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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01718
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: December 7, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01718
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




000016 120312 **3-D
LIB OF FLORI 3T326
20 ESUNVUNIV F FLORIDA
E ILLFE L 3261 _-1943


Reporter


Thursday, December 8, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 264 0 75 cents


GERRYMANDERING CLAIMS



Redistricting probe



to be released today


Would-be commission
candidate says District 5
redrawn to exclude him.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter. corn
An announcement is expected today
about a request to investigate how new
Columbia County voting district lines were
drawn.


Sheriff Mark Hunter said he planned to
meet late Wednesday with county attorney
Marlin Feagle before he announces what
the investigation has revealed so far.
"I will make the findings public tomor-
row," Hunter said, adding he could not
comment further during a phone interview
Wednesday.
The investigation was launched at the
request of Columbia County Commission
chairman Jody DuPree after he heard
complaints that voting district boundaries
approved by a 3-2 vote at the Nov. 22 meet-


ing may have been drawn to favor some
incumbents and possibly discourage candi-
dates from running for office.
Prior to the vote, Matt Vann, a Lake City
businessman, asked to have his neigh-
.borhood moved back to his old voting
district. Vann said he filed his paperwork
to establish a campaign account to run for
the District 5 seat currently held by Scarlet
Frisina six days before the vote.
After his, request was denied, Vann
PROBE continued on 3A


* 'ci.,,.;,


- -a' f~'~" '~" '.'
''.,.~-,
.r'A4


Lakeside view
Reflections of clouds are seen in the waters of Alligator Lake Tuesday afternoon.


Findings complete in response

to complaint by LCDP captain


LA/UIRA AM U UNILKLaKe ily Reporter
Remembering Pearl
The American flag flies at half staff
Wednesday outside the Lake City VA
Medical Center, 619 South Marion
Ave. Yesterday marked the 70th anni-
versary of the attack, on Pearl Harbor
where more than 2,400 Americans
were killed. The unprovoked attack
launched the nation into World War
II. It is estimated only 3,000 of the
60,000 servicemen and women who
served in Hawaii during the attack are
still alive.



Police


discover


body in


home

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Police Department
is investigating the discovery of a
man's body in a Ridgewood Avenue
home Tuesday night.
Capt. John Blanchard, Lake City
Police Department public infor-
mation officer, said there doesn't
appear to be foul play connect-
ed to the man's death, but his
body has been sent to the Medical
Examiner's Office in Jacksonville
for an autopsy.
LCPD officers were dispatched
to 410 Ridgewood Avenue around
10:16 p.m. Tuesday.
"There was some neighbors
who said they hadn't seen their
neighbor in a while and we
responded there," Blanchard
said. "The officers were able to
gather enough information to
make entry into the.home and
we located the deceased indi-
vidual inside the residence. The
deceased appeared to have been
in the home for some extended
period of time."
Blanchard said officers secured
the scene and made contact with
the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement
"The crime scene investigation
was conducted and there appeared
to be no signs of foul play,"
Blanchard said. "We are awaiting
more information from the medical
examiners office who is conducting
the autopsy."
The man's identity is being with-
held pending notification of next
of kin.


Final version of report
expected in 3-5 days,
says city manager.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Assistant city attorney Richard Stadler
has completed his findings on a complaint
filed by Lake City Police Department Capt.
Robert Smith.
The findings were hand-delivered to City
Manager Wendell Johnson late Wednesday
afternoon.


Johnson said the final report is three to
five days away and said Stadler's findings
will be just a portion of that document, to
be completed by Johnson.
Johnson said he plansto meet with LCPD
chief Argatha Gilmore, as well as Smith,
before releasing the final report.
Smith was placed on administrative leave
by Johnson Nov. 15 after filing the com-
plaint against another LCPD captain.
Smith's complaints center on allegations
of employment discrimination and "internal
operations disagreements" with Gilmore as
well as conflict between Smith and Capt.
John Blanchard, according to a memo from


Johnson to Smith placing
< Smith on leave. Blanchard
and Smith function as sec-
ond in command at the
police department.
"My choice to put Capt
Smith on administrative
Johnson leave while this inves-
tigation was going on is
because of what my observations tell me
his emotional involvement is and his inten-'
sity about it," Johnson said last month upon


LCPD continued on 3A


LAURA HAMPSO, Nil.,- 4 *; ', Pe-,.,-
Emergency response
Firefighters examine a car involved in an accident at SW Main Boulevard and Baya Drive on
Wednesday afternoon. Information on the crash was not available at press time.


CALL US:
(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


O pinion ................
People ..................
O bituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN
| PEOPLE
-1 I H .-',-H' star
SMorgan dies.


COMING
FRIDAY
Local news
roundup.


I


Mock disaster

Staged at CHS

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High School students and
staff practiced evacuating and locking
down the school during a mock disas-
ter Wednesday morning.
Under the scenario, front office
staff alerted administration when an
angry parent entered the school and
took a classroom hostage, said Terry

DRILL continued on 3A


603
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


1 I84264 u I I 100









2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011

I Celebrity Birthdays


) 91Wednesday:
SAfternoon: 1-6-4-3


Tuesday:
1-6-23-24-26


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



M*A*S*H star Morgan passes at 96


LOS ANGELES Harry Morgan
wasn't a star and didn't need to be.
In "M-A-S-H," "Dragnet" and so many
other TV shows and movies, the vet-
eran character actor proved as indis-
pensable as any marquee name.
Imagine "M-A-S-H" without the no-
nonsense but fair ArmyCol. Sherman
Potter, who knew how to traverse the
line between military discipline and
wartime humanity.
Here's Potter, on
his first day as com-
mander of a Korean
War hospital camp,
discovering the
moonshine-making
operation run by his
brilliant but wayward
surgeons and holding
his fire: "Had a still in Morgan -
Guam in World War
II. One night it blew up. That's how I
got my Purple Heart"
Or go back to the 1960fs version of
"Dragnet" and Morgan's tour of duty
as police Officer Bill Gannon, playing
droll foil to laconic Jack Webb's Sgt.
Joe Friday. Or consider Morgan's stal-
wart judge at the center of an intel-
lectual clash in "Inherit the Wind,"
the dramatization of 1925's so-called
Scopes Monkey Trial on evolution.
The 1960 film included tour de
force performances by Fredric
March, who raged as a version of
William Jennings Bryan, and Spencer
Tracy, a craftily impassioned take on
Clarence Darrow. Morgan held his
own as a smart, small-town jurist try-
ing to balance political pressure with
justice.
Morgan, who died Wednesday at
age 96 at his Brentwood home after
having pneumonia, was in the top
ranks of actors who could take a small
role, or a small scene, and bring it
deftly alive. He added richness to any
comedy or drama smart enough to


call on him.
And that happened over and over,
from gritty Westerns including 1943's
"The Oxbow Incident" and 1952's
"High Noon" to fluffy TV series
"December Bride" and "The Love
Boat."
Morgan, a Detroit native born in
1915, was studying pre-law at the
University of Chicago when public
speaking classes drew him to the
stage. He worked with a little-theater
group in Washington, D.C., followed
by a two-year stint on Broadway in the
original production of "Golden Boy,"
with Karl Malden and Lee J. Cobb.
Morgan began his television
career in 1954 when the medium was
young.
He was one of the "foundational
pieces of the industry," said "M-A-
S-H" star Mike Farrell, who tried to
gain Morgan a lifetime achievement
award from the Screen Actors Guild.
Such honors routinely go to stars
but also belong to Morgan and other
character actors who provide "the grit
and the substance and the context"
for so many films and TV shows,
Farrell said Wednesday.
"Harry has been that, par excel-
lence, for many years," he said.

'Drift Away' singer Gray
loses battle with cancer
NASHVILLE, Tenn. Dobie Gray'
was more than a smooth balladeer
who recorded the timeless hit "Drift
Away" in 1973.
He wrote songs for an array of
country and pop performers, was
a trailblazing entertainer in South.
Africa and, in death, a philanthropist
Gray died in his sleep at his
Nashville home Tuesday after along
battle with cancer. He was 69.
"Drift Away" also was recorded by
rap artist Uncle Kracker in 2003 and


became a hit again.
Gray's silky tenor also was heard
on other hits including "The In
Crowd" in 1965 and "Loving Arms"
in 1973. His songs received radio
airplay on several formats including
Top 40, country, AOR and adult con-
temporary.
"He had such a unique style,
so identifiable," said Bud Reneau,
Gray's close friend and songwriting
partner.

Guns 'N Roses, Beastie
Boys newcomers to Hall
NEW YORK Welcome to the
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Guns N'
Roses.
The seminal rock band of the
late 1980s and early '90s, best
known for hits like "Welcome to the
Jungle," "Sweet Child 0' Mine" and
"November Rain," leads the 2012
class of inductees announced on
Wednesday. Also making the cut is
the hip-hop trio Beastie Boys; rock-
ers the Red Hot Chili Peppers; the
late singer/songwriter Laura Nyro;
Donovan; and influential British
rock group The Small Faces/The
Faces, which included Rod Stewart
and Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie
Wood.
Nyro, who wrote such hits the 5th
Dimension's 'Wedding Bell Blues"
and Blood Sweat & Tears' "And
When I Die," is the only female act
to make it this time around. The
hall passed on Donna Summer, Joan
Jett and the Blackhearts, Heart and
Rufus with Chaka Khan, who were
on the ballot for 2012.
But it wasn't just women who were
denied entry into the rock hall for
next year. Voters also passed on hip-
hop pioneers Eric B. & Rakim, War,
the Cure and the Spinners.
(AP)


Actor-director
Maximilian Schell is 81.
Flutist James Galway
is 72.
Singer Jerry Butler
is 72.
Actor John Rubinstein
is 65.
Rock singer-musician
Gregg Allman is 64.
Actress Kim Basinger
is 58.
Rock musician
Warren Cuccurullo is 55.
Rock musician Phil
Collen (Def Leppard) is 54.


Country singer Marty
Raybon is 52.
Political commentator
Ann Coulter is 50.
Actress Teri Hatcher
is 47.
Singer Sinead
O'Connor is 45.
Rock singer Ingrid
Michaelson is 32.
M R&B singer Chrisette
Michele is 29.
Rock singer-actress
Kate Voegele is 25.
Actress AnnaSophia
Robb is 18.


Daily Scripture

"Jesus said to her, "I am the
resurrection and the life. The
one who believes in me will live,
even though they die;"
John 11:25 NIV


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecftyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, RFla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City; Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address'changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................ $26.32
24 Weeks...................$48.79
52 Weeks....................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax
Mall rates
12 Weeks................. $41.40
24 Weeks ............... $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Deceased lacrosse
player had defect
ORLANDO A medi-
cal examiner says a cen-
tral Florida high school
student who died after
collapsing at a lacrosse
practice had a rare heart
defect.
The Orange County
medical examiner's office
reported Wednesday that
an artery was connected to
the wrong part of 17-year-
old Daniel Valenson's
heart The Orlando
Sentinel reports that the
condition is usually fatal in
the first year of life, unless
corrected surgically. But
officials say it's possible
for it to go unnoticed for
years before a person sud-
denly dies.
The Orange County
Sheriff's Office reports
that Valenson was practic-
ing with his team Monday
at University High School.
When he went to the
ground, coaches checked
on him and found him in
distress. He was taken to a
nearby hospital in critical
condition. Valenson died
the next day.


ORLANDO A legal
challenge to a Florida law
requiring drug testing of
welfare applicants now is a
class action case.
U.S. District Judge Mary
Scriven on Wednesday in
Orlando granted a class
action request.
It was sought by the
American Civil Liberties
Union, which is represent-
ing Orlando resident Luis
Lebron in the case.
The certification will let
the challenge continue on
'behalf of all applicants for
temporary assistance even
if Lebron himself becomes
ineligible.
Scriven previously
issued an order temporar-
ily blocking implementa-


tion of the law championed
by Gov. Rick Scott.
The state is appealing
the order that put testing
on hold until-Scriven can
hold a full hearing.
She found the law may
violate a constitutional ban
on unreasonable searches
and seizures.

Grenade found in
USF library
TAMPA Campus
police evacuated parts of
the University of South
Florida library after work-
ers found an old grenade
in a box with other donat-
ed items.
Police say the third,
fourth and fifth floors of
the library were evacuated
Wednesday afternoon. The
bomb squad responded
and reopened the area
about an hour later.
Workers were going
through a box of items
donated to the library's
special collections section
when they found the gre-
nade believed to be from
World War I or World War
II. Police determined the
device was not dangerous.


ORLANDO Authorities
say a central Florida man
had a handgun in his carry-
on luggage when he tried
to pass through security
at Orlando International
Airport
Orlando police say
31-year-old Gleeson
Parks Johnson was
stopped Sunday when a
Transportation Security
Administration official
operating an X-ray machine
spotted the firearm. He told
officers that he forgot the
gun was in his bag and that
he had no intention of tak-
ing it on the airplane.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports that Johnson was
arrested and charged with
carrying a concealed weap-


on. He was later released
on bail.

Scott unveils '12
proposed budget
TALLAHASSEE -
' Florida Gov. Rick Scott
wants more money for
schools but he's proposing
$4.6 billion in spending
cuts for other parts of the
state budget to get it.
Scott on Wednesday
rolled out spending recom-
mendations that include $1
billion in new money for
education.
His proposal for the bud-
get year beginning July 1
totals $66.4 billion.
Besides funding the
school increases, the cuts
also would offset a poten-
tial deficit of nearly $2 bil-
lion and tax cuts.
Some of the heaviest
cuts would come in the
state-federal Medicaid pro-
gram.
This is the second
budget Scott has pro-
posed but the first he's
announced at the Capitol.
The Republican governor
unveiled his first budget at
a tea party event in central
Florida.


Welfare drug test Man chraged with FAMU band leader
now class action gun in carry-on FAMU band leader


U ImlOdlal ll ll LVU
ORLANDO Dismissal
procedures against the
longtime director of
Florida A M's band have
been put on hold.
A university attorney
said Wednesday that Julian
White's status has changed
to being on administrative
leave with pay.
The change was made'
after state police asked the
school to halt any disciplin-
ary action until a criminal
investigation into the death
of a band member is fin-
ished,
Detectives say hazing
played a role in drum
major Robert Champion's
Nov. 19 death.
(AP)


THE WEATHER


X* I=


MOSTLY PARTLY PARTLY ,. : PARTLY
SUNN i CLOUDY I CLOUDY CLOUDY


HI LO J H1I693LOj0 HI 67 LO HI LO 104


Pensacola
55/40


Tallahassee *
59/ 35 ''

* Paiama City
56/38


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


* .sta
60/ 31
Lake City
60, 38
Gainesvile o
\.61/43
Ocala *
"62/45
0
Tamnpu
67/56


FLMyemrs
72/57


79
55
69
46
86 in 1978
20 in 1937


0.06"
0.06"
32.95"
0.50"
46.30"


City
Jacklsoiile Cape Canaveral
59A43 Daytona Beach
Da a Bea Ft. Lauderdale
Da65*Beach Fort Myers
6554 Gailnesvllle
Jacksonville
riando Cap Canaveral ake Cityy West
37/53 &7/58 akeCity
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
71/64 e Orlando
Ft. Lauderdale Panama City
73/67 0 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
72/57 Miami Tampa
73/66 Valdosta
, est W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise today 7:14 a.m.
Sunset today 5:30 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 7:15 a.m.
Sunset torn. 5:30 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today 4:08 p.m.
,Moonset today 5:27 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 4:54 p.m.
Moonset tom. 6:21 a.m.


Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan.
10 17 24 1
Full Last New First


On this date in
1989, a winter
storm brought rain
and freezing rain to
parts of the Atlantic
Coast, from Georgia
to New Jersey.
Snowfall totals
ranged up to 7
inches at Staunton,
Va., and Tobacco,
Maryland.


7 -.W
~


- Forecasted temerabre Fes le' ttmatfe


45 nuate b bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.


HI LO


Friday
,5 56 p,:
71 55 p.:
I9 70/pc
80/62/pc
70/53/pc
67/53/pc
77/69/pc
69/50/pc
79/69/pc
79/64/pc
71/54/pc
76/59/pc
63/46/s
61/42/pc
67/42/pc
74/59/pc
68/42/pc
78/67/pc


Saturday
7-' 55 p,:
72 6( ,
80 70 p,:
8'i 60 [,i:
c66 47 p,.
; 7, p ,:
67/44/pc
80/70/pc
81/64/pc
71/51/pc
75/59/pc
61/44/s
59/37/s
64/39/s
75/57/pc
64/39/pc
79/68/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


S weathercom

&-f Forecasts, data and
graphics 201.1 Weather
\ y Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


Ge Connect



i''a',a ss s m 'd I]d()t~l


FLOOR IDA
lom
4W7A=y


Wednesday:
N/A


CA fH e Wednesday:
SAfternoon: 2-1-7


AROUND FLORIDA


1 fly


110SAUI).ql


1.,' j 6- -':.I -. V










Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


November was quiet

month for forest fires


From state forestry officials

November was a quiet
month in the Suwannee
Forestry Center area
with nine fires burning 49
acres. By county, the totals
were as follows: Baker 0
fires/0 acres; Bradford
- 2 fires/I acre; Columbia
- 1 fire/1 acre; Hamilton
- 1 fire/15 acres; Suwannee
- 4 fires/31 acres; Union
- 1 fire/1 acre. The pri-
mary cause of wildfire in
November was escaped
debris burn, responsible
for 33 percent of the fires.
Because Florida had no
significant tropical storm
activity this year, the area
never recovered from the
severe drought that has
dominated 2011.
Predictions for December
indicate there will be nor-
mal-to-above normal poten-
tial for wildfire in the area,
based on weather trends
and expected fuel dryness
conditions. The National
Weather Service expects
continuing drought and
drier fuel conditions to sup-
port significant fires after
the new year.


Escaped debris burn is
consistently the main cause
of wildfire in our district.
Most are the result of sim-
ple carelessness. Someone
burning yard debris doesn't
pay attention to the weather,
or steps away "just for a sec-
ond" and the next thing you
see are big yellow bulldoz-
ers rumbling in the woods,
or worse, a home on fire.
Here are two simple-
points to remember: 1) If
there's high wind and low
humidity, don't burn; 2) If
it's too hot to touch, it's
too hot to leave unattended.
Florida's outdoor burning
laws can be found on the
internet at: http://www.
fl-dof.com/wildfire/laws-
trash_burning.html.
The Rangers of Suwannee
Forestry Center normally
fight 17 wildfires in an aver-
age December. In December
2010 we fought 85 wildfires.
Please do your part to pre-
vent a repeat of last year.
If you have any questions
concerning daily burning
conditions, please call
Center Dispatch at 386 758-
5700. Our Duty Officers will
be happy to advise you.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
It's that time of year
Andy Hammock, of La Crosse, adjusts a fir tree Tuesday at Lee's Produce booth on U.S. Highway 90. The trees, ranging
from 5- to 9-feet high, were grown in North Carolina. 'Where Christmas is a symbol of the living Lord, the trees are a sym-.
bol of Christmas,' Hammock said:


DRILL: Mock disaster staged at CHS

Continued From Page 1A


Huddleston, CHS principal. During the
mock crisis gates leading into campus
were locked and monitored.
Students also practiced evacuating the
building and filing into Tiger Stadium, he
said. The drill was over by 11 a.m.
Afterward administrators and district
officials met to discuss the drill and any
changes that might be necessary.


"I think the community feels at ease
knowing there's a crisis plan," said Gloria
Spivey, safe schools coordinator for
Columbia County.
In addition to fire and tornado drills, the
state requires every district to have one cri-
sis drill during the school year. Each school
has an individual crisis plan. Last year the
drill was at Pinemount Elementary.


LCPD: City's findings now complete

Continued From Page 1A

release of documents related to the-investi"' i such'treatment that he's alleged and that
gation. "I told him that I feel it's in his best was the best way to do it."
interest to go home and relax ... I just want While on leave Smith has maintained his
him to be free from any further belief of patrol car, badge and gun.


PROBE: Becomes public today

Continued From Page 1A


said he believes his neighborhood was
moved to District 1 to prevent him from
running.
Vann said it would be difficult to
defeat longtime District 1 commissioner
Ronald Williams. District 1 is designated
the county's minority voting district.
Commissioners also refused to dis-
cuss a request by school board mem-
ber Keith Hudson to move a nearby
neighborhood back into his voting
district. Hudson argued the neighbor-
hood had been part of his district for
longer than the 35 years he has held
office and that many of his supporters
live there.
Commissioner Rusty DePratter made
a motion to consider Hudson's request
at the Nov. 22 meeting, but his motion
died from a lack of a second by other


little less.








V's-r}


commissioners.
DuPree later said he regretted not
relinquishing his chairman's seat to
Frisina so he could second DePratter's
motion and discuss the request at the
meeting.
Questions were also raised about
four maps drawn by the Supervisor of
Elections office that were not consid-
ered by commissioners at the meet-
ing. Instead, commissioners only con-
sidered a map drawn by county staff
at the request of county manager Dale
Williams.
DuPree and DePratter wanted all five
maps considered, but Frisina, Ronald
Williams and commissioner Stephen
Bailey voted to only consider the map
drawn by couinty staff.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Thursday December 8, 20 II


ON ANTE


ONE
OPINION


Canada


cools to


global
0

wannming

Canada has flat-out
rejected the proposals
pushed at the United
Nations' annual glob-
al-warming summit
in South Africa. This could be the
start of a trend of countries dump-
ing environmentalist fashion state-
ments and returning to rational
energy policies. If only the United
States would do the same.
As the U.N. conference heated
up in Durban, Canada poured cold
water on attempts to extend the
Kyoto Protocol limiting carbon-
dioxide emissions before the
treaty's Dec. 31, 2012, expiration
date. "Kyoto is the past," Canadian
Environment Minister Peter Kent
told reporters. He clearly stated
that his government had no inter-
est in renewing the treaty.
Much has changed since Kyoto
took effect in 1997. Escalating
energy prices have made
Canada's vast oil reservoirs a
valuable resource for a hungry
U.S. market The existing pact
obligates countries to cut their
carbon-dioxide emissions 5.2
percent below 1990 levels by the
end of next year. Canada is 17
percent above this target, partially
because of its growing oil indus-
try. Failure to meet treaty require-
ments would force the country
to purchase carbon-dioxide emis-
sions offsets at the cost of billions
of dollars, Rather than fill the
pockets of the carbon charlatans
peddling dubious greenhouse-gas
credits, Canadians can save some
loonies by opting out
Devotees of global-warming
dogma won't be happy if that
happens. At the Durban con-
clave, officials from 194 countries
were preoccupied with devising
a scheme for strong-arming
industrialized lands into supply-
ing a "green" climate fund with
$100 billion annually by 2020.
Underdeveloped places would, in
theory, use the cash to counter
the effects of purported global
warming.
By joining our neighbor in this
affordable-energy enterprise, Mr.
Obama could send a message to
voters that American power must
take precedence over enviro-
redistributionism.
Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
SSue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

L'E TT R S
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of


the Lake City Reporter.
, BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


I was expecting another
fastball, not that changeup
slow pitch. Struck out
again, darn it Shall I take
that leap from the cliff
with my friends? The water's
deep enough; what can happen?
(Ended up with two broken
front teeth.) Should I stay in
this stressful job? The future is
uncertain. (I stayed too long,
but when I quit I found the
career of my dreams.) In spite
of the unbroken centerline, do I
have time to pass? (Some poor
choices can be deadly!) Shall I
go back to school?
It's easy to passively walk
through life, not paying atten-
tion or recognizing the situ-
ation we're in. Or, we could
become sensitive, and notice
when we're given opportunities
to make life-changing choices.
If we can learn to identify
situations early, and see them
as "opportunities" instead of
"problems," we've taken the
first step in taking charge of
our own lives and building the
life we want for ourselves. I
think it took me about half of
my life to learn this principle.


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


How can we do that? Try see-
ing "problems" as "situations,"
and then as "opportunities."
Then you can take advantage
of these opportunities that life
presents us with. It could help
to ask some of these questions;
Can I see my life as a story?
What's my quest, or my desti-
ny? Where can I go from here?
Am I missing some emo-
tional signals that I'm at a
crossroads? Do I feel any
frustration, confusion, stress,
impatience, anger, or fear?
These feelings can alert me to
a branch in the railroad of my
life. Could I throw the switch,
and choose a new direction?
What choices do I see? I'll
-list choices, and the "pros" and
"cons." Is there an escape but-


ton or an ejection seat? Can I
change my mind, or is this a
firm commitment? What if I'm
wrong-what are the conse-
quefices? What are my respon-
sibilities to others who care
about me?
When you decide to take
that other path, go for it Then
list some goal steps you need
to take, and log them on your
calendar.
What benefits can I expect?
That depends on how well you
made your choice. Were you
motivated by the desire for hap-
piness, fulfillment,, success, pur-
pose, and to do what's right? If
you're driven by positive moral
values, you're well on the road
to a better life.
You can do it-it's time to get
started. Watch for life's switches,
signals, and sidetracks. You may
find some great opportunities.

* Bob Denny has counseled
troubled youth and families in
Florida for 15 years, and teaches
psychology at Florida Gateway
College. Your comments and
ideas are appreciated at Bob.
Denny@gmail.com


Sometimes the audience is

more interesting than the movie


t's a long way from South
Carolina to Las Vegas. My
sister doesn't get to visit
us often. So when I heard
she was coming for 10
days, I began to plan.
The first five days were easy.
We spent Thanksgiving in
California with my children and
grandchildren, fighting over who
got to hold which baby for how
long. Then we flew to Vegas and
she settled into our guest room
for five more days.
A three-hour gap in time zones
kept us on different schedules.
At night, she'd be surfing chan-
nels when I was ready to crash.
Come morning, I'd be up drink-
ing coffee, waiting for her to stir.
Between waking and sleeping,
we did what we always do eat,
talk and laugh. And she watched
a lot of TV with my husband, a .
man she had once warned me
about "If you don't marry him,"
she'd said, "I will."
He suggested taking her to
The Gun Store to shoot Uzis.
"What?" I said. "She'd never
do that! It costs too much."
I wanted to take her to all my
favorite places: Valley of Fire,
Red Rock Canyon, Trader Joe's.
But every morning, we'd
talk over coffee. Then I'd make
Dutch babies and we'd talk some
more. We'd have pizza for lunch'
with more talk. And then it was
time for dinner. Story of my life.
Finally, I said, "Let's go see the
Bellagio's Christmas exhibit"


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandoll.com
"OK," she said, "I'llshower."
Three hours later, we were
on our way. When we finally
got to the Bellagio, imagine my
surprise to find that the exhibit
didn't open until the weekend.
My sister just laughed.
"Let's go eat," she said.
The next day we decided to
see a matinee. ("Killer Elite'") at a
theater I had never been to.
There are many fine, state-of-
the-art theaters in Vegas. This
was not one of them. It was in
a part of town you don't see in
ads, except maybe ads for tat-
toos or bail bonds.
My sister insisted on buying
the tickets. They cost a dollar
apiece. So did the hot dogs. One
for me. Two for her. Two tickets,
three hot dogs, five bucks. Who
needs state-of-the-art?
We were early. Sprawled
around us were a half-dozen
men, all sleeping. Some had
backpacks and bedrolls. A few
had removed their shoes.
I began to question what sort
of theater this was? What if the
film we were about to see was


not what we expected?
Never have I been so glad to
see Robert De Niro's face appear
on screen. I can't recall the plot,
but the audience was riveting.
A fight broke out in back, but
they had the courtesy to take it
outside.
My sister didn't seem to notice
a patron who kept beaming a
flashlight on the back of her
neck. I decided if it didn't bother
her, it didn't bother me.
Halfway into the movie, a big,
burly man plopped down beside
me and began slurping popcorn.
When he leaned over to whis-
per in my ear, I screamed. No
one, not even my own sister,
seemed to notice. Or care.
"What's the name of this
movie?" he said.
I told him. He left And I
vowed to be a better person.
When the movie ended, I
told my sister to hurry.
"Afraid we'll get mugged?"
she said, snickering.
"I'm more afraid of the hot
dogs," I said. "You had two."
The good news is we were
fine. The bad news is, the next
day, my sister had to leave.
The measure of a time well
spent is not where you went or
what you did. It's the way you
smile remembering it.
Maybe next time, well shoot
Uzis.
Sharon Randall writes for
Scripps Howard News Service.


4A


-7


other shaky nations.
The Europeans have a way
of dithering and hair-splitting,
but in the European Union they
have an idea an ideal that is
too big to fail.
* Scripps Howard News Service.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Recognizing life's


opportunities


ANOTHER
VIEW


Germany;

France

to the

rescue

German Chancellor
Angela Merkel
and French
President Nicolas ,
Sarkozy, who have
emerged as the two most
dynamic leaders in dealing
with the European debt cri-
sis, have their work cut out
for them at the European
summit at the end of this
week.
At heart, they must save
the euro, which will be 13
years old this Jan. 1, and
they must save the 17-nation
eurozone for which it is a .
common currency, reining
in those nations that want
to return to the bad old
days when they could freely
manipulate their monies. The
two leaders must convince
the 17 nations to submit
to binding fiscal restraints
designed to prevent a recur-
rence of the current crisis.
And they must convince some
or all of the 10 European
Union nations that are not
part of the eurozone to join.
Britain is already a lost
cause in this respect, and
Prime Minister David
Cameron has said that his
main mission at the summit
is to preserve London's pri-
macy as Europe's financial
capital.
The:stakes are high since
Europe is close to the post-
war dream, launched in 1957,
of a single European market,
largely without borders, and
it has recently come achingly
close to building the world's
largest unified economy, a
development that would be
good for Europe and good for
us.
But Merkel and Sarkozy,
whose nations would be
largely unscathed if no deal
is reached, are operating-with
a gun -- maybe only a popgun
to their heads. Standard
and Poor's, which precipi-
tated a mild financial crisis in
the U.S. last summer when
it downgraded U.S. debt,
has put 15 eurozone nations,
including five that are triple-A
rated, on notice that they face
a downgrade in their credit
rating in the next 90 days.
Two eurozone nations were
excluded from the warning,
Greece and Cyprus, because
they're already on S and P's
watch list.
Merkel and Sarkozy are
said to have reached a "com-
prehensive" agreement on
new fiscal rules for the euro-
zone. The weakness in the
zone has always been that
while there is a common
monetary policy, overseen
by the European Central
Bank, there is no common
fiscal policy and no means of
enforcing one other than by
consensus.
Merkel and Sarkozy are pro-
posing an automatic enforce-
ment for countries that exceed
the EU's 3 percent-of-GDP defi-
cit rule. (The U.S. deficit last
year was 8.5 percent of GDP.)
Enforcement would be handed
to a stabilization commission
to go into effect next March,
assuming all the major players
go along.
In another major step to
attract and hold private capital,
private holders of a eurozone
nation's bonds would be pro-
tected in any future bailout
or restructuring. This comes
too late for Greece, but it may
steady the bond markets in










LAKE CITY REPORTER CALENDAR THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011 5A


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter. com.


Dec. 8

Senate candidate
at Tea Party meeting

Join us at 7:00 p.m. on
Thursday, December 8
for our monthly meeting.
Marielena Stuart will be
our guest speaker. She
is running for the U.S.
Senate seat currently
held by Bill Nelson. Ms.
Stuart came from Cuba
as a young girl and has a
good perspective on what
socialism/communism is
all about She spoke at our
Conservative Countdown
and really impressed
the people who talked
to her that day. We will
have information on our
upcoming Turkey shoot
and other events happening
in our area. For more
*information, call John 386-
935-0126, Sharon 386-935-
0821 or go to: www.

Garden Club


The Lake City Garden
Club will meet on
Thursday, December 8 at
11:00 a.m.
at the Club House
(Woman's Club). This will
be a Christmas luncheon
and everyone is
asked to bring a covered
dish to share. Also, please
bring a wrapped gift for
our gift exchange.
As in previous years, we
will be taking a collection
for the Dream Machine.
The Garden Club matches
whatever we collect and
presents to the Dream
Machine to help purchase
Christmas gifts for
children. Visitors are
welcome.

CHS reunion

The Columbia High
School classes of 1949,
'50, '51, '52, and '53 will
meet for a covered dish
lunch Dec..9 at the Mason
City Community Center
at 11:30 a.m. Anyone who


attended Columbia High
School is welcome.
For more information
call Julia Osburn at 752-
7544 or Morris Williams at
752-4710.


Afternoon tea

The community is cordially
invited to "Afternoon Tea"
Friday, December 9th and
16th, 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
at the Hospice of the Na-
ture Coast Wings Commu-
nity Education Center in
the Lake City Plaza (along
U.S. Hwy 441). "Afternoon
Tea" is an ideal way to
greet your neighbors and
friends and meet Hospice
of the Nature Coast staff
who will provide informa-
tion and answer any ques-
tions about hospice care
and services. For more
information, call Vicki
Myers at 386-755-7714 or
866-642-0962.
For more information about
hospice services in the Lake
City area, call Hospice of
the Nature Coast at 386-755-


7714. Visit us on the web at
www.hospicepofthenature-
coastorg.
Beekeepers Club

The next meeting of
the Columbia County
Beekeepers Club will
be held December 8th
at 7pm. Meeting will
be held at the Ft. White
Library 17700 S.W. Hwy
47 across from the High
School.
Everyone welcome to
come out and learn about
honeybees and how you
can help save them.
Please help spread the
word about this new club
to friends and neighbors.

Dec. 11


Vivaldi's Gloria
Sunday, December 11 at
11am, Dr. Poplin will direct
Vivaldi's Gloria at First
Presbyterian Church on
Baya Avenue in Lake City.
Unique at this


performance is that
three generations of
Herman Gunters will
be performing in this
spectacular Christmas
oratorio. Herman Gunter
III will sing with the
basses, Herman Gunter IV
will sing with the tenors,
and Herman Gunter V
(age 9) will sing in the
soprano section. Everyone
is welcome to attend! For
more information call the
church office at (386)752-
0670.



Dec. 14

Newcomers and Friends
meeting

The regular meeting of
the Lake City Newcomers
and Friends will be held at
11 a.m. on Dec. 14 at the
Eastside Village Clubhouse.
Special entertainment
will be provided by Genie
Harris, accordianist.
Lunch is $10 and will


be catered by Blue Roof
Caterers.


Dec. 16
The community is cordially
invited to "Afternoon Tea"
Friday, December 9th and
16th, 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
at the Hospice of the Na-
ture Coast Wings Commu-
nity Education Center in
the Lake City Plaza (along
U.S.-Hwy 441). "Afternoon
Tea" is an ideal way to
greet your neighbors and
friends and meet Hospice
of the Nature Coast staff
who will provide informa-
tion and answer any ques-
tions about hospice care
and services. For more
information, call Vicki
Myers at 386755-7714 or
866-642-0962.
For more information
about hospice services in
the Lake City area, call
Hospice of the. Nature
Coast at 386-755-7714. Visit
us on the web at www.
hospicepofthenaturecoast.
org.


OBITUARIES


Herbert R. Bohrman
Herbert R. Bohrman (88) passed
away on December 7, 2011.
Born August 26, 1923, in his ear-
lier years Herbert Worked with
his family at Bohrman's Clothing
and Bruce Clothing in Lake City,
and Leavy Wolf in Jacksonville,
Florida. He is preceded in death
by his parents Max and Reba
Bohrman and brother, Fredrick
J. Bohrman. He is survived by
his wife, Tradue A. Bohrman;
son, Bart D. Jordan (Babs) and
grandchildren Alex and Devin
Jordan. Graveside services will
be held at 2:00 PM on Thursday,
December 8, 2011 at Greenlawn
Cemetery, 4300 Beach Blvd.,
with Rabbi Joseph Lief offici-
ating. Contributions may be
made to Community Hospice
of Northeast Florida, 4266 Sun-
beam Road, Jacksonville, FL
3557 or Congregation Ahavath,
Chesed The Temple 8727 San
Jose Boulevard Jacksonville,
Florida 32217. Arrangements
under the care and direction
of Greenlawn Funeral Home
and Cemetery (904) 396-2522.
Words of comfort may be shared
with the family by visiting www.
greenlawnjacksonville.com
James H. Brown
Mr. James H. Brown, 76 of Lake
City, passed away on Decem-
ber 6, 2011 at Haven Hospice
of the Suwan-
nee Valley. He ,.,,
is a native of
Wetumpka,
Alabama and
Was born on
September
19, 1935. Mr.
Brown was the
son of the late
Ollie and Mary Ensley Brown.
He retired from Pepsi-Cola after
37 years and also was employed
by Florida Department of Trans-
portation and most recently
Peeler Transport. His everyday
joy was "Lil Buddy".
Mr. Brown was preceded in death
by two brothers Bill Brown and
Thomas Brown, and one sister
Mary Donaldson.
Mr. Brown is survived by his
wife of 57 years, Joyce Brown;
a son Danny Brown(Terri),Lake
City,Fl; a daughter Deborah
Raines(Rick),Dallas, Georgia.
Four grand-children Kari Dal-
las, Dallas, Georgia; Daniel.
Strickland ,Douglasville, Geor-
gia; Weston Brown, St. Johns,
Florida and Chase Brown,
Jacksonville, Florida. Two step-
grandchildren Shane Raines,
Douglasville, Georgia and Jer-
emy Raines, Burbank, Califor-
nia. Three great-grandchildren
Kaleb, Rachel and Mason all of
Georgia.
Two sisters Nell Walker and



Avon

Holiday

open

house

Submitted

Gift baskets from $5-10,
holiday decorations, gift-
ables, make up, jewelry,
men's gifts, cologne and
watches. Drop in today
from 2-8 at .493 SW Ace
Lane for coffee, tea and
cookies. For information
or directions call 397-3151
or 755-2372.
Bring a friend and get
your name in the raffle
drawing twice.


Betty Jean Baker both of Lake
City. Several special nieces and
nephews also survive.
Funeral services for Mr.. Brown
will be conducted at 11:00 A.M.
on Friday December 9, 2011 at
Lake City Church of God with
Rev. Jim Cain and Rev. Cagney
Tanner officiating. Interment
follow at Bethlehem Cemetery
(located on Highway 100). Visi-
tation will be held on Thursday
December 8 from 5-7pm in the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home Chapel. Arrangements are
under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign our
on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com

Ms. Anthea C. Duron-,
Ms. Anthea C. Duron, 88, died
Saturday December 3, 2011 at
the Lake City Medical Center in
Lake City. She was the daughter
of the late Antonio and Charlotte
Bruns Duron. She had lived in
Lake City for the past twelve
years. She enjoyed rescuing
abused animals and caring for
them.
'She is survived by her care taker
and special friends Jerry and
Susan Garrett, and close friend
Jane Johnson.
In lieu of flowers Ms. Duron
ask that donations be made to:
North Florida Animal Rescue or
Anthea Duron Adoption Center
at 16800 County Rd. 137 Well-
born, FL, 32094.
Cremation arrangements are un-
der direction of Dees-Parrish


Family Funeral Home in Lake
City, FL. 458 South Marion
Avenue Lake City, FL. 32025.
( 386) 752-1234. Please sign
guest book at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com
James Edward Foster
Mr. James Edward Foster 88 died
at Malcolm Randall VA Hospital
Gainesville, Florida, December'
5,2011. Born August 16, 1923 to.
the late James Scott and Flossie
Halstead Foster in Munson Fl.
Jim was preceded in death by
three children; James Daniel,
Robert Anthony, ..
and Ernie Kay -m-.
Foster as well
as one grandson -
John David Fos-
ter.
He is survived by his loving wife
of 68 years Teddy Foster, Lake
..City, two sons William Fos-
ter (Ann) Lake City, and John
Foster (Connie) Pelzer South
Carolina. One brother Ray Fos-
ter Port ST. Joe Fl. One sister
Doris Jean Gidden Middleburg
Fl. Four grandchildren, Scott
Foster, Jody: Foster, Michelle
Brown and Susan Foster. Three
Great-grandchildren, Brandon
and Heather Foster and Baleigh
Brown.
Prior to joining the Army Air
Corp. in 1941 he spent time in
the CCC's and' worked a year
with the U. S. Forest Service.
During his military service he
was assigned to the 754th Bom-
bardment Squadron and was he
was proud to have participated
at Normandy, Central Europe,
Rhineland Northern France, air
offenses Europe, and Ardennes.


Jim loved being outdoors, spend-
ing time working with his horses
or any other activity that kept
him in contact with animals.
Funeral services for Mr. Fos-
ter will be conducted Saturday,
December 10, 2011 at the Dees-
Parrish Family Funeral Home
Chapel at 2:00 p.m. With the
Reverend Bo Hammock offici-
ating. Visitation with the fam-
ily will be held one hour prior
to the service time. Internment
will take place at Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens Cemetery in
Lake City, Fl; Arrangements are
under the direction of the
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 S.
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025 752-1234 please sign
our on-line family guestbook at
parrishfamilyfuneralhome.com
Ernest Williams
Ernest Williams, 64, passed away
December 6, 2011 in Shands at
Lake Shore Hospital. Arrange-
ments are incomplete and will be
announced at a later date.
Arrangements entrusted to
Combs Funeral Home. 292 NE
Washington Street. Lake City,
FL. (386) 752-4366. "The Car-
ing Professionals"
Marion L. Williams
Mrs. Marion L. (Baker) Wil-
liams was
born October
6, 1927 to the
late Oscar L.
and Carrie E.
Baker in Olus-
tee, FL. She
later moved
to Lake City,


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Florida with her family where
she was raised. She was known
and loved throughout the com-
munity. Marion was united in
Holy Matrimony to the late Rob-
ert D. Williams, Sr. and from this
union six children were born.
She was a member of the Great-
er Truevine Missionary Baptist
Church where she attended until
her health failed. On November
30, 2011, the Heavenly Angel
signed her name on the roll "in-
scribed" well done, thy good and
faithful servant. Mrs. Williams
is preceded in death by three
siblings: Oscar L. Baker, Wil-
liam "Bill" Baker and Mildred
Doreatha Brown.
She leaves to mourn and share
precious memories, six devoted
children: Mary A. Williams,
Robert D. Williams, Brenda J.
Williams, Laverne Williams, all
of Lake City, FL, Rose M. Wil-
liams, Augusta, GA, Janice L.
Williams, Lake City, FL; three
loving siblings, Harold Baker,
Trenton, NJ, Carolyn E. Baker,
Jacksonville, FL, Juanita D.
Smith (Willie), Jacksonville, FL;
three granddaughters, Quashon-
da L. Williams, Valdosta, GA,
Shantia (Bree) O'Neal, Shalea'
(Liz) C. Thomas; two great-


grandchildren, Jameria Williams
and Joshua Davis; her "Special
Ladies", Noreen Jones, Juanita
Weston, Carolyn N. Baker,
Grace Cooper; special cousin,
Pastor Alvin J. Baker; special
friends, Mrs. Delores Williams,
Mrs. Alfreda Brown, Ms. Min-,
nie L. Thomas; and a host of
nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends.
Funeral services for Mrs. Marion
L. Williams will be held 11:00'
A.M, Saturday, December 10,
2011 at New Bethel Missionary:
Baptist Church.. 550 NE Martin
Luther King Street. Lake City,
FL. Alvin J. Baker, Pastor. Inter-'
ment will follow in the Garden
of Rest Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
at New Bethel Missionary Bap-
tist Church Friday, December 9,
2011 from 5:00 -7:00 P.M.
Arrangements entrusted to
COMBS FUNERAL HOME.
292 NE Washington Street. Lake
City, FL. (386) 752-4366. Marq
.Combs-Turner, L.F.D. "The Car-
ing Professionals".
Obituaries are paid advertise-,
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SOCIAL NEWS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


Corbetts celebrate 50 years of marriage


Submitted

Corbett knew
Mary Evelyne
Porter Corbett
his entire life,
but in third grade, in
Echols County Georgia, he
decided that he would one
day marry her. Although it
took him until tenth grade
to convince her of that,
on Oct. 29 they reached a
milestone in life that few
get to experience: they cel-
ebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary.
The festivities, (planned
and executed by their three
daughters and grandchil-
dren) began late afternoon
on the 29th as a surprise
when they were picked up
by a limo.
The three daughters,
Diane Anders, Sheila
Markham Schmidt and
Katie Corbett, enjoyed
the ride with their parents
as they asked Alton and
Mary questions about
their courting days. The
ride included driving by
to see the spot where he
first asked her out, where
they first kissed and where
they lived. The ride ended
at the store in downtown
Valdosta, Georgia where
Mary worked'and where
Alton bought her a ring
when she was only sixteen
years old, The Loft at City
Market.
The surprises continued
through the evening as
Alton and Mary's daugh-
ters and nine grandchil-
dren decided what better
way to share some special
moments of the life of their
Poppie and Nannyithan
with music: A legacy that
Alton and Mary has left for
their entire family. Each
daughter and grandchild
sang songs chosen from
Alton and Mary's list of
all-time favorite oldies,
like Blue Suede Shoes and
Mary in the Morning, leav-
ing many who attended
proclaiming that they
would have paid to see that
'show.
Alton and Mary were
married in Valdosta, Ga.
on Oct 29, 1961. They are
blessed to have had three
daughters, Diane Anders,
Sheila Markham Schmidt,
and Katie Corbett Nine
grandchildren and six great
grandchildren; Jennifer
Anders, Jonathan Anders,
Blake Markham, Fiona
Markham Hanewinkel
(and husband Phillip
Hanewinkel), Sofia
Schmidt, Preston Howell
(and wife Katie Howell),
Tate Howell, Denell Howell
Jones (and husband Rich
Jones), William Jones,
Ellie Jones, Marin Jones,
Hope Jones, Nate Jones,
Lance Howell, and Dalton
Corbett.
Jim Schmidt, Sheila's
husband, officiated the
"Hands of Matrimony"
ceremony that spoke of
their commitment over the
years.
Over a hundred people
were in attendance includ-
ir g their original Best Man
and Maid of Honor, Charles
and Tina Miller of Valdosta
Georgia.
The family would like to
give a special thank you
to Publix Super Market,
(Alton and Mary both
retired from Publix in Lake
City Florida) for the beauti-
ful cake donation for the
special event. They also
would like to thank every-
one who participated and
shared in the special night



CONNERSTED
REPORTER
N TEWs
wmATHER~a


Alton and Mary Corbett with their three daughters, nine grandchildren and six great grandchildren.


Alton (Poppie) Corbett thanking everyone who attended.


A


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Hospice should be your choice for hospice care.


COURTESY PHOTO
Alton and Mary with Best Man Charles Miller and Maid of
Honor Tina Miller















Reliable service at a sensible price.

SERVICES RATES
~~~~_____~~~________________LOW HIGH
Residential Service
(includes Federal Subscriber Line Charge $16.13 $19.20
.and mandatory expanded calling)
Residential Low Income $2.75 $5.82
Business Service
(includes Federal Subscriber Line Charge $32.80 $40.53
and mandatory expanded calling) j
Windstream is focused on delivering-quality services at
reasonable rates within our service territories.
Toll blocking is available at no charge to low-income customers
who qualify. Surcharges and fees such as those for emergency
9-1-1 services are assessed according to government
guidelines.
Low-income individuals eligible for Lifeline and Link-Up
telephone assistance programs may be eligible for discounts
on these basic local service charges through state-specified
telephone assistance plans.
We provide a complete menu of optional services, including
discounted bundles and basic services at the rates, terms, and
conditions specified in our tariffs. For questions call: At
residential customers: 1-800-347-1991 wi nsre V
business customers: 1-800-843-9214 wids.tear.


The First Prieshyterian uu iiiruih
invites the community to attend
I I= VIVALDI'S
GLORIA CANTATA
PML presented by the Chancel Choir.

Sunday, December 11 11:00AM
This is the beginning of special worship schedule
for the Christmas Holiday.

Sunday, December 11 Vivaldis Gloria 11:00 a. m.
A Cantata Prsented by the Chancel Choir
Sunday, December 18 We Have Our Savior 11:00 a.m.
A Musical Prsented by the Praise leam
Saturday, December 24 Impromptu Christmas Pageant 7:00 p.m.
For children, families and people of all ages
Saturday. December 24 Lessons and Carols 11:00 p. m.
For everyone who enjoys the more traditional Christmas service
Sunday, December 25 Christmas Service 11:00 a.m.
TraditionalService
Sunday; fJanuary 1 Sunday Service 11:00 a.m .
Contemporary Service and Communion
Regular service times will resume on Sunday, January 8.


* OIFMIC3M
* ARCCIMI'VES
* sCLAVoIEv:IE-I
* ENMTERTAjIVIMEIT
c ...3. ......Ef -
*COINNl--TED


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


I :-. ".s t'', "
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rachel Midgett of Houston, Texas, foreground, stretches with Heather Keister of Lubbock, Texas before heading to the start
line to run in the half marathon of the Las Vegas Marathon, in Las Vegas. Afflicted with .breast cancer, Midgett has been taking
the drug Afinitor for the last nine months and said that the cancer has not progressed in that time period, longer than other
cancer drugs she has taken in the past.


Big promise in new cancer drugs


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO Breast cancer
experts are cheering what could be
some of the biggest advances in more
than a decade: two new medicines that
significantly delay the time until women
with very advanced cases get worse.
. In a large international study, an
experimental drug from Genentech
called pertuzumab held cancer at bay
for a median of 18 months when given
with standard treatment, versus 12
months for others given only the usual
treatment It also strongly appears to
be improving survival, and follow-up is
continuing to see if it does.
"You don't see that very often. ... It's
a spectacular result," said one study
leader, Dr. Sandra Swain, medical direc-
tor of Washington Hospital Center's
cancer institute.
In a second study, another drug long
used in organ transplants but not tried
against breast cancer everolimus, sold
as Afinitor by Novartis AG kept can-
cer in check for a median of 7 months
in women whose disease was. worsen-
ing despite treatment with hormone-
blocking drugs. A comparison group
that received only hormonal medicine
had just a 3-month delay in disease
progression.
Afinitor works in a novel way, seems
"unusually effective" and sets a new
standard of care, said Dr. Peter Ravdin,
breast cancer chief at the UT Health


Science Center in San Antonio. He has
no role in the work or ties to drugmak-
ers. Most patients have tumors like
those in this study their growth is
fueled by estrogen.
Results were .released Wednesday
at the San Antonio Breast Cancer
Symposium and some were published
online by the New England Journal
of Medicine. They come a few weeks
after federal approval was revoked for
another Genentech drug, Avastin, that
did not meaningfully help breast cancer
patients. It still is sold for other tumor
types,
The new drugs are some of the first
major developments since Herceptin
came out in 1998. It has become stan-
dard treatment for a certain type of
breast cancer.
"These are powerful advances ...
an important step forward," said Dr.
Paul Burstein, a breast expert at Dana-
Farber Cancer Institute in Boston who
had no role in the studies.
A reality check: The new drugs are
likely to be very expensive up to
$10,000 a month and so far have not
proved to be cures. Doctors hope they
might be when given to women with
early-stage cancers when cure is pos-
sible, rather than the very advanced
cases treated in these studies.
Even short of a cure, about 40,000
U.S. women each year have cancer-
that spreads beyond the breast, and
treatment can make a big difference in
their lives,


Rachel Midgett is an example. The
39-year-old Houston woman has breast
cancer that spread to multiple parts of
her liver, yet she ran a half-marathon in
Las Vegas on Sunday. She has had three
scans since starting on Afinitor nine
months ago, and "every time, my liver
lesions keep shrinking," she said.
"My quality of life has been wonder-
ful. Ifs amazing. I have my hair.... If you
saw me you wouldn't even know I have
cancer."
Genentech, part of the Switzerland-
based Roche Group, applied Tuesday
to the federal Food and Drug
Administration for permission to sell
.pertuzumab (per-TOO-zoo-mab) as ini-
tial treatment for women like those in
the study.
The drug targets cells that make too
much of a protein called HER2 about
one of every four or five'breast cancer
cases. Herceptin attacks the same tar-
get but in a different way, and the two
medicines complement each other.
.The study tested the combination in
808 women from Europe, Norith and
South America and Asia and found a
6-month advantage in how long the
cancer stayed stable. All women also
received a chemotherapy drug, doc-
etaxel.
"That's a huge improvement" in
such advanced cases, said study leader
Dr. Jose Baselga, associate director of
the Massachusetts General Hospital
Cancer Center. He is a paid consultant
for Roche.


Apple juice can

cause health risk


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
Associated Press
It's true apple juice can
.pose a risk to your health.
But not necessarily from the
trace amounts of arsenic that
people are arguing about
Despite the government's
consideration of new limits
on arsenic, nutrition experts
say apple juice's real dan-
ger is to waistlines and chil-
dren's teeth. Apple juice has
few natural nutrients, lots of
calories and, in some cases,
more sugar than soda has.
It trains a child to like very
sweet things, displaces bet-
ter beverages and foods, and
adds to the obesity problem,
its critics say.
"Its like sugar water," said
Judith Stern, a nutrition pro-
fessor at the University of
California, Davis, who has
consulted for candy makers as
well as for Weight Watchers.
"I won't let my 3-year-old
grandson drink apple juice."
Many juices hre fortified
with vitamins, so they're not
just empty calories. But that
doesn't appease some nutri-
tionists.
"If it wasn't healthy in
the first place, adding vita-
mins doesn't make it into a
health food," and if it causes
weight gain, ifs not a healthy
choice, said Karen Ansel, a
registered dietitian in New
York and spokeswoman
for the American Dietetic
Association.
The American Academy of
Pediatrics says juice can be
part of a healthy diet, but its


policy is blunt "Fruit juice
offers no nutritional benefit
for infants younger than 6
months" and no benefits over
whole fruit for older kids.
Kids under 12 consume 28
percent of all juice and juice
drinks, according to the acad-
emy. Nationwide, apple juice
is second only to orange juice
in popularity. Americans slurp
267 ounces of apple juice on
average each year, accord-
ing to the Food Institute's
Almanac of Juice Products
and the Juice Products
Association, a trade group.
Lots more is consumed as an
ingredient in juice drinks and
various foods.
Only 17 percent of the
apple juice sold in the U.S.
is produced here. The rest
comes from other countries,
mostly China, Argentina,
Chile and Brazil, the associa-
tion says.
Television's Dr. Mehmet
Oz made that a key point a
few months ago when he
raised an alarm some say
a false alarm over arsenic in
apple juice, based on tests his
show commissioned by a pri-
vate lab. The Food and Drug
Administration. said that its
own tests disagreed and that
apple juice is safe.
However, on Wednesday,
after Consumer Reports did
its own tests on several juice
brands and called along with
other consumer groups for
stricter standards, the FDA
said it will examine whether
its restrictions on the amount
of arsenic allowed in apple
juice are stringent enough.


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General Eye Care & Surgery


Few parents ever heard

their child was overweight


IJ
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FLORIDA PAIN AND REHABILITATION CENTER
Formerly Comprehensive Pain Management of North Florida
www,.cpmnf.com


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Pediatricians are supposed
to track if youngsters are
putting on too many pounds
- but a new study found
less than a quarter of parents
of overweight children recall
the doctor ever saying there
was a problem.
Does that mean doctors
aren't screening enough
kids, or aren't frank enough
in these tough conversa-
tions? Or is the real story
parent denial? The research
published Monday can't tell,
but makes it clear the mes-
sage too often isn't getting
through.
"It's tricky to say, and it's
tricky to hear," says lead
researcher Dr. Eliana Perrin
of the University of North
Carolina. She analyzed gov-
ernment health surveys that
included nearly 5,000 parents
of overweight children from
1999 to 2008.
Parents tend not to real-
ize when a weight problem
is creeping up on their chil-
dren. When almost a third
of U.S. children are at least
overweight, and about 17
percent are obese, it's harder
to notice that there's any-
thing unusual about their
own families. Plus, children
change as they grow older.
The new study suggests
when parents do recall a doc-
tor noting the -problem, it's
been going on for a while.
About 30 percent of the
parents of overweight 12- to
15-year-olds said a doctor had
alerted them, compared with
just 12 percent of the parents
of overweight preschoolers.


Even among the parents of
very obese children, only 58
percent recalled a doctor dis-
cussing it, says the report
published Monday by the
journal Archives of Pediatrics
& Adolescent Medicine.
"Many pediatricians don't
worry until children are very
overweight, or until they're
much older," says Perrin,
whose team has created stop-
light-colored growth charts
to help doctors explain When
a problem's brewing. "If
we can notice a concerning
trend early, we're more likely
to be able to do something
about it"
That means taking a fam-
ily approach, says Dr. Nazrat
Mirza, medical director of an
obesity clinic at Children's
National Medical Center
in Washington. Important
changes such as switch-
ing to low-fat milk and water
instead of sugary sodas and
juice, or cutting back on fast
food should be viewed
as making the whole fam-
ily healthier, not depriving
everyone- because Johnny
needs to lose weight
"You do not want to single
out one individual in the fam-
ily. Thaft's enough to cause
a lot of friction," says Mirza,
who wasn't involved with the
new study.
Doctors have long tracked
children's height and weight
during yearly checkups, but
more recent guidelines urge
them to calculate a young-
ster's body mass index, or
BMI, to screen for developing
obesity. Unlike with adults,
one measurement alone
doesn't necessarily mean
children are overweight -
they might be about to shoot


up an inch.
The next step is ..plot-
ting that BMI on a growth
chart Youngsters are con-
sidered overweight if their
BMIs track in the 85th to
95th percentile for children
their same age and gender,
a range that just a few years
ago was termed merely "at
risk." Above the 95th percen-
tile is considered obese.
To tackle lack of aware-
ness, Children's National has
begun calculating BMIs for
every child age 2 or older
who is admitted for any rea-
son. Mirza calls it "a teach-
able moment"
Perrin's analysis shows
more parents of overweight
kids are starting to get the
message. Overall, 22 percent
of parents reported a health
professional telling them
their child was overweight'
But that rose to 29 percent
in 2008, the latest year of the
survey data and about the
time guidelines changed.
Perrin focuses on health,
not fat. She tells them the
child is at an unhealthy
weight that puts them at
risk for later problems -
and that she can help fami-
lies learn to eat better and'
get more active.


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Phone (386) 719-9663, Fax (386) 719-9662
(All treatment are offered in Lake City.
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REU(; LAR MIEETIN(;
LAKE SHOREI HOSPITAl. AUTHORITI()
BOARD OF TRI STFES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trusteecs of the lake Shore Hospital Authority will hold their
Regular MeetingL. on Monday, Decembler 12. 2011 at 5:15 pm at the I.SIIA Administrative Complex. Conference
Room, 259 NEF Franklin Street, lake City. Florida. I he purpose oI' the meeting is to take action on regular
business.
All interested persons are invited to attend.
SPECIAL REQLJREMENTS: I 'you require special aid or ser\ ices lor the meeting identified above, as
addressed in the American Disabilities Act. please contact Sue Fra/e al (386) 755-1090.
KOBY ADAMS









8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


(%1 )


I


I ,#lrtxi (. I*,dti r pi i'$'. {r.'
Mtel "d*1 r a lIr lh" wat, I1

ASSOCIATED PRESS
This frame grab from video shows a box of Plan B morning after pill. In a surprise move with
election-year implications, the Obama administration's top health official overruled her own
drug regulators and stopped the Plan B morning-after pill from moving onto drugstore shelves
next to the condoms.


Top Obama health


officials says 'no' to pill


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON In a surprise move
with election-year implications, the Obama
administration's top health official over-
ruled her own drug regulators and stopped
the Plan B morning-after pill from moving
onto drugstore shelves next to the con-
doms.
The decision by Health and Human
Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
means the Plan B One-Step emergency
contraceptive will remain behind pharmacy
counters, as it is sold today available
without a prescription only to those 17 and'
older who can prove their age.
The Food and Drug Administration was
preparing to lift the age limit on Wednesday
and allow younger teens, who today must
get a prescription, to buy it without restric-
tion. That would have made Plan B the
nation's first over-the-counter emergency
contraceptive, a pill that can prevent preg-
nancy if taken soon enough after unpro-
tected sex.
But Sebelius intervened at the eleventh
hour and overruled FDA, deciding that
youfig girls shouldn't be able to buy the pill
on their own especially since some girls
as young as 11 are physically capable of
bearing children.
"It is common knowledge-that -there:ace-
significant cognitive and behavioral differ-
ences between older adblescent girls anid
the youngest girls of reproductive age,"
Sebelius said. "I do not believe enough data
were presented to support the application
to make Plan B One-Step available over the
counter for all girls of reproductive age."
The move will anger a pivotal part of
Obama's Democratic base, and Sen. Patty
Murray of Washington, a member of
the Senate leadership, quickly asked for
Sebelius to explain her decision. The White
House said Sebelius, who is very close to
Obama and worked on his 2008 presidential
campaign, decided on her own.
"Secretary Sebelius took this action after
careful review," Obama spokesman Nick
Papas said in a statement "As the secretary
has stated, Plan B will remain available to
all women who need it, and the president
supports the secretary's decision."
But the move also could help Democrats
make their case to independents, whose
support will be critical in next -fall's presi-
dential election, that Obama is not the liber-
al ideologue Republicans claim. It followed
Obama administration reversals this year
on some environmental and other issues
that irked Democrats.


It was believed to be the first time that
the HHS has publicly overruled an FDA
decision.
It was the latest twist in a nearly decade-
long push for easier access to emergen-
cy contraception, and the development
shocked women's groups and maker Teva
Pharmaceuticals, which had been gearing
up for over-the-counter sales to begin by
month's end.
"We are outraged that this administra--
tion has let politics trump science," said
Kirsten Moore of the Reproductive Health
Technologies Project, an advocacy group.
'There is no rationale for this move."
"This decision is stunning. I had come
to believe that the FDA would be allowed
to make decisions based on science and
the public's health," said Susan ,Wood of
George Washington University,; who served
as the FDA's top women's health official
until resigning in 2005 to'protest delays
in deciding Plan B's fate. She said, "Sadly,
once again, FDA has been overruled and
not allowed to do its job."
But the decision pleased conservative
critics of the proposal.
'Take the politics out of it and it's a
decision that reflects the concerns that
many parents in America have," said Wendy
Wright. an evangelical Christian activist who
has helped lead the upposition to Plan B.
--This is the right decision based orna lack
of scientific evidence that it's safe to allow
minors access to this drug, much less over
the counter," said Sen. Charles Grassley.
R-I 'wa.
Major doctors' groups and contraception
advocates say quicker access to morning-at-
ter pills could cut the nation's high number
of unplanned pregnancies, but they have
said they didn't expect that selling Plan B
over the counter would prompt much more
use by younger girls. For one thing, the pill
costs about $50.
They argued that putting the pill next
to the condoms and spermicides would
increase access for more sexually active
ages who normally browse those aisles and
would learn about emergency contracep-
tion. Teva planned ad campaigns aimed at
18- to 30-year-olds.
"I don't think 11-year-olds go into Rite Aid
and buy anything," said Dr. Cora Breuner
of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
"We want it to be available to both girls
and boys who have made a serious error in
having unprotected sex and should be able
to respond to that kind of lack of judgment
in a way that is timely as opposed to having
to suffer permanent consequences."


Parkinsons and dance:


A very unusual union


Onrc


'l .


-s


Study finds surge

in young nurses


By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON A surge
in young nurses may ease
forecasts of coming shortages
as their baby-boomer cowork-
ers retire.
The past decade brought
a 62. percent increase in the
number of younger registered
nurses entering the work-
. force, researchers reported
Monday in the journal Health
Affairs.
A young influx is notewor-
thy because at least 900,000
of the nation's roughly 3 mil-
lion nurses are older than
50, meaning they're nearing
retirement At the same time,
the population is aging and
getting more chronic dis-
eases, bringing an increased
demand for care even before
the new health care law that
promises to help 32 million
more Americans gain insur-
ance within a few years.
The numbers of 20-some-
thing nurses had dropped
steadily through the 1980s


and 1990s, hitting a low in
2002. But by 2009, there were
165,000 full-time equivalent
nurses ages 23 to 26, report-
ed lead researcher David
Auerbach, a health economist
at RAND Health.
There's been a national
push for more nurses in
recent years, with accelerated
degrees and other programs
aimed to attract both young
nurses and second-career
ones in their 30s, said study
coauthor Peter Buerhaus, a
nursingprofessoratVanderbilt
University. The latter group is
on the rise, too, not unexpect-
ed in tough economic times.
But ifs not clear if the
growth in new nurses will
continue enough to meet the
coming demand.
"Keep it up and maybe
well get out of the woods,"
Buerhaus said.
Another issue is whether
there are enough nurses
trained in geriatric care, espe-
cially for outpatients, areas that
a recent Institute of Medicine
report deemed key.


r PRfMiARY
I CARE
IVEDICINE
Preventative Care
Physical Best o
*Geriatric Care ti h Yearst
Women's Health
Diabetes Management
386.754.DOCS (3627)
www.primarycaremedic.com


PHYSICIANS
IMAGING





LAKE CITY


* MRI
* Ultrasound
* X-Ray
* CT-64- Slice Scanner
* Digital Mammography
* Bone Density
386.487.3970


I Accepti ng wPat.i e s


* Physical Therapy
* Hand Therapy/
Splinting
* Osteoporosis Program
* Balance Disorders


386.755.3164


Motapit ets witin62 hous


. .. ~ ' ,
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11'-' .


i~Iauii~


5 '~ ~ *


I jt'.
Dii'.


By LINDSEY TANNER
Associated Press
. CHICAGO The two things that have
brought Michael and Roslyn Lieb clos-
er together couldn't be more different
Parkinson's disease and dance, one slowly
taking away, the other giving back in ways
they never imagined.
After tremors in his rigfitarm and leg 11
years ago led to Michael lHeb's diagnosis
with the debilitating brain disease, his wife
became his caretaker. But two, years ago,
she developed a tremor, too. The,diagnosis:
Parkinsoft's.
"I couldn't believe it. It seemed iAnredible
to me that we both should have the disease,"
he said. "It came as a real shock, a real
downer."
"No one in either of our families has
Parkinson's," she said. "Its come out .of th
blue for both of us."
Now retired, the couple still love to read,
go the symphony and opera, and get together
often with family and friends. Once a week,
they head to an unusual Chicago dance class
tailored for Parkinson's patients.
A nurse first recommended the Hubbard
Street dance classes three years ago, and
Michael Lieb figured he had nothing to lose.
His wife went along first to help Michael,
now to benefit herself, too.
The tremors and stiff, awkward move-
ments of Parkinson's hardly seem compat-
ible with dancing. But exercise is sometimes
recommended for Parkinson's patients, to
improve flexibility, and brain specialists are
investigating if dance offers something more.
For the Liebs, the answer is clear.
"It just lifts the spirits," said Roslyn Lieb,
69. "It does transport us, to a different planet
where Parkinson's doesn't matter so much."
"We check our Parkinson's at the door and
we're all one community, mutually supportive
and we dance together," said her 71-year-old
husband. "It's just a marvelous experience."
The free classes just west of downtown
Chicago are offered by an internationally
known troupe whose performances blend
modern dance, jazz and ballet.
Sarah Cullen Fuller, who danced with
Hubbard Street for seven years, launched
the classes three years ago, borrowing the
idea from the Mark Morris Dance Group in
New York.


'Michael Lieb works on during a dance class
therapy for Parkinson's at the Hubbard
Street Dance Center in Chicago.

The casess have grown from half a dozen
people to sometimes as many as 30 or more.
Students iclude former educators, scientists,
doctors "and everything in between," Fuller
says.
These dancers wouldn't be mistaken for
Baryshnikov, Martha Graham or even the
amateurs on TV's "Dancing with the Stars."
But their moves are just as stirring, in a less
showy, poignant way.
Some are in wheelchairs or can barely
move without their partners' help. During a
recent class, a man stood behind his wife's
chair, leaning down to gently stroke her
immobile arms in time with the music. A pia-
nist with two small drums fills the studio with
a steady, soothing beat
Fuller leads students through basic dance
exercises rhythmic arm-lifting, bending
and foot-stomping sometimes while they're
seated in chairs, sometimes on foot, sashay-
ing, in a way with their partners across the
dance floor.
"They assume that they're not dancers,
whereas I see them as dancers. I don't see the
disease I try not to. I try not to let it perme-
ate the room. But I also see them working
through it and pushing" to find new ways of
moving, Fuller said.


:7:.-
*'. i ,'7 '









Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter




SPORTS


Thursday, December 8, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


YOUTH SOCCER
Registration
make-up today
Columbia Youth
Soccer Association's
make-up
registration day for its
Winter Recreational
League is 6-7:30 p.m.
today at the CYSA
Complex.
For details, call
288-4481 or 288-2504.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club,
meeting Tuesday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club will
meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the teacher's lounge at
the high school.
For details, call Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
YOUTH GOLF
Holiday camp
at Quail Heights
Quail Heights Country
Club head pro Pete
Sands and Chet Carter
are offering a holiday
golf camp at the club for
juniors ages 6-17 from
8:30-11:30 a.m.
Dec. 19-23. Cost is $60
($20 for additional family
members). Groups will
be divided based on skill
level and number of
participants.
For details, call Carter
at 365-7097, Sands at
(850) 519-0302 or the
pro shop at 752-3339.
RUNNING
Reindeer 5K run/
walk Saturday
The Dashing to the
Snow Reindeer 5K
is 8 a.m. Saturday at
the Columbia County
Courthouse. Registration
($35) begins at 7 a.m.
For details, call (386)
208-2447 or go online at
www. lakecitychamber. com.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High
soccer at Interlachen
High, 7 p.m. (girls-5)
Fort White High
boys basketball at Union
County High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6),
Friday
Columbia High
wrestling in Capital City
Classic at Chiles High,
noon
Columbia High boys
soccer vs. Mosley High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High
basketball vs. Lee High,
7:30 p.m. (girls-6) ,
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling in Capital City
Classic at Chiles High,
TBA
Fort White High
basketball vs. Hawthorne
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball at Wolfson
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Stella Harris goes for a loose ball against a Hamilton County High player in
a game earlier this season in Lake City.


Gators
Florida pushed
to overtime,
beats Arizona.
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE Patric
Young scored a career-high
25 points, Erving Walker
made huge free throws
down the stretch and No.
12 Florida rallied to beat
Arizona 78-72 in overtime
Wednesday night.
Walker finished with 14
points, including seven in
the extra frame. He over-
came a poor shooting night
from the field (3 for 16) and
a miserable performance
from 3-point range (1 for 9).
The Gators (6-2) extend-
ed -their home winning
streak to 11.
Floridawon despite may be
the worst free-throw shoot-
ing performance in coach
Billy Donovan's 16 seasons.
The Gators were 14 of 31
from the charity stripe.
Jesse Perry led the
Wildcats (6-3) with 23
points and seven rebounds. Arizona's Jesse Perry (33) b


Indians drop

district contest


Lady Tigers
can't hang with
Newberry High.
From staff reports

Despite 24 points from
Melton Sanders, Fort White
High's boys basketball team
lost a district game, 57-49, at
Santa Fe High on Tuesday..
Also scoring for the
Indians were Trey Phillips,
8, A.J. Legree, 5, Deonte
Dunning, 5, Jonathan
Dupree, 4, Nick Butler, 2,
and Raul Colon, 1.
Fort White (1-3, 1-2)


survive


plays Union county High
at 7:30 p.m. today in Lake
Butler.
Lady Tigers basketball
Columbia High's girls
basketball team lost at
home to Newberry High on
Tuesday, 70-34.
Lady Tiger scorers
were Stella Harris with 18,
Justice Campbell with 14
and Amereanna Bryant
with two.
Columbia (2-3) plays
Lee High at 6 p.m.
Friday in a girls/boys
doubleheader.


OT


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
eats Florida's Will Yeguete (15) to a rebound in a game on Wednesday.


Retired QBs

weigh in on

Tebow debate


Cunningham
loves what
Broncos are doing.
By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- Nobody knows what will
come of the Tim Tebow
experiment, not even those
scrambling ramblers who
came before him.
Yet it seems like every-
body wants to talk about it.
Retired QBs who made
a living with their legs,
and who also turned the
NFL on its ear in their day,
have strong opinions about
what's happening in Denver,
where Tebow has led the


once lowly Broncos to six
wins in his seven starts.
Randall Cunningham
loves it.
Steve Young hates it.
Bobby Douglass admires
it.
While they debate wheth-
er Tebow can morph into
a prototypical pocket pass-
er, they're all pulling hard
for the Broncos' quirky
quarterback who defies
his messy mechanics and
flawed footwork with grit
and last-minute magic.
"I think what we all ought
to do is enjoy the circus
while it's in town," suggests
another former NFL quar-
terback, Joe Theismann.
TEBOW continued on 6B


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Denver Broncos' Tim Tebow throws during the second half of an NFL football game against
the Minnesota Vikings Sunday in Minneapolis.


REGISTER TO WIN PRIZES FROM SANTA'S TOYBOX!


o000 sORES


116












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
GOLF
3 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Dubai
World Championship, second round, at
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Harvard at UConn
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -WestVirginia at Kansas St.
NFL
8 p.m.
NFL Cleveland at Pittsburgh


FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo
Miami


Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


Denver
Oakland
Kansas City
San Diego


East
W L
9 3
7 5
5 7
4 8
South
W L
9 3
7 5
3 9
0 12
North
W L
9 3
9 3
7 5
4 8
West
W L
7 5
7 5
5 7
5 7


T Pct PF PA
0 .750 362 247
0 .583 290 260
0 .417 278 304
0 .333 246 220

T Pet PF PA
0.750 310 189
0 .583 249 229
0.250 152238
0.000 174 358

T Pct PF PA
0.750 296 192
0 .75'0 268 195
0 .583 266 250
0.333 175 240

T Pct PF PA
0 .583 256 292
0 .583 274 308
0.417 163268
0.417 287 289


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington


New Orleans
Adtlanta
Carolina
Tampa Bay '


x-Green Bay
Chicago,
Detroit
Minnesota


East
W L
7 5
6 6
4 8
4 8
South
W L
9 3
7 5
4 8
4 8
North
W L
12 0
7 5
7 5
2 10


T Pct PF PA
0 .583 283 244
0.500 287315
0.333 271 282,
0 .333 202 256

T Pct PF PA
0 .750 393 269
0 .583 269 244
0 .333 290 324
0.333 218 329

T Pct PF PA
01.000 420 262
0b .583291 242
0 .583 333 277
0.167 246330


West ,
W L T Pct PF PA
x-San Francisco 10 2 0.833 288 161
Seattle 5 7 0.417216246
Arizona 5, 7 0.417 232 269
St Louis 2 10 0.1'67 140296
,2'*-, hfsc -d d ivisioh' "- ., ,
;, Today's Garne. .
Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
New Orleans at Tennessee, I p.m.
Indianapolis at Baltimore, I p.m.
Kansas City at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, I p.m.
Houston at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Atianta at'Carolina, I p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, I p.m. .
New England atWashington, I p.m.
San Francisco at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Buffalo at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
Oakland at Green Bay, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
St. Louis at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. 15
Jacksonville at Atlanta, 8:20 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 17
Dallas atTampa Bay,.8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 18
New Orleans at Minnesota, I p.m.
Seattle at Chicago, I p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, I p.m,
Carolina at Houston, I p.m.
Green Bay at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Miami at Buffalo, I p.m.
Washington at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
New England at Denver, 4:15 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
U Monday, Dec, 19
Pittsburgh at San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.

College games

Saturday
SWAC championship, Alabama A&M
(8-3) vs.Grambling St. (7-4) at Birmingham,
Ala., I p.m.
Army (3-8) vs. Navy (4-7) at Landover,
Md., 2:30 p.m...

AP AII-SEC team

The 2011 Associated Press All-
Southeastern Conference football team
released Monday, with player's position,
name, school, height, weight and class
(u-unanimous selection):
FIRSTTEAM
Offense
WR Jarius Wright, Arkansas, 5-10,
180, Sr.
WR Da'Rick Rogers. Tennessee,
6-3,215, So.
L u-Barrett Jones, Alabama, 6-5,
311,Jr.
L -Will Blackwell, LSU, 6-4, 290, Sr.
L Cordy Glenn, Georgia, 6-5, 348,
Sr.
L Rokevious Watkins, South
Carolina, 6-4.340, Sr.
C William Vlachos, Alabama, 6-1,
294, Sr.
TE Orson Charles, Georgia, 6-3,
241,Jr.
QB Tyler Wilson, Arkansas, 6-3,
220,Jr.
RB u-Trent Richardson, Alabama,
5-1 I, 224,Jr.
RB Michael Dyer, Auburn, 5-9,
210,So.
K Caleb Sturgis, Florida, 5-11,
183,Jr.
All-Purpose Joe Adams, Arkansas,
5-1 I, 190, Sr.
Defense


T Fletcher Cox, Mississippi State,
6-4, 295, Jr.
T Malik Jackson, Tennessee, 6-5,
270, Sr.
E Melvin Ingram, South Carolina,
6-2, 276, Sr.
E Sam Montgomery, LSU, 6-4, 245,
So.
LB u-Jarvis Jones, Georgia, 6-3,
241, So.
LB Danny Trevathan. Kentucky, 6-1.
232, Sr.
LB Courtney Upshaw, Alabama,
6-2, 265, Sr.
CB u-Tyrann Mathieu, LSU, 5-9,
175, So.
CB Morris Claiborne, LSU, 6-0,
185,Jr.
S Mark Barron, Alabama, 6-2, 218,
Sr.
S Bacarri Rambo, Georgia, 6-0,
218,Jr.
P Brad Wing, LSU, 6-3, 184, Fr.
SECOND TEAM
Offense
WR Rueben Randle, LSU, 6-4,
208, Jr.
WR Alshon Jeffrey, South Carolina,
6-4, 229, Jr.
L Chris Faulk, LSU, 6-6, 325, So.
L Alvin Bailey, Arkansas, 6-5, 319,
So.
L Larry Warford, Kentucky, 6-3,
336,Jr.
L Gabe Jackson, Mississippi State,
6-4, 320, So.
C Ben Jones, Georgia, 6-3, 316, Sr.
TE Philip Lutzenkirchen, Auburn,
6-5, 250, Jr.
QB Aaron Murray, Georgia, 6-1,
211,So.
RB Zac Stacy, Vanderbilt, 5-9, 208,
Jr.
RB Marcus Lattimore, South
Carolina, 6-0,232, So.
RB Vick Ballard, Mississippi St.,
5-I 1,220, Sr.
K Drew Alleman, LSU, 5-11 I, 183, Jr.
All-Purpose Dennis Johnson,
Arkansas, 5-9,213,Jr.
Defense (equals),
T Michael Brockers, LSU, 6-6, 306,
So.
T Josh Chapman, Alabama, 6-1,
3 10,Sr.
E Corey Lemonler, Auburn, 6-4,
240,So.
E Barkevious Mingo, LSU, 6-5,
240, So. ,
LB Dont'A Hightower, Alabama,
6-4,260.Jr.
LB Chris Marve, Vanderbilt, 6-0,
242, Sr.
LB Jerry Franklin, Arkansas, 6-1,
245, Sr.,
CB -Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama, 6-3,
192,Jr.
CB Johnthan Banks, Mississippi
.State, 6-2, 185,Jr. .
CB Casey Hayward, Vanderbilt,
5-!1, 188, Sr.
S Antonio Allen, South Carolina,
6-2,202, Sr.
S Winston Guy Jr., Kentucky, 6-1,
216, Sr.
S Eric- Reid, LSU,.6-2; 208; So.
P Dylan Breeding, Arkansas, 6-1,
.21 ,Jr. '
HONORABLE MENTION
Offense
Kyle Fischer, L, Vanderbilt, 6-6, 308,
Sr.;T-Bob Hebert, LSU, L, 6-3, 304, Sr;
Quentin Saulsbery, L, Misssisippi State,
6-2,300, Sr.
Defense
Drew Butler, P. Georgia, 6-2, 214, Sr.;
Tyler Campbell, P, Mississippi, 6-2, 220, Jr;
Tim Fugger, EVanderbilt, 6-4,250, Sr.Jaye
Howard,T, Florida, 6-3,303, Sr.; Devin
Taylor, E, South Carolina, 6-7, 260, Jr.;
Tramain Thomas, S, Arkansas, 6-0, 204, Sr.

PLAYERS OF THE YEAR
OFFENSIVE
Trent Richardson,Alabama
DEFENSIVE
Tyrann Mathieu, LSU
COACH OFTHEYEAR
Les Miles, LSU
FRESHMAN OF THE YEAR
Isaiah Crowell, Georgia

FCS playoffs

Quarterfinals
Friday
Northern Iowa (10-2) at Montana
(10-2), 8 p.m.
Saturday
Montana State (10-2) at Sam Houston
State (12-0), Noon
Maine (9-3) at Georgia Southern
(10-2),2 p.m.
Lehigh (I I-I) at North Dakota State
(I I-I),4 p.m.

Division II playoffs

Semifinals
Saturday
Wayne State (13-1) at Winston-Salem
(13-0), 2 p.m.
Delta State (I11-2) at Pittsburg State


(I 1-1), 7:05 p.m
Championship
Saturday, Dec. 17
At Braly Municipal Stadium
Florence, Ala.
Semifinal winners, II a.m.

Division III playoffs

Semifinals
Saturday
Wesley (12-1) at Mount Union
(13-0), Noon
St. Thomas (Minn.) (13-0) at Wisc.-
Whitewater (13-0), 3:30 p.m.
Championship
Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl
Friday, Dec. 16
At Salem Stadium
Salem,Va.
Semifinal winners,'7 p.m.


BASKETBALL

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Game
No. 9 UConn vs. No. 25 Harvard,
7 p.m.
Friday's Game
No. 12 Florida vs. Rider at
Jacksonville Veterans Memorial
Arena, 7 p.m.


GOLF

Golf week

EUROPEAN TOUR
DUBAI WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: Jumeirah Golf Estates, Earth
Course (7,675 yards, par 72).
Purse: $7.5 million. Winner's share:
$1.25 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Today,
3-8 a.m., 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 6:30-11:30 p.m.;
Friday, 3-8 a.m., 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 3-8 a.m.,
10 a.m.-3 p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.).
Online: http://wwiw.europeantour.com
PGATOUR
FRANKLIN TEMPLETON*
SHOOTOUT
Site: Naples
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort,
Tiburon Golf Club (7,288 yards, par 72).
Purse: $3 million. Winners' shares:
$375,000 each.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday,
3-6 p.m., 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday,
midnight-3 a.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.; Sunday,
9:30-11:30 p.m.) and NBC (Saturday, 2:30-
4:30 p.m.; Sunday, 3-6 p.m.).
Format: Two-player teams. Friday,
modified alternate shot; Saturday, best
ball; Sunday, scramble.
Teams:GregNorman-FredHkJacobson,
Jerry Kelly-Steve Stricker, Keegan Bradley-
Brendan Steele, Charles Howell III-Justin
,Leor)rdl Rickie, FqwlerrCamil9 Yillegas,
Anthony Kim-Webb Simpson, Stewart
'Cink-Bo Van Pelt, Jasoin' Dufner-Sean
O'Hair, Chad Campbell-Chris DiMarco,
Rory Sabbatini-Jhonattan Vegas, Mark
Calcavecchia-Nick Price, Scott Stallings-
Kenny Perry.
Online: http://www.franklintempleton
shootout.com
PGA Tour site: http://www.pgatour.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Tuesday's Games
Columbus 3, Montreal 2, SO
New Jersey 3,Toronto 2, OT
N.Y. Islanders 5.Tampa Bay I
St. Louis 3, Detroit 2
Phoenix 3, Nashville 2
Winnipeg 2, Boston I
Calgary 7, Carolina 6
Vancouver 6, Colorado 0
Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2
Minnesota 2, San Jose I
Wednesday's Games
Washington at Ottawa (n)
Philadelphia at Buffalo (n)
Carolina at Edmonton (n)
Today's Games
Florida at Boston, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Chicago at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Vancouver at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at St. Louis, 8 pm.,
Colorado at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Dallas at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Colorado at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


AFIER RSAUZING SOME
COMPONENTS FOR
THFIR NEW TENT WERE
M155IN&, H-E PIP THIS.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: L I IT I I $.. I I

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday' Jumbles: GIZMO ABATE JINGLE STOCKY
Answer: Instant replay was such a hit when it was introduced
in 1963 that people wanted to SEE IT AGAIN


COLLEGE BOWL GAMES


SCOREBOARD


Saturday, Dec. 17
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Wyoming (8-4) vs. Temple (8-4),
2:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise, Idaho
Utah State (7-5) vs. Ohio (9-4), 5:30
p.m. (ESPN)
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette (8-4) vs. San Diego
State (8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Dec. 20
Beef 'O'Brady's Bowl
At St. Petersburg
Marshall (6-6) vs. FIU (8-4),8 p.m.
(ESPN)

Wednesday, Dec. 21
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
TCU (10-2) vs. Louisiana Tech (8-4),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Thursday, Dec. 22
MAACO Bowl
At Las Vegas
Boise State (11-1) vs. Arizona State
(6-6), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 24
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Nevada (7-5) vs. Southern Mississippi
(I 1-2), 8 p.m. (ESPN) ,

Monday, Dec. 26
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
North Carolina (7-5) vs. Missouri
(7-5). 4 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Dec. 27
LUtte Caesars Pizza Bowl
At Detroit
Western Michigan (7-5) vs. Purdue
(6-6), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
Belk Bowl-
At Charlotte, N.C.
North Carolina State (7-5) vs.
Louisville (7-5), 8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, Dec. 28
Military Bowl
At Washington-
Air Force (7-5) vs. Toledo (8-4),
4:30 p.m. (ESPN) *"
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Texas (7-5) vs. California (7-5), 8 p.m.
(ESPN)


Thursday, Dec. 29
Champs Sports Bowl
At Orlando
Florida State (8-4) vs. Notre
Dame (8-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
Baylor (9-3) vs. Washington (7-5),
9 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Dec. 30
Armed Forces Bowl
At Dallas
Tulsa (8-4) vs. BYU (9-3), Noon
(ESPN)
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Rutgers (8-4) vs. Iowa State (6-6),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Music City Bowl
At Nashville,Tenn.
Mississippi State (6-6) vs.Wake Forest
(6-6), 6:40 p.m. (ESPN)
Insight Bowl
AtTempe,Ariz.
Oklahoma (9-3) vs. Iowa (7-5),
10 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 31
Meinke Car Care Bowl
At Houston
Texas A&M (6-6) vs. Northwestern
(6-6), Noon (ESPN)
,' Sun Bowl
At El Paso,Texas
Georgia Tech (8-4) vs. Utah (7-5),
2 p.m. (CBS)
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis,Tenn.
Vanderbilt (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3),
3:30 p.m. (ESPN)
Fight Hunger Bowl
At San Francisco
UCLA (6-7) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Chick-fil-A Bowl
AtAtlanta
Virginia (8-4) vs. Auburn (7-5),
7:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 2
TicketCity Bowl
At Dallas
Penn State (9-3) vs. Houston (12-1),
Noon (ESPNU)
Capital One Bowl
At Orlando
Nebraska (9-3) vs. South Carolina
(10-2), I p.m. (ESPN)
Outback Bowl
AtTampa
Georgia (10-3) vs. Michigan State
(10-3), I p.m. (ABC)


Falcon Invitational on Saturday


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Lake City Middle School
is hosting its annual Falcon
'Winter hIvitatio6nal Soccer
Tournament onSaturday,
Lake City's wrestling
team also is hosting its
Falcon Invitational on
Saturday.
Five-team fields for girls
and boys will compete in
a. double-elimination for-
mat at.the Columbia Youth
Soccer Association fields.
Joining Lake City Middle
School are Richardson
Middle School, Suwannee

ACROSS 38 Bi
1 Scoped out 40 Gir
6 Nibbles away 40
11 City near 1o
Syracuse 41 SI
12 Maneuvers 42 HE
slowly 43 He
13 Honeydews m
15 Frequent 46 Sr
fliers (2 wds.) 48 CE
16 Tortilla 50 E
snacks 54 BN
18 NFL events 55 Nf
19 Writer fa
Tolstoy 56 Gc
21 Diving bird wi
22 Balmy 57 St
23 Fr. ladies wI
25 Refrain sh
syllables
28 Rubber-
stamps 1 M;
30 Half a bikini la
31 Lean-to 2 El
32 Home tel. sr
33 Incan treasure 3 Pa
35 Madrid art 4 El
gallery 5 AI
37 Previously W


12-8


Middle School, Taylor
County Middle School dnd
Lafayette High's middle
school teams.
The first game for both
biaat fe atf 9 a.m. On the
girls -side, Lake City plays
Richardson; on the boys
side, Richardson plays
Lafayette.
For the girls, Lafayette
plays Suwannee at
10:15 a.m., and Taylor
County plays the Lake
City/Richardson winner at
11:30 a.'m.
For the boys, Suwannee
plays Taylor County at
"10:15- a.m., and Lake City

become Answe
resome
reat Wall |V|ES
cale ES
pud st. C CU L
very glib L 0 T E
eifer's
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oral reefs F 0
engine noises K 0 A N
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et in touch E R I E
ith DST
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riter, for E AN
hort REND E


DOWN


FRI E


agna IuI1 m ILI


ude 6 Turns right
enjoyed a 7 "Mona Lisa"
norgasbord crooner
art of RSVP 8 Like some
section issue mgrs.
ndrews or 9 Dandelion, to
Vynter many


plays the Richardson/
Lafayette winner at 11:30
a.m.
Loser bracket games
begin at 1 p.m. and the
tournament championship
games are scheduled for
5 p.m. with if-needed finals
at 7:30 p.m.
The LCMS wrestling
Falcon Invitational features
11 teams from the nearby
area.
Matches begin at 9 a.m.
and continue throughout
the day to determine "king
of the mat"
Admission is $5 for adults
and $4 for students.

er to Previous Puzzle


S ZEBRAS

LT ENLIST
ER ROUGHS
NE OWN
BAS DIS
MLB GENOA
OER ORCAS
T UMA IRE
E POD TEA
NTH MED
XE AYE
ER WATERS
ND KNAVES
AjS=GLADE


10 Former JFK
arrivals
14 Telemarketing
danger
15 Wild card
17 Cold ocean
current
19 NBA hoopster
20 Clean the
board
22 Had on
24 Weaken
25 Tibet's capital
26 Books
inspection
27 Portico
29 Wet
thoroughly
34 Monsoons
36 Deep affinity
39 Escapade
43 Bottom feeder
44 Four Comers
state
45 Major- -
46 Threat ender
47 Picnic
intruders
49 Hosp. staffer
51 Billiards stick
52 Cowboy -
Maynard
53 B'way posting
of yore


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville
Florida (6-6) vs. Ohio State (6-6),
I p.m. (ESPN2)
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Oregon (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (11-2),
5 p.m. (ESPN)
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale,Ariz.
Stanford (I 1-1) vs. Oklahoma State
(I I-I), 8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Jan. 3
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Michigan (10-2) vs.VirginiaTech (11-2),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, Jan. 4
Orange Bowl
At Miami
WestVirginia (9-3) vs. Clemson (10-3),
8 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Jan. 6
Cotton Bowl
At Arlington,Texas
Kansas State (10-2) vs. Arkansas
(10-2), 8 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday, Jan. 7
BBVA Compass Bowl
At Birmingham,Ala.
Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. SMU (7-5), Noon
(ESPN)

Sunday, Jan. 8
GoDaddy.com Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
Arkansas State (10-2) vs. Northern
Illinois (10-3), 9 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 9
BCS National Championship
At New Orleans
LSU (13-0) vs. Alabama (11-1),
8:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Jan. 21
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg
East vs.WestTBA, (NFLN)

Saturday, Jan.28
Senior Bowl
At Mobile,Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Feb. 5
Texas vs. Nation
At San Antonio
Texas vs. Nation, 2 p.m. (CBSSN)


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


CEEDTT
7 -T I
L / L J L ^









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


TiAT WAY I CAN TOIA7Y JU!nFw4
FlAY INGINAgAN P WHIL-
RUCKING UP +1OOK IN e1UI:PFT
LOMcANIPSRA?CPUATINN WITH
MINIMLMARMKE-TABFXIGKI-S.I



Aftl,


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Not even death can heal

family's seven-year feud


DEAR ABBY: After a


bitter seven-year estrange-
ment from his family, my
husband received his
grandfather's eulogy in the
mail. His father sent it with
a nQte that read, "Here's a
copy of the eulogy I read
at his funeral." Abby, this
was how his family notified
him of his grandfather's
death two weeks after
the fact. We had attempted
several reconciliations with
no success.
A month later, my hus-
band died at the age of 36
- depressed and suffering
from black lung disease.
His family blames ME
for his depression. Not a
single relative of my hus-
band's attended his memo-
rial service despite being
given three weeks' notice
and my having mailed
them formal invitations.
My husband left a
declaration in his will
that his family should
never know our child,
whom they abandoned
at 2 months old via a let-
ter to us and my family. I
feel I have been choking
on their toxic behavior
and venom. Do you have
any advice as we move
forward with our crosses
after being abused by
these narcissists for more
than seven years? SAD
AND BITTER WIDOW
IN TENNESSEE
DEAR SAD AND
BITTER WIDOW: Yes. Put
down those crosses and
recognize that the anger


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
and bitterness you feel
will only poison yourself
and your child. Obey your
husband's wishes and raise
your child in a healthy
emotional environment -
as far from your husband's
family as possible. Unless
you do, the mistreatment
to which you have been
subjected will affect both
your lives and you will
waste what could be a
happy future.

DEAR ABBY: I know
some children who seem
to be mature and are able
to make logical decisions
on a fairly regular basis.
Still, making a decision
under stress when one has
not had a lot of experience
can be difficult
Having said that, at
what age do you think
it is appropriate to leave
a child alone at home?
Sometimes it's difficult
to arrange for child
care when kids are out
of school. Do you have
any guidelines as to
what to look for that
can help make this deci-
sion? BUSY WORKING
PARENT IN KANSAS
DEAR BUSY WORKING


PARENT: I don't think
children should be left
alone if there is any other
alternative available after-
school programs, YMCA,
activities where they will
have adult supervision.
Too many things can go
wrong, and you would
never forgive yourself if
one of them happened to
your child.

DEAR ABBY: How does
one respond to a former
co-worker/acquaintance
who wants you to be a
reference at your current
workplace? My experience
with him was not ideal.
He was a good worker,
but he became irritable
when he was under stress
and.drowned everyone
around him in negative
energy. I don't want to
work with this individual
again, but I prefer to be
nonconfrontational. -
FORMER COLLEAGUE
IN SUNNYVALE, CALIF
DEAR FORMER
COLLEAGUE: If you are
asked again, tell your for-
mer co-worker you are not
comfortable assuming that
responsibility. Don't be
defensive and don't allow
the person to pressure
you. And you do not have
to explain why you have
chosen not to give the ref-
erence.

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): A financial change
will help you plan for the
future. Stay within your
means and you will ease
your stress. You don't have
to be generous with your
cash to win friends; your
time, patience and under-
standing will be plenty.

' TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Make plans to'take
part in a stimulating event
or activity that offers the
opportunity to network
and develop a project you
want to pursue. Love is
highlighted, and spending
time romancing someone
you care for will bring high
returns. ***'
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Emotional deception
will develop if you show
uncertainty regarding the
way you feel about some-
thing or someone. You
have to be as honest and
straightforward as pos-
sible, in order to invite the
right kind of attention and
results. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): A change in a partner-
ship will leave you ques-
tioning what went wrong.
Ulterior motives are prob-
ably at the root of any
problem you encounter.
Be honest about what you
really want and proceed in
a direction that will satisfy
your needs. ****


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A
change of pace and location-
will get you thinking about
what and where you are
heading. Don't let a financial
concern stop you from fol-
lowing through with your
plans. You mustn't let any-
one take advantage of your
generosity. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Don't get angry or
upset get moving. Its up
to you to follow through
with your plans, regard-
less of what anyone else
decides to do. Don't rely
on others to make choices
for you or to do what you
want Romantic opportu-
nity is apparent. **
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct.
22): Put time and effort
into perfecting your home
emotionally, physically and
financially. Go over person-
al papers. Making altera-
tions that better suit your
goals will encourage you to
start a project you've been
putting off. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): You'll be drawn to a
partnership that looks cre-
atively promising. Making
suggestions will bring you
closer to a decision that
can translate into higher
income and greater flex-
ibility. A short trip will


enhance a relationship.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Expect to be
asked to take on someone
else's responsibilities. Do
what you can, but don't
jeopardize your own work.
An old friend will be able
to help you out. Visiting
and talking face-to-face
will help you get what you
want. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Enjoy getting to
know some of your peers
better. Your presence at a
gathering will make you
more approachable to a
wider variety of people.
Discussing what people do
and don't like will help you
make better choices. Love
is in the stars. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-.
Feb. 18): Not everyone will
understand what you are
trying to do. Don't let your
emotions take over. You
have to do things as you
see fit and for the right
reasons. Ulterior motives
won't work. Honesty is
first and foremost. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Arguing won't get you
anywhere. You'll be pulled
between two choices: One
you want and one you
feel obliged to follow to
completion. Love is in the
stars, and romance will
enhance your personal life
and your future. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 equals W
"U EYNG LZG ULKEUKD 0 K W YA EUAG.
U E Y N G LZG AYYH. U EVYNG LZG
TGYTEG. U EYNG LZG KLLULJHGX YA
ULKEUKDX." GELYD PYZD


Previous Solution: "I was a little girl in World War II and I'm used to being freed
by Americans." Madeleine Albright
201 1 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-8


FOR BETTER ORWORSE
Y ,OR SON IS N H IRE DOT LUOFU MR.LEE
MfRS P81FRVER0N. MICHAEL UJIWL3E.
.< NOEEV.


CLASSIC PEANUTS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


BUYITi~-


SE~aL~LIT

F ) Ti
IND fITl-


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lciniies 2 Signs Eaclh dditiul ine '165


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month.... 92.00
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Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



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Some people prefer to place their
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FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
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lication. Credit for published errors
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Land Clearing

Back Hoe, Dozer, Chopping, root
raking, bush hog, seeding, sod,
disking, site prep, ponds &
irrigation. Free Est! 386-623-3200


Services

A2Z of Lake City, Inc. Avail.
Dec" 1. Prof. House Cleaning Svcs.
Employees: Fingerprinted, Drug
screen & Bonded. 386-752-5655


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-273-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF ALICE
CLAIRE DEVANE,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
ALICE CLAIRE DEVANE, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
September 5, 2011; is pending in the
Circuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division; File Num-
ber 11-273-CP; the address of which
is 175 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tive and the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate, in-
cluding unmatured, contingent or un-
liquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30)
DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE EON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent's
estate, including unmatured, contin-
gent or unliquidated claims or de-
mands against the decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or
unliquidated claims, must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE..
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH. ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
DECEMBER 8, 2011
BY:/S/.TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386)752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative
BY: /s/ Lynne DeVane Boyd
Personal Representative
900 NW Frontier Drive
Lake City, FL 32055
05529423
December 8, 15, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA, COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-273-CP
.IN RE: ESTATE OF ALICE
CLAIRE DEVANE,
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The Administration of the estate of
ALICE CLAIRE DEVANE, de-
ceased, File Number 11-273-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hemando. Avenue, Lake City,
FL 32055. The estate is testate and
the date of the decedent's Will and
any Codicils are July 15, 2005. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set forth
below. The fiduciary lawyer-client
privilege in section 90.5021, Florida
Statutes, applies with respect to the
personal representative and any at-
torney employed by the personal rep-
resentative.
Any interested person on whom a
copy of the Notice of Administration
is served who challenges the validity
of the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or ju-
risdiction of the court must file any
objections with the court in the man-
ner provided in the Florida Probate
Rules within the time required by
law or those objections are forever
barred.
Any person entitled to exempt prop-
erty must file a petition for determi-
nation of exempt property WITHIN
THE TIME PERIOD BY LAW OR
THE RIGHT TO EXEMPT PROP-
ERTY IS DEEMED WAIVED. Any
person entitled to take an elective
share must file an election to take
share WITHIN THE TIME PRO-
VIDED BY LAW OR THE RIGHT
TO CLAIM AN ELECTIVE
SHARE IS DEEMED WAIVED. An
election to take an elective share
must be filed within the time provid-
ed by law.
By:/s/ TERRY McDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386)752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Personal Representative
By:/s/Lynne DeVane Boyd
Personal Representative
900 NW Frontier Drive
Lake City, FL 32055
05529422
December 8, 15, 2011
To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-274-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF JOAN LOUISE
POWERS
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
JOAN LOUISE POWERS,' de-
ceased, whose date of death was
May 7, 2011, is pending on the Cir-
cuit Court for Columbia County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 173 NE Hernando
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055.
The names and addresses of the Per-
sonal Representative and the Person-
al Representatives attorney are set
forth below. All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this notice
is required to be served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO(2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is December 8, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ MATTHEW C. MITCHELL
Attorney for William E. Powers
Florida Bar Number: 0028155
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
E-Mail: mcm@bbattomeys.com
Personal Representative:
BY:/S/ WILLIAM E. POWERS
702 SE Mayhall Terrace.
Lake City, Florida 32025-
05529424
December 8, 15, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, EI
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
SUNSTATE FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANDREW C. FAHRNY,
Defendant.
CASE NO. 12-2011-CA-000222
NOTICE OF' FORECLOSURE
SALE
Notice is hereby given that the un-
dersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court,
Columbia County, Florida, will on
the January 11, 2012, at 11:00am, at
the front court steps of the Columbia
County Courthouse, 173 NE Hernan-
do Avenue, Lake City, Florida, offer
for sale and sell at public outcry, one
by one, to the highest bidder for
cash, the property located in Colum-
bia County, Florida, as follows:
Lot 51, Springfield Estates Phase 3,
A Subdivision as recorded in Plat
Book 6, Pages 48 and 48A of the
Public Records of Columbia County,
Florida pursuant to the Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure entered on No-
vember 28, 2011, in the above-styled
cause, pending in said Court.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
P. DeWitt Cason, Clerk
Clerk of Circuit Court
By:PAPerry ,
Deputy Clerk
Copies Furnished To:
James E. Sorenson, Esquire
Mary Linzee Van Leuven, Esquire
Post Office Box 4128
Tallahassee, FL 32315-4128
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Andrew C. Fahrny
226 S. W. Brandy Way
Lake City, FL 32024-4548
Defendant
05529447
December 8, 15, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-280-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GLADYS L. SMITH
a/k/a GLADYS LITTLE SMITH,
deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
GLADYS L. SMITH, deceased,
whose date of death was September
20, 2011; File Number 11-280-CP, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Co-
lumbia County, Florida, Probate Di-
vision, the address of which is 173
NE Hernando Avenue, Lake City,
Florida 32055. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served, must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE


Fairfield Inn by Marriott
Looking for a Career not a job
Now-hiring for Front desk EMiand.
Night audit
Apply at 538 SW Corporate Drive
FT Position Office Clerk for Ma-
chine Shop, Computer skills need-
ed, Wide range of duties etc.
Apply in person Grizzly Mfg
174 NE Cortez Terrace
AP/AR, Estimating, order entry


Legal Secretary/Paralegal
Position for Civil Litigation.
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
send resumes to:
injuryattomeys(3yahoo.com
P/T Selling Event Specialist
needed to promote products in the
Local Grocery Chains. Must be
outgoing and dependable. Week-
ends/Some Weekdays are a must.
No experience needed, we will
train. Please call (904) 908-4516.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Security Officers needed.for,
Shands Lake Shore Hospital, must
have current D Security Lic., Clear
background, Drivers Lic, phone,
Diploma/GED. Benefits, DFWP
EEO, Call: (334) 805-7329,
MB 1000084

2 Medical
I U Employment

05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


Legal

FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS.BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is: December 8, 2011.
Personal Representative:
/s/ Ricky W. Smith
RICKY W. SMITH
982 SW Walter Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32024
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive:
FEAGLE & FEAGLE, ATTOR-
NEYS, P.A.
By: /s/ Mark E. Feagle
Mark E. Feagle
Florida Bar No. 0576905
Attorneys for Personal Representa-
tive
153 NE Madison Street
Post Office Box 1653
Lake City, Florida 32056-1653
386/752-7191
05529441
December 8, 15, 2011

100 Job
Opportunities

05529409
FT & PT PC Tech needed for
busy local shop. Exp required.
Sales Help wanted.
Electronic/Computers FT & PT
Send email to: bdj@startech.cc

05529412 "
Fantastic Opportunity
Guest Services Position -PT/Fr
with opportunity for advance-
ment. MUST be a people person
with strong work ethic,
DEPENDABLE, good commu-
nication, great customer service'
skills, sales skills, computer
skills, and willingness to learn.
MUST be a team player and
able to work a flexible schedule
including weekends & holidays.
We offer Competitive Pay and
Health Benefits. Hotel Experi-
ence Highly Preferred. Only
those seeking long term
employment apply in person
at Comfort Suites 3690 W US
Hwy 90. Please do not call the
hotel regarding your application.


05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-12/12/10
* Phlebotonmy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-01/26/12

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$80.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

411 Machinery &
411 Tools
Air Compressor, Craftsman,
125psi, upright tank,
good condition $110.
Call 386 963-4560
Generator, 5000 watt,
used twice,
good condition $325.
Call 386 963-4560


SiTEL!
1152 SW Business Point Drive
between Hwy 47 and Sisters Welcome Rd.
Lake City, Florida 32025
386-754-8JOB (8562)

www.sitel.com


Regular and

Temporary Positios

Paid Training!
S No telemarketing!



NOW


HIRING!


120 Medical
120 Employment

05529244
Advent Christian Village
658-JOBS (5627)
www.ACVillage.net
Join the Oldest Retirement
Community in Florida
FT RN Supervisor/
Long-term Care
FT supervisory position for RN
with unrestricted Florida
license, long-term care setting;
knowledge of LTC regs and pri-
.or supervisory/management
experience required; prior expe-
rience'in long-term care prefer-
red; PC proficiency required for
EMR; will join an interdiscipli-
nary team with strong focus on
compassionate care. BSN
strongly preferred.
FT Social Services Associate
FT position provides social
services support to long-term
care residents and their families,
including assessments, care
plans, advocacy & education in
an interdisciplinary team setting.
Bachelor's degree in human
services or related field
required. Master's degree
preferred. Experience with
geriatric or long-term care
population preferred.
Must be creative, energetic,
and organized.
Proficiency in electronic clinical
record keeping required.
Excellent benefits package
includes health, dental, life, dis-
ability, supplemental insurance;
retirement; time off, access to
onsite daycare and fitness facili-
ties. Apply in person at person-
nel Office Monday through
Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00
p.m., or fax resume/credentials
to (386)658-5761. EOE/Drug-
Free Workplace/Criminal
background checks required.
Excellent work environment.

CNA/MA/LPN needed F/T for
busy medical practice. M-F
Benefits available. Please email
resume to dac.lc22 vahoo.com.

Schools &
240 Education


JOB FAIR

Saturday, December 10th
Between 10:00 am 2:00 pm
(please be on time)

ii8m,,.


411 Machinery &
411 Tools

Shop Vac, large,
6hp, Sears, just
replaced filter $45
Call 386 963-4560


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-288-6875.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
Wanted to buy.
50 Rolls Coastal Hay.
Delivered.
386-344-0226.


430 Garage Sales

2 Families. 365 SW Bumett Ln
off CR 242 btwn SR 47 & Sisters
Welcome. Toys, women clothing,
household. 7-3 NO Early birds.
Fri & Sat. 8-2. Branford Hwy &
242, left at B&B 200 yds to Melon
Ct., left. 3rd house on right.
A bit of everything.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

RESIDENT YARD SALE,
Sat. 12/10, 8-4 pm., go SW on
McFarlane, right on Bali ends at
Lakewood Apts. Lots of misc.
Sat. 8am-? 202 SW Dewey Ct.
Hwy 47 S left on Watson Rd. to
Dewey. Look for signs. Fishing
stuff., clothes, misc. & more


440 Miscellaneous

6 gal gas tank,
like new $7.
Call 386 963-4560

Coleman cot, like new $20.
Twin size pop up bed,
Eddie Bauer, $20.
Call 386 963-4560
S Decorator
_4 et-- Hobby Horse.
ii'_ t Very interesting
piece. Head is 50 in
high. $350. obo.
(321)443-0845 By appointment.
Quilt, king size, Lone Star pattern,
rose and tealon ivory background.
Excellent condition. Original price
$1500 asking $800. 386-963-4560
RIDE NEEDED from S441 (near
Race Track) 7:30 A.M. to 1-75/90;
also need ride going back to Race
Track 4:30 P.M. Also, MOPED
NEEDED or 4-cyl. car in good
mech. cond. (cheap, dents ok;
prefer automatic) 386-628-7341,
Don't call Saturday.


450 Good Things
to Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several gbod Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood

It's Getting Colder!! Firewood
$65. Truck Load. we will call you
back. We deliver under 20 mi
$100 per load. Over 20 mi $120
per load. Joey 965-0288. Lv mess.

630 Mobile Homes.
6U 30 for Rent
1 BR/1l BA Furnished, all utilities
included + satellite,
$135 week, $135 deposit.
Call 386-758-6939
2 & 3 br/lba Mobile Homes for
Rent. CH/A includes water, sewer,
garbage. $475./ $525. mo. 1st &
last mo + $300 dep. 386-961-8466


SADvantage











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Monthly Specials
$550. mo. Free Water.
386-984-8448
3/2 SW, just renovated, off 41 on
246 between I-10 & 75,
$550 mo, $500 sec. NO PETS.
386-330-2316 or 386-266-3610
3BR/2BA SWWH on 1 acre in
Ellisville private lot 460. mo 1st.
last plus deposit.
386-454-2250
Mobile Homes for rent in
White.Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

6r4 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Palm Harbor Homes
New Home Stimulus
5K For Your Used Mobile Home-
Any Condition
800-622-2832 ext 210
All 2011's Must Go!
All Homes at Dead cost! Save up
To $10,000. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville. (352)872-5566
Land and Home Packages
for Mobile homes and modular
homes. No Money down if you
own your land. 100 mile radius.
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
We Need Used Mobile Homes!
Will buy or trade. Top Dollar Paid.
North Point Homes.
(352)872-5566

6 Mobile Home
650 & Land
Nice 1620sf 3br/2ba DW on 4
wooded acres, owner finance avail.
$119,900 Brenda Forrester,
Forrester Realty 352-339-6069
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 2.5 acres,
Mayo area, small down/$650 mo,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.coni
Rental/Starter, renovated, 3/2 SW
1 ac. off 41 btwn 1-10 & 75. 10
min to LC. $28,500 obo. No owner
Finance. 386-330-2316/266-3610

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent







2/2 w/garage & washer/dryer
hookups. West side of town,
Call for details
386-755-6867
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150 "'
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA in
Gatorwood S/D. Washer/dryer
hook up, clean. $650. 1st, last +
security. 386-867-9231
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sep 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
73 Home For Rent
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05529414
LAKE CITY
3BR/2BA 1325SF $895. mo
3BR/2BA 1064SF $595. mo
2BR/1BA 768SF $495. mo
2 AVAILABLE
1BR/1BA 500SF $395. mo
3BR/2BA 1000 SF $700 mo
2BR/1BA VACANT $495 mo
JASPER
3BR/2BA 1188SF $675 mo
4BR/2BA 2052SF $750 mo
MADISON
2BR/1BA JUST REMODELED
$450. mo. 2 AVAILABLE
3BR/1.5 BA REMODELED
$550. mo


Visit our website:
www.NorthFloridahomeandland.com
Mike Foster 386-288-3596
Mitchell Lee 386-867-1155
Accredited Real Estate Services
1688 SE Baya Dr., Suite 105
Lake City, FL 32025
Accredited Real Estate Services
is a Full Service Real Estate Of-
fice.
We do: Rentals ~
Property Management ~
Property Sales.
LENOER 0]
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
5br $1,100 mo. CH/A, Washer/
Dryer, Fenced Yard, Pets OK,
595 SE Putnam St. $1,100 mo. +
utils. Florida Homes & Land, Inc.
Info 386-755-5936
Available Immediately.
Rent To Own 3br/2ba home
In quiet subdivision.
386-752-5035 X 3113
7 days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
Gorgeous Lake View 2br
Apartment. Close to shopping.
$485. mo $485 dep.
386-344-2170
SWMH 2/2 in Wellborn,
$600 mo, and
$600 security.
386-365-1243 or 965-7534

7CA Business &
/5U Office Rentals


05529267
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor
FOR LEASE. Professional office
off of N. Baya Ave. 6 offices, 2
baths, kitchen area. Server closet
with T-1. Office is brand new! all
offices wired for phone/internet.
Nicest office space in town.
Call 386-867-1515


For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki br Joe 386-935-2832.
Office for Lease, was Dr's office
$8 sqft/2707 sqft
Oak Hill Plaza
Tom 961-1086, DCA Realtor
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/1 yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500








Lake City Reporter


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

820 Farms &
2 | Acreage
12 acres+/-, Northwest corner of
CR-18 and 81st Ave. Asking Price
$745,000. Call (801) 715-9162 for
more information
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

Q870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles

2006 Honda Dirt Bike CRF 450R.
Excel Cond, Well Maintained w/
helmet, boots, chest protector &
safety equip $3500. 386-752-0668

940 Trucks
2003 CHEVY SILVERADO,
2-WD EXT. CAB, 125,000 miles,
well maintained, great shape,
$7,500, Call 386-397-0571

950 Cars for Sale

2010 HONDA ACCORD LX
Blue w/Grey interior. One owner.
23,000 miles. $21,800.
Call 386-292-5763


951 Recreational
9 Vehicles
1984 CAMPER.
Everything works $3000.
904-233-2714 or
386-755-0273


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Your ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-623-9026

If you don't sell your vehilde
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


LakeCi t'Reprte








LAKE CITY REPORTER FOOTBALL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2011


FROM THE SIDELINE


Phone:(386) 754-0420
bfinley@lokecityreportercom

Jags still

need

Tebow
Prior to the
season, I wrote
about the
Jacksonville
Jaguars
franchise's commitment
to mediocrity. It sent off a
storm of emails blasting
me for being a Tim Tebow
homer and Jaguar hater.
Now that the season is
close to being over, my
opinion hasn't changed
much.
My biggest problem with
the Jacksonville franchise
is that it seemed content
on being stuck in the
middle of the NFL. It has
never gone after the big
move. It's a franchise that
plays it safe. It doesn't take
chances.
One of Jacksonville's
biggest problems after
the draft this season was
wide receiver and instead
of attacking that position
in free agency, the Jaguars
settled with the receivers
on their roster. Names like
Plaxico Burress, Braylen
Edwards and Santonio
Holmes were there for
the taking. Jacksonville
allowed other teams to
take them.
Still, receiver is only one
small piece to the puzzle
of why Jacksonville has
an identity as one of the
. league's worst franchises.
The Jaguars had a chance
two seasons ago to bring
an identity to the team.
Jacksonville could have
drafted a player that the
city would have rallied
around despite results.
Tebow may not have
had instant success in
Jacksonville, but the city
wouldn't have cared. It
would have welcomed
home one of its heroes and
waited for the success to
come.
Instead, Jacksonville
went with a quarterback
from the Big 12 conference
that has consistently
produced duds in the NFL
as of late. Colt McCoy
seemed like a world
beater at Texas, but look
at what he's done with the
Cleveland Browns.
Still, when Jacksonville
general manager Gene
Smith saw Blaine
Gabbert's gaudy college
numbers, he decided
to trade up in the draft
giving up valuable pieces
to the puzzle to pick what
he thought would be a
franchise quarterback.
Now which quarterback
would have been
better suited to play in


Jacksonville?
Let's look at weapons.
Most of Tebow's offensive
weapons couldn't start
in Jacksonville and that's
saying a lot when you look
at the Jaguars' playmakers.
After Maurice Jones-Drew,
Jacksonville lacks much
offensive punch, but
Tebow is handing off to a
revitalized Willis McGahee.
If Tebow can guide the
Broncos to a 6-1 record
this season, what could he
have done for the Jaguars?
Let's remember, he
didn't have an offseason to
continue his progression,
so for the most part,
Tebow is still a rookie.
How does he stack up
against Gabbert?
Tebow has a 10-1
touchdown to interception
ratio. Gabbert has thrown
eight touchdowns to his
seven interceptions.
The biggest knock
on Tebow has been his
completion percentage.
Gabbert is completing two
percent more of his passes
than Tebow.
When it comes down to
it, it's not about the stats.
Everyone knows that
there's only one stat that
matters in football and
that's wins and losses.
The best way I've heard
Tebow described is as a
force of competitive nature.
That competitive nature
has propelled the Denver
Broncos to six wins in
seven games with Tebow at
quarterback. Jacksonville
has three wins this season.
Seems to me that Tebow
might have been the
answer in Jacksonville after
all.
Then again, what do
wins matter?


TEBOW: Has many critics, but keeps winning


Continued From Page 1

Tebow has brought the
option back to the NFL
and while he usually strug-
gles for much of the day
to move his team down-
field, he keeps coming up
big in crunch time, guid-
ing the Broncos to sec-
ond-half comeback wins
against the Dolphins, Jets,
Raiders, Chargers and
Vikings since taking over
as the starter two months
ago.
On Sunday, he won a
shootout in Minnesota,
propelling the Broncos
(7-5) into a first-place tie
with Oakland atop the AFC
West.
"You've got Aaron
Rodgers, you've got Drew
Brees, you've got Tom
Brady that set a standard
of excellence in football
that we haven't seen," said
Theismann, now an NFL
Network analyst. "What
makes 2011 so unique is
we have seen quarterback
play in this league at such a
high extreme and in Tim's
case, the bottom rung
when it comes to comple-
tions."
And yet the Broncos are
also in the playoff hunt
in this pass-happy league
because of an .old-fash-
ioned formula based on
stout defense and a strong
ground game.
"That defense is as good
as any in football right
now," Theismann said.
"The offense doesn't turn
the ball over. There's been
one interception in seven
games. I say this tongue-
in-cheek: the way Tim


throws the ball sometimes,
nobody has a shot at get-
ting it, his guy, the defend-
ers. It's either bounce it in
the ground or throw it in
the third row."
Tebow is completing just
48 percent of his passes.
"And what's his win-
ning percentage?" retorts
Cunningham.
It's 85.7 percent, second
only to Rodgers, whose
Packers are perfect at
12-0.
Still, Broncos boss John
Elway won't publicly com-
mit to Tebow for 2012 and
beyond. Coach John Fox,
who told NFL.com last
month that Tebow would
be "screwed" if they were
running a conventional
offense, is living. in the
moment, not focused on
the future.
"The guys wins, how
can you not be a fan of
that?" Fox said. "He does it
with his feet, with his arm,
just with his competitive
greatness, really. That's
what you're looking for in
a quarterback."
The Broncos have decid-
ed not to try to fix Tebow's
throwing troubles now but
try to accentuate what he
already does well, which
is running a ball-control,
low-risk, no-frills offense
heavy on the option while
sprinkling in some down-
field passes.
"He's in a sweet spot
right now," said Young,
"but I don't know if it's
developing him to go do it
long-term in the NFL." '
Tebow is coming off his


best passing performance
as a pro 10 of 15 for 202
yards and two TDs but
Young would like to see
him sling it 20-25 times
every Sunday.
"I learned the hard way
what the job in the NFL
was," said Young, who
came into the league as
a scrambler and left as a
pocket passer with a cham-
pionship and a ticket to
the Hall of Fame. "I didn't
know what that job was and
it wasn't natural to me and I
like to just run around and
make plays.
"But it's not champion-
ship football. It can be win-
ning football, but it's not
championship football,"
'Young said. "And so I had
to learn the job, and the
Sjob is a Ph.D. in studying
defenses and the ability
- and some of it's natural
- to deliver the football."
There's the rub. Does
Tebow: really need to be -a
great passer?
"My first year, I was no
more accurate than he
was," said Cunningham,
who was a 42-percent pass-
er as a rookie but finished
his career at 56.6 percent
and was one of the most
exciting players of his day.
Young worries that the
option offense is stunting
Tebow's growth.
"We really haven't
learned anything," Young
said. "We knew he was
good at that."
Young said he fears the,
Broncos will head into
the offseason still clueless
as to whether Tebow can


really throw the ball and
thus they'll decide to draft
another quarterback, "and
then I'm going to say, 'Well,
why didn't we spend that
time last year see if he
could really do this job?"'
The answer to that ques-
tion: Because he's win-
ning. So says Douglass, the
Bears' scrambling quarter-
back from 1969-75 who
was a career 43 percent
passer.
"You have to make a deci-
sion: Can we put in some of
the stuff that he's real com-
fortable with plus create
all these problems for the
defense?" said Douglass.
"And then, are we better
off sacrificing some of
the things that he could
be learning if we didn't do
that? Obviously, they have
made that decision."
Although they've slowed
his growth as a passer, they
haven't stunted it, Douglass
suggested.
Cunningham, who spent
16 seasons in the NFL, said
the results speak for them-
selves.
"The bottom line is
the man wins games. I'm
probably his biggest fan,"
Cunningham said. "When
I look at him, I see a large
Michael Vick. People tell
Tim what he can't do; he
defies the odds. He doesn't
do itin awaythat everybody
else does it. He doesn't do
.it like Tom Brady or my
man Drew Brees. But let
me tell you something, at
the end of the game, it's
always exciting and he
comes out ahead."


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420