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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01721
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 11, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01721
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




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Reporter


Sunday, December I I, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 267 E $ 1.00


Live Oak

resident

among 3

killed in

collision

From staff reports
Three people, including a
Live Oak man, died Friday
night in a head-on collision
in Gilchrist County.
According to a Florida
Highway Patrol report,
a 1993 Chevrolet pick-
up driven by David M.
Pimental, 56, of Live Oak,
was headed north on U.S.
129 in the southbound lane
and struck a 1996 Pontiac
Grand Prix with two occu-
pants at 10:22 p.m.
All three occupants
of the two vehicles were
*declared dead at the scene
by Gilchrist County E.M.S.
The driver and passen-
ger in the Grand Prix were
identified as Billy Ray
Pumphrey, 52, of Trenton
and Douglas Wayne
Burns, 43, of Newberry.


A second

chance for

youngsters

in trouble

Program will keep
minor offenses
off their records.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
The Columbia County'
Sheriff's Office will
soon launch a program
designed to give juve-
nile offenders accused of
minor offenses a chance
to clear their records.
The Civil Citation pro-
gram will be implemented
'in local secondary schools
this week, said Columbia
County Sheriff Mark
Hunter. The program will
be administered by school
resource officers.
'"We're going to start this
as a pilot
program
at the
schools
to get the
program
in place
and to
Hunter see how
it works," Hunter said. "If
it's successful we're going
to spread it out to the rest of
the deputies."
The Civil Citation pro-
gram, established by the
Florida Legislature this
year, is a "second chance"
program for juveniles
caughtcommittingless seri-
ous crimes. Participation
by sheriffs offices state-
wide is voluntary.
"This allows us to cite
that juvenile with a civil
citation in lieu of making
a physical arrest," said
Sgt. Ed Seifert, Columbia
County Sheriff's Office
public information officer.
Once the citation is
issued, it is sent to the
Florida Department of
Juvenile Justice, which will
establish terms of proba-
tion for the juvenile. The
maximum is 50 hours of
community service. Once
completed, the juvenile's
record will be expunged.
JUVENILES continued on 7A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White resident Karen Mullins
embraces her husband, Delbert,
who began smoking marijuana
for chronic pain and nausea after
Medicare quit paying for Marinol, a
synthetic form of the drug.



Man's


pain may


lead to


prison

Arrested for marijuana
after Medicare stopped
paying for substitute.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Delbert Mullins doesn't consid-
er himself a criminal even though
he faces multiple felony charges
for possessing and growing mari-
juana.
Mullins, a totally disabled 62-
year-old Vietnam-era veteran, was
arrested Aug. 10 after law enforce-
ment officials conducting a multi-
agency aerial survey spotted mari-
juana growing at his Fort White
home.
According to a Columbia County
Sheriff's Office arrest report,
when investigators arrived at his
home, Mullins voluntarily. showed
them the location of two marijuana
plants growing in his back yard,
three small plants in seeding trays
on a table, the stalks from 15
marijuana plants and eight plastic
gallon bags containing marijuana
leaves.
Mullins was charged with two
felonies, manufacturing a con-
trolled substance and possession
of more than 20 grams of cannabis,
as well as a misdemeanor charge,
possession of drug paraphernalia.
He has a Dec. 19 status hearing in
Columbia County Circuit Court.
Roberta Getzan, assistant state
attorney, said a number of things
typically happen during a status
hearing. It's possible a plea agree-
ment could be reached or a trial
date is set. Getzan, who is not the
prosecutor in this case, said court
officials cannot comment about
specific cases until after they are
resolved.'
Mullins, a first-time drug offend-
er, faces a maximum five years for
each of the felony charges and one
year for the misdemeanor.
"That is not an indicator on what
he will receive," Getzan said. "If he
pleas, it's up to the judge to con-
sider the sentence."
Mullins said he first began smok-
ing marijuana earlier this year
after his Part B Medicare declined
coverage for the prescription drug
Marinol after covering the cost for
more than a decade.
The drug, is a synthetic form
of THC the active ingredient in
marijuana. Marinol was one of the
drugs prescribed to help Mullins
* deal with chronic pain and nausea
from arthritis and severe neck and
back injuries sustained in several
car wrecks, including one where
he was struck by a drunk driver
traveling at 90 mph, he said.
After his Marinol prescription
MULLINS continued on 3A


30 TONS OF FUN


ABOVE: Dalton Williams
(left), 10, sneaks up on
Isaiah Cox, 8, as he tries
to make a snow angel in a
mound of ice Saturday dur-
ing Snow Day at Olustee
Park in downtown Lake
City. RIGHT: One-year-old
Ronnajah Ross sticks out
her tongue as she glides
down a 60-foot-long snow
slide for five seconds of
fun during Snow Day. See
more Snow Day photos,
Page 5A.


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


The white stuff along with some

very happy kids was everywhere.


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com

T ay Irving grew up in North Carolina,
so seeing snew is no'big deal to him.
But his son Micah "Paco" Irving
had never seen the white stuff in per-
son before his father brought him to
Olustee Park in downtown Lake City on Saturday
for Snow Day. And Paco and thousands of other
children at the daylong event couldn't get enough
of it.
He joined other children who waited to slide
down man-made ramps of snow or go into a
fenced-in area where they could make snow angels
or toss snowballs at each other.
Being a typical 8-year-old, Paco didn't hesitate
when asked what he liked best.
"I liked throwing snow at people," he said.


Tay Irving said he brought his son to the event
to let him experience the same type of fun he had
playing in snow as a youth.
"It's been 10 years since I've seen snow," he
said. "Seeing it here, I miss it."
Machines that created 30 tons of man-made
snow at the park arrived at 5:30 a.m. By 9 a.m.,
when Snow Day officially opened, slides were
erected, children's bounce houses were inflated
and vendors set up their food booths.
Dennille Folsom, director of the Lake City/
Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, said this
was the second year her organization sponsored
the event with the support of the business com-
munity.
"This event attracts so many people throughout
the region," Folsom said. "We've never had so

SNOW continued on 3A


... and it was all capped by a parade


The 1st Street Music & Sound Co. float, pictured here, took top honors in this year's Christmas parade. See
more parade photos, Page 6A.


1 i84264 CU21 8


s-sx*

CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


65
Isolated showers
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................ 4A
Business ................ I C
Obituaries ....... ...... 6A
Advice.................. 3D
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
New econ chief
is on the job.


COMING
TUESDAY
Local news
roundup.









2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011



atc- (CA$H3A 4 ,

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
3-6-13-34 3 2-9-24-29-33 Afternoon: 2-6-7 Afternoon: 2-8-1-6 N/A N/A
Evening: N/A Evening: N/A


AROUND FLORIDA


Cell-phone video captures mom shooting son-in-law


MIAMI A cell phone
video captured a copfron-
tation between a South
Florida man and his
mother-in-law charged
with attempted first-degree
murder for shooting at
him outside her Broward
County home, authorities
said.
"I can't believe you did
that," Salvatore Miglino,
39, of Boca Raton, is heard
yelling in the video. "I
can't believe you shot me."
His estranged mother-
in-law, 66-year-old Cheryl
Hepner, was arrested
Thursday. She was being
held Saturday in jail kith-
out bond.
Her attorney said
Hepner was only protect-
ing her grandson and
daughter, who live with
her but were not home at
the time.
"I can't imagine that she
would go out and purchase
a gun and have some ulte-
rior motive," said attorney
Michael Tenzer.
Hepner fired three shots
at Miglino on Wednesday,
according to authorities,
striking him in his rib cage
and shoulder. Miglino was
treated and later released
from a hospital.
Hepner is heard in a 911
call telling a different side
of the story, telling the
operator that Miglino "had
me down on the floor, on
the ground" and pulled the
gun on her first outside
her home in Tamarac.
"I tried to grab the gun
and shoot," Hepner said.
Hepner, who was not


injured, told the operator
that the gun belonged to
Miglino. The Broward
Sheriff's Office, though,
said investigators had
not yet determined who
owned the gun.
The recording captured
on Miglino's cell phone
does not show the actual
shooting. Only their con-
versation, followed by
several gunshots, can be'
heard on the video.
Miglino pulled up to
the house to pick up his
son, per a court order
that authorizes him to
take custody of the child
every Wednesday night,
according to a sheriff's
office report. Hepner met
him outside with the boy's
pillow and bag and told
Miglino that his father-in-
law wanted to talk to him
inside, the report said.
Miglino declined to go
inside and asked for the
boy's belongings. Hepner
then pulled a handgun out
from behind the pillow
and fired three shots at
Mignilio, he told investiga-
tors.
Miglino landed on top
of her to stop her from
shooting again, said sher-
iff's office spokeswoman
Dani Moschella. The gun
jammed, "so that may
have been the reason
she stopped shooting,"
Moschella said. The video,
she added, "corroborates
his story."
"I caught it on video on .
my cell phone because I
knew something stupid
was going to happen,"


Miglino is heard telling a
911 operator.
Tensions have been
high between Miglino and
his estranged wife for over
a year. The two have been
in better divorce proceed-
ings, fighting over the
boy's visitation schedule,
records show.
"All he wants is quality
time with his son," said
Miglino's family law attor-
ney Andrea Gundersen,
who also dismissed accu-
sations made by Hepner
on the 911 call that
Miglino was trying to kid-
nap his son and take him
to New York.

Officer shoots at
officer in Davie
DAVIE Prosecutors
have charged a South
Florida police officer with
first-degree attempted
murder and firing a gun.
into an occupied vehicle.
Kristopher John Bieger
is accused of shooting his
ex-girlfriend, who is a fel-
low officer, and emptying
his gun into her patrol car
last month before begging
for more ammunition so
he could commit suicide.
The South Florida Sun
Sentinel reports that the
charges were filed Friday
against the 30-year-old
Bieger.
Bieger is accused of
firing 10 rounds at his
ex-girlfriend, Who was not
harmed. Bieger was later
arrested outside a Davie
restaurant.


Court documents show
Bieger had called two
other officers and asked
for at least one more bullet
so he could kill himself.
Bieger is being held
without bail. His next
court appearance has not
yet been set.

Man fatally stabs
mother of four
ORLANDO Central
Florida authorities have
arrested a man they say
fatally stabbed his girl-
friend.
Leonce Charles was
arrested Saturday and
charged with second-
degree murder. It was not
immediately known if the
48-year-old has an attor-
ney.
Orange County Sheriff's
Office spokeswoman
Ginette Rodriguez says
deputies responding to a
911 call found the body of
46-year-old Cecile-Freus *
in her Orlando area home.
An autopsy has been
planned. No further infor-
mation was released due
to the ongoing investiga-
tion.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports that Freus was a
mother of four and Charles
was her life-in boyfriend.

Student brings
loaded gun to class
JACKSONVILLE -
Police are investigating
a student who brought
a loaded handgun to his


. Jacksonville elementary
school.
A spokeswoman
says administrators at
Dinsmnore Elementary
School were notified by
another student before
classes Friday morning
about the gun. The gun
was immediately confis-
cated. No injuries were
reported.
The Florida Times
Union reports that an
initial investigation found
that the gun was not taken
to the school "to do any
harm." The student will
receive "appropriate disci-
plinary action."
Meanwhile, the school
district's police depart-
ment is investigating.

George Jones'
home up for sale
LAKELAND A piece
of country music history is
for sale in central Florida.


The
Ledger
reports
that a south
Lakeland
mansion
where
country
superstars
George
Jones and
Tammy
Wynette


Jones


once lived and partied is
on the market for $2.3 mil-
lion.
The 6,390-square-foot
home is on seven acres
and has 16 rooms, four


bedrooms, a horse barn
with four stalls, and a pool
in the shape of a guitar.
Jones called the home
the "Old Plantation." When
they were married in the
late 1960s and early 1970s,
he and Wynette had par-
ties there and built an
outdoor concert venue.
Loretta Lynn, Johnny
Cash, Conway Twitty and
Charley Pride all per-
formed at the home at one
time or another.

Pilot walks away
from crash
VENICE A 42-year-old
student pilot who crashed
near the Venice Airport
says he was gaining alti-
tude when the plane "just
stopped."
Oleg Anatollyevich
Bachurin said he was
sorry several times after
Friday morning's crash.
No injuries were reported.
The Sarasota Herald-
Tribune reports that
the Cessna 152 was sev-
eral hundred feet off the*
ground when it lost power.
The plan struck a utility
pole and slammed into a
building before crashing
nose-first into a concrete
slab.
Bachurin is a former
Russian military jet pilot
who is training for his U.S.
commercial pilot's license.
Police say he was practic-
ing at the Venice Airport
when the plane engine cut


(AP)


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Lady Gaga gives naughty, nice show


NEW YORK Lady Gaga was in
the Christmas'spirit at Z100's annual
Jingle Ball concert, but her version
of "White Christmas" would have
made Bing Crosby blush..
Gaga performed a slightly naugh-
ty rendition of the holiday classic
Friday night as part of her mini-
concert at the radio station's event
at Madison Square Garden. Gaga
- sporting tight studded leather
pants, matching top and a bare mid-
riff gyrated on a set that included
antlers, Christmas trees and holiday
lights as she performed "White
Christmas."
"So I recently added a couple of
lyrics to this song because I think it's
too short. It's like when-you really
start to enjoy it it stops. It's like a
really bad orgasm. Merry Christmas
New York!" she shouted. Later, she
made a suggestive pose as she gave
a come hither coo to Santa.
But her performance wasn't all
saucy. She was nostalgic and appre-
ciative as she thanked the radio
station for allowing her to be the
headliner of this year's show, which
included performances from Kelly
Clarkson, Demi Lovato, LMFAO,
Pitbull, David Guetta, Foster the
People, Hot Chelle Rae and more.
Gaga said her first concert as a
young girl growing up in New York
City was the Z100 Jingle Ball.
"I worked so hard and when I
was 11 ... my mom got me tickets to
Jingle Bell Ball," she said.
.Gaga opened the Jingle Ball con-
cert three years ago, she said: "I'll
never forget there were a whole
lot of superstars and no one knew
who the hell I was.... Some people
thought I was going to be a one-hit
wonder."
The singer, recently nominated for
three Grammys, proved to be oth-
erwise, and sang a few of her best-
known songs, including "Telephone,"
"Just Dance" and "Edge of Glory."
She opened her performance by
singing between several Christmas
trees; later, she performed on a
keytar shaped like a Christmas tree,
and she ended the night dressed
in a hospital gown, re-enacting the
theme of her latest video, "Marry


Singers Kelly Clarkson, left, and Demi
Lovato perform together at Z100's
Jingle Ball concert at Madison Square
Garden on Friday.

the Night."
A portion of the evening's pro-
ceeds will go to "STOMP Out
Bullying," a program designed to
reduce and prevent bullying, a cause
close to Gaga's heart Earlier this
week, she went to the White House
to meet with officials about the mat-
ter.
"It's important to keep everybody
safe in school," Gaga told the audi-
ence before launching into her inspi-
rational anthem "Born This Way."

Met Opera conductor
takes break until 2013
NEW YORK The music director
of New York's Metropc'itan Opera
will take a break from conducting
for the rest of the company's current
season and the 2012-2013 season.
The company's general manager,
Peter Gelb, announced Friday the
hiatus would allow James Levine
to recover from a spinal injury he
suffered in August during a fall.
The Met's longtime chief conductor
underwent emergency surgery and
has been hospitalized the past three
months.
He expects to return to his New
. York home next week, but Gelb says
doctors expect full recovery for the


68-year-old to be a long-term pro-
cess.
Levine hopes to resume his other
duties sooner, including coaching
and artistic planning.

Levi jazzed to host Spike
Video Games Awards
LOS ANGELES Zachary Levi has
performed at the Oscars, and now
he's hoping to pump dignity into the
Spike Video Game Awards.
"As a gamer, I definitely want to
bring as much legitimacy and respect
to the game community as I possi-
bly can," said the "Chuck" star, who
performed a song from Disney's
'Tangled" with Mandy Moore ear-
lier this year at the
Academy Awards, and
is serving as the host
of Saturday's ninth
annual Spike Video
Game Awards.
The show, which .
will be broadcast live \i
from Sony Pictures
Studios in Culver City, v
will honor outstand- Levi
ing achievements
within the gaming
industry over the past year, as well
as debut never-before-seen footage
from such upcoming games as "Metal
Gear Solid: Rising," 'Tom Clancy's
Rainbow 6 Patriots" and "BioShock
Infinite."
"I'm jazzed about hosting the
awards," said Levi earlier this week
during a break from filming on the
"Chuck" set "I'm very excited and
very nervous all at the same time. I've
always had so much respect for guys
and girls who host awards shows."
"Portal 2," the mind-bending puz-
zler from Valve, leads this year's
batch of nominees with 12 nods,
ahead of a pair of fellow game of
the year nominees: Rocksteady's
superhero sequel "Batman: Arkham
City," which is up for 10 awards,
and Naughty Dog's globe-trotting
adventure "Uncharted 3: Drake's
Deception," which has nine nomina-
tions.
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Pulitzer Prize-winning
composer Elliott Carter is
103.
Actress Rita Moreno
is 80.
Former California state
lawmaker Tom Hayden is 72.
Pop singer David Gates
(Bread) is 71.
Sen. Max Baucus,
D-Mont, is 70.
Actress Donna Mills


is 69.
Sen. John Kerry,
D-Mass., is 68.
Singer Brenda Lee is
67.
Actress Teri Garr is 64.
Singer Jermaine
Jackson is 57.
Rock musician Nikki
Sixx (Motley Crue) is 53.
Actor Gary Dourdan
is 45.


Lake City
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E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Daily ScriDture


"The LORD your God will raise
up for you a prophet like me
from among you, from your fel-
low Israelites. You must listen
to him."

Deuteronomy 18:15 NIV








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011 3A


SNOW: 15,000 were expected


Continued From Page 1A
many people this early."
Last year's attendance for
Snow Day was estimated at
10,000, but Folsom said she
expected as many as 15,000
people Saturday.
One reason for larger crowds
is because of a promotion by
Busy Bee B&B Food Stores,
one of the businesses sponsor-
ing the event. .
Marketing director Marshall
Beck said 360 Busy Bee custom-
ers at 20 stores throughout the
region were given the chance
to win a 2012 Jeep Wranger
Saturday afternoon. Another 40
lucky visitors at the snow day
event were also selected for a
chance to win the Jeep.
When the drawing was held,
those who were given a ticket
to participate in the giveaway
reached into a bucket and
grabbed a key. The person who
drew the key that unlocked the


door won the vehicle, valued at
$26,000.
Beck said ift's the seventh
year his company has given
away a new vehicle.
"We wanted to sponsor Snow
Day, so we did the drawing at
the same time," he said. 'We just
want to give back to the commu-
nity for their support Hopefully,
well keep that customer [who
won the Jeep] for life."
John Files, of Live Oak, didn't go
to Snow Day to win a new car. He
wanted to let his daughter, Heaven,
play in snow for the first time.
"We decided to have a fathe--
daughter day and come here,"
Files said. "It's cool for the kids,
especially if they've never seen
it before."
Heaven said her first experi-
ence was better than expected.
I like it because you can
throw it at people," she said. "It
was fun."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
William Stallard, 73, embraces his wife, Betty, 68, after she picked the winning key out of 396 keys Saturday to win
a brand new, fully loaded 2012 Jeep Sports Wrangler. The Jeep is valued at about $26,000. Stallard said the first
thing they will do is drive it to Texas to show their son. 'I told him earlier today that I was going to win,' she said.


MULLINS: Faces prison

Continued From Page 1A


was denied, Mullins said
his physician gave him
another one that was also
rejected. Mullins said he
can't afford the estimated
$600 a month it would cost
to pay for the drug without
help from Medicare.
"They just refused to pay
for it," he said. "They didn't
give a reason, they just
turned it down."
Doctors have prescribed
powerful narcotics, such
as morphine and demerol,
that would be covered by
Medicare, but Mullins
said he takes them spar-
ingly because their effects
make it difficult for him to
function normally. Without
Marinol or marijuana, he
said it's difficult to get out
of bed because of nausea.
"Most days, I throw up,"
he said. "Mornings are
always rough on me."
,, Mullins said he resort-
'ed'to breaking the law by
growing marijuana because
it's too expensive to buy on
the street and smoking the
drug was the only way he
could get relief.
But the intoxicating
effects from smoking
marijuana are unpleasant,
he said. He learned that
harvesting leaves from the
plants before they begin
growing buds that contain
high levels of THC provid-
ed relief for several hours
without getting him high.
The prospect of possible
jail time has Mullins wor-
ried about how he could
cope with chronic pain
behind bars.
"Itwould kill me," he said.
"I'd commit suicide because
the pain is so severe."
Mullins said he is seeing
a Veteran's Administration
psychiatrist to help him
deal with his physical and
psychological ailments.
"I'm depressed all the
time from being in pain all
the time," he said.
Michael Mirardi, Mullins'
lawyer, said the judge may
consider his client for the


drug court program, even
though that may not be the
best remedy because of the
strict guidelines partici-
pants must follow.
"Alot of drug courts don't
allow people to take medi-
cations, even prescribed
medications," Mirardi said.
, "They have to endure the
pain and suffering."
Pastor John Hudson
said he is sympathetic with
Mullins' current dilemma.
"He had the choice of
growing pot or letting
his power and utilities be
turned off so he could buy
Marinol," Hudson said. "He
grew it in plain sight. He
said he had nothing to fear
from the government he
served."
Now that Mullins faces
serious criminal charges,
Hudson hopes prosecutors
are sympathetic toward his
physical and legal prob-
lems.
'"We're hoping to we can
get him off from medical
necessity," he said. "He
shouldn't have been arrest-
ed." 9
Mirardi, of Stuart, said
-he hasn't spoken with pros-
ecutors and doesn't know
what to expect when during
his client's upcoming court
appearance.
Mirardi said he has
represented other clients
arrested for using mari-
juana for medical reasons
and the courts have shown
leniency.
"I haven't had a client
in that position who was
jailed," he said. ."The
cases I have, the people
have significant, absolute,
real health issues. Most of
these people have serious
illnesses."
In Mullins' case, Mirardi
said he didn't know why his
Medicare claim for Marinol
was denied.
"He was forced to break
the law because he was
denied," he said. "It's nec-
essary for his survival."


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Sunday, December I 1,2011


OU
OPIN


R
ION


That's


that


-for



now


hort of a lawsuit,
there's no legal mech-
anism for looking
into possible political
shenanigans on the
part of our county commission
concerning redistricting, it
turns out. As we're not the ones
crying foul and would likely
have no standing in a court of
law, it looks like we'll have to
let this one go.
It's a shame, too, because in
a democracy even the appear-
ance of possible impropriety
goes far to dampen the enthu-
siasm of an already cynical
electorate.
We're not saying anyone did
anything wrong.
We just want a better expla-
nation than we've-been given
for facts that strike us as odd.
To recount:
Supervisor of Elections Liz
Horne spent months creat-
ing four district maps, all of
,vhich, she says and she
would know pass legal mus-
ter concerning fair and equal
"representation.
A fifth map then surfaced,
to the surprise of Horne who
says -she' -now distanced-her-
self from the whole mess and
at least one commissioner.
Two weeks later, and by a
3-2 vote, map No. 5 is the only
one left on the table.
As a result, a potential
county commission candidate
is left out in the cold, gerry-
mandered, as he sees it, into
political obscurity.
As well, a longtime school
board member can't get an
answer as to why he lost
constituents neighbors and
friends, as he describes them
of 35 years.
As we say, we're not accus-
ing anybody of anything.
But we're pretty well cer-
tain our readers would like to
know more about this matter.
Anyone who'd like to speak
up is welcome.


Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:


news@lakecityreporter.com


President Barack
Obama laid out
his vision of
America Tuesday in
Osawatomie, Kan.
Ours is no longer, in our
president's take on things, the
land of the free and the home of
the brave.
America now is the land of
the envious and the home of the
victim.
Ours is a land, as our presi-
dent explains it, where the suc-
cess of one American comes at
the expense of another. Where
the poor are poor because the
rich are rich. And where the
role of government is not to
ensure "life, liberty and the
pursuit of happiness" but to,- .
tax away wealth from those it
deems to have too much and
determine how to invest our
nation's resources.
The president chose to give
this speech in Osawatomie
because President Theodore
Roosevelt, a Republican, spoke
there in 1910 and made a
plea for more government in
American life. How clever.
But in 1910, the federal gov-
ernment was extracting less
than five cents from every dol-
lar produced by the American
economy.
It was not until the 1930s,
except during World War I,
that this doubled to 10 cents of
every dollar. After World War II,
this doubled again, to 20 cents.
Now, after three years under
Obama's vision, the federal gov-
ernmerit takes 25 cents of every
dollar produced by the American
economy. If we throw in the costs
of state and local government,
barely 50 cents of each dollar of
our economic output remains in
the private economy.
, But Obama thinks we're lan-


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
guishing because we're still too
free.
The idea that "the market
will take care of everything"
may look good on a "bumper
sticker," according-to our presi-
dent, but, in his words, the idea
of free citizens and free mar-
kets "doesn't work" and "never
worked."
Perhaps our president ought
to wake from his dream, and
our nightmare, and take a closer
look at the country he is living
in.
According to the Kauffman
Foundation, which specializes
in studying entrepreneurship,
almost all net new jobs created
in our country come from firms
less than five years old.
Net new job growth in
America comes from entrepre-
neurs. Not from government
bureaucrats and not even from
corporate monoliths.
This entrepreneurial activ-
ity takes place at considerable
risk. According to one study
from Case Western Reserve
University, only 30 percent of
new business start-ups are still
operating after 10 years.
Entrepreneurs start and build
their businesses with personal
savings, credit cards, funds
from family and friends, and
loans and investments from
banks and venture capitalists.
But what entrepreneur will
take these risks if there isn't


upside as well as downside?
Who will do it if success is pun-
ished rather than rewarded? If
power-seeking politicians decide
that certain successful entrepre-
neurs have become too wealthy?
Our president cannot seem
to grasp that freedom and
entrepreneurship are not about
"doing your own thing" but are
the essence of what he calls
"we're greater together than we
are on our own."
Businesses grow by compet-
ing to serve customers.
It is also not about, to the
president's confusion, "making
up yotir own rules." It works
when we don't make up our.own
rules and live by eternal truths,
which prohibit theft and protect
private property. Our problems
start when government stops
doing its job to enforce those
rules and starts making up its
own.
'We stand at a critical cross-
roads today in clarifying the
role of government in our free
country.
Obama was correct to say
that "this is the defining issue of
our time."
Whatever solutions
Republicans propose to deal with
issues like government spending,
taxation, healthcare and educa-
tion must flow from a core vision
of what America is about.
Whoever emerges as the
Republican presidential nominee
in 2012 must be ready to offer
a dusted-off and clear vision of
America that will restore our
understanding of and faith in the
freedom that made and makes
this country great

* Star Parker is president of CURE,
Coalition on Urban Renewal and
Education (www.urbancure.org) and
author of three books.


Brangelina in luck in Ethiopia?


Hollywood gossips
say Angelina Jolie
and Brad Pitt intend
to adopt another
child from Ethiopia.
If they succeed, the movie-star
couple 'will be among the lucky
few who do.
That's because the East
African country, like others
that have been prime sources
of U.S.-adoptable children in
recent years, has cut way back
on the foreign adoptions it
allows. In fiscal 2010, more than
2,513 Ethiopian children were
adopted by Americans. This 4s-
cal year, just over 1,700 were.
In fact, Americans adopted
fewer children abroad this
year than in any of the previ-
ous 17 years, according to State
Department statistics. In all,
9,320 children were adopted from
abroad this year, compared to
11,050 last year, and the record
number of 22,800 in 2004.
The reason for the drop is
the growing unease of U.S. offi-
cials and their counterparts in
Guatemala, South Korea, China,
Russia and elsewhere about


Lisa Hoffman
lisahoffnan@shns.com


rampant corruption.
International adoption is a big-
ticket business, with parents in
the U.S. and Europe willing to
pay as much as $35,000 in fees for
a single adoption. Lawyers, judg-
es and bureaucrats all have been
implicated in kickbacks and other
schemes, spurring countries to
shut down their adoption depart-
ments or try to reform them.
A twice-delayed Pentagon
report to Congress, on a subject
as potentially incendiary as that
of gays serving openly in the
military, shows no sign of sur-
facing anytime soon.
At issue is the Pentagon's
view of allowing women


to serve in combat roles.
Congress ordered the Defense
Department to review by April
15 whether women troops are
denied an equal chance to excel
in the military and reach the top
ranks because they are barred
from combat fields, from which
80 percent of general officers
now ascend.
The Pentagon requested an
extension through October, but
there is no indication the report
due to the Senate and House
Armed Services committees is
forthcoming. -
New Army Chief of Staff Gen.
Ray Odierno told The Army
Times he was not happy with
the review that was conducted
before he became the Army's
top officer in September.
Odierno, an outspoken advo-
cate of opening more roles to
women and who led U.S. forces
in Iraq from September 2008 to
September 2010, said he didn't
think the report "represents
some of the things that our
women are doing in combat."
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


ANOTHERw


ANOTHER
VIEW


Anybody


seen that

missing


billion


lately?



billion is not
a problem, for
most of us, at
least in the
circles in which we circulate.
But there was John Corzine
before a congressional com-
mittee explaining that $1.2
billion of his customers' money
had vanished, seemingly over-
night, and "I simply don't know
where the money is."
Apparently the congres-
sional rewrite of the financial
regulatory laws intended to
prevent Wall Street from mak-
ing investors' money disappear
still has a few holes. The law-
makers should put aside that
"job killing" nonsense, at least
long enough to patch them.
Corzine was CEO of MF
-Global Holdings and hardly
an innocent on Wall Street
He is a former governor, U.S.
senator and CEO of Goldman
Sachs.
He learned the money was
missing only the night before
the broker-dealer was to file
for bankruptcy. Corzine said
he was "stunned," as who
wouldn't be, and asked his
staff to recheck their work.
They did and, indeed, the cus-
tomers' money was gone.
The root of the problem was
a $6.3 billion bet on European
debt that was going bad. How
they came to make that bet
should make interesting read-
ing when the details come out.
(The Great Wall Street Flop of
'08-'09 was a bonanza for finan-
cial writers.)
The Washington Post hints
at one explanation: When
the firm's chief risk officer
questioned the investment in
European debt, the board of
directors got another chief risk
officer.
The law prohibits broker-
dealer firms from using the
customers' money to trade on
the firms' behalf. Nonetheless,
MF Global employees
breached the firewall between
the firms' accounts and the
accounts of its customers,
apparently in a desperate bid
to cover its bet on European
debt.
Corzine insisted, "I never
intended to break any rules."
His only explanation was that
his staff may have miscon-
strued his instructions on
the eve of the bankruptcy:
"Someone could misinterpret,
'We've got to fix this' which
I said the evening of Oct. 30 -
We've got to find the money.'"
That kind of a misunder-
standing seems a considerable
stretch, but considering the
bonuses Wall Street pays and
the price of arguing with the
boss, maybe not so much.
Corzine, perhaps optimistic
to a fault, said, "My own expec-
tation is that even at these late
hours the money will be recov-
ered."
Betting on the banks and
counterparties who erroneous-
ly received MF Global custom-
ers' money voluntarily return-
ing it may be an even worse
wager than European debt
The FBI, federal regulators
and a whole host of plaintiffs'
lawyers are on the case, and
out of those investigations
there should come useful
recommendations. Congress
should act on them and quit
bleating about the perils of


federal regulation. For some
people, $1.2 billion is real
money.
* Scripps Howard News Service


www.lakecityreporter.com


Land of the envious,


home of the victim







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


More scenes from Snow Day A


Photos by JASOUN MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Isaiah Adams, 11, of Wellborn, launches a handful of snow Saturday while enjoying
the Snow Day event held at Olustee Park in downtown Lake City. 'This is really fun, especially
when I get to throw it at my sister,' Adams said. LEFT: Kids get, some air while bouncing in a.
bounce house Saturday during Snow Day.


PUBLIC NOTICE
Does your insurance company, Medicare or Medicaid


switch to mail-order prescriptions?
Call us. We can help.


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780 SE Baya Dr.
386.755.6677


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1465 W. US Hwy. 90
,386.755.2233


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Spring Term begins January 3,2012
Programs Available:
* GED Preparation
* Adult High School Diploma Option
* Skill Remediation
* College Preparatory Courses
Pre-registration: December 12-16, 2011
Course Fees/Tuition: $30.00 per term
New students must prove Florida residency
(s. 1009.21, F. S.).


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Monday through Friday
8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.


Services YOU receive with $30.00 tuition:
* Flexible Class Times and Locations
. TABE Assessments
* Small.Group Instruction
* Computer Assisted Instruction
* Computer Lab Availability
* Test Preparation
* GED Practice Tests
. Workplace Readiness Workshops
. Academic and Career Counseling
* Postsecondary Transition Assistance
* Job Shadowing Opportunities
. Florida Ready to Work Credentlaling


409 SW Saint Johns Street
Lake City, Florida 32025
386-755-8190
http://columbia.kl2.fl.us/adulted/index


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


Scenes from the Christmas parade


Y And the
winners

are ...

Best entrants in this
S -- i- -year's Christmas
.parade, as selected
.,. . .'..... ... by a citizen panel:


1. lst Street
Music & Sound Co.;
2. Christ Central
Ministries;
3. Mt. Carmel
Baptist Church.


PhIolo6 iii, page by JAbUN MAI IILEVVV V LKErI.OLal. '.A,r n"-"
ABOVE: A Christ Central Ministries float with tubers in recognition of the area's rivers and
springs passes through downtown Lake City Saturday. The float took second place overall.
ABOVE RIGHT: Ralee Fink, 2, plays with a Santa Claus doll while sitting on the shoulder of
her uncle, Lee Fink, 17, during the Christmas parade Saturday in Lake City.


ABOVE: Members of the Fort
White High School marching
band participate in the Lake
City Christmas parade on
Saturday. LEFT: Lake City
resident Jason Wright, 26,
(right) and Doug Hearne,
22, watch the Lake City
Christmas parade Saturday.
Wright is wearing a pair of
3-D glasses that lets him
see snowflakes whenever he
looks into lights.


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OBITUARIES

Thomas Earl Fielding
Thomas Earl Fialding, 87, passed
away on Thursday, December 8,
2011 at his home, surrounded by
his loving family. He was the son
of the late Thomas C. & Dovie
Sapp Fielding. He was born in.
Lake City but had spent most of
his life living in Live Oak, Flor-
ida. He served his country faith-
fully with the United States Army
during World War II in the Pacific
Theatre. He was a loving father,
grandfather and great grandfather
who was an avid reader, loved
to watch wrestling and listen to
music, but most of all he loved
spending time with his family and
his church family at Haven Full
Gospel Church. He was preceded
in ;eath by a grandchild, Kaley
P vid, a brother, Aubrey Field-
iig, son, Johnny Fielding and his
devoted wife, Bertie Fielding.
Survivors include his three sons,
Thomas Fielding of Arcadia, FL,
Raymond Fielding of Delray
Beach, FL, & Alan Fielding of
Wellborn, FL;'daughters, Darilyn
C. (Jody) Espenship of Lake City,
FL, Patricia A. (John) Sandlin of
Brooksville, FL, Betty J. (Bri-
an) Tritt and Pamela J. (Curtis)
Thomas both of Live Oak, FL; 14
grandchildren & 24 great grand-
children also survive.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed at 2:00 P.M., on Monday, De-
cember 12, 2011 at the Live Oak
Church of God with Pastor Carl
Thomas officiating. Interment
will follow in Live Oak Cemetery.
Visitation with the family will be
held one hour prior to service
time (1:00 P.M. until 2:00 P.M.)
at the church. Gateway-For-
est Lawn Funeral Home, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida 32025, (386) 752-1954 is
in charge of arrangements. Please
leave messages of love and com-
fort at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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NOTICE OF MEETING

COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE
CITY OF LAKE CITY


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Community Redevelopment Advisory Committee for
the City of Lake City, Florida will hold a meeting on Tuesday, December 13, 2011 at 5:00 P.M.,
in the Council Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida.


All interested persons are invited to attend.


SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as addressed in the
American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


r .. .


%w







LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


Newspaper's food drive wraps up


GORDON JACKSON/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Reporter employees Mandy Brown, left, and Joe Smith, right, pose Saturday with
some of the food donated during the newspaper's annual drive. Also pictured are assistants
Cheyenne Brown, second from left, and Lauren Wilson. Food collected during the drive will
be delivered to the Florida Gateway Food Bank on Monday.


Florida Tax Payers
please research this information,
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous fallacy
of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia High
School, and Fort White High School students and alumni. All of them
are offspring of Adam and his female, wife Eve and therefore are created
by God, in the image of God. (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1
End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1;
page 52 SC.912.L.15.10
http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)
I challenge the Florida.Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerr.iken@hotmail.com
In The Year of our Lord 2011
Paid for by Kenny Merriken


JUVENILES: Will get a second chance
Continued From Page 1A


Misdemeanors for which youths are eli-
gible to participate include: Fighting in pub-
lic, possession of alcohol by a minor, assault,
battery, vandalism, disturbing a school func-
tion, causing a false fire alarm, loitering and
prowling, petit theft, possession of less than
20 grams of marijuana, possession of drug
paraphernalia and trespassing.
Those who commit violent crimes are
ineligible for the program.
"These are somewhat minor crimes in
.terms of being misdemeanors, but they do
give the student a second chance to not
have a record in the future," Seifert said.
However, juveniles who do not complete
the program, or who commt another crime,
are removed from the program and the origi-
nal charges are reinstated.
"Once you're in the program you are in it
and once you're out, you can't come back in,"
Seifert said. "It's a one-time only deal."


...*4.. A.-e4, -


Calvin Klein


Those with previous criminal records
will not be admitted to the program.
Seifert said deputies get to decide
whether to arrest a juvenile offender or
issue a civil citation. Participation would
still depend on review by the Department
of Juvenile Justice.
"The deputy can make a recommenda-
tion for what he or she believes would.
be the right punishment or they could let
juvenile justice make that determination,"
Seifert said. "This program gives a juvenile
an incentive to not re-offend to have a clear
record for the rest of their life."
Deputies took part in special training to get
the program started. Sgt Tim Ball, school
resource deputy supervisor, has taken a key
role in to getting the program launched.
"We look for this to be quite a success,"
Seifert said. "We want to give that second
chance to that person."


I. I


PROTECT YOUR
HOME FROM
HARD WATER,
IRON STAINS
AND ROTTEN
EGG ODOR



better water. pure and simple:.-

R A A
FRE Istalto & OS UTL A S



e i m .

k-...'.". .'.. I
[i,, .{ l, .-, L , ., ,, i ,, .... .. ., . ... . .. t


1^r.."2-- --- mm.


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A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


THE WEATHER


I I


S ISOLATED .CHANCE
1.I OWNERS dfkOWERS



hi165 L047 HI68 LI51


Tallahassee *
57/47,
Pensacola *
58/47 Paama Cty
56/48


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


* Vald
56.
Lake
65/
Ga
6


62
55
69
45
84 in 1972
23 in 1917


0.02"
0.08"
32.97"
0.74"
46.54"


PARTLY PARTLY | PARTLY.
CLOUDY CLOUDY G CLOUDY



1170 LO 45 HI74 1.0L48 I HI75LO52


osta
'4 City
Jacksonville Cape Canaveral
City 61, 55 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
inesil&e Daytona Beach Fort Myers
67/52 74J65 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
71/56 0 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Key West
77/64 76/69 Lake City
Miami
Tampa Naples
79/60 West Palm Beach Ocala
78/70 0 Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers. 80/70 0 Pensacola
82/62 Naples Tallahassee
82/65 Miami Tampa
K.et u 80/70 Valdosta
'*est W. Palm Beach


79/71.


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tornm.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


7:16 a.m.
5:31 p.m.
7:17 a.m.
5:31 p.m.


6:40 p.m.
8:04 a.m.
7:38 p.m.
8:51 a.m.


3

45finnitesbo
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


30C00
Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan.
17 24 1 9
Last New First Full i


Monday
,J 69 .ri
73/64/sh
79/67/pc
82/62/sh
71/52/sh
68/56/sh
78/71/pc
68/51/sh
80/67/pc
81/63/pc
73/55/sh
77/64/sh
61/52/c
61/54/pc
62/46/sh
80/60/sh
63/43/r
77/69/pc


Tuesday
.5 6-" p,
74/58/pc
78/65/pc
81/58/pc
73/48/pc
69/53/pc
79/70/pc
70/46/pc
78/65/pc
81/60/pc
76/52/pc
76/57/pc
67/54/pc
69/54/pc
69/45/pc
79/55/pc
68/44/pc
77/67/pc


An exclusive
service-
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.




weather.com


Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, WIs.
www.weatherpublisher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: High pressure building across the United States will keep the country
mostly dry today. There will be some showers developing over the Southeast. Western Texas
could see some showers as well. To the west, a low pressure system will begin to impact
California's Central Coast with showers.


YESTERDAY'S NATIONAL EXTREMES High: 820, Opa Locka, Fla. Low: -I 1, Angel Fire, N.M.

Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturaay Today


CITY HI. Lo, Pcp.
Albany NY 3;, 3'. 1,
Albuquerque 37/22/0
Anchorage 27/21/0
Atlanta 53/35/0
Baltimore 47/33/0
Billings 40/27/0
Birmingham 48/29/0
Bismarck 38/12/0
Boise 34/21/0
Boston 47/42/0
Buffalo 27/21/0
Charleston SC 54/50/0
Charleston WV 38/30/0
Charlotte 53/34/0
Cheyenne 38/13/0
Chicago 26/12/0
Cincinnati 31/22/0
Cleveland 31/22/0
Columbia SC 56/46/0
Dallas 48/33/0
Daytona Beach 70/59/0
Denver 36/15/0


'


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


-Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
86/73/0
45/37/0
C., E 0
-1 21 6)
1. 3 '05 :'
90/72/0
64/48/0
55/43/0
77/64/0
39/35 21
6?, ., 1
'58'? "C


HI/Lo/W CITY
35/24/s Des'Molnes
46/27/pc Detroit
32/19/sn El Paso
52/35/pc Fairbanks
44/30/s Greensboro
41/13/pc Hartford
53/36/pc Honolulu
34/13/s Houston
42/22/pc Indianapolis
40/30/s Jackson MS
39/33/sn Jacksonville
57/40/sh Kansas City
43/23/s Las Vegas ',
48/30/s Uttle Rock
46/19/s Los Angeles
40/28/s Memphis
40/20/s Miami
37/28/s Minneapolis
53/33/pc Mobile
50/38/c New Orleans
74/65/sh New York
50/25/s Oklahoma City


-%-'y astras loay atraa lo


Today
HI/Lo/W CITY
87/72/pc La Pa
42/38/c Uma
61 5?2 Londo
i.,. 6:" r. Madri
45/23/s Mexic
38/32/c Montr
87/65/t Mosci
69/52/s Nalrol
. 50/39/pc Nassa
82/61/pc New D
o. 29 re Oslo
65/54/s Panar
88/75/pc' Paris


n
d
;o City
eal
aow
bbl
au
Delhi

mna


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
33/4/0 41/34/s Omaha.
29/17/0 36/27/s Orlando
45/30/0 52/35/pc Philadelphia
24/16/0 14/2/sn Phoenix
49/39/0 46/28/s Pittsburgh
45/39/0 39/25/s Portland ME
75/69/.08 80/67/r Portland OR
57/47/0 57/41/pc Raleigh
29/15/0 39/24/s Rapid City
51/33/0 53/32/pc Reno
59/54/0 61 '.. :r. Richmond
40/17/0 47/34/pc Sacramento
55/37/0 58/40/pc St. Louis
45/29/0 49/30/s Salt Lake City
64/48/0 58/48/pc San Antonio
44/30/0 48/31/s San Diego
81/74/.04 80/70/sh San Francisco
25/6/0 39/30/s Seattle
58/40/0 56/45/pc Spokane
54/45/0- 55/45/pc Tampa
1S6 460 0 39/32/s Tucson
2, ,:, 50/36/c Washington


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
59/39/0
73/66/0
43/30/0,
41/37/.04
68/43/0
32/23/0
34/28/0
77/55/0
81/73/0
72/55/0
28/18/0
84/77/0
48/37/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
60/39/sh
76/66/pc
50/35/sh
51/36/pc
70/43/pc
34/30/pc
31/29/sf
79/61/s
85/73/pc
72/52/s
23/18/c
88/73/t
.43/32/c


CITY
Rio *
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HI/Lo/Pcp.
29/5/0
80/63/0
45/39/0
66/42/0
33/23/0
44/33/0
34/27/0
51/37/0
44/16/0
33/14/0
50/37/0
49/30/0
37/19/0
36/20/0
54/49/0
65/47/0
S51/40/0
39/31/0
26/18/0
74/62/0
64/41/0'
47/37/0


SAturaay
HI/Lo/Pcp.
77/69/.11
64/54/0
84/74/.56
82/74/1.25
81/54/0
36/19/0
t '7 i'0

64/51/0
52/36/0

43/39/0
39/33/0


HI/Lo/W
40/34/pc
77/64/sh
42/30/s
66/43/pc
36/21/s
37/37/s
44/34/c
47/27/s
45/18/s
46/23/pc
44/28/s
54/39/pc
46/26/s
43/28/pc
52/45/c'
60/48/s
54/45/sh
45/37/sh
34/20/c
79/60/sh
. Ji 2 .'
44/28/s


loday
Hi/Lo/W
76/69/sh
63/49/sh
84/75/t
84/75/t
83/55/s
44/33/pc
86/76/t
76/65/sh
68/53/s
52/41/s
39/30/s
37/32/pc
35/27/pc


KEY TO CONDmONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc=partly cloudy, r=rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Sunday, December I I, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FOT WHIITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the teacher's lounge
at the high school.
For details, call
club president Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
Registration for
Boys Club hoops
The Boys Club of
Columbia County is
accepting registration
for its basketball
program. Cost is $45.
Three leagues are
offered: Training, ages
6-7-8; Jr. Varsity, ages
8-9-10; Varsity, ages
11-12-13-14.
Practices are twice
weekly with games
on Saturday (except
Training League).
For details, call
7524184.
YOUTH BASEBALL
10-under travel
team tryouts
The Columbia Timber
Rattlers 10-under
baseball travel team has
a tryout planned for
2:30 p.m. Dec. 18
at Southside Sports
Complex.
For details, call Todd
Gustavson at 365-2133.

9-under travel
team tryouts
The North Florida
Rays 9-under baseball
travel team has tryouts
planned for 10 a.m.
Saturday at Southside
Sports Complex.
For details, call Todd
Green at 365-5161 or
Leonard Johnson at
867-6655.
From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High girls
basketball at Melody
Christian Academy,
6 p.m. .
Columbia High girls
soccer at Suwannee
High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High, girls
soccer at Lafayette High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball at Keystone
Heights High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Terry Parker
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Tuesday
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Chiles High,
Thursday
Columbia High girls
soccer at Lincoln High,
7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Leon High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Friday
Fort White High
soccer at Oak Hall School,
6:30 p.m. (girls-4:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Atlantic
Coast High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Keystone
Heights High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling hosts duals
tournament, TBA
Fort White High
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High quad-match,


7:30 p.m. (JV-3)


RG3 claims Heisman for Baylor


Bears QB is first
winner of award
in school history.
By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
NEW YORK Robert
Griffin III beat out pre-
season favorite Andrew
Luck for the Heisman
Trophy, dazzling voters
with his ability to throw,
run and lead Big 12 door-
mat Baylor into the nation-
al rankings.
The quarterback
known as RG3 became
the first Heisman winner
from Baylor on Saturday
night by a comfortable
margin over the Stanford
star.
Griffin started the sea-
son on the fringe of the


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III (10) finds running room behind the line of scrimmage
against Texas in a Heisman-defining moment on Dec. 3 in Waco, Texas.


Heisman conversation,
a talented and exciting
player on a marginal team,
while Stanford's 'Luck was
already being touted as a


Youth


Future Tigers on
display during
weekend events.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com


No. 1 NFL draft pick.
Draft day might very
well still belong to Luck,
but Griffin diverted the
Heisman to Waco, Texas,


to a school that has never
had a player finish better
than fourth in the voting
- and that was 48 years
ago.


Braun

fails

drug test

By RONALD BLUM
Associated Press
NEW YORK ESPN
is reporting that NL MVP
Ryan Braun has tested
positive for a performance-
enhancing drug and is fac-
ing a 50-game suspension.
ESPN says the Milwaukee
Brewers star is disputing
the result in arbitration.
A spokesman for Braun
said in a statement issued
to ESPN and The Associated
Press by his representatives,
Creative Artists Agehcy, that
"there are highly unusual
circumstances surrounding
this case which will support
Ryan's complete innocence."


takeover


The future of Columbia
High sports was on dis-
play Saturday as Lake City
Middle School hosted mul-
tiple events.
The 2011 Lake City
Middle School Winter
Invitational welcomed soc-
cer teams from around the
area for the annual event
and the Falcon Invitational
Wrestling tournament ran
on campus.
Columbia High coach
Trevor Tyler was on hand
to watch the action and said
that this is an important
time in the development of
young players.
"The teams have a chance
to play in five or six games
in a day," Tyler said. "When
you're tired, you learn to
work on the mental part of
the game and not just the
physical part of it You have
to use your head to play. BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
It's good for us coaches to Lake City Middle School's Jake Thomas kicks a ball during a game in the Lake City Middle School Winter Invitational at the
come and watch the kids CYSA fields in Lake City on Saturday.
play at the different levels."
Tyler said ifs not as


important for the players to
learn his style of play as it is
that they are just playing.
"Soccer is a different
game and it's important
for them to learn different
styles," he said. "It's good
to be versatile."
Billy Jennings coach-


es the Falcons' team and
believes that he can have
the players ready to step in
as Tigers.
"We try to polish them
up so that the transition is
easy," he said. "We try to
get them away from the
recreational style of playing


where you just kick it and
run to the ball as fast as
you can. We're trying to get
them to learn to pass the
ball and the importance of
teamwork."
Assistant coach of the
Lady Falcons, Tracy Lee,
agrees with Jennings' phi-


losophy.
"It's important for them
to gain that experience at
this level and build the com-
mradarie with others," she
said.
But it's not just important
to learn the game of soccer
early.


Other sports offer early
experience at the middle
school level and individual
sports players such as wres-
tlers can have their skills
developed during middle
school years as well.
YOUTH continued on 2B


Navy beats Army

for 10th time in

a row, 27-21


Midshipmen run
for 296 yards in
win over Knights.
By JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press
LANDOVER, Md. -
When it comes to beating
Army, Navy is a perfect 10.
A new venue for Army-
Navy produced a famil-
iar result Saturday as the
Midshipmen rushed for
296 yards and capitalized
on three Army turnovers in
a 27-21 win over the Black
Knights.
With President Barack
Obama presiding over the


first Army-Navy game to be
played in the vicinity of the
nation's capital, the Mids
(5-7) got a pair of touch-
down runs from quarter-
back Kriss Proctor and one
from fullback Alexander
Teich to win their 10th
straight in the rivalry.
At least this one was close.
Navy had won the other
nine by at least a dozen
points. The Mids needed a
pair of fourth-quarter field
goals from Jon Teague and
a fourth-down stop in their
own territory before those
in the blue uniforms could
start chanting "10 more
NAVY continued on 3B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Navy offensive tackle-Graham Vickers (70) and running back John Howell (33) celebrate on
the field with their teammates after beating Army 27-21 in an NCAA college football game in
Landover, Md. on Saturday.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
FIGURE SKATING
Noon
NBC ISU, Grand Prix Final, at
Quebec City (same-day tape)
GOLF
3 p.m.
NBC Franklin Templeton Shootout,
final round, at Naples
NFL,
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC N.Y. Giants at Dallas

Monday
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN St. Louis at Seattle
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS New Jersey at Tampa Bay
SOCCER
2:50 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Manchester
City at Chelsea

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


New
N.Y
Buff
MiA


Hou
Teni
Jack
India


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF I
w England 9 3 0.750 362
:Jets 7 5 0.583290
alo 5 7 0.4172783
Wl 4 8 0.3332462
South
W L T Pct PF
iston 9 3 0.750310 1
lessee 7 5 0.583 249
sonville 3 9 0.250 152
anapolis 0 12 0.000 1743
North


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Denver
Oakland
Kansas City


W L
10 3
9 3
7 5
4 9
West
W L
7 5
7 5
5 7


PA
147
160
304
120

PA
189
129
238
158


T Pct PF PA
0 .769 282 198
0.750 296 192
0 .583 266 250
0.308 178 254

T Pct PF PA
0.583 256 292
0.583 274 308
0 .417 163 268(


San Diego 5 7 0.417287289
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 7 5 0.583283244
N:Y.Giants 6 6 0.500287315
Philadelphia 4 8 0 .333 271 282
V4shington 4 8 0 .333 202 256,
-South r
W L T Pct PF TPA
New Orieans 9 3 0'.750 39 '6"


Atlanta 7 5
Carolina 4 8
Tampa Bay 4 8
North
W L
x-Green Bay 12 0
Chicago 7 5
Detroit 7 5
Minnesota 2 10
West
W L
x-San Francisco 10 2
Seattle 5 7
Arizona 5 7
St. Louis 2 10
x-clinched division


0 .583 269 244
0 .333 290 324
0 .333 218 329

T Pct PF PA
01.000 420 262
0.583 291 242
0 .583 333 277
0.167 246 330

T Pct PF PA
0 .833'288 161
0.417 216 246
0.417 232 269
0.167 140 296


Thursday's Game
Pittsburgh 14, Cleveland 3
Today's Games
New Orleans atTennessee, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Baltimore, I p.m.
Kansas City at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, I p.m.
Houston at Cincinnati, I p.m.


Tampa Bay at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Atlanta at Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, I p.m.
New England atWashington, I p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Buffalo at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Oakland at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
St. Louis at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 15
Jacksonville at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 17
Dallas at Tampa Bay, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 18
New Orleans at Minnesota, I p.m.
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m.
' Cincinnati at St. Louis, I p.m.
Carolina at.Houston, I p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Miami at Buffalo, I p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 19
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.


Class 7A.
State Semifinal
First Coast 24, Lakeland 14
Manatee 19, Dwyer 14
Class 6A
State Semifinal
Armwood 46, Bartram Trail 38
Miami Central 17, Mainland 7
Class 5A
State Semifinal
Miami Norland 35, Palmetto 27
Wakulla 41, Pasco 38, 30T
Class 2A
State Championship
North Florida Christian 69, Admiral
Farragut 0
Class IA
State Championship
Jefferson County 47, Chipley 13

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 16 Alabama vs. bDetroit, 6 p.m.
No. 21 Memphis vs. Murray State,
6 p.m.
No. 24 Illlinois vs. Coppin State,
8 p.m.


NFL Iopgest win streaks Florida 90, Rider 69


(Including playoffs)
2003-2004 New England
2010-2011 x-Green Bay
2007 New England
1997-1998 Denver
1989-1990 San Francisco
1972-1973 Miami
1941-1942 Chicago
1933-1934 Chicago
x-active


College football awards

Maxwell Award
(Best all-around player)
Andrew Luck, Stanford, QB
Chuck Bednarik Trophy
(Best defensive player)
Tyrann Mathieu, LSU
Outland Trophy .
(Best interior lineman)
Barrett Jones, Alabama, OT
Davey O'Brien National
Quarterback Award
(Best Quarterback)
Robert Griffin III, Baylor
Doak Walker Award
(Best running back)
Trent Richardson,Alabama
Fred BiletnikoffAward
(Best wide receiver)
Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State
Jim Thorpe Award
(Best'defensive back)
Morris Clalborne, LSU
Lou Groza'Colleglate
(Place-kicker award)
Randy Bullock.Texas A&M
Ray Guy Award
(Best punter)
Ryan Allen, Louisiana Tech

The Home Depot Coach of ther
Year Award
Les Miles, LSU
Disney's Wide World of Sports
Spirit Award
University of Alabama Football Team
NCFAA Contribution to College
Football Award
Roy Kramer, SEC commissioner
1990-2002

FCS playoffs

Quarterfinals
Friday
Montana 48, Northern Iowa 10

Florida prep playoffs

Class 8A
State Semifinal
Miramar 14, -Christopher Columbus
Catholic 6
Plant 26, Fletcher 7


At Jacksonville
RIDER (1-9)
Stewart 4-7 1-2 9, Penn 4-11 I-I 12,
Nd-Ezuma 0-1 0-0 0,Thompson 4-6 1-2
10, Mitchell 1-7 0-0 2, Myles 5-9 0-0 11I,
Jones 8-12 2-3 20, Gadson 1-3 0-0 3,
Fortunat 1-1 0-2 2, Pereira 0-0 0-0 0.
Totals 28-57 5-10 69.
FLORIDA (7-2)
Young 5-7 2-2 12, Yeguete 2-3 0-0
4, Boynton 9-13 3-4 26, Walker 4-7 0-0
12, Beal 7-17 1-2 18, Rosario 2-7 0-0
4, Wilbekin 1-4 0-0 3, Prather 1-4 0-2
2, Murphy 3-7 0-0 7, Larson 1-1 0-0 2,
Pitchford 0-1 0-0 0.Totals 35-71 6-10 90.
Halftimie-Florida 43-27. 3-Point
Goals-Rider 8-19 (Penn 3-5, Jones 2-3,
Thompson I-I, Gadson 1-3, Myles 1-4,
Mitchell 0-3), Florida 14-33 (Boynton 5-9,
Walker 4-6, Beal 3-8, Murphy 1-2,Wllbekin
1-3, Rosario 0-5). Fouled Out-None.
Rebounds-Rider 33 (Myles 8), Florida
35 (Young 10). Assists-Rider 14 (Penn,
Thompson 4), Florida 25 (Yeguete 5).Total
Fouls-Rider 12, Florida 13.A-3,478.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
New Jersey 5, Ottawa 4, SO
Tampa Bay 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, SO
Vancouver 4, Montreal 3, SO
Florida 2, Boston 0
Chicago 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, OT
Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 '
Nashville 4, Columbus 3, OT
Detroit 5, Phoenix 2
St. Louis 4,Anaheim 2
Calgary 3, Colorado 2
Minnesota 4, Los Angeles 2
San Jose 5, Dallas 2
Friday's Games
Washington 4,Toronto 2
Buffalo 2, Florida I, OT
Winnipeg 4, Carolina 2
Edmonton 4, Colorado I
Saturday's Games.
Montreal 2, New Jersey I
N.Y. Rangers at Buffalo (n)
Vancouver at Ottawa (n)
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Landers (n)
Tampa Bay at Philadelphia (n)
Winnipeg at Detroit (n)
Boston at Columbus (n)
San Jose at St. Louis (n)
Anaheim at Nashville (n)
Minnesota at Phoenix (n)
Edmonton at Calgary (n)
Dallas at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
San Jose at Chicago, 7 p.m.
Florida at N.Y. Rangers, 7:30 p.m.
Monday's Game
New Jersey at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.


YOUTH: Soccer, wrestling on display

Continued From Page 1B


"Ifs one sport they don't
offer before this age," Dean
Wine, assistant coach of
Lake City Middle School,
said. "At this age, you can
learn the fundamentals. You
have a chance to physically
and mentally get in shape."
The key for head coach
Jason Langston is to pre-
pare the players for when
they arrive at the high,
school.
"We're here to give them,
a base foundation so that
they have a head start on
others when they get to
high school," Langston
said. "We've done fairly well.
My heavyweight, Marcus
Ziegler is the two time
defending North Florida
champion. Everyone has
done really well."
In wrestling, the middle
school offers many com-
petitors only outlet fbr the
sport without such things
as recreational leagues
available.
'"Ifs one sport that you
really can't be involved in
unless you're with USA
wrestling," Wine said.
No matter the sport,
all the coaches agree, the
younger a player is when
he starts developing the
skill, the better the player
will be when they're ready
to compete later down the


road.
The Falcons were 1-1
during early action in the
Invitational tournament
with a 5-2 win against
Richardson Middle School.
Lake City fell against Mayo,
5-2.
The Lady Falcons were 3-
1 in early action with 4-1 and
3-0 wins against Richardson
and a 3-1 win against Mayo.




Unscramble these four Jumbles,
-.one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I NEQUE I


The Lady Falcons' only
defeat came against Taylor
County Middle School in a
5-0 loss.
"We have some guys play-
ing really well," Jennings
said. "Trent Morrison
scored two goals and Brent
Nelson is playing really well
up front"
.Win or lose, each player is
a step ahead of the game.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


TPARNY | .

THs AFTrE HEAR& THE
COMP-AINT ABOUT
KCISYT HER WORKC
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: VIGIL STAFF PATCHY MORALE
I Answer: The Air Force boxing match featured these -
FIGHTER PILOTS


, .R UKANUUN FINLIY/LaKe Ulty Reporter
Lake City Middle School's Joshua Wine attempts to take down Richardson Middle School's
Tavian Wells during the Falcon Invitational on Saturday.


Photos by BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
ABOVE: Lake City Middle School's Ashley Nobles makes a play during a game Saturday.

BELOW: Brent Nelson breaks free against Mayo on Saturday.


ACROSS
1 AMA
members
4 Quark's home
8 Rx monitor
11 Seance
sounds
13 Emperor
before Galba
14 Flee hastily
15 Once again
16 Recognize
18 Arm muscles
20 Living qtrs.
21 Corroded, as
acid
22 Prune
24 Watch innards
27 Woodland
30 Out callers
31 Treasured
32 Cornfield cry
34 Tenth inning
cause
35 Vanilla source
36 Aftermath
37 Casual wear
(hyph.)
39 Jeered at


40 Charged
particle
41 Naval off.
42 With, to Henri
45 Confuse
49 Meat counter
buy (2 wds.)
53 Aloud
54 Give -
rest!
55 Cousin's
mother
56 Perfume
scent
57 Beauty-salon
item
58 Implore
59 Geol.
formations

DOWN
1 Dull
2 Rajah's
spouse.
3 Build on -
(chance a
profit)
4 Biscotto
flavorings


Answer to Previous Puzzle


A AM MAIE ME ISIH
IRA fOARS OLEO
AL CT I C R I LE
BLIT Z FO0A L
MRJOIOPM A|CQ
^CLAS^P DELACON
PAR IMAN OMOO
LTEU ABUT NEW
TAPERS ROI LS
BBC PEA
GARB LATHE
TOGA FEATHERY
EL HI LEIS AMO
MEAD ORD PAW


5 A Kennedy
6 Prospector's
find
7 Wk. day,
8 Toss, as a
coin
9 Foolish


Tan and Irving
Promises
faithfully
Gift-wrapping
need
Qt. parts
Cash advance
Ice hockey
great
Clean a fish
Radiate
Mimics
Daring deed
Picket-line
crosser
Seize
"J urassic
Park" star
Single no
more
Profile
Kind of tooth
Rube
Lion's quarry
Unfurnished
Neat as -
November
word
Was, to Ovid
Band
instrument
Hold out
Taiga
denizens
Bottle top
Ben- -
- whim


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


12-12


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420














Indiana beats Kentucky at buzzer


Associated Press

BLOOMINGTON, Ind.
- Christian Watford hit a
3-pointer at the buzzer to
give Indiana a 73-72 victory
over top-ranked Kentucky
on Saturday night.
Watford finished with 20
points, giving the Hoosiers
their first upset of a top-
ranked team since taking
down Duke in the 2002
NCAA tournament and set-
ting off a wild scene. Fans
stormed the court as offi-
cials looked at the replay
before counting the basket
The Hoosiers (9-0) are
off to their best start since
1989-90.
Doron Lamb scored 19
points to lead the Wildcats
(8-1) and Michael Kidd-
Gilchrist added 18 as
Kentucky's three-game
winning streak over Indiana
ended.
'The teams traded leads
five times in the final 2 min-
utes, but Kentucky missed
the front end of a one-and-one
with 28.8 seconds left and
the first of two free throws
with 5.6 seconds to go.

NO. 13 KANSAS 78,
NO. 2 OHIO STATE 67
'LAWRENCE, Kan. -.


Thomas Robinson scored
21 .points, Elijah Johnson
added 15 and Kansas
never trailed against the
Buckeyes, who were with-
out forward Jared Sullinger
due to injury.
Freshman reserve for-
ward Kevin Young scored
a career-high 14 points, and
Tyshawn Taylor had nine
points and a career-best 13
assists for the Jayhawks
(6-2), who extended their
winning streak to 47 games
over non-conference oppo-
nents at Allen Fieldhouse.
William Buford had 17 of
his 21 points in the second
half for Ohio State (8-1),
which was playing on the
road for the first tine this
season. DeShaun Thomas
added 19 points.
Sullinger, a preseason
All-American, missed a
second straight game with
back spasms.

NO. 5 LOUISVILLE 80,
FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON 58
LOUISVILLE, Ky.
-- Gorgui Dieng had 14
points and 12 rebounds
to lift Louisville to its 17th
straight win at the KFC
Yum! Center.
Kyle Kuric added 18
points and Peyton Siva had


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Indiana's Christian Watford puts up the game-winning shot
during the second half against Kentucky, Saturday.


16 for Louisville, which is
in -the midst of a 10-game
homestand.
Louisville (9-0) used a
10-0 run late in the first


half to open up a 19-point
advantage at the break and
was never threatened in the
second half.
George Goode, who


played three seasons at
Louisville before transfer-
ring to pursue a graduate
degree, had 17 points and
12 rebounds for FDU (1-8).
Melquan Bolding added 23
points.

NO. 7 DUKE 86,
WASHINGTON 80
NEWYORK- Freshman
Austin- Rivers scored 18
points and the Blue Devils
overcame a poor perfor-
mance from the free throw
line at Madison Square
Garden.
The Blue Devils (9-1)
seemed in control, taking
a 19-point lead three times
in the second half. But
the Huskies (4-4) shook
off a terrible first half and
chipped away at the deficit
With Duke making just
12 of 18 free throws over the
final 2:30, Abdul Gaddy's
drive got Washington with-
in 78-72 with 58 seconds
left. Duke made 6 of its last
8 to hold on.

NO. 8 XAVIER 76,
CINCINNATI 53
CINCINNATI Mark
Lyons scored 19 points as
Xavier beat its crosstown
rival in a game that featured


plenty of trash talking and
was called with 9.4 seconds
left because of a brawl.

NO. 10 MISSOURI 84,
NAW 59
COLUMBIA, Mo. -
Marcus Denmon scored
22 points to help Missouri
remain unbeaten and match
its best start since the 2006-
07 season.
Ricardo Ratliffe made 6 of
9 shots and had 14 points,
and Kim English chipped in
13 for the Tigers (9-0).

NO. 14 WISCONSIN 62,
UNLV 51
MADISON, Wis. -
Reserve Ben Brust hit
all seven of his 3-point
attempts and finished with
a career-high 25 points for
the Badgers.
Wisconsin (8-2) went on
a 13-0 run midway through
the first half to, take a 31-15
lead. The Badgers pushed
the advantage to 19 before
the Rebels (9-2) cut it to 36-
23 at the half.
UNLV couldn't get inside
double digits until just
under 4 minutes remained,
when Justin Hawkins hit a
wide open 3 from the cor-
ner to make it 57-49.


Sumlin, Mora land


jobs at TAMU, UCLA


Associated Press

HOUSTON Texas
A&M has hired Houston's
Ievin Sumlin as .its new
coach.
," A&M athletic director
Aill Byrne announced the
decision Saturday. He says
ie believes Sumlin "is the
right person to lead bur
football program into the
Southeastern Conference."
Speculation intensified
lhat Sumlin would move
about 100 miles northwest
to College Station when
A&M fired Mike Sherman
after he went 25-25 in four
seasons. Sumlin was an
assistant coach at A&M
under R.C. Slocum in 2001-
02.
The Aggies (6-6)
are scheduled to play
Northwestern (6-6) in the
Meineke Car Care Bowl in
Houston on Dec. 31, with
A&M defensive coordina-
tor Tim DeRuyter serving
s interim coach.
' It will be the Aggies' last
game as a Big 12 team
before moving to the
Southeastern Conference
next season.
"I am very excited about
the opportunity to serve
as the head football coach
at Texas A&M University,"
Sumlin said in a statement
"Having coached there
before, I understand the
culture and embrace the
commitment by the 12th
Man regarding Aggie foot-
ball. Aggieland is a special


place and I look forward
to working with the young
men in the football pro-
gram and recruiting the
type of players we need
to be successful in the
SEC."
Sumlin told the Cougars
that he was leaving in an
emotional meeting on
Saturday afternoon. -
The Cougars (12-1) play
Penn State (9-3) in the
TicketCity' Bowl in Dallas
on Jan. 2 with assistant
Tony Levine serving as the
interim head coach.

Mora lands at UCLA
LOS ANGELES -
Veteran NFL coach Jim
Mora was hired as UCLA's
coach Saturday, replacing
Rick Neuheisel and becom-
ing the first football coach
of the Bruins in more than
60 years with no ties to the
school. .
Mora was the coach of
the Atlanta Falcons and
Seattle Seahawks, going
31-33 over four seasons.
The son of longtime NFL
coach Jim Mora is a former
University of Washington
defensive back who had
only one season of college
coaching experience at his
alma mater in 1984 before
beginning a 25-year career
in the NFL.
Mora will be introduced
at a news conference next
week.
Neuheisel, who went 21-
29 over four seasons at his


alma mater. He was fired
last month after UCLA was
embarrassed 50-0 by No. 5
Southern California. The
Trojans' postseason ban
still allowed the Bruins
to play in the first Pac-
12 championship game,
where UCLA lost 49-31 to
Oregon last week.
UCLA will play Illinois
in the Kraft Fight Hunger
Bowl on Dec. 31 under
interim coach Mike
Johnson, Neuheisel's
offensive coordinator.
Johnson also was Mora's
quarterbacks coach for
two seasons with the
Falcons.
Mora spent the past two
years out of coaching, work-
ing as a television analyst
after the Seahawks fired
him in January 2010 and
replaced him with former
USC coach Pete Carroll
after"ust one season.
The 50-year-old Mora
was born in Los Angeles
and spent part of his child-
hood in the area, but has no
links UCLA. Athletic direc-
tor Dan Guerrero said that
wasn't a prerequisite for
the job.
The Bruins probably
could use a fresh start:
They haven't played in a
Rose Bowl in 13 seasons
and haven't been ranked
for more than five seasons,
both school-record streaks,
while rarely threatening to
emerge from powerhouse
USC's shadow across
town.


NAW: Has won last 10 over Army


Continued From Page 11

years!" ,
Proctor ran 32 times for
97 yards, and Teich win-
ner of the Campbell Trophy
as the nation's top scholar
athlete carried 18 times
for 93 yards for Navy, which
completed only one pass
in the tussle between run-
heavy, triple-option teams.
Raymond Maples and
Malcolm Brown ran for 82
yards apiece.for Army (3-9),
which finished the 'season
with four straight losses.
The Black Knights.rushed
for 298 yards and complet-
ed only four passes.
Obama, accompanied by
Vice President Joe Biden,
worked the Navy sidelines
before the game, shaking
hands and even getting a
hug from the Navy mascot
- a ram wearing a Santa
hat. The president per-
formed, a left-handed coin
toss at midfield Army
won and elected to receive
- then adhered to presi-
dential tradition by spend-
ing a half on each side
of the field. He switched
from Navy to Army with an
escorted walk on the 50-
.yard line from sideline to
sideline in a formal halftime
ceremony.
Asalways, the pageantry
was breathtaking, start-
ing with the Army Corps
of Cadets' march onto the
field three hours before
kickoff. Then the Navy's
Brigade of Midshipmen
took their turn. Both sides
taunted each other in good
spirits "Why so quiet?"
was the Navy chant after
the Mids took a 14-0 lead


- and beach balls and even
an inflatable snake were bat-
ted around the lower deck
while slick scoreboard vid-
eos poked fun at one acad-
emy or the other.
But there were also stir-
ring. moments of tribute
for the 80,789 inside the
Washington Redskins stadi-
um, and both sides swayed
and sang loudly when Lee
Greenwood performed
"God Bless the U.SA" at
halftime.
Both teams stuck to their
triple option attacks and
rarely even bothered try-
ing to put the ball in the air.
Navy didn't throw a pass
in tife first half, although
Proctor was sacked twice.
Army quarterback Trent
Steelman, starting again
after missing time this sea-
son with left ankle and right
leg injuries, went 1 for 2 in
the half.
After the teams traded
fumbles in the first quar-
ter, Navy took advantage of
a short field to score first
on Proctor's 4-yard run.
Another Army fumble, this
one near midfield, led to
Teich's 10-yard touchdown
run to make it 14-0.
The Black Knights
answered with back-to-back
scoring drives. Steelman
had a 34-yard touchdown
run, and then showed that
a top-notch air attack-isn't
needed to execute the 2-
minute drill. He completed
one pass for 10 yards
- in a 63-yard drive that
took only 1:56 and tied the
'game on Brown's 5-yard
run with 49 seconds to go


in the half.
Teich opened the second
half with his first kickoff
return of the season, plow-
ing 47 yards to give Navy
the ball in Army territory.
Proctor gave the Mids a 21-
14 lead five plays later with
a twisting 2-yard run.
Army responded again,
tying the game with the
Black Knight's fifth touch-
down pass of the season.
Steelman founiAdrown wide
open for a 25-yard strike.
But Army wouldn't score
again.
Navy had committed
only 26 penalties all season
- fewest in the country
- and their first infraction
Saturday came at a bad time
- a false start on third-and-
goal at the 1 with the score
tied in the fourth quarter.
The Mids had to settle for
Teague's 23-yard field goal
to take a 24-21 lead with
12:03 to play.
But Army's James
Whittington fumbled the
ensuing kickoff to give
Navy the ball at the Black
Knights' 27. Teague, who
entered the game having
made only 8 of 13 field goal
attempts this season for
Navy's beleaguered kicking
game, came through again
four plays later with a 44-
yard effort that made it 27-
21 with 10:26 to go.
Needing a touchdown,
Army drove to Navy's 25,
but Steelman was stopped
on fourth-and-7, stuffed for
a 1-yard loss when lineback-
er Matt Warrick read the
triple option perfectly with
4:31 remaining.


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420







4 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011

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Limit one coupon per customer. Customer is responsible for all applicable taxes.
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December 11, 2011 December 31, 2011 at all Publix locations.

LU# 7187 Publix.
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Story ideas?


Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rb,;d .e u : '/o : .; -.ri r r7, r ,i,,Tn


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


Sunday, December I I, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Development director on the job


Jesse Quillen, formerly
of Alabama, assumed
his duties Monday.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com

Jesse Quillen has done a lot of
listening and learning this past
week.
The new Columbia County
Economic Development
Department director's first day
on the job was Monday. His goal
last week was to meet as many
public officials and business and
community leaders as possible.
When he wasn't meeting peo-
ple, Quillen spent time learning
the county's geography, review-
ing existing regulations and edu-
cating himself about Florida's
strict open records and meetings
laws.
"I've had some conversations*
about open records," he said. "I
don't necessarily see that as bad.
The public needs to understand
what's going on."
Quillen said he is excited
about the challenge of his new
job marketing the county to pro-
spective businesses interested
in opening in Columbia County.
And he believes he has lots to
work with.
The county has two interstate
highways and two rail providers
pass through its boundaries. The
county is located near three met-
ropolitan areas Gainesville,


Jacksonville and Tallahassee.
Florida Gateway College, exist-
ing industry, an airport with
room to grow and two hospitals
in the county are also good sell-
ing points, he said.
"Our mission is to work proj-
ects," he said. "We want to be
effective and close deals."
The hospitals are one reason
Quillen said his wife Linda sup-
ported his decision to accept
the position. His wife is a nurse
who has a long commute for her
current job in the Mobile, Ala.
area. When his wife moves here,
Quillen said she hopes to find a
job at one of the hospitals and
spend less time driving to and
from work.
"One of the first things we
looked at is the medical facili-
ties," he said.
Quillen's wife and their
16-year-old son plan to remain in
Alabama until late spring before
moving to Columbia County.
"We want them-to finish the
school year," he said.
He also has a 22-year-old son
who may or may not move to the
area, depending on what hap-
pens after he completes a job
internship.
Quillen brings a unique per-
spective to the job. He served
nine years as mayor of Bruce,
Ala. and understands that funds
that support his department
must be spent wisely because
they are generated by taxpayers.
"I have empathy to situations
they might find themselves in,"


GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
New Columbia County Economic Department director Jesse Quillen points at features of the county's Catalyst
site, which he says has great potential to bring new jobs to the area. Quillen, who has been on the job since
Monday, said his goal is to bring new businesses and protect existing ones in the county.


he said of elected officials. "I
can't expect them to blindly sup-
port everything I do."
Quillen said he plans to begin
writing a formal strategic plan
for his department but hasn't
had a chance to review the exist-
ing plan to see if he needs to
make suggestions or write a new


one.
"It would be foolish to toss
that out and start over," he said
of any existing strategic plan.
But he has some changes
already planned if he gets
approval from the department's
board of directors and his imme-
diate supervisor, county man-


ager Dale Williams.
Quillen said a new depart-
ment website that will include as
much information as possible to
convince prospective businesses
to move here is important.
He said many businesses look
at an economic development
DIRECTOR continued on 2C


LAKE CITY-~COLUMtlIA COUNTY

,d CHAMBER'


BELONG ENGAGE *


LEAD PROSPER


THINK.









FIRST


Lake City Reporter









2C LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011

I------------------*1-* H -H -H


403(b) vs. 401(k)
Q Howy do 403(b) plans and
401(k) plans differ? M.C.,
Tampa, Fla.
A 401 (k) plans are tax-deferred
retirement plans for private-
sector workers, and similar 403(b)s
are primarily for employees of educa-
tional institutions and some non-prof-
its. With both plans, you contribute
"pre-tax" dollars, which are invested
and grow tax-free until withdrawal.
With both, employers will often
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some degree. If your employer does
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tage, 'as this is free money. Employer
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ing. In both cases, employee contri-
butions are immediately fully vested.
Learn more at www.fooLcom/
retirement and www.403bwise.com.

Q What's a UIT? R.G.
Springfield, Mo.
It's a unit investment trust,
invested in a relatively fixed
portfolio of securities (such as, say,
five or 20 stocks or bonds), with
no investment manager buying
and selling holdings throughout its.
defined lifespan The UIT compo-
nents are held until the trust is liqui-
dafed at a predetermined date in the
future which could be several or
many years down the road.
Investors who want to
trade shares of a UIT before
it matures can often do so on the
secondary market. Unlike a mutual
fund, UIT share prices in the sec-
ondary market maN be priced above
or below the net asset value of the
trust's actual holdings.
WhTen you buy shares of UITs,
you typically pay a sales fee, or
load, of around 4 or 5 percent,
but the ongoing management fees /
tend to be low. Man) mutual funds,
in contrast, charge no sales load
at all, but cari charge more in
annual fees.
Learn more at www.sec.gov/
answers/uit.htm.
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Stocks close higher as Europe nears budget pact


By DANIEL WAGNER
Associate Press
A deal to forge stron-
ger ties between most of
Europe's economies sent
stocks sharply higher Friday
as hopes grew that'the
region is close to resolving
its debt crisis. The Dow
Jones industrial average rose
186 points.
All 17 nations that use
the euro agreed to sign a
treaty that allows a central
European authority closer
oversight of their budgets.
Nine other EU nations are
considering it Britain is the-
lone holdout
The agreement came
after marathon overnight
talks among European lead-
ers at a two-day summit in
Brussels. A deal on tighter
fiscal control is considered
a crucial step before the
European Central Bank will
consider committing more
money to lower borrowing
costs of heavily indebted
countries like Italy and Spain
by buying their bonds.
Ryan Detrick, senior
technical strategist with


Schaffer's Investment
Research, cautioned that
investors have been disap-
pointed by Europe's previ-
ous efforts to contain its
debt crisis. The market will
likely remain volatile in the
coming weeks, Detrick said,
because the Europe plan is
"only a minor step" toward a
solution.
"We've seen these agree-
ments before, and they can
just as easily deteriorate,"
Detrick said.
The Dow closed up 186.56
points, or 1.6 percent, at
12,184.26. Ifs up 1.4 percent
for the week.
Bank stocks led the mar-
ket higher, reflecting traders'
optimism about Europe's
progress toward solving its
crisis. Citigroup Inc. rose
3.7 percent, Morgan Stanley
3.2 percent and JPMorgan
Chase & Co. 3 percent
Banks have been weighed
down for months by fears
about their exposure
to Europe. The biggest
European banks have been
downgraded. If Europe's cri-
sis spins out of control, U.S.
banks that do business with


them would also suffer.
The Standard & Poor's
500 index closed up 20.84
points, or 1.7 percent,
at 1,255.19. The Nasdaq
composite index finished
up 50.47, or 1.9 percent, at
2,646.85. The S&P is up 0.9
percent for the week, the
Nasdaq 0.8 percent
The gains were broad.
,DuPont was the only stock
among the 30 in the Dow
average to fall. The chemical
and materials company slid
3.2 percent after saying it
expects earnings this year
will fall well short of Wall
Street's forecasts because of
weak demand for electronics
and industrial supplies.
It was the second con-
secutive week of gains for
all three indexes. Stocks
were pummeled two
weeks ago as borrowing
costs soared for European
nations such as Italy. They
recovered last week after
the world's major central
banks announced a pro-
gram to give commercial
banks easier, cheaper
access to loans in U.S. dol-
lars.


Specialist Michael Gagliano, foreground right, works on the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange on Friday.


Both the Dow and the
S&P have risen 14 percent
since hitting yearly lows
on Oct. 3. Only the Dow,
however, is higher for the
year.


Trading volume was
very light Just 3.6 billion
shares were traded on the
New York Stock Exchange,
well below the recent daily
average of 4.7 billion.


The yield on the 10-year
Treasury note rose to 2.07
percent from 1.97 percent
late Thursday, signaling
lower demand for ultra-
safe investments.


Colleges buying .xxx sites to

thwart porn, protect school


By PATRICK CONDON
Associated Press
ST. PAUL, Minn. The University of
Kansas is buying up website names such
as www.KUgirls.xxx and www.KUnurses.
xxx. But not because it's planning a Hot
Babes of Kansas site or an X-rated gal-
lery of the Nude Girls of the Land of
Aaahs.
Instead, the university and countless
other schools and businesses are rush-
ing to prevent their good names from
falling into the hands of the pornography
industry. Over the past two months,
they have snapped up tens of thousands
of ".xxx" website names that could be
exploited by the adult entertainment
business.
"Down the road there's no way we can


predict what some unscrupulous entre-
preneur might come up with," said Paul
Vander Tuig, trademark licensing director
at the Lawrence, Kan., school.
The university spent nearly $3,000 in all.
It plans to sit on the .xxx names and do
nothing with them.
The brand-new .xxx suffix is an adults-
only variation on .com. The .xxx name
went on sale to the public for the first
time this week, promoted as a way to
enable porn sites to distinguish them-
selves and a means of making it easier
for Internet filters to screen out things
parents don't want their children to see.
ICM Registry of Palm Beach, Fla., is
the exclusive manager of the .xxx names
and sells them through a dozen middle-
man companies such as GoDaddy.com
for an average of $100 a year.


Paul Vander Tuig, trademark
licensing director at Kansas
University, pose for a photo-
graph. Kansas University has
purchased .xxx domains to
protect its school and brand
from being linked to pomo-
graphic sites.


DIRECTOR: On the job

Continued From Page 1C


authority's website before
they ever contact some-
one for more informa-
tion or to make an
appointment for a tour
or negotiate an agree-
ment.
A new website would
include information
about all the county's
selling points and
include information
about available sites.
"You can get elimi-
nated and not even know
they looked at you," he
said. "The environment
is ultra competitive."
He also wants to
work closely with other
departments and orga-


nizations because it's
important to ensure
everyone is providing
the same information.
"We need to all essen-
tially be telling the
same story," he said.
His goal is not just to
create new jobs but to
protect existing ones.
"There has to be
something quantifi-
able you can put your
hands on," he said of
ways to gauge his job
performance. "But it's
not all about new jobs.
Retention of existing
jobs is also important,
even if it's hard to quan-
tify."


TThe Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


I Askthe Fool












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


NYSE A Amex
7,502.88 449.33 2,291.91 +39.54


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
McClatchy 2.36 +1.22 +107.0
Talbots 2.83 +1.29 +83.8
SuccessF 39.87+13.62 +51.9
MSewrt 4.38 +1.37 +45.5
WirissHT 39.90+10.51 +35.7
DrxRsaBear38.83 +8.33 +27.3
Skyline 7.00 +1.42 +25.4
GCSaba 9.08 +1.77 +24.2
MGIC 3.78 +.72 +23.5
IntraUnks 6.40 +1.21 +23.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
DxRssBull rs33.24-11.53 -25.7
Invacare 16.00 -4.26 -21.0
ET2xNGIn 8.25 -1.84 -18.2
Blyth 57.89-12.18 -17.4
Resolutewt 2.10 -.43 -17.0
Fusion-ion 26.90 -5.06 -15.8
E-House 5.02 -.89 -15.1
GettyRty 13.09 -2.30 -14.9
Hyperdyn 3.23 -.54 -14.3
ChiCBIood 2.24 -.36 -13.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 13274767 5.72 +.08
S&P500ETF9220355126.05+1.19
SPDRFnd4444514 13.10 +.19
GenElec 3623987 16.84 +.75
Cihigrp rs 3085562 28.77 +.60
iShEMkts 2926840 39.37 -.40
FordM 2777072 11.03 +.13
iShR2K 2491433 74.54+1.04
Pfizer 2260301 20.56 *.67
JPMorgCh2197571 33.18 +.85

Diary
Advanced 1,913
Declined 1,232
New Highs 240
New Lows 44
Total issues 3,201
Unchanged 56
Volume 19,550,841,287


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SaratogaRs 6.07 +1.46 +31.7
PemixTh 9.85 +1.65 +20.1
EvolPetrol 8.76 +1.46 +20.0
BovieMed 2.66 +.42 +18.8
ComstkMn 2.02 +.27 +15.4
MexcoEn 7.91 +1.01 +14.6
HMG 4.14 +.44 +11.9
Procerars 17.59 +1.83 +11.6
Dreams 2.45 +.24 +10.9
LadThalFn 2.52 +.23 +10.0

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Orbital 3.98 -1.18 -22.9
Aerosonic 2.74 -.65 -19.2
ASpecRlty 6.40 -1.40 -17.9
TasmanMg 2.06 -.41 -16.6
HallwdGp 9.35 -1.62 -14.8
WhiteRiv 19.56 -3.24 -14.2
Protalix 5.37 -.76 -12.4
Timminsg 2.15 -.26 -10.8
ChinNEPet .2.10 -.25 -10.6
ElephTalk 3.05 -.33 -9.8

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
GrtBasGg 167901 1.11 +.16
NwGoldg 141414 10.81 +.18
AntaresP 141414 2.68 -.06
CheniereEn 133214 9.52 -.31
GoldStrg 123380 2.06 +.05
NovaGldg 101920 10.85 +.09
YMBiog 97930 1.58 +.23
Rentech 94109 1.55 +.05
VantageDrt 75708 1.15 -.01
NAPallg 63198 3.13 +.02

Diary
Advanced 260
Declined 252
New Highs 40:
New Lows 21
Total issues 526
Unchanged 14
Volume 392,564,481


Nasdaq
2,646.85 +19.92


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Crumb un h 4.25 +1.73 +68.5
DemandTc 13.12 +5.16 +64:8
Affymax 7.64 +2.39 +45.5
CarrollB 3.06 +.93 +43.7
Cyanotch h 8.59 +2.59 +43.2
BlueCoat 25.11 +7.30 +41.0
DiamondF 40.56+11.26 +38.4
G-ll 24.79 +6.59 +36.2
AtiCstFnh 2.38 +.63 +36.0
Flowlnt 3.52 +.93 +35.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
MiteiNetg 2.75 -.78 -22.1
Poniard rs 3.85 -1.03 -21.1
Pharmacyc 12.39 -3.24 -20.7
EssexRent 2.47 -.62 -20.1
PFSweb 2.73' -.68 -19.9
XenoPort 3.94 -.89 -18.4
CarolTrBk 2.34 -.51 -17.9
ImpeISgr 4.82 -.98 -16.9
HSW Intl h 2.42 -.48 -16.6
KiORn 12.79 -2.35 -15.5

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
Microsoft 2767280 25.70 +.48
Intel 2465557 25.01 +.37
Clearwire 2206665 2.15 +.01
Cisco 2172450 18.88 +.33
PwShs QQQ207279757.02 +.40
SiriusXM 1996546 1.75 -.11
MicronT 1453894 5.89 +.09
Oracle 1187189 31.69 +.49
Amgen. 908087 58.59 +.49
FstNiagara 890801 8.73 -.16

Diary
Advanced 1,440
Declined 1,236
New Highs 109
New Lows 147
Total issues 2,742
Unchanged 66
Volume 8,299,089,997


The Week in Review


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg%Chg%Chg
vjAMR NY ... .65 +.26 +67.5 -91.7
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 29.03 +.07 +0.2 -1.2
Alcoa NY .12 9.64 -.27 -2.7 -37.4
AutoZone NY ... 329.82 -.40, -0.1 +21.0
BkofAm NY .04 5.72 +.08 +1.4 -57.1
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 32.10 -1.30 -3.9 -2.6
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 15.43 +.17 +1.1 +4.2
CSXs NY .48 21.32 -.33 -1.5 -1.0
Chevron NY 3.12 104.25 +2.56 +2.5 +14.2
Cisco Nasd .24 18.88 +.33 +1.8 -6.7
Citgrprs NY .04 28.77 +.60 +2.1 -39.2
Clearwire Nasd ... 2.15 +.01 +0.2 -58.3
CocaCola NY 1.88 67.57 +1.19 +1.8 +2.7
Delhaize NY 2.45 58.11 -1.04 -1.8 -21.2
DrSCBr rs NY ... 26.85 -1.59 -5.6 -42.7
DirFnBrrs NY ... 36.48 -2.14 -5.3 -18.6
DirxSCBullNY ... 46.08 +1.75 +3.9 -36.4
FamilyDIr NY .72 57.86 -.84 -1.4 +16.4
FordM NY .20 11.03 +.13 +1.2 -34.3
GenElec NY .68 16.84 +.75 +4.7 -7.9
Hallibrtn NY .36 34.08 -2.50 -6.8 -16.5
HomeDp NY 1.16 40.23 +.29 +0.7 +14.7
iShEMkts NY .84 39.37 -.40 -1.0 -17.4
iSEafe NY 1.68 51.04 +.25 +0.5 -12.3
iShR2K NY 1.02 74.54 +1.04 +1.4 -4.7
Intel Nasd .84 25.01 +.37 +1.5 +18.9
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 33.18 +.85 +2.6 -21.8
Lowes NY .56 24.97 +.66 +2.7 -.4


Name Ex Div
McDnlds NY 2.80
Merck .NY 1.68
MicronT Nasd ...
Microsoft Nasd .80
MorgStan NY .20
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobltyH If Nasd ...
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Orade Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShsHQQQNasd .41
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFn NY .04
Ryder NY 1.16
S&P500ETFNY 2.46
SearsHldgsoNasd
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndcNY .20
TimeWarn NY .94
WalMart NY 1.48
WellsFargo NY .48


Wkly Wkly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg
98.03 +2.33 +2.4 +27.7
35.68 +.20 +0.6 -1.0
5.89 +.09 +1.6 -26.6
25.70 +.48 +1.9 -7.9
16.38 +.86 +5.5 -39.8
7.78 +.05 +0.6 -20.6
57.48 +1.72 +3.1 +10.6
6.36 +.06 +1.0 -21.6
5.16 -.46 -8.2 -50.0
94.40 -1.06 -1.1 -3.8
31.69 +.49 +1.6 +1.2
33.58 +.60 +1.8 +3.9
65.19 +.91 +1.4 -.2
20.56 +.67 +3.4 +17.4
40.76 -1.53 -3.6 -21.0
57.02 +.40 +0.7 +4.7
19.53 -.41 -2.1 -17.8
4.12 -.10 -2.4 -41.1
53.02 +.17 +0.3 +.7
126.05 +1.19 +1.0 +.2
56.96 -1.60 -2.7 -22.8
1.75 -.11 -5.9 +7.4
44.56 +.80 +1.8 +16.6
2.47 -.13 -5.0 -41.6
13.10 +.19 +1.5 -17.9
34.60 +.19 +0.6 +7.6
58.32 +,60 +1.0 +6.1
26.91 +.84 +3.2 -13.2


Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards.
If = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price, s = Stock has split by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi =
When Issued. wtl= Warrants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or
redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day's
net asset value, s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gatners and
Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week


Prime-Rate


e taRt nuocsiD


3.25 3.25


n0.10 A0.1c


Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.008 0.003
6-month 0.04 0.05
5-year 0.89 0.91
10-year 2.06 2.03
30-year 3.11 3.02


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AES Corp ...
AFLAC 1.32 3.0
AK Steel .20 2.3
vjAMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.9
AbtLab 1.92 3.5
Accenture 1.35 2.3
AMD
Aetna .70 1.7
Agilent
AlcatelLuc .
Alcoa .12 1.2
Allstate .84 3.1
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.64 5.7
Ameren 1.60 4.9
AMovilL s .28 1.2
AEagleOut .44 3.0
AEP 1.88 4.7
AmExp .72 1.5
AmintlGrp ...
Anadarko P.6 .4
AnalogDev 1.00 2.8
Annaly 2.51 15.6
ArcelorMit .75 4.0
ArchCoal .44 2.8
ArchDan .70 2.4
ArmourRsdl.32 18.6
AssuredG .18 1.3
ATMOS 1.38 4.2
AuRico g ...
Avon .92 5.5
BB&TCp .64 .2.7
BHP BilILt 2.02 2.7
BakrHu .60 1.2
BcoBrades .80 4.6
BcoSantSA .84 10.6
BcoSBrasil 1.65 20.1
BkofAm .04 .7
BkNYMeI .52 2.7
Barclay .36 3.0
Bar iPVix ...
BarrickG .60 1.2
Baxter 1.34 2.7
BerkH-B ... ...
BestBuy .64 2.3
BlockHR .80 5.0
Boeing 1.68 2.3
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.36 4.1
CBRE Grp ...
CBS B .40 1.5
CSX s .48 2.3
CVS Care .50 1.3
CbivsNYs .60 4.2
CapOne .20 .4
CapiftSrce .04 .6
CardnlHIth .86 2.1
-Carnival 1.00 2.9
Caterpillar 1.84 1.9
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 4.0
CntryUnk 2.90 8.1
ChesEng .35 1.4
Chevron 3.12 3.0
Chicos .20 1.8
Chimera .57 21.2
Cigna .04 .1
Citigrp rs .04 .1
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.6
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
Comerica .40 .1.5
CmclMtIs .48 3.3
ConAgra .96 3.7
ConocPhil 2.64 3.7.
ConEd 2.40 4.1
ConstellEn .96 2.4
Coming .30 2.2
Covidien .90 2.0


19 -.08
9 +.07
... +.39
... +.26
15 +.07
19 +.42
17 +.33
4 -.11
8 -.10
12 -1.43
+.04
10 -.27
40 +.25-
55 -.66
17 +.37
14 +.26
10 -.98
16 +.65
.11 +.48
12 +.57
... +.93
... -.23
13 -.06
8 -.11
14 -.20
14 -.66
9 -.87
15
4 +2.15
14 +.35
... -.71
10 -.09
15 +.39
... -.26
13 -3.23
... +.16
... .34
... +.15
+.08
9 +.31
.. +.13
... -.18
11 -1.21
13 -.75
17 +.17
9 +.51
15 +.89
.14 +.63
15 '-.16
17 +.77
19 -1.03
15 +1.18
13 -.33
15 +.08
12 -.91
6 +.73
33 -.25
16 +.45
14 +.57
15 -.32
... +.29
15 +.20
16 +.24
7 -.78
8 +2.56
14 +.65
5 +.06
9 -.46
8 +,60
3 +1.01
12 +1.19
12 +1.29
... +.34
15 +.41
10 -.60
16 +.63
17 +.29
7 +.57
12 -.97


Name DIv
CSVS2xVxS...
CSVeilVSt s..
DDR Corp .32
DR Horton .15
DTE 2.35
Danaher -.10
Darden 1.72
Deere 1.64
DetaAir ...
DenburyR ...
DeutschBk 1.07
DevonE .68
DxFnBull rs ...
DrSCBr rs ...
DirFnBrrs ...
DirLCBr rs ..
DrxEnBear ...
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24
Disney .60
DollarGeri ...
DomRescs 1.97
DowChm 1.00
DukeEngy 1.00
EMC Cp
Eatons 1.36
Ecolab .80
ElPasoCp .04
EldorGld g .12
EmersonEl 1.60
EnCana g .80
EntPrPt 2.45
Exelon 2.10
ExxonMbl 1.88
FMC Tch s ..
FstHorizon .04
RrstEngy 2.20
FootLockr .66
FordM .20
ForestOils ...
FMCd s 1.00
FrontierCm .75
Frontline
Fusion-ion ...
Gafisa SA .29
Gannett .32
Gap .45
GenGrPrp .40
GenMills 1.22
GenMotors....
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .20
Goldcrp g .54
GoldmanS 1.40
Goodyear ...
Hallibrtn .36
HartfdFn .40
HItMgmt ...
HeclaM .02
Hertz .
Hess .40
HewlettP .48
HollyFrts .40
.HomeDp 1.16
HonwillntI 1.49
HostHotis, .16
Huntsmn .40
ING
ION Geoph ...
iShGold ...
iSAstla 1.06
iShBraz 3.42
iSBGer .67
iSh HK .42
iShJapn .17
iSTaiwn .29
IShSilver ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
... -.74 -34.1 42.67
... ... -.03 -51.3 5.82
2.7 ... +.11 -17.0 11.69
1.2 55 +.77 +6.1 12.66
4.5 12 +.49 +15.1 52.18
.2 17 -.58 -.5 46.92
4.0 13 -4.32 -7.0 43.21
2.1 12 +.65 -5.7 78.34
... 12 +.09 -32.5 8.50
... 13 -.19 -13.9 16.44
2.7 ... -.40 -23.9 39.60
1.0 6 +1.17 -15.2 66.56
... .. +2.30 -53.2 65.12
... ... -1.59 -42.7 26.85
... ... -2.14 -18.6 38.48
... ... -.92 -31.3 30.11
... ... -.15 -49.3 11.43
... ... +1.75 -36.4 46.08
... ... -.06 -17.3 48.34
1.0 7 +.53 +33.5 24.74
1.6 15 -.05 -2.5 36.56
... 19 +.50 +31.9 40.44
3.9 18 +.21 +18.8 50.77
3.7 11 -.65 -20.6 2f.10
4.8 16 +.24 +17.1 20.86
... 23 +.29 +2.8 23.55
3.1 12 -.48 -12.6 44.35
1.4 26 +.06 +10.9 55.90
.2 ... -.42 +80.7 24.87
... 32 -1.00 -11.5 16.43
3.1 16 +.18 -9.8 51.54
4.2 34 -1.07 -34.2 19.17
5.4 36 -.78 +9.3 45.50
4.8 11 ,+.25 +4.7 43.58
2.3 10 +1.55 +11.2 81.34
... 33 -1.32 +16.7, 51.86
.5 33 +.27 -33.5 7.83
4.9 14 +.48 +20.9 44.77
2.6 15 +.60 +28.4 25.19
1.8 5 +.13 -34.3 11.03
... 16 +.54 -38.1 16.92
2.5 7 +.43 -33.8 39.73
14.5 34 -.20 -47.0 5.16
... ... +.60 -85.7 3.64
... ... -5.06 +19.6 26.90
4.9 ... -.30 -59.5 5.89
2.4 6 +1.51 -11.6 13.34
2.4 11 +.15 -14.5 18.85
2.8 ... +.20 -8.8 14.12
3.0 16 +.46 +13.6 40.42
... 5 -.13 -42.6 21.15
... ... -.05 -31.5 2.61
... ... +.28 -48.6 6.75
2.5 ... +.11 -43.8 7.86
1.1 20 -1.07 +9.4 50.32
1.4 16 +4.20 -39.7 101.45
...32 +.43 +22.8 14.55
1.1 12 -2.50 -16.5 34.08
2.3 7 -.42 -34.0 17.49
.. 10 -.16 -23.4 7.31
... 16 +.48 -42.7 6.45
... 14, -.26 -20.2 11.57
.7 10 -1.18,-23.6 58.47
1.7 6 +.22 -33.7 27.90
1.7 4 -1.44 +12.5 22.93
2.9 17 +.29 +14.7 40.23
2.8 14 -.13 +1.6 54.JO
1.1 ... ... -19.9 14.31
3.9 7 -.83 -34.4 J0.24
... ... -.13 -20.0 .7.83
... 32 +.97 -19.9 6.79
... ... -.35 +20.0 16.68
4.6 ... -.16 -9.0 23.15
5.7 ... +.29 -22.1 60.30
3.3 ... -.17 -15.8' 20.16
2.7 ... -.06 -16.9 15.73
1.8 ... +.07 -13.8 9.40
... .. -.35 -23.2 11.99
... ... -.32 +3.8 31.33


YOU CAN'T CONTROL




THE WORLD,

BUT YOU CAN CONTROL YOUR DECISIONS.

SiJiilliini' 11he market reacts poorly to world events, but

just because the market reacts doesn't mean you should.
Still, if current events are making you feel uncertain
about your finances, you should schedule a comlilimen-
tary portfolio review. That way, you can make sure
you're in control. of where you want to go and how you
get ilhere,


(Call or visit your local financial advisor today.

Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor

2929 West U S Highway 90

Lake City, FL 32055 www.edwardjones.com MoherSi.C
386-752-3847 MemberSPC


Name DIv YId
iShChina25 .85 2.3
iSSP500 2.45 1.9
iShEMkts .84 2.1
iShB20 T' 3.87 3.3
iS Eafe 1.68 3.3
iShR2K 1.02 1.4
iShREst 2.18 3.9
ITW 1.44 3.1
IngerRd .48 1.4
IBM 3.00 1.5
IntIGame .24 1.4
IntPap 1.05 3.7
Interpublic .24 2.5
Invesco .49 2.4
InvMtgCap 3.42 23.2
ItauUnibH .84 4.4
IvanhM g 1.48
JPMorgCh 1.00 3.0
Jaguar g .... .
JanusCap .20 3.1
Jefferies .30 2.4.
JohnJn 2.28 3.5
JohnsnCti .72 2.3
JnprNtwk. ...
KB Home .25 3.1
Keycorp .12 1.6
Kimco .76 4.7
Kinross g .12 .9
KodiakO g ... ...
Kehls 1.00 2.0
Kraft 1.16 3.2
LDK Solar ...


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASMLHId .58 1.4
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.3
AdobeSy ...
Affymax
AkamaiT
Alexza
AlteraCplf .32 .9
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 19.4
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.12 1.9
Apollolnv 1.12.15.8
Apple Inc
ApldMatl .32 2.9
ArenaPhm ...
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .15 .6
Atmel
Autodesk
AutoData 1.58 3.0
AvagoTch .48 1.6
AvisBudg ...
Baidu
BlueCoat
Broadcom .36 1.2
Broadwdh ...
BrcdeCm
CA Inc .20 .9
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene
CellTher rsh...
CentEuro ...
ChrmSh ... ...
ChinaMed ...
CienaCorp ...
CinnFin 1.61 5.4


+.94
49 -1.03
19 -.03
15 +.93
... +2.39
28 -.79
... -.40
14 -1.26
... -3.00
4 +.52
3 -.10
15 +.49
... -.11
14 +3.92
8 +.37
... +.32
... -.27
.. -1.02
8 -.12
29 +.42
20 +1.58
14 -.55
8 -.48
51 -3.57
42 +7.30
18 +.30
... +.13
31 +.20
13 +.38
26 +.07
... +.02
26 +2.37
... +.07
1 +.67
... +.22
3 -.35
... +.27
50 +.75


+8.5 41.60
-35.0 34.57
-1.6 12.24
-8.9 28.04
+14.9 7.64
-40.0 28.21
-50.0 .63
+.9 35.89
+7.2 193.03
+.6 28.90
-6.3 7.08
+6.7 58.59
-36.1 7.07
+22.0 393.62
-20.3 11.20
+16.3 2.00
+128.0 11.63
+29.3 26.83
-27.4 8.94
-10.0 34.39
+13.4 52.48
+7.7 30.61
-24.8 11.70
+35.2 130.52
-15.9 25.11
-30.4 30.29
-66.4 .78
+4.9 5.55
-12.4 21.41
+31.8 10.89
+10.4 1.06
+7.5 63.58
-46.1 1.18
-75.2 5.68
+34.6 4.78
-73.6 2.97
-41.9 12.22
-6.4 29.67


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Cisco .24
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
Costco .96
Cree Inc
Ctrip.com ...
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
DemandTc ...
Dndreon
DiamondF .18
DirecTV A ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips .12
E-Trade
eBay
ElectArts
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
Fastenal s .56
FiberTwrIf ...
FifthThird .32
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
FstSolar ...
Flextrn ...
FocusMda ...
Fortinets ...
GT AdvTc ...
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC ..
Groupon n ...
HercOffsh ...


16 +.33
... +.01
25 +.88
16 -.68
16 -.65
25 -2.36
26 -.80
20 -2.98
21 -.30
8 +.09
... +5.16
-.66
18+11.26
14 -.76
9 -.38
9 -.25
... -.05
37 -.16
23 +2.04
... -1.01
-.21
17 +.40
18 -.62
37 +.45
... +.15
11 +.39
23 +.11
12 -.16
7 -2.10
8 -.03
19 +2.78
61 +.15
5 -.29
11 -.39
20 +7.06
45 +2.12
...+4.53
+.11


-6.7 18.88
-58.3 2.15
-5.3 69.38
+3.7 22.68
+8.8 22.54
+16.8 84.37
-63.9 23.79
-42.6 23.20
-.6 18.46
+16.5 15.79
+21.0 13.12
-77.2 7.96
-23.7 40.56
+15.4 46.06
+31.4 25.83
-16.5 14.58
-56.8 2.37
-44.3 8.91
+13.7 31.64
+34.2 21.99
-13.3 10.00
+13.6 28.50
-14.9 45.99
+40.4 42.05
-93.3 .30
-14.8 12.51
-44.1 16.59
-37.6 8.73
-64.9 45.67
-24.8 5.90
+3.6 22.71
+51.7 24.54
-10.5 8.16
+7.6 39.01
+5.6 627.42
+77.8 58.44
-10.1 23.48
+20.7 4.20


Name Div
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
Illumina
Intel .84
JA Solar ..
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.40
LeapWirss ...
UbtintA h
ULirearTch .96
lululemn gs ...
Magma
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .88
MelcoCrwn .,.
MicronT
Microsoft .80
NIIl!dg ...
NetApp
Netflix ...
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
NorTrst 1.12
NuanceCm...
Nvidia
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd
Oracle .24
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .72
PacEth rs ...
PacSunwr ...
PaftUTI .20
PeopUtdF .63
PeregrineP ...
PoDular


Wkly YTD Willy


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
-.10 -15.8 36.30
+1.12 +.2 126.46
-.40 -17.4 39.37
... -1.93 +24.0 116.71
.. +.25 -12.3 51.04
... +1.04 -4.7 74.54'
+.74 -1.0 55.41
12 +1.18 -11.7 47.13
.. -.05 -29.5 33.18
'15 +4.90 +32.6 194.56
18 -.23 -5.3 16.76
10 -.50 +3.8 28.27
11 +.04 -9.8 9.58
11 +.50 -13.6 20.78
4 -.90 -32.6 14.71
... +.54 -20.1 19.09
...,+1.60 -5.0 21.78
7 +.85 -21.8 33.18
-.70 -10.4 6.39
7 -.08 -50.0 6.48
9 +.21 -52.6 12.61
16 +1.06 +4.3 64.53
14 +.40 -16.4 31.95
21 -2.70 -46.1 19.90
... +.16 -40.0 8.10
7 +.18 -16.6 7.38
73 +.45 -11.1 16.04
18 -.39 -29.5 13.36
44 +.21 +39.1 9.18
12 +.64 -6.3 50.90
20 +.20 +16.5 36.70
8 +.79 -55.0 4.55


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
5.4 ... +.09 -53.5 5.93
.... ... -.03 -68.4 7.54
36 +.59 -55.2 28.37
3.4 11 +.37 +18.9 25.01
4 -.13 -76.6 1.62
... .39 -.11 -25.4 10.80
... 22 +.61 -23.6 5.05
2.9 10 +2.05 +26.8 49.00
... ... -.49 -31.7 8.37
... 15 +.14 +1.5 16.01
3.2 13 -.41 -12.6 30.23
42 -1.89 +39.7 47.80
... ... +.04 +43.7 7.20
12 +.50 -23.0 14.29
3.2 14 +.28 +13.0 28.73
3.4 15 -.12 +8.4 25.61
42 -.83 +44.7 9.20
... 39 +.09 -26.6 5.89
3.1 9 +.48 -7.9 25.70
... 11 -2.25 -54.7 20.23
.. 22 +1.47 -30.8 38.01
... 16 +4.52 -59.7 70.89
1.1 16 -.04 +20.6 17.56
1.1 16 -.04 +9.4 17.96
2.8 15 +1.75 -28.3 39.74
+.68 +36.1 24.74
... 14 -.82 -3.2 14.90
... 6 +1.60 -55.3 13.23
23 +.10 -17.6 8.14
.8 18 +.49 +1.2 31.69
... 19 -.05 -37.4 5.38
1.8 17 -.24 -30.1 40.10
... ... -.28 -76.1 1.21
... ... +.36 -69.0 1.68
1.0 '11 -.37 -2.6 20.98
5.0 23 +.01 -10.8 12.50
... ... +.20 -49.1 1.17
-.22 -58.0 1.32


Name Div
LSI Corp ...
LVSands
LennarA .16
UllyEli 1.96
Limited .80
UncNat .32
UzClaib ...
LloydBkg ...
LyonBas A 1.00
MBIA
MEMC
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .80
Manulife g .52
MarathnO s .60
MarathPn 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MarintA .40.
Masco .30
McClatchy ...
Mechel
Medtmic .97
Merck ..68
MetUfe .74
MetroPCS ...
MobileTele 1.06
Molycorp
Monsanto 1.20




Name Div
PwShs QQQ.41
PriceTR 1.24
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ..
RschMotn ...
RiverbedT ...
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
Sequenom ...
Shutterfly ...
SIcnware .28
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol
SpectPh
Spreadtrm .20
Staples .40
Starbucks .68
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .24
THQ
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .90,
TibcoSft ...
TriQuint ...
UrbanOut ...
VertxPh ...
ViacomB 1.00
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 2.10
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
Yahoo ...
ZionBcp .04


E wat lyjone
MAKING SENSE OF ^^^INETG


Wkly YrTD
YId PE Chg .%Chg
... 11 -.04 -4.3
26 -2.05 -4.3
.8 41 +1.23 +4.7
5.0 9 +1.90 +12.1
2.0 15 +.22 +32.9
1.6 6 -.02 -27.9
... ... -.09 +16.3
... ... +.12 -60.1
3.0 6 +.38 +11.8
... ... +.67 -5.8
... +.14 -60.7
... ... +.72 -62.9
... -.16 -32.5
1.2. 12 +.25 +29.6
.7 ... -.26 -16.7
2.1 ... -.56 -40.3
... ... +.09 -35.5
2.1 7 +.56 +26.0
2.9 ... +1.57 -10.6.
.7 ... -.42 -5.9
.7 -2.72 -27.3
1.3 59 -1.0P -28.0
3.2 ... +.07 -25.8.
... 7 +1.22 -49.5
... ... -1.10 -65.7
2.7 11 +1.31 -3.2
4.7 13 +.20 -1:0
2.3 9 +.03 -28.5
... 14 +.18 -32.9
7.1 12 -.98 -28.0
30 -3.29 -41.4
1.7 24 +.81 +2.3


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


MonstrWw ...
MorgStan .20 1.2
Mosaic .20 .4
NCRCorp ...
NRG Egy ...
Nabors
NatGrid 3.00 6.3
NOilVarco .48 .7
NatRetPrp 1.54 6.0
NY CmtyB 1.00 8.3
NewfldExp ...
NewmtM 1.40 2.1
NextEraEn 2.20 3.8
NiSource .92 4.1
NobleCorp .55 1.7
NokiaCp .55 10.7
NorflkSo 1.72 2.3
Nucor 1.45 3.6
OcciPet 1.84 1.9
OfficeDpt ... ...
OilSvHT 1.82 1.1
OldRepub .70 7.6
PG&E Cp 1.82 4.8
PNC 1.40 2.5
PPL Corp 1.40 4.8
PatriotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34 .9
Penney .80 2.4
PepsiCo 2.06 3.2
PetrbrsA 1.34 5.2
Petrobras 1.26 4.6
Pfizer .80 3.9
PhilipMor 3.08 4.1
PitnyBw 1.48 7.9
PlainsEx ... ...
Potash s .28 .7
PdnFncl .70 2.9
ProShtS&P ... .
PrUShS&P ...
PrUIShDow ...
ProUltQQQ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
ProUltSP .31 .7
ProUShL20 ...
ProUSSP500...
PrUltSP500s.03 ....
ProUSSiv rs...
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.2
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudent 1.45 2.9
PSEG 1.37 4.3
PulteGrp ...
RadianGrp .01 .4
Raytheon 1.72 3.8
RegionsFn .04 1.0
Renren n ...
RepubSvc .88 3.2
RioTnto 1.17 2.3
RiteAid
SAIC
SKTIcm ...
SLM Cp .40 3.1
SpdrDJIA 3.16 2.6
SpdrGold ... ...
SPMid 1.64 1.0
S&P500ETF2.46 2.0
SpdrHome .31 1.8
SpdrLehHY4.20 10.2
SpdrRetl .49 .9
SpdrOGEx .50 .9
SpdrMetM .42 .8
Safeway .58 2.8
StJude .84 2.4
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82 5.1
SaraLee .46 2.4
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.3
Schwab '.24 2.0
SeadrillLtd 3.14 9.1


+.63 -66.3 7.97
+.86 -39.8 16.38
-.70 -33.9 50.51
-.26 +11.2 17.09
-.44 -3.1 18.93
+.46 -23.4 17.98
+.08 +7.3 47.60
+2.35 +9.1 73.40
+.25 -3.3 25.63
+.12 -36.2 12.03
-3.72 -41.9 41.88
+.26 +9.0 66.94
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-.31 +26.3 22.25
-1.61 -7.6 33.04
-.46 -50.0 5.16
-1.22 +17.5 73.79
+.29 -7.3 40.61
-1.06 -3.8 94.40
+.03 -55.7 2.39
-2.40 -13.6 121,35
+.28 -32.1 9.26
+.21 -20.1 38.24
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-.26 +10.4 29.07
-.15 -48.9 9.89
-1.50 -42.6 36.72
+.60 +3.9 33.58,
+.91 -.2 65.19
+.40 -25.0 25.64
-.16 -27.6 27.38
+.67 +17.4 20.56
+.11 +29.1 75.58
-+.30 -22.1 18.83
+.26 +11.8 35.94
-1.53 -21.0 40.76
+.23 -24.7 24.53
-.42 -7.4 40.61.
-.41 -17.87 19.53
-.48 -25.0 15.52
+1.27 +3.9 84.63
-.72 -24.6 43.87
+.77 -3.7 46.26
+.59 -46.6 19.77
-.44 -30.9 13.42
+1.49 -12.0 60.11
+.21 -68.1 12.53
-.28 -7.8 18.32
-1.49 -23.0 38.66
-.01 -14.2 50.39
-.25 -.3 31.71
+.16 -16.0 6.32
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+.20 -.9 45.55
-.10 -41.1 4.12
-.11 -79.6 3.68
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-1.13 -28.7 51.07
+.05 +41.6 1.25
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-.07 -22.2- 14.49
+.44 +3.9 13.08
+1.72 +5.3 121.78
-3.42 +20.0 166.40
+.97 -2.1 161.28
+1.19 +.2 126.05
+.35 -1.4. 17.14
+.26 -3.9 38.17
+.95 +10.6 53.51
-.53 +3.9 54.79
+,13 -22.0 53.63
+.86 -6.3 21.07
-.66 -17.7 35.17
+.13 .+4.5 7.65
+2.87 +10.2 35.53
-.08 +7.6 18.84
-.86 -11.2 74.15
+.30 -30.0 11.97
+.25 +1.2 34.32


Name DIv
SemiHTr 2.15
SiderurNac .81
SilvWhtng .18
SouthnCo 1.89
SwstAid .02
SwstnEngy
SpectraEn 1.12
SprintNex
SP Malls .82
SP HIthC .64
SPCnSt .85
SP Consume .61
SP Engy 1.08
SPDR Fncl .20
SP Inds .69
SP Tech .36
SP Util 1.36
StateStr .2
StillwtrM ...
SuccessF ...
Suncorgs .44
SunTrst .20
Supvalu .35
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.08
TaiwSemi .52
Talbots
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
TeckRes g .80
TenetHfth ...
Teradyn
Tesoro
Texlnst .68
Textron .08
ThermoFis ...
3M Co .2.20
TimeWam .94
TollBros ...
Transocn 3.16
Travelers 1.64
.Tyson .16
UBSAG
USAirwy ,..
US Gold ...
UtdCont ...
UPS B 2.08
US Bancrp .50
US NGs rs ..
US OilFd ..
USSteel .20
UtdhfthGp .65
UnumGrp .42
ValeSA 1.76
Vale SA pf 1.76
ValeroE .60
VangEmg .82
VeritonCm2.00
VimpelCm .79
Visa .88
Waigm .90
WsteMInc 1.42
Weathfinti ...
WellPoint 1.00
WellsFargo .48
Wendys Co .08
WDigital ..
WstnUnion .32
Weyeri .60
WmsCos 1.00
XLGrp .44
Xerox .17
Yamana g .20
YumBmds 1.14


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


. +.27 -5.1
... +.04 -49.8
22 +.37 -14.5
19 +.80 +16.6
38 +.17 -35.0
20 -.90 -1.7
16 -.25 +18.1
-.13 -41.6'
+.10 -11.2
... +.31 +7.4
+.27 +9.2
... +.28 +5.2
... -.23 +2.8
... +.19 -17.9
+.26 -2.6
... +.30 +3.4
... +.25 +11.7
13 +.95 -11.7
10 +.99 -43.7
...+13.62 +37.7
10 -.93 -23.5
17 -1.35 -41.6
62 +.19 -22.3
... -.07 -46.6
15 +.34 +.2
....-.04 +4.3
... 29 -66.8
.:. -.94 -44.1
13 +.62 -11.0
... +.09 -39.7
11 +.27 -33.5
10 +.96 +.6
5 -2.71 W17.5
12 -.03 -7.9
17 -.82 -23.0
13 -.90 -17.6
14 +2.44 -4.8
13 +.19 +7.6
87 +.54 +9.3
... +.50 -37.8
15 +2.19 +.6
10 +.37 +19.2
+.14 -24.8
10 +.78 -43.9
... -.15 -54.3
14 +1.36 -13.4
18 +1.38 -.2
12 +.57 -2.5
... -.56 -38.7
... -.53 -1.3
... -.33 -53.0
11 +.85 +35.4
S7 -.59 -11.4
-.70 -34.0
.. -.56 -28.4
7 -1.41 -8.5
... -.44 -16.5
15 +.58 +7.4
10 -1.21 -31.3
19 -.01 +38.1
12 +1.10 -12.2
15 +.43 -14.1
58 -.10 -34.3
9 -2.16 +17.0
10 +.84 -13.2
... +.19 +13.9
10 +.94 -4.5
12 +.63 -2.1
20 +.46 -9.0
20 -.47 +28.0
31 -.19 -5.8
14 -.06 -29.2
17 -.07 +25.5
22 +1.71 +18.2


30.87
8.37
33.38
44.56
8.44
36.79
29.52
2.47
34.10
33.82
32.01
39.35
70.19
13.10
33.97
26.04
35.00
40.93
12.01
39.87
29.29
17.22
7.48
. 1.41
29.47
13.08
2.83-
12.41
53.50
37.31
4.45
14.12
21.79
29.94
18.21
45.64
82.20 -
34.60
20.77
43.26
56.02
20.53
12.38
5.62
3.69
20.62
72.45
26.29
7.35
38.50
27.48
48.91
21.47
22.80
21.64
21.15
40.20
38.43
10.33
97.19
34.22
31.66
14.98
66.50
26.91
5.26
32.38
18.18
17.23
31.65
20.56
8.16
16.07
57.96


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
.7 ... +.40 +4.7 57.02
2.1 20 +.46 -10.2 57.96
1.6 22 +.84 +11.5 55.18
... 19 -.69 -23.5 5.62
... 3 -.31 -71.7 16.46
... 77 +.70 -23.4 26.93
... 10 +.07 +1.1 50.39
4.5 15 -.01 +7.5 16.16
... ... -.28 -51.6 3.89
... 41 -3.55 -26.8 25.54
6.5 14 -.31 -27.9 4.29
... ... -6.66 -10.1 61,86
... 44 -.11 +7.4 1.75
13 -.86 -45.9 15.49
... 17 -.21 +101.3 13.83
.9 10 -3.51 +24.7 22.90
2.7 11 +.34 -35.6 14.67
1.5 27 +.05 +36.8 43.96
3.0 12 -.18 -27.6 13.25
... 19 +.09 -3.3 16.19
1.5 15 +.32 -14.1 16.32
... -.82 -84.8 .92
1.9 ... +.11 -38.6 4.16
2.2 13 +.50 -22.9 40.20
.. 48 -.49 +37.5 27.11
... 9 +.04 -59.3 4.76
.. 19 -.75 -26.4 26.34
... ... +.12 -16.2 29.37
2.3 12 +1.49 +11.4 44.12
.8 ... -1.16'-22.1 21.23
7.7 ... +.48 +3.2 27.28
8.5 22 -.04 -15.9 11.72
1.8 26 -7.55 +6.8 110.86
2.3 15 -.47 +12.6 32.64
... 19 -.11 -4.1 15.94
.3 ... -.71 -36.0 15.50


Name


DIv YId PE


AbdAsPac .42 5.9
AdeonaPh ...
Adventrx ...
AlIdNevG ...
AmApparel...
AntaresP ...
Aunrzon g ...
AvalRaren ...
,Banks.com ...
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs ...
CanoPet...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn...
DejourEg ...
DenisnMg ...
ElephTalk.
FrkStPrp .76 7.1
GabGldNR 1.68 10.6
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly
GoldResrc .60 2.9
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasG g ...
GtPanSilvg ...
Hemisphrx ...
HooperH
ImpOil gs .44
InovioPhm ...
IntTowerg ...
KeeganRg ...
LadThalFn ...
LucasEngy ...
MadCatz g ...
MdwGoldq ...


Wkly YTD
Cho %Cho


+.19 +5.6
+.23 +13.6
-.02 -76.9
-.94 +23.4
-.01 -66.3
-.06 +57.6
-.12 -21.4
-.03 -51.6
+.0( -86.7
-.35 -.9
-.12 -44.8
-.07 -75.6
-.01 -21.4
+.02 -61.0
-.30 +5.9
-.31 +72.5
+.06 +21.9
-.01 -58.3
-.33 +29.2
-.01 -25.1
-.11 -18.0
-.01 -52.9
+.28 -45.7
+.68 -29.1
+.05 -55.1
-.51 -35.2
+.16 -62.5
+.06 -18.1
-.02 -55.5
-.05 -12.4
+.89 +7.2
-.00 -44.4
-.15 -54.3
-.33 -55.2
+.23+115.4
+.15 +5.2
+.03 -39.2
+.12 +203.6


Wkly Wkly YTD Wkly
Last Name Dv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Minefnd g
MinesMgt
NeoStem
Neoprobe
Nevsun g
NwGold g
NA Pall g
NthnO&G
NovaGld g
ParaG&S
PhrmAth
PionDrill
PolyMet g
Procera rs
Protalix
RareEle g
Rentech
Richmnt g "
Rubicon g
SamsO&G
SeabGld g
Talbots wt
TanzRy g
Taseko
TmsatlPet
TriValley
TriangPet
Ur-Energy
Uranerz
'UraniumEn
VantageDrd
VimetX
VistaGold
WTDrfChn
WizzardSft
Xfone
YM Bio q


+.27 +7.1
+.14 -40.9
+.05 -57.5
+.16 +21.4
+.02 -21.5
+.18 +10.8
+.02 -54.9
+.70 -8.3
+.09 -24.0
... -35.1
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-.13 -53.1
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-.76 -46.2
-.25 -69.6
+.05 +27.0
+.80 +139.7
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-.06 +39.4
+.96 -27.1
-.05 -98.5
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+.03 -42.9
-.09 -61.6
-.01 -69.1
-.01 -8.9
-.06 -68.5
+.02 -52.4
+.24 -47.7
-.01 -43.3
+.25 +50.9
-.12 +45.2
-.04 +.9
-.01 -44.0
+.03 -52.0
+.23 -32.2


Weekly Dow Jones

Dow Jones Industrials 78.41 52.30 46.24 -198.67 186.56
Close 12 184 26 0 0 *, ,
1-week cr-ange 164 84 11 4.i, MOIO TUES WED THUR FRl
13,000 .. .... .. ... .

12,500

12,000

11,500

11,000 ..... .

10 ,500 A........... . ... .. S 0 N . ... ..... S ... . ....... .



MUTUAL FUNDS
Tota] Assets Total Return/Rank Pct MinInit
Name Obj ($MIns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
PIMCO TotRetls Cl 142,635 10.84 -0.4 +3.7/E +7.7/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotStldx LB 62,801 31.41 +2.3 +3.0/B +0.3/B NL 3,000
Vanguard Instldxl LB 57,915 115.35 +2.4 +3.9/A -0.1/B NL 5,000,000
Fidelity Contra LG 56,073 68.50 +0.9. +1.8/B +2.7/A NL .2,500
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 54,829 29.26 +1.2 -2.0/D -0.5/D 5.75 250
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH 54,764 49.17 +1.2 +3.0/A +1.1/C 5.75 250
American Funds IncAmerA m MA 51,409 16.67 +1.9 +5.4/A +1.8/B 5.75 250
Vanguard 500Adml LB 51,226 116.12 +2.3 +3.9/A -0.2/B NL 10,000
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB 48,932 31.42 +2.3 +3.1/B +0.4/B NL 10,000
American Funds CpWIdGrIA m WS 45,594 32.39 +0.7 -6.1/D -0.5/B 5.75 250
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 42,793 27.19 +1.9 -0.3/1 -0.8/C 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV 37,794 30.70 +1.6 -12.5/D -2.4/A NL 2,500
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV 37,593 28.27 +2.7 +7.9/A 0.0/A 5.75 250
Dodge & Cox Stock LV 36,876 101.70 +2.5 -2.3/D -4.0/E NL 2,500
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m CA 35,355 2.07 +0.2 +3.3/B +2.6/C 4.25 1,000
Vanguard InstPlus LB 34,626 115.36 +2.4 +3.9/A -0.1/B NL 200,000,000
PIMCO TotRetAdm b Cl 31,256 10.84 -0.5 +3.5/E +7.5/A NL 1,000,000
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl 30,686 10.98 -0.3 +7.2/A +6.3/B NL 10,000
American Funds BalA m MA 30,568 18.25 +1.5 +5.3/A +2.4/B 5.75 250
Vanguard Totlnti d FB 30,375 13.75 +0.4 -10.4/C -2.7/B NL 3,000
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB 30,357 36.36 0.0 -10.6/C -0.6/A 5.75 250
American Funds FninvA m LB 30,354 35.57 +1.9 +0.1/D +0.5/A 5.75 250
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA 29,047 54.07 +1.7 +4.7/A +3.5/A NL 50,000
American Funds NewPerspA m WS 28,547 26.85 +0.8 -4:4/C +1.3/A 5.75 250
Vanguard TotStlns LB 28,094 31.43 +2.3 +3.1/B +0.4/B NL 5,000,000
Vanguard 5001nv LB 26,981 116.09 +2.3 +3.8/A -0.3/B NL 3,000
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondAdvlB 26,811 12.77 -1.4 -0.5/E +9.4/A NL. 50,000
CA -Conservatie dlocaton, Cl -Interediate-Trin Bond, ES -Europe Stod, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign argeGrowh, FV-Foreign
Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Larg Ble, LG -Loe Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Alocaior. MB -td-Cap Blend, MV-
Mid-Cap Value, SH -Speiallytea, WS -Wld Stock, Total Rem: Chng i NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank How flud performed vs.
others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Moningstar


Currencies
Last Pvs Day
Australia .9789 ,.9828
Britain 1.5662 1.5642
Canada 1.0186 1.0202
Euro .7479 .7497
Japan 77.54 77.67
Mexico 13.5906 13.6666
Switzerind .9241 .9268
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


- I


------------------------------------X--------X--


.0.75 0.75


Fal










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


TBUY IT


SL IThfc


~L I


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


Legal
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS
OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA .
The School Board of Columbia
County, Florida announces that the
School Board will hold its regular
public meetings, to which all persons
are invited to attend, as follows:
DATES:
January 10, 2012
January 24, 2012
February 14, 2012*
February 28, 2012
March 13, 2012
March 27, 2012
April 10, 2012
April 24, 2012
May 8, 2012
May 22,2012
June 12, 201,2
June 26, 2012
July 10, 2012
July 24; 2012
August 14, 2012
August 28, 2012
September 11, 2012
September 25, 2012
October 9, 2012
October 23, 2012
November 13, 2012
November 27, 2012
December 11, 2012
*Meeting to be held at Fort White
Elementary School
TIME: 7:00 P.M.
PLACE: School Board Administra-
tive Complex Auditorium
372 W. Duval Street Lake City,
Florida 32055
PURPOSE: To consider and act
upon business of the School Board.
A copy of each agenda may be ob-
tained no earlier than 7 days prior to
each meeting by writing to the Su-
perintendent of Schools at 372 W.
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida
32055 or. by calling Mrs. Lynda
Croft at (386) 755-8003. A complete
agenda of each meeting will be avail-
able on the School District's website


Land Clearing
Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200

Services
A2Z of Lake City, Inc. Avail.
Dec 1. Prof. House Cleaning Svcs.
Employees: Fingerprinted, Drug
screen & Bonded. 386-752-5655


Legal
at: www.columbia.kl2.fl.us
Pursuant to the provisions of the
American with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommo-
dations to participate in the above
meetings are asked to advise the
School Board at least 48 hours be-
fore the meetings by contacting Mrs.
Lynda Croft at (386) 755-8003.
School Board of Columbia County,
Florida
By: Michae EF. Millikin
Superintendent of Schools
05529442
December 11, 2011
100 Job
100 Opportunities
Fairfield Inn by Marriott
Looking for a Career not a job
Now hiring for Front desk PM and
Night audit
Apply at 538 SW Corporate Drive
FT Position Office Clerk for Ma-
chine Shop, Computer skills need-
ed, Wide range of duties etc.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg
174 NE Cortez Terrace
AP/AR, Estimating, order entry
Hiring Elementary Teacher.
Must have valid
Teaching Certificate.
Call 386-758-0055
Legal Secretary/Paralegal
Position for Civil Litigation.
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
send resumes to:
injuryattorneys(@vahoo.com
P/T housekeeper needed for
medical practice M-F.
Please fax resume to
386-487-1232.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lie., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diplbma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, Call: (334) 805-7329,
MB1000084

20 Medical
120 Employment
05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
S(904)566-1328


1 Medical
120 Employment

05529464
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
For its Student Loan Forgive-
ness program. Licensed Clini-
cians who serve in our approved
locations may qualify for up to
$60k in Student Loan forgive-
ness for F/T 2yr commitment.
Therapists:
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred
* Case Management
(adult &'child)
* Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
* Master's Therapist in
Screening
Medical Services
* RN full-time Lake City CSU
* PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
* Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply.
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

CNA/MA/LPN needed F/T for
busy medical practice. M-F
Benefits available. Please email
resume to dac.lc22(yvahoo.com.



Set your si%

on sromethir


BETTER


SUTEL
Apply in person or online
ffR i^fr'^ ^^^-'''^''1'^'^Aa^-*


1 Medical
120V Employment
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.

240 Schools &
2 0 Education
05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/12/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/26/12
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
4 CKC Registered Toy Poodle
puppies. Ready Christmas Eve.
$500. ea. Up to date on shots.
386-719-4808
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.
Puppies for sale. 2 males and 1
female tri-colored Jack Russell.
Ready Dec. 16. RO. Very
loving & playful! 386-623-6080

its

_S ^ es_

ReKm


407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
VINTAGE SOFA
Excellent condition.
$65.00 obo
386-487-5922'
Machinery &
411 Tools
10 INCH Craftman Miter
Compound Saw. New in Box.
Never opened. $195.00.
386-487-5922
Air Compressor, Craftsman,
125psi, upright tank,
good condition $110.
Call 386 963-4560
Generator, 5000 watt,
used twice,
good condition $325.
Call 386 963-4560
Shop Vac, large,
6hp, Sears, just
replaced filter $45
Call 386 963-4560


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


1Tis


e (Pecan) SeaSO


Shelled Pecans


SPkg.


r -- -- -------------------
Sugar 'n' Spice Pecans

Ingredients

3/4 cup corn syrup
4 1/2 cups sugar.
1 cup water
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 pounds pecan halves

Directions


Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil.

In a large heavy saucepan over medium
until sugar is completely moist and mix
point, without stirring, immediately rem
stops boiling. Stir pecans into mixture
onto a cookie sheet and allow to cool.


m heat, combine corn syrup, sugar, and water. Stir mixture only
lure reaches 242 degrees F on a candy thermometer. At that
ove from heat and add cinnamon. Stir until mixture settles or
all at once. Stir until all pecans are coated completely. Pour out
Break into pieces and serve.


---------------- ------------------mm------- --- ----- A


Baya East Baya West

780 SE Baya Dr. 1465 W. US Hwy. 90

386.755.6677 386.755.2233


- CHAMBER ia.

THINK


FIRST


Recipe courtesy Paula Deen Food Network


FLORIDA



INSTRUCTOR/COORDINATOR,
PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT
PROGRAM
(224 Days-Tenure Track)
Florida Gateway College's Physical
Therapist Assistant program is CAPTE
accredited through 2020. The program is
supported by experiencedACCE full-time
faculty and adjunct faculty.
Teach courses in the Physical Therapist
Assistant program. Advise students.
Conduct selection process of PTA program
students. Review PTA courses in areas
6f syllabi, lesson plans, tests, course
offerings and sequences. Monitor program
and implement needed improvements.
Assist faculty in developing, preparing
and updating program materials. Maintain
accreditation processes of the Commission
on Accreditation in Physical Therapy
Education (CAPTE). Keep informed of
changes affecting programs as mandated
by accrediting agency. Maintain accurate
literature regarding program's admission
requirements. Assist in the preparation of
program budget. Maintain PTA Advisory
Committee. Oversee semi-annual
meetings. Assist in curriculum reviews.
Maintain communication with health care
agencies. Promote positive relationships.
Conduct student follow up surveys.
Educational Experience Required: Master's
degree, with at least one degree in the field
of Physical Therapy or Physical Therapist
Assistant. Knowledge, Skills, Abilities
Required: Licensure as a physical therapist
or certification as a physical therapist
assistant. Minimum 3 years experience
in clinical practice; didactic and/or clinical
teaching experience; experience in
administration, educational theory and
methodology; experience in instructional
design and methodology; experience in
student evaluation and outcomes
assessment. Desirable Qualifications:
Community College teaching experience.
DPT preferred.
Salary: Based on degree and
experience. Application deadline:
Open until filled
Persons interested should provide College
application, vita, and photocopies of
transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at:
wwwEfgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrittfgc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/


-*


































pharmacy


* ADvantage [










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE*
All Yard Sale Ads ,
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
6 gal gas tank,
like new $7.
Call 386 963-4560

Coleman cot, like new $20.
Twin size pop up bed,
Eddie Bauer, $20 .
Call 386 963-4560
S Decorator
Hobby Horse.
T Very interesting
piece. Head is 50 in
P high. $350. obo.
S'(321)443-0845 By appointment.
Quilt, king size, Lone Star pattern,
rose and teal on ivory background.
Excellent condition. Original price
$1500 asking $800. 386-963-4560
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
S Don't call Saturday. ,,

4 n Good Things
5i U to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
SBuy, sell, crack & shell pecans
g2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
jPinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.
(630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 & 3 br/lba Mobile Homes for
Rent. CH/A includes water, sewer,
garbage. $475./ $525. mo. 1st &
last mo + $300 dep. 386-961-8466
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between I-10& 75,
$550 mo, $500,sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1I acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Mobile Homes for rent .in.
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640 Mobile Homes
U4 for Sale


Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used Mobile Home-
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext 210
S All 2011's Must Go!
All Homes at Dead cost! Save up
To $10,000. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville. (352)872-5566
Land and Home Packages .
for Mobile homes and modular
homes. No Money down if you
own your.land. '100 mile radius.
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
We Need Used Mobile Homes!
Will buy or trade. Top Dollar Paid.
North Point Homes.
(352)872-5566

650 fMobile Home.
& Land
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Saleprice $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618
i Rental/Starter, renovated, 3/2 SW
1 ac. off 41 btwn1-10 & 75. 10:
Arnin to LC. $28,500 6bo. No owner
| Finance. 386-330-2316/266-3610

S710 Unfurnished Apt.
Forent






Y 2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer.
Hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867.
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
SALandlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421


2006 Honda Dirt Bike
CRF 450R
Exc. cond., helmet, boots,
chest protector and other
safety equipment.
$3,500
Call
8386-752-0668


710 fUnfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
352-377-7652 or 352-514-2332
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA in
Gatorwood S/D. Washer/dryer
hook up, clean. $650. 1st, last +
security. 386-867-9231
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181
Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
73A Unfurnished
7I3 JHome For Rent
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $350mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
2 STORY, 2 BR/1.5 BA on
1/2 acre, fenced lot.off Turner Rd.
1st + last + dep. (includes water)
352-335-8330 or 352-258-9598
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA Near FGC & Airport.
$500mo. 1st, last & security.
386-752-0335
Monday -Friday 8A-4P


3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located4n the
country. Credit check required.,
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
' 3br/2ba w/garage 5 min. to Iche-
tucknee head spring Quiet wooded
area. Newly renovated $800 mo.
first and last w/ security dep.
phone Fort White 386-497-3536
4 BR/2 BA in town, good neigh-
borhood, fenced yard, fireplace, no
pets, $900 mo., 1st + $900 sec.,
386-755-6916.
SAvailable Immediately.
Rent To Own 3br/2ba home
In quiet subdivision.
386-752-5035 X 3113
days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
Beautiful 3/2 1 ac in NW Lake
City. Lg great, bonus rm. 2 garag-
es. $1150.mo 1st, last, dep. Avail
12/19.386-243-8553 or 418-2120.
For Rent with Option to Buy.
'4br/3ba unfurnished home. On the
East side of Lake City.
386-294-2494
Gorgeous Lake View 2br
Apartment. Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$600 mo, and
$600 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534
750 Business &
Office Rentals

05529267
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq'$5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-l. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515 *
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined fdri2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/1 yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500


2003 Chevy Silverado
2WD Ext. Cab
125,000 mi.,
well maintained,
great shape.
$7,500
Call
386-397-0571


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
' custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

820 Farms&
Acreage
12 acres+/-, Northwest comer of
CR-18 and 81st Ave. Asking Price
$745,000. Call (801) 715-9162 for
more information
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www,LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 dowr,payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
870 Real Estate
70 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

950 Cars for Sale
2010 H'ONDA ACCORD LX
Blue w/Grey interior. One owner.
23,000 miles. $21,800.
Call 386-292-5763
951 Recreational
5O Vehicles
1993 JAYCO 5th wheel. 26 1/2
feet. Well kept. Everything works.
Owner is Non-smoker $3,700
386-755-011.0


We're on target!


0)





Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.








duigtefrt10- dasyo
icaSn p u v

2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-623-9026
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can runthe same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



Call Mary


-II)75-54


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.



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Classified Department: 755-5440







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


Connected


D "


www.lakecityreporter.com


TimeLess ITlEmoRIes


Rol

rs
Plea
Moor
time
value
of tie
Toyot
Not v
coup
custc
& sh
incluC


' 386-466-1888
104 3S Main Blvd., (next to the Money Man)lake City, FL .3055


I


I.


Large Selection of Soap Fragrances
(ask for your favorite scoint)
We do favors for
Weddings, Baby Showers
) & and any occasion
Soaps
,. l)og Mechanic
Coffee & Monogranmmed
New line of purses have been added
] 275 N. Marion Avenue
(386) 243-8298
ment [)ODwntow i (nxt to owans)
Opn)t' rw1ad -Satuaird y'
*rtificates ,n,, n. iu. ",.,. r


North Florida Pecan Company
Fresh 'Georgia Pecans
Raw Halves, Raw Pieces
Gourmet Praline Bags
SlIb. Bags .
Chocolate Pecans
Gift Baskets *
3140 NW US Hwy 41 Lake City 386-365-2586 .


Iwo' m I *r mm iM-


1 I 1


f(^Ity Rep^forte


talkis Section. please catf 152-lifl-


Classified Department: 755-5440









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
b r,"J: ,l -,dit'-,j A -,'r, r,L- ,, .- ,',' 1


LIFE


Sunday, December I I, 2011 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK






Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Confederate

Roses for

the South
Oaklawn
Cemetery,
located just
northwest
of the post
office in Lake City, is the
final resting place for i55
unknown Confederate sol-
diers who died in the 1864
Battle of Olustee, or in a
Confederate hospital. This
information is engraved on
an old marker located in
the Civil War veteran area
of Oaklawn Cemetery.
A rich and important
part of our North Florida
heritage lies buried right
within our own neighbor-
hood. This area of the
cemetery, dedicated to
honor those who have
made the ultimate sacri-
fice in war, was in need of
attention. Recently, with
the help of the University
of Florida Master
Gardeners of Columbia
County, the entrance
received new landscape
plantings.
What better plant could
be chosen to adorn this
civil war cemetery than
the Confederate Rose,
Hibiscus mutabilis? This
plant, among a selection
of other low maintenance,
drought resistant plants,
was chosen to add color
and bold accents to the
cemetery entrance.
The confederate rose
is not really a rose, and'it
isn't even a native of the
South. However, by the
19th century, this Asian
native was a favorite plant
in southern gardens. We
now lovingly refer to the
confederate rose as an old-
fashioned garden plant of
the South.
The species grows in an
upright tree form, often
reaching heights of 15 feet
in freeze-free counties.
In North Florida, even
the frosts will generally
burn the plant back to the
ground. They will grow
back in the spring from the
roots, but will have a multi-
trunked form and reach a
height of 6 to 8 feet.
The blossoms, which
appear in late summer and
fall, open white and change
to pink and deep pink over
several days. The novelty
of having three different
colors of flowers on one
plant at the same time is *
very eye-catching. The
leaves of the Confederate
rose are large and bold,
allowing the plant to stand
out in the landscape, even
when not in bloom.
If you give a confeder-
ate rose a home in your
southern garden, be sure
to plant it in sun or part
sun. It isn't choosy about
soils and can tolerate some
drought after being estab-
lished in its new surround-
ings.
Frosts and freezes can
happen any night now, so
listen to the weather and
be ready to protect tender
plants. Call the Master
Gardeners at 752-5384 for
tips on winter plant protec-
tion.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Colurrmbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reponer
RMS assistant principal Jonathan Jordan (left) and Columbia County Superintendent of Schools Mike Millikin hands,out certificates Thursday during
the Student Dignitary Awards Program.


No reason not
to excel, students at
Richardson Middle
School are told. 4



By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
I W words of encour-
agement can go
a long way for a
child.
About 250
students at Richardson Middle
School got that encouragement
at a Thursday morning awards
program.
"We have a lot of students who
are academically talented but
waiting for someone to say, 'You
can do it,'" said Bernice Presley,
longtime teacher.
Presley said those words
helped her be successful in
school. As the science club advi-
sor, Presely said she wanted to
be that motivation for students by
recognizing their good grades.
"I tell my students a 'B' is ridic-
ulous when an 'A' is an option,"
she said.
Many times students will not
do their best in school because of Above: Richardson Middle Sc
peer pressure, she said. recognized Thursday at the R
"Don't ever make excuses for Pictured are David Williams (
doing well in school," said guest Janeicia Berry and Taylor Alfo
speaker Mike Millikin, Columbia ers a motivational speech to
County School District superin- 'Awards Program on Thursday
tendent. "You are the cool ones."
At the awards program, stu-
dents with an "A" in every class
were given a trophy and certifi-
cate. Students with an "A" in sci-
ence were awarded a certificate.
The EXCEL Science Club
sponsored the program, which
included musical performances
from the school jazz band and
Audre' Washington from the Lake
City Police Department commu-
nity relations unit
While speaking to parents in,
the audience, Millikin said he is
often asked the secret to success
in school, but he said there is no
secret. "It's very simply one adult
taking interest in a child's life."


can


1^-'


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
school sixth-graders pose for a photograph with their certificates after being
!MS Student Dignitary Awards Program for earning A's in all of their classes.
from left), Kaitlyn Parker, Kaden Jones, Micah Henderson, Leslie Bowen,
)rd. Below: Mike Millikin, the Columbia County Superintendent of Schools, deliv-
a group of about 400 during the Richardson Middle School Student Dignitary
y. 'It takes one adult to take some time in a child's life to make differencee'



'Don't ever
make excuses
for doing well
in school. You
are the cool
ones.'
Guest speaker Mike
Millikin, Columbia County
School District
superintendent.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter


Agricultural Sciences.









2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011



Jobs in the golf and landscape industries


mhe Golf Course
Operations
and Landscape
Technology programs
at Florida Gateway
College (FGC) began in 1967 and
Turf Equipment Management
was initiated in 1973. These pro-
grams were developed because
of demand from the golf and
landscape industries for people
who were properly prepared
through formal education and
practical experience to work into
management positions in these
industries. That was true over
40 years ago, and it still is true
today. With proper education
and experience, the job market
for graduates for assistant golf
course superintendents, turf
equipment managers, and man-
agers with landscape contractors
continues to be good.
The slow economy since 2008
certainly has hurt the golf indus-
try, housing, and the landscape
industry, but the properties
that have been built have to be
maintained and finding people


who have the expertise to do a
quality job economically within
the guidelines of all the new
environmental regulations still
exists. Our golf and landscape
programs have developed a
strong national reputation which
is an advantage for our students
'because employers want FGC
graduates. It is common for the
college to receive more job offers
than'can be filled; however, these
jobs may be around the state or
out of state.
Interestingly, as Executive
Director of the Industrial &
Agricultural programs which
includes golf, landscape, and turf
equipment,. my main problem is
not enough college ready stu-
dents to meet the demand. Most
people find that surprising in a
slow economy. There may be a
variety of reasons for this, but a
main one is that young people
(although we have students of
all ages) are not introduced to
these lucrative outside careers
as was true in the 70s 80s, and
90s. During those decades, sum-


John R. Piersol
john.piersol@fgc.edu

mer jobs for high school and
college students were commonly
labor jobs in construction, on golf
Courses, with landscape compa-
nies, etc. During these summer
experiences some students real-,'
ized they liked being outside,
and upon investigation, they
discovered one could be formally
educated for management jobs in
the golf and landscape industries.
Due to the tremendous reputa-
tion that the college had, many
students throughout Florida
and the country were told "You
need to go to Lake City". Since
not as many young people are
working in these summer jobs,


not as many are discovering
the career potential in them, so
the pool of people who find out
about our programs is smaller.
It really does take some practi-
cal experiences to get hooked
on these careers. A student who
comes into one of our programs
with industry experience is very
career focused.
Many high school graduates
are encouraged to go to college,
but many do not know for what
career. It is easy for a student
to lose focus at school without,
a career objective. It is best to
develop passion for a career, '
find out what education/train-
ing is necessary to excel in that
career, and pursue that course of
education and experience. Not
all careers require a bachelor's
degree, and some may require
more than a bachelor's degree,.
Without a clear career focus, it is
hard to determine what school-
ing to pursue.
Our Turf Equipment
Technology program is only one
year, Landscape Technology


is two years, and Golf Course
Operations is three years. All
lead to lucrative careers with
salary potential of $40,000 to
$75,000 and sometimes up to
$100,000 or more. Saint Leo
University which is on out cam-
pus will take our Associate in
Science (AS) degrees and in two
more years a student can earn a
Bachelor's of Applied Science in
Business Administration which
is a very good add-on for people
who. can handle the academics
and who clearly want to advance
as quickly as possible to a man-
agement level position.
We have good jobs in good
industries. I need more college
ready students who have an
interest in the golf and landscape
industries. Summer or part-time
jobs in these industries can lead
to not only some money, but also
a career.
For more information contact
John Piersol at 386-754-4225 or
john.piersol@fgc.edu, or go to
www.fgcgolfprogrms.com or
www.fgc.edu.


60th wedding anniversary

William and Eleanor Wood

William D.
(Bro. Bill)
and Eleanor
(Miss
Eleanor)
Wood will
celebrate
their 60th
wedding
anniversary .
Dec. 23.
They are
the parents
of a son,
Rich Wood,
who resides
in Brooklet,
Ga., anda G e
daughter,
Vicki Todd,
who resides
in Lake City. William D. and Eleanlr Wood
We also have a.
grandson who resides in Broolet, Ga.
Bro. Bill has been a Baptist minister for 57 years. he
has served several churches in both Florida and Georgia.
Miss Eleanor has been a faithful wife for all these
years. She has enjoyed creating beautiful floral arrange-
ments through the years. She has been the strength of
our ministries.
Engagement announcement

Gardner-Hamilton

Scot
and Lynn
Gardner of
Lake City
announce
the engage- "
meant and -
approaching
marriage of
their daugh-,
ter, Becca
Gardner of
Lake City,
to Mike
Hamilton of
Lake City,
son of Ed
and Sherri
Hingson of
Lake City.
Grand-
parents of Mike Hamilton and Becca Gardner
the bride
are James
and Janette
Spradley and Judy Gardner.
Grandparents of the groom are Jim and Lena
Iamilton.
The wedding is planned for Dec. 30.
Becca graduated Columbia High School in 2010. She is
currently enrolled at Florida Gateway College with stud-
ies in the medical field.
Mike graduated Columbia High School in 2010. He is
currently in the United States Marine Corps stationed in
29 Palmns, California.
All family and friends are invited to attend.'


The Colonel had more than 1 secret


Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. A
manuscript hidden for
decades shows Colonel
Harland Sanders was more
than an entrepreneur with a
special fried chicken recipe
and a vision that helped cre-
ate the fast-food industry. It
reveals that the white-jack-
eted man had his eye on
another lucrative market -
celebrity food books.
The recent discovery of


the unpublished text shows
that while Sanders was help-
ing build Kentucky Fried
Chicken into a global brand,
he was recording his life and
love of food for the world.
The typewritten manu-
script from the mid-1960s
was found recently by an
employee rummaging
through KFC's archives.
The Louisville-based
company plans to offer up
Sanders' writings on the
Internet.


Wedding announcement

Spurlock-Weaver


Christy .- -
Ann Spurlock
of Lake City
and Patrick
Glenn
Weaver of
Lake City
were united. .
in marriage
Oct 22 in
Tabernacle
Baptist
Church in
Lake City.
The bride
is the daugh-
ter of Pete
M. Spurlock,
Sr. and Joyce
Nettles
Spurlock of -
Lake City..
The groomi Christy Ann Spurlock and
is the son Patrick Glenn Weaver
of Dewey
Weaver and
Mary Jane Dykes Weaver of Lake City.
The bride was given in marriage by her father.
Dr. Donald Minshew officiated the ceremony.
The flower girl was Natalie Poppell.
Susan Lockett was the matron of honor.
Bridesmaid was Tonya Fountain.
Groomsmen were Matthew Poppell (best man) and
William Weaver.
Usher was Thor Kolnes.
Johnathan "Levi" McCoy was the ringbearer.
Martha Newbern was the pianist and Laurie Yates pro-
vided special music.
The couple will live in Lake City.
The bride graduated Columbia High School in 1997
and received an AA in communications in 2000. She is
employed at McRae & McRae as a legal assistant.
The groom graduated Columbia High School in 1996
and has an AS degree in computer programming. He is
employed by the Columbia
County Commission as a
web developer.


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Ashley Owens
Kenneth Gamble
December 3, 2011


Jazan Nabinger
Blaiyze Neeley
January 21, 2012


Jaci Chapman
Chris Ward
April 14, 2012
We know exactly what they
want in a wedding or shower
gift. We update their list as gifts
are purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


Birth Announcements

Ryan Joseph
Kress


Raymond and Tracy
Kress of Lake City
announce the birth of
their son Ryan Joseph
Kress on Oct 13 in
North Florida Regional
Women's Center in
Gainesville.
He weighed 6
pounds, 8 ounces and
measured 19 inches.
' He joins Rexton
Michael Kress, 3 1/2.
Grandparents are
Gail Marsett and Tim
and Lillian Marsett, and
J.C. and Virginia Ross
and Russell and Robin
Kress.


Owen Kyler
Burk
Dustin and Jenny
Burk of Wellborn
announce the birth of
their son, Owen Kyler
Burk on Nov. 18 in
Shands Lake Shore in
Lake City.
He weighed 8
pounds, 5 ounces and
measured 20 inches.
He joins Hayden Lee.
Grandparents are
Jerry and Sheila
Desmartin, Danna
Woodham and Larry
Burk.
Great-grandparents
are Billie Desmartin,
Faye Harris, Danny
Ryals and Sheila Pugh.


Titus Abram Crawford


Titus Abram
Crawford
Brian and Amber
Crawford announce
the birth of their
son, Titus Abram
Crawford, on
Saturday, September
23, 2011. Titus .
weighed 7 pounds, 12
ounces and measured
18.9 inches in length.
Maternal grandpar-
ents are Avery and
Twyla Roberts of
Lake Butler. Maternal
great-grandmother
is Linda Boles of
Keystone Heights.
Maternal great-great-
grandmother is Jessie
Mae Kembro of
Lake Butler. Paternal'
grandparents are
Stanley and Mary
Ann Crawford of Lake
City. Paternal great-
grandmother is Ruth
Tanner of Providence.


Special Occasions


..N0









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Party guest isn't celebrating


after finding her photo online


DEAR ABBY: Why do cam-
era-happy people think it's OK
to snap someone's picture and
then post it on social network-
ing sites without permission?
I recently attended a party
for an old friend. Of course,
everyone wanted a photo of
the guest of honor. Don't get
me wrong, I love pictures.
But I think that if the photog-
rapher is intending to post it
online, he or she should ask,
"Is it all right if I post your
photo on my Facebook page?"
One considerate person
asked if he could photograph
our table and we agreed.
Another person didn't ask
and just kept snapping away.
I tried to duck out of the way
when I knew it was going to
be an unflattering shot, but
it was posted anyway and I
looked awful. :
I have some health issues
that have caused weight gain
and hair loss,, and I'm very
self-coriscious and do not
want my image plastered
all over the Internet look-
ing this way. I am usually a
good sport, but wonder if
others feel this is a breach
of etiquette and possibly
security. What do you
think? CAMERA-SHY IN
PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR CAMERA-SHY: You
are definitely not the only per-
son who feels this way. Most
people prefer to be seen when
they know they look their
best Feeling as you do, con-
tact the person who took and
posted the picture and ask


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

that it be taken down from
the Facebook page. Your rea-
son for asking is valid and if
the person has any manners
at, all your wishes will be
respected.

DEAR ABBY: My col-
lege roommate "Jillian" has
become my closest friend.
When we started discussing
room assignments for next
year, she informed me that
she won't be rooming with'
me because she wants to
transfer to a different school
to be with her boyfriend. She
will be transferring from one
of the best schools in the
state to one that's much less
prestigious.
If Jillian's boyfriend loved
her, he wouldn't pressure
her into changing schools.
How can I convince her that
she's giving up an oppor-
tunity to receive the best
education hete? WANTS
THE BEST FOR HER IN
GEORGIA
DEAR WANTS THE BEST
FOR HER: It would be inter-
esting to know how Jillian's
parents feel about her mak-


ing the move. Has she told
them her plans yet? If they
are aware and have voiced no
objection, you could debate
this with Jillian forever and
not convince her because
she's thinking with her heart,
not her head.
This may not be what
you're hoping to hear, but my
advice is to start looking for
another roommate.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: When my
sister's husband comes to our
house for a family dinner or
other event, he immediately
asks where he can take a nap.
He then. goes upstairs and
sleeps for a couple of hours.
This has been going on for
more than five years and is
not related to any medical
condition. Should I mention
this to my sister? I think he
is being rude. "SLEEPY'S"
B.-I.-L.
DEAR B.-I.-L.: You should
definitely talk to your sister
about her husband's behavior
although she may wonder
why it has taken you so long
- to do so. "Sleepy" may be
uncomfortable interacting
with people, which is why
he retreats upstairs to sleep.
Please withhold judgment
until you have more informa-
tion.



* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't mix money and
emotions. You have to sepa-
rate your feelings if you don't
want to make a mistake. A
unique idea you have can
turn into a prosperous ven-
ture. Rely on your skills.
Present and promote what
you've got to offer. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): A day trip will bring the
results you are looking for.
Attend a lecture, drop in on a
trade show or go on a shop-
ping spree to find what you
are looking for. Take some-
one you love along with you
to enhance your relationship.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll be emotion-
ally corifused by the signals
someone is sending you.
Don't assume anything until
you have facts to support
what you are being told. A
partnership can change your
life and your status. Someone
has a hidden agenda. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Change will not be wel-
come or easily dealt with.
Keep your eye on every
move that is made and you'll
be ready to do whatever is

CELEBRITY


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

required promptly. There is
little room for error, but with
the right moves you can be
victorious. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Plan to have some fun. The
more you interact with oth-
ers, the more your popularity
will grow and your reputation
will be enhanced. Don't let
someone's jealousy get you
down or rain on your parade.
Enjoy your moment in the
spotlight. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Don't start trouble. Back
away from anyone who chal-
lenges you. Focus on love,
romance and having fun with
someone you truly enjoy
spending time with. Don't let
criticism or complaints stand
in your way or ruin your day.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Get together with old
friends and pick up where
you left offi The information
you obtain and the things
you share will boost your
confidence and add to your
future plans. Good things will


CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher, stands or another.
TODA Y'S CLUE: E equals I
"TFS'Y GBH F. FXFLD GWG FRS VW CRS
BRJ AFTO SAWYF NAW ABXF B
PLFBSFL RFFJ SABR WicL WNR." -
ABLGWR HETTFKLFN

Previous Solution: "There's only two people in your life you should lie to ... the
police and your girlfriend." Jack Nicholson
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-12


transpire through meaningful
conversations. *****
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Run your idea past
someone you feel can offer
you constructive criticism.
Changes to your personal life
should be in the works, and
a better understanding with
someone you love will enable
you to make an overdue
move smoothly. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Stick to your
plans. Don't allow what oth-
ers think or say get to you.
Follow your heart and make
changes that suit your needs,
not someone else's. A change
of location will do you good,
but be careful while travel-
ing. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Opportunity knocks.
Taking part in a festive
event or fundraiser will lead
to a proposition you cannot
refuse. There is money to be
made. Personal accomplish-
ments will help raise your
profile and popularity. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): If someone puts pres-
sure on you, fight back. You
know what you want, and you
mustn't give in to something
that doesn't fit into your plans.
Make a statement and stick to
your timetable. Itfs your life.
Live it your way. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your home is your castle.
Do your best to make it a wel-
come environment for friends
and relatives. Your hospital-
ity will encourage those you
entertain to give back, to you
or to a cause you want to help.
* *** *


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


SWAPPING 'PARTNERS By Kelsey Blakley / Edited by Will Shortz 11 2 3 14 15 6 17 8 19 10 11 12 113 114 15 ,16 117 |18


Across
1 Secretaries, e.g.
6 Modern record
holder?
10 Bucks .
15 Take '__(doze)
19 Dow Jones'
industrial with
the N.Y.S,.E.
symbol "AA"
20 Cataract site
21 "The Ten
Commandments"
role '
22 contender
(court plea)
23 Anais Nin, e.g.?
25 Seizure at Sing
Sing?
27 Title girl in a
1979 Fleetwood
Mac hit
28 Reverse
29 Cause for a kid's
grounding
30 Heavenly: Prefix
31 Tech marvel of
the 1940s
33 "Adam-12" call,
briefly
34 Pioneering
37 Rice may be
served in it
39 Heavenly voice
of conscience?
43 Figure in
Raphael's
"School of
Athens"
45 Going to hell
46 Verbally attack,
with "at"
51 Old switch
attachment?
52 Wrong
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with'a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


54 Due
56 House of __
(European
dynasty)
57 Sailors' spars
59 Specialty of a
couples
therapist?
62 "___ see it my
way" (Beatles
lyric)
63 Razzed
64 Adams and Falco
65 Israel's Dayan
68 Dear
71 Capital and
largest city of
Ghana
72 Gathering of
spies
73 Fjord, e.g.
74 Very good, in
slang
76 Courtroom
jacket?
79 Work in a
chamber, say
83 Scrutinizer
84 Prone to acne,
say
85 Food item prized
in French' cuisine
86 De Matteo of
"Desperate
Housewives"
87 Put right
89 "Yeah, r-i-i-
ight!"
92 Hypnotist Franz'
94 Circus performer
in makeup?
97 Fashion inits.
98 Starts, as a big
meal
1'02 Business
partner, often
103 Reciprocal
function in trig
105 Very sore
106 Island hopper?


108 No voter
110 Herr's her
113 Storyteller for
Satan?
116 Improvement of
a Standardbred's
gait?
118 "The ___ lama,
he's a priest":
Nash
119 Biology lab
stain
120 Dense
121 Rend
122 Moolah
123 Prefix with
history
124 Gorilla skilled
in sign language
125 Kicks back

Down
1 Many Li.ttle
League coaches
2 "Popular
Fallacies" writer
3 One starting a
stampede,
maybe?
4 Much-read
collection of
verses
5 Suppose
6 Rub with
ointment, as in a
religious
ceremony
7 Skewbald
8 Bread spread
9 Burrow, for some
10 Qualified
11 "___ and the Real
Girl" (2007
movie)
12 Up
13 Criminal
patterns, briefly
14 Hostess ___
Balls
15 Up in arms


16 "WarGames" grp.
17 "The George &
__ Show" (old
talk series)
18 Submarine
24 Dilemma
26 Sets to zero
29 Name sung over
and over in a
Monty Python
skit
32 The last Pope
Julius
33 D6cada divisions
35 Decorative tip on
a lace
36 -thon
(literary event)
37 English channel,
familiarly, with
"the"
38 Mark's
replacement
40 Counterpart of
advertising
41 Antarctica's
Ice Shelf
42 Votary
44 Became
discouraged
47 NyQuil targets
48 "Hamlet"
courtier
49 Downright
50 Nickname for
Theresa
53 "Leather," in
baseball
55 Generous leeway
58 Onetime Procter
& Gamble
shampoo
59 Churl
60 Be contiguous to
61 Pages (through)
63 Kind of force
65 Corner joint
66 How some
sandwiches are
made


67 Wallowing sites
69 Cause of a
breakdown
70 ___ of Venice
75 Movie genre
77 Element used for
shielding nuclear
reactors
78 Rank below capt.
79 Mobius strip, e.g.
80 Troops' harvest?
81 Athletic
supporters?


82 Title below
marquis
85 Big name in
faucets
88 Balcony window
90 "What's it gonna
be?"
91 Whip
93 Some "Men in
Black"
characters, for
short
95 Card game akin
to Authors


96 Time for the
balcony scene in
"Romeo and
Juliet"
98 Managed
99 "The Faerie
Queene"
character
100 It' may
punctuate a court
order
101 Fence straddler
104 Annual
advertising
award


107 It may come in
buckets
108 First name at
Woodstock
109 Barnes & Noble
electronic reader
111 Stuck in ___
112 Tag callers?
114 "Get it?"
115 Bunch
116 Reproachful
cluck
117 Mess up


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
DDEMONS ITNE HOM R RAMA
OLAVEA BNER ENOLA OF IT

KH N AMSAUR
RIDE H TASNDEAVY URGE


I T A E E D E
FILTH HARI AAHS SAO
UNIT MOROSE YOU'D UFOS
MSG CONSULS DONNA TRE
ATH ATE GAP RIYAL HAT
NAT RHYTHM SENATE ELP
C 1A LEMON PEA TEN DEl
HES ARONI ENMASSE AX E
USAF SONG USENET TRACK
F O E ERsIN ASKME
HER YL ST D 3S U
COASTAL OLDMANWINTER
ONTHENOSE ARC IE AWRY
OSHA CAUGHTACOiD MiRA
THE M N I G 0 B 0 Y L R
SURE A STONESOSA SLRS


5 6 8


7 3


83 5 72


39 5 4


1 8 2 7


7 8 9 5


2 1 4 6


3 26


4 3 1


7 9, 8 1 LaL 9 6


6 9 9 L 7 LZ 8


6 Z 9 L 6 8 V 9 L

L 1 6 C8E 9 8 L i



9 L 8 L l7 9 Z 6





9 6 9 E 8 L 6 7 L


8 6 L 7 9 C 9 L i


Page Editor: Robert Bridges 754-0428




4D LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2011


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