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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01724
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 15, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01724
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





000016 120312 ****-DITr 326
7 f c0 I B * * 3 -D I 3 2 6
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
P0 BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
-IANESVILLE FL 32611-1943


ty


Reporter


Thursday, December 15, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 270 0 75 cents


LCPD probe expanded


Now termed an internal
affairs investigation; city
remains silent on details.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
City officials are expanding their investiga-
tion into a complaint filed last month by LCPD
Capt. Robert Smith.
The probe is now termed an administrative


internal affairs investigation, officials said.
According to City Manager Wendell Johnson,
findings by assistant city attorney Richard
Stadler, who completed the initial investigation
Dec. 7, have prompted further review.
City officials would not elaborate but said it
is not a criminal probe.
Details of Smith's complaint are unknown.
However, according to a memo from Johnson
to Smith, they center on allegations of employ-
ment discrimination and "internal operations
disagreements" with LCPD Chief Argatha
Gilmore as well as conflict between Smith


and Capt John Blanchard.
Blanchard and Smith function
as second in command at the
police department.
Also at issue was a lost
police laptop computer said
to have been reported as sto-
Smith ^ len. Gilmore questioned why
Smith this "potential security breach
was not immediately brought to her atten-
tion," according to the memo from Johnson
LCPD continued on 3A


Dekle Road crash injures 2


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILalt ,i ':."-.nr,
Lights from a.TraumaOne helicopter illuminate a rescue crew prepping a female patient for transport following a two-vehicle crash at Southwest Brim street
and Southwest Dekle Road Wednesday night. The other driver, also a female, was taken by ambulance to an area hospital. No further information was
available at press time.



Freedom denied in 1988 murder


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
A woman convicted of murdering a Lake
City Community College student and kidnap-
ping her baby in 1988 will remain in prison
for an extra 20 years after a parole hearing
Wednesday. Jarvis
Melinda D. Flint, of Lake City, now 45 years


POLICE-

Man riding

stolen dirt

bike jailed
From staff reports

A Lake City man caught riding a
stolen dirt bike Wednesday morn-
ing was arrested and more arrests
could-follow in the case, authorities
said.
Chris Lyn Buse, 20,146 Sweetgum
Glen, was charged with grand theft
auto in connection with the case.
He was booked into the Columbia
County Detention Facility on $5,000
bond.
According to Columbia County
Sheriff's Office reports, around
midnight Tuesday, deputy Joshua
McCardle saw a man on a dirt bike
on Northwest Brown Road.
McCardle reported that the vehi-
cle lacked proper lighting and a
BIKE continued on 5A


old, was 22 when she was
given two life sentences for
killing Erin Himes, of O'Brien,
and-kidnapping her 9-week old
child.
The li)e sentences were to
run consecutively, with a mini-
mum of 25 years.
The Florida Parole


Commission met Wednesday and voted to
move Flint's release date from 2018 to 2038,
according to Third Circuit State Attorney Skip
Jarvis.
Flint will be 72 and will have served 50 years
if she is released at that time.
Before the murder, Flint would care for
MURDER continued on 5A


JASON MAHI IEW WALMWKILaKe City Reporter
A visit with Santa
Bryson Parlato, 3, of Live Oak, tells Santa Claus what he wants for Christmas at the Lake City Mall recently.


Econ

chief:


Let's

get to

work

By GORDON JACKSON
glackson@lakecityreporter.com
New Economic
DevelopmentDepartment
director Jesse Quillen
met with his board of
directors for the first time
Wednesday, and it wasn't
simply a meet and greet
event.
Quillen, who after more
than a week on the job still
doesn't have an Internet
connection in his office,
told
board
mem-en
bersThe




challenge of marketing
the right
tools to
do his
Quillen job.

challenge of marketing
the county to prospective
employers, Quillen said,
is having the ability to
respond quickly when a
prospect asks for more
information about a site,
permits, incentives or
anything else that could
convince them to create
new jobs here.
"Sonretimes two weeks
is too long," Quillen said.
"It's all about timing and
how you respond."
Quillen expressed
confidence in his ability
to bring new jobs to the
county if he is given the
proper support.
"If we are given the
tools, we'll do that for
you," he said. "Ultimately,
QUILLEN continued on 3A


4-year

degree

nears

at FGC

From staff reports

Florida Gateway
College on Wednesday
received accreditation
for its nursing baccalau-
reate program from the
Southern .Association of
Colleges and Schools,
eliminating the last obsta-
cle in the path to the pro-
gram launching in Fall
2012.
"This is the one we've
been waiting on," said Dr.
Charles Hall, president of
Florida Gateway College.
"We were pretty sure it
was going to come, but
we just couldn't go any
further until we received
this approval. We've been
through all the jumps, all
the hurdles, and this is
the last one we're really
excited."
FGC has worked for
more than two years to
offer a baccalaureate pro-
gram in nursing. The pro-
gram was approved by the
FGC Board of Trustees
in March, and approved
FGC continued on 5A


1 Ci V '.1 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


76
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


-;*-<- ~Opinion .. .. .
--.s P- People
:"-' : '' O bituaries
-' PAd.ice & Comics . . .. .
S Puzzles. ...


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
.. ir-t: T -, .,-t


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FRIDAY
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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


Wednesday:-
N/A


Novelist Pc

DURHAM, N.C. Novelist Michael
Peterson will get a new trial in the
death of his wife because a key pros-
ecution witness misled jurors about
the strength of bloodstain evidence, a
judge ruled Wednesday.
Peterson, 68, was convicted of first-
degree murder in the 2001 death of
Kathleen Peterson, who was found at
the bottom of a bloody staircase in the
couple's mansion. Peterson has main-
tained his wife died in an accidental
fall after drinking alcohol and taking'
Valium.
Four of Peterson's children were in
the front row of the courtroom when
the judge announced his decision. He
blew them a kiss as several members
of the family sobbed with joy.
Peterson's attorney, David Rudolf,
said it will likely be Thursday before
his client can be released on the
$300,000 bond set by the judge.
"I think it's a very sad thing when
an expert called by the state of North
Carolina, who's supposed to be impar-
tial and present technical information
to help the jury, becomes an advocate
who misrepresents facts and conclu-
sions," said Rudolf, who also repre-,
sented Peterson in his 2003 trial.
Judge Orlando Hudson ruled that
former State Bureau of Investigation
agent Duane Deaver misled jurors at
Peterson's trial when he testified that
his analysis of blood spatter showed
beyond any doubt that Kathleen
Peterson died after being struck by
her husband three times with a blunti
object

Nearly all state collapse
claimants accept offers
INDIANAPOLIS Nearly all of the
claimants have accepted Indiana's '
settlement offers over the State Fair
stage collapse.
The Indiana Attorney General's


,IA I 3. Wednesday:
Afternoon: 4-2-6


eterson gets

office said Wednesday that 63 of the
65 claimants have confirmed they'll
accept the settlements. Spokesman
Bryan Corbin says that accounts for
all but about $2,000 of the $5 million
in total compensation available under
state law. Those 63 include the estates
of all seven people who died in the
Aug. 13 collapse at the Indianapolis
fairgrounds.
Corbin says the state has contacted
attorneys for the two remaining claim-
ants to verify whether they'll accept
their offers.
The seven estates are due to receive
at least $300,000. The remaining
money goes to 58 other people injured
when strong winds toppled the stage
before a concert by the country music
duo Sugarland.

Jackson daughter tells
of her acting dreams
LOS ANGELES Michael Jackson's
daughter says she was inspired to be
an actress after seeing her father in
.the film "Moonwalker."
'"My dad was in the movie
'Moonwalker' and I knew'he could
sing really well, but I didn't know
he could act," Paris *
Jackson told talk show
host Ellen DeGeneres,
according to a tran-
script of the episode
to air Thursday. "I saw
that and I said, 'Wow,
I want to be just like

The film featuring Jackson
Jackson's signature
dance move and other
videos was released in 1988.
Paris said her father encouraged
.her and did improvisation sessions
to develop her skills. The 13-year-old
: has been cast alongside Larry King
in a film based on a new children's


ez'nafr."


Tuesday:
1-2-12-34-36


new trial

book, "Lundon's Bridge and the Three
Keys," which is in early stages of
development
The Internet Movie Database,
known as IMDB, shows the film is ten-
tatively scheduled for a 2013 release,
although filmmakers have not present-
ed the teen's proposed acting contract
to a Los Angeles court as required
because she is a minor.
Paris also talked about the lengths
that her father took to protect her
identity for an episode that will air on
Thursday.

'The Help' earns four
SAG nominations
LOS ANGELES The Deep South
drama "The Help" cleaned up with
four nominations Wednesday for the
Screen Actors Guild Awards, among
them honors for Viola Davis, Jessica
Chastain and Octavia Spencer.
The adaptation of the best-selling
novel also was nominated for best
ensemble cast, along with the silent
film "The Artist," the wedding comedy
"Bridesmaids," the family drama "The
Descendants" and the romantic fan-
tasy "Midnight in Paris."
The nominations are among the first
major honors on the long road to the
Feb. 26 Academy Awards. The SAG
list of contenders and Golden Globe
nominees that will be announced
Thursday help sort out favorites from
also-rans for Oscar voters, whose
nominations come out Jan. 24.
Davis is up for best actress and
Spencer for supporting actress as
black maids who agree to share sto-
ries of their tough lives with'an aspir-
ing white writer at the start of the civil-
rights movement in 1960s Mississippi.
Chastain also was nominated for
supporting actress as Spencer's lonely,
needy new boss.
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Actor-comedian Tim
Conway is 78.
Singer Cindy Birdsong
(The Supremes) is 72.
Rock musician Dave


Clark (The Dave Clark
Five) is 69.
Actor Don Johnson is
62.
Actor Adam Brody is 32.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Rapper Ro Rida
enters plea deal

MIAMI BEACH -
Rapper Flo Rida has
entered into a deal for first
time offenders on his DUI
arrest on Miami Beach.
His attorney told the
Miami Herald Wednesday
the singer
will enroll
in the "Back
on Track"
program
which
requires
him to
perform
community Flo Rida
service and
take DUI classes.
If completed, Flo Rida
will have his DUI charge
amended to reckless driv-
ing.
His arrest report says
officers spotted his car
driving erratically about
3:45 a.m. on June 6.
The report says the rap-
per, whose real name is
Tramar Dillard, failed a
field sobriety test It also
says he blew twice the
legal limit to drive into
a device to measure his
blood-alcohol level, had
bloodshot, watery eyes,
and slurred speech.
Flo Rida's hits include
the party jam "Low" and
"Right Round."

Parties take sides
on Holder remarks
TALLAHASSEE U.S.
Attorney General Eric
Holder warned politicians
not to pass election laws
that benefit themselves
and their parties and to
draw political districts that
reflect voters, not political
interests.
That couldn't be Florida,
right?
Well, it depends on who
you ask. Republicans say
the voting law they passed
this year will protect the
integrity of voting and


Holder should worry
about his own problems.
Democrats say Holder
is spot on and Florida is
the best example of the
problems he discussed in a
speech Tuesday in Texas.
And one elections supervi-
sor says both sides of the,
fight need to just relax
instead of spurring voter
hysteria.
So once again, Florida,
the state where George
W. Bush beat Al Gore by
537 votes in an election
some feel could have had
a different result if not for
a multitude of elections
problems, is a focus of
partisan finger pointing on
the voting process ahead
of a presidential election.
And with Florida possi-
bly playing a key role in
whe r President Barack
Obama gets re-elected, the
arguments are that much
louder.
"Of course they are valid
concerns," former state
Sen. Dan Gelber, a lawyer
for a group that's trying
to make sure lawmakers
follow new constitutional
amendriients that require
political districts to be
compact and not drawn to
benefit parties or candi-
dates. "Florida is the great-
est offender of some of
the most gerrymandered
districts in the country and
the Legislature is creating
obstructions to voting. It's
shameful."
But most Republicans
say political motivations
weren't behind a law that
puts tighter restrictions
and fines on third party
voter registration drives,
shortens the number of
early voting days and
forces voters to cast a
provisional ballot if they
change their address to a
new county when they go
to the polls. U.S. Sen. Bill
Nelson, a Democrat, calls
the new law '"The Voter
Suppression Act" saying
minorities, the elderly in
college students could find
it more difficult to vote.


Police identify 2
bodies at plant
LAKELAND Lakeland
police have identified both
victims found dead at a cen-
tral Florida power plant
Police identified the vic-
tims Wednesday as 25-year-
old-Christopher Francis
Artes of Baltimore, Md.,
and 22-year-old Medeana
Dina Hendershot of South
Carolina. Their bodies
were found this week at
a Lakeland electric plant -
Authorities say their deaths
appear to be accidental.
Police spokeswoman Ann
Dinges told the Ledger of
Lakeland the victims may
have hitched a ride on a
coal train and died when the
boxcar was being emptied.
She says the boxcar opens
from the bottom to empty
the coal and the forceful-
movement likely caused
the blunt force trauma
that killed Hendershot and
asphyxiated Artes.


THE WEATHER


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m ii.


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Pensacola
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Vald51a City Friday Saturday
7t/51 *Jacksonville Cape Canaveral 7760 P I6 60 pC
Tallahassee Lake City 5 53Daytona Beach 76 58 p 6 7
S1 ) Ft. Lauderdale 79 A8 F. 8", 6 ,,:
C Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers 80 61 d. a.1 ,L' ,
Panama City t, '" ,560 Galnesvllle 7 '55 p.: 77 .. 7"r:
73 5S Ocala Jacksonville 76 55 76 51 pc
7E, 54 0 e7
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West ;8 69 pc 78 68 p,
i' 59 76'-63 Lake City 77 54 pc 76 45 pC
Miami .0 6 p,: 81 68 p..
Tampa Naples 80 62 pc ,0 62 p.:
7 6 West Palm Beach Ocala 73 55 pc 7 7 5.3 p.
78 67 Orlando C 59 p.: '9 59 p.:
F FL Lauderdale Panama City 3 3 ; I. p,:
FLMyers 79 71 0 Pensacola 73 57 c 67 J, p:
79 60 *Naples Tallahassee 76 3 73 45 p,
79/61 Miami Tampa 79 62 p.: 9 61 p:
79 70 Valdosta 77 53 p: 7.3 45 p.:
Key West W. Palm Beach ,5 65 p. ,0 65 p.
17!69


Woman receives TEMPERATURES SUN
Craiglist kidn High Wednesday 75 Sunrise today 7:19 a.m.
ranIS kiey Low Wednesday 49 Sunset today 5:32 p.m.


MIAMI A woman is
recovering in a Miami hos-
pital after receiving a new
kidney after posting a plea
for help on Craigslist
Selina Hodge posted a
plea online in July asking
for someone to donate a
kidney. The 28-year-old then
turned to Craigslist She
told WnTV she "didn't know
where else to turn."
Hodge received more
than 800 responses from
all over the world from her
Craigslist ad. One came
from 23-year-old Stephanie
Grant, who lived just a few
miles away from Hodge in
Palm Beach Gardens.
The two drove together
to the University of Miami
Medical Center Campus
several times to complete
the evaluations. After
months of waiting, the
women underwent trans-
plant surgery Tuesday.
(AP)


Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low
PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


68
44
84 in 1967
19 in 1962

0.00"
0.36"
33.25"
1.06"
46.86"


Sunrse torn.
Sunset torn.
MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom..


7:20 a.m.
5:32 p.m.

10:38 p.m.
10:51 a.m.
11:39 p.m.
11:27 a.m.


@300
Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan.
17 24 1 9
Last New First Full


45 1ies tobin
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
'Channel.



S weather.com


~ Forecasts, data and
S, graphics 2011 Weather
ye IT 1 Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www..weatherpubllsher.com


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FLORIDA'
LOTT


t-A Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-4-6-5


Daily Scripture

"[The Birth of Jesus Foretold]
In the sixth month of
Elizabeth's pregnancy, God sent
the angel Gabriel to Nazareth,
a town in Galilee, to a virgin
pledged to be married to a man
named Joseph, a descendant of
David. The virgin's name was
Mary. The angel went to her
and said, 'Greetings, you who
are highly favored! The Lord is
with you.'"

Luke 1:26-28 NIV

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
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The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fa. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and. Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in parties forbidden without the pers- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 a.m. next day re-delivery or ser-
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POSTMASTER:Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O..Box 1709, e "e"
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...........;..755-5445
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(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks.................. $26.32
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or.suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


LCPD: Internal review to be launched
Continued From Page 1A


to Smith. The memo indi-
cated Smith thought he
was being singled out by
Gilmore, whose response
to the matter he consid-
ered harassment.
It is not yet known who
will conduct the investi-
gation.
Audrey Sikes, city
clerk, said the docu-
ments will be released
when the investigation is
complete.
Stadler's-report "is now
part of an administrative
internal affairs investi-
gation," she said. "The
investigation remains
active and will not be a


public record until the
end of the internal affairs
investigation."
Sikes she said does
not have a timeframe for
when the investigation
will be completed.
Under Florida law, find-
ings of an investigation at
this stage are not a mat-
ter of public record.
Johnson said on
Monday he met with
Smith, Gilmore and Gene
Bullard, the city's human
resource director, to dis-
cuss Stadler's findings.
Wednesday morning
Smith e-mailed Johnson
asking whether he was


the target of any "investi-
gation, inquiry or review"
being conducted by the
city. He said if he was,
state law required he be
notified of the nature of
the investigation.
Johnson replied, "The
city will comply with the
statutes for due process,"
according to Smith
Smith was placed
on paid administrative
leave by Johnson Nov.
15 after filing the com-.
plaint. He will remain on
leave during the investi-
gation.


we will be judged on
results."
He encouraged board
members to have open dia-
logue with him about their
expectations and sugges-
tions. But he said he needs
the authority to act quickly
without asking permission
if board members want an
agency that is responsive
and effective:
"If I'm given that free-
dom, I'll be successful
here," he said. "If not,
we've got a problem. I've
got to be honest with you.
You guys hired me to do
that."
Board members asked
Quillen to write a "wish
list" of needs so he has the
tools to do his job.
"I'm not trying to beat up
on anyone," Quillen said.
"If a project comes to us
and demands a response
by Friday at 3 p.m. we
have to be in the game.
We don't want little bitty
things to hold us up."
County Manager Dale
Williams, who is Quillen's
immediate supervisor, told
board members .that he
will have all the tools and


authority to do his job.
"I haven't heard any-
thing that Jesse said that
is an issue," he said.
Quillen will have a wire-
less Internet connection
soon, Williams said. The
reason for the delay is
Comcast officials said wir-
ing Quillen's department
for an Internet connection
has to be engineered.
"The building's just
hard to serve," Williams
said.
The lease for the depart-
ment's office space at the
old Bank of America build-
ing is month to month and
county officials are consid-
ering different locations.
It's possible the depart-
ment will remain at in the
bank building, Williams
said.
"Jesse will have a say in
where the new office will
be," Williams said.
County commissioner
Rusty DePratter said he
and other board members
want to be proactive and
support efforts to bring
new jobs here.
"I think we've come a
long way," he said.


Quillen thanked the
board for their support
and said he is ready to get
to work.
"I. just appreciate the
opportunity," he said. "We
have assets to be success-
ful if we can work togeth-
er."


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Lake City woman hurt


in Union County crash


From staff reports

LAKE BUTLER A
Wednesday morning crash
on State Road 100, just east
of Lake Butler, caused a
second accident, sending
three drivers to the hos-
pital.
A Lake City woman was
among those hurt
Cailyn B. Stalnaker, 26,
of Lake Bulter, slowed
to make a left turn onto
County Road 237 from
eastbound SR100, accord-
ing to Florida Highway
Patrol reports. '
Also driving east, Harlos
Deon Thomas, 30, of Lake
City, failed to stop in time
and rear-ended Stalnaker,
according to reports.
The impact pushed
Stalnaker's 2009 Chevrolet
into the westbound lane.
Stalnaker's vehicle struck
Daniel J. Dobrian, 57, of
Hawthorne, head-on as
he was traveling west in a
2007 Toyota.
'Thomas and Dobrian
were transported to Shands


at the University of Florida
in Gainesville with serious
injuries. Stalnaker was trans-
ported with minor injuries.


Thomas was charged
with careless driving.
All three drivers were
wearing seatbelts.


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QUILLEN: Ready to get started
Continued From Page 1A


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


4 -7
mandoc


MMOL


.#












OPINION


Thursday, December 15, 201 I


ONE ANOTHER


ONE
OPINION


New


kinds of


giving

T is the season to
shop for gifts
but here's news
that serves as a
reminder of what
Christmas is all about
According to a new poll by
the American Red Cross, 8 in
10 people prefer that someone
give them a donation to a char-
ity in their name rather than a
gift they don't want.
In other words, give a goat
to a hungry girl in Gambia on
behalf of a friend or relative
who really doesn't want one
more scarf or fruit cake.
The trend in such charity
gifts is one way that giving is
changing forcing both holiday
shoppers and charities to stay
on their twinkle toes this time
of year. The biggest changes
are driven by a stagnant econo-
my, the ease of social network-
ing, and a rising desire for prac-
tical results in selfless giving.
With joblessness so high,
for example, about 7 out of 10
Americans 'say it's important to
give to charity this season a
jump of 10 percentage points
from last year.
That's music to the ears of
charities. They usually collect
30 to 50 percent of their dona-
tions during the holidays (espe-
cially on Dec. 31, the last day
for charitable tax deductions).
A decade ago; only 4 per-
cent of Americans gave money
online. Now it's 65 percent.
Young people are tapping into
friends on Facebook, Google+,
and other social media to create
"swarms" of givers for a cause
or to solve a social problem.
One Twitter account called
Online Swearjar allows people
to make a donation to a cause
every time they use a curse
word on Twitter. The Case
Foundation is giving money
to people during the holidays
who post pictures of someone
committing "little acts of good
that go unsung" on the Twitter
hashtag #GoodSpotting.
The ways of giving may
change but the spirit of it only
grows. And celebrating the
coming of Christ is a reminder
of that eternal truth.
Christian Science Monitor


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETT E R S
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed, or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Tim Tebow is a


man. of character


as an assistant city
editor on a metro-
politan newspaper, I
made the discovery
that while' talent is a great bless-
ing, its often character that
counts most at the end of the
day.
An important story would
bounce into sight and I would
assign it to a brilliant reporter
while overlooking an arrogance
handicap, sometimes regretting
the decision. The next time I
might hand the banner opportu-
nity to a more humble, diligent,
eager, helpful reporter perhaps
lacking razzle-dazzle ability and
rejoice in the outcome.
That paper was in Denver. I
went there at a time when the
Denver Broncos were headed
for their first Super Bowl, and
the city was flipped out over the
team's Orange Crush defense
even to the point of painting
houses orange. I'myself had
many orange moments that sea-
son, though I left paint alone.
I now live outside Denver,
up the mountains a bit, and am
naturally enough caught up in
the saga of Tim Tebow, a man
of character. He's also a man of
controversy, of faith and of mir-
acle wins on the football field. It
has been something to watch.
This rookie quarterback has
led the Broncos to a series of
last-minute, improbable, come-
back victories, reversed a losing
season and put his team at the
head of its division. Inspiring
other players to top-notch per-
formances, he is a never-give-
up, upbeat leader. Still, he has
sometimes been awful in pass-
ing the ball and has infuriated
not a few with his open praise


of Jesus Christ and a kneeling
prayer position imitated world-
wide.
He's not really very good,
some people say. Yes, he runs
the ball well, but that is not
what quarterbacks are for, they
tell us. They seem to think it
little excuse for his sorry pass-
ing stats that fumble-thumb
receivers should have caught
some on-the-mark throws. They
wonder where he hides out for
the first three quarters of so
many games and they tell you
luck has been amazingly in his
corner. Then they come to reli-
gion.
Some consider it very nearly
an NFL disqualification that he
openly prays at games. Sports
really ought to get rid of all
the God talk, it is said by many
reflecting what seems to me the
most anti-religious period in my
life. Some wear it as a badge
of superiority that they hate
the church of their childhood.
I repeatedly have encountered
those whose boasted tolerance
does not extend to Christians
they think of as hypocritical,
judgmental, mean-spirited, anti-
science throwbacks to an age of
superstitious malevolence. .
The critics are not that smart.
Most of these I've run into sup-
pose all Christians subscribe
to some straw-man version of a


faith a world's distance from the
one I know that never ceases
preaching love. They can recite
faults of 500 and more years
ago without grasping any of the
immeasurable good.
But then listen to me sound-
ing snappish. That is not what
the faith is about. So now
listen to the always-self-effac-
ing Tebow on being sacked
by someone who then knelt
gleefully in the Tebow prayer
posture.
"He was probably just having
fun and was excited he made
a good play and had a sack,"
Tebow told an interviewer. "And
good for him."
I ran across the quote in a
Wall Street Journal piece that
also reminded us of how Tebow
has dedicated himself to charita-
ble activities that have included
visiting with a young leukemia
victim and saying his name on-
TV to boost his spirits.
I briefly met Tebow and will'
share my intuitive conviction
that he is genuine. Concerning
his public piety, please note that
while Tebow thinks believing
produces positive results, he
also says God does not fix ball-
games. His prayers are part of
a joy much like that of the early
Christians. It just can't help bub-
bling up.
He's a matter of national
debate now. That's fine. The
cynics are probably just having
fun. As for his sports future, I
make no predictions except to
say I believe character will out
* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


Women lose when religiously

dominated parties rule


You must hand it
'to her. Secretary
of State Hillary
Clinton is the first
in her position to
place women's rights front and
center. Even though two women
preceded her in that job, one
Democrat and one Republican,
neither of those women placed
much emphasis on women's
rights.
Last week Clinton stuck up
for Egyptian women and stuck
it to the men who are crowd-
ing them out of positions of
power in the new Egyptian
government. She told those
attending a European forum in
the Lithuanian capital, Vilnius,
that Washington expects all
"democratic actors" in Egypt to
uphold universal human rights.
She said that includes women's
rights, and allowing free reli-
gious practice.
Tough words, those, to a
new government dominated
by the Islamic Brotherhood
and other religious parties.
As I wrote in a column on a
similar topic last month, when
religiously dominated parties
come into power, women's


Bonnie Erbe
bonnieerbe@compuserve.com
rights go out the door.
I feared bad things would
happen to women as the so-
called Arab Spring unfurled. I
fear the same as our troops pull
out of Iraq and Afghanistan.
Even with democratic elections,
countries where strict religious
practices prevail and religious
leaders are free to become polit-
ical leaders, don't have enough
educated voters to hold truly
free elections and will eventu-
ally if not right away take back
personal and political freedoms
they enjoyed before the mullahs
took over.
Look at Iran. The Shah was
a corrupt ruler, but he gave
women immense freedom by
the standard of most Islamic
countries. Saddam Hussein, as
we all know, was a murderer
and a thief. But he ran a secular.


military dictatorship and while
he ran the country, women
flourished. There was a quota
for the percentage of seats in
Parliament that had to be filled
by women.
Look at women now in
Iran. The mullahs essentially
run the country and women
are back in their long, black,
fully covered outfits. They are
prisoners of their men. Even
though Iran is a much more
sophisticated, well-educated
country than, say, Afghanistan,
Iranian women have been
pushed back into subjugation.
Why? Because the vast major-
ity of political power is in the
hands of the mullahs.
Now back to Egypt. Even
with Clinton's advocacy for
Egyptian women, the situation
does not bode well for women's
empowerment. This was easily
foreseen. What can we do to
make sure the Middle East does
not become dominated by coun-
tries governed by strict Islamic
governments? At this point, not
much.
* Bonnie Erbe is a TV host and
writes this column for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


TSA


might try


trusting


its own

people


It doesn't seem like
a week goes by that
there isn't some hor-
ror story about over- '
zealous searches by
Transportation Security
Administration screeners at
airport checkpoints.
Last spring, there was the
video that went viral of a fright-
ened little 6-year-old girl being
subject to a thorough pat-down
by a female screener.
A pregnant teenager was
recently barred from a flight
because her handbag had a
decorative imprint of a hand-
gun on it, .clearly fake from the
photos and positively fake once
the screeners examined it
And then there are the
constant reports of 85-year-
old women for some reason
they all seem to be 85 who
are forced to partially undress
because they have a defibrilla-
tor, colostomy bag, back brace
or bulging adult diaper.
The TSA denies that these
are strip searches, and techni,
cally they're not in the sense
of what inmates go through
entering a maximum-security
prison. But to these humiliated
and perhaps terrified women,,
they are, in fact, strip searches.
The inevitable backlash took
its time coming, but now it has
started to arrive.
The House Transportation
Committee, instrumental
in the creation of TSA, has
introduced a bill, called STRIP
for Stop TSA's Reach-In
Policy. The measure would
ban screeners who have not
received federal law-enforce-
ment training from using the
title "officer" and ban them
from wearing uniforms that
look like those of law-enforce-
ment officers.
The proposed law seems
petty only if a traveler hasn't
been subjected to a super-offi-
cious TSA officer who feels
entitled to throw a little weight
around as a matter of empha-
sizing the screener's superior
status. He can force you to
miss your flight; you have little
or no recourse.
The TSA has a standard
bureaucratic defense: The
screener was only "following
rules and procedures." And
the rules and procedures
can't be elaborated on for
reasons of "security." It is
not being overly skeptical to
believe that the stonewalling
on the rules and procedures
is because some of them
are really stupid and would
embarrass the agency if they
became public.
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-
N.Y., has proposed stationing
special advocates at security
checkpoints to immediately
resolve passenger complaints
about security screenings.
Maybe one day these advo-
cates will be necessary, but
it seems that a wiser, more
effective course would be to
empower TSA supervisors
to make judgments on the
spot. Presumably, they have
a certain amount of experi-
ence and professionalism or
they wouldn't be supervisors,
at least one hopes that's the
case.
And the agency's constant
incantation of "rules and pro-
cedures" suggests that the
supervisors' professional judg-
ment has been superseded


by agency red tape. It would
bolster public confidence if the
TSA showed some confidence
in its own people.
* Scripps Howard News Service


m w










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


Shirley Temple Hill Dove
Shirley Temple Hill Dove, 76,
of Lake City, passed away on
December 12, 2011 at Suwan-
nee Valley Care Center fol-
lowing an extended illness.
Born on January 11,1935 in
Richmond, Missouri to the
late Carl and Temple Hill. She
loved traveling in their motor
home around the U.S., and was
a loving wife, mother, and sister.
She is preceded in death by
her son Audie Lance Dove.
Survivors include her husband of
58 years Charles Edward Dove
of Lake City, daughter; Mar-
cia Carline Dove of Venice, Fl,
brothers; Leslie H.Hill (Anne) of
Missouri, Ralph E. Hill (Vonnie)
of Missouri, and Ronald Keith


dren, as well as chances
for them to socialize with
other moms, offering sup-
port, advice & friendship.
Plus local favorite Ted
Wright will be back for his
monthly session playing
holiday music as you stroll
the market and enjoy the
peaceful, lakeside Wilson
Park. It's a great outing
for the family to shop for
locally created gifts in a
stress-free environment


ters-in-law, Dolia Murphy, Lillie
Adams; loving nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services for Mr. James
Harris will be 10:00 A.M. Sat-
urday, December 17, 2011 at
New Bethel Missionary Baptist
Church. 550 NE Martin Luther
KingStreet.AlvinJ. Baker, Pastor.
The family will receive
friends from 5:00 7:00
P.M. Friday, December 16,
2011 at the funeral home.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street.
Lake City, FL. (386) 752-4366.
Marq Combs-Turner, L.F.D.
"The Caring Professionals"
Linda Glover Knowles


Hill (Nora) of Panama City, Fl. Linda Glover Knowles, 66, of
A memorial service will be Lake City, FL, died on Tuesday,
conducted 2:00 P.M, Saturday, December 13, 2011, at North
December 17,2011 at Gateway Florida Regional Medical Center
Forest Lawn Funeral Home in Gainesville, FL. Born in Ra-
Chapel with Ralph E. Hill of- leigh, NC, she was the daughter of
ficiating. Arrangements are the late Darren James and Myrtle
under the direction of GATE- Lee Glover. She had resided in
WAY-FOREST LAWN Lake City for the past 28 years
FUNERAL HOME, 3596. S. after moving here from Ocala,
U.S. Hwy 441, (386) 752-1954. FL. She was a member of Berea
Please sign the guest book at Baptist Church and enjoyed their
www.gatewayforestlawn.co-m river place, fishing, and doing
puzzles. She loved her family
James Harris and the grandkids and was "The
Best Mom and Grandmom in the
On Friday, December 9, 2011, World". She was preceded in
Mr. James death by her husband of 47 years,
Harris met his 1 Jessie Lewis "Chester" Knowles
untimely death and a brother, Billy Glover.
as the result of i Sur'vivors include three sons:
an accident. Rodney Knowles (Christine) ,
Affectionate- Rusty Knowyles (Gina), both of
ly known as Lake City, FL, and Scott Lasher
"Wild Bill", <' Cindy) of Citra, FL; onedaugh-
he is nOw rest- NO tel. Rhonda Crews (M. Troy),
irif' thflie preserIce of:tli L d.' -Lake City, E;'bihd brdth& Dotri-
Mtr.,-Harris,, whose ',birth name ny Raye Glover, Branford, FL;
was Larry; D. Dean, was born one sister: Faye Miller, Jackson-
September 9, 1923 in Rochelle, ville, FL; eleven grandchildren:
GA. to Will Dean and Mary Jane Dustin Crews, Kyla Larson, Jes-
Dean Colson. Both preceded se Knowles, Matthew Knowles,
him in death. He was educated Taylor Crews, Shelbi Knowles,
in the public schools of Ro- Shelby Jones, Brooklynn
chelle, GA. Before establishing Crews, Carly Knowles, Tristan
residence in Lake City, Mr. Har- Knowles, and Austin Knowles;
ris worked at odd jobs. At the one great grandchild: Jalen
age of 15, he was baptized and Wade. Numerous other relatives
attended Shady Gr6ve Baptist and 'good friends also survive.
Church. After moving to Lake Funeral services will be conduct-
City, he was employed by Dan- ed Saturday, December 17, 2011,
iels Lumber Company for more at 11:00 A.M. at Gateway-Forest
than 20 years and the Division of Lawn Funeral Home Chapel with
Forestry until his health failed. Rev. Larry Sweat officiating.
Nine brothers, seven sisters, Interment will follow in Forest
children, Calvin Shaw, Ella M. Lawn Memorial Gardens. Visita-
Perry, also precedes him in death, tion with the family will be Fri-
Cherishing memories: a lov- day, December 16,2011, atthe fu-
ing and devoted companion for neral home from 5 P.M. to 8 P.M.
greater than 50 years, Ella Shaw; GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
son, Alvin Shaw; loving and FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S.
devoted granddaughter, Toyia US Hwy 441, Lake City, FL
S. Brown (Darcy); great-grand- (386-752-1954) is in charge of
children, Ja'Mar Smith (Alexia), all arrangements. Please send
Jerquia Smith, Tevin Gardner, messages of love. and comfort
De'Aunna Brown, De'Marcus at www.gatewayforestlawn.com.
Brown, Clara Kelly, Danielle
Kelly; great-great grandchildren, Obituaries are paid advertise-
Icis Brown (granddaddy's Pooh), ments. For details, call the Lake
Isiah Brown, Haley Carter, Jam- City Reporter's classified depart-
marrionKelly; sisters, WillieMae ment at 752-1293.
McMullen, Mattie Haywood; sis-



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FGC: 4-year degree nears
Continued From Page 1A


by the State Board of
Education in June.
The college will now
begin developing the cur-
riculum for the program
and, in the spring, will
begin accepting students
into the program.


Once launched, the col-
lege will turn its attention
to introducing its next four-
year program, a baccalau-
reate in Early Childhood
Education, which is tenta-
tively scheduled to begin
during Spring 2013.


BIKE: Returned to owner
Continued From Page 1A


license plate.
McCardle conducted a
traffic stop and learned the
dirt bike had been reported
stolen.
Reports said that on Dec.
4 two dirt bikes were report-
ed stolen from a home, on
Southwest Mayo Road in


Fort White.
Buse was taken into cus-
tody without incident and led
McCardle to the location of
the second stolen dirt bike,
reports say. Both dirt bikes
were returned to the owner.
Additional arrests are
pending, authorities said.


MURDER: Parole deniedin 1988 killing, kidnapping


Submitted
Saturday, December 17,
is MOMS Day at the Lake
DeSoto Farmers Market
as the Lake City MOMS
Club will sell baked goods
to raise funds for Relay
for Life and the March of
Dimes. MOMS (Moms
Offering Moms Support)
is an international organi-
zation where moms can get
together, have play dates
& activities for their chil-


Starts Friday, Dec. 16
preview day Thursday, Dec. 15

sof the

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claim of an "overwhelming mothering
instinct" was negated because Flint
later abandoned the baby, Jarvis said.
'There is no explanation that can jus-
tify the killing of a mother to take her
baby. melinda Flint is where she needs
to be," said Jarvis in the release.
Flint is incarcerated at the Lowell
Correctional Institution Annex in
Ocala.


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Joes Jeans Juacy Couture, Kate Spade, Keer
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Freerna, Hart Sc ralrer Marx ustin ..* Dockers
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Thomas Dean Tommy Balhama, Tuin, U,g,
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Handbags: Ktcheinovelty Le C
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on pror purchases or special orders Cannot be redeemed



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ENTIRE STOCK
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up. Flint parked the truck behind a
pharmacy, where a. curious employee
found the'body days later.
The child was later abandoned in 'a
gas station restroom, wearing only a
diaper
Jarvis argued for a later parole con-
sidering Flint shot Himes without
warning, he said. He also argued that
Flint stuffed pillows under her shirt to
give the appearance of pregnancy. Any


MOMS day coming

to farmers market


Continued From Page 1A

Himes's child while Himes attended
class. Himes would spend the night at
Flint's home when Himes had an early
class and when Flint's husband, a truck
driver, was out of town. ,
On March 9, 1988 Flint killed Himnes
while she slept, shooting her in the
head with the gun Flint's husband
owned, Jarvis said.
Flint wrapped Himes's body in a
blanket and placed it in Himes's pick-





. .



, ; .. , .
.7', .. -:, ," .. .


OBITUARIES


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


1 "1-, '1 I I -, m- 1 -


I . . . . I


*
* I
*
*
*


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.
*


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Dec. 16

Afternoon Tea
The community is cordial-
ly invited to "Afternoon
Tea" Friday, Dec. 16th,
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at
the Hospice of the Nature
Coast Wings Community
Education Center in the
Lake City Plaza (along
U.S. Hwy 441). "After-
noon Tea" is an ideal way
to greet your neighbors
and friends and meet Hos-
pice of the Nature Coast
staff who will provide in-
formation and answer any
questions about hospice
care and services. For
more information, call
Vicki Myers at 386-755-
7714 or 866-642-0962.
For more information about
hospice services in the Lake
City area, call Hospice of
the Nature Coast at 386-755-
7714. Visit us on the web at
www.hospicepofthenature-
coastorg.

Dec. 17

FACS Christmas.
dance and party

The Filipino-American
Cultural society of
Lake City will hold
its Christmas dance
and party Saturday,
Dec. 17 from 6-10
p.m. at the social hall
of Epiphany Catholic
Church in Lake City.
All FACS active
members and
guests, please plan
to attend this special
event. It will be a
night of seasonal
entertainment, with
Christmas caroling,
music, dancing and a
cultural food buffet.
As usual, bring your
best covered dish to
share.


Arrival, setup of buffet
and social time: 6-6:30;
dinner begins at 6:30.
New members are
always welcome.
For more information
contact Bob Gavette at
965-5905.

Girl Scouts fundraiser

The Girl Scouts invite
you to tell Santa what
you would like for
Christmas. Come
have breakfast with
Santa at Burger King
on West US 90 in Lake
City on Saturday,
December 17 from 8 -
11 a.m.' and a portion
of the proceeds will
benefit Troops 17,
163, 332, 525, and
926 as they travel to
Washington D.C. to
celebrate 100 years of
Girl Scouting in the
USA with a sing-along
at the National Mall.

'Glorious Impossible'

The combined music
ministries of Pine
Grove Baptist Church
and Southside Baptist
Church present "Glorious
Impossible" Saturday,
December 17 at 7:00
p.m., Southside Baptist
Church, 388 S.E. Baya
Drive and Sunday,
December 18 at 6:00
p.m., Pine Grove Baptist
Church, 1989 N. Hwy
441.
Admission is free,
but seating is limited.
For advanced tickets
or further information,
please call: Pine Grove
Baptist Church, 386-752-
2664 or Southside Baptist
Church, 386-755-5553.
Nursery will be provided
for up to four years old.


Dec. 18

'We Have Our Savior'

The First Presbyterian
Church, 697 Baya Dr.,
will have a worship
service at 11 a.m.
with the musical "We
Have Our Savior." For
information call 752-
0670.

One of Us

A Christmas musical
presented by the Adult
Choir, Sunday night,
Dec. 18 ay 6 p.m. at
First Baptist Church,
182 NE Justice Street,
Lake City.
Rev. Chris Phillips,
Minister of Youth, Rev.
Ken Baxley, Minister of
Music.

'Glorious Impossible'

The combined music
ministries of Pine
Grove Baptist Church
and Southside Baptist
Church present "Glorious
Impossible" Saturday,
December 17 at 7:00
-p.m., Southside Baptist
Church, 388 S.E. Baya
Drive and Sunday,
December 18 at 6:00
p.m., Pine Grove Baptist
Church, 1989 N. Hwy
441.
Admission is free,
but seating is limited.
For advanced tickets
or further information,
please call: Pine Grove
Baptist Church, 386-
752-2664 or Southside
Baptist Church, 386-755-
5553.
Nursery will be
provided for up to four
years old.

Candlelight service


We invite you to come
and worship with us at
our annual Candlelight
Service at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist
Church. The service
will begin at 5:30 p.m.
on Sunday, December
18, 2011. The church
is located at 550 NE
Martin Luther King
Street.

Our annual Watch-night
service will begin at
9:30 p.m. on Saturday,
December 31, 2011. We
invite everyone to come
and worship with us
as we praise and thank
.the Lord for bringing
us through 2011 and
for allowing us to enter
2012.
Pastor Alvin J. Baker
will deliver the message.


Dec. 19


EEOC monthly.
meeting
The, NAACP
- Columbia County
will host the U.S.
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Commission at its
monthly meeting.
Join us to learn about
the EEOC's latest
initiatives, and to meet
Tampa Field Office
Director Georgia
Marchbanks.
The meeting will be
held Monday, Dec 19 at
6:00 pm at Richardson
Community Center,
255 Coach Anders Way,
Lake City.
For further
information, contact
Glynnel Presley, (386)
752-4074.


Dec. 24

Christmas candlelight
service at Faith in
Christ Church
Everyone is invited
to come and worship
Christmas Eve
At our New church home
in Lake City Florida.
The service will begin
at 11pm on December
24th and end with Holy
Communion at midnight.
The church is located at
282 SW Magical Terrace,.
just off Pinemount/SR
252 one block North of
the Book Store.
Take Pinemount rd
SOUTH from Food Lion,
approx 1 mile, road is on
the RIGHT
Call for more info: 754-
2827.


THEY WANT A NOBLES GIFT CARD FOR CHRISTMAS!!

We've been hearing it for months! "Tell '.
my family for Christmas I want a gift .'
card from here!" With all the beautiful
plants, trees, shrubs and garden decor :.-'
to choose from they'll be thrilled. You
can't go wrong it's what they've been
asking for!

GIFTS FOR THE WILD BIRD LOVER!
Beautiful bird baths, bird houses and all types of feeders await you at Nobles! We even
offer several feeders that have been tested and proved to be squirrel proof!


_________1 1 TH i TREET
1,, .
Ti. T.LL


9248 129th ROAD LIVE OAK
(386) 362-2333
Monday tihru Friday 0110 a.m. 30i p m
Saturday 9.00 am 4-00 p m
CLOSED SLUNDA
"For Oer 30 Years'
www.noblesgreenhouse.com


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011 7A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama
gestures during a news con-
ference in the White House
briefing room in Washington.

Obama:-

Underage

girls should

not buy pill

By BEN FELLER and
LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama said
Thursday it was just common
sense to keep girls under the
age of 17 from being able
to buy a morning-after con-
traceptive pill off a drug-
store shelf. Citing his own
two daughters, Obama said:
"I'think most parents would
probably feel the same way."
. Plenty of pediatric lead-
ers and women's advocacy
groups did not, as reaction
flowed in to the administra-
tion's decision to prevent the
over-the-counter sale of the
anti-pregnancy drug to sexu-
ally active girls of younger
ages.
Critics said politics had
trumped science, again.
"When President Obama
took office, he pledged the
administration's commit-
ment to scientific integrity,"
said Cynthia Pearson of the
National Women's Health
Network. "This decision is a
betrayal of that promise."
At issue is a pill that can
prevent pregnancy if taken
soon enough after unprotect-
ed sex.
It is available without a pre-
scription only to those 17 and
older who can prove their age
and that will now remain the
case after Health and Human
Services Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius overruled scien-
tists at the Food and Drug
Administration. They were
preparing to let the pill be
sold without a prescription or
age limit
Obama rallied around
Sebelius' arguments that
younger girls may not be able
to understand the medicine's
labeling or use the pill prop-
erly.


.*- '% 1
-, "-.
4 .... ,. -


ADHD drugs safe

for adult hearts


By LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO Ritalin and
other drugs used to treat
attention deficit disorder are
safe for adults' hearts, even
though they can increase
blood pressure and heart
rate, according to the larg-
est study of these medicines
in adults.
The results echo find-
ings in a study of children
with ADHD, by the same
researchers, published last
month.
The review of health
records for more 'than
440,000 adults aged 25 to
64 showed those taking
ADHD drugs had about
the same number of heart
attacks, strokes and sud-
den heart-related deaths as
adults who didn't use those
drugs.
The research will be
published in the Journal
of the American Medical
Association's Dec. 28 print
edition, but was released
online Monday because


of its public health impor-
tance, journal editors said.
Although attention deficit
disorder is usually thought
of as a condition in child-
hood, many continue to
have symptoms as adults,
including impulsive, fidg-
ety behavior and difficulty
focusing or paying attention.
ADHD affects about 4 per-
cent of U.S. adults, roughly
9 million. About 8 percent
of U.S. children aged 3 to
17, or 5 million kids, have
ever been diagnosed with
the disorder, government
statistics show.
More than 1.5 million
U.S. adults were taking
stimulants used for ADHD
in 2005, an4 use of ADHD
drugs increased more rap-
idly in adults than in kids
over the past decade, the
study said.
More than 150,000ADHD
medication users were
involved in several states.
Their health records over up
to 20 years were compared
with similar adults who did
not use those drugs.


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


--a New method boosts

hemophiliacs' blood clots


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This June 1989 file photo provided by the Loyola University. Medical Center in Maywood, III.,
shows Madeline Mann shortly after her premature birth weighing 9.9 ounces. She is now an
honors student in psychology at Augustana College in Rock Island, Ill.


Tiniest babies beat


odds, grow up healthy


By LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press
CHICAGO One is a
healthy first-grader; the
other an honors college stu-
dent majoring in psychology.
Once the tiniest babies ever
born, both girls are thriving,
despite long odds when they
entered the world weighing
less than a pound.
A medical report from
the doctor who resuscitated
the infants at a suburban
Chicago hospital is both a
success story and a cau-
tionary tale. These two are
the exceptions and their
remarkable health years
later should not raise false
hope: Most babies this small
do poorly and many do not
survive even with advanced
medical care.
"These are such extreme
cases," said Dr. Jonathan
Muraskas of Loyola
University Medical Center in
Maywood, Ill. They should
not be considered "a bench-
mark" to mean that doctors
should try to save all babies
so small; he said.
The report involves
Madeline Mann, born in
1989 weighing 9.9 ounces,
then the world record; and
7-year-old Rumaisa Rahman,
whose 9.2-ounce birth weight
remains the world's tiniest.
Rumaisa's birth weight was
initially reported as several
ounces less, but that figure
,was based on a different
conversion scale.
Two other babies born
since 1989 weighed less than,
Madeline, and a German girl
was born last year at her
same birth weight.
The report was
released online Monday in
Pediatrics.
It addresses a question
that was hotly debated when
Madeline was born 22 years
ago, remains hot now and
still has no answer: "What is
the real age of viability? No
one knows," said Dr. Stephen
Welty, neonatology chief at
Baylor College of Medicine
- and Texas Children's
Hospital in Houston.
Muraskas and the report's
co-authors say most new-
. born specialists consider
babies born after 25 weeks
,,of pregnancy to be viable
- likely to survive and so
Z they should receive medi-
cal intervention if necessary
to breathe. Younger babies
are generally in a "gray
zone," where intervention
, isn't always so clear cut, the
report suggests.
In Japan, doctors have
lowered that threshold -


This undated family photo
provided Dec. 8, 2011, by
the Loyola University Medical
Center in Maywood, Ill.,
shows 22-year-old Madeline
Mann.
the gestational age to 22
weeks. Normal pregnancies
last about 40 weeks.
Some U.S. doctors will
attempt to save babies at 22
weeks, but that is not done
routinely, said Dr. Edward
Bell, a University of Iowa
- pediatrics professor.
Bell runs an online reg-
istry of the world's tiniest
babies, born weighing less
than about 14 ounces, or
slightly less than 1 pound.
Since 1936, 124 have been
listed. The registry is com-
piled from doctors' volun-
tary reports and so does not
represent all survivors.
Bell estimates that about
7,500 U.S. babies are born
each year weighing less
than 1 pound, and that about
10 percent survive.
Sometimes tiny babies
with zero chance of surviv-
ing show signs of life at birth,
and may be able to breathe
for a short time if put in
an incubator and hooked
up to a breathing machine
and intravenous treatments.
"But even so, if it's a baby
that doesn't have a chance,
we don't want to put the
baby and the family through
the discomfort," Bell said.
Muraskas says his report
highlights a sometimes
overlooked fact gestational
age is even more critical for
survival than size.
Rumaisa and Madeline
were both palm-sized, weigh-
ing less than a can of soda
pop the average size of an
18-week-old fetus but they
were several weeks older
than that.
Their gestational ages -
almost 26 weeks for Rumaisa
and almost 27 weeks for
Madeline meant their
lungs and other organs were


O E YE CENTER of North Fonda
General Eye Care & Surgery


5f"/=--:jj^ B c ' _
a;m i L, .. .


v... -^-
L : .m r . .
_____ __ I-' :. -*______ jf li___ 4. i


By MIKE STOBBE
Associated Press
ATLANTA In what's
being called a landmark
study, researchers used
gene therapy to success-
fully treat six patients with
severe hemophilia, a blood-
clotting disorder.
The study was prelimi-
nary and involved only six
patients, and other promis-
ing early attempts to use
gene therapy against hemo-
philia ultimately failed. But
a single infusion using the
new treatment worked in
some patients for more than
a year, boosting their clot-
ting ability significantly.
"I think this is a terrific
advance for the field. It's a
good lesson in terms of don't
give up on good ideas," said
Dr. Ronald. Crystal, chair-
man of genetic medicine
at New York City's Weill
Cornell Medical College,
It's "truly a landmark
study," said Dr. Katherine
Ponder, a Washington
University School of
Medicine physicians. She
praised the research in an
editorial that accompanies
the study's publication in
the New England Journal
of Medicine. The research


mature enough to make sur-
vival possible.
But both required inten-
sive medical intervention.
They were delivered by
cesarean section more than
a month early because their
mothers had developed
severe pre-eclampsia, dan-
gerously high blood pres-
sure linked with pregnancy.
Both babies were hooked
up immediately to breath-
ing machines with tubes as
slender as a spaghetti strand
slipped down their tiny air-
ways.
Rumaisa has a twin who
was more than twice as big at
birth. Few details about her
are included in the report.
Before the births, both
mothers were given steroid
drugs to speed up growth
of the babies' immature
lungs. Even so, Rumaisa and
Madeline were on breath-
ing machines for about two
months, and hospitalized for
about four months.
Madeline had mild brain
bleeding, common in tiny
preemies, but with no last-
ing effects. Severe cases
can cause serious mental
disabilities. She and Rumaisa
got treatment for an eye con-
dition common in preemies
called retinopathy, which
in 'severe cases can cause
blindness.
Madeline has asthma and
remains petite 4 foot 8 and
about 65 pounds at age 20;
Rumaisa at age 5 weighed
33 pounds and was 3 1/2
feet tall, smaller than about
90 percent of kids her age.
Current information on the
girls' size was not in the
report; Madeline is now 22
and a senior at Augustana
College in Rock Island, Ill.;
Rumaisa is 7 and attends
first grade in suburban
Chicago.
Jim Mann, Madeline's
father, said having a baby
born so small was "terrify-
ing" at first.


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Kin AR"W


also was being presented
Saturday at an American
Society of Hematology con-
ference in San Diego.
Hemophilia is an inher-
ited, potentially life-threat-
ening disorder affecting an
estimated20,000Americans,
almost all of them males.
Their blood doesn't clot
properly because of a faulty
gene.
In severe cases, they can
spontaneously start bleed-
ing internally, even in the
brain. Internal bleeding in
the joints leads to debili-
tating movement problems
and intense pain.
Past gene therapy experi-.
ments on hemophiliacs
improved blood-clotting
for only a few weeks. 'We
couldn't make it last," said
Val Bias, chief executive of
the National Hemophilia
Foundation.
Experts said the new
method needs to be tested
on many more patients to
confirm it's effective and
prove there are no risks.
Even if all goes right, it's
still several years away from
being available to most
patients.
Since the late 1960s, doc-
tors have given hemophili-
acs infusions of clotting pro-


teins. It's been a success,
increasing their average
lifespan to 63. But for severe
cases, treatment can involve
two or three infusions every
week and cost more than
$250,000 annually.
The new study was
led by researchers at the
University College London
Cancer Institute and St.
Jude Children's Research
Hospital in Memphis, Tenn.
All six of the patients in
the study were men seen
in London who had severe
forms of type B hemophil-
ia.
The six men each got a
single, 20-minute infusion
of healthy genetic material
delivered by a virus found in
monkeys. Viruses are often
used to transport DNA into
cells. Each saw the amount
of clotting proteins in their
blood increase from less
than 1 percent of normal
levels to at least 2 percent,
and in one case as much as
11 percent
That may not seem like
a lot, but it was enough
to allow all the men to
ease back on the number
of regular treatments they
needed, and four stopped
conventional treatment
altogether.


Birth control choices abound


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Worried about birth
control in light of headlines about side
effects from Yaz and the patch? Women
have a lot of options thit are, safe and effec-
tive, including some that are even more
reliable.
You can .choose a contraceptive that's
used daily, weekly, monthly, once every
three months, once every three years, even


NIS





LAKE CITY


* MRI
* Ultrasound
* X-Ray
* CT-64- Slice Scanner
* Digital Mammography
* Bone Density
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once a decade.
Yet almost half of U.S. pregnancies are
unintended and experts say confusion
and uncertainty despite all the options is a
bigreason.
"We have a whole generation now of
young adults, the vast majority of whom are
sexually active, who are in a fog about mod-
ern contraception," says Sarah Brown of
the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and
Unplanned Pregnancy. "They don't know
enough to make a reasonable choice."


* Physical Therapy
* Hand Therapy/
Splinting
* Osteoporosis Program
* Balance Disorders


386.755.3164


Ms ,.- -1 inm tsitin 4hor
-5.








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421


SPORTS


Thursday. December 15, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
Yomn eas
9-under travel
team tryouts
.The North Florida
Rays 9-under baseball
travel team has tryouts
planned for 10 a.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Todd
Green at 365-5161 or
Leonard Johnson at
867-6655.

10-under travel
team tryouts
The Columbia Timber
Rattlers 10-under
baseball travel team has
a tryout planned for
2:30 p.m. Sunday at
Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call Todd
Gustavson at 365-2133.

North Florida
Blaze tryouts
The North Florida
Blaze travel baseball
team for ages 11-12 has a
tryout planned for
2 p.m. Jan. 7 at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Tim
Williamson at 234-0423
or Jamie Sosa at
867-9039.

Registration for
Lake City open
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
registration for 2012 is'
available at
www.lcccyb.com.
For details, call Tad
Cervantes at 365-4810.

Georgia Batmen
fielding teams
Georgia Batmen is
fielding 8-under, 9-under,
10-under and 11-under
travel baseball teams in
2012.
If interested, call Jim
Bennett at (229) 630-
3736. For details, go to,
valdostabatmen.com.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Columbia High girls
soccer at Lincoln High,
7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Leon High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
soccer at Oak Hall School,
6:30 p.m. (girls-4:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Atlantic
Coast High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
M Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Keystone
Heights High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling hosts duals
tournament, 10 a.m.
Fort White High
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High quad-match,
7:30 p.m. (JV-3)


Chiles tops


Tigers, 3-2


Columbia's
Blakely scores two
goals in defeat.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Columbia High's Jimmy
Blakely scored two goals
but it wasn't enough as the
Tigers fell, 3-2, against visit-
ing Chiles High at Tiger
Stadium on Tuesday.
The Tigers scored first
as Kevin Pittman's assist
helped Blakely break away


for a goal.
After a Chiles goal,
Blakely would score again
with 12:33 remaining in the
first half for a 2-1 lead off an
Alex Rhea assist.
Chiles scored a goal
before the half and took
the lead for good with 23:37
remaining in the second
half.
"They're a wonderful
team," Columbia coach
Trevor Tyler said. "We
didn't break."
Columbia (6-8) hosts
Leon High at 7 p.m. today.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake CitypReporter
Columbia High's Cody Beadles (5) attempts to pass the ball while being chased by Fort White
defenders in a game on Dec. 6.


strong


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Marcus Amerson (11) goes for a jump shot Friday during a game against
Robert E. Lee High.


By BRANDON FINLEY
ca;,l e+ ,3';.-a .; _,7 ,"enPo" rer.com
With one game remain-
ing before the Christmas
break, Columbia High head
coach Horace Jefferson has
the Tigers basketball team
sitting exactly where he
wants.
Columbia has a 2-0 record
in the district after wins
against Robert E. Lee and
defending district champi-
on Wolfson High.
The Tigers are coming off
a loss against Jacksonville's
Terry Parker High and
Jefferson wasn't pleased
with the performance. Still,
it was the Tigers' third
game in four days and the
coach feels fatigue may
have played a part.
"I can't make excuses but
we had just come off two
intense wins," Jeferson said.
'We had to travel to one of
Florida's best teams with-
out a day off to practice. All
those things contributed to
our performance. It allowed
us some exposure, howev-
er, and that's one of the
reasons we schedule these
teams. Still, three games in
four days is tough for even
an NBA team."
Still, the Tigers are sit-
ting on top where it mat-
ters and Jefferson's team
has a chance to notch
another win as Columbia
hosts Atlantic Coast High at
7:30 p.m. on Friday.
'We're still undefeated in
the district and that's what
matters," Jefferson said.
St, Augustine, and
Wolfson have each lost one
district game. The Tigers
won't play either team until
after the Christmas break.
Just because the Tigers
have a break from the


district over the holidays
doesn't mean Columbia will
have a break from basket-
ball.
The Tigers will compete
in the Santa Fe Classic
Dec. 27-29. Santa Fe,
Eastside, Suwannee, St.
Francis and East Gadsden
will also compete in the
tournament.
"The great thing is that
we are guaranteed at least
three games," Jefferson
said.
That should .keep the
Tigers fresh for a run after
they return from the holi-
day break.
Still, Columbia wants to
take home the Classic. The
Tigers will take on host
Santa Fe at 7:30 p.m. on Dec
27. The winner will play the
following day against the
winner of Suwannee and St.
Francis.
But first, the Tigers must
take care of business in
the district against Atlantic
Coast.
Jeffersonlikes Columbia's
chances.
"They're a physical team,
but have only been around
a couple of years and don't
have a winning record,"
Jefferson said. "From my
understanding, they're
young. Still, they put on
their pants the same way
as we do. If we go in, play
well, play hard and smart,
we can compete with a lot
of people."
With Marcus Amerson
carrying the Tigers
through the early season,
Jefferson wants to see more
out of Morris Marshall. He
believes it's coming.
"If he can hit his first
couple of shot, he could go
for 35 one night," Jefferson
said.


Last Chance to Register and Win A Prize from Santa's Toybox


Milk



Gtllon
-, --.T.i l


Eggs

2AI


Entries accepted thru December 17, 2011 6j Razor-
Children may register, but parents must sign waiver. One entry per visit!
Drawing Held December 21st Ii
Bikes CD Player Video Camera : e
Razor Dirt Bike
and much more!


l Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!


Starting



Tigers sitting


on top


of district


4










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


- TELEVISION Division III playoffs


TV sports


Today
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC Ladies European Tour, Dubai
lIadies Masters, second round, at Dubai,
United Arab Emirates (same-day tape)
8:30 p.m.
TGC PGATourAustralasiaJBWere
Masters, second round, at Cheltenham,
Australia
1:30 a.m.
TGC Asian Tour, Thailand
Championship, second round, at Bangkok
NFL FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
NFL Jacksonville at Atlanta
PREP BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Oak Hill Academy (Va.) vs.
Miller Grove (Ga.), at Atlanta
9:30 p.m.
ESPN Montrose Christian (Md.)
vs. Marcus Flower Mound (Texas), at
Lewisville,Texas
* WOMEN'S COLLEGE
VOLLEYBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I, semifinal,
UCLA vs. Florida St., at San Antonio
9 p.m.
ESPN2 NCAA Division I, playoffs,
semifinal, Illinois vs. Southern Cal, at San
Antonio

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo
Miami


Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


East
W L
10 3
8 5
5 8
4 9
South
W L
10 3
7 6
4 9
0 13
North
W L
10 3
10 3
7 6
4 9
West'
W L


T Pct PF PA
0.769 396 274
0.615 327 270
0.385 288 341
0 .308 256 246

T Pct PF PA
0.769 330 208
0.538266251
0.308 193 252
0.000 184 382

T Pct PF PA
0-.769 320 202
0.769 282 198
0 .538 285 270
0.308 178 254

T Pct PF PA


Denver 8 5 0.615269302
Oakland 7 6 0.538 290 354
San Diego 6 7 0.462 324 299
Kansas City 5 8 0 .385 P73 305
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 7 6 0 .538 324 349
6 allas 7 6 0.538317281
hiladelphia' 5 8 0 385 297 292
Washirgt .1 4,. ,0 .308.229 290
South
1 l;" W'. L- T Pct PF' PA
x-New Orleans, 10 3 0 .769 415 286
Atlanta 8. 5 0 .615 300 267
Carolina 4 9 0.308 313 355
Tampa Bay 4 9 0.308 232 370
L North .


bh
y-Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


y-San Francisco
Arizona
Seattle


W L
13 0
8 5
7 6
2 II
West
W L
10 3
6 7
6 7


T Pct PF PA
01.000 466 278
0.615 367 305
0.538 301 255
0 .154 274 364

T Pct PF, PA
0.769 307 182
0 .462 253 288
0 .462 246 259


St.Louis 2 II 0.154 153 326
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Thursday's Game
Jacksonville atAtlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday's Game
Dallas at Tampa Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
j New Orleans at Minnesota, I p.m.
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, I p.m.
Carolina at Houston, I p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas City, I p.m.
". Tennessee at Indianapolis, I p.m.
r, Miami at Buffalo, I p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 22
Houston at Indianapolis, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 24
4 Oakland at Kansas City, 'I p.m.
Jacksonville at Tennessee, I p.m.
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
Denver at Buffalo, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Carolina, I p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, I p.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, I p.m.
Miami at New England, I p.m.
N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Arizona at Cincinnati, I p.m.
San Diego at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 25
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 26
Atlanta at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.

FCS playoffs

Semifinals
Friday
Montana (11-2) at Sam Houston State
(13-0), 8 p.m.
Saturday
Georgia Southern (11-2) at North
Dakota State (12-1), 2:30 p.m.
Championship
Friday, Jan. 7
At Pizza Hut Park
Frisco, Texas
Semifinal winners, I p.m.

Division II playoffs

Championship
Saturday
' At Braly Municipal Stadium
Florence,Ala.
K. Wayne State (12-3) vs. Pittsburg State
(12-1), I1 a.m.


championship
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Friday
At Salem (Va.) Stadium
Mount Union (14-0) vs. Wisconsin-
Whitewater (14-0), 7 p.m.

NAIA playoffs

Championship
Saturday
At Barron Stadium, Rome, Ga.
St. Xavier (111.) (13-1) vs. Carroll
(Mont) (12-1),4:30 p.m.

College bowl games

Saturday
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Wyoming (8-4) vs. Temple (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Utah State (7-5) vs. Ohio ,(9-4),
5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette (8-4) vs. San Diego
State (8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg
Marshall (6-6) vs. FIU (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)

Wednesday
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
TCU (10-2) vs. Louisiana Tech (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN) .

Thursday, Dec. 22
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Boise State (I1-1) vs. Arizona State
(6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN) ,

Saturday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Nevada (7-5) vs. Southern Mississippi
(I -2), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Dec. 26
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Missouri
(7-5), 4 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Dec. 27
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Western Michigan (7-5) vs. Purdue
(6-6), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina State (7-5) vs.
Louisville (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, Dec.28
Military Bowl
AtWashfnton
Air Force '(7-5) vs. Toledo (8-4),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas (7-5) vs. California (7-5), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)

Thursday, Dec. 29
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Florida State (8-4) vs. Notre
Dame (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Baylor (9-3) vs. Washington (7-5),
9 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
Tulsa (8-4) vs. BYU (9-3), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Rutgers (8-4) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Mississippi State (6-6) vs.Wake Forest
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
At Tempe.Ariz.
Oklahoma (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5),
10 p.m. (ESPN) '

Saturday, Dec. 31
Meinke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern
(6-6), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Georgia Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I RGMEE I


Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
UCLA (6-7) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 2
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Penn State (9-3) vs.-Houston (12-1),
Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina
(10-2), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
(10-3), I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
I p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Stanford (I -1) vs. Oklahoma State
(I 1-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Jan. 3
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan (10-2) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)


Wednesday, Jan. 4
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestVirginia (9-3) vs. Clemson (10-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Jan. 6
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington, Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday, Jan. 7
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday, Jan. 8
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala. *
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 9
BCS National Championiship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 10 Missouri vs. Kennesaw State,
8 p.m.
No. 14 Wisconsin vs. Savannah State,
8 p.m.
No. 24 Murray State vs. Lipscomb,
8 p.m.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Columbus 2,Vancouver I, SO
New Jersey 3, Florida 2, SO
Colorado 4, San Jose 3, so
Boston 3, Los Angeles 0
Ottawa 3, Buffalo 2, OT
Toronto 2, Carolina I, OT
Dallas I, N.Y. Rangers 0
Detroit 4, Pittsburgh I
Philadelphia 5,Washington I
Montreal 5, N.Y. Islanders 3
Nashville 2, Calgary I
Winnipeg 2, Minnesota I
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Ottawa (n)
Chicago at Minnesota (n)
Phoenix at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
Dallas at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Nashville 8 p.m.
Washington at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m.
Colorado at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Toronto at Buffalo, 7:3P p.m.
Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at New Jersey, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.

HAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


THE FLOOP AT 7
POCTO-R5 OFFRIC
C-.ATEPTHS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: A

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: ROBOT CHUNK LOCKED ROTATE
Answer: When Amundsen finally reached the South
Pole, all he could do was LOOK NORTH


Khan approved as



owner of Jaguars


By JAIMEARON
AP Pro Football Writer
IRVING, Texas (AP) -
Shahid Khan was 16 when
he moved from Pakistan to
the United States to attend
the University of Illinois.
While hanging out in the
basement of his frater-
nity house, he began his
American dream of own-
ing an NFL team.
After building a multi-
billion-dollar company,
Khan started working
toward spending some
of his fortune on fulfill-
ing that college fantasy.
He reached out to owners
such as Wayne Weaver of
the Jacksonville Jaguars to
learn the business from
the inside, and for them to
get to know him.
Khan's dream-turned-
plan crossed the goal line
Wednesday. He joined the
fraternity of NFL owners
as his purchase of the
Jaguars from Weaver was
unanimously approved by
the other owners.
The deal is for an esti-
mated $760 million. The
ownership transfer will be
complete Jan. 4.
"What I want to share with
the Jacksonville fans is: Here
I am, reporting for duty and
ready to serve the fans. Let
the fun begin," Khan said
with a smile that never left
his face during a 20-minute
news conference.
The 61-year-old Khan
is the league's first minor-
ity owner. But that's not
the only reason he stands
out among his 31 peers.
There's also the promi-
nent mustache he's fancied
since 1972, a trademark
that he joked enables him
to leap tall buildings and
"do things I didn't know I
could do."
Then again, what he's
done to get to this point is
pretty remarkable.
Upon graduating from
college in 1971, Khan went
to work at Flex-N-Gate as an
engineering manager. He
left in 1978 to start his own
company, Bumper Works,
and two years later bought
his former employer. Now
his privately held company
is a major manufacturer of
bumper systems for pick-


ACROSS
1 Kids around
6 Toronto
Blue -
10 Made a foray
12 Beepers
14 Escargots
15 Builds
16 Tie up a horse
18 Bowler
19 Minn.
neighbor
21 Baldwin of
films
23 Switch to low
beams
24 La Brea -
pits
26 Hockey feint
29 Graceful
steed
31 Oklahoma
town
33 Resistance
units
35 Supplicates
36 AAA
recommendation
37 "Elephant
Boy' star


ASSOCIATED PRESS
New Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shahid Khan concludes a
news conference at the NFL owners meeting in Irving, Texas,
Wednesday. The sale from franchise founder Wayne Weaver
to the Pakistani-born Khan was unanimously approved
Wednesday. The deal reportedly is for $760 million.


up trucks and sport util-
ity vehicles built in North
America. Revenue last year
topped $3 billion, and Khan
is believed to be a billion-
aire himself.
He tried buying the
St Louis Rams last year.
before landing this deal in
late November. Now, he's
officially part of the NFL's
ownership club, starting
right away with the other
items on the agenda of
this long-planned meeting,
although .he joked "I've
got my training wheels on"
because the transfer' won't
be completely official for a
few more weeks.
The league's finance com-
mittee formally approved
Khan's bid last week. So
when the agenda item
came up Wednesday, there
wasn't a single question, or
a single dissenting vote.
"I think that's a good
sign," NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell said. "It's
certainly an endorsement
of his ownership."
Cowboys owner Jerry


Long-distance
hauler
RN's group
Novelist -
Follett
Ski lift (hyph.)
Reclined
Plane
stabilizer
Makes
changes to
Mona Lisa
site
Bright
songster
Reach
Pilot's
position
Whodunit
terrier
Techies

DOWN
Next year's
grads.
r. Fleming
Travel word
Works in the
newsroom.
Pick out


Jones called the Jaguars
sale bittersweet because
the league is bidding fare-
well to Weaver. However,
Jones praised Khan for his
"commitment, his passion
and his skill."
"(Weaver) was a real asset
to the league, but he did it
right and he really brought
a very qualified person to
the table in Mr. Khan,"
Jones said. "It takes some
skill to. come from where he
came from to be where he is
today. You add that to your
(NFL) ownership group,
and we've gotten better. ...
The more people we can
have sitting around those
tables in there that have
wanted it real bad, that have
a paid a high price to get in,
and have a vision of how to
, grow the pie, the better the
NFL will be."
To Jacksonville fans, the
biggest questions are his
commitment to keeping
the team in their city and
to turning around a fran-
chise that's struggling in
the standings.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


a


STARE NIXTI E
BURNED ACT ING
USEDTO PAC NO C
S DE REX E ED


WOOL ADAGE

EMO ALONE EDS
MOI F WIDE


A FEED BE GES
HAZARD SER GES


jHINT INERT


0 Bumped
against
7 Passport
datum
8 Gross!
9 Tijuana Ms.
11 It ends in Oct.


12 Prepare
apples
13 Fast jet of
yore
17 Tools
19 Cables
20 Film
projection
22 Company
VIPs
23 Bit of paint
25 Contented
murmur
27 Uniform fabric
28 Plant firmly
30 Cellar, briefly
32 Novelist -
Rand
34 Bask
39 Spain and
Portugal
41 Buzz the
astronaut
44 Hymn finale
46 Whisper on
stage
47 Sunshine st.
48 Teeny bit
49 Protein
sources
51 de guerre
53 Cistern
55 Boathouse
item
56 Casserole
cover
57 Speaker's
pauses


12-15 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
I at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


DREENG|
I 7 ["/ -








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


DILBERT
WE TOLD OUR
ELBONIAN FACTORY
TO BE MORE GREEN,
SO THEY TURNED OFF
THEIR AC UNITS.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Child's way of saying goodbye

defied adult funeral etiquette


THE HEAT CAUSED THE THEY SAY YOU
ELASTIC BANDS IN SHOULDN'T SHOOT
THEIR HATS TO THE MESSENGER, BUT
STRETCH UNTIL THEIR NO ONE WARNS YOU
EYES WERE COVERED. HOW MUCH YOU'LL
AND THAT'S WHY WANT TO.
WE'LL MISS OUR SHIP *I
DATE. I


DEAR ABBY: "Saddened
in New Jersey" (Oct 2)
complained that her sister's
4-year-old daughter put
stickers on the hands and
face of her deceased grand-
mother during her wake.
Perhaps the child's mother
didn't anticipate her daugh-
ter's actions. Children need
to grieve, too. That said,
they also should behave
appropriately.
I saw an article about
one funeral home with an
excellent solution. Before
the dearly departed is
placed in the casket, the
inside fabric, pillow, etc.
are remdved.-The chil-
dren are then allowed to
decorate the uncovered
casket walls with farewell
messages and drawings.
The interior is then "reup-
holstered" and, nothing is
visible. The children are
told that it is to keep their
messages private.
One story was partidu-
larly touching a little boy
wanted his mommy to know
how much he loved her and
for it to be as close to her as
possible. He wrote "I love
you, Mommy" on the cas-
ket pillow that was placed
beneath her head. At the
service, only he knew about
the secret message he had
left for his mom for'all eter-
nity. A MOM IN TEXAS
DEAR MOM: Thank
you for sharing a clever
solution. I felt that the
child's placing of stick-
ers on her grandmother's'
body was disrespectful


worst that can be said
about the 4-year-old's
behavior that day, what's
the harm? Had she thrown
a tantrum during the ser-J
vice or before placing the
stickers, I'd agree that -
the child should not have
been there. But since
the behavior took place
after "Saddened" made an
issue of the stickers,. the
situation could have been
handled more effectively.
All "Saddened" had
to do was wait until the
service was over, take
the funeral director aside
privately and ask him to ,'
remove the stickers before
the deceased was interred.
No drama, no scene, no
tantrum, and everybody ,
goes home in peace.
Funerals, like any other
event, are only as stressful
as you want them to be. -
NO DRAMA, PLEASE
DEAR ABBY: I own the
West's oldest funeral firm
and I disagree with your
answer. Funerals are about
learning that we are mortal.
To stand on ceremony when
a young child is participat-
ing in one of life's most
important lessons misses
the point Memorials are not
about formality but human-
ity. Let the child place those
stickers and let everyone
learn something from that -
DAN IN SAN FRANCISCO


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
and the mother was wrong
to permit it in spite of the
grandfather's expression
of disapproval. While I
viewed it as a desecration
of a corpse, readers felt
differently. My newspaper
readers comment-
DEAR ABBY: "Saddened"
should never have removed
the 4-year-old from the
casket It was not her place.
The child was giving her
grandmother a goodbye
gift. If the woman wanted to
remove the stickers before
the casket was closed, she
should have done it after
the child left the room.
I have seen many friends
and relatives place things in
caskets as gifts and remem-
brances. It is not disrespect-
ful to the deceased, but
gives closure and a warm
memory to those who are
still living.
Putting stickers on
Grandma was the child's
way of saying goodbye.
A funeral is a celebra-
tion of life and no matter
what their age, people are
entitled to say goodbye in
their o'wn way. MELODY
IN NEVADA
DEAR ABBY: If the
sticker incident is the


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Plan a day trip or
shopping spree. Spending
time with'sqmeone you
can learn from will be a
bonus. A change in your
financial situation will
ease your mind about
the expenses you have
incurred. You can create
your own opportunity.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Get in touch with
people you don't see very
often. Your effort to reach
out will help ease tension
that may have been build-
ing between you and some-
one you must deal with
over the festive season. An
unusual partnership will be
beneficial. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Let everyone do as
they please and you'll be
given the same right Focus
on home, helping others
and securing your position.
Your great ideas will bring
impressive results. Good
fortune is making its way to
you. ****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Don't put pressure on
someone if you want to
avoid opposition. Take care
of your business and refrain
from meddling in what oth-
ers do. Concentrate on love
and enjoying the company
of someone you think is
special. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22),4
Interact with others and
share ideas about services
you have to offer that can
help you subsidize your
income. Branch out, explore
new avenues, meet new
people and expand your
mind. Traveling and social-
izing are favored. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): It will be difficult to
contain your feelings. Get
away from people and situ-
ations that are bothering
you. Distance yourself and
you'll see things differ-
ently. A new friend or lover
will help you find solutions
for old problems. ***
LIBRA. (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Offer help to the
needy and try to avoid a
power play with someone
close to you. Short trips
will pay off and help you
see things in a unique way.
An unusual opportunity
can be your way out of a
sticky situation. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Share thoughts with
friends and relatives and
you will come up with
a workable solution to
unsavory circumstances.
Trust that what you can
offer is enough. Your
shortcoming is a lack of


confidence due to a lack
of praise. **- ,
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22,
,Dec; 21): You have control
'ghi ff ija e ake -thingW-'a
pen, as long as you don't.
rub someone the wrong -
way. Give credit where ,.
credit is due and you can
make amends with some-'
one who is competitive and
has as much to offer as -,
you do. *****"
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-,-'
Jan. 19): Focus on pleasing
someone you care. about
With a little effort, you -
can make your home life "
less stressful. Begin living
within your. means as well,
as with the people or per--,
son you feel offers equal-
ity. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): You have plenty
to gain by discussing your
plans with someone who
can offer you a contract,
assistance or greater secu-
rity. A change at home will
bring you greater emotion-
al freedom and allow you
to start fresh. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Stick close to home
and avoid anyone trying to
push you in an unsuitable
direction. Focus on what
you can do for yourself and
the people you care about
most Don't get angry. Put
energy into achieving your
goals. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: G equals I
"EM MUT OVE RSMX TMK CKS TMK.
VEU RLVDP ME TMK GN TMK'BP SLP
MEP 'JLM RSMXR T M K BRPYN." UVDME
J V T VE R


Previous Solution: "It's a sign of mediocrity when you demonstrate gratitude
with moderation." Roberto Benigni
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-15


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


* Write Dear Abby at,
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


I


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS








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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-273-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF ALICE
CLAIRE DEVANE,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ALICE CLAIRE DEVANE, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
September 5, 2011; is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division; File Num-
ber 11-273-CP; the address of which
is 173 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresess of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE EON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims or de-
.mands against the decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
DECEMBER 8, 2011
BY:/S/ TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
'Telephone: (386)752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative
BY: /s/ Lynne DeVane Boyd
Personal Representative
900 NW Frontier Drive
Lake City, FL 32055
05529423
December 8, 15, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA, COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-273-CP
IN .RE: ESTATE OF ALICE
CLAIRE DEVANE,
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The Administration of the estate of
ALICE CLAIRE DEVANE, de-
ceased, File Number 11-273-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
FL 32055. The estate is estate and
the date of the decedent's Will and
any Codicils are July 15, 2005. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal'rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below. The fiduciary lawyer-client
privilege in section 90.5021, Florida
Statutes, applies with respect to the
personal representative and any at-
tornmy employed by the personal rep-
resentative.
Any interested person on whom a
copy of the Notice of Administration
is served who challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or ju-
' risdiction of the court must file any
objections with the court in the man-
ner provided in the Florida Probate
Rules within the time required by
law or those objections are forever
barred.
Any person entitled to exempt prop-
erty must file a petition for determi-
nation of exempt property WITHIN
THE TIME PERIOD BY LAW OR
THE RIGHT TO EXEMPT PROP-
ERTY IS DEEMED WAIVED. Any
person entitled to take an elective
share must file an election to take
share WITHIN THE TIME PRO-
VIDED BY LAW OR THE RIGHT
TO CLAIM AN ELECTIVE
SHARE IS DEEMED WAIVED. An
election to take an elective share
must be filed within the time provid-
ed by law.
By:/s/ TERRY McDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386)752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative
By:/s/ Lynne DeVane Boyd
Personal Representative
900 NW Frontier Drive
Lake City, FL 32055

05529422
December 8, 15, 2011


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Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-274-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOAN LOUISE
POWERS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JOAN LOUISE POWERS, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
May 7, 2011, is pending on the Cir-
cuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hemando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida '32055.
The names and addresses of the Per-
sonal Representative and the Person-
al Representatives attorney are set
forth below. All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice
is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABQVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO(2)
YEARS OR MORE'AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is December 8, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ MATTHEW C. MITCHELL
Attorney for William E. Powers
Florida Bar Number: 0028155
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
E-Mail: mcm@bbattomeys.com
Personal Representative:
BY:/S/ WILLIAM E. POWERS
702 SE Mayhall Terrace
Lake City, Florida 32025
05529424
December 8, 15, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
SUNSTATE FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANDREW C. FAHRNY,
Defendant.
CASE NO. 12-2011 -CA-000222
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
Notice is hereby given that the un-
dersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court,
Columbia County, Florida, will on
the January 11, 2012, at 11:00am, at
the front court steps of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NE Heman-
do Avenue, Lake City, Florida, offer
for sale and sell at public outcry, one
by one, to the highest bidder for
cash, the property located, in Colum-
bia County, Florida, as follows:
Lot 51, Springfield Estates Phase 3,
A Subdivision as recorded in Plat
Book 6, Pages 48 and 48A of the
Public Records of Columbia County,
Florida pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on No-
vember 28, 2011, in the above-styled
cause, pending in said Court.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
P. DeWitt Cason, Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: PA Perry
Deputy Clerk
Copies Furnished To:
James E. Sorenson, Esquire
Mary Linzee Van Leuven, Esquire
Post Office Box 4128
Tallahassee, FL 32315-4128
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Andrew C. Fahmy
226 S. W. Brandy Way
Lake City, FL 32024-4548
Defendant
05529447
December 8, 15,2011


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-280-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GLADYS L. SMITH
a/k/a GLADYS LITTLE SMITH,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
GLADYS L. SMITH, deceased,
whose date of death was September
20, 2011; File Number 11-280-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: December 8, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Ricky W. Smith
RICKY W. SMITH
982 SW Walter Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32024
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-
NEYS, P.A.
By: /s/ Mark E. Feagle
Mark E. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0576905
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
153 NE Madison Street
Post Office Box 1653
. Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
05529441
December 8, 15, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S
AUTO SERVICE gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on
12/29/2011, 08:30 am at 2550 SW
MAIN BLVD. LAKE CITY, FL
32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes.
JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
1HGEG8645RLO 15682 1994 Honda
05529565
December 15, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S
AUTO SERVICE gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell.
these vehicles on
12/30/2011, 08:30 am at 2550 SW
MAIN BLVD. LAKE CITY, FL
32025, pursuant to subsection 713.78
of the Florida Statutes.
JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the
right to accept or reject any
and/or all bids.
1G1NE52M8X6265981 1999
CHEVROLET
05529566
December 15, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Found Gray Dog.
Call to identify.
386-752-7374, 386-984-7333 or
352-264-8168 Leave message.
FOUND: Saturday night. US 90
on Ramp to 1-75 (1) wrapped
package. 386-965-0485 and
describe if it's yours.
LOST PYGMY GOAT, Fri. 12/9,
between Peacock Terrace/Price
Creek Rd. & 252. Male, Rust Col-
or, very friendly, 386-961-9188


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


100 ob
S Opportunities
FT Position Office Clerk for Ma-
chine Shop, Computer skills need-
ed, Wide range of duties etc.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg
174 NE Cortez Terrace
AP/AR, Estimating, order entry
Legal Secretary/Paralegal
Position for Civil Litigation.
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
send resumes to:
injuryattomeys@)yahoo.com
Looking for exp. plumber for serv-
ice work and wide range of duties.
Must be dependable and some
weekends are a must. Please fax
resume to 386-752-5613 or email
to leah(gdependableplumbing.net
Looking for physically Fit and out-
going individuals with clean driv-
ing & clean criminal history. Call
386-752-2112 Mon. Fri. 8a-5p.
Lube Tech Wanted
Tools Required
Apply @ Rountree Moore Chevy
4316 W US Hwy 90
Lake City, Fl. 32055
See: Jimbo Pegnetter in Service
P/T housekeeper needed for
medical practice M-F.
Please fax resume to
386-487-1232.
Payment Processer position
available in a fast paced growing
company. Must have 6-12 months
clerical experience, data entry,
knowledge of excel and word, and
the ability to multitask. Please
send resume to Pioneer Credit
Recovery, PO Box 3116 Lake City
Fl 32056, Attn: Sarah Drew
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lie., Clear
background, Drivers Lie, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com

Medical
120 Employment

05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

240 Schools &
24 Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

4 CKC Registered Toy Poodle
puppies. Ready Christmas Eve.
$500. ea. Up to date on shots.
386-719-4808
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

VINTAGE SOFA
Excellent condition.
$65.00 obo
386-487-5922

411 Machinery &
411 Tools

10 INCH Craftman Miter
Compound Saw. New in Box.
Never opened. $195.00.
386-487-5922


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.


430 Garage Sales
Fri & Sat. 8-3 Hwy 247, righf on
242, right on Mcguire Terr. Look
for signs: Electrical saws, lots of
various tools, doors,nails, & more.
I have too much stuff yard sale.
Fri & Sat 8a-4p. 200 SW Fulton
P1. Follow signs. Branford Hwy to
Troy Rd. left on Ascena, right on
Fulton. Toys, old tonka toys,
games, antiques, lamps, china,
electronics & more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 7-2. Branford Hwy. right on
252B, left on Timberidge, to
Mulberry. Look for signs. Kids
clothes, TV, household, lots misc.
SAT. 8-3. 90W, right on Lake
City Ave. left on Amanda St to
Open Ct. Look for signs. Designer
women clothing 2x-12, handbags,
dryer, lot of misc.


440 Miscellaneous

Chuck Norris Total Gym. Exer-
cise system w/DVD. Used 4 times
for demo. Like New. Paid $1,650.
Asking $800 obo. 386-365-6048
., Exercise Machine.
X C Great Christmas Gift.
"p HJia al parts. Cost over
.. I it if 1Good condition.
$500: obo.
'86-397-3335
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call Saturday.
Unique, Hand crafted, award
winning, Fabric play house.
Detachable accessories for
decorating inside & out. Pull apart
frame w/carry bag. Large enough
for 2 small kids. Tell Santa Early
$75.00 386-752-5104

450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood

It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2 & 3 br/lba Mobile Homes for
Rent. CH/A includes water, sewer,
garbage. $475./$525. mo. 1st &
last mo + $300 dep. 386-961-8466
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2br/lba, CH/A, near school,
$500 month, + deposit, no pets!,
pls leave message 386-365-1920
or 386-454-7764 after 6pm
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
Country Living
"2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

{640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
All'2011's Must Go!
All Homes at Dead cost! Save up
To $10,000. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville. (352)872-5566
Land and Home Packages
for Mobile homes and modular
homes. No Money down if you
own your land. 100 mile radius.
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
We Need Used Mobile Homes!
Will buy or trade. Top Dollar Paid.
North Point Homes.
(352)872-5566
Mobile Home
650 & Land
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618

10 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side.of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie: Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, larg-
er 2/br. for $495. mo. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.,
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

7 Unfurnished
730J Home For Rent
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $350mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$500mo. 1st, last & security.
386-752-0335


Monday -Friday 8A-4P
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
4 BR/2 BA in town, good neigh-
borhood, fenced yard, fireplace, no
pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.,
386-755-6916.
Available Immediately.
Rent To Own 3br/2ba home
In quiet subdivision.
386-752-5035 X 3113
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.


73O Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
Gorgeous Lake View 2br
Apartment. Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$600 mo. and
$600 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

75 Business &
5 Office Rentals

05529267
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office.
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/.l yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination."' Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call"
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
HUD HOME in Trenton area
4.77 ac, 3/2, as is $95,000. Buyer
bidding online daily. Call Robin
Williams 365-5143 MLS 79262
Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896

820 Farms &
2 Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com


Owner Financed land
$300 down payment. I
lots. Deas Bullard/BK
386-752-4339 www.l


d with only
lalf to ten ac
L Properties
andnfl.com


870 Real Estate
7v Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

940 Trucks
2003 CHEVY SILVERADO,
2-WD EXT. CAB, 125,000 miles,
well maintained, great shape,
$6,500, Call 386-397-0571

950 Cars for Sale
2010 HONDA ACCORD LX
Blue w/Grey interior. One owner.
23,000 miles. $21,800.
Call 386-292-5763

951 Recreational
95 Vehicles
1993 JAYCO 5th wheel. 26 1/2
feet. Well kept. Everything works.
Owner is Non-smoker $3,700
386-755-0110

We're on target!


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10'consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle'price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,*
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call-
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




-386)7


Do you take VIAG RA

or CIALIS?


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BUY THE BLUE PILL NOW!
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7 1 5p.--
2003 Chevy Silverado
2WD Ext. Cab
125,000 mi.,
well maintained,
great shape.
$6,500
Call
386-397-0571


Get Connected


www.lakecityreporter.com


Notp Flrd' H0 ~efe0
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laectreot rco CURRE" TS.maga.:.













SPi m
) '2"


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS magazine
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494


L a'ke Cit ~~-Re o tl .,,..


Classified Department: 755-5440


I


- a-













Tis the season: A guide to the 35 bowl games


By JOHN MARSHALL
Associated Press

Like it or not, the BCS
championship game will
be a rematch between LSU
and Alabama.
Oklahoma State com-
plained it should have had
a shot at the top-ranked
Tigers, BCS bashers had
more fodder for the we-
need-a-playoff debate and
many fans scrunched up
their noses at the thought
of another field goal-kicking
contest like the previous
incarnation of the Game of
the Century.
The good news, particu-
larly if you're in the no-
rematch camp, is that there
are 34 other bowl games
with some great. players,
great matchups and even
some interesting nick-
names, starting with that
rascally Honey Badger in
the Bayou.
Here's a rundown of
some of the things to look
for over the next month
or so:

Top games
Even if you're not a fan
of LSU and Alabama get-
ting a return engagement
in the BCS title game, you
HAVE to watch. It is for the
national title, after all.
But there are plenty of
other games worth watch-
ing.
Fiesta Bowl, Stanford
vs. Oklahoma State,
Jan. 2, Glendale, Ariz.'
- If the national champi-
onship game were to have
an undercard, this could
be it Two great offenses,
two great quarterbacks in
Andrew Luck and Brandon
Weeden expect lots of
yards and points in what
has the potential to be the
most entertaining bowl of
them all.
Rose Bowl, Wisconsin
vs. Oregon, Jan. 2,
Pasadena, Calif. -
Speaking of shows, how
about Badgers running
back Montee Ball and
Ducks dynamo LaMichael
James trading jukes and
touchdowns? Going to be
some day on the couch the
day after New Year's.
Alamo Bowl, Baylor
vs, Washington, Dec.
29, San Antonio, Texas
Robert Griffin III on one
side, Keith Price and Chris
Polk on the other, not a
lot of defense. Yeah, this is
going to be good.
Cotton Bowl, Arkansas
vs. Kansas State, Jan.
6, Arlington, Texas -
Arkansas' two losses were
to LSU and Alabama, K-
State's to the two big
Oklahoma schools. All you
need to know.

Players to watch
Robert Griffin III,
Baylor. The Heisman
Trophy? You may have
heard of it and him.
AndrewLuck, Stanford.
The Cardinal quarterback
is the fourth player to be
Heisman runner-up in con-
secutive seasons, a threat
to pass or run, the likely
No. 1 overall pick in the
NFL draft.
Tyrann Mathieu, LSU.
The Honey Badger has a
knack for coming up with
big plays at big moments.
Now he gets his chance on
the big stage.
Case Keenum,
Houston. The sixth-year
senior will leave Houston
with his own section in the
NCAA record book. Being
relegated to the TicketCity
Bowl after a late-season
loss will likely have him
motivated to go out with a
big game.
Justin Blackmon,
Oklahoma State. The All-
American is just the sec-
ond two-time winner of the


Biletnikoff Award, given to
the nation's top receiver,
and a big-play threat every
touch.
Trent Richardson,
Alabama. The Crimson
Tide's running back won
the Doak Walker Award
as the nation's best run-
ning back and was third in


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Hunter Joyer (41) reacts after scoring a touchdown in a game against Furman University on Nov. 19.


Heisman voting. ;
Montee Ball,
Wisconsin. Montee
should have a ball at the
Rose Bowl.
LaMichael James,
Oregon. Give him a seam
and he's gone; a likely
Heisman finalist for the sec-
ond straight season if that
elbow hadn't kept popping
ott of place.

Nicknames
Every team has players
with nicknames. Here's
some of the coolest we
could find:
Honey Badger, LSU
defensive back Tyrann
Mathieu. He reportedly
doesn't like the ode to the
furry and ferocious little
beast, but it's not going any-
where.
RG3, Baylor quarter-
back Robert Griffin III.
Combination of initials and
beifig the third in a line of
Robert Griffins sounds like
a cool new line of shoes.
Wolf Man, Utuh run-
ning back John White.
Has a tattoo of a wolf on his
chest because wolves roll
in packs and eat meat to
the bone.
Sharks, Oklahoma's
defensive backs. Pulled
from a Lil Wayne song,
quite catchy.
Zeus, Alabama's Dont'a
Hightower. A mythologi-
cally proportioned lineback-
er at 6-foot-4, 260 pounds.

Odds
Based on the close game
they played the first time


around, it's no wonder the
BCS championship game
between LSU and Alabama
had the closest odds among
the 35 bowls, opening at 1
point on the Glantz-Culver
line and a pick 'em as of
Tuesday.
Next closest was 1'/2
points: Arkansas State over
Northern Illinois in the
GoDaddy.com Bowl and
Auburn over Virginia in the
Chick-fil-A Bowl.
The biggest spread?
Oklahoma at plus-14 over
Iowa in the Insight Bowl.
Highest over/under is 74/2
points between Oklahoma
State and Stanford in the
Fiesta Bowl.

Distances
Last bowl season, sev-
eral teams had the chance
to play in their home cit-
ies, including SMU, which
played the Armed Forces
Bowl in its own stadium
because TCU's was being
renovated.
This year, there won't be
any so-called home games,
but there are several teams
that won't have to go very
far: LSU in the BCS title
game (it's in New Orleans),
Texas A&M in the Meineke
Car Care Bowl in Houston,
Florida State at the Champs
Sports Bowl in Orlando,
and Rutgers in the Pinstripe
Bowl at Yankee Stadium.
Western Michigan
also is playing in Detroit,
Louisiana-Lafayette in New
Orleans, Vandy in Nashville
arid N.C. State in Charlotte.
The longest trip will be
Southern Mississippi in the


Hawaii Bowl, a distance of
(we're ballparking here)
4,200 miles.
Longest kids-in-the-car
trip? Illinois at the Kraft
Fight Hunger Bowl in San
Francisco, a distance of just
over 2,100 miles. That's
roughly 31 hours with long,
horizon-rarely-changes sec-
tions through the Midwest
and Nevada, so good luck if
you try that one.

Numbers
8 Wins in Texas this


season by Baylor, which
plays in the Alamo Bowl in
San Antonio.
13 Straight seasons
Oklahoma has gone to a
bowl game.
22.67 Points Baylor
quarterback Robert Griffin
III is responsible for per
game.
41 Years since
Louisiana-Lafayette last
played in a bowl game.
The Ragin' Cajuns face San
Diego State in the New
Orleans Bowl.
91 Solo tackles by


Tulsa linebacker Curnelius
Arnick, most of any player
in a bowl game and third in
the nation.
599 Yards of offense
averaged by Houston, best
in the nation.
986 Over/under on
the number of times TV
announcers say Urban
Meyer's name during the
Gator Bowl between his for-
mer team, Florida, and his
new one, Ohio State.
1,037 Combined yards
averaged by Fiesta Bowl
foes Oklahoma State and
Stanford during the regular
season.

Absentee coaches
Every bowl season there
are a handful of teams that
play under interim coaches
because the head coach ha
either been fired or moved
on to another job. This year
seems to have an avalanche
of absenteeism.
Arkansas State. Hugh
Freeze is headed for
Mississippi State, leaving
the Red Wolves to play
under running backs coach
David Gunn.
Mississippi St. Freeze
was hired because former
coach Larry Fedora is leav-
ing for North Carolina:
Fedora will coach the 22nd-
ranked Golden Eagles
a final time in the Hawaii
Bowl.
Arizona State. Dennis
Erickson was fired after
five seasons, but will still
coach the Sun Devils in the
MAACO Las Vegas Bowl
against Boise State.


126



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We Buy:
a Broken & Unwanted Gold, Silver,
and Platinum Jewelry
Sterling Flatware & Serving Sets.
a Gold & Silver Coins
Dental Gold
Gold & Silver Bullion and More....
-- -


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LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420