before you make your
move. The situation you face
is uncertain and can turn
costly if you make the wrong
choice. Don't believe every-
thing you hear. A surprise is
apparent ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


TAKING HALF STEPS By Timothy Polin / Edited by Will Shortz 11 12 13 4 15 6 7 18 19 i 10 |11 i12 1131 14 |15 |116 17i |ii |i


Across
1 Knives, forks and
spoons
6 Jackson and Reno
12 Where a plant or
animal thrives
20 Shakespearean
nobleman
21 Wipes out
22 Spanish
conquistador
who searched for
.the Seven Cities
of Gold ,
.23 Taking too much
24 Reassure that
one's joking, in
a way
25 Aesthete
26 Little shavers at
school?
28 Northern
sympathizer
29 moment's
notice
30 Tucker out
31 Bone: Prefix
32 Just recently
35 Maternally
related
37 Knoll
39 Like.trenchant
wit
45 Paper tray size:
Abbr.
46 Mercedes sedan
48 Potpourri
50 Burrowing
rodents
51 Home in the
woods
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


52 Kin: Abbr.
-. 53 Radiohead
frontman Yorke
55 Cockamamie
57 Extraordinary
and
unexplainable
59 Play sentinel
61 Fix, as a fairway
62 "The Clan of the
Cave Bear"
author
63 Southern
university whose
campus is a
botanical garden
64 Table scraps
65 Economic woe
69 Burns,. e.g.
73 Ones pictured in
corp.. reports
74 Newspaper units':
Abbr.
75 Body of water in
a volcanic
crater, for one
76 Group that
doesn't believe
in revolution?
82 #2 or #3
84 "Get it?"
85 "Lohengrin"
soprano
86 Fixed price
87 Quick inning
enders, for short
88 Walled city of
Spain
89 Key
91 Modernize the
plant
93 Trademarked
marker
94 Spheres
96 ___-Alt-Del
98 Gusto


99 Draft inits.
100 Goddess with a
headdress
depicting a
throne
102; Kille-d as a test
104 Former
transportation
regulation agcy.
106 Dangers for
children and
klutzes
111 Immigrant's
opposite
116 1994
Schwarzenegger
film
.117 Judge in Judges
118 Neighbor of a
Turkmen
119 Cactuslike plant
of the Southwest
120 Doorway jamb
121 Remark after an
awkward silence
122 Vocal skeptic
123 Hockey team,
say
124 Nobelist Bohr

Down
1 Aircraft carrier
2 "Open __-"
3 Cruel Ugandan'
4 Veg-O-Matic
company
5 Planned
6 Instrument played
in the mouth
7 Short operatic
solos
8 Kid minders
9 Glacial ridge
10 Render
11 Retired boomers
12 There's no foul
. play when one
passes by these


13 Brass
14 More pretentious
15 Vaquero's
neckwear
16 a secret
17 Rikki-tikki-___
18 Some punches
19 Slander or libel
27 Cavalry member
31 2005 biography
subtitled "The
Making of a
Terrorist"
32 Seasoned hand
33 Sycophant
34 Repeated film
title role for Jim
Varney
36 Organic food
label
38 Links chain
40 Orly bird?
41 Pass (out)
42 Potpourri
43 Lens solution
brand
44 Fixed at an acute
angle
47 Guide
49 Fox hunter's cry
54 Shapes studied
by Dr. Watson
and his partner
56 Frequent answer
to "When?"
58 Set-
59 Letter after pee
60 Wrinkly-faced '
dogs
62 Lhasa
65 Dastardly laughs
66 Mario's dinosaur
sidekick
67 Like some
cigarettes
68 Way to refuse


69 Pavement caution 78 Samoan port


70 Bottom dealers,
perhaps
71 Cousins of
giraffes
72 Tightens (up)
73 Backups for
backups
75 "The-Origin of
Species" concept
76 Part of a freight
train
77 Something a
dome lacks


79 Former
Connecticut
governor Jodi
80 Welsh,,e.g.
81 Robert of "The
Sopranos"
82 "___ Andromeda"
(British sci-fi
series)
83 10th-century
pope
86 F major has just
one
90 Kind of kick


92 Former surgeon
general C. ___
Koop
95 It's found near
the toe of a boot
97 Apt to change
101 Inscribed
marker
103 Ancient volume
105 Wispy clouds
106 Al who sought
the 2004
Democratic
presidential
nomination


107 Water hazard?
108 Give a lift
109 They leave
trails
110 Director Kazan
111 Piped fuel
112 Site for techies
113 Writer Grey
114 Organic
compound
115 Tiny criticisms


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
DESKS IPOD CLAMS ANAP
AL C OA N I LE A RO I NOLO 0
DIARYOUEEN PRI|SONGRAB
SARA UNDO SASS URANO 0
ENIAC APB EARLYDAY
BED INTERNALANGEL
EUCLID D OOMED LASHOUT
EROO AMISS OWED ESTE
BOWSPR I TS AR I TALARTS
iT YTO GIBED EDIES
MO S HE TREASURED ACCRA
INTEL INLET BOFFO
TRIALBLAZER LEGISLATE|

RESTORE MYFOO I T MESMER

DIGS INTO SON COSEC
IRATE FROG ANTI FRAUD
DEV I LS L I AR TROTREFORM
SONEL EOS I N LOW PUP P
K A L. E E|TH|No 0 K 0 RES|T S|


7 9 1


5 8 2


5 3 7 4


9 2 6 8 5


1 9 6 7


4 9


4 9 3


.3 6 9 2


2 3 5 7


L 8 L_6 l 99





9 861 9 L 8 L 6


8 6 EL L 1 9V9

L_ 9 19 6 E 8 Z8 L



SL 17 9 8 9 EZ L 6


7 L C Z 9 6 L 9 8


6 E L 8 9 L V9C

9 9 8 1 L 9 6 EL
998S-i.L76LJ9-8


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415







4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2011


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The Staff of Glenn I. Jones, Inc. wishes all
S"Happy Holidays,"



WB. MkWAmt iL5A-, If tAO&-w 4


QKerry Gkristlmas an
every good wtsk for your
affiness in Ie new
year. R/ank you for
your support.

The Move Connection
196 NE Chestnut Ave.
|Lake City, FL 32055
(386)755-5595
Fax(386)755-7798
ia r
HHIIB marwa TO^ lprya


Merry Christmas
& Happy New Year
from all of us at...

GW Hunter, Inc.

Chevron Ch vrnn


Oil
Jobb,


1798 US 90 West 752


er


-5890


Betty' BJ" Federico'
(386) 365-5884..



Kayla Carbono
(386) 623-9650
mrenKaainla inarop




Eah ffc idee~pr~ ond nBgertty "J" Fderi
Busnes (86 75-675 Tll r(3186) 3336-5884
(386) 623-9650
habla espafmlo


Dear Santa.
My Name is Johnathan. I would like for a to
bring me a Dirt Bike.

Dear Santa.
I kinda been a good boy this year. I hope
to Git Snake boots and rc traxiss track.
And DS or Dsi. From Brandon F. age 9

Dear Santa.
I have been a good girl this year. I live
in Lake City. I would like. A new easy
bake oven. my little pony. lots of make up,
clothes. sherts, boots (1 or 13), DSI. I Love
you Santa.
Brinsleigh., age 6

Dear Santa.
I would like a big track, dirt bike. gas
pomp. snake, bike, real big gun like Bubbas.
orange turtle, football. cars, big tractor
with trailer, big knife. cowboy hat.
Levi B

Dear Santa,
I would like a Dirt bike, and a shotgun, and
a track, and a rifl. and a pistl. and a snake
and I want the magic and a football and
a nife and a bike and a brown cowboy hat.
Clayton B

Dear santa,
Can gou bring me toy horses and amike
action figure and a barbi house and a
barbi doll and barbi clothes.
Thank you Jaci S

To:Santa
From: Jiaya B.
Dear Santa first happy birthday and can
I ask gyo a qpstion. Well I have been very
good this year so can goa give my family
the best Christmas ever. If this is to much
don't worry about it.
9 year old Marry Christmas Santa and I
hope to be seeing goal

Dear Santa. For Christmas what I want
are tons of things like for example: wii.
DSI. Xbox 360. t.v. books, caculater. Dog.
phone, remote control car or(and) heli-
copter, and one more thing: pens.
Sincerely Lauren G

Dear Santa,
For Christmas I want a PSP. Mario Cart. o,
q-wheeler, a bike with deep tread so I can
drive in the dirt. a new scooter, a case for
my 3DS and more games for it. Inline skates,
mire remote control tracks. A touch I-pod
like dezmunds. The tag nerf gan and some
under armor staff.
Ricky C Age 8


Thank you for such a wonderfulyear.
Merry Christmas
Come G&fi


-' Leave
Happy
3322 W. US Hwy 90 (386) 755-2502

Island Shack
S Tanning Salon
I noted Best Tanning Salon Years
Give the Gift of
A Great Tan
1' / Christmas Specials Lotions
Spray Tanning Accessories
S 'e '11 even wrap up your gifi
Sol so it will be ready to give.
S' '- ,ift Certificates Available
'265 SW Malone St. "52--4970 Open Days ,' I 1.


4^


In an emergency we're here for you!
GAINEY AUTOMOTIVE & TOWING
3468 SW CR 138 Ft. White
(386) 454-3580


- ---= = -


IA


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