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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01708
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 25, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01708
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





000015 120312 ****3-D-CIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA H3STOY26
PO BOX 117007H
205 SM '3IV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVTILE F L 32611-1943


7


Reporter


Friday, November 25, 201 1 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 253 N 75 cents
r - _________________________-I _______


Santa



hits



town


Sat.


Will make first official
appearance during
the Festival of Lights.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Many local residents have made
kicking off their holiday season with
their friends and neighbors a holiday
tradition. They can continue that
tradition Saturday with the annual
Festival of Lights,lighting ceremony
at Olustee Park in downtown Lake
City.
Starting at 2 p.m. there will be live
entertainment at the park. At 6 p.m.,
the lights at the park will be turned
on, signaling the start of the local
Christmas season.
"A 6:15 p.m. Santa Claus will arrive
via the Polar Express, arid he'll open
up his Santa's house for the holiday
season," said Dennille Folsom, Lake
City Columbia County Chamber of
Commerce executive director.
Two food vendors are slated to be
at the park for the festivities Girl
Scouts, who will be selling baked
goods, and representatives from The
Shining Star Academy..
"This event isthekick-off, the'start
of our holiday season," Folsom said.
"It's a 26 year-tradition that signifies
the start of the holiday season with
the lighting and Santa's arrival. We
encourage everybody to come out
and participate. There's been a lot of
people that have given their time:to
help decorate the park. We just want-
everybody to enjoy it"
Tihe event, hosted by Jeanie
SWilks, is sponsored by Grace Harbor
Ministries. Entertainment is provid-
Sed by SRS Artist Productions and
Starlight Sound.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

2:00 Arteelia
2:30 Lauren Ogburn
3:00 -Joe Martino
3:30 Willow Martinei
4:00 Elvis Christmas Show
4:35 Hailey Baker
.5:00.- Kara Compo
5:30 Matt Johns Trio
6U00 Lighting of the.Park
6:10 Santa arrives
6:30 Girl Scouts sing
Christmas carols
6:45 Stephen Jopes
7:15 Grace Harbor Praise
Band
8:00 Sheena Bella
8:35 Breanna Betters


A feast for hundreds


STAFF PHOTO
Eileen Jacob, left, and Terri Millikin serve Thanksgiving dinner at First Presbyterian Church on Baya Drive Thursday. This is the 11th year the
church has served a community-wide feast on Thanksgiving. Millikin said this is her 10th year of participation. As many as 500 people, from all
walks of life, were expected to attend.



Giffords serves troops in Tucson

Congresswoman dishes up turkey at Air Force base


By BOB CHRISTIE and
MATT YORK
Associated Press
TUCSON, Ariz. U.S. Rep. Gabrielle
Giffords helped serve a Thanksgiving meal
to service members and retirees at a mill-.
tary base in her hometown of Tucson,
Ariz.
Giffords arrived in the dining hall at
Davis-Monthan Air Force' Base at midday
Thursday wearing a ball cap and an apron
with her nickname of "Gabby" sewn on the
front. She was accompanied by her retired


astronaut husband, Mark Kelly, who also
donned an apron.
Giffords used only her left hand as she
served, a sign that physical damage remains
from the injuries she suffered when she
was sbot in January
K1gl supported her from her left side as
she '\9rk'd.- ,thit ky.station on.the-serv-".
ing-line. He served m.
Afterward, she mingled with service
members, exchanging pleasantries and
mostly one word greetings and responses.
Sheidid tell Airman 1st Class Millie Gray,
of Kansas City, Mo., "Happy Thanksgiving,


thank you for your service."
Gray said she had intended to only grab
a plate and head back to her dormnto eat,
until she heard that Giffords was going to
be there.
"She's such an inspiration and her story
is so inspirational, it really made me proud.
I felt -very proud, and very humble." Gray
said. "It Just feels really good to see that she
is out here supporting the troops, and just
continuing to be an inspiration and a strong
role model for Americans in general.
GIFFORDS continued on 3A


Jetpack-
wearing
monkeys
and more
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Julius, a jetpack-
wearing monkey
made by Paul
Frank, is seen
during the Macy's
Thanksgiving Day
Parade in Times
Square in New
York on Thursday.
The parade pre-
miered in 1924,
and this is its 85th
year. See story,
Page 3A.


Gingrich could draw GOP ire on immigration


By SHANNON McCAFFREY
Associated Press
ATLANTA Newt Gingrich has
charged into the fray over illegal
immigration, risking conservative ire
just as his Republican presidential
campaign once declared all but
dead has vaulted into front-runner
status.
The firebrand former House speak-
er broke with what has become a
reflexive Republican hard line on
immigration, calling for "humane"
treatment for otherwise law-abiding
illegal immigrants who have been in


the United States for decades, estab-
lishing deep family and community'
ties.
Gingrich suggested they should be
provided a pathway to legal residency
but riot citizenship. Republicans, he
said, should see illegal immigrants
through the prism of another issue
near and dear to the GOP faithful:
family values.
"I don't see how the party that says
it's the party of the family is going to
adopt an immigration policy which
destroys families that have been here
a quarter-century," Gingrich said at a
televised debate Tuesday night.


The response was swift.
Some conservatives asserted he
had wounded his candidacy, perhaps
fatally.
"Newt did himself significant harm
tonight on immigration among cau-
cus and primary voters," tweeted
Tim Albrecht, deputy chief. of staff
to Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, whose
state holds the lead-off caucuses in
January.
Immigration has proven to be polit-
ically treacherous for Republicans
trying to appeal to the party's conser-
GINGRICH continued on 3A


S.II I. CALL US:
(386) 752-1293 74 5 1 Opinion ........ ........ 4A
SUBSCRIBETO Sun People ................. 2A
1THE REPORTER: Sunny Advice & Comics......... 4B
I Voice: 755-5445 Puzzles ................. 2B
1 14264 0020 Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 2A vV7


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential hopeful former House Speaker Newt
Gingrich and his wife Callista buy a pork chop lunch as they
campaign at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines Aug. 12.


E TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE SATURDAY
Kindle Fire's Local news
worthy foe. roundup.
II II I- --~~ 9- '1~ I I,.









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


H* 3


Saturday:
Not available


Saturday:
Not available


" Saturday:
Not available


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Nook Tablet is Kindle's worthy foe


By PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer

NEW YORK- Listen, and I'll tell
Syou the story of the bookstore chain
That stormed into the hottest catego-
ry in consumer electronics and con-
quered.
It's a nice underdog story, right? A
,' bit like the tale of plucky rebels who
Attacked Lord Vader's Death Star.
SBut that was fiction. Barnes &
Noble Inc.'s new Nook Tablet ($249)
is a solid product, worthy of dtik-
ing it out with Amazon.com Inc.'s
Kindle Fire. Considering that the
Nook comes from, a desert planet
where the only entertainment was
shooting womp rats (Sorry, I mean
"from a bookstore chain."), it's real-
ly impressive.
But the Nook doesn't quite muster
enough force to blow up a Death Star.
Barnes & Noble's earlier Nooks were
dedicated book-reading devices, and
the Tablet is at most a half-way step
into the world of general-purpose tab-
let computing;
Like the new Kindle Fire, the
Tablet has a 7-inch, touch-sensitive
color screen, about half the size of the
iPad's. It's the same, screen as on the
Nook Color, the e-reader Barnes &
Noble launched a year ago. I thought
it was the best e-reader yet when it
launched.
The Tablet improves on the Nook
Color mainly by beefing up the pro-
cessor and the memory and extend-
ing the battery life. to 11.5 hours of
reading, or 9 hours of video.
The Tablet also has improved soft-
ware, butthe Color will be getting the
: same software through a download-


able update.
The Tablet is debuting with Netflix
and Hulu applications. Coupled with
the nice, sharp screen, that makes for
a good device for that TV and movie
fix -as long as you're connected to
Wi-Fi.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This product image provided by Barnes & Noble Inc., shows the new Nook Tablet. The Bames &
Noble's Nook Tablet is a worthy competitor to Amazon.com's Kindle Fire. It avoids some of the Fire'p
shortcomings, but has flaws of its own. .
J


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor-game show host Ben
Stein is 67.
* Actor John Larroquette is
64.
* Singer Amy Grant is 51.
* Singer Mark Lanegan
(Queens of the Stone Age
and Screaming Trees) is 47.
* Singer Stacy L'attisaw is
43.

Daily Scripture


* Guitarist Rodney Sheppard
of Sugar Ray is 45. Rapper-
producer Erick Sermon is 43.
* Actress Jill Hennessy
("Crossing Jordan") is 42.
* Actress Christina Apple-
gate is 42.
* Actor Eddie Steeples ("My
Name Is Earl") is 36.


"So then, just as you received
Christ Jesus as Lord, continue
to live your lives in him, rooted
and built up in him, strength-
ened in the faith as you were
taught, and overflowing with
thankfulness."
Colossians 2:6-7 NIV.


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Faxnumber..............52-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
'E. Duval. St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
MemberAudit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.:.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or.
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. .U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter,com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakectyreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please. call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10.30 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 am., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation.................755-5445
(drculation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
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Rates indude 7%Psalestax.
Mail rates
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52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items, if you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executiveeditor. Corrections and clarifications will run
ir this space And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA '


THE WEATHER


Man released early after U MOSTLY
weight-loss dealwith judgY MOS
weight-loss deal with judge -


By STEPHEN HUDAK i .-;
Orlando Sentinel


TAVARES George McCovery shed
25 pounds in 20 days on the "lose-a-pound,
gain-a-day" plan suggested by Lake County
Judge Donna Miller, but he wouldn't nec-
essarily recommend the diet to others.
Miller, who sentenced McCovery, 37,i.
earlier this month for driving with a sus-
pended license,. promised the 345-pound
hypertensive man that she would shrink
his stay at the Lake CountyJail by one day
Sfor every pound he lost while in custody.
After 20 days in the slammer, where he
limited his intake mostly to vegetables on
fhis dinner tray, he weighed in Monday at
320 pounds, and Miller cut him loose early
in time for turkey-day sweet-potato pie.
at home in West Palm Beach.
"It's not easy to lose weight. I thought
he'd lose 5, maybe, 6 pounds not 25,"
said Miller, 64, who has often dished out
creative,sentences during her 17years as a
county judge. "It's like (sentencing) some-
one in a drug case. I'd much rather have
them stop doing drugs than send them to
jail, I hope I can help."
Miller, the judge on "Lake Courts," a
TV program on a community-access chan-
nel that replays criminal proceedings in
her courtroom, has ordered defendants to
take up jogging, enroll in dance class and
tutor math. She often assigns misdemean-
or offenders to pull weeds or turn dirt in a
community vegetable garden that benefits
food pantries.
"I don't do any Jerry Springer stuff
where people have to parade outside
Walmart with a sigh that says, 'I'm a thief,'
"Miller said, referring to punishment that
includes public humiliation. "I do what I
do to try to change the person in front of
me. But I know I can't help everyone. If the
person needs jail, they get jail."
Bobby Azcano, an attorney with The
Ticket Clinic law firm, said Miller's
approach on the bench is unusual in the
Central Florida courts where he practic-
es, which also includes Orange, Osceola,
5Seminole and Volusia counties.
"Very unique to say the least," said
Azcano, a lawyer since 2000. "I think she's
a counselor on the bench is how I would
describe it She's interested in the reha-
bilitation process. She's not as punitive as
other judges are."
A former teacher who has worked as


a public defender and once served as
the Lake County sheriff's attorney, Miller
admitted sonie peers have cautioned her
to act more judicial' and less like a social
worker. She shrugs off the criticism.
"I'm the Tim Tebow of the courtroom,"
Miller said,half-joking in her reference to
the former University of Florida football
star widely criticized by NFL pundits for
unconventional but successful :qarter-
backing skills.
Mitler usually gives defendantma choice
between her specially tailored sentence or
jail and fines.
In October, Gwendolyn' Wages, 50.
appeared in Miller's court on a probation
violation that accused her of failing to com-
plete a community-service requirement for
causing a wreck while impaired by pain
medicine. The Ocala woman, limited by
back and hip ailments, said she was not
healthy enough for physical work.
Prosecutors offered to forgive the viola-
tion and five days in jail if Wages just paid
her fine and costs.
Miller instead directed Wages to com-
plete" 60 holiday-greeting 'cards, enough
for every patient at LifeStream Behavioral
Center, a mental-health and addiction facil-
ity in Leesburg.
Said Miller: "Come Christmastime, we'll
pass them out to whoever is in LifeStream
and away from their family during the holi-
day season."
Wages said she made not 60 but 90
cards: "I hope it brightens up somebody-
else's day."
Not everyone embraces the judge's sen-
tences.
An .Orlando woman turned down Miller's
proposal Wednesday to fulfill a .sentence for
driving with a suspended license by decorating
small brown bags.that will hold holiday goodies
for LifeSyream patients. She chose instead to
pay a $200.fine.
But Natasha Wells, 30, a divorced mother
with three kids, leapt at the same deal for the
same offense.
"Pay $200 or have an arts-and-craft day with
my kids? Are you kidding?" she asked.
McCovery, cited, for the criminal traffic
offense while visiting his sister in Leesburg,
also was surprised by the judge's proposal. He
had discussed his desire to lose weight with
Miller in court while asking her to delay his
jail stay for a week so he could retrieve his pre-
scription medicine for high blood pressure.


" SUNNY I SUNNY



HI 61 LO 36 i HI 67 LO) 40


HI 4 LO 51 HI 7LO53


..... ::. ~". e C eJacksonville
Tallahassee Lake City 73/52
72/48 74/51
Pe a Gainesvie Daytona Beach
69/58" :Pafama City 74/53 76 60
S 68/52 Ocala *
76/53 *
Odando Cape Canaveral
79/59 76/63
Tamla e
78/62. Weat s ue .,h


.
FL Myers'
80/60


Key l
78/


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal low
Record. high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


72
51
72
49
86 in 1948
25 In 1925

0.00"
1,47"
32.74"
1.69"
45.32"


i "7"4', ,T" ,


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Friday Saturday







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78/68 *
FL Lauderdale
79,'70 *
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81/62 Mimi
t 79/68
71es
71


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
GalnesvIlle
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples
Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Tallahassee
Tampa
Valdosta
W. Palm Beach


77/61/pc
78/59,'s
80/68/s
82/62/s
78/54/pc
77/54/s
79/72/1pc
78/53/pc
80/67/s
80/62/s
79/55/pc
80,58/s
71, 56/pc
74/47/t
74,'56/s
81,63/s
76/55/pc
79/64/s


77/49/sh
74/44/pc
81/54/pc
80/52/pc
69/40/pc
70,40/pc
80/65/pc
69/38/pc
81,56/p:
81/55/pc
72.,41/pc
75/47/pc
62/44/pc
59/37/pc
65/37/1
75/51/pc
65/39t/
83/51/pc


An exclusive
SUN se vc
Sunrise today 7:04 a.m. bouStele
Sunset today 5:31 p.m. brought to
Sunrise tom. 7:05 a.m. O 0E our readers
Sunsettom. 5:30 p.m. 456inut blm
Today's 1y
MOON ultra-violet The Weather
Moonrise today 7:28 a.m. radiation risk Channel.
Moonset today 6:02 p.m. for the area on
Moonrisetom. 8:31 a.m. a scalefrom
Moonset tom. 7:05 p.m. to


Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec. Forecast, dat
25 2 10 17 graplics 020l1. Weather
New First Full Last V|| / Central, LP, Madison, Wi..
weather J www.weahepublh.com


On this date in
1987, thunder-
storms over cen-
tral and eastern
Texas produced
locally heavy rains.
Huntsville, Texas,
reported 9 inches of
rain for the day, with
8.5 inches reported
at Wimberly, Texas.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


Thanksgiving parade heads through NYC


By CHRIS HAWLEY
Associated Press

NEW YORK Spectators
cheered and sang on Thursday
as the annual Macy's
Thanksgiving Day Parade made
its way through the crowded
streets of Manhattan beneath
brilliant sunshine.
A jetpack-wearing monkey
and a freakish creation from
filmmaker Tim Burton were
two of the big new balloons that
made their inaugural appear-
ances. Paul Frank's Julius and
Burton's B. joined more than
a dozen other giant balloons,
including fan favorites like
Snoopy and Spider-Man.
"Hete comes Snoopy!" said
an excited Regan Lynch, 5,
nudging her grandfather, Nfck
Pagnozzi.
Pagnozzi, 59, of Saddle River,
NJ., drove into the city at 6
a.m. to get a seat on the bleach-
ers along Central Park West
He said Regan wanted to make
sure he took pictures of every
balloon.
In all, the parade featured
more than 40 balloon creations,
27 floats, 800 clowns and 1,600
cheerleaders. Star appearances
included Mary J.' Blige, Cee
Lo Green, Avril Lavigne and
the Muppets of Sesame Street.
Some performances were at a
Stage at the end of the route in
Herald Square; others were on
floats.
"I feel like a kid all over, man,
you know?" said Green, who
rode a float featuring young


hockey players.
In the crowd along Seventh
Avenue, tourist Wilfred Denk of
Munich, Germany, said he was
most impressed by the high
school marching bands. The
procession featured bands from
as far away as Hawaii.
"Those kids, they play good
music and they really put on a
,good show," Denk said. He and
his wife, Bethina, were on their
Honeymoon in New York.
Suddenly, a float bearing a
replica of Mount Rushmore
came into view. "Look, Neil
Diamond!" said Bethina Denk.
The crowd started singing
"Sweet Caroline! Whoa! Whoa!
Whoa!" as Diamond waved
from a platform in front of the
Mount Rushmore heads.
Near the beginning'of the
route, Conor Jones, 5, of the
Bronx, ducked as a troupe of
clowns dressed as firefight-
ers doused the crowd with
multicolored cbnfetti. He and
his twin brother, Nblan, have
attended the parade three years
in a row.
"I like the bands best," he
said. His brother preferred the
Spider-Man balloon.
Dozens of handlers got
revved up with a cheer herald-
ing their cartoon balloon char-
acter: "Buzz! Lightyear! Buzz!
Lightyear!"
Nearby, balloon handler Joe
Sullivan, a.retired banker, held
one of six nylon lines securing
a huge floating pumpkin. He's
been volunteering in the parade
for more than 15 years.


"When its windy it's a strug-
gle," he said. "But today is great
weather."
Macy's predicted 3.5 million
people could crowd the parade
route, while an additional 50
million watched from home.
The parade begins at 77th
Street and heads south on
Central Park West to Seventh
Avenue; before moving to Sixth
Avenue and ending at Macy's
Herald Square.
Sherre Chaplen, 49, of
Thomaston, Conn., said she
wgs surprised by the energy of
the clowns and musicians, who
are often overshadowed by the
balloons on television.
Chaplen came to New York
with her teenage daughter and
husband.
"This was on the bucket list,"
she said. "It's so much different
seeing it live than at home. It's
something everyone should do
.at least once in a lifetime."
The parade got its start in
1924 and included live animals
such as camels, goats and ele-
phants. It was not until 1927that
the live animals were replaced
by giant helium balloons. The
.parade was suspended from
1942 to 1944 because rubber
and helium were needed for
World War H.
Since the beginning, the
balloons have been based on
popular cultural characters
,and holiday themes. Returning
favorites this year included
Buzz Lightyear, Clumsy Smurf,
SpongeBob SquarePants and
Kermit the Frog.


The "Sonic The Hedgehog" float is seen during the Macy's Thanksgiving Day
Parade in Times Square in New York on Thursday.


GIFFORDS: Serves Thanksgiving meal at Arizona air base

Continued From Page 1A


"She was very warm, asked how our-
meal was, which, of course, was amaz-
ing. The food is awesome," Gray said.
"She and her husband were very, just
delightful and asked a lot of questions.
It was just very warm-hearted, and I
told her she was an inspiration ,and
she was very thankful for that'"
Giffords and Kelly left after less
than an hour.
Giffords has been undergoing inten-
sive rehabilitation at TIRR Memorial
Hermann' in Houston as she recovers
from a gunshot wound to the head.
She was monrig 19 people shot Jan. 8
as she met with constituents outside a
Tucson supermarket Six people died.
SThe congresswoman arrived in
Tucson on Tuesday evening from
Houston for a private visit with her


parents and' other family members
and friends.
"It's always special to have a mem-
ber of Congress come and spend time
with the troops and show support,"
said Brig Gen Jon Norman, acting
commander' of the Acting command-
er of the 12th Air Forces, Southern.
'"But after everything that she's been
through, it's a little bit more special."
Giffords' staff said base officials
originally asked a member of the con-
gresswoman's staff to take part in the
annual Thanksgiving dinner. When
the staff member told Giffords about
the event, the congresswoman decid-
ed she wanted to go herself.
Giffords previously returned to
Tucson for the Father's Day arid Labor
Day weekends.


: ASSOCIATED PRESS
U.S; Rep. Gabrielle,Giffords, D-Ariz., and her husband, retired Capt. Mark Kelly, serve a Thahksgiving
meal to troops at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Thursday in Tucson, Ariz.


GINGRICH: Could draw Republicans' wrath for comments on immigration

Continued From Page 1A


vative base. Just ask Texas
Gov. Rick Perry, who said
critics of in-state tuition for.
illegal immigrants "did not
have a heart" Perry had to
apologize for the remark.
William IGheen, presi-
dent of the Americans' for
'Legal Immigration PAC,
said Gingrich's campaign
"will now fake the 'Perry
plunge.'"
But others praised
Gingrich for emerging as
a "voice of reason" on an
emotionally charged topic.
"With me, personally,
I fall right. in line with
him," said Columbia, S.C.,
Gingrich supporter Allen
Olson, a former tea party
official. "It's utterly impos-
sible to round up'12 mil-
lion people and ship them.
off."
The stance is not a new
one for Gingrich. Aides say
he was saying the same
thing at town halls and
forums long before he was
running for president It's
laid out clearly on a cam-
paign Web page.
What is new is the scru-
tiny he's receiving. Recent
polls have shown Gingrich
at or near the top of the
Republican field, along
with Mitt Romney. With a
little less than six weeks to
go until the'Iowa caucuses,
people are listening to the
former Georgia congress-
man.
And far from a stumble,
Tuesday night's remarks
seemed a calculated tac-
tic to draw a contrast with
Romney, whom he now
sees as his chief rival to the


party nomination and who
has had his owni. trouble
with conservatives, largely
because of the health care
overhaul law he pushed
through as governor of
Massachusetts.
But Romney has been
tough on illegal immigra-
tiori while running for
president He said Tuesday
night that what Gingrich
was proposing would act as
a magnet for foreigners to
enter the country illegally.
The Gingrich team coun-
tered by pointing to com-
ments Romney made on
NBC's "Meet the Press"
in 2007, during which he
called proposals similar to
the one Gingrich was back-
ing "reasonable."
In. Des Moines, Iowa, on
Wednesday, Romney didn't
address those, past com-
ments directly.
"My view is that those
people who have waited in


line patiently to come to
this country legally should
be ahead in line," he told
reporters. "And those peo-
ple who have come. here
illegally should not be
given a special deal."
Opponents of illegal
immigration say Gingrich
has a checkered history on
the topic.
While in Congress,
Gingrich voted for amnes-
ty for illegal immigrants
in 1986 and for smaller,
more specific amnesties
throughout the 1990s, said
Roy Beck, president' of
NumbersUSA, which advo-
cates tighter immigration
controls. The organization
gave Gingrich a "D" for his
time in Congress.
Beck said he believed
Gingrich was playing to the
Republican establishment,
which has been softer on
illegal immigration than
the grass-roots wing of the


party.
But the Gingrich
team worked furiously
Wednesday to fend off a
potential backlash, rushing
out several news releases'
praising his stance, includ-
ing one with remarks from
the son of former President
Ronald Reagan.
"My father never would
have broken up a family
to try and make,, in' fact,
a point on immigration,"
Michael Reagan said on
Fox News. "And so he
would have applauded
Newt Gingrich on that."
Gingrich himself said he
is "prepared to take the
heat for saying let's be
humane in enforcing the
law without giving them
citizenship."
Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-
Ga., chuckled when asked
about Gingrich's remarks.
Chambliss was booed in
2007 at an annual meeting


of the Georgia Republican
Party for championing an
amnesty program similar
to what Gingrich is push-
ing now. One of his critics
at the time, Chambliss said,
was Gingrich.
"But I wouldn't under-
estimate Newt," Chambliss


continued. "He's one of
the smartest politicians
out there, and don't think
he hasn't thought this
through."
Associated Press writers
Kate Brumback in Atlanta
and Tom Beaumont in Iowa
contributed to this report.


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atricia "Ann"
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,-cplmTn c[ 22, 1957 Nvenmbcr 25. 2010


-our Loving Family

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GRANOC. Irll)DRFN
'nbIil, a, tiniva. h, Brianna.
lianca, trisha and Thonias III
I.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428
















Friday, November 25, 2011


ONE


ONE
OPINION


Don't let

up on

al-Qaida

S ince the death of
Osama bin Laden, the
ranks of al-Qaida have
dramatically dimin-
ished and its leader-
ship ranks diminished to just
two figures, U.S. intelligence
officials tell The Washington
Post, "whose demise would
mean the group's defeat".
Their demise could take
awhile it took us 10 years to
get bin Laden but we'should
have the patience to see it
through. The.remaining "high-
value" targets are bin Laden's
replacementasleader, Ayman
al-Zawahiri, and his deputy,
Abu Yahya al-Libi. The CIA's
SPredator drones, surveillance
craft and intelligence operators
.are concentrated on eliminat-
ing them and whatever random
bands of al-Qaida terrorists still
remain.
Effectively, the rest of
the al-Qaida leadership that
planned the 9/11 attacks is
dead or, like the self-proclaimed
mastermind, Sheikh Khalid
Mohammed, in prison. The
organization should not be
allowed to reconstitute itself.
The plodding al-Zawahiri is
evidently not much of a leader.
Al-Lili, thought to be 48, is'
charismatic, eloquent, well
schooled in Islam and has the
revolutionary credential of hav-
ing escaped from U.S. custody
'at the U.S.-Afghan prison at
Bagram in 2006.
Left at large, he could poten-
tially fill the leadership vacuum
left by bin Laden and the terror-
ist cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, killed
by a drone strike in September-
in Yemen.
In 2001, the CIA, U.S. spe-
-cial forces and their Afghan
allies had bin Laden trapped
in Afghanistan's remote
mountains along, the Pakistani
border. The Bush administra-
tion took its foot off the gas.
to begin diverting troops and
resources to the pending inva-
sion of Iraq.
You'd like to think that we
learned our lesson and won't
make the same mistake again,
but we might -,if Congress
Persists in massive, automatic
cuts in the Pentagon budget
in 2013.
Scripps Howard; News Service

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc. .
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary gogl is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
Snws@lakecityreporter.com


OPINION


www.lakecityreporter.com


'Obama has most to


fear from Huntsman


f Jon Huntsman were
the GOP presidential
nominee, President -
Barack Obama probably
would be moving back to
Chicago.in January 2013.
With the advantage from
Republicans' perspective that
he's iot Obama, Huntsman'
appeals to many independents
because he's not a tea partier.
And, once again, independents
will decide the election.
Like Mitt Romney, Huntsman
is, a successful businessman and
a former governor.
Like Newt Gingrich,
Huntsman has been out of
the country, although while'
Gingrich favors cruises around
die Greek isles, Huntsman has
lived.abroad.
Like Rick Perry and Herman
Cain, Huntsman has a sense of
humor although he hasn't behn
as humorously gaffe prone.
SLike Michele Bachmann, .
Huntsman loves children.
'Bachmann has five, of her own
and hosted 23 foster children,
and Huntsman has seven chil-
dren, including one adopted
from China and one from India.
Like Ron Paul, Huntsman is
worried about the United States
getting into war after war after
war.
Like Rick Santorum, well, no,
Hurtsman is a conservative but
nowhere near that dogmatic.
Huntsman not only speaks
Mandarin Chinese but
Taiwanese Hokkein, learned -
as a young Mormon mission-


ary. He was ambassador to
Singapore, and U.S. trade
ambassador under President:
George W. Bush. As Obama's
former ambassador to China,
Huntsman understands China's
importance. For some, how-
ever, his service there under
Obama makes him traitor
to Republicans while some
Democrats think hq is disloyal
to Obama for now attacking his
former boss. 1.
At the lith GOP debate (are
we having fun yet?), the topic
was national security. Huntsman
alone made the point that for-
eign policy must be considered
in the light of America's eco-
nomic woes.
As Gingrich was calling for
regime change in Iran by bomb-
ing Iran's refinery and prevent-
ing Iran from getting gasoline,
Huntsman was calling for com-
mon sense. (Qne wonders if
Gingrich has any idea how large
Iran is.)
Obama has good credentials
on foreign policy; his admin-
istratiot killed Osama bin
Laden ard helped bring down
Moammar Gadhaft. But for


many voters, it will be hard to
get past 9 percent unemploy-
ment It may not be fair, but the
president gets the credit when
the economy is good and the
blame when it is bad.
At 2 percent in the pblls,
Huntsman so far is not reso-
nating nationally in this race.
He has put all his eggs in one
basket New Hampshire. If
he wins there a formidable,
challenge because Romney
was governor of a neighboring
state Huntsman then becomes
:a plausible contenderfor the
nomination.
Huntsman's dilenuna was
laid bare on Saturday Night
Live, when Seth Meyers said he
would say something Americans
never hear in the debates:
'"Governor Huntsman, the first
question is for you."
Huntsman's hope is that after
everyone else in the race has
beenlfrontrunner for a few min-
utes, hell get his turn too.
\But winning still is about
organization and money. And
although Huntsman's father is
a billionaire, so far campaign
donations are not flowing into
Huntsman's coffers as they are
into Romney's.
If Romney is the nominee,
there is a 50-50 chance that
Obamia will be reelected.


* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Tough calls.:

ahead for

Congress ,

T he congressional
deficit-reduction
supercommittee
was not necessar-
ily destined to fail,
but it was always a long shot
at best
Its dozen members con-
ceded Monday what the
Associated Press termed "igno-
minious defeat," but a failure to
work miracles is hardly igno-
minious. And a miracle is what
the panel would have needed
in agreeing on $1.2 trillion in
budget cuts over a decade. ,
Congressional and presiden-
tial commissions, task forces
and panels work best when
there is broad agreement on
the goals and the means to
get there. These groups also 4.
give lawmakers political cover "
for courses of action that may
prove temporarily unpopular.
The two sides on the super-
committee agreed on the goal
of bringing a national debt
that has reached $15 trillion
-under control. There was no
agreement on means. The
Democrats'want to reach
it mainly by raising rev-
enues, taxes, if you will; the
Republicans want to do so by
major cuts in federal spending. '
Thete were some credible
efforts at compromise by vari- ::
ous panel members, but'they -
were shot down, often by the -
leaders of their own parties.
Co-chair Sen. Patty Murray, D-
Wash., said efforts would con-
tinue even after Wednesday's
official deadline, but they are
likely to'be desultory and it's
difficult to envision a scenario
for success.
What is sometimes dis-.
missed as partisan bickering -
is, in fact, deep philosophical
division. But for fans of largely
political posturing, there is
plenty of grandstanding to
come.
Next month, Congress must
decide whether to extend
President Barack Obama's
temporary 2 percent cut in the
payroll tax, whether to renew
his extended unemployment
benefits and somehow reverse
a planned 27 percent cut in
payments to doctors treating
Medicare patients.
And, let us not forget, only
one of the 12 spending bills
for government operations
that were supposed to have
been finished by Sept 30 has .,
been passed and signed by the
president n
If there is no action as the
end of the year approaches,
the practice has been to roll
the leftover measures into
one bill and push it over to
the next session. These bills
are often messy and conten-
tious because they offer one
of the rare opportunities that
lawmakers have left to slip in
special-interest measures.
Congress rarely hangs
around much in January, but in
February Obama sends his fis-
cal 2013 budget to the Hill.
If Congress can't agree
on $1.2 trillion in tax hikes
and spending cuts, those
cuts go into effect auito-
matically across-the-board in
January 2013. Congressional
Republicans, who got them-
selves into this trap, hope to ""
avoid those cuts, especially
in defense, that the Pentagon ,
says will leave a hollow mill-
tary.
Those cuts will be deeply
unpopular with the public, but
Obama says he will veto any
attempts by the Republicans to i
get around them. "There will .,'
be n6 easy off-ramps on this ;
one," he said.
If so, there will be a pretty '
spectacular collision that /
may make the country yearn
for the days of.endless bick-
ering.


a Scripps Howard News Service .


omen and
work.
More maga-
zine, a monthly
for "women of
style and substance" (read: over
S40) weighed into that minefield
recently, though perhaps a bit
unwittingly.
In its November feature
' "10 Great Careers for Women
who want a Life," the piece by
Virginia Sole-Smith looked at
jobs pharmacist, web profes-
sional, physical therapist that
can offer women work with
flexibility. But it was the "side-
bar" information that riveted
me.
More partnered with the
Polling Company/WomenTrend
"to survey women about their
attitudes toward their jobs,"
Editor-in-chief Lesley Jane
Seymour explained. What
they found is that "43 percent
described themselves as less
ambitious now than they were
10 years ago; only 15 percent
reported feeling more ambi-
tious."
The survey was conducted
using a nationwide representa-
tive sample of 500 professionally
employed women aged 35 to 60
with at least a college degree,


Betsy Hart
betsysblogcom
and annual household incomes
starting at $60,000 if single and
$75,000 if married.
More interesting the survey
found, "Nor are women slowing
down because they're not get-
ting enough help at home; only
15 percent of respondents said
household or child-care duties
have held them back in their
careers."
Wait a minute. I thought "the
man" is supposed to be the
source of women's work prob-
lems? Some people sure didn't
get the memo on political cor-
rectness.
But most intriguing to me
was that 73 percent of women
surveyed yes, almost three-
quarters would not apply for
their boss's job. Why? Almost
40 percent of those who don't
want to move up said they
"don't want the (office), poli-


tics, pressure, and responsibil-
ity."
Obviously, these women are
not slouches. They are exactly
what our feminist foremothers
sought to produce: Intelligent,
capable, educated women with
a world of professional choices
in front of them. Yet, an over-
whelming majority don't want
their boss's job, because of what
the work entails. The grittiness
of the real world.
So, for women the difficulties
of being at home may have been
replaced by the difficulties of
Being in the workplace. Who
knew?
By the way, as a profes-
sional woman I am all for
women working, succeeding,
and being treated seriously in
the workplace. I have three
daughters and I'm eager to see
what and how they will choose
their work. If anything I see
too many moms today, eschew-
ing all work outside the home,
pour too much of themselves
into their children in a way
that's not healthy for anyone.

Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


Women. and work









P LAKE CITY REPORTER CALENDAR FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


* Submit Community Calendar
announcements by mail or drop off at
the Reporter office located at 180 E.
Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail Ihampson @lakecityreporter.com.


Saturday

Back Rubs For Bucks
United Husbands &
Fathers of America will
be offering back rubs for
tips as a charity fundraiser
in the center court of the
Lake CIty Mall from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.

Calling crafters
The Lake DeSoto
Farmers market is looking
for local artists and craft-
ers for the first Holiday
Craft Festival on Nov.
26 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Vendor applications are
available at www.lcfla.


com/farmersmarkethtm
and the fee is $10. The
farmers market will also
feature music from the
Worley Family Band, of
Monticello. It is located in
Wilson Park along Lake
DeSoto. For information
call (386) 719-5766.

Nov. 30

LEC activity
Shirley Bethel performs
at 11 a.m. at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The cen-
ter is located at 628-S.E.
Allison Court.

Dec. 2


Community theater
Community Theater,
130 NE first St. in High
Springs, will perform the
Frank Capra classic "Its a
Wonderful life" weekends
from Dec. 2 until Dec. 18.
This year done in the style
that has become a High
Springs tradition, as a
staged Radio Show. With all
of your favorite characters
Son stage, this year promises
to be must see. Don't miss
this heart warming family
entertainment Shows will-
b Friday and Saturdays
at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2
p.m. Tickets are available in
High Springs at The Coffee
Clutch (386454-7593), in


Lake City atThe'Framery
(386-754-2780), on line at
highspringscommunitythe-
ater.com and at the door.

Dec. 3

Toy ride
The 10th annual Dream
machine Toy Ride will
be Dec. 3 at 10 a.m. at
Rountree Moore Toyota
in Lake City. Bring a new,
unwrapped toy or cash
donation for the Christmas
SDream Machine. Also
Sbing'a nonperishable food,
item to donate. Thewe will
be an after party at the
fairgrounds with barbecue
a-d local band, Scattergun.


Call (386)362-6529.

Blank-Fest Florida
Rockstar Lounge, 723
East Duval St. in Lake
City, will host Blank-Fest
Florida on Dec. 3. at 6 p.m.
Admission is one blanket
that will be donated to the
homeless. There will be
several bdnds performing
and raffles.


Dec. 7 1


Olustee meeting
The Blue Grey Army is'
meeting 5:30 p.m. Sept 14
at the Central Building to


plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across
from Aquatics Center.

Dec. 15

Cooking show
The annual Celebrate
the Seasons Cooking
show on Dec. 15 from
6 to 9 p.m. The event
is a sampling of dishes
prepared by guest chefs.
The cost is $15 per ticket
and includes drinks and
appetizers prior to the
show. It is sponsored
by the Woman's Club of
Lake City. Call 755-0347
for information.'


Walk

for

Water
Photo courtesy Carol Glemon
Walk for Water, a local effort
to bring clean drinking water
to The Sudan in Africa, was
a great success, organizers
report. There were 69 walk-
ers representing 18 churches
and students from the New
Generation School of Lake
City, some of which'are
pictured. So far $4,360 has
been raised. For more infor-
mation contact Carol Hudgins
at 386-935-2997.


Columbia, Suanneeroad, lane closures, Nov. 26-Dec. 2


Note: All work will be suspended through
Sunday for the Thanksgiving holiday. -
FDOT

COLUMBIA COUNTY

Baya Drive Crews will be repainting
the roadway lines from US 90 East to US
90 West

Interstate 10 Daytime and night-
time lane closures between US 441(Exit
303) and the Suwannee County line (west
of Interstate 75) for milling and paving
beginning Monday at 6 a.m.. until Friday
at 6 a.m. The speed limit is ,reduced to
60 mph during lane closures. Only two
miles will be closed at one time. No lane
closures allowed Friday (after 6 a.m.)
through Sunday.

Interstate 75 Daytime lane closures
for northbound traffic north of the US
41/441 overpass in Ellisville to work in the
median. The speed limit is reduced to 60


mph during lane closures.
State Road 136 Daytime lane clo-
sures at the Suwannee River Bridge in
White Springs on Monday from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. for routine bridge maintenance.

US 41 (North Main Boulevard)
Daytime lane closures for southbound
traffic from the railroad overpass to Long
Street on Monday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.'
to allow the City of Lake City to repair a
lianhole.

US 41/441 Crews will be repaint-
ing the roadway lines from the Alachua
County line (Santa Fe River Bridge) to
US 90.

US 441 Crews will be repainting the
roadway lines from US 41 to the Georgia
line.

US 90 (Duyal Street) Crews will be
repainting the roadway lines from Baya
Drive to State Road 100.


SUWANNEE COUNTY

Interstate 10 Daytime lane closures
Monday through Thursday between US 90
(Exit275) and US 129 (Exit 283) to repave
the shoulders. Also, daytime lane closures
to replace the guardrail in the median.
The speed is reduced to 60 mph during
lane closures. No lane closures allowed
Friday through Sunday and lane closures


are restricted to two miles.

US 90 The road will be closed on
Friday, December 2 at 5 p.m. through
Saturday, December 3 at 5 p.m. from US
129 to Houston Street in downtown Live
Oak for the Christmas on the Square.
The road will also be closed Saturday,
December 3 until 9 p.m. for the Christmas
parade. Live Oak Police will detour traffic.


_ ~


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


Occupy movements mark holiday


By BETH DUFF-BROWN
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO
Most Americans spent
Thanksgiving snug inside
homes with families and
football. Others used the
holiday to give thanks
alongside strangers at out-
door Occupy encampments,
serving turkey or donating
their time in solidarity with
the anti-Wall Street move-
ment that has gripped a
nation consumed by eco-
nomic despair.
In San Francisco, hun-
dreds of campers at Justin
Herman Plaza in the heart
of the financial district pre-
pared turkey dinners that
were handed out by volun-
teers, church charities and
supporters of the movement
against social and econ )mic
inequality.
AcrossthebayinOakland,
where protesters and police
previously clashed when
an Occupy encampment
was broke up,. occupiers
enjoyed a Thanksgiving
feast outside City Hall with
music and activist speakers,
including Clyde Bellecourt,
co-founder ofthe Minnesota-
based American Indian
Movement
And in New York,
Occupy organizers distrib-
uted Thanksgiving meals
at Zuccotti Park, where the
protest movement began on
Sept 17 before spreading
nationwide.
"So many people have
given up so much to come
and be a part of the move-
ment because there is real-
ly that much dire need for
communityy" said Megan
Hayes, a chef and organizer
with the Occupy Wall Street
Kitchen in New York. "We
decided to take this holiday
opportunity to provide just
that--community."
She .said some '3,000
meals were distributed.
The movement's slogan,
"We afe the 99," refers to;
the growing wealth gap
between the wealthiest 1
percent of Americans and
the remaining 99.
S The movement was trig-
gered by the high rate of
unemployment and foreclo-
sures, as well as the grow-
ing perception that big
banks and corporations are
not paying their fair share
of taxes, yet are taking in
Huge bonuses, while most
Americans have seen their
incomes drop.
In'NewYork, restaurants
and individual donors had
prepared more than 3,000
meals for the traditional
Thanksgiving feast, said
Haywood Carey, 28, of
Chapel Hill, N.C:, who
was volunteering his time
serving meals and said
the celebration was a sign
. of Americans' shared val-
ues.
'The thhgs that divide are
much less than the things
that bind us together,"
Carey said, as the crowd ate.
to the old spiritual anthem,
"Let it Shine" by a guitarist
and a bongo player.
In Las Vegas, Occupy
organizer Sebring Frehner
said protesters had a pot-
luck Thanksgiving meal
at their campsite near the
University of Nevada, Las
Vegas. He said he was
happy to skip the traditional
meal at home.
"Instead of hunkering
down with five or six close
individuals in your home,
people you probably see all
of the time anyway, you are
celebrating Thanksgiving
with many different fami-
lies kind of like the origi-
nal Thanksgiving," Frehner
said.
Trisha Carr, 35, spent
her holiday at the Occupy
encampment at City Hall in
Philadelphia. She has been
out of work for more than


two years and lost her car
and home. She's been liv-
ing in an Occupy tent for
several weeks.
The sunny, crisp weather
Thursday put her in a godd
mood, and she watched the
annual Thanksgiving parade
before coming back to the
encampment for a plate full
of turkey and fixings.


Liza Ostolaza, 37, of Puerto Rico, distributes turkey and vegetarian meals to volunteers for Thanksgiving dinnerin Zuccotti Park Thursday in New York.
Protestors used the holiday to give thanks alongside straingrs at outdoor Occupy encampments nationwide, serving turkey or donating their time in solidarity
with the anti-Wall Street movement.



'Road diets' used to help slow traffic
,,., .,. .


By JEANNIE NUSS
Associated Press

HARRISON, Ark. It looks
like any other road-improvement
project orange barrels, repaving
equipment and men in fluorescent
vests. But a closer look,reveals
something curious.
Instead of making the street
wider to accommodate more cars,
the crew reduces it from four lanes
to two ,in a project called a "road'
diet." The goal is to rein in aggres-
sive drivers and'make shopping
areas friendlier to pedestrians.
The idea seems counterintui-
tive for 'traffic-choked towns, but
it's catching on.. In Harrison, a
small city in northwest Arkansas,
officials also hope it drums up
more business along Main Street.
Mayor Jeff Crockett wants drivers
"to slow down;, stop, shop, take
your time getting through."
Some people say the plan seems
to be working, citing an increase
in foot traffic at stores. Others
worry that the new configuration
will have the opposite effect: If traf-
fic backs up too much, people will
flee Main Street for other routes.
"We're afraid of people avoiding
this area," said Kristi Myers, who
runs a tire and battery shop with
her husband along the newly paved
street. "If someone doesn't want to
come down this road, less traffic
means less business for us."'


Road diets and doubts about
them are not entirely new. A
decade ago in University Place,
Wash., city offidals faced opposi-
tion when they eliminated some
traffic lanes.
"The idea thatyou can take lanes
away seems to some to be insan-
ity," said Steve Sugg, city manager
in the conmunty about 40 miles
'southwest of Seittlet
Yet in Univrsity Place and
scores of other communities that
have taken similar measures,
motorists are often pleasantly sur-,
prised. Comnutes don't take much
longer, and more drivers follow the
speed limit largely because they
have no more passing lanes.
In Harrison, the road was nar-
rowed to two diving lanes, with a
turn lane in thenmiddle.
But business owners such as
Ernest Raney, who runs a pawn
shop with his wife along Maii
Street, questiona whether it will
achieve anything for businesses.
"T-hey call it a road diet which
means they're going to cut back
on traffic," Ranr said. "But I can't
imagine any businessman wanting
less traffic in fro t of his business."
The pace ot life has always
been slow in this city of 13,000.
People honk tleir horns to say
hello, not to criticize someone's
driving. Sales :clerks and super-
market baggers know customers
by name.


A painted arrow indicates a turn lane on Main Street in Harrison, Ark, The
number of lanes was reduced from four to three to make drivers slow down.,.


A year later, town mourns 3 missg boys
A year later, town mourns 3 missing boys


By JEFF KAROUB
Associated Press

DETROIT Morenci
Police Chief Larry Weeks
recently served as a guest
spelling-test presenter for a
fifth-gradeclass, and after-
ward invited the students
to ask questions. Amid the
usual queries about weap-
ons and uniforms came one
from a girl that reminded
him howhard the southern
Michigan town has been
hit by the disappearance
of three young boys who
would have attended ,the
school.
"She raised her hand
and asked how often I have
investigated cases where
parents have stolen their
children," Weeks said. "I
struggled with responding
to the question. ... It con-
cerns me how it's changed
their outlook. Kids should
have the opportunity to be
kids. To be thinking of that
tells me that they're wor-
ried, they're concerned.
And that bothers me
immensely."
One year later, Weeks
can point to successes in
the case, such as the con-


viction of John Skelton, the
boys' father and prime sus-
pect on unlawful imprison-
ment charges. But Weeks,
the boys' family and 'other
residents of the close-knit
community remain haunt-
Sed by one reality: Andrew,
Alexander. and Tanner
Skelton have never been
found.
The Skelton brothers
were 9, 7, and 5 years
old, respectively, when
they went to spend last
Thanksgiving at' their
father's home in Morenci,
about 70 miles south-
west of Detroit near the
Ohio state line. The boys'
mother, Tanya Zuvers, had
exclusive custody of them,
but agreed to let them visit
their father nearby if he
returned them the next
day.
When John Skelton didn't
return them, Zuvers noti-
fied police, who arrested
Skelton and launched what
became a massive search
effort in the following
weeks. Cell phone records
indicated Skelton left home
the day after Thanksgiving
and drove at least'as far as
Holiday City, Ohib, about


ASSOCIATED PRESS
This combination file photo made with undated photos provid-
ed by The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
shows, from left, Alexander Skelton, 7, Andrew Skelton, 9,
and Tanner Skelton. 5.


20 miles southwest, before
returning home.
Despite the help of hun-
dreds of volunteers search-
ing fields and roadways in
the often bitter cold, the
search produced nothing.
The unlawful imprison-
ment charge pertains to
Skeltoh's failure to return
the boys to Zuvers the day
afterThanksgiving. Skelton
said he doesn't know what
happened to his children
after he handed them over
to a group he hasn't identi-
fied to protect them from
their mother.
Skelton pleaded no con-
test to the charge in July in


exchange for prosecutors
dropping a charge of paren-
tal kidnapping. He was sen-
tenced in September to 10
to 15 years in prison. His
lawyer, John Glaser, object-


, ed to the severity of the
sentence, telling the judge,
"My client is not here on a
murder charge."
Police don't believe
Skelton's story but are
nonetheless pleased to
have him behind bars.
"It gives us some breath-
ing room to continue our
investigation and search
for the boys," Weeks said.
Authorities plan to con-
duct what they're calling a
"road canvass" from about
4 a.m. to 7 a.m. Friday
along U.S. 127. Weeks said
it coincides with the time
exactly one year earlier
that police believe he made
the 40-mile roundtrip from
Morenci to Holiday City
and "disposed of the boys."


wvvw.myfiapts-com


'"
:
.r
s









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkrby@lakecityreportercom


SPORTS


Frida November 25 20 II


I, --


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Turkey


Bowl a


tribute
T night's
playoff games
will only whet
the appetite of
football fans
at Columbia High and
Fort White High.
For a more relaxed
setting, fans and their,
families are invited to
Memorial Stadium on
Saturday.
The Breon Thomas
Turkey Bowl is planned
as a tribute to fallen
Columbia High
classmates.
It will consist of a
flag football tournament
among Columbia classes
from 1995-99 and
2000-01. The first game is
at 10 a.m.
The tournament is
free. Plans for a free feed
fell through, but there
will be concessions on
sale.
~"e are going to have. ..
some fun," said Michael
Daies, who has come to
Lake City from Atlanta.
"I think there is going to
be a nice crowd. Bring
the kids out."
The class captains list
reads like a who's who
of former CHS stars -
Jerome Carter, Rodney
Johnson, Jarvis Byrd,
Theis Rossin, Terrence
Harrell, Ron Jernigan
and Daies.
It will be a good
chance to meet many
of the Tigers in this
100th year of celebrating
Columbia football.
Thomas and Daies are
cousins, who graduated
together in. 1996. Thomas
Died in 2001 and Daies,
along with Ron Jernigan,
had the idea of honoring
him and other classmates
from 1996.
"Me and Ron came.up
with it one day," Daies
said. "'We were talking
on Facebook about who.
had the best class and it
started there. There has
been a lot of bragging on
Facebook. We have 400
members on the Breon
Thomas Turkey Bowl
site and are getting a lot
of positive feedback."
Columbia County
Recreation Director
Mario Coppock has
arranged for a trophy
and will make the
presentation to the
winning team.
Daies said Chris Bell,
Bobbie Davis and Ann
Jones have promoted the
tournament locally and
came up with the T-shirts
for his 1996 team.
He is looking forward
to lining up against old
friends, but there also is
a serious side:
'We have lost a lot of
classmates from the class
of 1996 and we want to
honor them," Dales said.
"We are inviting all their
parents and families to
come out and watch the
game, and we will have
something special for
them."
Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


Bear, hunt




for Tigers

CHS looks for big night for Gabe Johnson,
crowd as Bartram who has run for 1,155 yards
crowd a and 15 touchdowns.
Trail High visits. "They're balanced
Depending on the down and
By BRANDON FINLEY distance," Allen said:
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com Still, Allen feels his
offense can stack up to that
It will truly be a matchup of the Bears.
of contrasting styles when "We have a guy in
Bartram Trail High travels Jayce Barber that has
into the Jungle to take on numbers that compare to
Columbia High in today's (Peterman)," Allen said.
second round matchup of "Our guy has 1,200 yards
the Class 6A state playoffs. and we don't throw a ton."
Bartram is lead by a bal- Allen's goal, however, is
anced offense that bases its to make the Bears' attack
sets out of the spread. Don't one-dimensional.
let the word "spread" fool, "We want to take away
however, because the Bears the run and force them to
have a balanced attack. pass," Allen said.
Bartram Trail is averaging "They'll go deep, but if we
more than 200 yards on the do what we're supposed to
ground and through the do, e'll be fine. We'll have.
air. a safety over the top. These
The Bears' best weapon guys are veterans now. It's
is quarterback Nathan not just one or two games
Peterman, who Tigers head under their belt. They've
coach Brian Allen believes played 12 ball games and
is a next-level player. had 12 weeks of practice."
"We must contain him," Allen wants the Tigers
Allen said. "He's an SEC to have an edge with
kid. He's better than good. attendance. He believes
We'd like to contain him Columbia has enough fan
and force him into bad deci- support to pack the house.
sions. We need to get to "It'd be tremendous,"
him on the ends and not Allen said. "I've talked with
let him sit back and get Donnie (Harrison) and told
comfortable in the pocket. him I'd like to get 6,500
We've got to have the clock in here before its done.
ticking in his head." I Itd be tremendous to get
Allen isn't fooled by that many. We want it to be
thinking the Bears can't tough to find a seat."
get it done on the ground Allen believes that if
either. He knows that the the Tiger faithful pack the
Tigers will have to play like stands it will give Columbia
they have over a four-game the 12th-man factor.
stretch in which Columbia "We want them in here
has allowed only 18 points.
If not, it could be a big CHS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A Fort White High runner fights for extra yardage in the win over Santa Fe High.




Showdown II


Fort White seeks
revenge in trip to
Trinity Catholic.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High will have a dif-
ferentfacewhenthe Indians
meet Trinity Catholic High
in today's rematch.
The two District 3 teams
square off in Ocala in a
Class 3A regional final
game. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
Trinity Catholic won
-'he -frst meetingg: 49-14.
on Nov. 4. In that game,
the Celtics scored three
touchdowns in the first six
minutes of the game and
added three more in the
final seven minutes. Trinity
Catholic'feasted on eight
Fort White turnovers.


Fort White played
without starting quarter-
back Andrew Baker, who
resumed his. season tear
after returning against
Santa Fe High.
In his two games back,
Baker is 16-of-30 passing
for 237 yards and four
touchdowns. He has 14 TD
passes and has not thrown
an interception since the
third game of the season.
In the first meeting,
Trinity Catholic returned
three passes to the end
zone. Two stood for
touchdowns and one was
negated by a penalty, only
to postpone the agofiy for
two plays.
In Fort White's win over
The First Academy, Baker
had touchdown throws of
32 and 10 yards to A.J.
Legree and 11 yards to
Soron Williams. Legree


and Williams have com-
bined for 26 touchdowns
this season. Baker has
rushed for three TDs.
Fort White's offensive
line will have to deal with
a Celtics defense that had
seven sacks last week, led
by Matt Lewis with two.
Fort White will likely
see a different look from
Trinity Catholic, which
beat Melbourne Central
Catholic High last week,
45-21.
Demonta Blunt, who had
51 yards rushing against
the Indians, ran the ball
nine times for 146 yards
and two touchdowns.
Austin McClellan rushed
for 148 yards against Fort
White, but his main dam-
age,against MCC was a
54-yard punt return and a
INDIANS continued on 3B


Plenty at stake in SEC's final week


National title,
bowl possibilities
will be decided.

By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE The
Southeastern Conference
has played significant
games every week for the
last six seasons.
This week might be big-
ger than any of the others.
Yes, the league that has
won five consecutive nation-
al championships and had
a regular-season matchup
dubbed 'The Game of the
Century" earlier this month
has as many meaningful
games this weekend as any
weekend in recent years.
In addition to Arkansas-
LSU, which will help
determine the Western
Division race, the league
has renowned rivalries on
tap, long winning streaks
at stake and plenty of post-
season implications on the
line.
The No. 3 Razorbacks.
and the top-ranked Tigers
get the weekend started
today with a game that
has turned out to be as
'relevant to the conference
and national champion-
ship pictures as the much-
hyped LSU-Alabama game
three weeks ago. LSU can
secure a spot in the SEC
title game with a victory.
The Razorbacks need to
win and have Auburn upset
No. 2 Alabama Saturday to
definitely reach Atlanta.
And there are several
scenarios involving the
Bowl Championship Series
national title game.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida tight end Jordan Reed (11) catches a pass from John Brantley while playing against
Furman University at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in Gainesville on Saturday.


"I have to be real honest
with you. I have not been
able to internalize any of
that," LSU coach Les Miles
said. "I can tell you one
thing. We're going to play
this very talented team in
our stadium. ... Frankly, it is
one of those games that you
look forward to playing."


The winner of the Iron
B6wl, the annual in-state
rivalry game between
Alabama and Auburn, has
won the last two national
championships and could
be a factor again.
Georgia, South Carolina
and Florida have 'a lot to
play for Saturday.


The Bulldogs (9-2), the
SEC East champs who have
a chance to wreak havoc
on the national champion-
ship picture next weekend
in Atlanta, have won nine
in a row and are looking
to maintain that momentum
against Georgia Tech.
The Gamecocks (9-2)


already have made school
history by winning nine
games in consecutive years
for the first time. They can
add to that accomplishment
by winning a third straight
game against rival Clemson
for the first time since 1970,
and by winning 10 games
for just the second time in
school history (1983).
Florida (6-5) can say the
same thing about its in-
state rivalry game against
Florida State. Thel Gators
have dropped five of their
last seven games and fin-
ished below .500 in confer-
ence play for the first time
since 1986.
The Gators can salvage
their worst season since
with a victory.
Tennessee, Mississippi
State and Vanderbilt all
need wins to become bowl
eligible.
The Volunteers (5-6) play
at Kentucky (4-7), a team
they have beaten 26 times
in a row. It's the longest
active winning streak in
the country in an annually
played series.
The Bulldogs (5-6) host
in-state rival Mississippi in
the Egg Bowl. Mississippi
State desperately wants to
make back-to-back bowl
games for the first time in
more than a decade.
Ole Miss would love to
send fired coach Houston
Nutt out on a positive note.
Vanderbilt (5-6) has made
a bowl game just once since
1982.
Assuming the league
gets two spots in the BCS,
Tennessee, Mississippi
State and Vanderbilt would
need wins for the confer-
ence to fill its bowl slots.


I











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
II a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Brazilian Grand Prix, at Sao Paulo
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
II a.m.
ESPN2 Louisville at South Florida
M Noon
ABC Iowa at Nebraska-
FSN -Houston atTulsa .
2:30 p.m.
CBS -Arkansas at LSU
3:30 p.m.
ABC Boston College at Miami
FSN Colorado at Utah
7p.m.
ESPN Pittsburgh atWest Virginia
10:15 p.m.
ESPN California at Arizona St.
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour,
South African Open, second round, at
Johannesburg, (same-day tape)
Noon
TGC-Australian PGA Championship,
second round, at Coolum Beach,Australia
(same-day tape)
10:30 p...'
TGC Mission Hills World''Cup,
'third round, at Hainan Island, China
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Old Spice Classic, semifinal,
at Orlando
2 p.m.
VERSUS Battle 4 Atlantis,
semifinals, at Nassau, Bahamas
2:30 p.m.
ESPN -Teams TBA
ESPN2 -Teams TBA
5 p.m.
ESPN -Teams TBA
ESPIN2-Teams TBA
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 'Old Spice Classic,
consolation bracket, at Orlando
10p.m.
ESPN2 South Carolina vs. North
Carolina, at Las Vegas
12 Midnight
ESPN2 76 Classic, semifinal, at
Anaheim, Calif.
NHL HOCKEY
I p.m. ,
NBC Detroit at Boston
PREP FOOTBALL
; 10:30 p.m.
FSN CIF-SS playoffs, quarterfi-.
nal, Lakewood (Calif.) at San Clemente
(Calif)

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


Ne
N Y
Buf
MIa


HoL
Ten
Jac
Indi


AMERICAN CONFERENCE,
East
W. L TPct PF PA
w England 7 3 0'.700 293 203
Y.Jets 5 5 0 .500 2 217
falo 5 5 0.500 237 253
mi 3 8 0.273 212 206
South
W L'T Pct PF PA
uston 7 3 0.700273 166
nessee 5 5 0.500203 195
ksonville 3 7 0.300 125 180
ianapolis 0 10 0.000 131 300
North


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


T Pct PF PA
0 .700 256 176
0.700 220 179
0 .600236 195
'.400 145 193


West
W L T Pct PF PA
Oakland 6 4 0 .600 235 254
Denver 5 5 0.500 205 247'
San Diego 4 6 0.400236259
Kansas'City 4 6 0.400 144 252
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Dallas
N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
Washington


New Orleans
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Green Bay
Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota


San Francisco
Seattle'
Arizona
St. Louis


East
W L
7 4
6 4
4 6
3 7
South
W L
-7 3
6. 4
,'.4 6
2 8
North
W L
II 0
7 3
7 4
2 8
West
W L
9 1
4 6
3 7
2 8


T Pct PF PA
0 .636 270 225
0 .600 228 228
0.400 237 213
0.300 160 205

T Pci PF PA
0 .700 313 228
0:600 235 213
0 A400 182268
0 .200225 286

T Pct PF PA
01.000 382227
0.700 268 207
0.636 316 246
0.200 200 271

T Pct PF PA
0.900 256 145
0400 168209
0.300 190236
0.200 120247


Thursday's Games ,
Green Bay 27, Detroit 15
Dallas 20, Miami 19
San Francisco at Baltimore (n)
Sunday's Games
Arizona at St. Louis, I p.m.
-Tampa Bay at Tennessee, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y.Jets,'I p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Carolina at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Minnesota at Atlanta, I p.m.
Chicago at Oakland, 4:05,p.m.
Washington at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Kansas City, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
N.Y. Giants at New Orleans,
8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Dec. I
Philadelphia at Seattle, 8:20 p.m.

College games

Today
EAST
Bowling Green (4-7) at Buffalo (3-8),
Noon
Kent St. (5-6) at Temple (7-4), Noon
Pittsburgh (5-5) at West Virginia
(7-3), 7 p.m.
SOUTH
Louisville (6-5) at South Florida
(5-5), II a.m.
Arkansas (10-1) at LSU (11-0),
2:30 p.m.


Boston College (3-8) at Miami
(6-5), 3:30 p.m.
UTEP (5-6) at UCF (4-7), 7 p.m.
MIDWEST
E. Michigan (6-5) at N. Illinois (8-3),
II a.m.
Iowa (7-4) at Nebraska (8-3), Noon
Akron (1-10) at W. Michigan (6-5),
1 p.m.
Toledo (7-4) at Ball St. (6-5), 2 p.m.
WEST
Houston (I 11-0) atTulsa (8-3), Noon
Colorado (2-10) at Utah (7-4),
3:30 p.m.
California (6-5) at Arizona St. (6-5),
10:15 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today
No. 8 Houston at Tulsa, Noon
No. I LSU vs. No. 3 Arkansas,
2.30 p.m.
No.22 Nebraska vs. Iowa, Noon
Saturday
No. 2 Alabama at Auburn, 3:30 p.m.
Noi 4 Stanford vs.' No. 22 Notre
Dame, 8 p.m.
No. 6 Virginia Tech at No. 24 Virginia,'
3:30 p.m.: .. ,
No. 7 Boise State vs.Wyoming, 2 p.m.
Igo. 9 Oregon vs. Oregon State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Southern Cal vs. UCLA,
10 p.m.
No.11 Michigan Stateat Northwestern,
Noon
No. 12 Oklahoma vs. Iowa State,
Noon
No. 13 Georgia at No. 25 Georgia
Tech, Noon
No. 14 South Carolina vs. No. 18
Clemson, 7:45 p.m.
.No. 15 Wisconsin vs. No. 20 Penn
State, 3:30 p.m..
No. 17 Michigan vs. Ohio State, Noon
No. 21 Baylor vs.Texas Tech; 7p.m.


BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games .
No. I North Carolina vs. South
Carolina at Orleans Arena. Las Vegas,
10:30 p.m.
No. 3 Ohio State vs. Valparaiso.
6:30 p.m.
No. 4 UConn vs. UCF-or College of
Charleston at Atlantis Resort, Nassau,
Bahamas, I or 6 p.m.
No. 5 Syracuse vs. Stanford or
Oklahoma State at Madison Square
Garden, 2:30 or 5 p.m.
No. 7 Louisville vs. Ohio, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Florida vs. Jacksonville.
7 p.m,
No., II Wisconsin vs. Bradley at
Sears Centre Arena, Hoffman Estates, IllI.,
8:30 p.m.
No. 12 Xavier vs. Georgia, 8 p.m.
No. 17 Pittsburgh at Pennsylvania.
7 p.m.
No 18 Var.derb. vs. : Monmouth (NJ),
'.9 p.m . r '"
No. 22 Florida State vs. Utah or
Harvard at Atlantis Res-ort, Nassau,
Bahamas, 3:30 or 8:30 p.m.
No. 24 Mississippi State vs. UT-Martin.
p.m.

Florida St. 73, UMass 53

At Paradise Island
Bahamas
FLORIDA ST. (5-0)
James 2-8 5-6 9, White 2-8 7-9 II.
Gibson 2-82-4 6, Loucks 4-6 4-4 12.
Snaer 4-11 7-8 18, Dulkys 0-0 2-2 2.
:Peterson 1-6 1-2 3, Shannon 3-3 2-4 8,
Whisnant II 0-0 0-0 0, Kreft 2-7 0-0 4. .
Totals 20-57 30-39 73.
UMASS (4-1)
Farrell 4-1 1-2 9,Vinson 1-7 2-2 4,
Se. Carer I-I 0-22,Wllliams 3-14 1-28,
Riley 0-4 0-0 0, Esho 3-5 4-5 10, Morgan
,1-7 1-2 3. Lalanne 0-3 0-1 0,Sa, Carter
2.4 2-3 6. Putney 4-12 2-2 II. Totals
19-681 3-21 53.
Halftime-Florida St 36-25. 3-Point
Goals-Florida St. 3-12 (Snaer 3-6,
Loucks 0-1, White 0-2, Peterson, 0-3),
UMass 2-23 (Williams 1-3, Putney 1-5.
Sa. Carter 0-1, Morgan 0-2, Lalanne 0-2,
Farrell .-3,Vinson 0-3, Riley 0-4). Fouled
Out-Farrell, Putney. Rebounds-Florida
St. 53 (White 11), UMass 43 (Vinson 8).
Assists-Florida>St. 7 (Loucks, Snaer 3),
UMass 6 (Williams 6).Total Fouls-Florida
St. 22, UMass 30.Technicals--James, Snaer,
Sa. Carter, Farrell.A-1,493.

AUTO RACING

Race week

FORMULA ONE.
BRAZILIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Sao Paulo.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
II a.m.-12:30 p.m.); Saturday, practice,
qualifying (Speed, II a.m.-12:30 p.m.);:
Sunday, race, II a.m. (Speed, 10:30 a.m -



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I CUORC


I p.m.).
Track: Interlagos, Autodromo Jose
Carlos Pace (road course, 2.677 miles).
Race distance: 190.08 miles, 71 laps.
Online: http://www.formulal.com

Sprint Cup winners

Feb. 12 x-Budweiser Shootout
(Kurt Busch)
Feb. 17 x-Gatorade Duel 2 (Jeff
Burton)
Feb. 17 x-Gatorade Duel I (Kurt.
Busch)
Feb. 20 Daytona 500 (Trevor
Bayne)
Feb.27 Subway Fresh Fit'500 (Jeff
Gordon)
March 6 -1K,_balt Tools 400 (Carl
Edwards)
March 20 Jpff Byrd 500 presented
by Food City (Kyle Busch)
.March 27 Auto Club 400 '(Kevin
Harvick)
April 3 Goody's Fast Relief 500
(Kevin Harvick)
April 9 Samsung Mobile 500 (Matt
Kenseth)
April .17 Aaron's 499 (Jimmie
Johnsin)
April 30 Crown Royal Presents
The Matthew & Daniel Hansen 400
(Kyle Busch)
May 7 Showtime Southern 500
(Regan Smith)
May IS 1 -- FedEx 400 benefiting
Autism Speaks (Matt Kenseth)
May 21 x-Sprint Showdown (David
Ragan)
May 21'- x-NASCAR Sprint All-Star
Race (Carl Edwards)
May 29 Coca-Cola 600 (Kevin
Harvick)
June 5 STP 400 (Brad Keselowski)
June 12 5-hour ENERGY 500 (Jeff
Gqrdon) ,
S June 19 Heluva Good! Sour Cream
Dips 400 (Denny Hamlin)
June 26 -Toyota/Save Mart 350 (Kurt
Busch)
July 2 Coke Zero 400 Powered By
Coca-Cola (David Ragan) *
July 9 Quaker State 400 (Kyle
Busch)
July 1.7- Lenox Industrial Tools 301
(Ryan Newman)
July 31 -- Brickyard 400 (Paul
.Menard)
Aug.7 Good Sam RV Insurance 500
(Brad Keselowski)
Aug. 15 -.Heluva Good! Sour Cream
Dips at The Glen (Marcos Ambrose)
Aug. 21 Pure Michigan 400 (Kyle
Busch)
Aug. 27 Irwin Tools Night Race
(Brad Keselowski)
Sep. 6 AdvoCare 500 (Jeff
Gordon)
Sep. 10 -7Wonderful Pistachios 400
(Kevin Harvick)
Sep. 19 .GEICO 400 (Tony
Stewart)
Sep. 25 -- Sylvania 300 (Tony
Stewart)
Oct. 2 -AAA 400 K.-t Bus .:'
SOct. 9 -- Hollywood Casino 400
(Jimmie Johnson) '
Oct. 15 Bank of America 500 (Matt
Kenseth)
Oct. 23 Good Sam Club 500 (Clint
Bowyer) '
Oct. 30 TUMS Fast Relief 500.
(Tony Stewart)
Nov. 6 AAA Texas 500 (Tony
Stewart)
Nov. 13 Kobalt Tools 500 (Kasey
Kahne)
Nov. 20 Ford 400 (Tony Stewart)
x-non-ppints race

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Boston 4, Buffalo 3, SO
New Jersey 2, Columbus I, SO
Montreal 4, Carolina 3, SO
Philadelphia 4; N.Y. Islanders 3, OT
St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2, OT
SWashington 4,Winnipeg 3, OT
Detroit 5,:Calgary 3
Florida 2, N.Y. Rangers I
Minnesota 3, Nashville 2
Dallas 3, Los Angeles 2, OT
Phoenix 4;Anaheim 2
Vancouver 3,.Colorado O .
San Jose1 I, Chicago 0
Thursday's Games,
No games scheduled
Today's Games
Detroit at Boston, I p.m.
New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders, 3 p.m.
Montreal at Philadelphia, 3 p.m.
Edmonton at Minnesota, 4 p.m. "
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4 p.m.
Chicago atAnaheim, 4 p.m.
Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Phoenix, 9 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's' Jumbles: TACKY HABIT MUSSEL GAINED
Answer: When the Pilgrims were presented with a
feast, they did this SAID THANKS


11-25


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(35.5-16.5); 2. Farmers (30.5-21.5);
3. Pin Busters (29.5-22.5).
High handicap game: 1. Roberta
Glordano 232; 2. Yvonne Finley 219;
3. Diane Madsen 216. 1. Chuck
Shorter 232; 2. Joe Peterson 221;
3. Morrell Atwood 208.
High handicap series: 1. Shirley
Yates 639; 2. Aggie Mumbauer 634; 3.
Louise Atwood 622. 1. C.W. Reddick
613; 2. Keith Herbster 601; 3. (tie)
Wayne Johns, Ross Meyers 593.
(results from Nov. 15)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Susie
Camaclo 219; 2. Lori Davis 208;
3. Lorrie Geiger 196. 1. Mark Koppa
258; 2. Mark Davis 249; 3. Vernon
Black 225.
High scratch series: 1. Susie
Camacho 567; 2. Lori Davis 513;
3. Lorrie Geiger 499. 1. Mark Davis


SCOREBOARD


impact We're getting. back
to the way we always played
and we want guys to show
that we haven't seen in a


BOWLING

600; 2. Vernon Black 595; 3. Tom
Sewejkis 582.
High handicap game: 1. Lori
Davis 245; 2. Diane Madsen 233;
3. Danni Fair 232. 1. Mark Koppa 273;
2. Vernon Black 262; 3. Mark Davis
253.
High handicap series: 1. Susie
Camacho 723; 2. Brandy Watson
661; 3. Rachel Mcinally 635. 1. Ken
Watson 680; 2. Eddie Hillhouse 673;
3. Marc Jennings 657.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 188,
Mark Davis 203.
(results from Nov. 15)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Quirky Quad
(37-19); 2. BMW (35-21); 3. 4 S's'
.(33.5-22.5, 32,876 pins); 4. Three Gals
& A Guy (33.5-22.5, 32,748 pins).
High handicap game: 1. Susan.
Mears 252; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 240;
,,3. Barbara Griner 238. 1. Bill Price
259; 2. Earl Hayward 249; 3. Wayne
Johns 243.
High handicap series: 1. Shirley
HIghsmith 673; 2. Bea Purdy 664;
3. Elle DeRosa 654. 1. Lee McKinney


AMERICAN LEGION HOLD 'EM




Kellet wins ChampionsII


From staff reports


The Champions II
Tournament was Nov. 18.
The main tournament prize
of $500 was won by Cheryll
Kellet
The consolation tourna-
ment had a prize fund of
$100, which was chopped
by Marshall Garner ($50),
Marylan Kerley ($25) and
SJim Grimsley ($25).
To make the Champions
H field, players had to
place in the top four in any
of the 38 Monday, Thursday
or Saturday, qualifying
tournaments.
Qualifiers got a minimum
of 5,000 in chips for qualify-
ing one time and another'
2,000 in chips for each addi-
tional time they qualified.,
The chip leaders going
into the tournament were
Frank Capallia 51,000, Art
Lowes 21,000, Jim Grimsley
19,000 and Martin Woods
17,000.
Capallia finished in sec-



CHS: Winne


Continued From Page, 11

crazy loud," Allen said. 'We
want them causing false-
start penalties and proce-
dure penalties. We want
them loud on fourth-and-
short. It could be a huge


ACROSS
1 Tadpoles have
them
6 Minor
mistakes ..
11 Worm seekers
13 Casino'
employee
14 Reddish-
brown
15 Horse operas
16. kwon do
17 Highest
degree
18 Mountain
pass
21 Wails in
lamentation
23 Near empty
26 Metal to be
refined
27 Groundless
28 Drop one's
jaw
29, Chatty feline
31 Yielded to
pressure
32 Copier ink
33 Pursuing


COURTESY PHOTO
Champions II Hold 'em' Tournament winner Cheryll Kellet
(right) took home the $500 first prize. She is congratulated
by final table dealer Eloise Reynolds.


ond place and Brittany May
placed third. Both .Kellet
and May qualified with only
5,000 chips.
Week 13 winners/qualifi-
ers in the American Legion
Post 57. Texas Hold 'em
Champions Tournament:
*-,Nov. 14- Firank
Capallia.' first; Judith


.Berube, second; Corey
Anderson,. third; Martin
Woods; fourth;
U* Nov. 17 Frank
Capallia, first; Ron Lubas,
second; Raiidall Mosley,
third; Terry Newth, fourth.
Total qualified -- 58;
Royal Flush Jackpot -
$445.


there's more to come in
the following weeks. The
winner of tonight's game
will take on the winner of


while." 'Pace High and Pensacola
And the Tigers hope High next week.


35 Host -
Trebek
36 Road map
info
37 Date regularly
38 Crayola
, : choice
39 Harmonious
sound
40 Box-score fig.
41 Corn crib
42 Marvy
44 Not
interesting in
the least
47 Laws
51, Living
quarters
52 Lab glassware
53 More friendly
54 Tintylle hue

DOWN
1 Canine
warning
2 Promise to
pay
3. Scale meas.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


A MO T BSP SA-S.H
P AILE O.AHU E LLA
E C LIP SES C EES
SEANCE HAUTE
NO S F!TRAPF
BAlLS TRE
UISE T .RE RI E
MVA'X 1WAND NOM'
I A
| TOWMN EAVT
FAN DAFT


L E


ODIN AMES CAIT


4 Memory
jogger
5 More
underhanded
6 Airliner
capacity
7 Thin strip


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


8 Percent ending
9 diem
10 Almost grads
12 Chargers
13 Metaphysical
poet
18 Share the lead
(hyph.)
19 Colorful
songbird
20 Slanted
22 Puts in office
23 Richly
appointed
24 Ballpark event
25 Hunks of
cheese
28 Invisible
substance
30 Tijuana loc.
31 Waterfalls
34 Young cow
36 Ladder parts
39 Clementine's
dad
41 Linger
43 Quick snack
44 Prohibit
officially
45 Kimono
fastener
46 Transport for
Sinbad
48 Uniform
wearer
49 Part of TNT
50 Depot (abbr.)


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


734; 2. George Walters 641; 3. Jim
Burnett 638.
High average: 1. De De Young
154.83; 2.. Betty Carmichael 152.87;
3. Elaine Nemeth 152.67. 1. David
Duncan 193.33; 2. Bill Dolly 189.79;
3. Lee McKinney 180.24.
(results from Nov. 17)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: '1. McGhghy's
Navy (35-17); 2. TAZ (33.5-18.5);
3. WGASA (32.5-19.5).
High scratch game: 1. Norma
Yeingst 235; 2. Norma Yeingst 182;
3. Angela Pond 177. 1. Leroy Newton
255; 2. Jon Cadle 234; 3. Blake
Landerf'233.
High scratch series: 1. Norma
Yeingst 569; 2. Angela Pond 483;
3. Jennifer Freeman 457. .1. Leroy
Newton 651; 2. Robert Pond 631;
3. Jon Cadle 596. ,
:High average: .1. Norma Yeingst
173; 2. Cheryl Jacks 156.03;
3. Jennifer Freeman 150.64. 1. Dan
McNair 205.15; 2. A.J. Dariano
196.44; 3. Mark Moore 191.13.
(results from Nov. 20)


r plays Pace/Pensacola


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I
a


CNKOUL
RDs AN



RDSANT
r-7- 0177
^^^^ -& A, -A










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Mississippi defensive'end Jason Jones (53) tries to get around LSU lineman Alex Hurst (72)
During their game in Oxford, Miss., on Saturday.




BCS chaos? No


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

You want BCS chaos?
If No. 3 Arkansas beats
No. 1 LSU today in Baton
Rouge, La., now you really
have some chaos.
Remember the 2008 sea-
son? Texas beat Oklahoma,
Texas Tech beat Texas and
Oklahoma beat Texas Tech,
producing a three-way tie
among highly ranked teams
atop the Big 12 South stand-
ings. This would be similar,
though the Southeastern
Conference has a different
tiebreaker system.
SIt can be a little confus-
ing on paper, but here's
all you need to know: If
i Arkansas beats LSU and
Alabama takes' care of
Auburn, on Saturday, and
*the Tigers, Crimson Tide
and Razorbacks finish in a
three-way tie for first in the
SEC West, the team with
the lowest rating in the BCS
standings is eliminated.
SThen the tie between the
two highest-rated teams
is broken by head-to-head
result. Even with the SEC's
tiebreakers, a possible
.three-way tie is sill, going
to be messy.
If Arkansas hands LSU
its first loss, it seems logi-
cal that voters in the Harris
and coaches' polls would
jump the Razorbacks past
the Tigers.
But it would be hard to
justify Arkansas ahead of
Alabama, considering the
Tide beat the Razorbacks
38-14 in September.
So Alabama is No. 1.


Arkansas is No. 2 and LSU,
which beat the Tide 9-6 on
the road in overtime and
has the most .impressive
nonconference wins of the
three, would be ... No. 3?
There are no good solu-
tions. And the reality is the
team that loses the head-to-
head tiebreaker and doesn't
play No.' 13 Georgia in the
Southeastern 'Conference
championship is probably
better off.
Now that is chaos.
TODAY
No. 8 Houston (minus 3)
at Tulsa
Forget BCS, Cougars
.need a victory to clinch
C-USA West ... HOUSTON
4543.
No. 3 Arkansas (plus 12'k)
at No. 1 LSU
Tigers take care of busi-
ness ... LSU 31-17.
Iowa (plus 91) at No. 22
Nebraska
Another loss by Hdskers'
drops them to 8-4, a:
major disappointment ...
NEBRASKA 28-20.
SATURDAY
No. 2 Alabama (minus
21) at Auburn
Iron Bowl emotion, and
home field can't make up
for Tide's talent advantage
... ALABAMA 35-10.
No. 22 Notre Dame (plus
61) at No. 4 Stanford
Andrew Luck looking
to pull a Carson Palmer,
locking up Heisman against
Irish ... STANFORD 31-21.
No. 6 Va. Tech (minus 5)
at No; 24 Virginia
Division title on the
line, aid Hokies have won
seven straight 'in series ...


VIRGINIA 21-17
Wyoming (plus 32k) at
No. 7 Boise State
Broncos 5-0 against
Cowboys ... 48-14.
Oregon State (plus 28) at
No. 9 Oregon
Ducks have won three
straight in Civil War rivalry
... OREGON 47-17.
UCLA (plus 12'k) at
No. 10 Southern California
A victory puts Brains in
Pac-12 title game ... USC
35-17.
No. 11MichiganSt (minus
6') at Northwestern
Spajtans already locked
into Big Ten title game ...
MICHIGAN STATE 35-24.
Iowa State (plus 28) at
No. 12 Oklahoma
Two in a row too much
to ask for Cyclones ...
OKLAHOMA 52-21.
No. 13 Georgia (minus 6)
at No. 25 Georgia Tech
Bulldogs have won
five straight in Atlanta ...
GEORGIA 34-21.
No. 18 Clemson (plus 4k)
at No. 14 South Carolina
Gamecocks have won
two straight against Tigers
... CLEMSON 28-21.
No. 20 Penn State (plus
14' ) at No. 15 Wisconsin
Winner goes to Big Ten
title game ... WISCONSIN
35-17.
Ohio State (plus 7'h) at
No. 17 Michigan
Question for Buckeyes
fans: Urban Meyer or awin?
... MICHIGAN 27-17:
Texas Tech (plus 12') at
No. 21 Baylor
Pencil in: another 400-
plus yards passing for RG3
... BAYLOR 54-44


COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYOFFS


FCS playoffs
First Round
Saturday
James Madison (7-4) at Eastern
Kentucky (7-4), Noon
Norfolk State (9-2) at Old Dominion
(942), 1:30 p.m.
Albany (N.Y.) (8-3) at Stony Brook
(8-3), 2 p.m.
Central Arkansas (8-3) at Tennessee
Tech (7-3),3 p.m.


(9-2), I p.m.
Northwest Missouri State (10-2) at
Midwestern State (10-0), I p.m.
Washburn (10-2) at Pittsburg State
(9-1), I p.m.
Wayne State (Mich.) (I1-1) at
Nebraska-Kearney (10-1), I p.m.
Minnesota-Duluth (10-2) at Colorado
State-Pueblo (I I-0), 2 p.m.

Division Ill playoffs


First Round
Division II playoffs Franklin 24,Thomas More 21
Kean 34, Christopher Newport 10
First Round Salisbury 62,West. New England 24
North Greenville 63, Albany State St.John Fisher. 23,Johns Hopkins 12
(Ga.) 14 Delaware Valley 62, Norwich 10
California (Pa.) 44, Elizabeth City St. 0 Wesley 35, Hobart 28
Kutztown 17, Concord 14 Wabash 38, Illinois College 20
North Alabama 43;West Alabama 27 Centre 51, Hampden-Sydjey 41
Northwest Missouri State 35, Missouri Mount Union 47, Benedictine (I11.) 7
Western 29 Wis.-Whitewater 59,Albion 0
Minn.-Duluth 30, Saginaw Valley 27 StThomas (Minn.) 48, St. Scholastic 2
Wayne State (Mich.) 48, St. Cloud Monmouth (III.) 33, lll.-Wesleyan 27
State 38 Mary Hardin-Baylor 34, Redlands 13
( Washburn 52,Abilene Christian 49 McMurry 25,Trinity (Texas) 16
Second Round' North Central (111.) 59, Dubuque 13
Saturday Linfield 30, Cal Lutheran 27
Kutztown (11-1) at New Haven Second Round
(10-I), Noon Saturday
North Greenville (10-2) at Mars Hill (Sites TBA)
(8-2), Noon Kean (10-1) vs. Salisbury (10-1), Noon
California (Pa.) (10-2) at Winston- St.John Fisher (9-2) vs. DelawareValley
Salem ( I-0). Noon (I -0), Noon
North Alabama (9-2) at Delta State Centre (9-1) vs. Mount Union (11-0),


Noon
Wabash (I -0) vs. North Central (III.)
(10-I), Noon
St.Thomas (Minn.) (I1-0) vs. Monmouth
(I1l.) (10-1), I p.m.
MaryHardin-Baylor (11-0) s.McMurry
(8-2), I p.m.
Wisc.-Whitewater (11-0) vs. Franklin
(10-1), I p.m.
Linfield (10-0) vs.Wesley (10-1), 3 p.m.

NAIA playoffs
First Round
Marian (Ind.) 3 ., Grand View (Iowa) 0
St. Francis (Ind.) 28, Missouri Valley 14
Georgetown (Ky.) 21, Benedictine
(Kan.) 7
MidAmerica Nazarene (Kan.) 40,
Southern Nazarene (Okla.) 28
St.Xavier (11I.) 51, Bethel (Tenn.) 13
St. Fracis (I11.) 21, Morningside (Iowa)
17
Carroll (Mont.) 47, Valley City State
(N.D.) 0
Azusa Pacific 49, Ottawa (Kan.) 26
SQuarterfinals
Saturday
St. Francis (III.) (10-2) at Marian (Ind.)
(I 1-0), I p.m.
St. Francis (Ind.) (9-2) at Georgetown
(Ky.) (1 1-0), 1:30 p.m. .
St. Xavier (I11.) (1C-1) at MidAmerica
Nazarene (Kan.) (10-1), 2 p.m.
Azusa Pacific (Calif.) (9-2) at Carroll
(Mont.) (I 1-I), 2:07 p.m.


INDIANS: Keys: 'believe and execute'


Continued From Page 1B
15-yard touchdown run.
Celtics quarterback Reid
Carlton completed just
'3-of-10 passes against Fort
White, but he connected
four times for 118 yards
and two touchdowns to
Jack Reed in the fourth
quarter last week. 'Reed,
who'had one carry against
Fort White, was moved to
receiver in the second half.
The Indians defense will
counter with leading tackler
'Kellen Snider (140 tackles),


Terry Calloway (128), Trey
Phillips (95), Legree (94)
and Jonathan Dupree (92).
Legree leads Fort White
with six interceptions and
Calloway has three, includ-
ing one. against Trinity
Catholic.
"We are stressing to the
kids to be aggressive," Fort
White head coach Demetric
Jackson said. 'They have
got to learn to fight We
showed the guys on film
what effort plays do for you


and we need to translate
that to special teams. We
don't want to play second
fiddle to anybody. We're
right there with (Trinity
Catholic). We just need to
1) believe and 2) execute."
Directions: Take
Interstate-75 south to State
Road 200 exit (No. 350)
in Ocala; 'go east to 27th
Avenue and turn right; go
three stop lights to S.W.
42nd Street and school is
on the corner.


I RECREATION ROUNDUP


A-. R0


COURTESY PHOTO
Members of the Columbia Youth Soccer Association's 2011 U-14 Stingers are (front row,
from left) Caleb Strickland, Spencer Robinson, Chase Innocenti,-Ashtoe.Lee, Brittney Lee,
Kyrsten Giebeig, Alix Lloyd and Joe Beach. Back row (from left) are coach Conrad Carwile,
coach Eddie Kurtz, Alex Exum, Hunter Houston, Jacob Strickland, Dillan Ward,
Dustin Carwile, Nathan Conley, Brant Nelson, Braxton Treverrow, Brandon Powell,
Josh Kurtz, coach Tracie Lee, coach Jim Beach and coach/trainer Steve Nelson.


U-14 Stingers cap perfect season


From staff reports

The FYSA 2011 District
Commissioners Cup
was at the Amelia Island
Youth Soccer Complex on
Saturday.
The tournament format
was single elimination with
all games on one day.
The Columbia Youth
Soccer Association. U-14


Stingers played in a four-
team bracket and won the
two games in their age
group by a combined score
of 10-0.
The Commissioners
Cup victories capped an
undefeated season for the
U-14 Stingers. In the reg-
ular''season, the Stingers
scored 40 goals and allowed
four.


"This team has had a
terrific season and is one of
the best teams I have ever
had the pleasure of coach-
ing," head coach Eddie
Kurtz said. "I am proud
of every player and the
effort as a team that really
made this season happen.
I am also thankful to have
four other very dedicated
coaches to help me."


A N ,N : T" : ; Tpi, Inc.


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter

CYFA unveils new scoreboard
Columbia Youth Football Association purchased a new scoreboard for Memorial Stadium.
Presenting the scoreboard during the Memorial Bowl on Nov. 15 are CYFA board member,
Mario Coppock (from left), secretary/treasurer Heyward Christie, vice-president
Richard Keen and president L.J. Gainer. Board member Jeff Tyre Was not available.
The scoreboard and'installation cost $13,000.


President's Award
SLake City Pop Warner Association president
Mario Coppock (right) presented his annual
President's Award to Carole Dotson at the
Pop Warner Football Banquet at Hopeful
Baptist Church on Nov. 1. Dotson gave the
idea of Pop Warner football to Coppock,
who served as president for three years
before turning his gavel over to
COURTESY PHOTO vice-president Mike Ferrell for next year.


COURTESY PHOTO


Lightning takes Turkey Shoot-out
Lake City Lightning 10-under travel softball team went undefeated in the USFA Turkey
Shoot-Out Softball Tournament in Jacksonville over the weekend. The Lightning outscored
opponents, 48-6. Team members are (front row, from left) Brandy Wacha, Abi Annett,
Caroline Lewis, Isabella Maranto, Adrianna Saavedra, Lucy Giebeig and mascot
Gabby Saavedra. Back row (from left) are Carson Frier, Mikayla Collins, Morghan Warner,
Dara Gaylard, Story Giebeig and Whitney 'Whit Whit' Lee. Back row coaches (from left) are
Oscar Saavedra, Butch Lee and Tammy Collins.









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


DILBERT

I WANT TO BUY
YOUR COMPANY'S a
PRODUCT BUT IT'S
LIKE PULLING TEETH
WITH YOU.

n^ *


-~ I-rn


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


HA HA! I SWITCHED
FROM COMMISSIONS
TO A GUARANTEED
SALARY. I' FREE
FROM THE TYRANNY
OF CUSTOMER SERVICE!


DEAR ABBY


Man's denial of paternity


leaves wife dumbfounded


THIS NO PAPER-
IS LESS WORK FOR
THAN ME!
IDEAL. WOOT!
I I WOOT


DEAR ABBY: I have
recently found out that
I'm pregnant My problem
is my husband doesn't
believe the baby is his. He
says he and his ex tried
for 13 years to have a baby
and couldn't
I don't know what to
say to.him. I can't explain
his past with that other
woman. My doctor has
ordered rest and no stress,
but this is taking a toll
on me. When the subject
comes up, I just walk
away and my husband
explodes. What do I do? -
EXPECTING IN GUAM
DEAR EXPECTING:
Your husband is"'explod-
ing" because you are walk-
ing away and won't discuss
this with him. Tell him
that you are scheduling an
appointment for BOTH of
you with your OB/OYN.
Let the doctor offer to
refer him to a urologist
who can test his sperm
count, which may be low.
It would explain why he
and his ex were unable
to conceive. The problem
could, also have been hers.

DEAR ABBY: My 78-
year-old mother opens
her mouth for only three
reasons to tell me what
to do, complain about
other people and to remind
me that when my older
sister died, it left a void
in her life no one can fill,
including me and my other
sister.
Several months ago, I


woman and you have my
sympathy. And now that
the dear lady has made
clear how she feels, follow
your mother's wishes with
a clear conscience.
P.S. If you know any of
her neighbors, consider
asking them to let you
know if her newspapers
start piling up.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My dear
friend "Katie" doesn't
share the same religious
or political beliefs I do. Sh
enjoys discussing these
topics and assumes that
everyone agrees with her.
If someone tries to dis-
agree, she becomes high~
offended and angry.
How would you go ,
about tactfully changing
the subject? DIFFERING
FRIEND IN LARAMIE,
WYO.
DEAR DIFFERING: I
wouldn't do it once some-
one has started proselytiz1
iig. I'd do it BEFORE. At:
a time when you and your
friend are involved in sonle
mutually enjoyable activ-
ity, mention that certain
topics, such as politics and
religion, make you uncor4
fortable and that you'd
appreciate it if they weren't
brought up with you. AncdF'
if she "forgets," smile
sweetly and say, 'Who do,
you think will be playing ih
the Super Bowl?"
E Write Dear Abby at .:
www.DearAbby.com or ;
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


- ARIES (March 21-April
19): Take a look atyour
financial situation and you
will find a way to make
your assets grow. Love is
in the stars, and socializ-
ing, travel and.finding out.
more about someone you
think is special should be
your focus. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't spend on some-
thing you don't need. Look
for entertainment that isn't
costly.A physical chal-
lenge will be invigorating
and spark greater interest
in diet and exercise, but
make sure you don't over-
do it Network, and you'll
make new friends. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Volunteer your ser-
vices or reach out to some-
one in need; not only will
you feel good, you'll meet
people who motivate and
interest you. Love is on the
rise, and enjoying the com-
pany of someone special
will enhance your relation-
ship. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Putting in a long day
will pay off, but you may
get complaints from some-
one who wants to spend
leisure time with you. Plan
something special for the
evening hours and you will
defuse any upset brewing
in your personal life. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 02):
Make changes, learn


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

something new and travel
to different destinations.
Most of all, plan to have
fun with your friends, fam-
ily or your lover. You can
improve your mind, body
and attitude with a couple
of pick-me-up purchases.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Expect to deal with
some uneasy, uncertain
situations. Take a head-on.
approach and you will curb
the problem before it gets
a chance to develop into
something uncontrollable.
Take care of your health
and your assets. **
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): You won't need to
use force to get your way.
Simply let everyone know
what you want and what
you need. Romance should
be planned for the evening
hours. An unusual form of
entertainment will open up
all sorts of new personal
possibilities. ****
SCORPIO (Oct 23-
Nov. 21): Past experience
Regarding money and
finance will come in handy
now. Make quick altera-
tions.to the way you save,
budget and handle your
cash in grder to stabilize
your situation. Don't get
angry over loss; do
something about it. **


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Keep things
simple, quiet and risk-free.
Trying to do too much,
or putting yourself in a
precarious position, will
leave scars. Focus on the
changes required to make
Your personal life better
and your home safe and
secure. ***r
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You can help
Others, but don't let them
take advantage of you.
Limit yourself to offering
suggestions, rather than
doing the work or paying
for the problem. Resolve a
financial situation involving
someone who you owe or
who owes you. ***
AQUARIUS. (an. 20-
Feb. 18): You will enhance
your reputation if you
take on responsibility that.
shows off your attributes.
There is money to be
made if you masterfully
incorporate what you do
best into a service you can
offer. Love is in the stars.,

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20)! Take a backseat and
listen. Observe what
everyone else does and
says. Now is not the time'
to make a move. Protect
your assets and your heart.
Let experience guide you
now. Reuniting with an old
business or personal part-
ner is favored. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are creafed from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: E equals K
"VF.KBSXWM HXW WHDKBR
KMLBAWMVWS, HMS K HBJI RD JHMC
CZ SZ CFKMOD K VHM NW GXZAS CZ
DFZJ TR EKSD DZTWSHR." LHKCF
F K B B


Previous Solution: "He is a wise man who does not grieve for the things which
he has not, but rejoices for those which he has." Epictetus
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-25


CLASSIC PEANUTS

WHAT'S
I\ WoU? I)


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
visited Mom and she wasn't
feeling well She has a heart
condition and osteoporosis,
which makes her unsteady
on her feet A few weeks
later, I called to check on
her but couldn't reach her
by phone. Because I live
150 iniles away, I asked my
uncle to check on her. He
went to her house several
limes and rang her bell, but
got no answer at the door.
I called other family mem-
bers and friends, fearful that
she had fallen or worse.
Finally, that night at
10 p:m. I called the local
police department When
the officers knocked pn
the door, Mom finally '
answered and told them
that where she was or
what she was doing was
no one else's business!
She later told my uncle the
same thing.
This is a cautionary tale
to the elderly or infirm who.
tell us to leave them alone.
WE WILL DO SO. But do
not complain when you
don't hear from us, because
you can't have it both ways.
- FED UP IN TEXAS
DEAR FED UP: OK,
you have now vented.
Your mother is a difficult


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415,


' r











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


ADvantage


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Reporter Classifieds!

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nperonaly merchandise talking $, ass
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atm. to 5:00 p.m.
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ad catperson ries mr will retaquire prepay- ss
Each vali us tr nde e pnce
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.miI' 2.SI.es Earhaiddlm|itianie1.65



Limited to serth e R type adver.is
ing only. n,

" Adi10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
aam. to F1 5:00 p.m. F.,9: .





















Sunday Fi.,10:00.m. i.,:00am.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department,
EMAIL classifieds@lakecityre-
'porter.com -





Ad is to Appea:l Call by: : FaxlEmail by:
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Saturday Fit., 10:1 am. Fi.,S:Oa.m.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.


J Ad Errors- Please read ypur ad
on the first day of publication.
i We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation..
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy. should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
: with Federal, State or local laws
regarding'the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word. of each ad may
Snot be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
wwW.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO. 2011-CA-000437
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUC-
CESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC
HOME LOAN SERVICING, LP
FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING, LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
AEL UNKNOWN HEIRS, CRED-
ITORS DEVISEES, BENEFICIA-
RIES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST JOSEPH MAS-
SAR; JENNIFER MASSAR; UN-
KNOWN PERSONS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT PROPER-
TY;
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendarit(s):
ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, CRED-
ITORS DEVISEES, BENEFICIA-
RIES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN'
INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST JOSERH MAS-
SAR
247 SE BENNIE LANE
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32035
(LAST KNOWN ADDRESS)
JENNIFER MASSAR
247 SE BENNIE LANE
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32025
(LAST KNOWN ADDRESS)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 4,. BLOCK B, HIDDEN
ACRES, A SUBDIVISION AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PA-
GES 63 THROUGH 64, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.,
TOGETHER WITH:'
2000 FLEETWOOD MOBILE
HOME VEHICLE' IDENTIFICA-
TION NUMBER
GAFLX39Ai3850F221' TITLE
NUMBER 80671913 AND VEHI-
CLE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER
(AFLX39B13850F221 TITLE
NUMBER 80671968 a/k/a 247 SE
BENNIE LANE, LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA 32024
lias been filed against you and you
arerequired to serve .a copy of your
vrinen defenei. if any, to it, on Ka-
hane & .Assocales, P.A., Attorney
for Plaintiff, u hose address is 8201
Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Planfation,
FLORIDA 33324 on or before De-
ceinber 19, 2011, a date'which is'
within thiry (30) days after the first
publication of this notice in' the
LAKE CITY REPORTER .and file
the original with;the Clerk p9fthis
Court-either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the .relief de-
manded in the complaint
If you are a person with a disability
who required accommodations in or-,
der to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you,
the provision of certain assistance.
Individuals with disability who. re-
quire special accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing should contact the ADA coordi-
nator, 173 -NE Hemando, Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, FL 32055,
(386)719-7428, within two (2) busi-
ness days of receipt of notice to ap-
pear. Individuals who are hearing
impaired should call (800)955-8771.
Individuals who are voice impaired
should call:(800)955-8770.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court-this 19 day of: October,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
$y:/s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
Submitted By;
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsirmile: (954) 382-5380
05529212
November 25, 2011
December 2, 2011


'N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-205-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF JEFFIE FRAN-
CES SWEAT,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Adminstration)
TO ALL. PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS .OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of JEFFIE
FRANCES SWEAT, deceased, File
No. 11-205-CP, by the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055; that the total cash
value of the estate is $-0 and that the
names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned by such
order are:
NAME
Dwight T. Sweat
ADDRESS:
1394 NW Labonte Lane,
Lake-City, FL 32055
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court


Services

A2Z of Lake City, Inc. Avail.
Dec 1. Prof. House Cleaning Svcs.
Employees: Fingerprinted, Drug
screen & Bonded. 386-752-5655


Legal


WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
'AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is November 18, 2011.
Attorney for Person Giving notice:
By:/s/ TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City,:FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386)752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Person Giving notice:.
By:/s/Dwight T. Sweat
1394 NW Labonte Lane
Lake City,' FL 32055
05529117
November 18, 25; 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-183-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF ELLA MAE
SRUIS f/k/a ELLA MAE SMITH
SDeceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
Sder of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of ELLA
MAE RUIS f/k/a' ELLA MAE
SMITH, deceased, File No. 11-183-
CP, by the Circuit Court for Colum-
bia County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address 'of which is 173 NE
Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL
32055; that the total cash value of
the estate is $-0 and that the names
and addresses of those to whom it
has been assigned by such order are:
NAME
James Robert Davis
ADDRESS: '.
806 SE Defender Drive, .
Lake City, FL 32025
ALL. INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THATt ,
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands.
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of- the
first publication of this notice must
file their' claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER .OF THREE:
MONTHS AFTER: THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All- other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file their claims with this
codirt WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS:
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED. ,
The date .of the first publication of
this Notice is November 18, 2011.
Attorney for Person Giving.Notice:
By:/s/TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, FL 32056-1328.
.Telephone: (386)752-1896.
Florida Bar No. 052454
Person Giving notice:
By:/s/ James Robert Davis
806 SE Defender Drive
Lake City, FL 32025
.05529118
November 18; 25, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Best friend Lost
Know where he is?
Call 386-249-0164

facebook.com/chewylost

FOUND: Mini Poodle.
Fri. 11/18
89th Rd and 216th Street
O'Brien. 386-362-2140

100 Job
S Opportunities

Entry level
SLand surveying
help wanted
386-454-8147


t 0 Opportunities


05529233
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position available for a
Construction Loan Specialist.
Responsible for the administra-
tive servicing of residential
construction loan portfolios.
Ability to read and interpret
surveys and title insurance
documents. Previous
construction or mortgage
lending experience preferred.
Applications may be obtained
from any First Federal branch
and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029,
Lake City FL 32056 or email
Turbeville.J(tffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer.

Hall's Pump & Well and Carolyn
Height Water Company is seeking
someone to work in our Water
treatment section. Must have high
school diploma and be mechani-
cally inclined. Apply in person at
904 NW Main Blvd. 752-1854

MECHANIC
Part Time
Call: FJ Hill Construction
386-752-7887

Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442


Seeking caring,
experienced, qualified
Caregiver in Lake City.
850-510-8111
STYLIST NEEDED at
Southern.Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info.

120 Medical
SEmployment

05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.'
S (904)566-1328


SMedical Billing
Must have experience in all
aspects of coding, billing,
and collections.
Send resume in confidence to:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com or
Fax #.386-758-5987

240 Schools &
240 Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp (
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/28/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

Black, female, CKC Toy Poodle.
Parents'on Premises. Avail the end
of Nov. Deposits being taken. Will-
hold til Christmas. 386-758-7706


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
3 Supplies
WANTED: I Buy and Sell used
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay. cash. Call 386-935-1522

407 'Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy
K&HTIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales


BYRDS STORE CR 49. Fri.
Sat.& Sun, (8-4). 247-240R CR
49R, 247 Beachville. CR 49N, 252
Pinemount Rd CR 49L. Lots of
antiques, new items inside, outside
if no Rain watch for signs.
FRI. 11/25 & SAT. 11/26, 8 AM -
Noon, 255 SW Dairy Street, off
Mauldin Rd off CR 240, Furniture,
clothes, mower, lots of misc.
Multi Family. Sat. 8-? Clothes,
Christmas, tools, furniture, etc.
471' SW Theresa Ct. 32025 off
McFarlane, follows signs.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard' Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Sat. 8-12. 90W to Brown Rd. Left
on Horizon, 3rd on Right. Tools,
. household, jewelry Christmas,'
Furniture & more."
SAT. 8-? 490 NW Spring Hollow
Blvd..off Lake Jeffery Rd.
Clothes, sinks, light fixtures, tools,
porch furniture, much more!

440 Miscellaneous
2-- Ten Eighty Quarter Pike
SkateRamps in fair/good
condition. $200.00 for both OBO.
386-755-0807
American Heritage Mahogany
Pool Table Perfect Christmas Gift.
regulation size, w/overhead bil-
liard lights. Racks, balls, cover.
(3/4" slate. $1000. Firm 365-5099
Complete HO Train
Layout in time
for Christmas.
386-758-8724
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
47x40. 5 Disc CD player/stereo
system w/speakers.
$45.00 for all obo. 386-752-6669 -


450 Good Things
5V to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288 .
if no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
6 0 for Rent
1 BR/1 BA Furnished, all utilities
included + satellite,
$135 week, $135 deposit.
Call 386-758-6939
S2& 3 br/lba Mobile Homes for
Rent, CH/A includes water, sewer,
garbage. $475./ $525. mo. 1st &
last mo + $300 dep. 386-961-8466
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished: Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-642
'2/2:Units.
Monthly Specials
S$550. mo. Fred Water.
386-984-8448,
2br/2ba $500 mo. new flooring,
fresh paint. ,Also, Resd'l RV lots.
Btwn Lake City & G'ville: Access
to I-75 & 441 (352)317-1326
Country Living
2&3bdrmnn, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
LIKE NEW DW 3br/2ba. CH/A,
on 1 -ac lot. 10 min. south of Lake
City. Pet on approval: $750 mo.
plus elec. & dep. 386-758-2408
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

r6 0 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South'side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
/ MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
OWNER FINANCING
iSWMH on 2 lots, fencedpaed .
streets, close to town MLLS 7021I,
$49,900. Coldwell Banker Bishop,
ElainI Tolar 386-755-6448
EXCELLENT LOCATION
3br/2ba MH, deck, porch. Well
maintained. MLS 79304 $55,000.
Coldwell Banker Bishop, Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Direct Sale
15K-25K Off Models
800-622-2832 ext 210
All 2011's Must Go!
All Homes at Dead cost! Save up
To $10,000. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville. (352)872-5566,
Land and Home Packages
for Mobile homes and modular.
homes. No Money down if you
own your land. 100 mile radius.
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
We Need Used Mobile Homes!
Will buy or trade, Top Dollar Paid.
North Point Homes.
(352)872-5566


WANTED,

Medical Records/

Medical Receptionist

For busy medical office.

Full time. Pay depends on

experience. Will train right

person. Bring resume to

Southern Internal Medicine

404 NW Hall of Fame Drive


BIUYIT


fCTlCiai"4


SLSL IT


Classified Department: 755-5440









Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 2011


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
REDUCED! 3/2 MH on 1 acre in
nice sub. paved rd. metal roof.
Completely remodeled. new every-
thing! Only $39,000 386-249-1640

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$120,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well Maintained MH on 10ac. 2
car, covered carport, huge deck.
Wood laminate flooring. MLS
79417, $94,900 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Nice 1620sf 3br/2ba DW on 4
wooded acres, owner finance avail.
$119,900 Brenda Forrester,
Forrester Realty 352-339-6069
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 2.5 acres,
Mayo area, small down/$650 mo,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05528965
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Anberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1//1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo. and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, Ig 2 br Apt.
Close to town
$485 mo + $485 dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA in
Gatorwood S/D. Washer/dryer
hook up, clean. $650. 1st, last +
security. 386-867-9231
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. MIove in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup,
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND.
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

'720 Furnished Apts.
72 For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,.
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808


730 Unfurnished
7J3 Home For Rent
lbr/lba Free ele. Utilities incl. 4mi
S. Lake City. $300dep. $375mo.
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3 BR 2 1/2 BA Country Home.
Pool 6 miles So of Col City
$1375 mo First/Last/$500 dep
386-755-4050 or 752-2828
/ TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553
3BR/1BA.w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
3BR/2BA CB home Carport hard-
wood floors. CH/A Fenced yard.
Good area. $750 mo plus security.
386-752-0118 or 623-1698
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City:
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.
home brick, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083
For lease-Lakewood sub. LG
brick, 2600 sq. ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lg lot by Lake Jeffrey. $1275.m
+last+sec. Bruce 386-365-3865

750 Business&
5J Office Rentals

05529267
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Gorgeous 20.02 ac. Ready for new
home. Land has 2 power poles, 2
wells & 24X30 slab. MLS 78126
$132,000. REO Realty Group
Heather Craig 386-466-9223
PUBLISHER'S: NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
BANK OWNED 3/2 home.with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 $129,000 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
COUNTRY CLOSE 3/2 brick, 3
acres, pole barn, workshop, fruit
trees. $129,900 #78096
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate


810 Home for Sale
Great home in Woodcrest, super
location. 3br/2ba. New A/C,
covered back porch. MLS 75198,
$129,900 Coldwell Banker
Bishop. Elaine Tolar 755-6488
HUD HOME 4.77 ac, near
G'ville. 3/2, as is $95,500 Call
Robin Williams 365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com 091-
434983 Hallmark Real Estate
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large
oaks, wood floors, fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Lake Home in town. 4b/3b. For-
mal LR, DR & modern Kit,
f'place, upgrades. MLS 76085,
$299K. Coldwell Banker Bishop.
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Nice 4/2 on 4 ac. w/open floor
plan. 2 living rooms, eat-in-
kitchen, dining room & more.
MLS 76150. $79,000 Result Real-
ty. Brittany Stoeckert. 397-3473
4/2 Immaculate new carpet &
fixtures. Lg Kitchen, fenced yard.
2 car garage. MLS 77602.
$159,200. REO Realty Group.
Nancy Rogers. 386-867-1271
Amazing 4/3 Ranch Style home
w/over 2,000 sf. 56.28 rolling ac.
Too many extras to list. $500,000.
MLS 78420 REO Realty Group.
Heather Craig 386-466-9223
NICE 4br/2ba Cedar home,
outside city limits, big rooms.
Reduced to sell. MLS 78769
$169,000. Coldwell Bariker
Bishop. Bruce Dicks, 243-4002
Lovely 2 story on 7 ac. 3br/2ba,
fenced, fish ponds, pole barn, Ig
kitchen, oaks, fruit trees. MLS
79306 $174,900 Coldwell Banker
Bishop Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus.
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
SHORT SALE 3/2, Built 2007,
wood floors, Game room.
REDUCED! Call Ginger Parker
386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms &
Acreage
12 acres+/-, Northwest corer of
CR-18 and 81st Ave. Asking Price
$745,000. Call (801) 715-9162 for
more information
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
.w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
Www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
-20 AC Wooded tract.
Very nice piece of Land. 10m iles
from Cedar Key. MLS 78886,
$70,000. Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

830 Commercial
Property
MOBILE HOME PARK with Ig.
brick owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84 Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
860 Investment
Property -
GREAT INVESTMENT,
Building features 2 unitw/
2br/2ba, Income producing' MLS
79271, $230,000. Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert. 386-397-3473

8o0 Real Estate
7 V Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price'
386-269-0605

950 Cars for Sale!
1997 LINCOLN Towicar
Under 40,000 miles. Very Good
condition. $5,500-
386-623-3727 I

51 Recreational
951 Vehicles
2003 Allegro 30DA. Workhorse
Chassis. 18000 miles, garage kept.
Excellent cond. w/many extras
$45,000. 386-754-5660
99 Coleman Fleetwood Pop-up -
camper, Sleeps 8. 2 king size beds,
fridge, stove & AC/heat. Good
shape. $3,000. 386-755-9559

iH H & er





Lake City Reporter


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1986 Chevy
Monte Carlo SS
Maroon on maroon,
one owner, non-smoker,
84,000 orig. mi., never
wrecked, solid body.
Reduced to*8,000
Call
904-718-6747


-aU

2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
Only 18,000 miles, garage
kept motorhome. Excellent
condition w/many extras.
$45,000


1997 Lincoln
Town Car
Under 40,000 miles.
Very good condition.

$5,500


727


Call Call
386-754-5660 386-623-37