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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01723
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 14, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01723
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text



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Reporter


Wednesday, December 14, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 269 0 75 cents


PALESTINE LAKE DROWNINGS




2nd victim recovered


Body of Lake City man
found Tues. near center
of Union County lake.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
LAKE BUTLER -Authorities recovered the
body of missing boater Norris S. Demeritte
Tuesday morning near the center of Palestine
Lake in western Union County.
Demeritte, 53, was reported overdue from a
fishing trip Saturday night along with his mother,
Emma G. Kelly, 74.
Kelly's body was found 7:30 a.m. Sunday at the
south end of the lake. Demeritte was recovered
Tuesday morning. Both are Lake City residents.
"We located the victim about 8:40 a.m.,"
said Karen Parker, Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission public information


coordinator, "The lake is a very shallow lake, so
he was probably in about 7-8 feet of water."
Parker said both lifejackets were found in the
boat
Authorities resumed search and recovery
efforts around 6 a.m. Tuesday after shutting
down operations at dusk on Monday.
Although both bodies have been recovered,
Parker said the investigation will continue.
"They'll.try to determine exactly what occurred
out there," Parker said. "We may never know. My
guys are very good at their job and hopefully we
can get the investigation wrapped up quickly."
The boat was found floating on the lake around
1 a.m. Sunday.
DROWNINGS continued on 6A

PHOTO COURTESY FWC
Union County sheriff's officials carry the body of
Lake City resident Norris S. Demeritte to shore
Tuesday morning.


Teacher

contract

OK'd by

board

Pact, which includes
2% raise, now goes to
union for ratification.

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia County teachers and
educational support staff were given
a two percent raise Tuesday night
when the school board approved con-
tracts for both unions.
The contact between the school
board and the Columbia Teacher
Association includes a two percent
raise to the entire teacher salary cat-
egory, said Kevin Doyle, president of
the teachers union.
How much extra money teachers
will see in their paychecks depends
on their years of teaching experience
and the step they are currently in.
The district will continue to con-
tribute $5,500 to teachers' benefits
PACT continued on 3A


Alabama

woman

killed in

I-10 crash

From staff reports

An Alabama woman who was
pulling off 1-10 to check her
phone's GPS for directions was
killed Tuesday when her car was
struck from behind near the 1-75
interchange, the Florida Highway
Patrol reported.
The 87-year-old Perry man who
hit her is listed in critical condi-
tion in Shands at the University of
Florida.
Dead is Julie Linn Laughridge,
41, of Sylacauga, Ala. Critically
injured was Edward C. Harvey.
According to FHP, Laughridge
was traveling west at3:30 p.m. when
she slowed her 2003 Volkswagen
Jetta to enter the outside emer-
gency lane to check her phone
for directions. As she entered the
emergency lane Harvey's 1991
CRASH continued on 3A


'What I Love About Florida'


LAURA HAMPSON/Lake City Reporter
More than four years ago, Lake City Middle School students begin creating a book about Florida with handmade prints and original poems.
Now those students are in high school and the book has been copyrighted and sent tb the Library of Congress. School representatives present-
ed the second edition df "What I Love About Florida" to school board members Tuesday night. The book, with 57 poems and 29 prints, was also
given to every school in the district. Pictured are Pat Sinor, Lake City Middle art assistant; Sonya Judkins, Lake City Middle principal; Lance
Revoir, cover artist and Columbia High senior; and Don Sloan, Lake City Middle art teacher.



Speedway's too loud, county says

Court order will
specify days, times
races can be held.

g]ackson@lakecityreporter.com .
The owner of the Lake City
Speedway has been notified that
he will receive a court order w
specifying the days of week
when races are held and the .. .
hours they must end.
County attorney Marlin --
Feagle said he contacted the ,
track's owner, Phil Duadagno,
of Ocoee, by telephone to tell
him about the pending action
which should be sent sometime
next week.
Commissioners at the Dec. 1
meeting asked Feagle to notify
Duadagno that neighbors living
near the track had complained
about hearing loud noise after -
midnight from a race on Nov.
27.
The petition Feagle plans to _JANM--._________ __CtReoe
file in court will include stipula- JASON MATTHEWWALKERILake City Repoier
tions that setbusiness hours and Dylan Harrell, 17, lives within about a quarter mile of Lake City Speedway where some residents have
been complaining about noise. 'I've lived here so long that I don't really hear (the noise) anymore,' Harrell
SPEEDWAY continued on 3A said. 'It blends in with everything else. I don't really notice it.'


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


16,3 |00


74
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


N.
I


Opinion ....... ........ 4,A
People.................. 2A
Obituaries ............. 5A
Advice & Comics ........ 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Brees, Elmo
share stage.


COMING
THURSDAY
Local news
roundup.


I


I

--^-a-









2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14,; 2011


FLORIDAK
1 Saturday:
3-19-22-28-34-37
x4


.C$Ho Tuesday: %? Tuesday:
\" Afternoon: 1-0-5 Afternoon: 9-4-8-8


t 16Monday:
16-20-25-27-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Drew Brees shares stage with Elmo


NEW ORLEANS


Move over, Grover!
One of the NFL's top
passers is heading to
"Sesame Street."
New Orleans
Saints quarterback Drew Brees is
making a special appearance on
Thursday's episode of the education-
al children's TV show. He visited the
set a few months ago to record the
segment, which co-stars the street's
furry red resident, Elmo.
The segment will air Thursday
morning on PBS Kids.
Brees, who has two young sons,
Baylen and Bowen, taped the seg-
ment before the start of this year's
regular football season. Brees
leads the NFL with 4,368 pass-
ing yards, putting him on pace to
break Dan Marino's single-season
passing record of 5,084 yards,
which has stood since 1984. Brees
led the Saints to victory over the
-Indianapolis Colts in Super Bowl
XLIV and was that game's MVP.

'Survivor' winner hopes
for future reality series
NEWPORT, RI. Reality televi-
sion star Richard Hatch says he's
hoping for a new show about his
'relationship with children conceived
by his sperm donations, now that
he's out of prison in Rhode Island.
Hatch said Tuesday that he has
so far met two biological children
through the Donor Sibling Registry,
which helps connect donors.and
their children.
The 50-year-old won the first
season of the CBS reality show
"Survivor." He was freed from prison
Monday after being sentenced in
March for failing to comply with the
terms of his supervised release in a
tax evasion case stemming from his


In this undated handout photo provided by Sesame Street, New Orleans Saints
quarterback Drew Brees poses with Sesame Street character 'Elmo' in New York.
Brees is making a special appearance on Thursday's episode.


$1 million winnings. Hatch says he's
innocent and a victim of "institution-
alized bullying."
Hatch says no deals have been
finalized for him to-appear in a real-
ity series.

Vets upset with 'Hawaii
Five-O' crew at cemetery
HONOLULU A group of Pearl
Harbor survivors say they were dis-
respected by the crew of the CBS
drama "Hawaii Five-O" during a visit
,to Honolulu's National Memorial
Cemetery of the Pacific..
The Denver-based Greatest
Generations Foundation took 23
veterans to the Punchbowl cemetery
last week to commemorate the 70th


anniversary of the attack on Pearl
Harbor.
The veterans found it offensive
that the crew members didn't
stopi production while the national
anthem and taps were played and
that they were walking on graves,
said Steffan Tubbs, a foundation
board member and co-host of KOA-
AM's morning news show in Denver.
Tubbs visited the cemetery with the
group, which conducted a small cer-
emony there.
The crew was filming a scene
involving a lead character visiting his
father's grave, "which in reality was
surrounded by the real graves of
WWII heroes," Tubbs said Tuesday.
"It didn't seem right."

(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays
Actor Hal Williams is is 63.
73. 3 Actress Vanessa
Actress Dee Wallace Hudgens is 23.


Daily Scripture
When he had called together all
the people's chief priests and
teachers of the law, he asked
them where the Messiah was
to be born. "In Bethlehem in
Judea," they replied, "for this
is what the prophet has writ-
ten: 'But you, Bethlehem, in the
land of Judah, are by no means
least among the rulers of Judah;
for out of you will come a ruler
who will shepherd my people
Israel.'"
Matthew 2:4-6


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number...............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440.


'Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-jelivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks .............. $26.32
24 Weeks.................$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.48
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Court refuses to
halt barrel racing
TALLAHASSEE -
Betting on barrel racing
can continue at a quarter
horse track in the Florida
Panhandle at least until the
next step in a legal chal-
lenge to the new form of
pari-mutuel wagering is
resolved, an appellate court
ruled Tuesday.
Less than 24 hours after
hearing oral arguments, the
1st District Court of Appeal
issued a brief order denying
.a request by opponents to
:temporarily halt barrel rac-
ing in Gretna, a small town
west of Tallahassee, which
'began on Dec. 1.
The three-judge panel
:next will decide whether
!administrative hearings
,should be ordered to deter-
mine the legality of barrel
'racing, normally a women's
:rodeo sport, as a pari-mutu-
,el event
Also hanging.in the bal-
'ance are card rooms and
,possibly slot machines at
;Gretna and potentially other
quarter horse tracks across
'the state.
The Florida Quarter
'Horse Racing Association
and Florida Quarter Horse
Breeders and Owners
*Association contend barrel
-racing is a low-cost way for
,tracks to sidestep state rac-
ing regulations so they can
,qualify for more lucrative
forms of gambling.
"It is important to note
,that the court's decision
'does not vindicate or
-validate in any way what the
'state and the permit holder
:are doing in Gretna," said
'Mike Barry, a lawyer for the
-two associations. "'The court
-is merely reserving judg-
,ment on the matter while
we prove our case to put a
stop to this illegal activity."
Barry's clients, though,
'may not get that chance.
Gretna Racing and the
Florida Division of Pari-
mutuel Wagering contend
-the two associations lack
the standing, or legal right,


to challenge licenses the.
state has awarded Gretna
Racing for barrel racing
and a card room that's set
to open Saturday. The case
also involves an applica-
tion by Hamilton Downs
Horsetrack for barrel rac-
ing in Hamilton County
to the east of Tallahassee.
The state agency refused
requests by the two associa-
tions to hold administrative
hearings in each of those
cases.

Business groups
oppose tax hike
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida business leaders
are calling on Gov. Rick
Scott and state legislators
to block a massive tax hike
that will hit businesses next
year.
A coalition of busi-
ness groups, including
- the Florida Chamber of
Commerce and the Florida
Retail Federation, say the
$817 million increase in
unemployment taxes could
harm the state's economy
when it takes effect in the
spring.
Scott says he wants to
make Florida more busi-
ness friendly, but he did not
target the tax hike in his
budget recommendations.
Nearly 460,000 busi-
nesses across the state are
currently getting notices
about the higher unemploy-
ment taxes.
The minimum tax rate
will jump from $72.10 per
employee to more than
$171.70 per employee.
The maximum rate is also
expected to rise from $378
to $459 per employee.

Police: Ex-NBA
star left crash site
MIRAMAR A former
NBA point guard has
been charged in Broward
County with leaving the
scene of an accident.
A Miramar Police report
shows 41-year-old Kenny


Anderson was arrested
Sunday. The South Florida
Sun Sentinel reports he
was briefly jailed. He has
no home phone number
listed.
Police say Anderson .
crashed into two trees
while driving his SUV, flee-
ing on foot Police went
to his hqme and told him
to return to the scene. He
told police a blown tire
caused him to lose control.
The affidavit says all four
tires were blown out.
Picked No. 2 overall by
the New Jersey Nets in the
1991 draft out of Georgia
Tech, Anderson played 14,
seasons in the NBA. The
6-foot guard averaged 12.6
points and 6.1 assists for
eight teams.

Hazing suspects
out of jail
TALLAHASSEE -
Three Florida A&M
University marching band
members are free after
spending the night in jail
on charges that they beat a
fellow Marching 100 mem-
ber in a hazing ritual.
Sean Hobson, Aaron
Golson and James Harris
all left the Leon County jail
on Tuesday afternoon after
posting bond.
Hobson and Golson
were charged by
Tallahassee police with
battery and hazing for
allegedly hitting Bria
Shante Hunter with their
fists and a ruler that
resulted in a broken thigh
and blood clots in her
legs. Harris was charged
with hazing because the
incidents occurred in his
off-campus apartment.
The three men refused
to comment while leaving
the jail.
Hunter was beaten
about three weeks before
drum major Robert
Champion died during
what was believed to be
hazing on a band bus.
(AP)


THE WEATHER



MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY. PARTLY
SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY


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1.: -


Vldsta City
711 1 Jacksonville Cape Canaver
Tallahassee L4 5 2- Daytona Beac
72 50 Ft. Lauderdal
Pensacola Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
. 5i Panama City 5 1e Galnesville
7 1, 57 Ocala Jacksonville
76 52 Key West
Orliando Cape Canaveral Key West
: 75 64 Lake City
S 75 6-1 Miami
Tampa Naples
78 9 West Palm Beach Ocala


79 67 Orlando


FL Lauderdale Panama !
FL Myers 79 69 Pensacol
79.- 59 Naples Tallahass
x1 62 Miami Tampa
.. ... ,) 67 Valdosta


TEMPERATURES

TEMPERATURES S


High Tuesday
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SJor nmal I.:\
Record hign
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
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Normal year-to-date





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An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


weather.com


Jan. AtV Forecasts, data and
9 graphics 0 2011. Weather
Full 41 i iJ Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weat www.weatherpubllsher.com

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Civil War graves get proper treatment


Submitted

The University of Florida
Columbia County Master
Gardeners hosted a plant-
ing party recently at Oak
Lawn Cemetery as the
culmination of a beautifica-
tion project that was five
months in the making.
In an effort to serve
Lake City in general and,
more specifically, to show
respect and honor for
our heritage, the Master
Gardeners moved to pro-
vide landscaping at the
.entrance and around the
monument at Oak Lawn
Cemetery in the area of
the 155 unknown Civil
War soldiers.
Plans for the enhance-
ment were submitted for
approval to the Lake City


Beautification Committee,
Mayor Stephen Witt,
City Manager Wendell
Johnson and Tom Henry
of the Public Works
Department.
The landscape design
was the work of Master
Gardener and professional
Landscape Designer Amie
Morie of High Springs,
and features native and
drought tolerant, low
maintenance plants. The
red, white, and blue theme
has a Confederate Rose as
the centerpiece on either
side of the main entrance
gate planted along with
Florida Mock Orange,
Mexican Firebush and
Muhly grass. The heir-
loom plant, Alachua Red
Rose, is planted to climb
along the chainlink fenc-


es.
Around the monument
base are an abundance
of Super Blue Liriopes,
known for their showy
blue spikes, and Pacific
Blue Juniper is planted to
cover and cascade down
from the monument plat-
form.
The project was financed
by the efforts of the
Columbia County Master
Gardeners with the help of
a number of local business-
es that graciously donat-
ed goods to the Master
Gardeners for their silent
auction fundraiser.
Approximately 10
Master Gardeners and
private citizens put the
plants into the ground and
mulch was spread by Tom
Henry's workers within


days of the plants being
set out. The landscaping
was planned to provide
bloom 10 months of the
year and is expected to
be a focal point of beauty
for the Olustee Festival
Cemetery Rededication in
February, 2012, and for
years to come.
You are invited to visit
the Columbia County
Master Gardeners at
the Columbia County
Extension Office (locat-
ed near the fairgrounds
on Mary Ethel Street)
at -their "Plant Clinic" on
Tuesday and Thursday
mornings from 9 a.m. to
noon with your individ-
ual plant questions and
concerns. Free soil pH
tests are also provided
by the Master Gardeners


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia County Master Gardeners hosted a planting party
at Oak Lawn Cemetery as part of a beautification project.


every Wednesday morn-
ing at the Clinic. You can
call the Columbia County
Extension Office for fur-
ther information about


the Master Gardeners
Program and the services
they provide to the com-
munity of Lake City and
Columbia County.


PACT: Teachers will get 2 percent raise under new contract; ratification pending

Continued From Page 1A


package.
-Teachers had a minimal
raise two years ago, said
district superintendent
Michael Millikin. "This is
minimal too," he said.
However, board mem-
bers voted to remove some
language in the contract
involving teacher assess-
ment. The deleted part says
that if state laws governing
teacher assessments aue
changed, the district and
the union will begin negoti-
ating to find a new teacher
assessment system.
The state approved
teacher merit pay in
March, meaning a teach-
er's income would hinge
on assessments. However,
the Florida Education
Association is suing the
state, questioning the law's
constitutionality.
Millikin said upon reflec-


tion there was language
in the contract that would
have had unintended con-
sequences detrimental to
the district and teachers.
Although the state has
. given districts general
guidelines for teacher
assessment, there is no
absolute model to follow,
he said. The Department
of Education must approve
the teacher evaluation sys-
tems.
Contract agreements
with the Columbia County
Educational Support
Personnel Association
include maintenance staff,
mechanics, custodians
and bus drivers. In addi-
tion to the raise, the board
will continue contributing
$5,500 in benefits.
Both contracts were
.approved retroactively but
teachers and staff should'


not expect to see extra
money in the paychecks
until January.
"It's important to know
that you don't get what you
deserve, I'll be the first to
say that, but we are working
on it," said board member
Charles Maxwell, address-
ing teachers attending the
meeting. Specific wording
in the contracts matter,
Maxwell said. Negotiations
never had anything to
do with the people that
deserve it most, he said.
Board chairman Steve
Nelson said board mem-
bers have in their heart the
best interest of the school
district There needs to be
discussion to get the best
out of what we do, he said.
Board member Glenn
Hunter said he appreciated
the board coming togeth-
er to finalize the contract.


CRASH: Alabana woman killed

Continued From Page 1A

Toyota pickup struck her from behind. Laughridge was pronounced dead at the
FHP investigators believe Harvey entered scene.
the emergency lane to avoid the slowing Neither Laughridge nor Harvey was
vehicle of Laughridge. wearing a seat belt, FHP said.


SPEEDWAY: Too noisy, county says

Continued From Page 1A


"With comments and assur-
ance from the superinten-
dent," Hunter said, "I feel
very assured now that this
will not adversely affect the
district and we will not have
.to lay off employees."
Doyle, union presi-
dent, said .removing the
teacher assessment lan-
guage was not bargaining
in good. faith. Teachers
had already agreed to the
contract as a package and


now the board has altered
that package, he said. We
could have fixed the lan-
guage later if the district
was in danger of losing
money, he said.
Board members also
approved school board dis-
tricts, which will be in line
with new county commis-
sion boundaries.'
Board member Keith
Hudson voted against
approving the same bound-


aries. He said the new
boundaries removed part
of the neighborhood he
has represented for more
than 30 years.
Although the school
board is not required
to abide by commission
boundaries, Hunter said
different boundaries
would be confusing to the
public and too costly for
the county during election
time.


Pharmacy burglarized


From staff reports

Police are investigating the Monday
night burglary of Baya Pharmacy in Lake
City.
Investigators responded to a 8:54 p.m.
alarm at the business, located at 1465 NW
U.S. 90. They discovered the front door of
the business had been shattered, but ho


HOM



FT*CAKE

I 3000
Kountr Korne


suspects were seen in the area.
Lake City police investigators are con-
ducting an inventory, to determine what
was taken from the business.
Police are asking anyone with informa-
tion about the burglary to call the depart-
ment's TIP line at (386) 719-2068. Callers
can remain anonymous.


strict times .to end races and have the track
and parking lot cleared. The intent is to put
the court system on notice that Duadagno
has been warned about noise complaints
and that they will not be tolerated.
"I did discuss it with him and told him
what I intended," Feagle said in a phone
interview Tuesday.
The track will be required to only hold
races Friday and Saturday nights and all
races must end by midnight, with no
exceptions. The track and parking lot must
be cleared by 12:30 a.m.
Feagle said a very limited number of
races may also be allowed on Sundays, but
races will not be allowed to begin earlier
'than 1 p.m. and must end by 5 p.m.
"We're trying to protect church ser-
vices-when church services are going on,"
Feagle said of the limited Sunday racing
hours.
Duadagno said the most recent race that
caused complaints was due to a wreck that
caused a delay in other races scheduled
that night. Race organizers wanted to be


extra cautious removing an injured driver
from a wrecked car, he said.
'"We wanted to take precautions to
ensure the driver was OK to move before
we pulled him out of the car," he said.
But Feagle said there are no exceptions
to the midnight deadline to stop racing.
"It doesn't need to happen and there
don't need to be excuses for it," he said.
Duadango said he has verbally agreed
to the conditions set forth in the order he
will receive.
"This is the first, complaint in the six
years I've owned the track," he said. "Yes,
we did run over. I'd like to apologize to the
folks who are upset we ran over. It won't'
happen again."
Dylan Harrell, who lives about a quarter
mile from the track, said the noise doesn't
bother him and he hasn't heard any com-
plaints from his neighbors.
"I've lived here so long I don't even hear
it anymore," he said of track noise. "It
blends in with everything else."


Columbia County's Most Wanted


Shannon Tori
Chiarini
DOB: 7/21/85
Height: 5' 10"
Weight: 110 lbs.
Hair: Brown Eyes: Brown
Tattoos: Right Arm-Stars;
Back-Tribal Symbol
Wanted For: VOP Possession of 20
Grams Cannabis or Less


-t. I


Joseph Danby
Lewis
DOB: 5/14/83
Height: 5' 5"
Weight: 170 Ibs.
Hair: Blonde Eyes: Blue
Tattoos: Back-Scars; Right Arm
and Left Arm-Flames
Wanted For: VOP 2 Counts
Uttering a Forgery


WANTED AS OF 12/12/2011
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
0F COLUMBIA COUNT y www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


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Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS Magazine


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Wednesday, December 14, 201 1


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Taking

a bite

out of

nuclear

terror

The Department of
Homeland Security
frets deeply about
the security of
nuclear power
plants but its solutions, as gov-
ernment solutions are wont to
be, tend to be expensive and
unconvincing.
A Florida nuclear power
plant appears to have stumbled
on a security measure that is
green, so cheap it's practically
free and likely to be bitingly
effective.
The endangered American
crocodile has appeared at
Florida Power and Light's
Turkey Point Nuclear Power
Plant and has flourished in
the plant's protected 168 miles
of canals that provide cooling
water to the reactors.
The local CBS station quotes
FPL biologist Bob Bertelson as
having seen a tenfold increase
in the number of crocs in the
last 20 years. They are said,
to be shier and less aggres-
sive than their African and
Australian cousins but since
some are as long as 15 feet and
weigh up to one ton, who wants
to take that chance?
Bertelson advises, "Don't
turn your back on a croc; they
are dangerous."
Al Qaida, you have been
warned.,

E Scripps Howard News Service



Clarification
A line in Sunday's edito-
rial on redistricting has been
misread by some to mean
Supervisor of Elections Liz
Horne "distanced" herself from
a county commissioner, we're
told.
That's not the case.
Horne distanced herself
from the controversy over the
redrawing of district lines, not
from any elected official.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, puUlisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the'writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Making blended families


work at Christmas


mhe holidays are
sometimes like a
patchwork quilt. We
stitch them together
from scraps pieces
of time and memory, imagina-
tion and hope to form some-
thing new from the old.
That's especially true after
the loss of a loved one, when
traditions can feel as empty as
the missing place at the table.
The year after my first hus-
band died, my youngest was
Working in Yosemite National
Park and couldn't come home
for the holidays. So his brother
and sister and I drove five hours
to spend Christmas with him
in a hotel room, laughing at a
movie called "Something about
Mary," which, despite what
I was led to believe, was not
about the Holy Mother.
It was different from every
Christmas we had known. But it
was still Christmas, and best of
all, we were still a family.
Since then, we have celebrat-
ed 12 Christmases, each differ-
ent from all the rest Different
has become our tradition.
When I remarried six years
ago, my new husband and I set
to work on a new "quilt," one we
hoped would be large enough to
cover both our families.
Blending families is sort of '
like herding pigeons. It's not
that the pigeons don't get along.
But even birds of a feather can't
always manage to get together.
One of the things I like about
my husband (and a reasonl I
decided to marry him) is his
obvious love for his family for


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com


his parents, his two boys, his
sister, her husband and their
children and the closeness
that they share.
That closeness became even
clearer last winter after we lost
his dad to complications of dia-
betes. We knew this Christmas
would be hard on the family,
especially on his mom.
So we began comparing
notes, gathering scraps, try-
ing to piece together a plan to
get people, who live hundreds
of miles apart, together in the,
same place at the same time.
Pigeons might have been easier.
But one of the gifts that often
follow a loss is a finer apprecia-
tion.for the importance of family
and a growing awareness that
any Christmas, any year, any
moment to be together, could
be our last
Two weeks before Christmas,
my husband and I flew from Las
Vegas to Oakland, Calif., to join
his family -. everyone who could
possibly make it for dinner at
one of his mom's favorite res-
taurants. (His sister, bless her,
made the reservations and put
us up at her house.)
Both of my husband's boys
were there. His older son and.


his girlfriend brought their 3-
month-old, Charlotte, and we
passed her around the table like
a box of See's candy.
I was stealing a bite of my
husband's lemon tart when I
looked across the table and saw
his mom laughing at Charlotte,
her great-granddaughter. I wish
you could've seen them, some
80 years apart, beaming at each
other as if they knew secrets
the rest of us would never
guess.
I hoped my father-in-law was
watching. Nothing could have
made him happier.
The evening passed all too
quickly, just a few hours togeth-
er and a lot of goodbye hugs in
the parking lot, but it will linger
long in memory.
Why are the best memories
often the briefest of moments?
My husband and I will spend
this Christmas at home in Las
Vegas. We're hoping my oldest
can join us for a few days. My
youngest and his wife will bring
their toddler (the Firecracker)
for New Year's. My daughter
and her husband will stay home
with their baby (Henry, who's
a day younger than Charlotte)
and I'll go see them in January.
It will be a different sort of
Christmas, an ever-changing
quilt. But we'll still be a family,
and it will keep us warm.
Here's wishing the same for
you and yours.


* Sharon Randall can be con-
tacted at P.O. Box 777394,
Henderson, NV 89077.


Many states make it harder to vote


nastier.
Thousands of peo-
ple who have been
voting for years and
college students eager to vote
will find themselves shut out
next year.
Even as Mitt Romney and
Newt Gingrich resemble joust-
ing mastodons, clumsily trying
to knock each other down, more
than a dozen state legislatures
in such key battleground states
as Florida have been kicking
aside eased voting procedures.
Although the laws vary, the
obvious aim is to make it tough-
er for minorities and young peo-
ple to vote. For example, Texas
now permits registered voters
to present at the polls either a
valid driver's license or passport
or a letter from a government
agency, a utility bill or even a
paycheck. The new law would
require current government
photo identification. For exam-
ple, an expired passport would
not be acceptable. A college
ID would not suffice although
a permit to carry a concealed
handgun would be acceptable.
Julian Bond of the NAACP says
that older African Americans who
were born during segregation in
the South may not have a birth
certificate and even though they
may have been voting for years


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com
will be denied their right to vote
next year.
Rock the Vote, which works
to get young people registered,
says the new laws will keep
thousands of students from vot-
ing and believes it is because
they tend to be liberal.
Rock the Vote tells young
people: "There is a war on vot-
ing going on and your rights are
under attack. Politicians are try-
ing to block young people from
voting with shady new photo ID
and residency laws. They are
getting rid of things that make
it easier for people to vote, like
Election Day registration, early
voting and pre-registration
laws....In America, we rock the
vote, we don't block the vote."
The rash of new restrictions
might be justified if the nation
faced a barrage of fraudulent
voting. But it doesn't. There is
only one case being adjudicated.
Florida's new law, which not
only requires a photo ID but


one wTth a signature or two
valid IDs, was passed in a state
*with fewer.than three dozen
allegations of fraud. Supporters
of the law say they are being
preemptive rather than reactive.
So far the Democratic National
Committee has not filed lawsuits
to block the new laws but has not
ruled that out. Democrats are
embarking on education efforts
to let voters know what forms of
identification they will need to
show at the polls.
Many fear that successful
efforts to make voting more
difficult will discourage people
from even making an effort to
vote a subtle form of disen-
franchisement. State legisla-
tures have passed restrictive
. voting laws in Ohio, Florida,
Wisconsin, West Virginia,
Maine, Rhode Island, Texas,
Kansas, Tennessee, Alabama,
Georgia and South Carolina.
North Carolina, Missouri and
Pennsylvania are considering
new restrictions.
How ironic that as the United
States demands democracy and
free elections around the world,
politicians here are trying to
tamp down voting in America.

Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


ANO
VI


4A


THEIR
E W


Kremlin:


Blame


the U.S.

The Kremlin's
default position
for the much that -
goes wrong in
Russia has always .;
been to blame the United
States. But the current lead-
ership may be losing a step
or two.
Parliamentary elections
were held Sunday, Dec. 4,
and almost immediately there .
were massive public protests
against the regime and its
clumsy, and not totally suc-
cessful, attempts to rig the
outcome.
And whose fault were
the protests? The U.S., of
course, and most specifically
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton.
Prime Minister Vladimir
Putin said Clinton "gave a
signal" to the opposition.
"They-heard the signal, and
with thp support of the U.S.
State Department began their -
work."
As proof, Putin cited the
speed with which Clinton
criticized the elections. "The.
first thing that the secretary
of state did say was that they
were not honest and fair, but
she had not even yet received .
the material from the observ-
ers," he said, tacitly indicat-
ing that there,was something -
to the charges.
Actually, Clinton would
have been safe in saying even
before the balloting that the
elections were not honest and
fair. The Kremlin outlawed
many rival political parties,
barred certain candidates
from the ballot, denied oppo-
sition candidates access to
the state-controlled airwaves,
banned many of their rallies
and, shortly before the vot-
ing, cracked down hard on
the country's only indepen-
dent election monitor.
It must be flattering to
Clinton that Putin believes
that, with a wink and a nod or
a change of hairstyle, she can
send hundreds of thousands
of protesters to the streets
across Russia to denounce
Putin's ruling United Russia
as "the party of thieves and
crooks."
Clinton is good, but, let's
face it, she's not that good.
In 2002, when the sub-
marine Kursk sank with all
hands on board, the Russian
military immediately blamed
the United States, saying
that the boat must have been .
rammed by a U.S. sub in the
area. An investigation showed
that sloppy maintenance
caused its torpedo warheads
to explode.
Russia has also accused us
of causing the 2010 Haitian
earthquake by testing a
massive undersea weapon
meant for use against Iran.
And the U.S., of course, was
behind the country's 1998
economic collapse and debt
default. That same year, the
Kremlin said that the U.S.
and NATO intervention in
Yugoslavia was a smoke
screen to conceal our plans
to invade Russia. And, oh yes,
the Russian mafia is our fault,
too.
The Kremlin may have
cried "U.S.!" once, or maybe
many times, too often.
Political analyst Dmitry
Oreshkin told the Associated
Press that ordinary Russians
would shrug off Putin's
attempts to blame the U.S. for
his troubles.
"Even in Soviet times, it
did not work," he said. "Now
it won't work for sure." Too
bad. In its own twisted way,
blaming us was a sincere if
backward form of flattery.


* Scripps -joward News Service


www.lakecityreporter.com









Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail lhampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Dec. 14

Newcomers and
Friends meeting

The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends will be held
at 11 a.m. on Dec. 14
at the Eastside Village
Clubhouse. Special
entertainment will be
provided by Genie Harris,
accordianist.
Lunch is $10 and will
be catered by Blue Roof
Caterers.

Dec. 16

Afternoon Tea

The community is
cordially invited to
"Afternoon Tea" Friday,
16th, 2:0.0 p.m. to 4:00
p.m. at the Hospice of
the Nature Coast Wings
Community Education
Center in the Lake
City Plaza (along U.S.
Hwy 441). "Afternoon
Tea" is an ideal way to
greet your neighbors
and friends and meet
Hospice of the Nature
Coast staff who will
provide information and
answer any questions
about hospice care and
services. For more
information, call Vicki
Myers at 386-755-7714
or 866-642-0962.
For more information -
about hospice services in
the Lake City area, call
Hospice of the Nature
Coast at 386-755-7714.
Visit us on the web at
www.hospicepofthenatu-
recoast.org.

Dec. 17

FACS Christmas
dance and party

The Filipino-American
Cultural society of,
Lake City will hold
its Christmas dance
and party Saturday,-
Dec. 17 from 6-10
p.m. at the social hall
of Epiphany Catholic
Church in Lake City.
All FACS active


members and
guests, please plan
to attend this special
event. It will be a
night of seasonal
entertainment, with
Christmas caroling,
music, dancing and a
cultural food buffet.
As usual, bring your
best covered dish to
share.
Arrival, setup of buffet
and social time: 6-6:30;
dinner begins at 6:30.
New members are
always welcome.
For more information
contact Bob Gavette at
965-5905.

Girl Scouts fundraiser

The Girl Scouts invite
you to tell Santa what
you would like for
Christmas. Come
have breakfast with
Santa at Burger King
on West US 90 in Lake
City on Saturday,
December 17 from 8 -
11 a.m. and a portion
of the proceeds will
benefit Troops 17,
163, 332, 525, and
926 as they travel to
Washington D.C. to
celebrate 100 years of
Girl Scouting in the
USA with a sing-along
at the National Mall.

'Glorious Impossible'

The combined music '
ministries of Pine
Grove Baptist Church
and Southside Baptist
Church present "Glorious
Impossible" Saturday,
December 17 at 7:0Q
p.m., Southside Baptist
Church, 388 S.E. Baya
Drive and Sunday,
December 18 at 6:00
p.m., Pine Grove Baptist
Church, 1989 N. Hwy
441.
Admission is free,
but seating is limited.
For advanced tickets
or further information,
please call: Pine.Grove
Baptist Church, 386-
752-2664 or Southside
Baptist Church, 386-755-
5553.
Nursery will be
provided for up to four


years old.

Dec. 18

'We Have Our Savior'

The First Presbyterian
Church, 697 Baya Dr.,
will have a worship
service at 11 a.m.
with the musical "We
Have Our Savior." For
information call 752-
0670.

,One of Us

A Christmas musical
presented by the Adult
,Choir, Sunday night,
Dec. 18 ay 6 p.m. at
First Baptist Church,
182 NE Justice Street,
Lake City.
Rev. Chris Phillips,
Minister of Youth, Rev.
Ken Baxley, Minister of
Music.

'Glorious Impossible'

The combined music
ministries of Pine
Grove Baptist Church
and Southside Baptist
Church present "Glorious
Impossible" Saturday,
December 17 at 7:00
p.m., Southside Baptist
Church, 388 S.E. Baya
Drive and Sunday,
December 18 at 6:00
p.m., Pine Grove Baptist
Church, 1989 N. Hwy
441.
Admission is free,
but seating is limited.
For advanced tickets
or further information,
please call: Pine Grove
Baptist Church, 386-
752-2664 or Southside
Baptist Church, 38.6-755-
55.53.
Nursery will be
provided for up to four
years old.

Candlelight service

We invite you to come
and worship with us at
our annual Candlelight
Service at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist
Church. The service
will begin at 5:30 p.m.
on Sunday, December


18, 2011. The church
is located at 550 NE
Martin Luther King
Street.

Our annual Watch-night
service will begin at
9:30 p.m. on Saturday,
December 31, 2011. We
invite everyone to come
and worship with us
as we praise and thank
the Lord for bringing
us through 2011 and
for allowing us to enter
2012.

Pastor Alvin J. Baker
will deliver the message.

Dec. 19

EEOC monthly
meeting

The NAACP
- Columbia County
will host the U.S.
Equal Employment
Opportunity
Commission at its
monthly meeting.
Join us to learn about
the EEOC's latest
initiatives, and to meet
Tampa Field Office
Director Georgia
Marchbanks.
The meeting will
be held Monday,
Dec 19 at 6:00
pm at Richardson
Community Center,
255 Coach Anders
Way, Lake City.
For further
information, contact
Glynnel Presley, (386)
752-4074.

Dec. 24

Christmas candlelight
service at Faith in
Christ Church
Everyone is invited
to come and worship
Christmas Eve
At our New church home
in Lake City Florida.
The service will begin
at 11pm on December
24th and end with Holy
Communion at midnight.
The church is located at
282 SW Magical
Terrace, just off
Pinemount/SR 252
one block North of the


Book Store.
Take Pinemount rd
SOUTH from Food Lion,
approx 1 mile, road is on
the RIGHT
Call for more info: 754-
2827.

Christmas pageant
The First Presbyterian
Church, 697 Baya Dr.,
will host an impromptu
Christmas pageant
for all ages at 7 p.m.
and have a traditional
Christmas service at 11
p.m. For information call
752-0670.

Christmas Eve church
service

The Mount Tabor
A.M.E. Church will be
hosting a Christmas
Eve church service and
celebration on Saturday,
December 24 at 6 p.m.
The community is
invited. The church is
located at 519 SW L.M.
Aaron Drive in Lake
City.
For more information
please contact George
Moultrie at 386-754-0376
or Reola Finkley at 386-
438-4803.
Pastor: Rev. Robert
Postell.

Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service

Falling Creek Chapel,
1290 NW Falling Creek
Rd., wil be having
a Christmas Eve
Candlelight Service
starting at 6:30 p.m.
Everyone is welcome.
For information call 755-
0580.

Dec. 31

Watch-night service

We invite you to come
and worship with us at
our annual Candlelight
Service at New Bethel
Missionary Baptist
Church. The service
will begin at 5:30 p.m.
on Sunday, December
18, 2011. The church
is located at 550 NE


Martin Luther King
Street.

Our annual Watch-night
service will begin at
9:30 p.m. on Saturday,
December 31, 2011. We
invite everyone to come
and worship with us
as we praise and thank
the Lord for bringing
us through 2011 and
for allowing us to enter
2012.

Pastor Alvin J. Baker
will deliver the message.

ONGOING

Boys Club winter
program

The Boys Club of
Columbia County is now
registering for its winter
program, which runs
through March 1.. Fees
are $175, which includes
transportation from all
elementary and junior
high schools.
The club offers a variety
of activities including
sports, arts and crafts,
gamerooms ad special
events. The club also
offers a homework
program with tutoria
help for the children.
a computer lab is also
available,
For more information,
please call 752-4184 or
visit the club on Jones
Way.

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News from Shands Lake Shore

Transportation service
offered; drivers needed


Shands Lake Shore RMVC Auxiliary
announces the arrival of pur "trolley golf
cart." We now offer transportation from
all of our parking lots on campus to the
hospital and back again on a daily basis. If
you would like to volunteer to be a driver
for us, please call the hospital at 386-292-


8000. Our hours are from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30
p.m. and our route will include all of our
parking lots. This is a free service for all
patients and staff.
Drivers are needed. You must be 18 or
older and a licensed driver to apply. Please
call the hospital for more information.


Shirley Temple Hill Dove
Shirley Temple Hill Dove, 76,
of Lake City, passed away on
December 12, 2011 at Suwan-
nee Valley Care Center fol-
lowing an ,extended illness.
Born on January 1,1935 in Rich-
mond, Missouri to the late Carl
and Temple Hill. She loved
traveling in their motor home
around the U.S., and was a lov-
ing wife, mother, and sister.
She is preceded in death by
her son Audie Lance Hill.
Survivors include her husband of
58 years Charles Edward Dove
of Lake City, daughter;' Mar-
cia Carline Dove of Lake City,
brothers; Leslie H.Hill (Anne) of
Missouri, Ralph E. Hill (Vonnie)
of Missouri, and Ronald Keith
Hill (Nora) of Panama City, Fl.
A memorial service will be
conducted 2:00 P.M, Saturday,
December 17,2011 at Gateway
Forest Lawn Funeral Home
Chapel with Ralph E. Hill offi-
ciating. Arrangements are under
the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN
FUNERAL HOME, 3596 S.
U.S. Hwy 441, (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn.comrn

Richard Robert
Rosencrants
Richard Robert Rosencrants,
age 76 of Dickson, TN. Decem-
ber 11, 2011 Survived by: wife


Katherine Jean Rosencrants;
daughters Robin Cady (Ralph),
KimberlyHutch- a
ings, Charla
Tague (Vance), ,-
Lynn Holcomb -
(Mark); brother
Bruce Rosencrants (Celine); sis-
ters Nancy Derby (William) and
Linda Burke; twelve grandchil-
dren and thirteen great grandchil-
dren. Preceded in death by par-
ents and brothers Barry & Brad.
Mr. Rosencrants is a retired chief
petty officer, proudly serving
in the United States Navy. His
cremains will be buried in Fort
Custer National Cemetery in
Battle Creek, Michigan. He was
a member of the committee who
obtained the Cemetery's Nation-
al Accreditation. He was also
a member of the High Springs
(FL) and Lake City (FL) Theatre.
Memorial services are Thurs-
day, December 15th, from the
Chapel of Dickson Funeral
Home. DICKSON FUNERAL
HOME AND CREMATION
CENTER. Chapels in Dick-
son, Fairview and White Bluff
www. dicksonfuneralhome. corn

Eva Mae Wall
Mrs. Eva Mae Wall, age 83,
of Lake City, Fla. passed away
Dec. 12, 2011 at Shands Hospi-
tal, Jacksonville, Fla. Mrs. Wall
was preceded in death by her
husband of 56 years, Dub Wall.
She was born in Columbus, Ga.


And resided in Hollywood, Fla.
until moving to Lake City in
1983. She worked as an assis-
tant vice-president with Barnett
Bank of S.E. Florida, Holly-
wood, Fla. for over 25 years un-
til her retirement. She enjoyed
reading and working cross-word
puzzles and was a member of the
Bethel United Methodist Church
of Lake City. She is survived by
four children, Pat (Don) Wil-
liams and Brenda (Joe) Geno-
vese both of Lake City, Fla., Ron
(Sharon) Wall of Winder, Ga.
and Suzie (Robert) Wallace of
Charlotte, N.C.: Sister-in-law,
Effie Avery of Beverly Hills,
Fla.: 10 grandchildren and 14
great-grandchildren also sur-
vive. Funeral services will be
conducted at 2 P.M. Friday, Dec.
16, in the Bethel United Method-
ist Church with Rev. Deborah
McKown ,Pastor, officiating
and assisted by Rev. Ken Ham-
ilton. Interment will be in For-
est Lawn Memorial Gardens,
Lake City, Fla. Visitation will
be from 6 to 8 P.M. Thurs-
day, Dec. 15, at GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, S.W.
Main Blvd., Lake City,t Fla.
www.guerryfuneralhome. net



Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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2 FA


OBITUARIES


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


Man stole, cashed


checks, say police


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Columbia County man was arrested
for stealing and fraudulently endorsing
about $85 worth checks from his mother,
police reports said.
Michael David Emory, 31, 2463 SW
Main Blvd., was charged with larceny,
counterfeiting of a bank bill, check or draft
note and fraud in connection with the case.
He was booked into the Columbia County
Detention Facility on $11,000 bond.
According to Columbia County Sheriff's
Office reports, on Monday around 10:55
a.m., a deputy responded to Columbia
County Bank where a woman told him her
son stole some checks from her, forged
them and cashed them without her knowl-
edge or permission.
The woman told the deputy she deter-


Smined some checks were
,missing and she went to
the bank to investigate.
She said bank staff told her
that three checks had been
cashed and the checks were
made out to Emory. The
total amount taken from her
Emory account was $85.
The woman told the
deputy the signature was not hers. The
deputy confirmed that by comparing it to
the signature on record at the bank.
The woman said she did not give permis-
sion to Emory to take or cash the checks.
Bank personnel told the deputy three
other checks were pending.
When authorities contacted Emory
he reportedly acknowledged that he
had cashed the checks. Emory was then
arrested and taken to jail.


DROWNINGS: Fishing poles still in water
Continued From Page 1A


"It wasn't capsized,"
Parker said. "There was
a little bit of water in it,
but it wasn't like the boat
had a leak or anything like
that. It was floating, it still
had equipment in the boat
and fishing poles with their
lines in the water. It was
just a really kind of odd
thing."
A family member said
the two loved fishing.
"They were doing what
they enjoyed doing best,"
said Irene Kelly Williams,
Demeritte's sister and the
daughter of Emma Kelly.
'That was her fishing
buddy. I don't think God
makes mistakes."
. Both bodies have
been sent to the Medical
Examiner's office in
Gainesville for autopsy.
"It usually takes a couple
of days to determine the
cause of death," Parket
said.


Parker said foul play is
not suspected.
The FWC was in charge
of search and recovery
efforts.
Personnel and resourc-
es from the Union County
Sheriff's Office, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office,
U.S. Forest Service and the
Department of Corrections
were also used-in the recov-
ery effort. More than 30
people participated in the
search, which included at
least seven boats, including
two air boats and a helicop-
ter and K-9 unit.
"The partnership
between the agencies
involved in the search was
amazing, and I'm extreme-
ly pleased with our efforts,"
said FWC regional com-
mander Maj. Lee Beach.
"Our hearts go out to
the family," said Columbia
County Sheriff Mark
Hunter. "Everyone who


was involved in the search
is saddened by this event
We just hope this brings a
little closure for the fam-
ily and friends who waited
patiently while we searched
the lake."
A side scanning sonar
provided by a Texas-based
company was used to find
Demeritte.
"We were utilizing equip-
ment from Equusearch
Search and Recovery,"
Parker said. "Apparently
they volunteered their ser-
vices and flew out here.
They showed us how to use
the equipment and mount-
ed it in one of the boats."
Parker said FWC has
side-scanning sonar, but
officials believed the lake
was too shallow [less than
10 feet] to utilize the equip-
ment but the unit from
Equusearch worked under
those conditions.


ADVERTISEMENT


Health & Wellness


"Confessions of a


Spicy Food Victim"


By Ralph Bums;
Here's My Story: "For most of
my life; I purposely avoided spicy
foods. Every time I ate something
hot I'd get this terrible burning.
Like someone poured molten lead
down my throat and stomach. I'd
get those disgusting "minli-throw-
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them. And end up curled into a ball,
praying for the burning to stop. But
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I had trouble sleeping. And felt
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I WAS MISERABLE!
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'I thought I would never
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When I went out to eat I didn't
even know what to order anymore. I
felt like I lost my best friend.
One night we went out to dinner
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I knew Steve had a history of
indigestion, just like me... so I was
surprised to see him order the lasagna.
'What happened next
changed my life'...
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drink"? Jeez. That doesn't sound
good at all!" He said "what is
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He told me about an article he
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aloe extract that promotes healthy
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He was very impressed by
the ad. Especially by how many
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Steve decided to order it and was
shocked by the results.


"Every time I ate
something that didn't
agree with me... I'd get
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like my stomach
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The next day Steve brought
me a 3-month supply of a product
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I was so thrilled; I wrote the
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work in just seconds
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It actually helps soothe your
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a "wonder" compound that gently
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They are yours to keep no matter
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isn't for you.
But hurry! This is a limited time
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Order your Risk Free Trial of
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Call Now, Toll-Free!
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(PS: Don't forget to tell
them Ralph sent you.)


THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE US FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THESE
PRODUCTS ARE NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS NOTTYPICAL.


LAKE CITY'COLUMBIA COUNTY

,dFCHAMBER
BELONG ENGAGE LEAD PROSPER






THINK











FIRST


rn M.1jA Wk'Y'


Lake City Reporter


.il... .


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreportercom


SPORTS


Wednesday, December 14, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
LCMS SOFTBALL
Conditioning
begins Jan.,4
Lake City Middle
School softball
conditioning begins at
3:15 p.m. Jan. 4 at the
LCMS softball field. All
participants must have a
current physical,
parent permission form
and drug consent form
before participating (no
exceptions).
For details, call
Machon Kvistad at
623-6833.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Registration for
Boys Club hoops
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
accepting registration
for its basketball
program. Cost is $45.
Three leagues are
offered: Training, ages
6-7-8; Jr. Varsity, ages
8-9-10; Varsity, ages
11-12-13-14. Practices are
twice weekly with games
on Saturday (except
Training League).
For details, call
752-4184.
YOUTH GOLF
Holiday camp
at Quail Heights
Quail Heights Country
Club head pro Pete
Sands and Chet Carter
are offering a holiday
golf camp at the club for
juniors ages 6-17 from
8:30-11:30 a.m. Monday
through Dec. 23. Cost is
$60 ($20 for
additional family
members). Groups will
be divided by skill level
and number of
participants. The
fundamentals of golf, full
swing, short game and
course management will
be covered.
For details, call Carter
at 365-7097 or the pro
shop at 752-3339.

Practice group
offered for girls
A golf practice group
for girls ages 9-17 is
proposed for 4-5 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays
at Quail Heights Country
Club. The group is for
girls who want to learn
the game and to develop
Lady Tigers for the CHS
golf program. Fee of $45
will include range balls
during practice and a
monthly tournament
For details, call Chet
Carter at 365-7097.
From staff reports

GAMES
Thursday
Columbia High girls
soccer at Lincoln High,
7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Leon High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
soccer at Oak Hall School,
6:30 p.m. (girls-4:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Atlantic
Coast High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Keystone
Heights High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling hosts duals
tournament, TBA
Fort White High
basketball vs. Hamilton


County High quad-match,
7:30 p.m. (JV-3)


Braves



give CHS



2nd loss


Lady Indians fall
in district game to
Keystone Heights.
From staff reports

Columbia High's basket-
ball team could not knock
off two undefeated oppo-
nents in a row.
Terry Parker High defeat-
ed the visiting Tigers, 68-45,
in Jacksonville on Monday.
The Braves improved to 5-
0.
Morris Marshall led
Columbia with 12 points
including one 3-pointer.
Marcus Amerson hit two
treys and scored 10 points.
Tre' Simmons scored
eight points and Jalen
Wyche hit a pair of treys.
Laremy Tunsil scored
five points and had five
rebounds. Javonta6 Foster
had two points and three


assists, and Abram Rossin
had two points. .
Columbia (5-2, 2-0)
hosts Atlantic Coast High
in a District 4-6A game on
Friday.
Lady Indians basketball
Fort White High's girls
basketball team lost a
39-24 District 5-4A game at
Keystone Heights High on
Monday.
Desma Blake led the Lady
Indians with eight points.
Kayshinique Cook, Cenise
Armstrong and Tasha
Robinson each scored four
points. Khadijah Ingram
and Jasmine Robinson each
scored two points.
Fort White (2-5, 1-2)
hosts Hamilton County
High as part of a girls
and boys varsity/junior
varsity quad-match on
Saturday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tre' Simmons (2) shoots the ball in a game against Lee High on Friday.


I


ish


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the 2011-12 Columbia High wrestling team are Isabelle Warner (front left) and Kathryn Warner. Kneeling (from left) are Trey Allen, Tim Mallard,
Kaleb Warner, Dustin Regar, Cole Schreiber and Josh Rodgers. Standing (from left) are coach Kevin Warner, Lucas Bradly, Monterance Allen, Josh Walker,
coach Andrew. Porter, Joe Fields, Ethan Trevarrow, Isaac Henderson and coach Adam Bricker. Daniel Devers also is on the team.




Three Tigers place second


From staff reports

Columbia High's wrestling team
placed fourth in the 32-team Capital
City Classic last weekend. The
tournament was at the Al Lawson
Jr. Center on the campus of Florida
A&M University in Tallahassee.
Lowndes County (Ga.) won
the tournament with 189 points.


Fleming Island High (183), Somerset
Academy (167.5), Columbia (147.5)
and Lincoln High (139.5) rounded
out the top five. 6. Chiles, Wakulla,
University Christian, Godby,
Gainesville and Suwannee were
next in the standings.
Cole Schreiber (3-1 in the 106-
pound weight class), Joe Fields (4-1
at 182 pounds) and Monterance


Allen (4-1 at 195 pounds) led CHS
with second-place finishes.
Isaac Henderson (5-2 at 152
pounds) placed fourth and Daniel
Devers (4-2 at 160 pounds) placed
fifth.
Kaleb Warner (3-2 at 120
pounds) placed seventh. Lucas
Bradly and Trey Allen were 3-3 and
placed eighth at 220 pounds and


285 pounds, respectively. Ethan
Trevarrow was 2-2 at 113 pounds.
Tim Mallard (138 pounds), Josh
Rodgers (145 pounds) and Josh
Walker (170 pounds) were 0-2 in
varsity competition. In junior var-
sity, Walker was 4-0, Rodgers was
2-2 and Mallard was 2-1.
Columbia is hosting a duals tour-
nament on Saturday.


ier










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
3 p.m.
TGC Ladies European Tour, Dubai
Ladies Masters, first round, at Dubai,
United Arab Emirates (same-day tape)
8:30 p.m.
TGC PGATourAustralasia,JBWere
Masters, first round, at Cheltenham,
Australia
1:30 a.m.
TGC Asian Tour, Thailand
Championship, first round, at Bangkok
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Cincinnati at Wright State
7:30 p.m.
ESPN FlU at Maryland
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Tennessee at College of
Charleston
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Chicago at Minnesota

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


New
N.Y
Buff
Miar


How
Teni
Jack
India


Bait
Pitt
Cin
Clev


Der
Oak
San
Kan


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pet PF
w England 10 3 0.769 396
(Jets 8 5 0.615 327
alo 5 8 0.385288
mi 4 9-0.308 2562
South
W L T Pct PF
iston 10 3 0.769330
nessee 7 6 0.538 266
sonville 4 9 0 .308 193
anapolis 0 13 0.000 184:
North
W L T Pct PF
timore 1.0 3 0.769 320:
sburgh 10 3 0.769282
cinnati 7 6 0 .538 285
veland 4 9 0.308 178:
West
W L T Pct PF
nver 8 5 0.6152693
land 7 6 0.53829Q
Diego 6 7 0.462324
isas City 5 8 0.385 173:


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Philadelphia
Washington


x-New Orleans
Atlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay

y-Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


y-San Francisco
Arizona
Seattle
St. Louis


East
W L
7 6
7 6
5 8
4 9
South
W L
10 3'
8 5
4 9
4 9
North
W L
13 0
8 5
7 6
2 11
West
W L
10 3
6 7.
6 7
2 I1


PA
274
270
341
246

PA
208
251
252
382

PA
202
198
270
254

PA
302
354
299
305


T Pct PF PA
0 .538 324 349
0.538317281
0 .385.297 292
0 .308 229 290

T Pct PF PA
0.769 415 286
0 .615 300 267
0.308 313 355
0.308 232 370

T Pct PF 'PA
01.000 466 278
0.615 367 305
0 .538 301 255
0.154 274 364

T Pct PF PA
0.769307 182
0 .462 253 288
0 .462,246 259
0.154 153 326


x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
Sunday's Games
New Orleans 22,Tennessee 17
Baltimore 24, Indianapolis 10
N.Y.Jets 37, Kansas City 10
'Detroit 34, Minnesota 28
Houston 20, Cincinnati 19
Jacksonville 41,Tampa Bay 14
Atlanta 31, Carolina 23
Philadelphia 26, Miami 10
New England 34,Washington 27
Arizona 21, San Francisco 19
Denver 13, Chicago 10,'OT
San Diego 37, Buffalo 10
Green Bay 46, Oakland 16
N.Y. Giants 37, Dallas 34
Monday's Game
Seattle 30, St Louis 13
Thursday's Game
Jacksonville at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 17
Dallas atTampa Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 18
New Orleans at Minnesota, I p.m.
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, I p.m.
Carolina at Houston, I p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Miami at Buffalo, I p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 19
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.

FCS playoffs

Semifinals
Friday
Montana (11-2) at Sam Houston State
(13-0), 8 p.m.
Saturday
Georgia Southern (11-2) at North
Dakota State (12-1), 2:30 p.m.

Division II playoffs

Championship
Saturday
At Braly Municipal Stadium
Florence, Ala.
Wayne State (12-3) vs. Pittsburg State
(12-1), II a.m.

Division III playoffs

Championship
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Friday
At Salem (Va.) Stadium
Mount Union (14-0) vs. Wisconsin-
Whitewater (14-0), 7 p.m.

NAIA playoffs

Championship
Saturday
At Barron Stadium
Rome, Ga.


St. Xavier (Il.) (13-1) vs. Carroll
(Mont.) (12-1),4:30 p.m.

College bowl games

Saturday
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Wyoming (8-4) vs. Temple (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Utah State (7-5) vs. Ohio (9-4),
5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette (8-4) vs. San Diego
State (8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg
Marshall (6-6) vs. FlU (8-4), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)

Wednesday. Dec.21
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
TCU (10-2) vs. Louisiana Tech (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Thursday, Dec. 22
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Boise State ( 11-1) vs. Arizona State
(6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Nevada (7-5) vs. Southern Mississippi
(I I-2),8 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Dec. 26
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Missouri
(7-5), 4 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Dec. 27
Little Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Western Michigan (7-5) vs. Purdue
(6-6), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina State (7-5) vs.
Louisville (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN).

Wednesday, Dec. 28
Military Bowl
At Washington
Air Force (7-5) vs. Toledo (8-4),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas (7-5) vs. California (7-5), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)
-..
Thursday, Dec. 29
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Florida State (8-4) vs. Notre
Dame (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Baylor (9-3) vs. Washington (7-5),
9 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
Tulsa (8-4) vs. BYU (9-3), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Rutgers (8-4) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Mississippi State (6-6) vs.Wake Forest
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempeAriz.
Oklahoma (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5),
10 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 31
Meinke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern
(6-6), Noon (ESPN)
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Georgia Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
UCLA (6-7) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
At Atlanta
Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 2
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1),
Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina



Unscramble.these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


I


WHEN AMUNPSEN
FINALLY REACHEJ-DP THE
SOUTH POLE, ALL HE
COUL-P VO WAS --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: L 1- 1(1
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SKUNK PLUMP INJURY DECADE
Answer: He didn't earn the knot-tying badge because
he was this A SLACKER


GOLF REPORTS



Peters wins Saturday blitz


(10-2), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
At Tampa
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
(10-3), I p.m. (ABC)
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
I p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Stanford (II I-) vs. Oklahoma State
(I1-1), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Jan. 3
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan (10-2) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, jan.4
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestVirginia (9-3) vs. Clemson (10-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Jan. 6
Cotton Bowl
AtArlington,Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday, Jan. 7
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday, Jan. 8
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.'
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)
Monday, Jan.9
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m: (ESPN)


BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 2 Ohio State vs. South Carolina-
Upstatq, 7:30 p.m.
No. 6 Baylor vs. Bethune-Cookman,
8 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR OF AUSTRALASIA
AUSTRALIAN MASTERS
Site: Melbourne,Australia.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Victoria Golf Club (6,886
yards, par 71).
Purse: $1.02 million. Winner's share:
$183,300.
Television: Golf Channel (Today,
8:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Thursday-Saturday,
9 a.m.-noon, 8:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; Sunday,
9 a.m.-noon).
Online: http://www.austratianmasters.
com.au
PGA Tour of Australasia site: http':/
pgatour.com.au
OTHERTOURNAMENTS
MEN
ASIAN TOUR: Thailand Golf
Championship, Thursday-Sunday, Amata
Spring Country Club, Bangkok.Television:
Golf Channel (Thursday-Sunday, 1:30-
5:30 a.m., noon-3 p.m.). Online: http://
www.asiantour.com
WOMEN
LADIES EUROPEAN TOUR: Dubai
Ladies Masters, Wednesday-Saturday,
Emirates Golf Course, The Majlis, Dubai,
United Arab Emirates. Television: Golf
Channel (Today-Saturday, 3-6 p.m.).
Online: http://www.ladieseumpeantour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Game
New Jersey 5,Tampa Bay 4
Tuesday's Games
Los Angeles at Boston (n)
Ottawa at Buffalo (n)
Carolina at Toronto (n)
Dallas at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Detroit at Pittsburgh (n)
Philadelphia at Washington (n)
Vancouver at Columbus (n)
New Jersey at Florida (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Montreal (n)
Calgary at Nashville (n)
Minnesota at Winnipeg (n)
San Jose at Colorado (n)
Today's Games
Boston at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix atAnaheim, 10 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Steve Peters had his
best round in months, a
+11 to take first place in the
Saturday blitz. He broke
out of a tightly packed field
with three birdies on the.
back nine for a four-shot
win over Greg Lyons (+7).
Larry Ross picked up
third place with +5. Andy
Peterson was another shot
back in fourth.
The skins game pro-
duced four winners. Dennis
Crawford had back-to-back
birdies on Nos. 13-14 to
claim half of them. Bruce
Gibson carded an eagle on
No. 2 for his skin. Peters
had the other keeper.
A birdie on the tough
par 3 fifth hole gave Don
Combs'the edge he need-
ed in the Wednesday blitz.
Combs finished his round
at +6 for a two-shot margin
over John Dennis and Mike
Gough, who tied at +4.
Ed Higgs (+2) was alone
in third place, followed by
George Burnham and Bob
Randall tied at +1.
Only three players


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


scored in the skins game.
Chad Hunter, Buddy Slay
and Randall shared a nice
payout. Both pot holes car-
ried over.
The Good Old Boys
played two one-point
matches.
In the first contest, Monty
Montgomery, Tom Elmore,
Tony Branch and Paul
Davis had all they wanted
from the team of Marc Risk,
Bobby Simmons, Dave
Cannon and Hugh Sherrill
before taking a 6-5 win.
In the three-team sec-
ond match, Eli Witt, Nick
Whitehurst, Jim Stevens
and Dan Stephens need-
ed a couple of recounts to
confirm their 4-3 win over
Stan Woolbert, Jim Bell,
Jim McGriff and Jerry
Snowberger.
Jerry West, Terry Mick,
Howard Whitaker and
Joe Persons were another


Donald wins PGA Tour


player of the year


By DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE -
Already No. 1 in the world,
Luke Donald now is No.
1 in the eyes of the PGA
Tour.
Players have voted
Donald the PGA Tour


player of the year, making
him' the first British player
to win the award since it
began in 1990. The vote
follows a season in which
Donald won,twice and cap-
tured the money title by
shooting 30 on the back
nine to win the last tourna-
ment of the year.


The tour does not dis-
close the votes or who was
the runner-up.
Along with his PGA Tour
performance, the 34-year-
old from England last week
became the first player to
win the money title on the
PGA Tour and European
Tour in the same year.


Mountain West sends


letter requesting BCS bid


Associated Press

LAS VEGAS The
Mountain West Conference
has sent a letter to the
BCS presidential oversight
committee outlining why
it should receive an auto-
matic bid the next two sea-
sons.

ACROSS 34 Jo
1 Fixed look 35. Re
6 Undeliverable th(
mail 37 Fa
11 Forgot the 39 Fr
roast 40 C
12 Drama class m
13 Did, once 41 G
(2 wds.) 45 Te
14 "Serpico" al
actor 47 N
15 Be generous 48 R
16 Uh-huh 51 Si
17 Washday fa
choice 52 Fi
18 Mardi Gras 53 S
luminary ru
19 Watched 54 S
carefully re
23 Lanolin 55 N
source llk
25 Proverb g
26 Hoedown
partner
29 Delicate hue
31 Scientist's 1 R
workplace a2
32 Comic 2 T
Philips 3 C
33 Isolated M


Commissioner
Craig Thompson's let-
ter was posted on the
conference's website
Tuesday.
It says the conference
finished among the top
five major college football
leagues in two of three cri-
teria used to determine if a


journal VIPs
ecurring
heme
ar-flung
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onogram
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end the
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ight locales
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seventh automatic bid will
be added for the last two
years of the current BCS
agreement.
Teams currently in
the MW have performed
well enough over the last
four years to allow the
league to request an auto-
matic bid.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


J AIIW BOLILMA
AKA ELSA VIAL
VIGI LANT ERMA
ANODES THREES
TRE ROD
MCCO Y TABOOS
PLAT 0000 ALE
G UN S .LOT OTIS
BEACON TASTE
SNAG BUS

U WIPING ELIDES

EDAM ENVISAGE

ELLA DEEP LGE

KEEL ELS ESP


Nerve network
Ancient Tokyo
"Final Four'
letters
Prickled
Sundial
numeral


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


12-14


9 Country hotel
10 Freud topic
11 Police raid
12 Highest point
16 Got dingy
18 Muddy the
waters
20 Sturdy lock
21 I say!
22 Cotillion
honorees
24 Viking name
25 Scored well
26 Rare minerals
27 In a frenzy
28 A - care!
30 Indigo dye
36 Neonate
38 Come forth
40 Lipstick
shades
42 Alpine peak
43 Realtor
44 For fear that
46 Memorable
times
47 "How've ya
-?,"
48 Sarcastic
retort
49 Jackie's
tycoon
50 Kind of
meditation
51 Herr, in
Madras


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


stroke back.
Risk matched par on both
sides to grab medalist hon-
ors with a 72. Montgomery
(75) was even with Risk
at the turn, but fell to sec-
ond with a 39 on the back
nine. Tom Elmore posted
a 77 and Bobby Simmons
checked in with a 79.
The L(A divided players
into foursomes for a better
ball match with a twist
One foursome counted
their scores only on even-
numbered holes and the
other counted their scores
only on odd-numbered
holes.
The team of Natalie
Bryant, Jayne Hope, Sally
Rivers and Rocky Roth
did their scoring when it
counted and took a close
decision over Cathy Steen,
Ann Bormolini, Dottie
Rogers and Anita West
The MGA 3 on 3, using
18 par 3 holes, is Saturday.
Three-man teams will be
chosen by blind draw at
7:30 a.m., followed by a
shotgun start


TAREOT
r7 / 1
_ / /












OUTDOORS


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers drops back to passluring the first half of an
NFL football game against the Oakland Raiders Sunday in Green Bay, Wis.



Marino's yards passing


record in jeopardy


By BARRY WILNER
Associated Press

NEW YORK Dan
Marino long ago moved to
the comfort of the broad-
cast booth. His passing
record of 5,084 yards, set in
1984, has ,withstood strong-
armed challenges for more
than a quarter-century.
It looks as if that record
is about to fall, and not at
the hands of one prolific
quarterback but as many
as four.
Drew Brees, who came
closest to it in 2009, falling
15 yards short, leads the
chase at 4,368 yards, fol-
lowed by Tom Brady with
4,273 and Aaron Rodgers
with 4,125. Imagine how"
Eli Manning feels having,
4,105,' yet' being fourth in
this lineup.
Only Marino and Brees
have reached 5,000 yards
passing in a season, yet all
four of these players figure
to get there if they remain in
the lineup. There's always
the chance the Packers will
rest Rodgers once they have
clinched home-field advan-
tage in the NFC playoffs,
.which could come with a
win this weekend at Kansas
City. Then again,. they do
have that undefeated thing
going, so maybe he won't
be seeing the sideline all
that much.
Brady's Patriots and
Brees' Saints are in a dif-
ferent situation. Both their
teams could need to win
the rest of the way to reach
as advantageous a postsea-
son position as possible.
Neither has clinched its
division, although New
Orleans owns at least a wild-
card spot in the NFC, and
one more victory gives New
England the AFC East.
Manning, barring injury,
won't be sitting out any-
thing with the-Giants need-
ing to sweep their final


three games to assure mak-
ing the playoffs.
Manning is playing with
an ease and confidence usu-
ally associated with, well,
Brady and Brees, recently
with Rodgers, and with that
guy in Indianapolis named
Peyton. Plus, he might need
to get to 5,000 yards to keep
the Giants in the champion-
ship mix.
"I don't ever feel pres-
sure when I'm playing
football," Manning said.
"I know my assignments,
I'm reading the defense, I
know my plays and I try to
make plays and try to get
the ball into my receivers'
hands and let them do their
job. It's exciting, it's fun.
I'm competitive and I'm out
there doing what I can to
get a win."
So, gentlemen, let 'er rip.
"For, me, I haven't really
thought about the 300-yard
games or the necessary
(pace) to do that or anything
like that. I just think about
doing whatever it takes to
win," Brees has said. He's
already been through this
pursuit, so unlike the other
three, this is not uncharted
territory for Brees.
"It seemed like this is
one of those crazy years
where teams are throwing
it a lot I think as the year
goes on situations changes.
Some people stay on pace
and others don't"
Four have stayed on
pace.
This is the first season
with at least three quar-
terbacks passing for more
than 4,000 yards through
Week 14. There also have
been a league-record 14
400-yard passing games,
led by Manning with three;
Marino holds the record
with four in '84.
The reasons for such
prolific passing numbers
'are many. Start with the
lockout, which prevent-


ed defenses from putting
together and mastering the
complex schemes that slow
the aerial game. For most of
the schedule, offenses have
been ahead of defenses, and
some of those leaky pass
defenses (Packers, Patriots,
Saints, Giants) 'belong to
division leaders. It's not just
the tailenders who can't
cover receivers.
Weather also has helped
- rarely have we seen the
wind, rain or cold that mess
up passing attacks.
"If it snows, it is better.
It helps your footing as a
receiver compared to the
defensive back," says Cris
Carter, a semifinalist for
the Pro Football Hall of
Fame this year and fourth
on the career receptions
list. "The greatest effect is
the wind and the tempera-
ture. When you get below
zero and have the wind,
those are the things that
hinder the passing game
most"
Those things have
not occurred through 14
weeks.
The rules also help pass-
ing as quarterbacks and
receivers get the benefit of
the doubt on penalty calls,
which makes defenders
gun-shy.
Finally, colleges are train-
ing quarterbacks in ways
that fit the pro style much
better than they ever did.
A Cam Newton .or Andy
Dalton can step right in dur-
ing the 2011 season and
have an impact, just as a
Ben Roethlisberger or Matt
Ryan or Sam Bradford have
done in recent years, and
pile up the yards.
Unquestionably, the NFL
has become a pass-first
league. It might not be too
long before 5,000-yard sea-
sons are the norm and peo-
ple are wondering what was
the big deal about Marino's
record.


Spurrier's contract at SC

extended through 2015


SAssociated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -
South Carolina has extend-
ed football coach Steve
Spurrier's contract through
the 2015 season, the school
said Tuesday.
The board of trustees
approved the two-year
extension.
Spurrier says he appre-
ciates having four years
remaining on his contract,
which he says will help as
he recruits athletes by let-
ting them know he will be
around for their collegiate
career.
"Our football program is
headed in the right direc-
tion," 'Spurrier said in a
statement. "We've had
some success and have had


some good things happen
here, but winning the SEC
is one goal we have not
yet reached. We hope and
believe we can do that in
the next four years."
South Carolina is 10-2
this season, and could set a
school record for wins with
a victory over Nebraska in
the Capital One Bowl in
Orlando, Fla., on Jan. 2.
The 6-2 mark in the
Southeastern Conference
is the best since the school
joined the league. This
year's victory over Clemson
was the third consecutive
over the archrival Tigers,
the first time South Carolina
has accomplished that since
1970.
Spurrier is 54-35 in seven
seasons, ranking second on


the all-time wins list behind
only Rex Enright, who had
64 victories.
"The accomplishments
that have transpired under
Coach Spurrier's leadership
are exemplary," athletics
director Eric Hyman said.
While there is no raise
included in the extension,
Spurrier received a signifi-
cant raise when the board
revised his contract in
April.
Spurrier earns $2.8 mil-
lion this year, rising to
$2.9 million for the 2012
season and $3 million in
2013. None of those fig-
ures include incentives for
accomplishments such as
reaching a bowl game or
winning a conference or
national championship.


Florida black bear ... a

conversation success story


By KATHY BARCO
FWC Chairman
his is my first
column as
Chairman of
the Florida
Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC). I
thought it appropriate to
start my conversation with
you by sharing our
success story of the
FWC's threatened
species rule for Florida
black bears.
In the early 1970s,
Florida black bears
dropped to their
lowest numbers on record;
estimates were as few as
300 bears statewide. Our
predecessor agency, the
Florida Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission,
stepped in and selected
the Florida black bear
as one of the first listed
threatened species in
1974, adding more
protection to bears and
their habitat
But adding bears to a
list alone does not recover
a species.
The FWC and its -
partners identify
important wildlife habitats
and work with private
landowners to keep those
lands in conservation,
whether through
easements and
agreements through our
Landowner Assistance
Program, or purchases
through programs like
Florida Forever.
Statewide educational
efforts teach thousands
of people each year
about bears and how to
avoid conflicts. Formal
education programs like


Photo courtesy of Monty Stephens
Night time photo of a male black bear in Osceola National
Forest using a trail camera with LEDs.


The Florida Black Bear
Curriculum Guide bring
bear issues directly into
the schools, and informal
efforts occur through
FWC staff time spent
engaging the public at
festivals and community
events.
The FWC passed a rule
that made feeding bears
illegal, allowing us to.
focus on the core cause
of human-bear conflicts.
All of those efforts have
allowed us to bring the
bear back to about 3,000
animals today.
In fall 2010, the FWC
led a team of experts to
review all the data
available on Florida black
bears to see if bears met
the criteria to be
considered at high risk
of extinction. The team
found that the bear rio
longer met those
criteria, and five additional
external species experts
reviewed the report and
agreed with the team's
recommendation to
remove it from the
threatened species list.
In June, FWC staff
presented their
recommendations on


the bear and 60 other
threatened species. As
my colleague and former
Chairman Rodney Barreto
said, it was "a time to
celebrate our success."
We have more bears
in Florida now than we
have had in the past seven
decades, and the bear is
well on its way to being
removed from the
threatened species list
Our work to manage
Florida's black bear is
a continuing process. A
team of FWC staff has "
been working diligently
with stakeholder groups to
create a management plan
for bears. A revised plan
is expected to be brought
to the February 2012
Commission meeting.
The bear's success is
an example of what our
threatened species rule is
designed to do:
identify species that need
our attention, act to
conserve the species, and
bring them back so that
they will never be at risk
of extinction again.

* Kathy Barco is Chairman of ,
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation CommisSion.


Stay on target with ammo


By MONTY STEPHENS
Special to the Reporter

Recently I was
invited to hunt
at a hunting
club in Georgia.
After three
days of hunting and
seeing nothing, my chance
came and I missed a
97-yard broadside shot.
' I conjured up lots of
excuses, like there was a
twig in the way. OK, that
was my only excuse.
The next day, on the
final morning of the hunt,
I missed an 84-yard shot.
Now I'm in a state of
shock, and suspecting
foul play. Foul play like ...
someone tinkered with my
scope.
When I returned to
Lake City, I promptly hit
the range. Three shots
later at 100 yards, I could
not find a hole in the
target. After firing several
rounds at a bigger and
closer target, I finally
found a bullet hole 22
inches low at 50 yards.
Great adjustments were
made to the elevation and
now the rounds were
hitting 12 inches low, then
10 inches high, then low,
then high, etc.
It's now clear my scope
is malfunctioning.
Glad I never publicly
accused anyone of
sabotage.
I lamented my story to


several knowledgeable
hunters who remarked
something like, "It's not
the scope, it's your ammo ,
- same,.thing happened
to me. You shoot cheap,
ammo and it's not
accurate. Try the
premium, handmade,
top-shelf ammo that I
use."
Good advice, but I've
shot cheap ammo all
my life and to my way
of thinking $20 factory
ammo is not cheap. But
what I got out of this was
"ammo challenge."
' The challenge started
with purchasing four
boxes of 30-06 ammo.
Three were in the $20
range and one box was
$48. Brand names were
not important, but
suffice it to say they were
all from big name
companies in the firearms
or ammo industry.
I also reloaded 20
rounds with quality
components and brought
along a handful of surplus
W.W. II full metal jacket
ammo.
A different scope was
installed for the challenge.
I used the reloads to
dial in the scope and was
happy with 2-inch groups
that favored slightly high
and left at 100 yards.
The $20 factory rounds
stayed within the 2-inch
groups and had 3-4 flyers
that struck 3-5 inches off


center.
I attributed those shots
to me.
The premium ammo did
perform well and had two
rounds that nearly
overlapped each other, but
did not better the
established 2-inch group.
Rifle support was rather
meager and consisted of
an old blanket placed on
the bench for a pad.
With proper support,
I'm sure I could make
improvements.
The surplus ammo was
surprising in one sense,
it had no misfires. Recoil
was rather mild in this
50-plus-year-old ammo that
could not achieve anything
less than a 4-inch group.
The conclusion of this
informal, loosely
structured, unscientific
research project was price
doubling does not mean
accuracy will double. Buy
the premium ammo when
the very best is needed,
but keep in mind
marksmanship depends
on many variables.
Important dates:
general gun season
on private lands ends
Jan. 22;
spring turkey season
on private land opens
March 17 and ends
April 22.

Monty Stephens is an avid
hunter and fisherman who
lives in Lake City.


Florida Trail Association news


From staff reports

The Florida Trail Association's new
trail staff members are Guy Duffner, Eric
Mason, Sean Ogle, and Elizabeth Slack.
These professionals are working to
enhance our trail program and to assist
our volunteers with trail projects. These
four staff are based in the Florida National
Scenic Trail field office in Tallahassee.
Several F-Troop projects for the Spring
2012 trail season have been scheduled.
We are coordinating project details with


section leaders and agency partners and
will have more information and a link for
each project in the upcoming weeks.
We are working on additional F-Troop
projects and Alternative Break Crews
Check the website at www.f-troop.org.
Scheduled F-Troop projects:
Jan. 13-21, Juniper Wilderness;
Jan. 24-25, Leave No Trace Trainer
Course;
Feb. 2-5, Bradwell Bay Backcountry
Log Out & Crosscut Saw Certification;
Feb. 17-25, Big Cypress.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Page EdItor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


DILBERT

WE HAVE A SAFETY
PROBLEM AT OUR
ELBONIAN FACTORY.


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DEAR ABBY


Mother in law's scanty clothes

get dressing-down from wife


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WE'RE GETTING
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| NESS. THEY DON'T
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CAUSING IT.



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SEE!
///


-


HOROSCOPES


ARIES. (March 21-April
19): You are on the right
track mentally, emotionally
and financially, but you
have to take better care of
yourself physically. Make
sure you get rest and avoid
any activities that have the
potential to lead to injury.

TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Overly emotional
actions will bring the same
in return. You have to*
monitor what you do and
say if you want to get
things accomplished. Put
your energy into doing
something constructive.
Set an example and you
will gain respect. **
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): Do your best to
please those around you.
Planning festive events
that bring people together
will enharice your relation-
ships with your business
and personal friends. Fix
up your home to reflect
your mood. Your sug-
gestions will be inspired.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Put a push behind the
things you have to finish
before the year ends. It's
important to work hard
and show your value to
the people around you. A
change will favor you and
your position. Apply for
better jobs or advance-
ment. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Show everyone how things
are done. You'll shine if
you step into the limelight.
Socializing with colleagues
will allow you to network
with people who can influ-
ence your future. Your
ideas will impress and
interest someone impor-
tant ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Be careful how you
approach sensitive issues.
Not everyone will feel the
same way you do. Focus
on appreciating the ones
you love. Shopping will
lead to some good pur-
chases, but be careful not
to spend more than you
can afford. *** 3
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Use your imagination
to get ahead. The ideas
you share now will help
you advance in the future.
Your abilities to initiate
change and to teach and
learn from being a team
player will separate you
from the crowd. ****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You may know what
you want to accomplish,
but an emotional con-
flict will hold you back if
allowed to spin out of con-
trol. If change is needed,
you must be willing to


make the adjustments
quickly so you can move
on without worry. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Make altera-
tions at home or to the
way you live that will save
money and ease stress.
Taking care of paperwork
will help you get set for
the new year. A good idea
will bring great response
from family and friends. -

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Expect to have
visitors sharing your space.
Open your doors to friends
and family and you will be
given all sorts of excellent
suggestions for some of the
issues that have been both-
ering you. Favors will be
granted. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Let your emo-
tions out. Share your
thoughts and your game
plan for the future. Not
only will you receive the
help you need, you'll also
find comfort in knowing
that you don't have to do *
things alone. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't argue when
understanding is required.
Listen attentively and
offer what you can to ease
someone's stress. Love is
in the stars,. nd planning a
special evening with some-
one you fancy will enhance
your relationship. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: N equals H
"BK'J X JBSG AM YZCBALDBKF TNZG
FAH rCZYAGJ.KDXKZ SDXKBKHCZ TBKN
YACZDXKBAG." DAUZDKA UZGBSGB


Previous Solution: "It's fine to celebrate success, but it is more important to
heed the lessons of failure." Bill Gates
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-14


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS

Hq DONT I [
I 600V DTAIX


I CAN'T... I JUST CAN'T..,


I HAT tELFFORNOT HAVING
N006 NERVE TO TALK TO HER!


WJELL,THAT 1iT EXACTLq
TRUE.,I HATE MYSELF FOR A
LOT OF OTHER REAON$,TOO..


DEAR ABBY: I am an
educated woman in my
late 20s. I have been mar-
ried for several years to
a wonderful man, and we
were recently blessed with
our first child.
Since our wedding,
my relationship with my
mother-in-law has been
an evolving one. Since the
inception of "Desperate
Housewives" on TV, she
seems to believe she's a
character on the show. She
trots around in revealing,
clothing looking like a
streetwalker. She spends
most of her time gossiping
with her newfound bud-
dies who are half her age,
and who seem to delight,
in dressing her up to make
her the talk of the town.
As a little girl, when I
dreamed of how my life
would be as a married
woman, it was never like
this. My dreams never
included a MIL who
enjoys seeing people look
at her in disbelief as she
struts across the room. I
don't want this to be an
example for my daughter.
Confronting her doesn't
work she responds with
guilt and mockery. In.
other words, she always
wins. I'm at a loss and
have given up trying to
figure her out. Please
help. DESPERATE
HOUSEWIFE
DEAR DESPERATE: As
an educated woman, ifs
time for you to smarten up
and accept your mother-


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com.
in-law for the "character"
she is warts and all. You
were wrong to expect her
to fulfill the fantasy role
you created for her. She's
not ready to do it and she
may never be.
The way she dresses
will not influence your
daughter; you will do that.
Your mother-in-law's attire
is a reflection only on her,
not you. Remember that. If
she is so youthful in spirit
that she has been accepted
by a younger group of
women, stop judging her
and perhaps even learn
from it. She's not over the
hill yet. So stop trying to
push her there, and you'll
both be happier.

DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band, "Joe," and I have
been married for 12 years.
I have a daughter from a
previous marriage and he
has a son from a previous
relationship. My daughter
is married and lives in
another state.
My 22-year-old stepson,
"Junior," lives with us. He
has a history of drug and
alcohol abuse and has sto-
len from us. I recently dis-
covered that another item


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


of mine was missing. I told
Joe .it has to stop that I
can't live like a prisoner
in my own home. Joe will
not kick Junior out of the
house. Joe said HE would
leave, but that he won't put
Junior out on the street
like a dog.
Our marriage was solid
until Junior's problems
started a year ago. I'd
never ask my husband
to make a choice. Junior
is his son. I, on the other
hand, feel like a stranger
in my own home. We
barely speak now and
have been sleeping in
separate rooms. I am at a
loss. Abby, have you any
advice? STRANGER IN
MY OWN HOME
DEAR STRANGER:
Yes. You and your hus-
band should consult a
therapist who specializes
in treating addictions.
Your husband loves his
son, but he is enabling
him to continue using
by turning a blind eye
to his stealing and not
enforcing consequences.
Sometimes love has to be
tough. Because your mar-,
riage has deteriorated to
the point that you no lon-
ger speak or share a bed-
room, recognize that you
must look out for your
own welfare because your
husband seems unwilling
or unable to.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.












um ia,

Your marketplace source for Lake City and


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


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Columbia County


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Hospice facility to mark 5 years


From staff reports
The Haven Hospice Suwannee
River Care Center was built nearly
five years ago and officials are plan-
ning to celebrate the center's anniver-
sary in January.
However, Haven Hospice has been
providing residents of this area with
services for decades.
Carolyn Long, Haven Hospice
volunteer coordinator, said Haven
Hospice has been serving Columbia
County for more than 30 years.
Haven Hospice provides end-of-
life care, and those services revolve
around pain and symptom manage-
ment; bereavement services for fami-
lies, school systems and businesses;
spiritual support and volunteer ser-
vices.
Located at 1637 West U.S. Highway
90, the Haven Hospice Suwannee
River Care Center is constructed
with two wings, each of which has
eight rooms. All the rooms are pri-
vate.
Haven Hospice is currently in the
midst of a volunteer recruitment
campaign to increase its number of
volunteers.
'The volunteers go in and they sit
with patients," Long said. "We're try-
ing to recruit volunteers in this area
because our census has gone up so
much and I have so many requests
for volunteers to come into the home
to sit with a patient so the caregiver
can run errands or just take a break.
That kind of volunteer service is very
meaningful. You get to go in and get to
know somebody and share in their life.
Especially at this time a lot of people
like to do a lot of life review and talk
about who they are, what they did...."


Long said Haven Hospice also has
a veterans program where veterans
go into the homes and pin another
veteran and thank them for service to
the country.
Haven Hospice's mission is:
"Honoring life by providing comfort,
care and compassion to those we
serve."
Haven Hospice serves 18 North
Central Florida counties. The Lake
City team serves six counties. The
Lake City Haven Hospice team has
close to 100 volunteers and approxi-
mately 80 staff members at its care
center, including nurses, a chaplain,
social workers and others that work
in the field.
The Haven Hospice census aver-
age is about 130 patients served
annually and there is a 16-bed patient
care facility that is normally at capac-
ity throughout the year.
"The care center is not like a nurs-
ing home, it's not like a hospital, but
ifts a very homely environment and
people feel comfortable being there,"
Long said.
She said another aspect of the
homely atmosphere at the care cen-
ter is that is was built with plenty of
contributions from the community.
"Five years ago when we built the
care center we had a capital cam-
paign and it was put here by this
community," Long said. "The land
was donated and there are a lot of
plaques on the walls where differ-
ent people made major donations in
order to have a naming opportunity.
People came in and volunteered
decorating the rooms and they even
paid for the things in the room."


TOP: Haven Hospice
staff and employees
Lori Watson (back row
from left), Sandie Danko,
Vanessa Rentz, Lynwood
Walters, Shaleda Mirra,
Ethel Hazelwood and-
Carolyn Long and Cheryl
Whigham (front row,
kneeling) and Polly
Tyler. RIGHT: Selena
Cameron (from left)
Haven Hospice patient
care manager, talks to
Bethany Pierce and Jody
Waldron about a pending
patient admission.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


I BUY I


ISELL


[INDI14TTi


4 lines 6 days aine $ a25 I
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totllng $500 or ss.


Each Item must lude a price.
This Is a non-refundable rate



One Item per ad iI rO
4 lines 6 days $ah additional
Rate applies to private 1 ndviduals ling


personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or less
Each Item must Include a price.




One Item per ad
T i line $1.15






4 lines 6 days tin 01.5 ens
Rate applies to private Indviduas lling
personal merchandise totellng 1000 or less.
Each Item must Include a price.







One I ntem peread a .
4 lines 6 days ach additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
peRona merchandise total ling $4, 000 or ess.
Each Item must Include a price


One eom per ad $30 0
4 lines 6 days Each additional
. Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $6,000 or less.
Each Item must Include a price
Iah This Is a no-reoundable rate..


Glarag


43des$ 1750

inclu des 2 Signsi Edr ldmanel line 1.65


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday Insertion.


You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00'
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com




Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mn., 10:00a.m. Mon.,900a.m.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00am. Mon.,9:00 a.m.
Thursday Wed., 10:00 am. Wed., 9:h0a.m.
Friday Thurs., 10:00 a.m. Thurs.,9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fri., 9:00 am.
Sunday Fri., 10:00 a.m. Fri., 9:00 am.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.



Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor .for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language' must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
wWWi.likecityreporter.com


Legal

INVITATION TO BID
BID NO. 2011-U
CORRUGATED METAL PIPE
Please be advised that Columbia
County desires to accept bids on the
above referenced items.
Bids will be accepted through 2:00
P.M. on December 22, 2011. All bids
submitted shall be on the form pro-
vided.
Specifications and bid forms may be
obtained by contacting the office of
the Board of County Commissioners,
Columbia County, 135 NE Hemando
Street Room 203, Lake City, Florida
32056-1529 or by calling (386) 719-
2028. Columbia County reserves the
right to reject any and/or all bids and
to accept the bid in the County's best
interest.
Dated this 7th day of, December
2011.
Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners
Scarlet Frisina, Chairperson
05529421
December 7, 14, 2011
Public Auction
Will be held by. Gainey Automotive,
Inc, in Columbia County at 3468
S.W CR 138, Fort White, Fl. 32038
Date 12/27/2011
Time: 8:00 A.M.
2001 Dodge
Vinm# 1B7HF13Y01J291619
05529559
December 14,2011

020 Lost & Found
Found Gray Dog.
Call to identify.
386-752-7374, 386-984-7333 or-
352-264-8168 Leave message.
FOUND: Saturday night. US 90
on Ramp to 1-75 (1) wrapped
package. 386-965-0485 and
describe if it's yours.
LOST PYGMY GOAT, Fri. 12/9,
between Peacock Terrace/Price
Creek Rd. & 252. Male, Rust Col-
or, very friendly, 386-961-9188
100 Job
Opportunities.
,05529509
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
Columbia County_
Columbia County is accepting
applications for Equipment
Operator I, Public Works.
Position's primary responsibility
is skilled work in the operation
of several types of automotive
vehicles and mobile motorized
equipment. Light maintenance
of vehicles and equipment
operated. Operates or drives a
dump truck, participates in the
loading and unloading of
materials. Minimum Experi-
ence: High School education or
G.E.D. preferred and one year
experience in vehicle and or
equipment operation, or an
equivalent combination of
training and experience. Valid
Fl CDL Class B Drivers License
required within the first ninety
(90) days of initial employment.
Salary is $9.55 per hr. plus
benefits. Successful applicant
must pass pre-employment
physical & drug screening.
Applications may be obtained at
the Human Resources
Office or online at,
www.columbiacountyfla.com,
Board of County Commission-
ers, 135 NE Hernando Ave.,
Suite 203. Lake City, FL 32055,
(386) 719-2025, TDD (386)
758-2139. Deadline: 12/30/11.
Columbia County is an
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

Fairfield Inn by Marriott
Looking for a Career not a job
Now hiring for Front desk PM and
Night audit
Apply at 538 SW Corporate Drive
FT Position Office Clerk for Ma-
chine Shop, Computer skills need-
ed, Wide range of duties etc.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg
174 NE Cortez Terrace
AP/AR, Estimating, order entry
Legal Secretary/Paralegal
Position for Civil Litigation.
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
send resumes to:
iniurvattorneys(Byahoo.com
Looking for exp. plumber for serv-
ice work and wide range of duties.
Must be dependable and some
weekends are a must. Please fax
resume to 386-752-5613 or e-mail
to leah(S)dependableplumbing.net
Looking for physically Fit and out-
going individuals with clean driv-
ing & clean criminal history. Call
386-752-2112 Mon. Fri. 8a-5p.
P/T housekeeper needed for
medical practice M-F.
Please fax resume to
386-487-1232.






Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services


100 Job
v100 Opportunities
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, MB 1000084 Apply online
at: www.dsisecurity.com

120 Medical
120 Employment

05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

240 Schools &
SEducation
05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-01/09/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/16/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
4 CKC Registered Toy Poodle
puppies. Ready Christmas Eve.
$500. ea. Up to date on shots.
386-719-4808
PUBLISHER'S NOTE.
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
VINTAGE SOFA
Excellent condition. <
$65.00 obo
386-487-5922

/411 Machinery &
4 Tools
10 INCH Craftman Miter
Compound Saw. New in Box.
Never opened. $195.00.
386-487-5922
Air Compressor, Craftsman,
125psi, upright tank;
good condition $110.
Call 386 963-4560
Generator, 5000 watt,
used twice,
good condition $325.
Call 386 963-4560
Shop Vac, large,
6hp, Sears, just
replaced filter $45
Call 386 963-4560

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

430 Garage Sales
Fri & Sat. 8-3 Hwy 247, right on
242, right on Mcguire Terr. Look
for signs. Electrical.saws, lots of
various tools, doors, nails, & more.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
6 gal gas tank,
like new $7.
Call 386 963-4560

Coleman cot, like new $20.
Twin size pop up bed,
Eddie Bauer, $20.
Call 386 963-4560
Quilt, king size, Lone Star pattern,
rose and teal on ivory background.
Excellent condition. Original price
$1500 asking $800. 386-963-4560
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call Saturday.

450 Good Things
to ( Eat


4 0 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.
630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2 & 3 br/lba Mobile Homes for
Rent. CH/A includes water, sewer,
garbage. $475./ $525. mo. 1st &
last mo + $300 dep. 386-961-8466
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832 ext 210
All 2011's Must Go!
All Homes at Dead cost! Save up
To $10,000. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville. (352)872-5566
Land and Home Packages
for Mobile homes and modular
homes. No Money down if you
own your land. 100 mile radius.
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566


Set your si9
on somt. eth
O.nimfiif *SBS^^BB
BO *r^r|


6 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale'
We Need Used Mobile Homes!
Will buy or trade. Top Dollar Paid.
North Point Homes.
(352)872-5566

Mobile Home
650 & Land
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
.Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626



its


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
*386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! Ibr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


SITEL
Apply in person or online

A. kl '


Featuring SouTthern c

& Country Musici


Friday Night, December 16th

Enjoy Story Telling

Christmas Card Scrooge: John B


The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420


A2Z of Lake City, Inc. Avail.
Dec 1. Prof. House Cleaning Svcs.
Employees: Fingerprinted, Drug
screen & Bonded. 386-752-5655


* ADvantage


/


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $350mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$500mo. 1st, last & security.
386-752-0335
Monday -Friday 8A-4P
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposi,
386-752-3225
4 BR/2 BA in town, good neigh-
borhood, fenced yard, fireplace, no
pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.,
386-755-6916.
Available Immediately.
Rent To Own 3br/2ba home
In quiet subdivision.
386-752-5035 X 3113
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
For Rent with Option to Buy.
4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
Gorgeous Lake View 2br
Apartment. Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep..
386-344-2170
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
'$600 mo, and
$600 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

750 Business &
SOffice Rentals

05529267
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515
For Rent or Lease: Former Doc-
tors office, Former professional
office & Lg open space: avail on
East Baya Ave. Competitive rates.
Weekdays 386-984-0622
evenings/weekends 497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/1 yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144-or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500

805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
'housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living witl parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
, telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba DW, 10.16 acres S of
Columbia City.Fully fenced with
workshed & barn. 2nd well, tank,
& pole on site. (727)289-2172
820 Farms &
Acreage
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

870 Real Estate
Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale
2010 HONDA ACCORD LX
Blue w/Grey interior. One owner.
23,000 miles. $21.800.
Call 386-292-5763

9n51 Recreational
951 Vehicles
1993 JAYCO 5th wheel. 26 1/2
feet. Well kept. Everything works.
Owner is Non-smoker $3,700
386-755-0110

We're on target!


ADVERTISE YOUR

GARAGE SALE
WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER
Only

$175o

4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS I.

(386) 755-5440


---O- -- -








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-S555
.If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




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To et ou


Vehcl Sld


Lake City Reporter
lakecityreporter.com CURRENTS mgatin,
Subscribe Today
386-755-5445


Classified Department: 755-5440






LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2011


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CZ Jewelry *

UNCONDONAL OFF TIME GUARANTEE
.... UNCONDITIONAL LIFETIME GUARANTEE i


386-466-1888On All Blue Luster
1034 SW Main Blvd., (next to tle Money Man)Lake City, F 3205


North Florida pecan

Raw Halves, Raw Pieces
Gourmet Praline Bags
1 Ib. Bags
Chocolate Pecans
Gift Baskets
3140 NW US Hwy 41Lake City4* 5-


Company


Large Selection of Soap Fragraines
(ask fn 'or Vor[rt\'(Ia 4it.; .'ntl


We do favors for:
Weddings. Baby Sho'wers
(and all occasional
Soaps
DOog Mechanic
Coffee & Monograinlmed


New line of purses have been added
Holiday 275 N. a nrin Avenue
(3M)a 243-8298
Silk arrangernents D,.niow-n nrt to I'kowans
Olt-n r iiF.Jv-s ti lrday
Ask about Gift Certificates ,monao lhl o ('wnrr


ountree Moore Toyota Bucks Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks


Kt5 TOYOTA
Please- preseri Rounlre
Mcc.re Toyota Buc at31
limre of purchase Nc. cash
value Nro reproduclion.'
ot me Rountree Moore
Toyota Buchs is allo-.ed
Not valid Alth any olrier
coupon One coupon per
customer Fee- ta'
& shop supplies not
included

S -IS7


10% OFF


SERVICE
Expires 12/31/11
Not Legal Tender
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pATimEae55 mimoRIes
Zebra Ottoman

kI Small'$59 each 4
J/ arge 19 each-' .
386-466-1888
(' 1034 SW Main Blvd. (next to the Money Man) Lake City, FL 32055 7


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Classified Department: 755-5440