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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01710
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 27, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01710
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





000015 120312 ****3D G
L LIB OF FLORIDA H HISTORY 36
P0 BOX 11l7007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611O 943


Reporter


Sunday, November 27, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 255 $1.00


SEASON



OPENER


Lighting of Olustee
Park marks official
start of holidays.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

There was a constant "thump"
heard in the downtown Lake City
area Saturday afternoon originat-
ing at Olustee Park.
At first it signaled music from
local musicians, but by 6 p.m. it
could have been the collective
heartbeat of residents and visitors
who showed up at the park for the
Annual Festival -of Lights where
Christmas Lights were set to be
turned on in the park as a local
holiday tradition,







4


Local musician Harry Wuest
flipped the switch turning on the
lights as he was joined by Donald
Johns and Jeanie Wilks. Wuest,
who has a long history in the
music industry and who was the
first band leader at Walt Disney
World, also turned on the lights
during last year's ceremony.
Event organizers estimated that
close to 5,000 people visited the
park at different times in the day
during the event, but noted there
was more than 300 people at the
park to see the light ceremony and
to visit with Santa Claus.
Johns said the lighting ceremo-
ny has been held at the park for
close to 25 years and Saturday's-
event was held with the same tradi-
tion, with the exception of having
SEASON continued on 3A Festival of Lights attendees await Santa's arrival on Saturday at Olustee Park.


T ONY BHITTIL 3pr 1' ai.,
SAbove, Santa Claus is greeted by camera flashes and hugs from children on his arrival
-,at Olustee Park. At left, Donald Johns (from left), Harry Wuest and Jeanie Wilks prepare
for a countdown before turning on the Christmas lights at Olustee Park.


Reporter.

food drive

kicks off

tomorrow

Collection effort
will continue
though Dec. 10.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

Collecting food for needy families
has become a holiday tradition for the
Lake City Reporter's staff and many
local residents.
The tradition will continue Monday
when the Reporter kicks off its annual
food collection drive.
'This is a joint effort between our
staff, our newspaper carriers and our
readers to help offset some of our
neighbors' most basic needs food,"
said Todd Wilson, Lake City Reporter
publisher. "We're asking our com-
munity to once again rally behind this
effort and donate a few canned goods
to help those less fortunate. All of
the food items will be donatedto the
Food Bank."
The food collection site will be
the Lake City Reporter office, 180 E.
Duval St, beginning Nov. 28. A col-
lection container will be in the front
portion of the building for the food
donations.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Mandy Brown, circulation director for the Lake City Reporter, with a box full of food
for the Lake City Reporter's fourth annual Community Food Drive.


Mandy Brown, Lake City Reporter
circulation director, said people can
bring their food by the office 8 a.m.
- 5 p.m., Monday Friday, or they can
leave it at their box for the carrier to
pick-up on Saturday, Dec. 10.
This year's food collection drive
marks the fourth year the Lake City
Reporter has sponsored the "Let's Fill
It Up" Lake City Reporter Community
Food Drive.
"Four years ago, we became aware
of the shortage at the Food Bank
in the weeks between Christmas
and New Years," Wilson said. "The
thought of people being hungry with


no Christmas .dinner was very trou-
bling to our staff and we wanted to
make. a difference so we launched
the Lake City Reporter's Community
Food Drive."
The annual food collection drive
started as a food drive focusing on col-
lecting food during the holiday period
when food donations are often low.
"Nobody really donates food
between Thanksgiving and Christmas
and this is to help offset some of the
costs for the food bank," Brown said.
"The community food drive, created
REPORTER continued on 3A


Cyber Monday

still means local

shopping to many


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Some people are so excit-
ed, about Christmas shop-
ping that they take a long
nap after Thanksgiving
dinner and wake up 'early
enough to wait in lines up
to two hours in advance of
a.store opening its doors at
3 a.m. or earlier.
Then, there are others
who do their shopping
online. There's lots of
them and their numbers
are growing.
In fact, online shoppers
have a special day that is
the equivalent of Black
Friday, It's called Cyber
Monday, a marketing term
describing one of the busi-
est online shopping days
of the year.
Cyber Monday is the
MondayafterThanksgiving.
One possible reason for
why the first weekday after
Thanksgiving is so busy for
e-commerce is an estimat-
ed 52.7 percent of all online
shopping is done from
work computers, according
to industry studies.
And the numbers of


online Christmas shoppers
are growing, according to
comScore, a company that
measures online consumer
behavior.
Consumers spent $610
million on the first Monday
after Thanksgiving in
2007. Last year, they spent
more than $1 billion in
online sales the Monday
after Thanksgiving. The
organization predicts a 15
percent increase in online
sales this year.
Still, not everyone's sold
on the idea of online shop-
ping.
"It's not as fun shopping
on the computer as going
shopping in the stores,"
Dawn Vargo said Saturday
at the Lake City Mall.
Kelli Ronsonet said she
prefers to shop locally
rather than online.
"I decided to shop Lake
City first to keep money
here in the community and
help support small busi-
nesses and small business
owners here in Lake City,"
she said. "I'll probably do
a little Internet shoppirig,
CYBER continued on 3A


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I111 CALL US:
l (386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER: Areas Of Fog
Voice: 755-5445
SlFax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 6A


Opinion ................ 4A
Business ......... . .... IC
Advice & Comics......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B
People ............... .. 2A


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
'Birds of America'
comes to Philly


COMING
TUESDAY
Local News
Roundup


.!' I.
,i o RAT


Community Food Drive


Saturday, December 10, 2011
Carrier Pick Up Day


See the adi' today's paper for details.


TONY BRITT/Lake City Reporter


Starting November 28, 2011
Drop off at the Reporter office


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2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011





Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
'8-34-39-43 11 3-7-13-23-24 Afternoon: 0-7-3 Afternoon: 8-1-8-3 N/A N/A
Evening: 8-1-0 Evening: 9-3-0-3



AROUND FLORIDA



Man, mother of toddler found in woods arrested


PIERSON The mother,
of a 1-year-old girl found in
a wooded area in Volusia
County and the man who
reported her missing
have been arrested in the
child's disappearance.
A sheriff's office
spokesman says 23-year-
old Carlos Rivera and
30-year-old Leah Wiley
were arrested Saturday.
Charges were not immedi-
ately released.
Deputies, a helicop-
ter and bloodhounds
had searched for Lupita
Gonzalez:for hours. A'
missing child alert was
also issued.
SAuthorities say
Gonzalez, Rivera and
Wiley were at a party
Thursday where "illegal
drugs were being con-
sumed." Rivera walked
away from the house
where the party was being
held with the child for
unknown reasons. He left
the girl in a field where
she was later found.
Authorities have not
releasedadditional infor-. '
nation on the case.:

Hundreds turn out
for Gingrich rally
NAPLES Speaking to a
standing room-only crowd
in Naples on Friday, presi-
dential candidate Newt
Gingrich detailed his views
on immigration, just days
after breaking with what
has become a Republican
hard line on the topic.
't"'t'db'hbt Beieve7 you can


Republican presidential candidateNewt Gingric
porters with his wife, Callista, at-the Naples Hil
Friday. Giqgrich was in the area to speak at a t
ing:


Federal prosecutors say
the trio conned elderly
customers into buying
unnecessary septic prod-
ucts, in some cases toilet
paper to last more than 70
years,
The Miami Herald
reported Saturday that
14 the three worked for FBK-
Products. A phone number
listed online for the Riviera
Beach-based company was
not a working number.
SThe three pleaded guilty
Last week in federal court
ASSOCIATED PRESS to conspiring to commit
ASSOCIATED PREss wire fraud. They will be
ch greets sup- sentenced in Feb. Three
ton in Naples other employees are await-
:own hall meet- ing trial.
,More than a dozen vic-
tims were told that they


pass comprehensive leg- .grants Who have lived
isolation Gingrich said to peaceful, law-abiding, tax-
nearly 1,000 people gath- paying lives in the United
ered at the Naples Hilton. States for many years.
The event, which was Other Republican can-.
rpoved from another loca- didates were quick to con-
tion to the hotel'to accom- dermn his remarks. But his,
modate more people, was ideas didn't seem to aliep-
so crowded that some ate the folks in Naples -
people left when they ',' the crowd was enthusiastic
found out that they would with his appearance and
have to listen to him from wildly applauded many of
an adjacent room. his remarks, including his'
Recent polls have outline on how to handle
shown the former house illegal immigration in the
speaker at qr near the top U.S.
of the Republican presi-
dential field, along with 3 face prison in
Mitt Romney. During a
televised debate Tuesday, toilet paper scam
some Republicans and W T P BEACH
pundits thought Gingrich WEST PALM BEACHe up to
may have risked that re e face up to
status when he said he two decades in prison in a
favored, pathways to legal $1 million toilet paper scam
status for illegalimmi-, .,,in Palm Beach County.


needed the company's
special toilet paper to
avoid ruining their septic
tanks because the fed-
eral government changed
regulations on toilet paper.
The federal government,
though, does not regulate
septic tank products.


Port to set world
record for cruisers
FORT LAUDERDALE,
_ Port Everglades is look-'
ing to break its own world
record. ,
The South Florida port
expects to set a iew world
Srecord'for the number
of cruise passengers to
depart a port in a single
day. Some 55,000 passen-
gers are expected to sail
Saturday to the Caribbean
on eight ships. '


The South Florida Sun- Reyn
Sentinel reports that the Satui
port's last record of 53,365 27-ye
cruise passengers was set with
on March 20, 2010. Au
sheri
Man shoots ex, acal
turns gun on self strain
at he
BRADENTON about
Manatee County authori- of D;
ties say a man shot his De
ex-girlfriend multiple times and
before turning the gun on arre,
himself on Thanksgiving. pulled
Thats according to the shot
sheriff's office, which Br
identified the shooter as right
26-year-old William Rolston arm,
and the ex-girlfriend as graz
26-year-old Lindsay Bellow. was
The Sarasota Herald- his r
Tribune reported Saturday Th
the couple had recently retu
ended a long-term relation-
ship and were arguing in
Rolston's Bradenton apart- Wo
ment at the time. dri.
The Sheriffs Office has .,
not yet released a 911 call SA
- made by neighbors after pollc
the shooting susp
No further information shoe
about t4e shooting has womn
'been released.. peoj
S ,

Deputies shot, not Nao
seriously injured mor
other
DEBARY-A Volusia to
County man has been fet
Charged with twod counts of ,ad
attempted murder of a law seric
enforcement officer after W
. authorities say he shbttwo one
deputies respondingt-o a pick
domestic-violence call. later
Jail-records show Corey,


lolds was being held
rday without bail. The
ear-old is also charged
felony battery.
authorities say the
iff's office received
I Saturday morning
Reynolds had tried to
igle his ex-girlfriend
r home in DeBary,
.t 25 miles southwest
aytona Beach.
deputies John Braman
John Brady tried to
st Reynolds, who
ed out a handgun and
both deputies.
amnan was shot in the
Shoulder and left
and another bullet
ed his neck. Brady
grazed on the back of
ight shoulder.
ie deputies never
rned fire.

man killed in
re-by shooting
ARASOTA Sarasota
:e are searching for
ects in a drive-by
voting that killed one
ian and injured four
>le.
>lice say 22-year-old
rmi Clyburn died at
scene of Saturday
ning~s shooting. Three
r victims were taken
.e hospital with non-
hreatening injuries
one was taken had a
us injury.
witnesses said at least
suspect fired from a
up truck, which was
found abandoned.


(AP)
'' ' \


^ .2' 2 ^ff,' k


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Show goes on for hurt Chaning


NEW YORK Stockard Channing
has made a speedy some might say
miraculous return to Broadway.
The 67-year-old Tony Award-winner
performed in "Other Desert Cities"
on Friday night and plans to con-
Stinue in the show despite undergoing
arthroscopic surgery on her right
knee less than a week ago.
Channing felt her knee collapse
backstage after the Nov. 18 show and
missed seven perfor-
mances. She plans to
perform in Saturday
night's show and
Sunday's matinee.
An understudy 'per-
formed Saturday's'
matinee and will do
Wednesday's mati-,
nee. Channing
The Jon Robin
Baitz play, about a
dysfunctional family wrestling with a
deep secret, opened Nov. 3.
In an interview Friday before her
return, Channing said: 'This is maybe
stupid. I don't know. But if it doesn't
blow up or get painful, I'm doing the
right thing,"

'Louisiana Crossroads'
offers nation a taste
LAFAYETTE, La. Audiences
on Sunday will get another chance
to see the "Louisiana Crossroads"
film being shopped as a television
pilot, a project that seeks to bring-
the region's' award-winning music
concert series to TVs across the
nation.
"Louisiana Crossroads," a pro-
gram of the Acadiana Center for
the Arts, premiered "Songs from
the Coast" on Friday at the James
Devin Moncus Theater. It will run
again Sunday at 4:30 p.m.
The hour-long film features seg-
ments on D.L. Menard, filmed on
location at his home in Erath; Irma
Thomas, filmed during a June per-
formance at the Acadiana Center;
Sonny Landreth, filmed both
atthe Acadiana Center and the
Festival International de Louisiane;
and Allen Toussaint, filmed at


Preservation Hall in New Orleans.
The Advocate reports film-
maker Allison Bohl worked with
"Louisiana Crossroads" director
Dirk Powell to create.the.pilot,
which was funded by the state's
Department of Culture, Recreation-
and Tourism and the Lafayette
Economic Development Authority.
Gerd Wuestemann, executive
director of the Acadiana Center,
said the film crew used multiple
high-definition cameras'to create
an "extremely polished piece" that
"can hold its own against anybody"
.despite its limited budget.
SWuestemann highlighted the seg-
ment on Landreth, which features,
in part, close-up shots of Landreth's
technical prowess on the guitar
through the use of multiple cam-
eras set up within the theater.
"We want to show the expected
Louisiana but we also want to
showcase, perhaps more impor-
tantly, the unexpected, the part of
Louisiana and the story that we all
know is here but. that I think the
national audience hasn't seen yet,"
,Wuestemann said.
When the idea for a TV compo-
nent first arose more than a decade
ago, Wuestemann said it initially
aimed to be Lafayette's own "Austin
City Limits," the popular concert
series that airs on public television.
Wuestemann said that concept
was expanded to include stories
behind the music through inter-
views with the artists and a further
exploration of how Louisiana music
connects to other'music cultures.
"We felt there was a big oppor-
tunity and also a big need here to
take this extraordinary treasure
trove of Louisiana music, which
really is almost unmatched in the
country, and create a series that
brings that extraordinary gift to the
rest of the country," Wuestemann
said.
Powell said the state has much to
celebrate.
"And I know that, in true
Louisiana style, the celebration
will not only honor what is past but
strengthen immeasurably what is to
come," he said.


Jamaica reggae founder
Lewellyn passes at 64
KINGSTON, Jamaica One of
the founders of a leading Jamaican
reggae and rocksteady trio from the
1960s has died.
A bandmate says Barry Llewellyn
of the. Heptones died Wednesday at
age 64.
Lead singer Leroy Sibbles said
Friday that Llewellyn died-of
unknown causes at Kingston Public
Hospital.
Llewellyn founded the Heptones
with Earl Morgan in the late 1950s.'.'
The group was considered highly
influential during the island's rock-
steady era in the 1960s.
The Heptones reunited in the
1990s after a nearly 20-year absence
during a worldwide ska and rock-
steady revival.
Llewellyn is survived by his wife,
Monica, and several children.

Philly museum brings
'Birds of America' to life
PHILADELPHIA One of the
world's rarest and most valuable books
is out of the vault and on public view
as part of an unusual daily ritual at the
nation's oldest natural history museum.
Every weekday at 3:15 p.m., a white-
gloved staff member of the Academy of
Natural Sciences lifts the locked protec-
tive cover from 19th century naturalist
John James Audubon's influential book,
"The Birds of America," and turns a
large linen-backed page to reveal the
bird of the day. More than 180 years
after Audubon created the life-size illus-
trations that now link his name with
ornithology, their vibrant watercolors
and fine details are still remarkable.
"Many times these were framed as
artworks and faded from exposure to
light," said curator Robert Peck, who
does many ofge the page turnings. "Ours
weren't exposed to light, so they're in
wonderful condition."
The Academy of Natural Sciences
was an original pay-as-you-go subscrib-
er of "The Birds of America" from 1827
to 1838.
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Actor James Avery is
63.
Academy Award-
winning director Kathryn
Bigelow is 60.
TV host Bill Nye is 56.
Caroline Kennedy is 54.
Former Minnesota
Gov. Tim Pawlenty is 51.
Actor Fisher Stevens
is 48.


Actress Robin Givens
is 47.
Actor Michael Vartan
is 43.
Actor Kirk Acevedo
is 40.
Rapper Twista is 39.
Actor Jaleel White is -
35.
Actress Alison Pill is


Daily Scripture

"Therefore, since we are
receiving a kingdom that
cannot be shaken, let us be
thankful, and so worship God
acceptably with reverence and
awe."

Hebrews 12:28 NIV


Lake City Reporter
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Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


- -









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27; 2011 3A



As deadline looms, Occupy LA says they'll stay


By ANDREW DALTON
Associated Press


L --


LOS ANGELES Despite
a fast-approaching deadline
set by the mayor and police
chief, very few of the anti-
Wall Street protesters from
Occupy Los Angeles had
begun breaking down their
tents Saturday on the City
Hall lawn and most said
they didn't intend to.
The Occupy IA encamp
ment was abuzz with activity,
but nearly all of it was aimed
at how to deal with authorities
come Monday's 12:01 am.
deadline. ASSOCIATED PRESS
. Some handed out signs Mayor Ant6nio Villaraigosa and LAPD Chief Charles Beck
mocked esup to look like the r- announce plans to close City Hall Park to Occupy protesters
city's notices to vacate, adver-
tising a Monday morning as of midnight Sunclay on Friday.
"eviction block party." ters and pepper spray ers' cause, it was. time for the
Dozens attended a teaching MayorAntonio Villaraigosa camp of nearly 500 tents to
on resistance tactics, includ- announcedFridaythatdeispite leave for the sake of public
ing howstay safe in the face of his sympathy for the protest- health and safety.
rubber bullets, tear gas carns-


The mayor said the move-,
ment is at a "crossroads," and
it must "move from holding
a particular patch of park to
spreading the message of
economic justice."
But occupiers did not
intend to give up their patch
of park too easily.
Will Picard, who sat
Saturday in a tent amid his
artwork with a "notice of evic-
tion" sign posted outside, said
the main organizers and most
occupiers he knows intend
to stay..
'Their plan is to resist
the closure of this encamp-
ment and if that means get-
ting arrested so be it," Picard
said. "I think they just want to
make the police tear it down
rather than tear it down them-
selves."
But some agreed with the
mayor that the protest had.
run its course.


"I'm going," said Luke
Hagerman, who sat looking
sad and resigned in the tent
he's stayed in for a month. "I
wish we could have got more
done."
Villaraigosa expressed
pride that Los Angeles has
lacked the tension, confronta-
tion and violence seen at simi-
lar protests in other cities. But
that peace was likely to get its
biggest test on Monday.
Police gave few specifics
about what tactics they would,:
use for those who had no
intention of leaving.
Chief Charlie Beck said
at Friday's news conference,
that officers would definitely.
not be sweeping through the
camp and arresting everyone
just after midnight '
But in an intervieW with.
the Los Angeles Times on
Sunday, Beck said that despite
the lack of! confrontations in


the camp's two-month run, he
was realistic about what must
happen.
"I. have no illusions that
everybody is going to leave,"
Beck said in an interview
with the Times. "We antici-
pate that we will have to make
arrests."
But he added, "We certain-
ly will not be the first ones to
apply force."
Ue Daniels, 21, said as an
artist he's "as nonviolent as
they come" but he planned
on resisting removal any way
he could.
'I think well comply as
far,as putting our tents on
the sidewalk maybe, that's
something that's been going
around."
But as far as leaving alto-
gether?
"They would probably
have to drag me away," he
said.


Inmate condemns

governor for reprieve


Associated Pres
SALEM, C
demned inm
scheduled to
next moithi
Gov. John K
giving him
saying the
didn't have
carry out th
Two-time
Gary Hauge
tarily :given
challenges,
wants to be
protest of a'
tice system
. brbken. Bu
ion Tuesda
won't allow
executed wl
office, callii
death pena
"conpromis
uitable."
But in
inter view.
(CAStatesman
Friday, Haq
-Ki thaber.
'"l feel h


,,
s cowboy," he said. "He
)re. A con-couldn't pull the trig-
Late who was ger
abe executed'- Haugen's criticism
is slammingreverses his earlier praise
is slarrming 'of Kitzhaber's decision
pit berfr 'during an interview with
a reprieve The, Oregonian. He told
e. governor the. Portland newspa-
e execution per that Kitzhaber cited
Smurdier some of the same criti-
n had volin- cism of the death penalty
nu his legal that Haugen has raised..
up hisgal After 'further reflec-
saying.cut e tion, Haugen said: he
xcriminalted in came to the conclusion
c'imivaljus- that the governor "basi-
het Kitzhber a call pulled. 4 coward's
SKsaid' he move" by 'acting on. his
any .: e personal beliefs instead
anyone to be of carrying out the will of
il he is in Oregon voters, who rein-
na -regon's
n Osregon'se stated 'the death penalty
ty~isheme i in 1984.
ed and ieq- .Haugen said he learned
Telephone ofthe reprieve when he
a telephone was:.summohed.fromian
with na,:e nautdo,: e-exercise!,break
Journal, on'
Jgen mocked at the state penitentiary
genmocked and allowed to read the
.e's a paper governor's statement.


OPENER: Lighting at Olustee Park starts holiday

Continued From Page LA
Gateway City Big Band pres-
ent providing the music..
Then less than 15 min-'
utes later, a police siren was
heard -in the distance and
shortly thereafter,- Santa
Claus, arrived in the Polar
Express which drew a huge
ovation from more than 300
people who were in the park
- many who had. children ,
lined up to see Santa in his
workshop.
Mandi Mella and son
Caleb, 3, were at the begin-
ning of the line that had
formed to-see Santa Claus.
Mella .said they had been
waiting in line for mbre than
three hours in anticipation of
seeing Santa Claus. ..
: We came, walked around "
and listened to all the up
and, coming Yiupical art-
ists' here," she said. "This
is our fist timeicdming to
the lighting ceremony and
,we wanted to see what was
like. We lvpe,liying here and
hopefully we can make this
a tradition. It's been fun so TONY BRrrTllake Cit Reporter
far." Santa Claus.talks to a youngster as he makes his way to his "workshop" in Olustee Park.


One U.S.

student

returns

to home

-By KATHY MATHESON
Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA At'
least one ofthreeAimerican-
students arrested during
protests in Cairo arrived;
back in the U.S. Saturday
evening, nearly three-days
after an Egyptian court
ordered their release.
,Gregory Porter, 19, was
greeted by his 'parents
Sand other relatives when
' he landed at Philadelphia
International Airport' He
and two other U.S. stu-
dents had been arrested
on the roof of a.univer-
sity"building near Cairo's
iconic Tahrir Square last
Sunday after officials
accused thrm of throw-
ing firebombs at.security
forces fighting with. pro-
testers.
Porter took nio ques-
tions at the airport, but
said he was thankful for
the help he and the other
two young men received
from the U.S. Embassy in
Cairo,' administrators at
the university they were
attending and attorneys in
Egypt and the U.S.
"I'm. just so thaik-
ful to be back, to be in
Philadelphia right now,"
said Porter, who is' from
nearby Glenside, Pa., and
attends Drexel University
in Philadelphia.
Luke Gates, 21, and
Derrik Sweeney, 19,
left the Egyptian capital
Saturday morning on sep-
arate connecting flights
Sto Frankfurt, Germany,
an airport official in Cairo
said. The three were
studying at the American
University in' Cairo.


CYBER: Local shopping still big thing in computer worldMonday

Continued From Page I


mostly we'll buy everything
here in town and Columbia
County."
And' merchants in Lake
,City aren't necessarily wor-
ried about online sales hurt-
ing business, whatever the
long-term trend.
Candy Douglas, manager
of the J.C, Penney store at
the Lake City Mall, said more
customers are using technol-


ogyto help there choose mer-
chandise.
Iouglas said many cus-
tomers use smart phones to
download coupons that can
be scanned by-a cashier for a
discount,
"Its really 'nice because
you can get the coupon over
the phone," Douglas said.
"Everybody's doing that
now."


The J.C. Penney website
is a tool used by store staff
to order merchandise that
might not be available in the,
Lake City location, Douglas
said.
"Online is good because it
helps promote sales in the
store," she said.
Will Batte, manager of the
Belk store in Lake City, said
most of his customers who go


REPORTER: Kicking off annual drim


Continued From Page 1A
ated in 2008 by the newspaper, targets
the time frame between Thanksgiving and
.Christmas when food supplies are scatre,
but demand from needy families reaches
some of the highest levels of the year."
All the food collected during the drive
:will be given to the Florida Gateway Food
Bank, which serves Columbia and sur-
rounding counties.-
"This is a very important event to the
community," Brown said. "We call on the
businesses to help ps fill up the truck. We
had nine pallets of food that we took over
to the food bank last year."
'The collection drive will take place Npv.
28 Dec. 10.
Residents are asked to donate non-per-
ishable food items such as canned goods,
boxed goods and crackers. Meats and other


perishable items should not be donated.
Brown said any business wishing to have
a collection box placed at their establish-
ment can call the Lake City Reporter, 752-
1293, and a company representative will
be happy to bring a collection box to the
business and pick it up at the conclusion of
the food drive.
The last day to bring food to the office'
will be 5 p.m. Dec. 9. The food will be
stored at the Lake City Reporter office,
until Dec. 10, when it's taken to the food
bank.
Cash donations will also be accepted dur-
ing the food drive. Checks can be made pay-
able to: The Florida Gateway Food Bank.
"Last year we collected $1,000,to help
the needy and we also had a little over
4,000 pounds of food," Brown said.


PUBLIC NOTICE
Does your insurance company, Medicare or Medicaid
require you to' switch to mail-order prescriptions?
Call us. We can help.


pharmacy


Baya East
780 SE Baya Dr.
386.755.6677


Baya West
1465 W. US Hwy. 90
386.755.2233


online at his company's web-
site are checking 'out mer-
chandise prior to shopping.
"Most of our customers
who shop online do it for
research and come into the
store to buy the items;" he
said.
SBatte said he doesn't have
many customers who use
smart phones to research
prices and merchandise.


"Our business does not
thrive off mobile shopping,"
he said.
Jessica Smith, manager of
Ithe Lowe's store in Lake City,
said her business typically
doesn't compete, with online
businesses..
"We do have more Internet
sales on Monday," she said.
Dennille Folsom, direc-
tor of the Lake City/


Columbia County Chamber
of Commerce, said Cyber
Monday does not have a big
impact on Christmas shop-
ping in the area.
"I think the majority of peo-
ple in Lake City want to shop
locally," she said. "This is the
busiest:time of year for the
chamber."
One local shopper noted an
added benefit to shopping in
person rather than online.
"You get to meet other peo-
ple, talk to cashiers and get to
see the latest stiff in person,
rather than look at pictures,"
Jami Miller said Saturday.
"I had one employee that
was able to tell me 'Merry
Christmas' and that was awe-
some."
Tony Britt contributed reporting
to this story;


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OPINION


SundayNovember 27, 20 II


OUR
OPINION



Help us


help out


1l year long we
report on the gen-
erosity of others.
Now its our turn
to help.:
The fourth annual "Let's Fill
It Up" Comimunity Food Drive,
sponsored by this newspaper,
starts tomorrow.
Lending a hand is easy.
Bring your non-perishable
food items to our offices at 180
:E. Duval St, or leave donations
for your carrier to pick up Dec.
40.
SEither way, the local food
'iank gets replenished and area
families are less likely to go
hungry for the holidays'..
,* The timing of our efforts :
intentional. ,
STurns out relatively few
-people'donate to food banks
between Thanksgiving and
Christmas -Ijust when the need
1p greatest.'
' Help us help our friends and
ieghbors, won't youi? ,
Last year we collected
roughly two tons of food. Not
much compared to Eagle Scout
Jeremy Barwick's heroic effort,
but a fair amount just the sam e.
Still, we'd like to do even bet-
ter.this time around.
With your help, we will:
And we'll all be better for it

SH I G:H L G HTS
IN .H I S7TO RY
Today is Sunday, Nov. 27, the
331st day of 2011. There are 34
.days left in the year. _. .
Today's Highlight in History:

On Nov. 27, 1910, New York's
Pennsylvania Station officially
opened as itbecame fully opera-
tional with regular through train
service from the Pennsylvania
Railroad.

On this date:

In 1942, during World War II,
the French navy at Toulon scut-
tled its ships and submarines to
keep them out of the hands of
German troops.

In 1953, playwright Eugene
'O'Neill died in Boston at age 65.

S Associated Press


Lake City, Reporter
SServing Columbia County
Since. 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pide for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

L ETT ERS
POLICE Y
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed'
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters. must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Losing sight of


American exceptionalism


. he Pew Research
Center has provided
some timely food for
thought as we enter
our traditional holi-
day season.
A According to a recent report
comparing attitudes in.Europe
and America, only 49 percent
of Americans now feel that
American -culture is superior to
others. This is down from 60
percent in 2002.
For those that may find thi
troubling, there is more reason
for concern in that only 37 per-.
cent of young Americans, aged
18 to 29, say American culture
is superior.
What.the study does not'
examine is what we mean by:
culture :
I happened to hear a discus-
sion on one of the cable shows
about this report, and the dis-
cussants were bewailing the
prevalence of reality shows, Kim
Kardashian, and Facebook.
But I think this is a misread-
ing of culture. Culture is about
the prevailing core:attitudes of
a society. And, when we look'
further into this same study,
we find that American attitudes
are distinctly different from
their European counterparts
anrd that'these attitudes very
Such reflect what is uniquely-
American.
For instance, 58 percent of
Americans feel that individual
;freedom is more important than
government "guarantees that
nobody is in need." Only 36 per-
cent of French and 36 percent
of Germans feel this way.
Only 36 percent of Americans'
agree that success is largely
determined by "forces outside
our control." But 72 percent
of Germans and 57 percent of


Star Parker
Sparker@urbdncure:org
French agree with this.
SAnd 50 percent of Americans
'believe religion is very impor-
tant in contrast to 21 percent
-in Germany and 13 percent in
France.
Americans are distinct from
Europeans in our beliefs in the
importance ofindividual free- -
dom of personal responsibility
and religious faith.
Can it be an accident that
'these valuesthat are so preva-
lent in American culture today
are in line with the principles
stated in the nation's founding
document 235 years ago? That
our Creator endowed us with
rights to life, liberty, and the
pursuit.of happiness and 'That
'to secure these rights govern-
ments are instituted anong .
men."
Distinctly American is our
credo, but also that being
American is defined by free
choice and a set of principles
rather than bliid circumstance
of geography or genetics.
To point to the fact that
American.culture is distinct
does not necessarily prove that
it is better.
Is it?
Considering economic per-
formance, there is little com-
parison between our nation and
SEurope. Per capital GDP, the
economic output per each indi-
vidual in the country, is $47,200


in the United States' compared
to $32,700 in Europe.
The average per capital GDP
in the European Union is less
than that of America's poorest
state, Mississippi ($32,764).
SOne hint that there might
be something special going on
here is that our problem seems
to be limiting the number'of
people that want to come in,
rather than preventing people
,from escaping.,
.According to the State
Department, more than 5 mil-
lion people, are now waiting to
. immigrate to the United States
in various family and employ-
ment categories
Although Anmerican attitudes
are distinct, they are changing
and trending in the direction of
Europe. So, if you think this is a
problem, and I do, there is rea-
son for concern.
I consider my own experi-
ences and know that nowhere
else in the world could I live the
life I have been living.
SWhere else could a young"
black mother on welfare con-
clude she was on the wrong
path, walk away from it, get her
degree, build a business and
a don-profit organization that
includes on its'board of advisers
a former U.S. senator and attor-
ney general of the United States
and a former counselor to the
president of the United States
and U.S. attorney general?
SMy work is inspired by my
conviction that America is truly
exceptional and I pray every
day that we do not lose our way.
Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition
on Urban Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


Humpty Dumpty contest begins


Dumpty-like con-
test under way,
sponsored by the '
Pentagon's futuristic
brain trust, which wants to find
a way to piece back together
the remnants of shredded docu-
ments found in war zones.
Since the Defense Advanced
Research Projects Agency
announced the "Shredder
Challenge" Oct. 27, more than
8,000 teams or individuals have
signed up to try their hand
at what some are calling the
Mother of All Jigsaw Puzzles.


LETTERS


Lisa Hoffman
lisahdffman@shns.com
The prize: $50,000.
The purpose of the exercise is
far from frivolous. Troops often
discover documents shred-
ded by the enemy to protect
sensitive information, making


reconstruction a task of poten-
tial high value that could save
lives, DARPA says. A key part of
the puzzle is coming up with a
method simple and fast enough
for soldiers in the field to use.
Contestants are encouraged
to engage whatever techniques
they can think of from com-
puter algorithms to high-resolu-
tion photography and crowd
sourcing and beyond.
. The winners will be
announced the week of Dec. 5
(www.shredderchallenge.com).
* Scripps Howard News Service


TO THE EDITOR


JEA should use river water instead


To the Editor:

I find it interesting that the
people who control the water in
Florida feel we can pump cool
water out of the aquifer to cool
electric plants and put in the
river. Why not use river water.
If river water is used to cool the
electric plants it could be cycled
back into the river banks.


The reason I question this
use is simple, because I like
nature. In the past I would ride
through North Florida to look
at the rivers, lakes and springs.
Today many of those springs
have dried up and there is little
water in the Suwannee and
other rivers. Surrounding lake
beds now have docks without
any water close to them at all.


Some of those docks' tops were
eight feet off the lake bottom.
I enjoy drinking water and
bathing to be clean. If these lev-
els continue to drop will there
be enough water for human
consumption and other usage
for our basic needs?

Irv Crowetz
Lake City


4A


,ANOTHER


ANOTHER
VIEW '



Chu'd


out

I f only the administra-
tion's Solyndra scandal
were a garden-variety
case of crony-capital-
ist payback to political '
.supporters. Its much worse,
as President Obama's energy
policy is fixated on solving the
supposed global-warming crisis,
regardless of the economic cost
Energy Secretary Steven Chu
traveled to Capitol Hill on Nov.
17 to defend his decision to poiu
$535 million into the ill-fated,
Solyndra, which filed for bank-.
ruptcy in August. He denied .
that his order was "based on
political considerations" and told
lawmakers the United States
must compete for business
in an $80 billion clean-energy ,
market that is expected to grow
by hundreds of billions in com-
ing decades. "We are.in a fierce;.
global race to capture this mar-,
ket," he argued.
Then Mr. Chu pointed an
envious finger at Beijing. The ,
China Development Bank has .
extended credit lines of more
than $34 billioAto Chinese
solar companies, he lamented, .,-
but Congress has appropriated..:
only $10 billion to backstop ,.,
the Energy Departments loan-.
.program. The energy secretary,
concluded his testimony, saying,
"When it comes to theclean- ,
S-energy race, America faces
a simple choice: Compete or
accept defeat I believe we can
and must compete."
;What Mr. Chu didn't mention.
is the "clean" energy market
is an artificial one built upon
an unsound theory. It posits ...
that combustion of the.carbona-
based fuels that power modern
civilization is elevating levels
of atmospheric carbon dioxide,
trapping heat and cooking the .
planet's biosphere. Whats miss-
ing in this scary tale is the link
between cause and effect. If an
increase in carbon dioxide from
human activity causes rising
temperatures, then the warming
trend should have accelerated
as industrialization has spread.'
It hasn't ,
Global warming, renamed
"climate change" to downplay
the embarrassing absence of
actual warming, is an article of';
faith, not a product of science. It
appeals to utopians who believe
human beings are defiling an
otherwise pure planet The
idea is to impose restrictions :
on conventional power sources'
and to favor antiquated sources-
of energy like windmills as if :;
reversing the effects of civili- :'
zation will somehow restore.
Earth's equilibrium. For those
who buy into this, Solyndra wa:
just a temporary setback.
Mr. Obama used his
-Australian visit last week to :
reaffirm his adherence to the :
global warming credo: "I share
the view of... most scien-
tists in the world that climate-
change is.a real problem and::
that human activity is contrib-.:
uting to it, and that we all have
a responsibility to find ways to:
reduce our carbon emissions."
As he did so, China was woo-
ing TransCanada with an offer.:
to buy the oil that Mr. Obama:
refused when he blocked
construction of the Keystone
XL pipeline the week before.
While Mr. Chu covets China's:;
trendy energy subsidies, .
Beijing has the good sense to
pursue real fuel sources.
An artificial solar and wind
energy market propped up by::
ideology rather than econom-
ics is destined to collapse,
taking taxpayer funds with
it. It doesn't have to be that
way. Americans stand upon
the world's most expansive
reservoirs of affordable, con- .'
ventional energy resources.
The nation can no longer


afford the policies of Steven :
Chu and Barack Obama that
keep domestic energy sources-:
off-limits.
* Washington Times









Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Nov. 28

The Fort White FFA
Chapters will be holding
their 3rd Annual Poinsettia
sale starting Monday,
November 28 with pick
up on December 2 after
3:30 at Fort White High
School Agriscience
department Delivery is
available if needed. The
poinsettias are the "Red
Velvet" variety and are .
approximately 18" in
height The poinsettias are
being sold for $9.00 per
plant with a foil wrapper or
$12.00 per plant with a foil
wrapper and bow. Please
contact Mrs. Jill Huesman


at 497 5952 to place your
order. The Fort White FFA
Chapters thank you for
your support!


Nov. 30
LEC activity
Shirley Bethel performs
at 11 a.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The cen-
ter is located at 628 S.E:
Allison Court

* Dec. 2
Community theater
Community Theater,


130 NE first St. in High
Springs, will perform the
Frank Capra classic "It's a
Wonderful Life" weekends
from Dec. 2 until Dec.
18. This year done in the
style that has become a
High Springs tradition,
as a staged Radio Show.
With all of your favorite
characters on stage, this
year promises to be must
see. Don't miss this heart
warming family enter-
tainment Shows will be
Friday and Saturdays at
8 p.m. and Sundays at 2
p.m. Tickets are available
in High Springs at.The
Coffee Clutch (386-454-
7593), in Lake City at The
Framery (386-754-2780),


on line at highspringscom-
munitytheater.com and at
the door.
Dec. 3
Toy ride
The 10th annual Dream
machine Toy Ride will
be Dec. 3 at 10 a.m..at
Rountree Moore Toyota
in Lake City. Bring a new,
unwrapped toy or cash
donation for the Christmas
Dream Machine. Also
bring a nonperishable food
item to donate. Thewe will
be an after party at the
fairgrounds with barbecue
-and local band, Scattergun.
Call (386)362-6529.


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com. .


Blank-Fest Florida
Rockstar Lounge, 723
East Duval St. in Lake
City, will host Blank-Fest '
Florida on Dec. 3. at 6 p.m.
Admission is one blanket
that will be donated to the
homeless. There will be
several bands performing
and raffles.

Dec. 7

Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Sept. 14
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409


SW St. Johns St across
from Aquatics Center.
Dec. 15
Cooking show
The annual Celebrate
the Seasons Cooking
show on Dec. 15 from
6 to 9 p.m. The event
is a sampling of dishes
prepared by guest chefs.'
The cost is $15 per ticket
and includes drinks and
appetizers prior to the
show. It is sponsored
by the Woman's Club of
Lake City. Call 755-0347
for information.


Columbia County

Girl Scouts look

to 'Rock the Mall'


Submitted
Columbia County Girl
Scout troops 17, 163, 332,
525 & 926 are having a
rummage sale and bake
sale on Saturday, December
3, from 7 a.m.. to noon at
Monet & Me on W U.S.
Highway 90, just West of
Sunbelt Chrysler. If you
would like to donate items
for this cause please bring
them to Monet & Me Friday,
December 2 between 5:30
and 9 p.m.
SThis is to raise funds for:
their trip to Washington,-
D.C., in June, 2012, for the
100th Anniversary of Girl
Scouts of the U.SA. sing-
along. The aim is to "Rock
the Mall.";
Here's some information


from the "Rock the Mall"
Facebook page:
Since the Girl Scout
movement was founded
in 1912 by Juliette Gordon
Low, we have used-songs
to celebrate friendship and
Express our commitment to
girls' leadership. The Girl
,Scouts have a long tradi-
,tion of holding aSing-Along
...on the National Mall. We
gathered for the 85th, 90th
and 95th anniversary.
Over 250,000 Girl Scouts
have lined the National
Mall.and sung some of our
favorite Girl Scout songs,
listened to the music and
joined together to celebrate
the strength of the Girl
Scout movement Become
a part of the tradition!


COURTESY PHOTO


Scene from a previous sing-along at the National Mall in Washington, D.C.


OMNI, Altrusa partner to help needy kids
-.'i.)' 1 "~~C '4~u


S.


LAKE CITY-COLUMBIA COUNTY

, CHAMBER
BELONG ENGAGE LEAD a PROSPER


I-,
U


. *


THINK


Employees of Omni Home Care were moved to action after reading a recent article in the
Lake City Reporter about a "back pack" program in the school system for children that might
not have food readily available. OMNI partnered with the local chapter of Altrusa International
to help support the school back pack program. Attached is a picture of the food collected with
Amy Femandes, OMNI Administrator (from-left); Joy Lizotte, Lake City Altrusa International
President; and LeAnne Fair, OMNI Sr Liaison and Altrusa member.


Florida Tax Payers
please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous fallacy
of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia High
School, and Fort White High School students and alumni. All of them
are offspring of Adam and his female wife Eve and therefore are created
by God, in the image'of God. (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biqlogy 1
End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specifications, page 32 SC7.L.15.1;
page 52 SC.912.L.15.10
http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf
I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com
In The Year of our Lord 2011
Paid for by Kenny Merriken


EVMKUUITY


FIRST


*


...
SI .
%(kI-

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Lake City Reporter:
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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


. -"-

S76/59 ..

70/44 i7/
71/54.


NATIONAL FORECAST: A frontal boundary extending from the Great Lakes to the Gulf Coast
will be responsible for a widespread region of precipitation today. Look for showers for por-
Stions of the Northeast and upper Midwest, with the chance of heavier rain extending across
the Ohio River Valley to the southern Mississippi River Valley.


I~oWESTLYI


, MOSTLY
I SUNNY



HI 70 LO 38


'. % A- : ,I.


--79/5- -. asonvie
L.ake C* 76/63
79/58
Glidesie Daytona Beac
.80/60 79N,64
Ocaa l
82/61 *
Orlando CaptC
82/62 79


82/6


0
FL Myrsi,
83/65


West Pan
79/T
Ft. Laud
81/'
*Naples
'81/67


*
Key West
80/72


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


80
51
72
48
84 In 1973
22 in 1950


0.00"
1.47"
On7A


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunnse torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrse tom.
Moonset torm.


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
d Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Danaveral
a/67 Lake City
6 Miami
Naples
l Beah Ocala
73 a Orlando
erdalJ Panama City
71 0 Pensacola
STallahassee
Miami Tampa
81/72 Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


7:06 a.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:07 a.m.
5:30 p.m.


9:28 a.m.
8:09 p.m.
10:17 a.m.
9:13 p.m.


5

30 liumbs 10um
Today's
ultraviolet
radiabon nsk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
ANVbak


1.85"
45 Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec.
2 10 17 24
First Full Last New
+J


Monday
73.55' h
74/55/r
82/65/sh
78/63/sh
73/46/sh
S73/48/r
80/72/pC
70/40/sh
80/66/sh
76/62/sh
75/51/sh
75/55/r'
64/38/r-
57/43/pc
67/37/r
73/59/r
70/37/r
79/65/sh


Tuesday
70 53, pc
69/47/pc
73/58/s
72/51/s
67/39/s
65/45/s
77/65/pc
68/38/s
74/60/s
70/55/s
67/42/s
68/47/pc
64/41/s
65/42/s
65/37/s
72/49/s
63/37/s
71/59/s


E H
Am easxsl
serni



wa fldgMr
by


a I -HH- 1

Forecasts, data and
graphics 2011 Weather
Central, LP, Madison, Wsb.
www.weatherpubllsher.con


CITY
Albany NY
Albuquerque.
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore 2
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinatl
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


CITY-
Acapulco
SAmsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Being
Berln
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinkl
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
60!32/0
4 /38.0
I1 -1 02
69. 50 0
,70/36/0
40/26/60
74/57'0
36 29 0
45,'26.'0
62/48,,0
56/48/0
2, 45 0
67. 33.0
7Q. 39, 0
28/19/0
55 52 .11
67/37/0
63 48 0
70/371/0
66,52! 06
78'66/0
38 23'0


Today
HI/Lo/W
58/47/s
55/29/s
16, 13'sn
66 48'r
64, 52.; c
62; 37/s
63,'43, t
49 30 pC
.49,35/s
57/50,s
57/4 '/sh
75 63 pc
66 52.sr.
65, 53. c
57/36/s'
40 34 st
59,.43'sh
56,42, sh
72,57/pc
54/32/s
79.64/s
64, 37,s


CITY
Des MoInes
Detroit
El Paso
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile -
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pop. HI/Lo/W CITY
55/39/09 39/25/s Omah
63,'46/0 53,'32sh rdamn
56/43M0 61,'35,s Phila
S6.-26 0 15 -23 c.: Phoen
67/40/0 67,53/pc Pittsb
62/32/0 62,4 7/s Portla
81/72/0 81/68/s Portia
70.61/ 86 57 36 Pc Raleli
65/51/0 51, 37.'sp Rapid
72/58/ 04 55..36ish Reno
78/57!0 76/63/s Rlchn
55,41. 81 42,25 pc Sacra
. 64,46 0 70,45 s St.Lo
66,57, 50 47,32;sn Salt L
71/40/0 76/50/s San A
73-60,0 49/35/r San D
82/71/0 '81, 2 pc San F
50/42/.08 34,26,'s Seatt
78/57/0 65/41/i Spoka
78/68/.01. 58/43/sh Tamps
65/50.0 65'52. s Tuco
59,46. 18 50,'27. Washl


Saturday Today


a
So
lelphia
iix
urgh
ad ME
nd OR
gh
City
nond
mento
Ulls
ake City
Antonlo
ilego
rancisco
le

on
Ington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
51, 39.'0
81,'60/0
65. 39. 0
;2. 4. 1:1
60/44, 0
59.35, 0
51/46/0
70/39/0
39. 31,0
49/26/0
70/37/0
52, 41 0 ,
64'56 01
41 I23,0
70/57/1.08
72,'49.0
58,49. 0
46 41. 02
38/30/0
81/63/0
67.4]1'0
60, 39, 0


HI/Lo/W
41/21/s
82/62/pc
63.51 pc
;5 47, s
59/48/sh
52/43/pc
52/40/,r
68/54/pc
57. 27,oc
61, 32 pc
68,'52/oc
65. 4 I, ig
41,33.'c
5., 3f pc
59/32/s
85,'52,
65,49,. pc
51 39.
48/30/sh.
82/65/pc
73'45's
64, 51, c


a
~aturaay roasy satumay aoaay aaturaay


saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
84/75/0
54,'43/0
51146,/0
64.57:0
45/27 0
46,39,' 02
88/59/0
S3;54. 0
46./28/0
81/61i0
45/36,,0
75 70 0
88/73/0


Toaay
HI/Lo/W
86/71/pc
54 ,43'sh
58,43/s
67, 59,
50/31' '
50,'40/pc
91/70/c
67 55 sn
52;2 7,,pc
82,'63/;h
45/37/r
80 70 s
88 77/sh


CITY
La Paz
Lma
London-
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
63/39/0
75. 64/0
55:45/0
59 37,0
66/52/0
48,'45/0
36'34,'0
72, 61, 0
84/7,3,'0
79.'57/0
41/36/0'.
88/75/0
48-37 0


loaay
HI/Lo/W
63/40/sh
74,64, pc
55/36/sh
59/36/s
61/43/'sh
50/48,'sh
35/31,'rs
74'63,in
82 71,'pc
80/60/s
39/30.,rs
84, 73 1
53.'41.c


'CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


aaturaay
/HI/Lo/Pcp.
82/75/22
64.145,0
85,'76 01
84, 74 0
84/57'0
52.32,'0
90/79/0
S82.660.u
66.48 0
57 46,0
55;,48/0
46, 28, 0
45.36 05


Tooay
HI/Lo/W'
76/72/1
65/43/,
83/77/t
82/75/t
80.51's
61,50/c
88/76/t,
'80/63/s
.67/50/s
63/50/c
55/39/sh,
49/34/s
43/37'sh


KEY TO CONDmONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy..


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THE WEATHER


--` -'-- -- -- ''I --u


TUESDAY


THUSI


2 sUDA


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LAKE CrTYALMANAC :UV INDEX


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@oakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Sunday, November 27, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS


Workout class
at Richardson
A Bodies in Motion
exercise class is
planned at Richardson
Community Center at
6 p.m. Tuesday. The
instructor is Trevita
Riley. The class is for all
ages and genders. The
first class is free. If there
is interest for ongoing
classes, a fee ($7 has
been proposed) will be
charged. .
For details, call Mario
Coppock at 754-7096.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Registration for
Lake City set
Lake City Columbia
County Youth Baseball
-registration for 2012
is available at www.
Icccyb.com beginning
Wednesday. Online
registration is $75 plus
a transaction fee. Onsite
registration is 5-7 p.m. :
Jan.'6, 13 and 20, and
10 am. to 4 p.m. Jan. 7,
14 and 21 at Southside
Sports Complex with a
cost of $80.
For details, call
president Tad Cervantes
at 365-4810.
YOUTH QOLF
Practice group
offered for girls
A golf practice group.
for girls ages 9-17 is
proposed for 4-5 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursdays
at Quail Heights Country
Club. The group is for
girls who want to learn
the game and to develop
Lady Tigers for the CHS
golf program. Fee of $45
will include range balls
during practice, and a
monthly tournament All
aspects of the game will
be covered.
For details, call Chet
Carter at 365-7097.
From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Bradford High,
7 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Lincoln High,
7 p.m. (JV-5) :
Fort White High
girls basketball vs. Baker
County High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Tuesday
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Mosley High
at CYSA field, 7 p.m.
Fort White High
soccer at RK. Yonge
School, 7 p.m. (girls-5) '
Fort White High
basketball at Interlachen
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30)
Columbia High boys
basketball vs. Hamilton
County High, 8 p.m.
Thursday
Fort White High boys
basketball vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday -
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Fort White High
soccer at Keystone
Heights High, 7 p.m.
(girls-5) -
Saturday
Columbia High
wrestling hosts Tiger
Invitational, TBA
Columbia High
soccer at Capital City
Invitational, TBA
Columbia High boys
basketball at Suwannee


High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Broken hearts


for Columbia


'. JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's Tyrone Sands falls on a fumble in the end zone during the third quarter of
the Tigers' playoff loss against Bartram Trail High on Friday:


Seminoles


Tigers fall in final
seconds against
Bartramn Trail.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecltyreporter.com -
This one is supposed to
hurt
That was the -message
delivered to Columbia High
players by head coach Brian
Allen following the Tigers"
27-24 loss against Bartram
Trail High in the Region
1-6A semifinal on Friday.
"I see tears so I know
you're invested," Allen told
the players- after the game.
"I didn't see tears after the
Brooks County game. It
hurts now, because you're
invested."
Much like the regular


beat


up Gators, 21-7


Florida St. makes
it two straight
wins in series.
. By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE -
Devonta Freeman had two
short touchdown ,,runs
following turnovers, and
Florida State beat rival
Florida 21-7 on Saturday
night despite only 95 yards
of offense.
The Seminoles (8-4) were
inept most of the night,
but they took advantage of
John Brantley's first-half
mistakes.
.Florida -State sealed its
second consecutive win
in the once-revered series
when Terrance Parks 'inter-
cepted a pass by Jacoby
Brissett in the fourth quar-
ter and returned it 29 yards
for a.score. -
The Gators (6-6) avoid-
ed their first shutout since
1988 when Brissett found
Quintgn Dunbar for a 6-yard
score with 4:16 remaining.
Brantley. ended the
worst game of his career
in the locker room. He was
sandwiched between two
defenders and sustained an
apparent concussion.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Chris Rainey (1) is taken down by Furman's Colton Keig (79) and Mitch McGrath
(20) during a game on Nov. 19 :


season, Columbia clawed
back when it looked bad
early.
Allen's team started the
year 0-2, but rebounded to
make the playoffs and win
its opening round game
against St. Augustine High.
The Tigers fell into a
24-7. hole on Friday. They
did not give up.
Columbia fell behind 7-0
after. quarterback Nathan
Peterman ran it in from
four yards during the first
quarter.
Five players touched the
ball for Columbia on its
next drive which resulted in
a touchdown. Quarterback
Jayce Barber set up a
Rakeem Battle touch-
down run with a %23yard4
CHS continued on 4B


FROM THE SIDELINES


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lqkecityreportercom'

Jernigan

affects

victory

GAINESVILLE
holding out
hope that it
would be a
classic battle
in the annual Florida-
Florida State game,
that hope was quickly
dismantled by John
Branfley. .
Then, Lake City's
Timmy Jernigan put a hit
on Brantley that ended
any chance Florida had
of pulling out a come-
back in the Seminoles'
21-7 win on Saturday.
The Gators came out
firing, but they weren't
firing on the right
cylinders.
By midway through
the first quarter, Brantley
had thrown his first
interception. It was the
beginning of Florida's
self-destruction.
The Seminoles took
JERNIGAN continued on 4B


Same story for

Celtics, Indians


Fort White falls
35-3 inplayoffs to
Trinity Catholic.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com
OCALA Trinity
Catholic High brought its
"A" game to the Class 3A
regional final with Fort
White High on Friday.
The Indians played better '
than in the first meeting,
but were no match for the
Celtics who defended their
home turf, 35-3.'
Fort White ends the sea-
son 8-4, and with the second
playoff win in the school's
history.
Two of those losses came


against Trinity Catholic
(74), the defending Class
2B state champion which
will play Madison County
High in the state semifinals.
Trinity Catholic held
Fort White to 189 total
yards, matching the season-
low the Celtics laid on the
Indians when they played
Nov. 4. Fifty of those yards
came in the fourth quarter
after Trinity Catholic estab-
lished the final score with
11:40 left in the game.
Fort White took its
chances on three fourth-
and-short tries and gave the
ball up each time. Trinity
Catholic turned all three
attempts into touchdowns,
INDIANS continued on 4B


JASON MATTHEW WALKERLake City Reporter
Fort white High's Trey Phillips (left) works through a stiff-arm to bring down Santa Fe High's
Tray Presley (6) during the Battle for the Paddle on Nov. 11.










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
10:30 am.
SPEED Formula One, Brazilian
Grand Prix,at Sao Paulo
GOLF
9 Lam.
TGC European PGA Tour, South
African Open,final round, atJohannesburg,
(same-day tape)
Noon
TGC-Australian PGA Championship,
final round, at Coolum Beach, Australia
(same-day tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 -. Old Spice Classic, third
place game, .at Orlando
6:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Old Spice Classic,
championship game, at Orlando
9 p.m."
ESPN2 76 Classic, championship
game, at Anaheim, Calif.
NFL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
I 4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Pittsburgh at Kansas City
TENNIS
5 a.m.
ESPN2 ATP World Tour, Finals,
semifinals, at London (delayed tape)
12:30 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP World Tour, Finals,
championship match, at London
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL
2 p.m.
ESPN Baylor at Tennessee

Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPNh2 -- Xavier at Vanderbilt
8:30 p.m.
FSN -'Georgia at Colorado
": NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN --N.Y. Giants at New Orleans
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS --Tampa Bay at Minnesota

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


Ney
N.Y
Buf
Mia


Hoe
,Ten
Jack
Indi


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
wEngland 7 3. 0.700293203
'.Jets 5 5 0.500 228 217
falo 5 5' 01500 237 253
ami 3 7.Q;.3(OGila348&',
South ,-.
W L T Pct PF PA
uston 7 3 0.700273 166
nessee 5 5 0.500203 195
sonvllle 3 7 0.300 125 180
ianapolls 0 10 0.000 131 300
North


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


W L
8 3
S 7 3
6 4
4 6
West
.W L


T' Pct PF PA
0.727272 182
0.700 220 179
0.600 236 195
0.400 145 193

T Pct PF PA


Oakland 6 4 0..600 235
Denver 5 5 0.500205
San Diego 4 6 0.400236
Kansas City 4. 6 0 .400 1442
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington


New Orleans
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
Carolina -


Green Bay
Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota


San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona .
St. Louis


254
247
259
252-


East
W L T Pct PF PA
6 4 0.600 250 206
6 4 0.600228228
4 6 0.400237213
3 7 0 .300 160 205
South
W L TPct PF PA
7 3 .0.700 313228
6 4 0.600235213
4 6 0.400 182 268
2 8 0.200 225 286
North
W L T Pct PF PA
II 0 01.000 382 227.
7 3 0.700268207
7 4 0.636316 246
2 8 0.200200271
West
W L T Pct PF PA
9 2 0.818 262!161
4 6 0.400 168209
.3 7 0.300 190 236
2 8 0.200 120247


Today's Games
Arizona at St. Louis, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Tennessee, I p.m.
Cleveland, at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m
Carolina at Indlinapolis, I pm.
Minnesota at Atlanta. 'I p.m.
Chicago at OaldaAd, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Seattle, 4.05 pn. 't
Denver at San Diego, 4.15 p.m
New England at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Kansas City, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday's Game
Philadelphia at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 4
Kansas City at Chicago, I p.m.
Atlanta at Houston, I p.m.
Denver. at Minnesota, I p.m.
Carolina at Tampa Bay, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets atWashington, I p.m. '
Oakland at Miami, I p.m.
Tennessee at Buffalo, I p.m.
Indianapolis at New England, I p.m.
Baltimore at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Arizona,.4:15- p.m.
Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 4:15 pFm.
Detroit at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.

College scores

Friday
Bowling Green 42, Buffalo 28
Temple 34, Kent St 16
WestVirginia 21, Pittsburgh 20
Boston College 24, Miami 17
LSU 41,Arkansas 17


Louisville 34, South Florida 24
UCF 31,UTEP 14
N. Illinois 18, E. Michigan 12
Nebraska 20, Iowa 7
Toledo 45. Ball St. 28
W. Michigan 68,Akron 19
Houston 48,Tulsa 16
Colorado 17, Utah 14
California 47,Arizona St. 38

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 13 Alabama vs.VCU, 9:30 p.m.
No. 17 Pittsburgh vs. Robert Morris,
5 p.m.
No. 21 Missouri vs. Binghamton,
3 p.m.
No. 24 Mississippi State vs. North
Texas, 2:30 p.m.

Florida 107,
Jacksonville 62

At Gainesville
JACKSONVILLE (2-3)
D. Graham 1-5 3-4 5, G. Powell 0-4
1-2 I,R. Powell 6-9 2-4 15, Davis 1-3 0-1
3, McDougald 5-14 0-0 12, Bogus 0-5 0-0
0, E. Graham 0-1 0-0 0,Jeffers 4-7 0-1 8,
Cabell 3-7 I-I 7, Sahbegovic 0-0 2-2 2,
Galvin 2-4 0-244, Geisler 2-3 0-0 S.Totals
24-62 9-17 62.
FLORIDA (4-1)
Yeguete 4-7 0-0 8, Young 6-9 2-5 14,
Boynton 6-12 6-9 22, Walker 6-9 7-8
21, Beal 5-8 4-5 15, Rosario 4-11 1-2.
12,Wilbekin 2-6 0-2 5, Prather 2-3 2-4
6, Larson 1-1 0-0 2, Pitchford I-I 0-0 2.
Totals 37-67 22-35 107.
Halftime-Florida 58-38. 3-Point
Goals-Jacksonville 5-15 (McDougald
2-6, Geisler 1-2, R. Powell 1-2, Davis
1-2, Galvin 0-1, Bogus 0-2), Florida
11-25 (Boynton 4-7, Rosario 3-9,Walker"
2-4, Wilbekin 1-2, Beal 1-3). Fouled
Out-None. Rebounds-Jacksonville 35
(D. Graham 6); Florida 46. (Beal, Yeguete,
Young 9). Assists--acksonville 8 (Cabell,
McDougald 2), Florida 20 (Walker 6).
Total Fouls-Jacksonville 22, .Florida 18.
A-10,033.

Harvard 46, FSU 41

PARADISE ISLAND, Bahamas
Braridyh Curry had six points, five'
assists, and five steals'to help Harvard top
No. 22 Florida State 46-41 on Friday in
the semifinals of the Battle 4 Atlantis. I
Oliver McNally had a game-high nine
points for the Crimson (5-0).
The Seminoles (5-1) missed their first
15 shots. Michael Snaer led the way for
Florida State with seven points.'
The halftime score was 14-14..

AUTO RACING

Nationwide winners
Feb 19 -'bRIVE4COPD 300 (Tnhy'
Stewart)
Feb. 26 Bashas' Supermarkets 200
(Kyle Busch)
March 5-- Sam's Town 300 (Mark
Martin) .
March 19 Scotts EZ Seed 3001
(Kyle Busch)
March 26 Royal Purple 300 (Kylet
Busch)
April .8 O'Reilly Auto Parts 300
(Carl Edwards)
,April 16 -Aaron's 312 (Kyle Busch)
April 23 Nashville 300 (Carl
Edwards)
April 29 BUBBA burger 250
(Denny Hamlin)
May -- Royal Purple .200. (Kyle
Busch) ; ,
May 14,- 5-hoJir ENERGY 200 (Carl
Edwards)
May 22 Iowa John Deere Dealers'
250 (Ricky Stenhouse Jr.)
May 28 Top Gear 300 (Matt
Kenseth)
June 4 STP 300 (Justin Allgaler)
June 18 Alliance Truck Parts 250;
(Carl Edwards)
June 25 Bucyrus 200 (Reed.
Sorensqn) ..
July I SubwayJalipeno 250 Powered
By. Coca-Cola (Joey Logan)
July 8 FeedlThe Children 300.(Brad
Keselowski)
SJuly ,16 New England 200 (Kyle
Busch) : .
July 23- Federated Auto Parts 300
(Carl Edwards)
July 30 -: Kroger 200 (Brad
Keselowski)
Aug. 6 U.S. Cellular 250 (Ricky
Stenhouse Jr.)
Aug. 13 Zippo 200 at The Glen
(Kurt Busch)
Aug. 20 NAPA Auto Parts 200
(Marcos Ambrose)
Aug. 26 Food City 250 (Kyle
Busch) .. .. ..
SSep. 3 -- Great Clips 300 (Carl
Edwards) '' '



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each 'square,
to formfour ordinary words.

I DUIMH I


Sep. 9 -Virginia 529-College Savings
250 (Kyle Busch)
Sep. 17- Dollar General 300 Powered
By Coca-Cola (Brad Keselowski)
Oct. I OneMain Financial 200 (Carl
Edwards)
Oct. 8 Kansas Lottery 300 (Brad
Keselowski)
Oct. 14 Dollar General 300 Miles
of Courage (Carl Edwards)
Nov. 5 O'Reilly Auto Parts
Challenge (Trevor Bayne)
Nov. 12 Wypall 200 (Sam Hornish
Jr.) .
Nov. 19 -- Ford 300 (Brad
Keselowski)
Points final
I. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 1,222.
2. Elliott Sadler, I,177.
3.JustinAllgaier, 1,105.
4.AricAlmirola, 1,095.
5. Reed Sorenson, 1,062.
6.Jason Leffler, 1,028.
7. Kenny Wallace, 963.
8. Brian Scott, 947.
9. Michael Annett,944. ,
10. Steve Wallace, 921.

Camping World winners

Feb. 18 NextEra Energy Resources
250 (Michael Waltrip), :
Feb. 2l- Lucas Oil 150 (Kyle Busch)
March 12- Too Tough To Tame 200
(Kasey Kahne) ;K ;
April 2 Kroger 250 (Johnny
Sauter)-
April 22 Bully Hill Vineyards 200
(Kyle Busch)
May. 13 -- Lucas Oil 200 (Kyle
Busch)
May 20 North Carolina Education
Lottery 200 (Kyle Busch)
June 4 OReilly Auto Parts 250
(Clint Bowyer)
Juhe 10 WinStar World Casino
400k (Ron Hornaday Jr.)
July 7 UNOH 225 (Kyle Busch)
July 16 Coca-Cola 200 (Matt
Crafton)
July 22 Lucas Deep Clean 200
(Austin Dillon) -
July 29 AAA Insurance 200
(Timothy Peters),
Aug. 6 Good Sam RV Emergency
Road Service-125 (Kevin Harvick)
Aug. 20 -VFW 200 (Kevin Harvick)
Aug. 24 O'Reilly 200 (Kevin
Harvick)
Sep. 2 Good Sam Club 200 (Ron
Hornadiy Jr.)
Sep. 16 Fast Five 225 (Austin
Dillon)
Sep. 24 F.W Webb 175 .(lyle
B(isch) ,
Oct. I Kentucky 225 (Ron
HornadayJr.)
Oct. 15 Smith's 350 (Ron Hornaday
Jr.)
Oct. 22 Coca-Cola 250 Powered
by Fred's (Mike Wallace) .
Oct. 29 Kroger 200 (Denny
Hamlin)
Nov.4-.WirStarWorld Casino 350k
(Kevin Harvick)
SNdv-I8:.- Ford:200 (|Jhnty.Sauter)
Pointsfinali
1.Austin Dillon, 888.
2. Johnny Sauter, 882.
3.James Buescher,859.
4. Ron Hornaday Jr. 838.
S.Timothy Peters, 832.
6.Todd Bodine, 803.
7.Joey Coulter, 796.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games.
Detroit 3, Boston 2, SO
Toronto 4, Dallas 3, SO,
New Jersey I, N.Y. (slanders 0
Philadelphia 3, Montreal I
Edmohton 5, Minnesota2
N Y Rangers 6.Washington 3
Chicago 6,Anaheim s5
Pittsburgh 6, Ottawa 3
Winnipeg 3, Carolina I
Columbus 5, Buffalo I
Tampa Bay 2, Florida I, OT
St. Louis 2, Calgary 0
Vancouver 5, Phohnix 0,
.Saturday's Games
N.Y.Islanders 3, New Jersey 2
N.Y. Rangers 2. Philadelphia 0
Colorado 5, Edmonton 2
Boston 4,Winnipeg2
Buffalo 5,Washington
Pittsburgh 4, Montreal 3, OT
Tampa Bay 5, Florida I ..
Detroit 4, Nashville I
,.phoenix 3, Dallas 0 '
Vancouver at San Jose (n)
Chicago at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
Carolina at Ottawa, 5 p.m.
St. Louis at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Calgary at Minnesota, 6 p.m.
Toronto at Anaheim, 9 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m.
DEallas at Colorado, 9 p.m. ,
Nashville at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
'San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


} I nE TH coWvs HU5ANP
RaFUSE TO CHANGE HIS
S. MNP CAUSE HE
BLETEE AST
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer:
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: OCTET FACET BARREL TEDIUM
Answer: After the massage therapist got over her
cold, she FELT BETTER


COURTESY PHOTO


Crime Stoppers BowI-a-Thon .

Crime Stoppers of Columbia County had a fundraiser bowl-a-thon at Lake City Bowl on
Oct. 22. Sponsors and bowlers combined to raise more than $1,500 for the program:
/.Crime Stoppers offers rewards for anonymous tips that lead to an arrest. Anyone with
information about a crime can call the tip line at (386) 754-7099.


Florida St.


falls in OT

"Associated Press


PARADISE ISLAND,
Bahamas- Shabazz Napier
hit a big 3-pointer with a
minute left in overtime and
finished with 26 points,
leading No. 4 Connecticut
to a 78-76 victory over 22nd-
ranked Florida State in
Saturday's consolation game
of the Battle 4 Atlantis.
Napier had five assists,
four rebounds and two
steals, bouncing back from
a terrible performance in
the Huskies' 68-63 loss to
UCF on Friday when he
had seven turnovers.

FLORIDA ST. (5-2)
James 4-11 3-3 I 1. White 2.3 1-2 5.
Gibsor. 4-5 0-0 9. Loucks 3-7 0-2 7. Sr.aer
5-14 8-9 20, Dulkys 5-8 0-0 14. Peterson
2-4 0-05,Shnr,non 0-4 2-2 2 Kreft 1-4 1-2
3.Total 26-60 15.20 76
UCONN (6-1) I .
Dniels i-3 0-0 3, Olander 1.7 2-3 4.
Drummond 5.8 2-5 12. Lamb 7-9 2.2 19.
Napier 8-18 4-7 26. Boatright 4-7 5-5 14.
Bailey 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 0.2 0-0 0 Orakhi
0-0 0-0 0 Totals 26-54 15-22 78
Halftime-UConn 37-30: End Of
Regulation-Tied71.3-PointGoals-Florida
St. 9-19 (Dulkys 4-5, Snaer 2-8, Gibson
I-1, Peterson 1-2, Loucks I1-3), UConn
11-25 (Napier 6-13, Lamb 3-5, Daniels
1-2, Boatright I-3, Olander p-1, Smith 0-1).
Fouled, Out-None. Rebounds-Florida
St 34 (James 14), UConn 36 (Drummond
10). Assists-Florida St. II (Peterson 4),
UConn 14 (Napier 5).Total Fouls-Florida
St. 20,UCoQrin IS.

ACROSS .47 He
1 Bellow si
5 Broom rider Fa 50
08 Gullet 51 .
11' Indigo dye- 51 4A
12 Water; in Baja 55 S
14 Pie -- .
mode bui
mode 56 Bi
15 Closet .. I
fresheners 57 SE
17 Set of tools Gi
18 Amazon, for 5 8
one U.59 A
19 Cheerful 5I
21 Lb. and oz.
23 Epochs I
24 James or 1 PI
Ventura 2 Si
27 Story opener ve
29 Back when 3 Pi
'30 Knocks down .4 Al
34 Clear soup ru
37 Opposite of 5 C0
"paleo" c<
38 Wildebeest 6 G
chaser m7
39 Tiny jumpers 7 E:
41 Baker's need 8 -
43 Tempest
45 Formal 9 .
papers il


11-28


COURTESY PHOTO

Catfish surprise

Senior Chief Robert Ratliff landed this 17-pound, 8-ounce
catfish while visiting family over the Veterans Day
weekend. Ratliff, a Lake City native, is stationed on the
USS Theodore Roosevelt in Virginia. Ratliff was using
bread trying to catch bream when the big cat took the bait.


. Answer to Previous Puzzle


MESA K I LNS
REWA.R 1IRADIOS

AMEL IA INSERT




YG URT BRIBED


SEND OAK SA
SEMINIARB

BCE LLD UNTO
ORDEAL EMBARK
CANAPE DiR VES
KMART .-SK Y- S


10 Light
bulb
measure
13 Facet'
16 Moniker
20 A Maverick


22 See ya later!
(2 wds.)
24 Poke
25 I, to Claudius
26 Worthless
coin
28 A Bobbsey
twin
30 Sitcom
waitress
31 Compass dir.
32 PBS founder
33 Coast Guard
alert
35 Lands in
"la mer"
36 Bedding
39 Dart about
40 Imposed
taxes
41 Chicago
airport
42 Skirt slits
44 In -
(brief ly)
45 Russian
emperor
46 Be "it"
48 Wasp's nest
location
49 Stern
counterpart
52 Moo goo -
pan
53 Paul Anka's
"- Beso"


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


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bargain
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Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com











NBA owners,



players reach


Tentative deal
SWI


ASSOCIATED PRESS
tny,Stewart celebrates after winning his third NASCAR Sprint Cup Series championship, at Homestead-Miami Speedway
in Homestead on Nov. 20.


NASCAR opens and closes


2011 season with a bang


y' JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N
JASCAR opened its
with a fresh-faced D
S500 winner and er
ith one of the mos
ix4 championship r
series history.
In between, then
conflict, cdntrovers
host important, c
ling competition -
more so than Sunida
s!n finale. Tony S
grabbed his third NA
championship with
mined drive at Homr
where he passed an
lievable 118 cars tov
the fifth time in the
thase for the Sprii
championship.
The victory lef
tied with Carl Edw
'he final points sta
- a NASCAR first
Stewart got the title
fie-breaker of season
"If you didn't thi
was one of the mos
mng Chases to watc
a fan standpoint, you
to go to a doctor ii
lately and get check
Stewart said.,
'.The, television
backed it up, as N1
saw an upswing for t
time in years. ESPN
largest audience eve
NASCAR race, as 1
rating was up 18 I
from last year's, final
More important,
for the entire Chas
up 14.8 percent fro


year.
"Obviously, we think
the season has gone very
'.C. well," NASCAR chairman
season Brian France said two days
>aytona before the race:
ided it It was a good sea-
3t thrill, son,; beginning with
aces in Trevor f3ayne's improb-
able Daytona 500 victory.
re was Nobody, gave'-the 20-year-:
y and,, old a chance in NASCAR's
ompel- version of the Super Bowl,
- none, -not in his first Daytona 500
y's sea- start and driving for a team
itewart that hadn't been to Victory
ASCAR Lane in a decade.
a deter- But with a slew of veter-
estead,' ans lined up behind him :on
a unbe- the final restart Stewart
win for -included -- Bayne kept his
10-race foot on the gas and drove
nt Cup -'the- famed No.-21 Wood
Brothers Ford to a stunning
ft him upset It was a tremendous
yards in kickoff to the season and"
mdings made many people forget
- and about the two-car tandem
on the racing style that had taken
n wins. over at Daytona.
nk this As the months wore on,
t excit- 18 different drivers won
h from Sprint Cup races, includ-
i've got ing 'six, first-time- winners.
mmedi- Among them' was Regan
ad out," Smith, driving for under-
funded, single-car team
ratings Furniture Row Racing,
ASCAR and Marcos 'Ambrose,,
he first who proved Richard Petty
had its Motorsports could still'
er for a compete after staving off a,
the 4.0 2010 collapse.
percent And then there was'Brad
1e. Reselowski, a brash and
ratings outspoken driver who just
e were two years ago was a thorn
im last in most everyone's side.


That seems so long ago
now. Keselowski has grown'
into a media darling and
backed it up with a sensa-
tional summer run while
driving with a broken ankle
- that got him into his first
Chase and earned him a
surprising fifth place in the
final points standings.
His emergence 'helped
soften things at Penske
Racing, which all year was
forced to clean up behind
driver Kurt Busch.
Busch sparred with'-his
team, the media, and his
meltdowns on his in-car
radio became legendary.
Just this week, Busch's
crew chief formally. quit
the team and Penske offi-
cials took the unusual step-
of issuing a public apology
when a fan posted video to
YouTube of Busch being
verbally abusive Sunday to
an ESPN reporter.
Then there's Busch's
little brother.
The last. month of the
season was rough for
Kyle Busch,' the top seed
at the start of the Chase
who ended the year ranked
last in the 12-driver stand-
ings. He was suspended by
NASCAR three weeks ago
at Texas for intentionally
wrecking Ron Hornaday Jr.
under caution :in a Truck
Series race, and Kyle Busch
had to fight hard to keep
primary sponsor M&M's
from firing him.
Although his job appears
to be safe, his future partic-
ipation in Nationwide and


Truck races seems to be in
jeopardy.
The suspension was one
of the many hiccups for
Kyle Busch, Who unwit-
tingly .became .the poster
boy for NASCAR's "Boys,
have at it" policy.'
Still grappling with just,
how far drivers can go'
in policing themselves,
NASCAR officials held up
Busch at Texas as the one
who finally crossed the line. '
But, there's still questions: A
week after Busch's incident,
Brian -Vickers intentionally
wrecked Matt Kenseth at'
Phoenix after announcing
weeks before that Kenseth
had one coming and
NASCAR took no action.
I NASCARi, oalsoz didn't
explain publicly why
Vickers- wasn't punished,'
Sand it was discovered days
before the season finale that
Keselowski had been secret-
ly fined $25,000 for critical
comments he made about
fuel injection. At a time when
NASCAR claims to be trans-
parent, it was back-to-back
examples of the missteps
thd series still makes.
France has promised to
re-evaluate the process of
not announcing all fines
during the offseason.
There are other issues to
be addressed, as well.
At least four major teams
are going away next year
one from Roush Fenway
Racing, one from Richard
Childress Racing and both
Red Bull cars because of
sponsorship issues.
I


By BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

NEW YORK After
nearly two years of bicker-
ing, -NBA players and own-
ers are back on the same
side.
"We want to play basket-
ball," Conmi ssioner David
Stern said.
Come Christmas Day,


headed to a "nuclear win-
ter," he sat next to Hunter
to announce the 10-year
deal, with either side able to
opt out after the sixth year.
"For myself, ifs gieat to
-be a part of this particular
moment in terms of giving
our fans what they wanted
and wanted to see," :said
Derek Fisher, the president
of the players' association. '


.they should be. A majority on each side
'The sides reached a is heeded to approve the
tentative agreement ,early agreement, first reported
Saturday to end the 149-day ,by. CBSSports.com. The
lockout and hope to begin 'NBA needs votes from 15
the. delayed season with a of 29 owners. (The league
marquee tripleheader Dec. '.owns the New Orleans
25. Most of a season that Hornets.) Stern said the
seemed in jeopardy of being labor committee plans to
lost entirely will be salvaged discuss the agreement later
if both sides approve the Saturday and expects them
handshake deal. to endorse it and recom-
Barring a change in mend to the full board.
scheduling, the 2011-12 The union needs a sim-
season will open with the ple majority of its 430-plus
Boston Celtics at New members. That process is a.
York Knicks, followed by bit more complicated after
Miami at Dallas in an NBA the players dissolved the
finals rematch before MVP union Nov. 14. Now, they
Derrick Rose and Chicago must drop .their antitrust
visiting Kobe Bryant and 'lawsuit in Minnesota and
the Lakers. reform the union before
Neither side provided voting on the deal.
many specifics about the Because the union dis-
.deal, and there are still banded, a new collective
legal hurdles that must be bargaining agreement can
cleared before gymnasiums only be completed once the
are open again, union has reformed. Drug
"We thought it was in .testing and other issues still
both of our interest to try to mustbe negotiated between
reach a resolution and save the players and the league,
the game," union executive vyhich also must dismiss its
director Billy Hunter said. lawsuit filed in New York.
After a secret meeting ."We're very pleased
earlier this week that got we've come this far," Stern
'the broken process back said. "There's still a lot of
on track, the sides met for work to be done."
more than 15 hour Friday, The sides will quick-
working to save the season. ly return to work later
Stern said the agreement Saturday, speaking with
was "subject to a variety of attorneys and their own
approvals.and very. complex committees to keep the pro-
'machinations, but we're' cessmiowng. ,
optimistic that will all come When the' NBA returns,
to pass and that the NBA owners hope to find the
season will begin Dec. 25." type of.parity that exists in
SPresident Barack Obama the NFL, where .the small-
gave a thumbs-up when market Green Bay Packers
told about the tentative are the current champions.
settlement after he finished The NBA has been domi-
playing basketball at Fort nated in recent years by
McNair in Washington on the biggest spenders, 'with
Saturday morning. Boston, Los Angeles and
The league plans a 66- Dallas winning the last four
game season and aims to titles.
open training camps Dec. "I think' it will largely
9, with free agency opening prevent the high-spend-
at the same time. Stern has ing teams from competing
said it would take about 30 in .the free-agent market
days from an agreement to the way they've been able
playing the first game. to in the past. It's not the'
"All I feel right now is system we sought out to
'finally,"' Miami Heat star get in terms of a harder
Dwyane Wade told The cap, but the luxury tax is
Associated Press. harsher than it was. We
Just 12 days after talks hope'itfs effective," deputy
broke down and Stern commissioner-Adam Silver
declared the NBA could be said.


TOP 25


Richardson powers 'Bama past Auburn


Associated Press

AUBURN, Ala. Trent
Richardson and No. 2 Alabama
turned the Iron Bowl into a state-
ment game. Now, they'll wait and
see what happens in the national
title and Heisman Trophy races.
Richardson rushed for a career-
high 203 yards and AJ McCarron
threw three first-half touchdown
passes to lift the Crimson Tide to
a 42-14 victory over rival Auburn
on Saturday.
TheTide (11-1,7-1 Southeastern
Conference) has a week before
finding out if its resume is good
enough to secure a shot at a sec-
ond national title in three years.
No. 3 Oklahoma State and No. 1
LSU have big games remaining
against No. 12 Oklahoma and No.
13 Georgia, respectively.
SRichardson rant 27 times and
caught a 5-yard touchdown pass
in his final chance to impress
Hleisman voters. He had runs of
35 and 57 yards to set up second-
half Scores.
Fans began chanting first
"Heisman" and then "LSU" in
the fourth, with a sizable contin-
gent wearing crimson and white
remaining in the stands afterward


clamoring for a rematch. By then,
there wasn't all that much orange
and blue left.
The Tide fell to LSU 9-6 in an
overtime game that 'Bama fans at
least feel didn't settle the matter
of which one is better.
It's pretty clear who's best in
the state. <
In the end, the win might have
given the Tide enough style
points to hold onto No. 2 in the
BCS rankings whatever happens
next week.
The Tide dominated statisti-
cally but didn't put Auburn (7-
5, 4-4) away until Dee Milliner's
35-yard interception return early
in .the fourth quarter. Alabama
entered the quarter with a 309-44
advantage in total yards but also
gave up touchdowns on a fumble
recovery and a kick return.
McCarron completed 18 of 23
passes for 184 yards but only
,attempted five second-half passes.
Richardson handled the rest He
gained 142 yards on 13 carries in
the second half against a defense
ranked 98th nationally against the
run.
It was more than enough to
end Auburn's streak of 14 straight
wins at Jordan-Hare Stadium.


No. 6 Virginia Tech 38,
No. 24 Virginia 0
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.
- Logan Thomas threw for two
touchdowns and ran for one and
David Wilson scored on two long
runs in the second half as No.
6 Virginia Tech shut out No. 24
Virginia 38-0 on Saturday.
The Hokies (11-1, 7-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference) earned the
league's Coastal Division title and
a rematch with No. 18 Clemson in
next weekend's ACC champion-
ship game in Charlotte.
It was their eighth consecutive
victory in the series, and 12th in
13 games. They will be playing
for the ACC title for the fifth time
and seeking their fourth title in
five years.
The Cavaliers (8-4, 5-3) had won
four straight and seemed ready to
finally challenge their state rival,
but quarterback Michael Rocco
threw two interceptions and fum-
bled it away once.

No. 15 Wisconsin 45,
No. 20 Penn State 7
MADISON, Wis. Montee
Ball scored four more touchdowns


in his pursuit of an NCAA record,
powering No. 15 Wisconsin to
a 45-7 rout of No. 20 Penn State
and a spot in next week's Big Ten
championship game.
Ball has scored 34 touchdowns
this season for the Badgers (10-2,
6-2 Big Ten), the second-most in
a single season in NCAA history.
Barry Sanders holds the record,
scoring 39 for Oklahoma State in
11 games in the 1988 season.
With the win, Wisconsin
will play Big Ten Legends divi-
sion winner Michigan State in
Indianapolis next Saturday.
The Nittany Lions (9-3, 6-2)
came into the game hoping to
salvage something from a sea-
son dwarfed by scandal. They
took an early 7-0 lead but quickly
unraveled, falling behind 28-7 by
halftime.

No. 13 Georgia 31,
No. 25 Georgia Tech 17
ATLANTA The celebration
didn't last long. Georgia had not
even finished off another win over
its state rival when the fans in red
and black began to chant, "LSU!
LSU! LSU!"
Time for an even bigger game.


Aaron Murray threw four
touchdown passes and No. 13
Georgia extended its domination
over No. 25 Georgia Tech, pulling
away for a 31-17 victory Saturday
that sent the Bulldogs into the
Southeastern Conference cham-
pionship game on quite a roll.

No. 17 Michigan 40,
Ohio State 34
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Denard
Robinson accounted for five
touchdowns, helping No. 17
Michigan beat Ohio State 40-34
on Saturday and snap a school-
record, seven-game losing streak
in the rivalry.
The Wolverines (10-2, 6-2 Big
Ten) were forced to settle for a
six-point lead with 1:59 left on
Brendan Gibbons' career-long
43-yard field goal after two appar-
ent TDs were negated by a video
review and then penalties.
The Buckeyes (6-6, 3-5) had
a chance to win the game on
their final drive, but freshman
Braxton Miller sailed a pass over
Deviser Posey's head on what
could've been a 76-yard TD and
threw a loss-sealing interception
to Courtney Avery.


~


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's Jayce Barber runs by Bartram Trail High defenders during the Region 1-6A semifinal on Friday.


CHS: Tigers' rally falls short against Bartram Trail


Continued From Page 1B

scramble on third-and-5.
It was ,Columbia's only
score of the first half.
Following a 53-yard pass
to Jare Crump and a one-
yard touchdown pass to
Matt Arnwine, the Bears
led 21-7.


Cole Leininger made it
24-7 with a field goal near
the end of the first half.
In the second half, the
Tigers showed their fight.
S"We hadn't played our
best.half," Allen said. "We
had to play tougher defense
/


and we stepped up and did
just that."
Nigel Atkinson' sparked
the comeback with a
73-yard touchdown run to
cut the lead to 24-14.
Two plays later- the
Columbia defense used a


fumble recovery in the end
zone by Tyrone Sands to
cut the lead, to three.
Missed opportunities
kept the Tigers down
throughout the middle
stages of the second half,
as a missed field goal and
dropped touchdown pass
left the Tigers trailing
24-21.
Columbia tied the game
with a Hayden Lunde field


JEN CHASTEEN'Sper.a lo ir e Recorner
Columbia High's Tyrone Sands makes a tackle on,
Nick Uruburu during the Tigers' playoff loss to Bartram Trail


High on -nday.

goal from 24 yards with
,10:19 remaining in the
contest.
An Austin Reiter sack
forced the Bears to punt
with 1:58 remaining in the
game and Columbia had
life.
After moving the ball
deep into the Bears' territo-
ry, a holding penalty forced
the Tigers into third-and-20
and Columbia wasn't able


to convert. -
With 23 seconds remain-
ing, Bartram Trail received
the ball on a punt. On thid
and-10 Peterman connecA
with Bobby Walker fora"I
41-yard reception.
As the clock expire
Leininger connected ora
32-yard field goal to end tli
Tigers' season.
Columbia finished t -
season at 8-4. ;.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILs e C'ry Prerner
Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) is chased by Santa Fe High defenders on Nov. 11.


INDIANS: End year 8-4


Continued From Page 11
following with drives of 29,
38 and 39 yards. '' ".
The Celtics had two,
backs with more than 100
yards rushing Austin
McClellan (19-183) and
Derrionta Blunt (21-103).
McClellan had 148 yards
against Fort White in the
first meeting, making the
Sr. next to his name a wel-
come sight for the Indians.
McClellan also pulled off
a fake punt for 25 yards
and a first down, which led
to Trinity Catholic's fourth
touchdown.
After Fort White's Colton
Jones kicked a field goal,
Blunt returned the kick-
off 48 yards to put Fort
White in a hole that led
to the second fourth-down
gamble.
Jones' field goal came at
the end of a 10-play drive to
cut the lead to 7-3 at the end


of the first quarter.
The Indians would never
'get any closer.
It was Fort White's fourth
playoff appearance in coach
Demetric Jackson's five
years, and the second time
the Indians have advanced
to the second round.
Fort White extended its
domination in the Battle
for the Paddle series with
Santa' Fe High this year,
and pulled off a miracle
win over Wakulla High on a:
hook-and-lateral play.
Wakulla is in the third
round of the playoffs, as is
Union County High which
beat Fort White on a last-
second field goal.
"I am extremely proud
of our guys," Jackson said.
"With just a few, seniors,
we really played hard and
it brought us to the second
round of the playoffs."


Tr.Catholic 7 7 14 7 35
FortWhite 3 0 0 0 3
First Quarter
TC--Johnson I run (Den.cola kick),
5:44
FW-Jones 27 FG,
Second Quarter
TC-Blpnt 6 run (Denicola kick), 5:35
Third Quarter
T -Blunt 2 run (Denicola kckl. 9:50
TC-Crisera 17 pass from Carlton
(Denicola kick), 5:44
Fourth Quarter
TC-McClellan 65 run (Denicola kick),
S1:40


S. FortWhite
First down 9
Rushes-yards 33-97
Passing 92
Comp-Att-Int 7-22-3
Punts-Avg. 3-45
Fumbles-Lost 1-0


Tr. Catholic
I I 1:
43-292
so50 ,
4-9-0 ,
4-41
0-0


Penalties-Yards 4-35 7-60
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, S. Williams
12-45,T.Williams 3-36, Baker 12-14, Snider
2-8, Phillips 2-2, Dupree 1-0, Sanders
I-(-8). Trinity Catholic; McClellan 19-183,
Blunt 21-103, Johnson 2-3, Hanks 1-3.
PASSING-Fort White, Baker 7-20-
92-2, Sanders 0-2-0-1. Trinity Catholic,
Carlton 4-9-50-0.
RECEIVING-Fort White, Phillips
3-33, S. Williams 2-34, Pitts 1-20, Snider
l-5.Trinity Catholic, Guyton 2-26, Crisera
.1-17, Blunt 1-7,


JERNIGAN: Made big hit


Continued From Page 1E
over at the Florida
20-yard line and made it
down to the 1. Florida's
defense held, however, and.
the Seminoles were
looking at a field goal
or fourth-down attempt.
Again, Florida kicked itself
when it was already down.
A personal-foul penalty
allowed the Seminoles
another opportunity with
a first down and Devonta
Freeman made the best of
the opportunity.
Brantley gave another
gift to Florida State with a
throw into triple coverage
after the Gators moved into
Seminole territory. Instead
of driving the ball, Brantley
took another big shot
downfield. Mike Harris
made him pay.


Harris returned
Brantley's second pick 89-
yards to set up another
Freeman score.,
Brantley followed with
another interception.
The Seminoles had
forced Florida into
abandoning its offense.
With 1:42 remaining,
Jernigan hit Brantley while
throwing. It was Jernigan's
first mark on the game and
perhaps the last play of
Brantley's career.
Jernigan later combined
with Christian Jones to
.sack backup.quarterback
Jacoby Brissett to end
Florida's drive. He gave a
Gator chomp to the crowd,
perhaps signaling to his
hometown that he made
the right choice.


ASSOCIATION


Beef O'Brady's
Phone: 386-754-6860
Blake Construction
4 Phone: 386-754-5810
Boyette Plumbing
Phone: 386-752-0776
Bryan Zecher Construction, Inc.
Phone: 386-752-8653
Cal-Tech Testing, Inc.,
Phone: 386-755-3633
Concept Companies
Phone: 877-309-1029
D & S Lighting, Inc.
Phone: 386-755-5255
Don Reed Construction
Phone: 386-752-4072
Edgley Construction
Phone: 386-752-0580


Our members are.dedicated to
fulfilling the American dream of j
Home Ownership and are
, committed to our community.


First Federal Bank, R. Maxson
Phone: 386-755-0600, X3945
Florida Pest, Control
Phone: 386-752-1703
Glenn Hunter
Phone: 386-752-2707
Glenn I. Jones, Inc.
Phone: 386-752-5389
Hall's Pump & Well Service, Inc
Phone: 386-752-1854
Home Depot
Phone: 386-755-0761
Lowe's Home Improvement
Phone: 386-719-6622
McElhaney's Mortgage Services
Phone: 386-984-5217
Morrell's, Inc.
Phone: 386-752-3910


North Florida Glass
Phone: 386-961-9900
O'Neal Contracting, Inc.
Phone: 386-752-7578
Sherwin Williams
Phone: 386-752-0405
Sikes Enviroseal Insulation, Inc.
Phone: .386-438-8542
SLK Construction, Inc.
Phone: 386-365-3646
T D Bank
Phone: 386-754-7510
The Buck Stove Place, Inc.
Phone: 386-752-7010
W. L. Hunter Insurance
Phone: 386-752-6990
Waste Pro of Florida
Phone: 386-206-6061
Whiddon Construction
Phone: 386-754-7367 A


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





BUSINESS


Sunday, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Local charities on a Christmas crusade


By GORDON JACKSON
glackson@lakecityreporter.com

While the holiday shopping
season is big business,
it's also among the most
stressful times of the year
for families struggling
financially.
Officials at non profit organizations in
Columbia County predict the demand for
help during the holiday season should be
as high as any year in recent memory.
"I definitely think there's a greater
need this year," said Rita Dopp,.execu-
tive director of United Way of Suwannee
Valley. "It's hard to estimate how many
people need assistance, but it's not unre-
alistic to think thousands of kids are
helped by local agencies. There are lots
of people struggling with the economy."
United Way receives many requests for
assistance during the holidays. Workers
refer callers to, specific organizations that
,plan to help families during the holidays,
she said.
Despite efforts by non profit organiza-
tions to spread the word about assistance
they offer during the holidays, Dopp said
some families in need learn about holi-
day help from other families who have
received assistance.
"A lot of it happens by word of mouth,"
Dopp said. -
The Christian Service Center of
Columbia County is preparing to donate
400 food baskets to needy families for
Christmas. The baskets will include a
turkey with all the trimmings, said Shirley
McManus, the organization's director.
The organization is also screening
applicants to determine which ones will
get new arid used toys to put under the
tree on Christmas day, she said.
SWhile the demand is higher than the
400 families the service, center will help
during the holidays, volunteers are work-
ing to help as many as possible.


"It's all we can handle," McManus said.,
"Of course, there's always more we could
do."
Pepsi is helping by donating $3,300 to
the Christian Service Center, McManus
said. And the organization has an anony-
mous donor who has offered to match
any cash donations to the center to buy
gifts and food. Dollar General also has a
barrel where people can drop off gifts.
And people can also bring gifts to the ser-
vice center, she said.
'"We're going toy shopping so they will
have a very good Christmas," McManus
said..
The reward comes for volunteers when
they see the response by families picking
up food and gifts.
"When you see the families in tears
because they didn't know what to do [for
Christmas dinner and gifts], it's all worth-
while," she said. "Parents are very, very
grateful."
Perhaps the organization with the
greatest impact is the Christmas Dream
Machine, which will provide gifts for at
least 900 children on Christmas Day. The
non-profit organization has a Christmas
tree at Lake City Mall that has handmade
ornaments with the first name, age and
gender of a needy child. On the back of
the ornament is the child's clothing size
and brief wish list of possible gifts.
All gifts must be new and unwrapped.
Donors are encouraged to buy at least
one complete outfit of clothes as gifts.
Meally Jenkins, a longtime Christmas
Dream Machine member, said the recipi-
ents may not know where the gifts came
from but they have potential to make a
child's Christmas memorable.
Last year, Jenkins said a man serv-
.ing in the Navy and his sister who is a
nurse donated because of the impact the
Christmas Dream Machine had on their
lives when they were younger.
They recently learned from their moth-
er that the Christmas Dream Machine
was responsible for providing the gifts.


Meally Jenkins places ornaments on a Christmas tree at Lake City Mall. Jenkins, a member
of the non-profit organization the Christmas Dream Machine, said each paper ornament con-
tains the name and age of a child, along with the child's clothes size and Christmas wish list
of gifts. Anyone wishing .to make a needy, child's Christmas a happy one. can choose an orna-
ment with a child's.first name and register to buy gifts for him or her. All gifts must be dropped'
off at the Dream Machine's booth in the mall by Dec. 15. :


they opened for at least two Christmases,
Jenkins said. They both chose ornaments
containing the names of.children around
the same ages as they were"when their
family was helped by the organization.
S'The items he chose were the same
ones he wanted as a child,"'Jenkins said
of the sailor. "That touches us." ,
While those who buy gifts won't get
the satisfaction of seeing them opened,
donors will get a memento to hang on
their owfi tree the ornamentthey' ."


chose when they volunteered to make a
child's Christmas a merry one.
S"These children do not know where
their gifts come from," Jenkins said. "We
don't want to label them. We just want
them to wake up Christmas morning with
gifts.". .
-. Call the United Way of Suwaannee
Valley at (386)'752-5604 for information
about non profit agencies providing help
for the holidays or to donate gifts and
money. .- "


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BUSINESS


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


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Fims' :- ... 'i aon rules
piirms give varied signals on rules


By LARRY MARGASAK
Associated Press
-WASHINGTON Large
aidd small companies have told
Republican-led congressional
committees what the party' wants
td hear: dire predictions of plant
cltsings&and layoffs if the Obama
administration succeeds with
plans to further curb air and water
pollution.
'But their message to financial
regulators and' investors conveys
less gloom and certainty.
-The administration itself has
clbuded the picture by withdraw-
ing or postponing some of the envi-
ronniental initiatives that industry
labeled as being among the most
.onerous.
,Still, Republicans plan to make
what they say is regulatory over-,
reach a .2012 campaign issue,
taking aim at President Barack
Obama, congressional Democrats
and an aggressive Environmehtal
Protection Agency.
"'Republicans will be talking
to voters this campaign season
*about how to keep Washington
out of the way, so that job creators
can feel confident again to create
jobs for Americans," said Joanna
Burgos, a spokeswoman for the
House Republican campaign orga-
nrzation.
nThe Associated Press compared
the companies' congressional testi-
mony to company reports submit-
ted to the Securities and Exchange.
Commission. The reports to the
SEC consistently said the impact
of environmental proposals is


unknown or: would 'not. cause
serious financial harm 'to a firm's
finances.,
Companies, can : legitimately
argue that their less gloomy SEC
filings are correct, since most of
the tougher anti-pollutiotn propos-
als have not been finalized. And
their officials' testimony before'
congressional committees was
sometimes on behalf of and
written by -- trade associations, a
perspective that can differ from an
individual company's view.
But the disparity in the mes-
sages shows that in a. political
environment, business has no mis-
givings about describing potential
economic horror stories, to law-,
makers.
"As an industry,. we have said'
this before, we face a potential
regulatory train wreck," Anthony
-EarleyJr., then the executive chair-
man of DTE,Energy in.Michigan,
told a House committee on April
15. "Without the right policy, we
could be headed for disaster."
The severe, economic conse-
quences, he said, would be.dev-
astating to the electric' utility's
customers, especially .Detroit resi-
dents who "simply cannot afford"
higher rates.
Earley, who is now chairman
and CEO'of Pacific Gas & Electric
Corp., said if the EPA had its way,
coal-fired plants would be replaced
with natural gas leading to a
spike in gas prices. He said he was
testifying for the electric industry,
not just his company. '
But in its quarterly report to the
SEC, Detroit-based DTE, which


serves 3 million utility custom-
ers in Michigan, said that it was
'"reviewing potential impacts of the
proposed and recently finalized
rules, but is not able to quantify the
financial impact ... at this time."
Skiles Boyd, a DTE vice presi-
dent for environmental issues, said
in an interview that the testimony
was meant to convey the potential
economic hardship on ratepayers
- while the SEC report focused
on the company's financial condi-
tion.
"It's two different subjects," he
said.
Another congressional witness,,
Jim Pearce of chemical company
FMC Corp., 'told a H6use hear-
ing last Feb. 9: "The current U.S.
approach to regulating greenhouse
gases ... will lead U.S. natural soda
ash producers to lose significant
business to our offshore rivals...."
Soda ash is used to produce glass,
and is a major' component of the
company's business..
But in its annual report cover-
ing 2010 and submitted to the SEC
13 days after the testimony, the
company said it was "premature to
make any estimate of the costs of
complying with un-enacted federal
climate change legislation, or as
yet un-implemented federal regu-
lations in the United States." The
Philadelphia-based company did
not respond to a request for com-
ment..
California Rep. Henry Waxman,
the senior Democrat on the
House Energy and Commerce
Committee, said the SEC filings
"show that the anti-regulation rhet-


oric in Washington is political hot
air with little or no connection to
reality."
House Republicans have con-
ducted dozens of hearings, and
passed more than a dozen bills
to stop proposed environmen-
tal rules. So far, all the GOP
bills have gone nowhere in the
Democratic-run Senate. .
"I will see to it, to the best
of my ability, to try to stop
everything," CalifQrnia Sen .
Barbara Boxer, the Democratic
chairman of the Senate's envi-
ronment committee, vowed in
reference to GOP legislation
aimed at reining in the EPA.
She predicted Republicans "will
lose seats over this."
The' Obama administration
has reconsidered, some of the
environmental proposals in
response to the drumbeat from
business groups. In September,
the president scrubbed a clean-
air regulation that aimed to
reduce health-threatening smog.
Last May, EPA delayed indefi-
nitely 'regulations to reduce
toxic pollution from boilers and
incinerators.
James Rubright, CEO of
Rock-Tenn Co., a Norcross, Ga.-.
based producer of corrugated-
and-consumer packaging, told
a House panel in September
that a variety of EPA, job safety
and chemical security regula-
tions would require "significant
capital investment" money
that "otherwise go to growth in
manufacturing capacity and the
attendant production of jobs."


Debt worries push oil prices lower for week


Associated Press
NEW YORK Oil rose Friday
after a see-sawing session in post-
holiday, low-volume trading, but
was down slightly for the week.
The benchmark for crude oil
in the U.S. rose 60 cents to set-
tle .at $96.77 a barrel. It dropped
$1.84 on Wednesday, before mar-,
kets in the U.S. were closed for
the Thanksgiving holiday. On the
week, however, oil lost 0.7 per-


cent.
Oil had fallen earlier as Europe's
debt crisis continues to undermine
confidence the continent will avoid
recession next year.
In London, Brent crude for
January delivery fell $1.38 to settle
at $106.40 a barrel on the ICE
Futures exchange.
Investor concern that fiscal aus-
terity measures aimed at lower-
ing Europe's debt levels will hurt


global economic growth and oil
demand has helped pull crude
back from above $103 last week.
Uncertainty about contagion
spreading from Greece to Portugal,
Italy, Spain and Ireland has begun
to undermine confidence in
Germany and France. The yield
on Germany's 10-year bond .rose
above the 10-year UK government
bond for the first time since 2009.
And on Friday Standard & Poor's


downgraded Belgium's financial
standing, citing the country's gov-
ernment stalemate and the loom-
ing European recession.
"The eurozone sovereign crisis
is starting to threaten the bond
markets of even the most solid
European economy Germany,"
Barclays Capital said in a report.
In the U.S., meanwhile, the aver-
age price for a gallon of gas has
fallen to $3.31.


Stocks end

week with

slight fall


By MATTHEW CRAFT
Associated Press
NEWYORK-The worst
week for the' stock market
in two months' ended with
a whimper in thin trading
Friday.
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average lost 4.8 per-
cent this week, while the
'broader Standard & Poor's
'500 index fell 4.7 percent.
Both had their worst weeks
since Sept 23.
Major indexes wavered
throughout Friday's ses-
sion' which was shortened.
because, it's the day after
Thanksgiving. Worries
about Europe's debt crisis
flared up again after Italy
had to pay 7.8 percent to
borrow for two years at a
debt auction. It's another
sign. that investors are
increasingly hesitant to lend
to European countries.
The euro slipped to $1.32,
losing 2 percent this week
against the dollar. The drop
puts the euro at its lowest
level since Oct 4.'
Higher interest rates on
government debt of Italy,
Spain and other European
countries have rattled stock
markets in recent weeks.
When borrowing costs
climb above the 7 percent
threshold, it deepens inves-
tor fears about a govern-
ment's ability to manage
its debts. Greece, Ireland
and Portugal had to seek
financial lifelines when their
interest rates crossed the
same mark.
The Dow fell 25.77 points,
or 0.2 percent, to close at
11,231.78. Of the Dow's 30
stocks, Chevron Corp. lost
1.6 percent Friday, the big-
gest drop. Travelers Cos.
Inc. added 1.2 percent, the
largest gain.
The S&P 500 lost 3.12
points, or 0.3 percent, to
1,158.67. The Nasdaq com-
posite dropped 18.57.


I Askther


v


An Oil-Field Juggernaut
National Oilwell Varco's (NYSE:
NOV) third-quarter results were
impressive. The oil-field services
giant posted year-over-year increases
in earnings per share and revenue of
30 percent and 24 percent, respec-
tively. All segments saw healthy
growth, especially Rig Technology,
which had a record level of capital-
equipment orders.
In its quarterly conference call,
management noted that shale and
other unconventional drilling now
accounts for more than half of all
North American activity. Regarding
shale, the CFO explained that "... its
efficiency-obsessed, time-shortening,
consumption-accelerating drumbeat
will continue to drive (the compa-
ny's) performance" as it accelerates
demand for products and services.
Thanks to an advantageous
melding of two key ingredients -
technology and oil price deep-
water drilling is also driving strong
results, including the landing of 28
offshore rig packages.
National Oilwell Varco has built its
dominant position through mergers
and acquisitions. This strategy can be
tough to execute and has led many to
mediocrity, or worse. But National
Oilwell Varco's management has
executed it well for a long time.
This company is likely to remain
a dominant player and is a good
way to gain exposure to the energy
sector. (The Motley Fool owns
shares of National Oilwell Varco,
and its newsletter services have rec-
ommended buying shares of it.)


l111:11.11111












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27,2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW



-. .Review.. .


SNYSE 3 Amex
6,898.18 -384.29 2,105.33 -135.54


Gainers ($2 or more) Gainers (42 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
DirLatBear 22.56 +4.73 +26.5 HKN 2.86 +.72 +33.6
DrSCBrrs 39.66 +7.89 +24.8 LucasEngy 2.20 +.30 +15.8
PrUPShR2K19.60 +3.91 +24.8 SoCTBcp 2.19 +.29 +15.3
DSOXBrrs 72.78+14.27 +24.4 B&HO 3.66 +.46 +14.4
iPSER2K 58.83+10.97 +22.9 AvalonHId 2.89 +.32 +12.3
DrxEnBear 15.95 +2.70 +20.4 SlreamGSv 2.68 +.27 +11.2
DirEMBear 25.53 +4.13 +19.3 GSESy 2.06 +.20 +10.8
DirOMBrrs 46.31 +7.39 +19.0 dOrionEngy 2.82 +.22 +8.5
PrUJPSM40023.54 +3.61 +18.1 WellsGard 2.19 +.15 +7.4
DrxRsaBear43.04 +6.49 +17.8 ATS'Corp 3.38 +.22 +7.0

Losers ($2 or more) Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
Frontline 2.76 -3.03 -52.3 Bacterin 2.17 -.71 -24.7
ShipFin 10.00 -4.45 -30.8 SagaComm29.25 -7.05 -19.4
OvShip 9.79 -4.20 -30.0 PionDnill 9.02 -2.05 -18.5
Vancelnfo 9.10 -3.42 -27.3 Gastargrs 2.82 -.60 -17.5
Fusion-ion29.33-10.27 -25.9 GenMoly 2.75 -.58 -17.4
BiPGCrt) 13.72 4.13 -23.1 KeeganRg 3.80. -.73 -16.1
AlOnUSA 7.60 -2.22 -22.6 HaderaPap 40.11 -7.36 -15.5
iP LXR2K 37.29-10.82 -22.5 Augusta g 2.92 -.51 -14.9
DxLtBull rs 64.78-18.52 -22.2 GoldenMin 6.06 -1.05 -14.8
Skyline 5.10 -1.43 -21.9 TriangPet 4.89 -.84 -14.7

MOSt Active ($1 or more) Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAin 9191992 5.17 -.61 CheniereEn248837 10.21 -1.49
S&P500ETF6790021116.34-5.64 NwGoldg 148984 9.57 -.74
SPDRFncl266150511.78 -.72 GrtBasGg 138023 1.01 -.18
GenElec 2312891 14.70 -.95 YMBiog 119446 1.35 -.30
iShEMkts 1937863 36.10-2.44 NovaGIldg 112154 9.67-1.28
iShR2K 1914316 66.62-5.36 GoldStrg 109422 1.78 -.23
Ciligrp rs 1877629 23.63-2.65 AntaresP 78605 2.54 -.07
FordM 1679772 9.75 -.35 Rentech 68515 1.44 -21
Pfizer 1611845 18.45-1.08 CFCdag 54546 21.42 -.83
JPMorgCh1411064 28.48-2.14 NAPall g 54328 2.76 -.26

Diary Diar
Advanced' 477 Advanced 139
Declined 2,686 Declined 358
NewN Highs 98 New Highs .20
NewLows 232 NewLows. 52
Total issues 3,201 Total issues 520
Unchanged 38 Unchanged 23
Volurme .13,217,379,863 Volume : 306,757,275


Nasdaq
Y 2,441.51 -130.99


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
GIblEduc 10.78 +5.41 +100.7
Pharmsst s133.17+60.50 +83.3
RoyaleEn 4.64 +1.55 +502,
Pozen 3.62 +1.11 +442
Andatee 3.83 +.77 +252
Inhibitex 11.15 +2.22 +24.9
G 105.00+19.00 +22.1
N rp 9.22 +1.42 +182
Perfuman If 19.10 +2.63 +16.0
PhotoMdx 14.83 +2.04 +15.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SchoolSp 4.05 -3.46 -46.1
Poniardrs 6.26 -4.10 -39.6
Groupon n 16.75 -9.44 -36.0
CIFCCorp 3.06 -1.47 -32.5
Sevcon .4.15 -1.85 -30.8
FocusMda 17.70 -7.80 -30.6
Gevon 5.18 -2.03 -28.2
Netlist 261 -89 -254
DiamondF 27 0 -882 -24 6
AmicusTh 2.10 -67 -242

Most Active (si or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SidusXM 32e4)56 175 -03
Intel 1853416 2273-156
Microsoft 1833471 2430-100
PwShs00Q170459752 88-2 52
Cisco 1644670 1750 -92
MicronT 1368664 550 -79
FocusMda 1232465 17 70-7 80
GileadSci 1054597 3928 -60
Nvidia 960688 14.04 *11
Oracle 8i2634 28.74-186

Diary
Advanced 395
Declined 2.218
New-Highs 24
NewLows 310
Total issues 2.734
Unchanged 61
Volume 6.267.876.893


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST


Name Ex Div Last


AT&T Inc NY 1.72 27.41
AlcatelLuc NY ... 1.54
Alcoa NY .12 8.95
AutoZone NY ... 322.96
BkofAm NY .04 5.17
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 30.50
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 13.70
CSX s NY .48 20.00
Chevron NY 3.12 92.29
Cisco Nasd .24 17.50
C g rp rs NY .04 23.63
CocaCola NY 1.88 64.74
Delhaize NY 2.45 55.45
DrSCBr rs NY ... 39.66
DirxSCBull NY ... 33.67
FamilyDlr NY .72 55.80
FocusMda Nasd .. 17.70
FordM NY ... 9.75
GenElec NY .60 14.70
GileadSci Nasd ... 39.28
HewlettP NY .48 25.39
HpmeDp NY 1.16 386.47
iShEMkts NY .84. 36.10
iS Eafe NY 1.68 46.45
iShR2K NY 1.02 66.62
Intel Nasd .84 22.73
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 28.48
Lowes NY 56 2268


Wkly Wkiy YTD
Chg%Chg%Chg


-1.23 -4.3 -6.7
-.36-18.9 -48.0
-.74 -7.6 -41.8
-6.44 -2.0 +18.5
-.61 -10.6 -61.2
-.86 -2.7 -7.5
-1.05 -7.1 -7.5
-1.64 -7.6 -7.1
-5.59 -5.7 +1.1
-.92 -5.0 -13.5
-2.65 -10.1 -50.0
-2.65 -3.9 -1.6
-4.00 -6.7 -24.8
+7.89 +24.8 -15.3
-9.00 -21.1 -53.5
-.92 -1.6 +12.3
-7.80 -30.6 -19.3
-.35 -3.5 -41.9
-.95 -6.1 -19.6
-.60 -1.5 +8.4
-2.60 -9.3 -39.7
-1.41 -3.7 +4.0
-2.44 -6.3 -24.2
-2.95 -6.0 -20.2
-5.36 -7.4 -14.9
-1.58 -6.4 +8.1
-2.14 -7.0 -32.9
-63 -27 -96


Name Ex DIv


McDnlds NY 2.80
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .80
MorgStan NY .20
NY Times NY
NextEraEn NY 2.20
NobltyHIf Nasd
NokiaCp NY .55
Nvidja Nasd ...
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShsQQQNasd .41
PrUShS&PNY .:.
Ryder NY 1.16
S&P500ETFNY 2.46
SearsHldgsNasd ..
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1:89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FnclNY .20
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48
YRC rsh Nasd


WKy Wikly YTD
Last Chg %Chg %Chg


92.10 -.64 -0.7 +20.0
5.50 -.79 -12.6 -31.4
24.30 -1.00 -4.0 -12.9
13.26 -.95 -6.7 -513
6.51 -.68 -9.5 -33.6
52.57 -2.41 -4.4 +1.1
6.15 -.48 -7.2 -24.2
5.29 -1.22 -18.7 -48.7
14.04 +.11 +0.8 -8.8
86.69 -7.63 -8.1 -11.6
28.74 -1.86 -6.1 -8.2
29.61 -1.96 -6.2 -8.4
62.49 -1.40 -2.2 -4.3
18.45 -1.08 -5.5 +5.4
40.67 -2.63 -6.1 -21.2
52.88. -2.52 -4.5 -2.9
23.19 +2.04 +9.7 -2.4
46.74 -4.40 -8.6 -11.2
116.34 -5.64 -4.6 -7.5
58.40 -5.87 -9.1 -208
1.75 -.03 -1.7 -74
42.47 -.73 -1.7 +11.1
2.38 -.24 -9.2 -43.7
11.78 -.72 -5.8 -26.1
32.36 -1.25 -3.7 +.6
56.89 -.34 -0.6 +5.5
23.51 -1.18 4.8 -24.1
04 .O00 +26 -989


Stock Footnotes: g = Div.aerds ard rearinga in Caniaaar. dollars n Does nol meet conrnued-lsting standard
II Late fling mih SEC n = New in pasd 52 weeks pl = Prtlerred rs = SloCk has unargone a levnrse stock spin
61 at least 0 percent wilhn rhe pa.t year in Righl lo buy ecunly a a specified price s = Stock has spill by ai
least 20 percent min he laEl year un Unns v] = In bjnkerptcy or receivership Ad = When distnbuted wl
When issued or = Warranri
Mutual Fund Footnoteas: i=b Fa co enrng makal coih In pain Irom. fund asedn n v Delenrfd -alea cwrk, or
redempln lea I = hom rloaa sales, chargeI m a=Multpelefeas ar crnorgd hA = noti adiable p= previousuayE
nel assl value s = lrid spil shares during Thie wek x vnd paid a lltnDutlon aunrug Inl *eek.Galners and
Losenrmust be worth at least 2 to be misled in tlaes at leh Most Actives nmus be worth at leasI $1. Volume in
hundreds of srures Source: Thi Associaled Press Sales figures are unofficial


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Pnme Rale 3 25 3.25
Discount Rale 0 75 0.75
Federal Funds Pale 00- 25 00-25
Treasunes
3-morlh 0 02 0 01
6-month 0.07 004
5-year 0 93 092
10-yearI 196 201
30-year 292 2 99


Currencies
Last Pve Day
Australia I 0311 1 0293
Bnlain 1 5433 1 5489
Canada 1 0503 1 0468
Euro 7558 7500
Japan 77 76 77 15
Mexico 14 2375 142100
Swilzerlnd 9318 9199
Bnrl.sr pound epi op a in U S dollars AlI ir..
ers snow dollar Il Ioreign .:urrenrCy


Weekly DowJ g.j' .

Dow Jones Industrials -248.85 -53.59 -236.17CLOSED -25.77
Close: 11,231.78 S
1-week change: -564.38 (-4.8%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
1 3 0 0 0 . -. . ... .. . . . .. ", . . . . .. . . . . ... .. .. .. . .. . . . .. .. .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. ..







11,000 _i .. ....... ....................

10,500-: ...................... ....... .................. .... ..............................................


. M w t ,,,P un.,' P:-R.: .*:.

Total Assets Total Retumr/Rank Pct Min Inlt
Name 4 Obi ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-vear Load Invt


PIMCO TotRetls Cl
Vanguard TotSIldx LB
Vanguard Instldxl LB
Fidelity Contra LG
American Furnds GrIhAmA m LG
Amrencan Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Ameriencan Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard 50OAaml LB
Vanguard TolSIlAam LB
Amencan Funds CpWIaGrIA m WS
Amencan Funds InvCoAmA m LB
Dodge& Co>ri lSnu FV
Dodge & Cox SIO. LV
Arencan Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
FrankTenip-Franklin Income A m CA
Va.guard InslPlus LB
PIMLO ToiRetAdm D Cl
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
vanguard Torlns a FB
American Funds BaJA m MA
Amencan Funds FninvA m LB
Vanguard TotBdAdmI Cl
Amencan Funds Ne*PerspA m WS
Vanguard WellinAdm MA
vanguard TolSllirs LB
Vanguard 5001n LB
FrarmiTemp-Templelon GIBorlAdvt IB


144,140


144,140
59,187
57,894
56898
55932
55.236
51,707
51,028
48,798
46.958
43.433
39,278.
37,789
37,647
35.355
34636
31.685
31.624
30.912
30.776
30.605
30.350
29.209
28,910
27,914
27,754
26.811


+1.4/E
-2.3/B
-1.3/A
-3.7/C
-6 4/D
-0 9/
.1 2/A
-I.3/A
-2.2B
-10.7/C
-4.8/D
-1841E
-77/E
+2.3/A
40.1
-13/A
+1.1/E
-15.2/B
-16 I/D
t1.3/A
-4.6/C
+60/A
-92/C
.0.71A
-2.2/B
1.41A
-3 2/E


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
NI 2,500
5.75 250
5.75 250
575 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
575 250
5 75 250
NL 2.500
NL 2.500
575 250
425 1,000
NL 200.000,000
iL 1.000.000
575 250
NL 3.000
575 250
575 250
NL 10,000
575 250
NL 50,000
NL 5.000.000
NL 3,000
NL 50,000


CA Co.'.-veAsm canO 0C amsw-rTern Brma ES Lurme Si. FBS- FW Lapertn.FGo*r Largemrno FV-Foreu
LAi vaAi IM w 1 AjmiM LB-uWe ti6a [G-i reGfi LV-L tarPM ImsMA UAaore Ar iac.MB m MBCApBen MV.
s].a4 u&, S *. S-an.a.reC,, W3 .it Sa TOl RenJM, Cir j ,IAV wi AwiMMs rdeslmd Rar Heo hild pedoAlMe vn
ae.wnanM arr.i Aci fe Alsitobp20 E m Cco 20% WMirieDr Vt m:i Sl eeea ioiv astlrlu, Soe.Mirrguar


SII


New York Stock Exchange


WkName D YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AESCorp ... .
AFLAC 1.32 3.4
AK Steel .20 2.8
AMR ... ...
AT&T Inc 1.72 6.3
AbtLab 1.92 3.7
Accenture 1.35 2.5
AMD
Aetna, .60 1.6
Agilent ... ...
AlcatelLuc .. .
Alcoa. .12 1.3
Allstate .84 3.4
AlphaNRs .,. ...
Altria 164 6.0
AMovilLs- :28 1.3
AEagleOut .44 3.4
AEP 1.88 5.1
AmExp .72 1.6
AmIntlGrp .
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 3.1
Annaly- 2.51 15.7
Apache .60 .7
ArcelorMit 75. 4.9
ArchCoal. ,.44, 3.2
ArthDan .,.7Q- 2.5
ATMOS 1.38 4.2
Avon .92 5.7
BB&T Cp .64 3.0
BHP BillUt 2.02 3.0
BakrHu .60" 1.2
* BcoBrades .80 5.3
BcoSantSA .84 12.4
BcoSBrasil 1.65 23.9
BkofAm .04 .8
BkNYMel .52 2.9
Barclay .36 3.7
BariPVix ...
BarrickG .60 1.3
Baxter 1.34 2.8
BerkHB ...
BestBuy- .64 2.5
Boeing 1.68 2.7
BostonSci ... ...
BrMVSq 1.32 4.4
CBREGrp... ...
CBS B .40 .1.7
CSXs .48 2.4
CVR Engy ... ...
CVS Care .50 1.4
CampSp 1.16 3.6
CdnNRsgs .36 ...
CapOne .20 .5
CapW.Srce ..04 .7
Carnival ,1.00 3.3
Caterpillar 1.64 2.1
Celanese .24 .6
Cemex
CntryLnk 2.90 8.1
ChesEng .35 1.6'
Chevron 3.12 3.4
Chicos N .20 2.0
Chimera .57 21.9
Cigna .04 .1
SCitigrprs .04 .2
CliffsNRs "1.12 .1.9-
CocaCola 1.88 2.9
CollctvBrd .... ...
Comerica .40 1.7
CompSci .80 3.5
-ConAgra' .96 4.0
ConocPhil 2.64 4.0
ConEd 2.40 4.2
ConstellEn .96 2.5
Cooper Ind 1.16 2.2
Coming .30 2.2
Covidien .90 2.1
CSVS2xVxS...


13 .-66: -8.9 11.09
8 '-2.93 -30.8 39.05
...'-1.37 -57.0 7.04
-.19 -79.3 1.61
14 -1.23 -6.7 27.41
18 -1.47 +8.6 52.05
16 -1.40 +10.7 53.70
4 -.48 -39.0 4.99
8 -1.80 +24.2 37.89
12:-2.98 -18.3 33.83
-:36 -480 1.54
9 -,74 -41.8 8:95
36 -1:28 -22.5 24.70
-44 -3.42 -68.7 18.81+
1,7 -.39 +10:7 27.25
10 -2.08 -22.7 22.17
15 -.71 -11.9 12.89
10 -1.36 +3.4 37.20
11 -1.88 +4:8 45.00
1 -1.81 "-58.4 '20.07
... 4.86' -5.7 71.84
'11 -3.02 -14.3. 32.28
8 -.21 -11.0 15.94
8-11.73 -27.2 86.83
98 -2.14 -59.5 15.43
12 -1.24 --61.1. 13.63
9 -1.00 -72 27.90.
14 -2.12 +4.1 32.48
9 -.75 -44.6 16.09
13 -1.51 -19.5 21.17
... -5.60 -28.6 66.32
13 -5.18 -14.5 48.87
... -1.45 -25.9 15.04
.... -.65 -36.2 6.80
-... 59 -49.3 6.90
... -.61 -61.2 5.17
.8 -1.22 -414 17.70,
...-.90 ,41.8 9.62
+2.31 +30.8 49.20
11 -1.25 -10.5 47.59
13 -2.70, -5.7 47.72
16 -2.48 -9.0 72.89
9 -1.43 -25.3 25.63
12 -4.68 -3.8 62.78
15 -.15 -30.4 5.27
15 -.65 +13.9 30.16
18 -.49-28.6 14.62.
13 -1.23 +23.6 23.55
12 -1.64 -7.1 20.00
5 -.95 +12.0 17.00
15 -1.31 +6.0.36.85
13 -1.80 ,-8.3' 31.85
.:. -3.41 -26.5 32.64
5 -1.62 -6.0 40.02
31 -.25 -16.8 5.91
A2 -1,50 -33.9 30.47
13 -7.21 -7.4 86.72
J11/-.36 -1.7 40.47
... -.79 -66:.2 '3.48,
16, -1.55 -22.7 35.70
7 -1.911 -13.5 22,42.
7 -5.59 +1.1 92.29
13 -1.23 -16.0 10.11
5 -.09 -36.7 2.60
9 -1.17 +11.6 40.92
6 -2.65 -50.0 23.63&
5 -7.74 -23.4 59.72
12 -2.65 -1.6 64.74
12 -1.27 -40.7 12.52
11 -1.88 -45.5 23.02
... -2.28 -53.8 22.93
14 -.33 +6.1 23.95
9 -3.13 -2.9 66.14
16 -.98 +15.3 57.16
16 -1.68 +24.0 37.97
11 -.18 -10.9 51.96
7 -1.05 -27.8 13.95
12 -2.74 -6.1 42.87
,... +5.48 -1.1 63.98


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIveYId PE Chg %Chg Last
QSVellVSt s... ... ...-.26 -58.9 4.91
DR Horton .15 :1.4 .47 -.39 -9.0 10.86
DTE 2:35 4.8 12 -1.78 +9.1 49.43
Deere 1.64 2.2 11 -.63 -11.3 73.64
DeltaAir ... ... 10 -.24 -43.5 7.12
DenburyR ': ... 11, -1.55 -25.Q 14:32
DeutschBk 1.07 3.3 ... -4.23 -37.9., 32.34
DevonE .68 1.2 5 -5.14 -25.4 58.58-
DxFnBullrs... ... ... -9.11. -64.5 49.38
DrSCBrrs ... ...... +7.89 -15.3 39.66
IDirFnBrrs ... .. ... +7.77 +14.5 54.10
DrxEnBear ... ... +2.70 -29.3 15.95
DirEMBear ... ...... 4.13 +25.8 25.3
DirxSCBull ... ...... -9.00 -5355 33.67
DirxEnBull .i. ...... -8.01 -37.2 36.69
Discover .24, 1.0, 6 -i0 +23.9 22.96
Disney .40 1.2 13 -2.12 -10.7 33.51
DomRescs1.97 4.0 17 -1.53 +15.9 49.51
DowChm 1.00 4.1 10 -1.48 -28.3 24:47
DOkeEngy 1.00 5.1 16 -.38..+11.1 19.79
EMOCp ... ... 22 -1.19 -4.5 21.88
Ecolab .70 1.3 24 -.71 +6.1 53.51
BPasoCp .04 ,.2 ... +.04 +80.5 24.84
EldorGldg .12 ... 31 -4.83 -11.9 4-1.36
EmersonEI1.60 '3.4 14 -2.60 -17.6 47.11
EnCanag. .80 .4.5 32 -1.65 -38.9 17.80
EvergEnh ........... -.14 --67.7 .21
Exelon 2.10 5.0 11 -1.75 +.7 41.93
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.5 9 -4.00 +1.1 73.90
FstHorizon .04 .6 28 -.52 -42.4 6.79
FirstEngy 2.20 5.2. 13 -2.34 +13.3 41.94'
FordM ... :.. 5 -.35 -41.9 9.75
ForestOils ... ... 12 -1.40 -51.3 13.30
FMCGs 1.001 3.0 6 -3.12 -43.7, 33.82
FrontierCm .75 13.9 36' +.09 -44.6 5.39
Frontline .47 17.06 4 -3.03 -89.1 2.76
Fusion-ion ... .. ...-10.27 +30.4 29.33
GafisaSA .29 5.1 ... -.08 -61.1' 5.65
GameStop ... ... 8 -.95 -6.0 21.51
Gannett .32 3.0 5 -.49 -30.4 10.50
Gap ,r. .45 2.6 10 -1.14 -20.1 17.62
GenGrPrp .40 3.1 ... -.71 -16.1 12.99
GenMotors ... ... 4 -1.34 -44.8 20.34
GenOnEn ... ... ..-.24 -33.3 2.54
Genworth ... ...... -.70 -59.0 5.39
Gerdau .20 2.8 ... -.93 -49.7 7.04
GoldFLtd .24 1.6 2 -.81-16.4 15.16
Goldcrp g .41 .9 '19 -2.70 +4.0 47.84
GoldmanS1.40 .1;6 14 -3.16-47.2 88.75
Goodyear -.. ... 27 -.83 +.7 11.93
HSBC 1.95, 5.4 ... -1.61 -29.6 35.92
Hallibrtn .36 1.1 11 -4.16 -22.1 31.80
HartfdFn .40 2.6 6 -1.81 -41.6 15.46
HitMgmt ... 10 -.88 -21.8 7.46
HeclaM .02 ... 13 ,-.67 -52.9 5.30
Hertz ... ... 12 -.86 -31.1 9.99
Hess .40'.73 10 -5.40 -29.0 54.33
Hewletti .48 1.9 6 -2.60 -39.7 25.39
HollyFrt,s .40 1.8 4 -2.14 +6.6 21.74
HonleDp 1.16 3.2 16 -1.41 +4.0 36.47
Honwillnt 5 1.49 3.0 13 -3.61 ,-7.6 49.14
HostHoIs .'16 1.2 '... -.98 -28.3 12.81
Huntsmn .40 4.2 7 -33. -39.6 9.43
ING ... ... -.92 -36.1 6.26
iShGold -... .....-.43 +17.9 16.J9
iShBraz 3.42 6.3 : ... 4.75 -298 '54.30
iShGer .67 3.7 ... -1.51 -24.2. 18.14
iSh HK .42 2.8 ... -.46 -20.7 15.01
iShJapn .17 1.9 ... -.32 -19.0 8.84
iShKor .50 1.0 ... -3.17 -19.1 49.52
iShMex .71 1.4 ...- .29 -19.8 49.64
iSTaiwn .29 ;....... -8.64 -26.3 11.51
iShSilver ......... -1.20 +.1 30.20
iShDJDv 1.84 .3.7 ... -2.12 -,9 49:43
iShChina25 .85 2.6 ... -1.99 -22.7 33.33
iSSP500. 2.45 2.1 ... -5.70 -7.6 116.64
iShEMkts '.64 2.3 ... -2.44 -24.2 36.10
iShB20T 3.92 3.2 ... +1.46 +28.3 120.80
iS Eafe 1.68 3,6 ... -2.95 -20.2 46.45


Name DIv YId I
iShiBxHYB7.16 8.7
iShR2K 1.02 1.5
iShREst 2.18 4.2
IngerRd .48 1.6
IBM 3.00 1.7
IntPap 1.05 '4.1 ,
Interpublic .24 2.9
Invesco .49 2.7
ItauUnibH .84 5.3
JPMorgCh 1.00 3.5
Jabil .32 1.71
JanusOap .20 3.4
Jefferies .30 2.8
JohnJn 2.28 3.7
JohnsnCtl .72 2.6
JnprNtWk ... ...
KB Home .25 3.7
KeyEngy
Keycorp .12 '1.8
KimbClk 2.80, 4.1
Kimco .76 5.2 6
Kinrossg .12 .9
KodiakOg ... ... 3
KohIs 1.00 1.9
Kraft 1.16 3.4
LSI Corp .. ...
LVSands ... ...
LennarA 16 1.0,
ULillyBi 1.96 5.5-
UncNat .32 1.8
Unkedin n ...
UoydBkg ... ...


muy T lu wuy
PE Chg %Chg Last
...-3.14 -8.4 82.75
-5.36 -14.9 66.62
-2.97 -7.8 51.60
-2.03 -38.1 29.17
14 -8.18 +20.6 177.06
9 -2.13 -5.0 25.89
10 -.55 -20.8 8.41
9 -1.48 -25.6 17.91
.;. -1.25 -34.1 15.74
6 -2.14 -32.9 28.48
11 -1.98 -8.7 "18.34
6 -.22 -54.8 5.86
7 +.49- -60.0 10.65
15 -2.0'1 -.9 61.27
12 -2.17 -27.8 27.59
21 -2.39 -45.4 20.17
... -.51 -50.3 6.71
9 -1.81 -5.0 12.33
7 -.38 -24.6 6.67
16 -1.41 +9.0 68.69
67- -1.04 -18.4 14.72
17 -.09 -32.8 12.74
37 -.01 +17.3 7.74
12 -3.53 -4.7 51.81
19 -.45 +8.9 34.32
10 -.56 -14.9 5.10
25 -2.87 -7.7 42.40
34 -1.23 -12.3 16.44
8 -1.31 +1.5 35.58
5 -1.87 -36.8 17.58
.. -8.92 -33.1 63.08
... -.18. -65.9 1.40


./
Name Div; Yld
LyonBas A 1.00 3.5
MEMC ... ...
MGIC ... ...
MGM Rsts.. .
Macys .40 1.4
Manitowoc .08 .9
ManpwrGp .80 2.4
Manulife g .52 ...
MarathnO s .60 2.4
MarathPn 1.00 3.1
MktVGold .40 .7
MktVRus. .18 .7
MktVJrGId 2.93 10.9
MarlntA .40 1.4
MarrVac n ...
Masco .30 3.6
McDrmlnt ...
Mechel ... ...
MedcoHIth ... ...
Medtmic .97 2.9
Merck 1.68 5.1
Meritor ... ...
MetUfe .74 2.7
MetroPCS.. .. ...
MobileTele 1.06 6.9
Molycorp ...
Monsanto 1.20 1.8
MorgStan .20 1.5
Mosaic .20 .4
MotdaMon ...
NCR Corp.
NRG-Egy ... ...


S Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last9
... -1.13., -3.4 28.65
... -43 -65.2, 3.92
... -.25 -74.7 2.58
... -.54 -37.6 9.27
11 -.91 +16.4 29.45
... -1.99 -32.3' 8.88
.. -2.59 -47.9 32.71
-.70 -39.9 10.32
6 -1.47 +9.7 24.66
... -.55 '17.3 32.27
... -2.27 -10.9 54.79
... -1.75' -27.4 27.54
-2.27 -32.4 26.97
55 -1.16 -32.8 27,92,
.. +.54 -1.9 17.65
.. .59 -33.5 8.42
12 -1.06 -51.2 10.10
... -1.26 -69.3 8.97
16 -1.54 -12.3 53.74
11 -.26 -9.2 33.68
12 -1.79 -8.0 33.16
8 -.31 -76.1 4.90
7 -2.71 --37.2 27.91
12 -.55 -40.5 7.51'
12 +1.51 -25.9 15.47
27 -1.38 -45.9 26.98
23 -3.68 -2.8 67.71
8 -.95 -51.3 13.26
10 -3.56 -35.4 49.30
-.16 +32.6 38.60
11 -.83 +5.8 16.26
16 -1.81 -4.2 18.71


Name DIv YId
Nabors ......
NalGnd 3.00 6.2
NOilVarco .48 .7
NY CmryB 1.00 8.8
NewellRub .32 2.2
NewmlM 1.40 2.2
NexlEraEn 2.20 4.2
NISource .92 4.3
NobleCorp .55 1.7
NokiaCp .55 10.4
NorflKSo 1.72 '2.4
Nucor 1.45 4.1
OcciPetl 1.84 2.1
Och-Z.ff 1.07 14.3
OtftceDpt
OIISvHT 14.2 .1
PG&EC Op 1.82 4.9'
PNC 1:40 2.9
PPLCorp 1.40 4.9
PatriotCoal ... ...,
PeabdyE .34 1.0;
Penney .80 2.7
PepsiCo 2.06 3.3
PetrbrsA 1.34 5.9
Petrobras 1:26 5.2
Pfizer .80 4.3
PhilipMor 3.08 4.3
Potash s .28 .7
PS USDBull...
ProLogis 1.12 4.4
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
ProUltQQQ ... ....
PrUShQQQ rs... ....
ProUItSP .31 .8
ProUShL20 .. .
ProUSSP500...,
PrUltSP500 s.03 .'1
ProUSSIvrs.:. ..
ProUShEuro...
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.3
ProUSR2K ms.... ..
PrudentI 1.45 3.2
PSEG 1.37T 4.4
PulteGrp ...
QksilvRes .. ...
RadlanGrp .01 .5
Raytheon 1.72 4.0
RegionsFn .04 1.1
Renren n ... ...
ReynAmer 2.24 5.6
RioTlnto 1.17 2.5,,
RiteAid ... ...
RylCarb .40 1.7
SKTIcm -.;..
SLMCp '.40 3.3
SpdrDJIA 3.168 2.8
SpdrGod ... ....
S&P500ETF2.46 2.1
SpdrHome .31 2.1
SpdrS&PBk .26 1.5
SpdrLehHY4.23 10.8
SpdrRetl .49 1.0
SpdrOGEx .50 1.0
Spd&MetM .42 :9'
Safeway .58 3.1
StJude .84 2.4
Salesforce ...
SandRdge ...
Sanofi 1.82 5.7
SaraLee .46 2.6
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.5
Schwab .24, 2.2
SemiHTr .2.15 2.3
SiderurNac .81 10.7
SilvWhtng .18 .6
SouthnCo 1.89 4.5
SwstAirl .02 .3
SwstnEngy ...


-* ', : ., .. ,-. .. : .'

Wkly YT Wkly Wkiy YTD Wkly
PE Ch %Chg Last Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


16 -2.61 -31.9 15.98
... -2.08 +9.8 48.71
15 -2.98 -4.1 64.52
10 '-.55 -39.6 11.38
32 -.90 -21:6 14.25
15 -1.69 +3.8 .63.77
13 -2.41 +1.1 52.57
19 -.65 +21.2 21.35
24 -2.61 --9.3 32.46
... -1.22 -48.7 5.29
14, -2,85 +12.1 70.44
18 -2.59 -18.8 35.57
12 -7.63 -11.6 86.69
... -.42 -51.9 7.49
... -.35 -63.7 1.96
.. -9.57 -19.7 112.85
15 -1.79 -22,2 .37.21
8 -3.62 -19.2 49.07
11 -.96' +8.5 28:57
... -1.23 -58.1 '8.11
10, -3.28 -48.8 32.78
18 -1.96 -8.4 29.61'
16 -1.40 -4.3 62.49.
... -2.08 -33.7 22.64,
... -2.24 -35.5 24.41'
12 -1.08 +5.4 18.45
15 -1.78 +21.8- 71.31
12 -2.63 -21.2 40.67
.. +.41 -1.3 22.42
...-2.33 -20.5 25.21
... +2.02 +.8 44.21
... +2.04 -2.4 23.19
... -7.23 -10.3 73.03
... +4.44 -11.3, 51.59
... -4.03 -17.7 39.53
... -.50 -49.6 18.66
... +2.25 -9.8 17.50
.-7.57 -30.3 47.61
, +.95 -65.0 13.76
... +.78 -4.0 19.50-
11 -1.00 -11.5 17.58
... +6.79 -1.2 49.64
6 -3.62 -23.5 44.91
11 -1.48 -1.9 31.21
... -.25 -30.6 5.22
3 -1.24 -53.3 6.88
,... -.15 -72.9 2.19
8 -.88 -6.2 43.12
22 -.41 -47.3 N 3.69
.. -.57 -79.4 3.71
16 -.12 +22.6 39.99
... -5.29 -35.3 46.34
... -.07 +24.6 1.10
9 -2.89 -50.7 23.19
... +.19 -22.7 14.41
13 -1.08 -4.8 11.99
...-.59 -3.0 112.14
... -422 +17.8 163.40
... -5.64 -7.5 116.34
.. -1.03 -14.0 .14.98
...-1.23 -32.0 17.63
...-1.23 -8.3 36.43
...-2.84 +.3 48.50
-4.61 -8.7 48.14
.. -4.70 -32.2 46.63
11 -.29 -16.3 18.83
12 -1.75 -18.6 34.78
... -8.50' -20.5 104.93
9 -.78 -13.3 6.35
... -1.67 -1.6 31.72
13 -.40 +1.3 17.74
20 -4.95 -20.5 66.37
16 -.49 -37.1 10.77
-2.20-13.2 28.25
... -1.26 -54.7 7.55
21 -1.32 -20.8 30.91
18 -.73 +11.1 42.47
34 -.31 -42.2 7.50
19 -3.59 -6.4 35.03


SpectraEn 1.12 4.0 16 -.59 +13.0
SprintNex ,.. : .. '.. -.24 -43.7
SPMatls ..82 2.6 ... -1.85 -18.2
SPHIthC .64 2.0 ... -1.14 +.7
SPCnSt .85. 2.8 ... -.69 +3.6
SPConsum .611 1.7. ....-1.55 -2.9
SPEngy 1.08 1.7 ... -4.32. -6.5
SPDR Fnd .20' 1.7 ... -.72 -26.1
SP Inds .69 22 ... -1.76 -10.6
SPTech .36 1.5 -1.20- -4.7
SPUtl 1.36 4.1 ... -1.21 +6.7
StarndHtI .50 1.2 .14 -5.67 -28.6
StateStr .72 2.0 11 -2.26 -21.8
Suncorgs .44 9 -3.60 -29.3
Suntech ... ... 2 -.05 :71.4
SunTrst .20 1.2 16 -1.56 -44.0
Supvalu .35 5.0 59 -1.08 '-27.0
Synovus :04 2.8 ... -25 -46.6
Sysco 1.08 4.0 14 -.72' -7.9
TJX .76' 1.3 17 -.79 +32.3
TaiwSemI .52 4.3 ... -.59 -3.7
TalismEg .27 ... -1.14 -45.9
Target 120 2.3 12 -1.79 -14.8
TeckRes g .80 ... -2.84 -49.4
TeleEsp s 2.14 12.6 -1.74 -25.5
TempurP ... ... 16-12.16 +22.1
TenetHith ... ... 10 -.33 -37.7
Teradyn ... ... 8 -1.49 -16.8
Tesoro 5 -1.31 +20.7
Texinst .68 2.4 12 -2.26 -14.5
Textron .08 .5 16 -1.19 -26.7
Themos ... ... 13 -1.48 -19.8
3MCo 2.20 2.9 13 -3.86 -11.8
TimeWam .94 2.9 12 -1.25 +.6
TollBros ... ... 40 -.31 -2.4
Transocn 3.16 .7.1 .. -2.14 -36.0
Travelers 1.64 3.1 14 -2.81 -4.1
TrinaSolar ... 2 +.09 -72.1
Tycolntl 1.00 2.3 14 -2.38 +7.0'
Tyson .16 .8 9 -.20 +11.8
UBSAG ... ... ... -.78 -34.9
USAilwy ... ... 7 -.40 -59.8
UtdContl ... ... 10 -.69 -33.2
UPS B 2.08 3.1 16 -2.68 -8.4
USBancop .50 2.1 11 -1.35 -10.9
USNGsrs... +.33 -33.1
USOIFd ... .:. -66 -4.7
USSteel .20 .9 ... -3.41. -61.9
UtdhlthGp .65 1.5 10 -.88 +20.9
Vale SA 1.76 8.0, ... -2.90 -36.7
Vale SA pf 1.76 8.6 ... -2.50 -31.9
ValeroE E .60 3.0 7 -1.58 -12.5
VangEmg .82 2.2 ....-2.43 -23.1
VerizonCm2.00 5.7 14 -1.11 -1.2
ViacomB 1.00 2.4 12 -2.84 +5.0
VimpelCm .79 7.0 8 +.07 -25.3
Visa .88 1.0 18 -1.79 +26.5
Walgm .90 2.8 '11 -.16 -16.7
WsteMInc 1.36 4.5 15 -.66 -17.8
Weathflnti ... ... 51 -1.58 -42.3
WellsFargo .48 2.0 9 -1.18 -24.1
Wendys Co .08 1.6 ... -.35 +5.4
WDigital .... ... 8 -1.04 -26.3
WstnRefin ... ... 6 -1.31 +5.9
WstnUnion .32 2.0 11 +.10 -12.2
Weyerh .60 3.9 18 -.93 -18.2
WmsCos 1.00 3.4 19 -.75 +20.1
WTIndia .18 1.1 -.80 -37.5
XLGrp .44' 2.3 25 -.94 -13.3
Xerox .17 2.2 13 -.31 -34.3
Yamnanag .20 1.4 16 -.77 +14.5
YingliGm ... ... 2 +.33 -61.4
Youku n ... ... ... -.91 -55.1
YumBmds 1.14 2.2 20 -1.12 +7.5


28.23
2.38 ,
31.41
31.71
30.37
36.33
63.83
11.78
31.16
24.01
33.43
43.41
36.24
27.06
2.29
16.53
7.03
1.41
27.07
58.75
12.07
12.01
51.21
31.31
17.00
48.93
'4.17
11.68
22.37'
27.7,9
17.33
44.42
76.13
32.36
18.55,
44.51
53A4tM
6.54
44.33
19.25,,
10.72,
4.02'
15.98
66.46
24.03"
8.02
37.16,-
22.27
43.67
21.9 -
20.58
20.23
37.01
35.35
41.61
11.23.
89.02
32.41.
30.31-
13.16.
23.61
4.67,'.
25.00 .
11.20
16.30"
15.48
"29.70
16.50
18.92
7.57..
14.65
3.81
15.72
52.72


Nasdaq Most Active


4 .

Wldy YTD WCkly
Name DIv YId PE Cha %Cho Last


AclivsBliz .17 1.4
AdobeSy ....
AkamaiT ... ...
AlteraCp If .32 .9
Amarin
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 20.2,
AmCapLtd ... ...
Amgen 1.12 2.0
Apple Inc ... ...
ApIdMall .32 3.1
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .15 .6
ArubaNet ...
Atmel ... ...
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.58 3.3
AvagoTch .44 1.5
Baidu
BioFuelEh .. ...
Biogenldc ...
BrigExp ... ...
Broadcom .36 1.2
Broadwdh ...
BrcdeCm ... ...
CA Inc .20 1.0
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene .. .
CentEuro ...
CentAl ... ...
ChkPoint ...
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .24 1.4
Clearwire ...
CognizTich...
Comcast .45 2.1
Comcsdcl .45 2.2


21 -.30' -5.5 11.75
14 -1.35 -16.1 25.83
26 -1.66 -44.1 26.31
13 -1.09 -4.1 34.12
... +.35 -13:4 7.10
96-14.74 +1.3 182.40
4 -.30 '-3.4 27.76
2 -.65 -13.5 6.54
14 -.92 -.5 54.65
13-11.37 +12.7 363.57
7 -1.07 -27.7 10.16
... +.62+112.4 10.83
...-1.92 +24.0 25.74
33 -2.84 -8.0 19.20
8 -.80 -32.5 8.31
25 -3.70 -22.0 29.80
19 -1.96 +3.6 47.93
13 -1.42 +.1 28.44
56 -7.02 +24.2 119.91
... -.22 -56.3 .76
23 +1.55 +62.9 109.20
23 -.01 +33.6 36.39
18 -3.19 -32.1 29.58
... +.16 -73.6 .61
28 +.47 -3.4 5.11
12 -.64 -19.0 19.80
24 -.86 +23.2 10.18
... -.20 -5.2 .91
25 -2.80 +1.9 60.24
1 -.02 -86.6 3.06
8 -1.63 -49.2 7.89
23 -.52 +15.4 53.40
... -1.89 -47.9 10.97
15 -.92 -13.5 17.50
... +.07 -70.1 1.54
23 -3.75 -14.7 62.48
15 -.43 -4.0 21.00
15 -.40 +.5 20.81


Name DIv
Cree Inc
Ctrip.com ...
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DiamondF .18
DirecTV A ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DryShips .12
E-Trade ..
eBay
ElectArts ...
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...,
FifthThird .32
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
FstSolar ...
Flextm ..
FocusMda ...
ForcePro ...
FosterWhl ...
GT AdvTc ...
GileadSci ...
Globlind ...
Google
GreenMtC ...
Grouponn ...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic ...
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
Illumina
Infosys .75
Inhibitex ...
Intel .84
Intuit .60


Wkly YTD Wkly
Yd PE Chg %Chg Last
... 26 -3.02 -63.8 23.85
... 23 +.29 -35.7 26.00
2.1 20 -1.72 -8.3 17.03
... 7 -.68 +4.9 14.22
... ... -.49 -77.5 7.85
.7 12 -8.82 -49.2 27.04
... 14 -1.54 +12.9 45.08
... 8 -.89 +21.3 23.84
.11 -.39 -60.8 2.15
... 34 -.09 -49.1 8.14
... 21 -1.58 ,+1.4 28.23
...... -1.16 +27.2 20.83
4.0 ... -.75 -20.5 9.17
1.1 15 -1.35 +4.1 26.11
... 16 -1.82 -22.0 42.15
2.9 9 -.92 -25.3 10.97
... 19 -1.96 -43.7 16.73
7.8 12 -.44 -41.1 8.24
... 7 -5.12 -69.0 40.32
... 7 -.34 -30.4 5.46
... 15 -7.80 -19.3 17.70
... ... -.02 -.5 5.48
... 13 -1.81 -49.3 17.50
... 5 -.37 -20.0 7.30
.. 11 -.60- +".4 39.28
... ... +.01 +15.2 7.98
... 18-31.88 -5.2 563.00
... 38 -.79 +51.1 49.66
...... -9.44 -35.8 16.75
... ... -.44 -4.9 3.31
... 27 -.83 -15.0 16.00
6.2 ... -.35 -59.7 5.13
...... -1.08 -70.6 7.03
... 35 -1.84 -56.9 27.30
1.5 18 -3.12 -34.3 49.97
... ...+2.22+328.8 11.15
3.7 10 -1.56 +8.1 22.73
1.2 25 -2.77 -.1 49.27


Name DIv
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JamesRiv ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.40
LamResrch ...
LibtlntAh ..
LifeTech
UnearTch .96
lululemn gs ...
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92
Maximintg .88
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .80
NelLogicM ...
NetApp
Netflix ...
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OmnMiVsn
OnSmcnd ..
Oracle .24
PMCSra
Paccar .72.
PacEth rsh ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.28
PeopUtdF .63
PerfectWd ...
Pharmssts ...
Popular
Power-One
PwShsQQQ.41
PriceTR 1.24


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 1 +.01 -77.2 1.58
... 34 -1.43 -34.0 9.56
... 11 -1.02 -74.8 6.38
.. 15 -.22 -47.4 3.48
3.3 9 -2.31 +8.9 42.08
... 8 -3.72 -29.0 36.76
... 14 -.77 -3.9 15.16
... 19 -1.52 -35.0 36.08
3.4 12 -2.15 -17.9 28.39
... 4-2.80 +35.2 46.26
... 11 -1.51 -29.2 13.14
3.3 14 -.84 +8.3 27.55
3.7 14 -1.97 +1.3 23.92
... 48 -.47 +32.5 8.43
.. 37 -.79 -31.4 5.50
3.3 9 -1.00 -12.9 24.30
... ... -.06 +57.0 49.31
... 20 -.49 -37.7 34.25
... 15-14.20 -63.7 63.86
1.2 14 -.35 +9.7 15.97
1.2 14 -.55 -.9 16.27
... 16 -1.58 +22.4 22.26
... 13 +.11 -8.8 14.04
... 4 -1.92 -64.8 10.41
... 19 -.50 -30.0 6.92
.8 16 -1.86 -8.2 28.74
.. 19 -.41 -36.7 5.44
.1.9 15 -1.88 -35.0 37.28
.. ... -.01 -75.1 1.26
1.0 10 -2.26 -11.3 19.11
4.7 19 -.89 -11.6 27.33
5.3 21 -.36 -15.6 11.82
... 4 -2.57 -58.3 9.87
... ...+60.50+511.4 133.17
... ... -.02 -54.5 1.43
4 -.78 -58.2 4.26
.8 ... -2.52 -2.9 52.88
2.5 17 -2.89 -23.1 49.61


Name Div YId
PrUPShQQQ...
Qualcom .86 1.7
RFMicD ... ...
Rambus
RschMotn ...
RiverbedT ...
SanDisk ...
SeagateT .72 4.7
Sequenom .
SvArts rsh ...
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ... ...
Sonus
Spreadtrm .20 .8
Staples .40 2.9
Starbucks .68 1.7
StlDynam .40 3.5
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr .24 1.6
Tellbs .08 2.1
TevaPhrm .90 2.4
TiVo Inc ... ...
TrQuinl ... ...
UnivDisp ...
UrbanOut ...
VerlxPh ...
VirgnMdah .16 .7
Vodafone 2.10 8.2
Windstrm 1.00 9.0
Wynn 2.00 1.9
Xilinx .76 2.5
YRCrsh ...
Yahoo
Yandex n ...
ZionBco .04 .3


Wkly Y'T Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last Name


... +3.04
21 -3.81
19 -.95
50, -.87
3 -2.19
68 -2.17
9 -3.16
14 -.85
-.15
-.08
...-10.97
44 -.03
12 -2.86
... -.37
12 -2.46
10 -.42
25 -1.18
10 -1.21
18 -.86
14 -.96
... -.16
12 -2.76
... -.87
8 -.50
... -8.89
19 -.77
... -1.69
.. -.75
... -1.33
21 -.51
25 -9.74
14 -1.40
... +.00
18 -.28
...-1.90
...-1.52


Div Y


Id


AbdAsPac .42 6.2
AdeonaPh ...
Adventrx
AlexcoR g ...
AlldNevG ...
AmApparel ...
AntaresP ...'
Aurizon g ...
AvalRaren ...
Banks.com ...
Banro g
BarcUBS36 ...
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs .
BritATob 3.86 4.4
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCda g .01
CheniereEn...
ChenlereE 1.70 10.5
CrSuiHiY .32 11.2
DejourEg ...
DenisnMg ...
EV UdDur 1.25 8.5
ExeterR gs ...
FrkStPrp .76 7.6
GabGidNR t.68 11.1
GascoEngy ...
Gastargrs ...
GenMoly
GoldResrc .60 3.3
GoldenMin ...
GoldStrg ...
dranTrrag...
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSilvg ...
HKN
KeeganRg ... ...


v- -. ..ost--


Wkly YTD Wy Wkly YTDl Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chfg Last


KimberRg ...
LadThalFn ...
LucasEngy ...
MadCatzg ...
MdwGoldg ..
Minefndg ...
NeoStem ...
Neoprobe ...
Nevsung .10
NwGoldg ...
NA Pallg ...
NthnO&G ...
NovaGIdg ...
Oilsandsg ...
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAth ...
PionDrt ...
Procerars ...
QuestRMg ...
RareEleg ...
Rentech ..
Richmnntg ...
Rubicon g ...
SamsO&G
SeabGdg ...
TanzRyg ...
Taseko ..
TmsatlPet ...
TriValley ...
TriangPet ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn...
VantageDdr...
VimetX ..
VistaGold ...
YMBiogq ...


-.16 -28.6
-.18 +81.2
+.30 -5.6
-.03 -42.1
-.15+158.3
-.42 -.8
-.07 -63.8
-.21 -.5
-.28 -32.3
-.74 -1.9
-.26 -.02
-2.20 -24.5
-128 -32.2
-.01 -54.8
-20 -44.4
-.14 -71.4
-2.05 +2.4
-1.56+132.9
-.15 -52.1
-.67 -69.6
-.21 +18.0
-.46+102.9
-.30 -42.6
-.09 +56.1
-.19 -33.1
+.03 -65.3
-20 -47.4
-.22 -64.9
+.01 -64.9
-.84 -24.8
-.17 -71.2
-.44 -61.7
-.25 -55.6
-.08 -44.8
-2.76 +23.2
-.31 +30.5
-.30 -42.1


1.00
2.12
220.
.59'
2.17
10.95
.51
2.05
5.10
9.57
2.76
20.54
9.67
.19
222
121
9.02,
14.44
2.70
4.88
1.44
10.37
3.28
2.06
20.52
2.53
2.76
1.17
.20
4.89
.86
1.53
2.68
1.12
18.29
3.12
1.35


S Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


.. -_ -- ;-, I


I


. V


-j I It











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


mragi^
LI*UYIc


iBEfLL Tc


One "am per ad 250 |

Each item must include a pdditionae.
S Thies to a on-sendale rate.25




One atem per ad e Ie
4 lines 6 days hdddtronal
personal merchandise totalling $500 or lessm
SThis I a non-retundable at.




S ne item per a d toa h 1.0 additional.
4 lines 6 days line $1.15



I Rate applies to prvste Individuals selling
personal merchandise talking $2,500 or tess.
S Each item must Include a price
This isa non-refundable rate.




4 nes ays line $1.45








Rate applies to private Individuals seeing
personal merctandise totaling $00 or less.
Each Iem must include a price.
S This a non-relundable rate.
One Hem per ad 3.I |
lines-* 6 days d $1.55 j
Rate appitas to private individuals s1 .
personal merchandise totalling St or leesa.
Each item must include a price.
This a a non.-refundable


4 1750
*nladch Slt8' ,FEach al lillio i1t 5 r



Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one monthW.1..$D2.00.'
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additibronal $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You car call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their.
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Oue-office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax.or email your ad.
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad Is to Appear. Call by: FaxlEmall by:
Tuesday' Mon.,10:00am. Mon., 9:00 a.m.
Wednesday Mn., 10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00 am.
Thursday Wed.,10:00a.m. Wed.,9:00a.m.
S Friday Thurs.,10:00a.m. Thurs.,9:00 am.
Saturday FRi.,10:00a.mi. Fi.,9:00 a.m.
Sunday Fri., 1(00a.m. Fli.,9:00a.m.'
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad .
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please 'call 755-5440'
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated. .

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College WILL RECEIVE BIDS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Renovations to Building 015
Florida Gateway College
Lake City, Florida
FGC Bid No. 12-1-02
Architect's Project No. 1102
Date & Time for Receiving Bids:
Thursday, December 8, 2011 AT
2:00 P.M.
Date, Time and Place for
Pre-Bid Conference: All interested
bidders are required to attend the
MANDATORY PRE-BID CON-
FERENCE-to be held at 10:00 A.'M.
local time on Thursday, December 1,
2011 on the main campus of Florida
Gateway College. Conference will
start in Room 001B, Building 003
which is physically located at 127 SE
Student Way, Lake City, Florida
32025
Place for Receiving Bids: Bids may
be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
149 S.E. College Place .
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids are to be pre-.
sented to: .
Florida Gateway College.
Mail Room (Bldg 025)
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped!'by a Mail Room represents- .
Stive prior to .the specified bid open-
ing date/time. The' College will not
be responsible for Postal or other de-
livery service delays that cause a bid
to arrive .at Florida Gate3ay Col-
lege's Mail Room after the designat-
Se6d bid opening date/time. Bids that
are mailed must be clearly marked
on the outside of the envelope "BID
# 12-1-02 Renovations TO building
015, Florida Gateway College, BID
OPENING Thursday, December 8,
2011". Bids will be opened in a pub-
lic bid opening in
Room 001B, Building 003 which is
physically located at 127 SE Student
Way, Lake City, Florida 32025.
Contractor's Prequalification: ALL
PRIME CONTRACTORS WISH-
ING TO BID ,THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUAEIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to submit a bid on'
this project must prequalify with
Florida Gateway College. To' be
considered for prequalification, con-
3tractors must request,'complete and
.submit a prequalification package to
the College. Prequalification pack-
ages may be obtained from the'Col-
lege's Director of Purchasing; Bill
SBrown at (36) 754-4360 or by e-mail
at biUlbrown@fgc.edu: COMPLET-
ED prequalification packages must
be returned, lo the College's Mail
Room which is located in Building
025 not later an l:00 PM local time
Tuesday, Noeember 29, 2011.i. The
College will not be responsible for
Postal or other delivery service de-
lays that cause'-a prequalification
package to arrive at thewMail Room
after the designated date/time. -
Bid Documents '.'.
Prepared' By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS :
3911 Newberry Road, Suite D'
Gainesville, FL 32607-
(352) 372-8424 FAX (352)' 377-
4945
Bid Documents
Available .'' From:
http://www.csa-
architect.com/biddocuments.htm
Project Description: The work in-
cludes, but is not limited to, the com-
plete renovation of the interior of
Building 015, on the main campus of
Florida Gateway College in .Lake
City, Florida.,
The work involves extensive demoli-
tion of the interior and new stud
walls, ceilings, flooring and related,
work. Included is a new mechanical
room in the interior existing space
with hew mechanical and electrical
systems included in the renovation
work. .
SThe existing HVAC system in the at-
tic space is to be demo'd'and re-
moved from the attic. The new
HVAC system is to be connected to
the Campus chilled water and steam
Systems.
Exterior work includes a masonry
closure wall around the perimeter of
the building and various sidewalk
areas to be filled in and/or repaired.
Right to Waive Irregularities and
Technicalities: Florida Gateway Col- "
lege reserves the. right to waive mi-
nor irregularities and/or technicali-
ties associated with this solicitation.
The Director of Purchasing of Flori-
da Gateway College shall be the final
authority regarding waivers of irreg-
ularities and technicalities. :
FOR THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College
Charles W. Hall, President
05529027
.November 13, 20, 27, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Best friend Lost

Know where he is?
Call 386-249-0164

facebook.com/chewylost


FOUND: Mini Poodle.
Fri. 11/18
89th Rd and 216th Street
HE IS HOME NOW!!


Services

A2Z of Lake City, Inc. Avail. I
Dec 1. Prof. House Cleaning Svcs.
Employees: Fingerprinted, Drug
screen & Bonded. 386-752-5655


100 Job
Opportunities

05529233
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
Construction Loan Specialist.
Responsible for the administra-
tive servicing of residential
construction loan portfolios.
Ability to read and interpret
surveys and title insurance
documents: Previous
construction or mortgage
lending experience preferred.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City FL 32056 or email
Turbeville.J(&ffsb.com
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer..

05529240
Insurance Verifier
High volume Medical facility
seeking an Insurance Verifier.
Duties include Verify insurance
for limits and parameters of
policy, data entry, gather
appropriate documentation, fill
out necessary forms and submit
authorization requests.
Maintain reports.
High school graduate, with a '
min. of 1 year medical insurance
verification.
Please send resume to
jpapesh(&cancercarenorthflori-
da.com or fax to 486-628-9231.

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full training provided
Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Entry level
Land surveying
help wanted
'386-454-8147
FARM LABORER
with transportation and familiar
with equipment. Leave Message @
386-752-3397
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) ,wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


PFLORIDA




ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,,
MATHEMATICS
S(o commence Spring TFrm 20121
T ar,:n .ollege- e i ara pit.na rory- -
iT.a r., m3i ..:t, : .c ir. .I ,:,. e pj '. :I-,.
ir- navaa'c .rm vi r ca nmTi al n-'r a i
c...,:,n a ;p,',,r g ,r'ti, ,p.',r mI '=ll ilr,
possible continuance based on enrollment
needs. Requires a Master's degree in,
mathematics; or master's degree with
'minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in
course work centered onr) mathematics.
'Ability to use technology in instruction.
Ability to teach on-line and distance
learning courses. Ability to work well with
others.Abillty to learn from colleagues
and to share knowledge. Ability to utilize
various'instructional strategies to reach
students. Ability to present information in
a coherent manner and the ability to fairly
evaluate student retention of that
Information. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience. Ability to
teach college level and preparatory
mathematics. .Salary: Based on degree
ind experience. Application Deadline:
Open Until Filled.
Persons interested should provide Col-
lege application, vita, and photocopies
of transcripts. AIlIforeign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
-evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at:
www.foc.edu
Human Resources
Ftorida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814,
E-Mail: humanr(dafac.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education and Employment


100 JOpportunities

Hall's Pump & Well and Carolyn
Height Water Company is seeking
someone to work in our Water
treatment section. Must have high
school diploma and be mechani-
cally inclined. Apply in person at
904 NW Main Blvd: 752-1854

t Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
Seeking caring,
experienced, qualified
Caregiver in Lake City.
850-510-8111
STYLIST NEEDED at
Southern Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info.


FLORIDA




INSTRUCTORICOORDINATOR,
PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT
PROGRAM
(224 Days-Tenure Track)
Florida Gateway College's Physical
Therapist Assistant program is CAPTE
accredited through 2020.The program is
supported by experiencedACCE full-time
faculty and adjunct faculty
Teach courses in the Physical Therapist
Assistant program. Advise students.
Conduct selection processor PTA program
students. Review PTA courses in areas
of syllabi, lesson plans, tests, course
offerings and sequences. Monitor program
and implement needed improvements..
Assist faculty in developing, preparing
and updating program material. Maintain.
accreditation processes of the Commission
on Accreditation in Physical Thehipy
Education (CAPTE). Keep informed of.
changes affecting programs as mandated
by accrediting agency. Maintain'accurate
literature regarding program's admission
requirements. Assist In the preparation of
program budget. Maintain PTAAdvisory
Committee. Oversee semi-annual
meetings. Assist in curriculum reviews.
Maintain communication with health care'
agencies. Promote positive relationships.:
Conduct student follow up surveys.
Educational Expeience Required: Master's
degree, with at least one degree in the field
of Physical Therapy or Physical Therapist
Assistant. Knowledge, Skills, Abilities
Required: Licensure as a physical therapist'
3d: ,': '" M ,,',,TiufT- J ', cj ; 'l-'i :"" ,
f ,. "i : l pj .:1..:| 3.l ,'la.:i. .a',lt '.l.' ..:3l
teaching experience; experience in
administration, educational theory and
methodology; experience in instructional:
design and methodology; experience in,'
student evaluation and outcomes
assessment. Desirable Qualifications:
Community College teaching experience.
DPT preferred.
Salary: Based oni degree and
experience. Application deadline:
Open until filled
Persons interested should provide College
application, vita, and photocopies of,
transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at:
www.fac.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Fl, 32025-2007
Phone*(386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: human( 4fac.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. VP/
ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Employment

STo place your
classified ad call

,gMnn. o


120 Medical
120Employment


05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


05529244
Advent Christian Village
658-JOBS (5627),
www.ACVillage.net
Join the Oldest Retirement
Community in Florida
FT RN Supervisor/
Long-term Care
FT supervisory position for RN
with unrestricted Florida
license, long-term care setting;
knowledge of LTC regs and pri-
or supervisory/management
experience required; prior expe-
rience in long-term care-prefer-
red; PC proficiency required for
EMR; will join anr interdiscipli-
nary team with strong focus on
compassionate care. BSN
strongly preferred.
FT Social Services Associate
FT position provides social
services support to long-term.
care residents and their families,
including assessments, care .
plans, advocacy &' education in'
an interdisciplinary team setting.
Bachelor's degree in human
services or related field
required. Master's degree
preferred. Experience with
geriatric or long-term care
populationpreferred.
Must be creative, energetic,
and organized.
Proficiency in electronic clinical
record keeping required.
Excellent benefits package
includes health, dental, life, dis-
ability, supplemental insurance;
'retirement; time off, access to
onsite daycare and fitness facili-
ties. Apply in person at person-
nel Office Monday through
Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00
p.m., or fax resume/credentials
- to (386)658-5761. EOE/Drug-
Free Workplace/Criminal
background checks required.
Excellent work environment.

0552924b
Meridian Behavioral'
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online':-
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps

For its Student Loan FQrgive-
ness program. Licensed Clini-
cians who serve in our approved
locations may qualify for up to
$60k in Student Loan forgive-
ness for F/T 2yr commitment.
Therapists:

LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred

* Case Management
.(adult & child)
4 Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic .
* Master's Therapist in '
Screening
Medical Services.
* RN frill-time Lake City CSU
* PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
* Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.prg
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


120 Medical
2 Employment

05529260
Medical Billing
Must have experience in all
aspects of coding, billing,
and collections.
Send resume in confidence to:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com or
Fax # 386-758-5987


240 Schools &
240, Education

05528912 .
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/28/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion,, $800 next class-11/28/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies


, ft






r!








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%,:


Black, female, CKC Toy Poodle.
Parents on Premises: Avail the end
of Nov. Deposits being taken. Will
hold tilChristmas. 386-758-7706
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate'from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they -
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


330 Livestock &
Supplies
WANTED: I Buy and Sell used -
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay cash. Call 386-935-1522


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood & .
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
-Wanted-Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. '"
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
SAfter 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri. '-.
Sat.& Sun, (8-4). 247-240R CR :'
49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252 .
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of '
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE :
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

2-- Tei Eighty Quarter Pike
Skate Ramps in fair/good
condition. $200.00 for both OBO.
386-755-0807
American Heritage Mahogany
Pool Table Perfect Christmas Gift.
regulation size, w/overhead bil-
liard lights. Racks, balls, cover.
3/4" slate. $1000. Firm 365-5099
Complete HO Train
Layout in time
for Christmas.
386-758-8724 ,
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
47x40. 5 Disc CD player/stereo
system w/speakers.
$45.00 for all obo. 386-752-6669 -;
GUNSHOW: 12/03 & 12/04 .
@ The Columbia County *,
Fairgrounds, Hwy 247 Lake City.
Sat 9am 4pm, Sun 9am-3pm.
Info: 386-325-6114


450 Good Things
50 to Eat ,

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor ;,
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans .,
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024 :
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville '.
386-963-4138 or 961-1420 :


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


SADvantage
-











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


450 Good Things
450 to Eat
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent
2 & 3 br/lba Mobile Homes for
Rent. CH/A includes water, sewer,
garbage. $475./ $525. mo. 1st &
last mo + $300 dep. 386-961-8466
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Monthly Specials
$550. mo. Free Water.
386-984-8448
2br/2ba $500 mo. new flooring,
fresh paint. ,Also, Resd'l'RV lots.
Btwn Lake City & G'ville. Access
to 1-75 & 441 (352)317-1326,
LIKE NEW DW 3br/2ba. CH/A,
on 1 ac lot. 10 min. south of Lake
City. Pet on approval. $750 mo.
plus elec. & dep, 386-758-2408
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale


2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
LS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896'
OWNER FINANCING
SWMH on 2 lots, fenced, paved
streets, close to town. MLS 79218,
$49,900. Coldwell Banker Bishop,
Elaine Tolar 386-755-6448
EXCELLENT LOCATION
3br/2ba MH, deck, porch. Well
maintained. MLS 79304 $55,000.
Coldwell Banker Bishop, Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Palm Harbor Homes
4/2 From 499 Mo Loaded
3/2 From 399 Mo Loaded
Homes on Your Lot 0 Down
800-622-2832
All 2011's Must Go!
All Homes at Dead cost! Save up
To $10,000. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville. (352)872-5566
Land and Home Packages
for Mobile homes and modular
homes. No Money down if you
own your land. 100 mile radius.
North Pointe Homes; Gainesville
(352)872-5566
We Need Used Mobile Homes!
Will buy or trade. Top Dollar,, Paid,,,
North Point Homesi,
S(352)872-5566.


REDUCED! 3/2 MH on 1 acre in
nice sub. paved rd. metal roof. .
Completely remodeled. new every-
thing! Only $39,000 386-249-1640

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land r'
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS.74862 Brittany'
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 "ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$120,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well Maintained MH on 10ac. 2
car, covered carport, huge deck.
Wood laminate flooring. MILS
79417; $94,900 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 396-397-3473
Nice 1620sf 3br/2ba DW on 4
wooded acres, owner finance avail.
$119,900 Brenda Forrester,
Forrester Realty 352-339-6069
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 2.5 acres,
Mayo area, small down/$650 mo,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05528965
SPRING .HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.'
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. "1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7612
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com


710 Unfurnished Apt. 805 Lots for Sale
For Rent80LosfrSl


Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, Large 2 br Apt.
In town. Close to shopping.
$485 mo + $485 dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA in
Gatorwood S/D. Washer/dryer.
hook up, clean. $650. 1st, last +
security. 386-867-9231
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off'
Hwy90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer ikup..
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep'386-961-9181 ,


70i Furnished Apts.
72, For Rent.,'.
SRooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished, Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. person $135,
.2 petsons:$150. weekly.
386-752-5808

fi Unfu IrIished
-730 Home r Rent
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
/TOWNHOUSE 2br plus..
bonus room. %/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC 750. mo plus,
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
\ 386-752-3225 :,,
3BR/2BA CB home Carport hard-
wood floors. CH/A Fenced yard.
Good area $750 mo plus security.
386-752.--Ol8'or623-1'698-.-


,3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.,
home brick, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083
For lease-Lakewood sub. LG
brick, 2600 sq. ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lg lot by Lake Jeffrey. $1275.m
+last+sec. Bruce 386-365-3865

750f Business &
/ Office Rentals,
05529267
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mtli
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
'(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor'
For Lease: E BayaAve. Two -
1000,sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.
Zoned Comm'l or Resd'l. 5br/3ba
home.or professional office.
$1000. mo. w/1 yr. lease.
Contact 386-752-9144 or
386-755-2235 or 386-397-3500

805 Lots for Sale
Gorgeous 20.02 aq: Ready for new
home. Land has 2 power poles, 2
wells & 24X30 slab. MLS 78126
$132,000. REO Realty Group
Heather Craig 386-466-9223

North Florida


Lak e City Repr* .


Lake City Reporter


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper'are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCYj
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
LOCATION! CONDITION! .
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt With city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPJPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233 .
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL',
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.-
386-755-5110 #78838
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 $1 29,000 Call Paula
Lawrence 38,6-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate

COUNTRY CLOSE 3/2 brick, 3 /
acres. pole barn, workshop. fruit
trees. $129,900 #78096
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Great home in Woodcrest. super
location. 3br/2ba New A/C,
covered back porch. IMLS 75198,
$129,900 Coldwell Banker
Bishop. Elaine Tolar 755-6488
HUD HOME 4.77 ac, near
G'ville. 3/2, as is $95,500 Call
Robin Williams 365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com 091--
434983 Hallmark Real Estate
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large
oaks, wood floors, fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Lake Home in town. 4b/3b. For-'
mal LR, DR & modem Kit,
f'place, upgrades. MLS 76085,
$299K. Coldwell Banker Bishop.
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Nice 4/2 on 4 ac. w/open floor
plan. 2 living rooms, eat-in-
kitchen, dining room & more.
MLS 76150. $79,000 Result Real-
t,. Brittany Stoeckert. 397-3473,
4/2 Immaculate new carpet &
fixtures. Lg Kitchen, fenced yard.
2 car garage. MLS 77602.
$159,200. REO Realty Group.
Nancy Rogers. 386-867-1271
Amazing 4/3 Ranch Style home
w/over 2,000 sf. 56.28 rolling ac.
Too many extras to list. $500,000.
MLS 78420 REO Realty Group.
Heather Craig 386-466-9223
NICE 4br/2ba Cedar home,'
outside city limits, big rooms.
Reduced to sell. MLS 78769'
$169,000. Coldwell Banker
Bishop. Bruce Dicks, 243-4002
Lovely 2 story on 7 ac. 3br/2ba,
fenced, fish ponds, pole barn, Ig
kitchen, oaks, fruit trees. MLS
79306 $174,900 Coldwell Banker
Bishop Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
.MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
SHORT SALE 3/2, Built 2007,
wood floors, Game room.
,REDUCED! Call Ginger Parker
386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate


Private Estate
Within the city limits. Beautiful -
older home with .nature land-
scaping and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5
baths, 3 fireplaces, private paved
drive. 39.7 acres of property in-
cluded with home. $994,000 or
,500 per mo. for rent or home
plus 2 acres only $495,000. Call
for additional info and showings.

Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887
_1 or co-owner (386)397-5131


MOBILE HOME PARK with 1g.
brick owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Q860 Investment
860 Property
GREAT INVESTMENT,
building features 2 units w/
2br/2ba, Income producing. MLS
79271, $230,000. Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert. 386-397-3473
8 0 Real Estate
0 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605 .

950 Cars for Sale'

1997 LINCOLN Towncar
Under 40,000 miles. Very Good
condition. $5,500
386-623-3727

t' RecreatiOnal
951J Vehicles
2003 Allegro 30DA. Workhorse
Chassis. 18000 miles, garage kept.
Excellent cond. w/many extras
$45,000. 386-754-5660
99 Coleman Fleetwood Pop-up
camper, Sleeps 8. 2 king size beds,
fridge, stove & AC/heat. Good
shape. $3,000. 386-755-9559


If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain ,the
same for the additional rnu.q



( -


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eat detad 386.755.5445


820 Farms &
S Acreage
12 acres+/-, Northwest comer of
CR-18 and 81st Ave. Asking Price
$745;000. Call (801) 715-9162 for
more information
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.IandOwnerFinancing.com
20 AC Wooded tract.
Very nice piece of Land. 10 miles
from Cedar Key. MLS 78886,
$70,000. Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
,lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
OJ0 Property


a we.]ek


1 O.Days

ONLY


1$41 1


Classified Department: 755-5440







Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


jjij!!!~~i


Toadvertise YOUR business _in..........ion,..leas. call 752 1293...
I T h- F'.7 .1 I -


I


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ji
I
I,



-j


Large Selection of Soap Fragrances
(ask foryour favorite scent)


B' by de.-gn

Holiday
Silk arrangefmnt
Ask about Gift Certificates


We do favors for:
Weddings. Baby Showers
and anv occnstion--
S- og MechanpkC
Coffee & Monogrammed
!75 IN. Marion Avenue
(386) 243-8298
ts Downtown Open 'tuesday-Saturday
DOtin. tlhydl. Wnwr


i livirpwTOWON"mOlffz[l


1^lTIELESS





i 386-4(
1034 SW Main Blvd., (next to


NiEmIORIES'"
Tia Collection
Bedroom Suite
Q 1189
,Queen bed, dresser/mirror, chest, two nightstands.
66-1888
the Money Man)Lake City, FL 32055 -


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-, I


- maaMe tannJw inwm mn*fl


obstetrics and Gynecology
- Weight Loss, 69
Hair Removal .69
SAccepting all Insurance. Nb ins ,isit $50

(38} 466-1106
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Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@Jakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter




LIFE


iindav. November 27. 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Fresh

pecans

for the

holidays
T he pecan tree, a
common sight in
North Florida, is
a large deciduous
North American
native. It grows in areas with
long, hot summers and cooler
winters. The pecan, Carya
illinoensis, is in the same fam-
ily as some other stately nut
trees, including black walnut
and hickory. For those ofus
not fortunate enough to have
our own pecan trees, be aware
that the time to buy fresh
pecans is October through
December. When buying .
pecans in the shell, look for
smooth, clean shells that are
free of mold, scars or cracks.
They should feel weighty for
their size and should not 'ratle'
when shaken. If this is your
year to plant a few pecan trees,
take some time to research the
cultivars best suited for North
Florida and your personal
needs ,Some of characteristics
you can choose are kernel
size and color, shell thickness,
flavor, shape, crop size and tim-
ing. Most importantly, make
sure you chose a cultivar bred
for disease resistance. Male
and female flowers may bloom
at slightly different times, so
choose two or three different
cultivars to help with adequate
wind pollination.' A list of
dependable cultivars can be
found at http://edis.ifas.ufl.
edu/HS106 -
Planting time is recom-
mended from late November
to February when the trees
are dormant This will allow
roots to grow and become
established before spring. No
soil amendments are needed,
and fertilizer should not be
used at planting time. Refer to
the publication http://edis.ifas.
ufl.edu/HS229 for the correct
watering and fertilizing practic-
es for new and for established
trees.
Pecan trees, which can
spread up to 50 feet, need lots
of room if expected to produce
well. Growers understand
how yields are reduced by
overcrowded groves. So be
sure to give your plants plenty
of space.Most soil types are tol-
erated, but the trees require a
soil pH of 5.5 to 6.5. If the soil
is more alkaline, zinc and man-
ganese deficiencies develop
and stress the plant It is best
to do a soil test before planting
so the soil pH can be adjusted
in advance. Although pecan
trees can survive drought peri-
ods, they need adequate mois-
ture for decent yields while in
production. Pecan trees are
often troubled by a host of
insects and diseases. Buy dis-
ease resistant plants and check
the plants often for any prob-
lems. Pathogens and insects
can remain in fallen leaf and
branch litter and re-infest the
Tree in the spring. Clean up
debris from beneath the tree
to help keep infestations from
reoccurring.Master Gardeners
can help you with nutty
problems on Tuesday and
Thursday mornings at the UF/
WAS Extension Office. Stop in
or call them at 752-5384.
D. Nichelle Demorest is a hor-
ticulture agent with the Columbia
County.Extension of the
University of Florida Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences.


Wendy Schaumburg, a volunteer at the Wishing Well Gift Shop in the Shands LakeShore Regional Medical Center, displays a few glass sun
catchers that she.makes herself. Schaumburg, who doubles as the secretary for the center's auxiliary group, said that an average each piece
takes about a day to create. Her pieces are also for sale at the gift shop.


Stained

: LG~lass








Wonder
a'


Local woman

excels at the art

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Wendy
Schaumburg's
hands look no
different from
many other
people's hands.
There are no cuts, scratches
or bandages to indicate she
works with glass, but a visit to
the Shands LakeShore Regional
Medical Center will not only
confirm her work, but show
how talented Schaumburg has
become in creating stained glass
artwork and other forms of
hand-crafted art
Schaumburg is a volunteer at,
the Shands LakeShore Regional
Medical Center Gift Shop. She's
worked at the gift shop as a vol-
unteer for close to 18 months.
Schaumburg, 58, moved to
Columbia County from the
Miami about four years ago.
"I've been doing stained
glass for about 15 years,"
Schaumburg said. "I enjoy doing
it When I started volunteer-
ing at the gift shop, I asked Pat
Hunziker, the auxiliary presi-
dent, if I could bring some of my
pieces in to sell."
Schaumburg started by
bringing in small sun catch-
ers, but now she has several
pieces of the art she's created
in the shop, including stained
glass picture frames, stained
glass crosses, stained glass fans
(night lights), pot holders and
knit stocking caps for newborns.


JAMOUNI mAI InW mLr.nEruLanu .ly rnupuIouI
A popular creation is glass.picture frames available in differ-
ent colors and styles.


Schaumburg carefully carved dozens of pieces of glass of various colors and matched them up to form a
unique pattern. After mounting a light behind them, they become a nifty desk lamp. She said that she learned
to work with glass more than 15 years ago and has sold at least 200 pieces.


"I've made over 50 frames
for the shop that I've sold," she
said.
Pat Hunziker said
Schaumburg is a valued mem-
ber of the hospital's auxiliary
and her talent speaks for itself.
"She makes stained glass sun
catchers, frames, night lights
and much more for sale in our
gift shop," she said. "They are
her designs and we sell a lot of


them. She will custom design
for customers in their chosen
colors."
Schaumburg took a course at
a community school where she
learned to create stained glass
artwork. She creates and makes
the pieces in her garage.
"I like glass," she said. "I like
the way the colors are. They're
bright, beautiful, the sun shines
through them. It's a lot of fun


- it's tricky. You've got to cut
it right and you've got to fit it
right I enjoy it"
Schaumburg normally sells
her hand-crafted pieces through
the gift shop on consignment.
She said she decided to vol-
unteer her time at the hospital's
gift shop because she wasn't
working and she needed some-'
GLASS continued on 2D


4










2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27,2011




Am I a good sport?


m I a good sport? I
guess I'm still learn-
ing, like the rest
of us. We have a
lifetime to learn it. I
remember an incident in my 9th
grade junior high school football
team. During one rough after-
noon practice, the coach became
aware that I wasn't blocking
hard enough. He placed me in
front of a player named "Tiny.",If'
you've ever had a team member
named "Tiny," you know that
he's the biggest and toughest
guy on the teani; built like a
brick outhouse. Coach made us
butt helmets over and over, until
he was either satisfied with my
performance, or gave up on me.
I don't know which. .Later as we
showered in the locker room, I
was hit in the back of the head
with a wet towel. -As quickly 'as
I spun around in anger, the guys
had a good laugh. It wasn't until
years later that I realized it was
their way of saying, "You're okay,


Denny," like the tamer "high
five." It was a powerful lesson in
sportsmanship.
Another time: As a senior in
high school, I regularly played
football in the street with the
other kids on the block. My
friends Dennis and Stu got
into an argument over a rules
dispute. Dennis left, but soon
returned brandishing a baseball
bat. Alerting to the challenge,
Stu grabbed a nearby garbage
can to use as a shield. The battle
was on. As we watched, the can
suffered a terrible beating. The
bat was the undisputed winner.
Amazingly, there were no inju-
ries to the human participants.,
And by the way, all was soon for-
gotten, by next week's game.
The Wikipedia definition of
sportsmanship: "Sportsmanship
is an aspiration or ethos that a
sport or activity will be enjoyed
for its own sake, with proper
consideration for fairness, ethics,
respect, and a sense of fellow-


Robert Denny
* Bob.Penny8@gmail.com


ship with one's competitors. A
'sore loser' refers to one ;who
does not take defeat well, where-
as a good sport means being a
good winner, as well as being a
good loser." '
You don't have to be in a sport
to have sportsmanship. It's ani
attitude about respect and appre-
ciation of others, and wanting
them to have a good experience,
of support and success"-n their.
efforts. It's a social behavior
of showing we appreciate their
participation and what they


bring to the table. We all have
the chance to be "good sports."
Have you ever said, "Game over!
I'm taking my ball and going
home?" Don't feel bad; you're
just human like the rest of us.
So, what if there is an "I" in
win. There's no "I" in "team."
Grantland Rice, the great sports-
writer said, "It's not whether you
win or lose, but how you played
the game." The great catcher
Yogi, Berra said: "It ain't over 'til
it's over." As it is in sports, so ,
it is in life. After all is said and
done, you have to live with your-
self 24 hours a day. Wouldn't
you like to sped your life with
someone who's a good sport? ,
If you're a good sport, youwill:
surely enjoy living with. yourself
a lot more. I'm pretty sure that
most other people enjoy spend-
ing time with people they like,
too.
Where can we find opportuni-
ties to practice sportsmanship?
'Opportunities show up where


we look for them. Look around
you. We can be good sports
by feeling respect and showing
respect and appreciation for oth-
ers, wherever we go. Some good
places to practice sportsmanship:
How about that person closest
to you, your family and relatives,
friends, groups you hang out
with at school, work, church, or
the community? Support those
folks, and strengthen that posi-
tive connection. People really .
do like a good sport, and it adds
good feelings to others.
Still reading? I think you
already have that healthy /
sportsmanship attitude.
Congratulations. Isn't the world
a little better because you're
here? I think so.

* Bob Denny has enjoyed coun-
seled troubled youth and families
in Florida, and teaches psychology
at Florida Gateway College. Your
comments are welcome at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.com.


By Brandee A. Thomas
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE, Ga, -
Like -most students, Efre
Chavez was looking for a
easy A when he chose 1
take geology this semester
"I chose geology because
I thought it would be ea
ier than chemistry," sai
Chavez, a 20-year-old bus
ness administration major.
Gainesville State College.
'"I thought we were ju
going to be learning; abpi
a bunch of rocks and mine
als." ,
_. haL s partially 'tru
hflt dout se also require
c~;h to read maps. His eas
A had just become difficult
Chavez can't read a mal
In fact, he-can't even see
map. .
He lost his sight when h
was just 9,years old, a resu
of detached, retinas.
"Part of the geography
and geology classes at GS
involve; reading and inte
preting topographic map
These are two-dimension
maps that use various syr
bols and lines to depict el
vation and other geograpt
ic features," said Chr
Semerjian, Gainesville Stat
associate professor of geol
raphy. '
Ordinarily, 'visual
impaired students would'v
been referred to' a there
dimensional model to us
but Chavez didn't 'want A
be singled out. He wanted
to learn in the same manni
as his peers.
"This was the first tin
that we've been given th
challenge of how to teach
visually impaired student t
read a flat map; on a piece
paper," Semerjian said.
Chavez's desires ma
have presented the college
with a challenge, but hi
proven to not be an ineu
mountable obstacle.


With assistance from
Chavez, staff, member
Carol. Kraemer developed
- a unique paper map that
n allows him to "read" it. To
n those with sight, aside from
to the raised blue and green
r. lines indicating roads and
se rivers, the map appears to
s- be blank.'
id '"We made something he
i- could feel, instead of see,"
at said Kraemer, a Gainesville
State geospatial technology,
st research associate.
ut "We don't know that any-
'- thing like this has ever been
done before."
e. Tb- -"-te --the 'map,
ed Kramner 'used Adobe
sy Photoshop to make a mir-'
ror image of a digital map,
P.: which 'she then enlarged
a and printed. :.
"I made a mirror, image
le because we needed to be
lt able to ,see the lines, as he.
would, so .that we could
yy trace them with the graphic
CC tactile tools," Kraemer said.
r" '"Those tools create tex-
s. ture on the other side, so he
al can feel the features of the
M- map. I tried to get as close
e- as I could to what the other
h, students saw when they
s. 'look at their topographical
te maps.
g- "I had to split his into
Stwo. One has coordinates
ly on it and the other has (land
ve features) because having all
e-. of that information on one
e, would've been confusing."
to Chavez's nimble' fingers
d glide over the dots, dashes
er and ridges on the paper. He
easily identifies.roads and,
te rivers, while differentiat-
-e ing between the.incline and'
a decline of a mountain.
to He picks up on subtle
of changes that his sighted-'
counterparts miss.
ly "I put on a blindfold and
ge tried to pick things out, but
as my hands didn't see as well
lr- as my eyes did," said Derek


"Robinson, a Gainesville
State environmental science
major, who helped create,
the map.
. "I'm really impressed the
way he has picked all of this
up.' Our sight sometimes
gets in the way of our learn-
ing, but he doesn't have that
issue.
"It's a different way of
learning, but we're learning
the same thing."
Recently, the ,Geospatial
Alliance hosted Geographic
Information Systems, or GIS
Day, at Gainesville 'State.
During the event, GIS users
shared real-world -applica-
tions for the multidimen-
sional technology.
According to .the United
States Geological Survey,
GIS "is a computer system,
capable of .capturing, stor-
ing, analyzing, and display-
ing data identified accord-
ing to location."
With GIS technology,
users can create multilay-
ered maps very much
like the paper maps that
Chavez uses. During GIS.
Day, Chavez showed visitors
how to "read" his maps.
"You're going to feel a lot.
of different lines. Did you
notice that thick line? That's
the road," Chavez told one,
blindfolded volunteer.
"And those little curved
ones are called. contour
lines. They basically indi-
cate the level of steepness
in an area. The closer the
lilies are, the steeper it is."
Although he didn't physi-
cally create the 'maps,
Chavez was a key member
of the team.
'"He. helped me through
'it ev ery step of the way.
I would do a little bit at a'
time and have him:check it
to make sure, I was on the
right track," Kraenier said.
"He even taught nie, how
to use Braille; so I could


make the stickers for it."-
Even though Kraemer
was creating a learning tool
for Efren, he taught herthe
importance of seeing things
from a different perspec-
tive.
"During the design pro-
cess, I thought about not
going with the green road-
way because I didn't. like
the way it looked," Kraemer
said.
"When I told Efren that I
was going to' do; it over, he.
started. feeling the map and
said, 'Don't change a thing.
I can read it great.'
"I almost let my sight get
in the way of me seeing that
things were as they should
be."
This may be the first
map of its, kind, but it has
inspired the Gainesville
State team to make sure ifs
not the last.
"This is the proto-
type. We're very excited
about how successful this
first attempt has been,"
Semerjian said.
"(Chavez) used this map.
to take a lab test and he.
made a 100, which is highly
unusual for students whp
can see. Its a real testament
not -only to what (Kraemer)
has created, but also 'his
ability to see through, his
hands.


Tips for happier holiday
shopping. No, really


SBy Christina Rexrode
Associated Press
i NEW YORK-
Cointless "experts" are
eager to tell you how to do
your holiday shopping.
Some of their tips are
obvious; Set a budget
Some tips only help stores:
If there's someone on
your list who doesn't need
anything, buy a gift card.
Some are useless at this
point Shop throughout the
year.
We've cut through the
noise,to offer some warn-
ings, workarounds and
hints that actually are
helpful.
SEEK DEALS A
NIGHT AHEAD: If a sale
is advertised to start on,'
say, a Tuesday, you may be
able to avoid the crowds
by going to the store after
6 p.m. that Monday. Many
retailers program their
registers the night before
a promotion begins. That
means the deal might
come up even if the signs
on the floor haven't been
changed, according to the
National Retail Federation.
If the sale price doesn't
automatically pop up,
many retailers will give
you the deal if you ask.
BEWARE OF CARDS
BEARING GIFTS: As
many as one-fourth of the
value of gift cards remains
unspent in a year, accord-
ing to one estimate by


Consumer Reports. People
lose them, forget about
them or let fees eat away
their value. That is why
stores push them so hard.
So make sure your rdcipi-
ent actually wants and can
use a gift card; otherwise,
consider cash or a check
Be even more wary of
buying a discounted gift
card online. You can get
great deals from people
who legitimately can't
use a particular card
they've received. But
many gift cards available
on Craigslist or eBay are
counterfeit, and you won't
"find out until you or your
loved one tries to spend
them. Only buy if a card
seller is willing to mniet
you, at the store so her
card can be verified.
HOMEMADE
COSTS MONEY TOO:
Lots of budget-savvy
shoppers think they can
save by giving homemade
presents. Baking usually
does turn out to be less
expensive than buying,
but crafting is not always
cost-effective. If you have
visions of whipping up
your own hand lotion,
first calculate the cost
of liquid glycerin, fancy
bottles and the toll on
your blood pressure if it
turns out wrong or takes
longer than you expected.
Likewise, sewing often
costs more than buying
something ready to wear.


STAINED, GLASS: Local woman excels


Continued From Page 1L
thing to fill her time.
For, a short while she
donated some of her time
at Catholic Charities, donat-
ed time to the Columbia
County Public Library
before she came to the hos-
pital's gift shop.
"I really enjoy this, it's
kind of taken off. Usually
I'm here two, three days
a week," she said of her
volunteer work at the gift
shop.
Schaumburg said she
considers herself artistic
in the sense that she can
follow a pattern to create
something:
"If you were to give me
a blank piece of paper I
would be stuck," she said.
"I enjoy what I do and I


think other people enjoy
'if too. Most of the designs
that I do are pretty simple
- it's the colors that I put
in there. Sometimes hang-
ing in the gift shop the
light isn't just right, but you
take some of these pieces,
put them in the sunlight or
the window, and the colors
just jump out at you. It's
just beautiful."
Schaumburg also works
at the North Florida
Surgery Center as an RN,
where she often fills in for
employees in another job
where she gets to use her
hands.
However, she said she
is not truly an artistic per-
son but a person who has
learned to be creative.


"My mother was very -
creative," she said. "My
mother taught me a lot.
She got me to sew the pat-
terns."
Schaumburg said she
learned her other cre-
ative knowledge from her
neighbors growing up as
well as being a girl scout.
She said her youth plays
a big part in the work that
she now does with her
hands.
Schaumburg currently
has close to 50 pieces of
her work in the Shands
LakeShore Regional
Hospital Medical Center
gift shop. She said she
thinks she's sold more
than 200 of her pieces in
the gift shop.


Gainesville St student



.insp re ap f r the blin


_- L:


' '











Paae Edior Emqn rhm7401 AECT EOTR AVC R SW R UDY OEBR2,21


DEAR ABBY



Daughter's rejection adds


to terminally ill man's pain


DEAR ABBY: I am mar-
' tried to the most wonderful
husbandand and father woman
could ask for. He has been
diagnosed with a terminal
illness and may not have
long to live. Ever since I met-
"John" he has searched for
his daughter who was given
up for adoption years ago. We
recently found' her., It took
him some time to find the
courage to send her a mes-
sage, and when he did she
rejected him.
'"Ptty" met her birth
mother a few years ago and
decided to have contact only
with her. This has caused
John so much pain that I
sometimes cry myself to
sleep at night Our daughters
were raised knowing they
have an older sister. They
also know we found Patty
and she doesn't want to get ",
to know us. I don't know how
to explain what's happening
without them thinking they're
not good enough.
My husband was raised in
\ foster homes. He had no family,
so family is the most important
thing in the world to us and
he could die at any moment
I don't know what I cati do to
si9' ease the sadness or make his
daughter see that she may not
lave another chance. Abby,
please help. -BLINDSIDED
J. 1N BEND, ORE.
DEAR BLINDSIDED: Ill
S ry. Write Patty a.letter and' .
11ll her that her father loves'
fier and searched for her for
many years before he'was
S '
: i '. ^ ' ':- "*


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com

able to locate her. Tell her
that he is now terminally ill
and would like to see her
before he dies and that it
could be healing for both
of them. Of course, it is her'
right to refuse.
As to what you should tell
your daughters, explain that
Patty's reason for not wanting
to meet them may be that her
birth mother has poisoned
her against the paternal
branch of the family, and not
to take it personally. It may.
very well be the truth.

DEAR ABBY: My identi-
cal twin sister "Gwen" and I
were close1our whole lives.
She married an4 had two chil-
dren, while I stayed single.
Because our lives t6ok'differ-
ent directions, we have not
been as close over the past
couple of years because Gwen
was busy raising her family.
She has recently gone
through a divorce and is the"
primary caregiver of her
children. She doesn't have
a job. I feel like Frm walking
on eggshells around her. She
hlas threatened several times


to kill herself, and she starts
horrible arguments with our
parents and me.
I have tried to help out and
watch her kids when I could,
but, I have a full schedule
and need to make time for
my other relationships. After
being threatened a couple of
times, I finally stopped talk-
ingeto her because I was tired
ofturning the other cheek
to her outrageous, violent
behavior.
.. I love my twin and miss our
close relationship. I under-
stand the stress of being an
unemployed, single mother
of two, but I can't continue
putting up with the weekly
arguments. Is there any
Sh6pe we can be close again?
Gwen was in counseling for a
while. What can I do-to help
resolve things without turn-
ing into a doormat again? -, .
MIRROR IMAGE IN SOUTH
'CAROLINA
DEAR MIRROR IMAGE:
Your sister's violent outbursts
and threats of suicide are
indications that she is suf-
fering from so0tie significant
emotional problems. Until and
unless she gets more profes-
sional help, nothing you can
do will "resolve things." The
Best thing you and your fam-
ily can do is encourage her
to get more counseling and
remain close enough to her to
be sure her children are,safe.
g1 Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.'


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April THE LAST WORD
19): Look at every possibil-
ity. Try expanding what you Eugenia Word
have to offer and presenting
a new version of something upcoming events you plan to
you have done in the past. A host at home. ****
combination of the past and LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
present will lead to a prosper- Too much of anything will
ous future. *** work against you. Modesty,
TAURUS (April 20-May especially when dealing with
20): Put love on a pedestal people you work with, will be
and do everything in your a must if you don't want to
power to make someone look foolish or frivolous. You
you care for feel good about can make a difference and
life. Your thoughtfulness will initiate change by offering
bring emotions to the surface honest opinions. .
and prompt rewards'that will VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
lead to a bright future. Getting together with peers
GEMINI (May 21-June for a little festive cheer will
20): Take care 6f financial do you good and can lead to
matters. Act conservatively an entertaining suggestion
now so you will be able to that intrigues you. Love is
deal with burdens at the end in the stars, along with self-
of the year when the bills improvement projects and
need to be paid. Knowing taking nation. 23-Oct. 22):
your limitations will help LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
keep things under control. Fix up your digs. You need
Don't mess with authority to feel comfortable i- your
Don't messwith authority. space if you intend to get
things done. Love is on the
CANCER (June 21-July rise, and matters pertaining
22): Show your strengths and to home and family should
lend a hand. Your contribu- be taken care of before you
tions will help you prove a. relax or have fui. ***r
point and show your capabili- SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
ties. The little extras you do 21): Give credit to others
Will also help you prepare for

CELEBRITY CIPHER.
S'by Luls Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms rare created from quotations b famous people, past and present.
SEach lette r in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: TqusK K .K
J OE AWZJWSW JC Y N XX JCF F EE O'
ENX JCXE XDW U EVZO. HCOJ
AWZJ'WSW J.C XHTJC.F RHVW EM WHRD
EX DW V DHVSWG M J W VB X WJC

Previous Solution: "Recognize that the harder you work and the better
prepared you are,othe more luck you .might have." Ed Bradley
O 2011 by NEA, I'c., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-28


You don't have to do every-
thing on your own. Someone
will be quite capable to take
over, giving you a break and
a chance to reflect on the
year gone by. Your status is
heading for a hike. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Travel to a place
you haven't seen in a while
to revisit dreams, hopes and
past wishes. An old friend or
lover will be disgruntled but
happy to see you. Offer a life-
line to someone who needs
your help. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): You know what you must
do; but it won't be easy to 'get
past the people in charge.
Use finesse and knowledge
to get your way. Arguing will
work against you. A property
deal, investment or purchase
will turn out favorably.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Keep things simple. Too
much of anything will not go
well. You. don't haveto spend
a lot to make an impression.
Do extra work if it will bring
more work or income your
way. Altering your vocational
direction will have benefits.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Don't tip your hand.
Actions are what will count at
the end of the day. A partner-
ship will be enhanced if you
are progressive, productive
and proficient. Show every-
one how talented you are.


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


FIGURE IT OUT By Trip Payne / Edited by Will Shortz ,-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 9 10 12 1 1 5 1. 17

NOTE IN SOME SQUARES OF THIS CROSSWORD (AS INDICATED BY SLASHES), THE ACROSS AND DOWN ANSWERS DO NOT ACTUALLY 18 9 2 0 .
CRTOS. RflE BOTH .PARi IN THE Syi.RE X:. THENqSETHE CENTRAL AcROss ANSWER TO INTERPRET THEM PROPERLY TO SPELL AN 5
-.1. APPROPRL TE FINAL %ORD. ', "''


i, Across
1' ___ World Tour
(sports circuit)
i4 St'ew'
"8 Comedian Nora
12 School hall
feature
18 Rank in kendo
19 Article's start, to
a journalist
' .t 20 Former New York
governor Cuomo
21 Like some
moving
estimates
22 Justice Fortas .
23 Computer
animation option
'25 Some harvesters
.26 Calculator
symbol
28 The "B" of B&N
29 Lincoln -_
S(L.A.
neighborhood)
31 '"___ You Glad
You're You?"
.,32 Fill-in
:33 Teeing.off
34 Mountain in
Deuteronom.
36 X-ray units
37 Settee settings'
39 Gourmet's treat
41 Paid, with "up"
42 Within the grace
period?
45 Thuggish sorts
49 Armored truck
company,
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
S phone: 1-900-285-5656,
$1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


" 50 Is persistent at
an auction
51 Alternately "
52 7-go,tten. gains ..
53 Signs
54 Dieter's unit:
Abbr.
55 The Great
Commoner
56 Front of a coin:
* Abbr.
59 Aunt ___-- ("Star
Wars" character)
60 Lead-in to 1812
or attrition
.62 Stal that may be
"adjusted"
63 How to get this
Puzzle's final
word -.
.69 Suffix with mail
70 You can believe
it
71 Way o6ff
72 Furthermore'
'73 Burned out.
75 You go by one in
Quebec -
76 Strike down
77 Season Pass .
'. offerer
81 Some ninths
.83 Rattlesnake, at
times
84 Singer Morissette
862011
International
Tennis Hall of
Fame inductee
87 Bob Marley's
group, with.
"the"
88 Vodka source
89 Not ethereal
91 County northwest
'of San Francisco


"92 Traumatize
95.Men in.the
middle of.th
peerage
96 Takes a bit o
99 La Citth Eter
101 Trojan War
figure,
103 "I'd never h
s1: suspected !"
.104 Veep before
Spiro
'105 Gurtis' title
106 Oscar'winne
for "Cocoon
1 985
i' 108 "My source
no" source.
A11 Years, to Y
112 Word 'with n
or case
.113 Like some
accents.
'114 Item to thru
115 "Details
forthcoming
Abbr.
116 Pants
117 Prudential
Center team
118' --
119"_
.questions?"

Down
Make fit
2 Dinner date '
request
3 Zithromax tre
4 Sitcom waitre
5 Cardinals,
6 Awards with a
"Best Fact
Crime" cate
7 Will's ex-wifi
S"Glee"


8 Morse bits
9 Swiss canton
e '10 Seasonal saint
11 Hole in the head.-
ff 12 Cap
na 13 Fit to be called
". uP
14 Fruit-flavored '.i
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united it
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24 "Dear ___
Landers"
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es being watched
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note 34 Minds
35 Sci-fi series set
in the 23rd
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39 It'was first.
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40. Monitorinits.
41 "Independent
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42 Puzzler.
43 Come back from
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47 __- nous
48 Chi Cygni, for
ats it one
ss 51 Italian province
or seaport
.54 Desk chair
features'
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a four-cylinder


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example
61 Rock's _.
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63 Politicians'
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sometimes
64 Incorporating
65 Singer Marie.
66 Grandson of
Adam
67 Send away ;
6.8 Certain muscles


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sci-fi film of'
2009
76 'Besmirches,
78 Ladylove
'79 Thiamine
80 Spanish bear
82 Intel interpreter,
for short .'
83 TV award'
discontinued in
1997.
84 Ardent adherents


85 Actor Chaney
87 Electrical worker
90 Conversation
stopper
91 Over-the-
shoulder garment
92 Sends millions of.
unwanted
messages, say
93 Animal crackers
S animal
94 Georgia Domre,
e.g.


96 Color whose
name is French
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97 Blood type
system
98. Rise up
:1400 Appraise
102 Most-quoted
author in. the
O.E.D.: Abbr.
104 #1's, e.g.
107 Chicago trains
109 Kind of course
110 CBS's Moonves


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Page Editor: Emoaene Graham 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011








4D -LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2011


What will your


pet find under the


Christmas tree?


By Sue Manning
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Just
oveihalfofAniericanpet own-
ers wil buy giftkfor their pets
this holiday season, and they'll
spend an average of $46 on
their animals, with toys and
treats topping the list, accord-
ing to a new AP-Petside.com
pol l
Sixty-eight percent of pets
getting gifts can look forward
to a toy, 45 percent to food or
another treat, 8 percent new
bedding, 6 percent clothing,
3 percent a leash, collar or
harness and 3 percent new
grooming products, the poll
showed. (Some pets will get
more than one gift.)
"Christmas is about the
pets," said Gayla McCarthy,
58, of Kekaha, Hawaii, whose
Australian shepherd, Echo,
will find a toy under the tree.
McCarthy even got a shirt for
her husband as a gift to him
from the dog,,and shell be
giving collapsible bowls that'
she ordered online to all their
friends' dogs. :
Although the average bud-
get for pet gifts among those
surveyed was $46, 72 percent
of those polled said they'd.
spend $30 or less. Those who
bought gifts for their pets last
year said they spent $41 on
average.
Overall, 51 percent of those
polled this year said they
would buy holiday gifts for
their pets, a figure that's been
relatively stable in the last few
AP-Petside.com polls. It was'
53 percent last year, 52 per-
cent in 2009 and 43 percent
in 2008.
Income does matter. Those
making $50,000 or more say
they plan to spend an average


$57 on their pets. Those mak-
ing under $50,000 say it will
be $29.
Major- pet retailers have
been. taking part in the Black
Friday and Cyber Monday
frenzy for a few years: Petco
Animal Supplies Inc. plans
a 72-hour "Black Friday
Weekend Blowout," said Greg
Seremetis, vice president of
marketing.
Products for both-pets and
pet owners will be available; he
said. "Including pets in holiday
gift-giving has been a growing
trend in the last few years.
More and more pets are being
treated as family members
and being included in holiday
traditions, including having a
gift waiting for them under the
tree," he said.
PetSmart Inc. plans to open
stores at 7 a.m. on Black Friday,
followed by a "Countdown to
Christmas" .sale beginning on
Dec. 16, said spokeswoman
Stephanie Foster.
Online retailer Foster &
Smith Inc. plans a live, stream-
ing, four-hour (11 aIm. 3 p.m.
ESI) webcast full of sales and
giveaways on Black Friday and
Cyber. Monday, spokesman
Gordon Magee said. "As far as
we know, with the exception of
QVC ..., no other retailer has
done a live broadcast like this
on Black Friday and Cyber
Monday," Magee said. "We
are going to give it a go.".
Younger pet owners are
more apt to say they'll buy
their pet a holiday gift, includ-
ing 56 percent of pet owners
under age 50. Among those
ages 50-64, its 47 percent, and
among seniors, 39 percent, the
poll showed.
I Lauren Beard, 22, of Felton,
Pa., and her family lavished
their dog Groovy with gifts last


year including treats and
bones because it was the
chocolate lab's first Christmas.
"We still love her but it's a little
less exciting this year," Beard
said. So she reduced her bud-
get of $70 last year to $50, .j
and hopes to get some things
on sale. She'll also buy a gift
for Groovy'q best friend and
neighbor, a golden retriever
named Tessie, Beard said.
Ronda Singleton and her
husband live in Elk, Wash.,
and raise and show standard
poodles. But they don't plan
to get gifts for their dogs or
for each other. "If we need
something, we go get it," she
explained, adding that the
dogs get treats all the time.
She and her husband like to
celebrate holidays with tra-
ditional dinners and church
services.
Thomas Koch, 69, ,in
Raleigh, N.C., has something
special to celebrate this year
- adoption of his adult son
should be finalized, he said.
The two will spend the holi-
days with their dog, Jessie,
a Sheltie-chow mix, and two
cats, Tanz and Calie.
Last year, Jessie got toys
and the cats got play mice and
a large bag of catnip. "'They
liked it so much we just threw
it 'on the carpet and let them
roll in it," Koch said.
He covered the goodies last
year for a mere $8, but is set-
ting aside $10 this year just in
case prices have gone up.
George Smith, 43, a father
of three in Adams County,
Colo., says pets are "part of the
family, just like our kids." But
they keep the holiday gifts for
Miley, a golden retriever, and
Zippity, a cat, low-key: no fancy
wrapping or stockings, just S10
worth of toys and treats.


Sky has his toe
.- Snails painted
B by 13-year-
old Kourtney
,Gottula on
Nov. 7 at her
home in Spring,
Texas. Just over
,half of American
pet owners will
buy gifts for
their pets this
holiday season,
and they'll
spend an aver-
age of $46 on
their animals.
ASSOCIATED PRESS





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