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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01704
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 20, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01704
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






L000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
SPO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
L GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Sunday, November 20, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 249 E $1.00





CARC's ex-chief cries foul


Taking job was 'worst mistake,'
says Amber Baughman, who left
her post after just 12 weeks.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
-The former executive director
of a non-profit organization that
pi-ovides a group home and job
training for people with disabili-
ties in Columbia County has no
regrets about resigning after 12
weeks on the job.
, Amber Baughman said at least
one board member for CARC
- Advocates for .Citizens with
Disabilities was too involved in


Amber Baughman Cedric Davis


day-to-day operations, making it
difficult for her to perform her
duties.
"That was the worst mistake
I made, taking this position,"


Glenn Hunter


she said in a phone interview
Thursday. ,
Baughman gave her two-weeks'
notice on Oct. 27 and was asked
by board members to relinquish


her position the following day. She
contacted the Lake City Reporter
last week to setthe record straight
after reading a story saying she
quit her job without explanation.,


for plumbers


Thanksgiving
means added
stress on pipes.

By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter.com" .
T his Thanksgiving
J -when fhe relatives
have arrived, the,
table set with holi-
day delicacies and
the turkey cooked to a golden
brown, there are still other
seasonal disasters to avoid.
Cooking grease and increased
water use can wreak havoc on
septic tanks and sewer lines.
"Ift's almost guaranteed I'll be
working that day," said David
Faulkner, service division man-
ager for Faulkner Plumbing of
Lake City. Extra water going
down the drain from cooking,
cleaning and toilet flushing puts
stress on septic tanks, especially
in older houses, he said.
Faulkner said he will have
calls this Thanksgiving, getting
in a bite of turkey in when he
can. '"The way this economy
is, you have to work when you
can," he said.
Leah Culp, office-manager
at Dependable Plumbing, said
while this time of year is not
always the busiest, it is not
uncommon to get a call from
someone with a house full of


JAWN MAI11 IHE Al K L ae. ty RIepo rtefrUIt
Lake City resident Heather Mullins, 24, scrapes leftovers into the kitchen sink. With Thanksgiving less than a
week away, people should be more careful what they stuff down their sink as clogged pipes can be a serious
problem during the holidays. 'This sink hasbeen backed up plenty of times,' Mullins said.


people and backed up pipes.
Once one drain gets clogged,
they all get backed up, she said.
- Some people get their septic


tanks pumped before the holi-
days as a preventative measure,
said 'Many Rhoden., secretary
of Ford's Septic Tank Service.


"It would be embarrassing and
kinda ruin the Thanksgiving
mood" to have a sewage back-
THANKS continued on 3A


On thescene in Lake City: Santa
On the cene i


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Christmas can't come soon enough
for Grace Golzalez.
The Lake City toddler was among
the first children to sit on Santa's lap
shortly after his arrival at the Lake City
Mall on Saturday morning.
Grace and other children squealed in
delight and screamed his name when
he pulled into the mall on a golf cart,
with horns blaring.
While Grace waited in line to meet
Santa, she talked about her Christmas
gift wish list.
"I want a Barbie for Christmas," she
said. "And a pink teddy bear."
When asked what she will tell Santa
when he asks if she behaved during the
year, her expression became serious.
"I did be a good girl," she said.
Her father, Zabe Gonzalez, of Lake
City, said Grace was intimidated when
she met Santa last year.
"She did a lot better this year," he


said. 'ast year, she was terrified."
Gonzalez said taking his daughter to
meet Santa brings back fond childhood
memories.
"I used to look forward to this," he
said. "I still do."
I It's unlikely another early arrival,
Sammi Puckey, will remember her first
visit with Santa. But her parents will.
Sammi's father, John Puckey, of Lake
City, wanted photographs of his infant
child's first visit with Santa. And she
obliged, posing like a super model with
a beaming smile as pictures were taken
on Santa's lap.
Janice Dorminey, the mall's manager,
said Santa's arrival is one of the biggest
days of the year, other than the' official
kickoff to the holiday shopping season
the day after Thanksgiving.
"It does increase traffic," she said.
"For a community event, Santa's arrival
is probably the top one. This is the real
Santa."
And Santa better have a strong lap
SANTA continued on 3A


Sammi Puckey
sits on Santa's
lap shortly after
his arrival at the
Lake City Mall
on Saturday.
Her father, John
Puckey, of Lake
City, said he
brought Sammi to
the mall because
he wanted pho-
tos of his infant
daughter's first
Christmas. An
estimated 2,000
children will visit
Santa at the mall
during the holiday
shopping season.


"I need to do what I can to
protect my reputation," she said.
"There were problems the board
wasn't aware of. The board did
not have a clue."
Baughman refused to provide
more details about possible prob-
lems within the organization, say-
ing she wants to put the past
behind, her. She said she. sent
a detailed resignation letter to
the 14 board members explaining
why she was quitting after less
than three months on,the job.
' CARC officials told the Lake
City Reporter that the resignation
letter is in Baughman's personnel
file and is not a public record.
CARC continued on 3A


Holiday

dinner

for all

'It's for anybody and
everybody,' says one of
the event's organizers.,
By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Members of the First
Presbyterian Churchin Lake
City believe Thanksgiving
dinner should be shared -
with everybody.
The church- is inviting
anyone with a desire to.
eat a free, delicious home-
made turkey dinner with all
the trimmings to stop by
between 11:30 a.m. and 1:30
p.m. Thursday.
"It's for anybody and
everybody," said Wally
Reichert, one of the event
organizers. "You'll find
homeless, visitors, rich,
poor, black, white, green,
you name it."
Church officials expect to
feed about 500 people from
all walks of life from home-
less to prosperous during
the 11th annual dinner.
Reichert said other church-
es in the community also
help with the cooking and
other preparations.
"It's one of the few events
where many of the church-
HOUDAY continued on 3A


Motorcycle

crash kills

local man
From staff reports
ALake City man has died
of injuries he sustained in
a Hamilton County motor-
cycle crash, the Florida
Highway Patrol reported
late Friday.
Charles Ronald Miller,
62, died Friday, one' day
after 'his 2007 Harley
Davidson struck the back
of a pickup truck on US
129.
According. to FHP,
Miller was headed south
when the pickup slowed
to make a left turn onto
SE 76th Trail. Miller failed
to stop and struck the
rear of the truck. Miller
was airlifted- to Shands at
the University of Florida
where he died the next
day.
The truck's driver;
Douglas McArthur Parr
Jr., 40, Jasper, and his pas-
senger, Jonathan L. Parr,
15, Jasper, were unhurt.


111 424 2 1


CALL US: 79 5
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER: Partly Cloudy
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER, 6A


O pinion .............
Business .............
Obituaries ............
Advice ..............
Puzzles .................


PEOPLE COMING
Regis makes TUESDAY
exit from City council
morning TV coverage


l9 1 spesIO I MII


S6~6~I~8os~n~ar~--Pr~T. xs:,- I;.









2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011





Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
11-12-28-39 1-4-16-29-30 8-2-0 4-8-3-3 Not available Not available
MB 12


AROUND FLORIDA


Hundreds of Fla. foster kids adopted this month


Associated Press
MIAMI A 17-year-
old foster child with Down
syndrome got a new name
Friday: Shelley Westbrook.
The teen was adopted by her
high school teacher nearly
a year after her mother's
death.
Her adoption was among
dozens across the state
Friday and hundreds this
month as part of National
Adoption Month.
Stephanie wore a new
dress with pink flowers
along with a corsage match-
ing one worn by her new
mother, 54-year-old Shelley
Westbrook. The single
mom has two other adopted
daughters who' are in their
20s.
Last year, the kind teach-
er with glasses noticed
Stephanie had abruptly left
school. When she learned
that the teen's mother 'was
dying, she called the case
manager and asked if she
could become her foster
mother. The adoption was
finalized Friday.
Up the coast in Daytona
Beach, Hunter Haynes was
adopted by his sixth foster
family.
The 13-year-old lived with
his uncle in New York after
his father died and his moth-
er became unable to care for
him because of alcoholism.
Tina Battista adopted two
young toddlers Friday. The
29-year-old single mother
was babysitting for a little
girl, then 6-months-old,
when no one showed up to
claim her. Battista decided'


to take her in and later got
the girl's brother from foster
care and says she doesn't
worry being a single mom
will crimp her dating life.
"If someone does love me,
they are going to haveto love
them, too. If they don't, then
they are not right for me,"
said Battista, who works as a
hospital technician.
In Miami, 45 children
were adopted in a special
ceremony honoring the
families.
The Department of
Children and Families
Secretary David Wilkins
said roughly 800 foster
children need homes. The
majority of foster 'children
waiting for loving parents
are teenagers.
Teenagers who age out
of foster care without being
adopted run a higher risk
of being arrested, becoming
teenage parents, dropping
out of school, and becoming
homeless, he said.
More than 3,000 foster
children were adopted last
year in Florida. Adoptive par-
ents receive a monthly adop-
tion subsidy for the family,
health benefits for the child,
and free college tuition at
a Florida public university.
Parents can also receive a
federal adoption tax credit of
approximately $13,000 per
child.
Wilkins is hosting a live
webcast Monday to discuss
new efforts to recruit adop-
,tive families and provide
post-adoption support
"Raising awareness and
. recruiting loving adoptive


parents are simple things
we can all do to give these
children the best possible
opportunity for success,"
he said during an adoption
event earlier this month.

Man shoots self
at Fla. gun range
ORLANDO -
Authorities are investigat-
ing after a man fatally shot
himself in the head at a
central Florida gun range.
Orange County deputies
said the 45-year-old man
arrived at the gun range
Friday night and began
shooting in the prac-
tice .lanes. The Orlando
Sentinel (http://lb.vg/
S5oh9) reports he then,
shot himself in the head.
He later died at the hospi-
tal. His name has not been
released.
Authorities are investi-
gating whether the shoot-
ing was accidental or inten-
tional.

Disabled war vet
gets new home
TAMPA A severely
wounded Iraq war veteran
is, getting a hero's home-
coming to a specially
outfitted new home in
Tampa.
Army Sgt Joel Tavera,
one of the most gravely
wounded survivors of the
war, has been in the hospi-
tal for nearly four years and
had 75 surgeries.
.Beginning at 10 a.m.


Saturday, Tavera will be
part of a 7-mile processional
motorcade along flag-lined
streets to his new home.
The 4,200-square-foot
house, built for Tavera and
his parents, includes full
wheelchair accessibility, a
therapy swimming pool,
and iPad-controlled elec-
tronic controls throughout
the home. The nonprofit
group, Building Homes
for Heroes, helped put it
together.
Tavera suffered head
trauma, burns, and lost
sight in both of his. eyes.
He also lost his right leg
and four fingers.

Manatee Co.
debates
chicken zoning

BRADENTON Some
Manatee County residents
want county commission-
ers to change zoning rules
to allow them to house
chickens in their backyard.
The Bradenton Herald
(http://bit.ly/s42ngU)
reports that residents plan
to attend Monday's com-
mission meeting and raise
the issue. .
Chickens are currently
illegal in residential neigh-
borhoods. The nearby cit-
ies of Sarasota and Palmetto
both allow chickens under
certain circumstances.
Sarasota amended its city
code in February to allow
folks to keep no more than
four chickens. Roosters are


prohibited. People say they
enjoy the fresh eggs back-
yard chickens provide.
Sarasota's ordinance
is being forwarded to
. Manatee officials.

3 dead after
car plunges into
South Fla. lake
POMPANO BEACH -
Three people have died
after their car plunged into
a South Florida lake.
Authorities said fire
rescue officials pulled the
three victims from their car
just after 5 a.m. Saturday.
They were transported
to the hospital and pro-
nounced dead. .
The victims have not
been identified.
Authorities are investi-
gating.

Mega Money
,player wins

top prize
TALLAIJASSEE,) One
ticket matched the four
winning numbers plus the
Mega Ball number to col-
lect $500,000 in the Mega
Money game, the Florida
Lottery said Saturday.
The winning ticket was
bought in Melbourne, lot-
tery officials, said.,
'Five tickets won $1,340
each for picking 4-of-4;
58 tickets won $253 each
for picking 3-of-4 plus the
Mega Ball number; 811
tickets won $54 each for


picking 3-of-4; 1,424 tickets
won $21 each for picking
2-of-4 plus the Mega Ball;
11,535 won $2.50 each for
matching one number plus
the Mega Ball; 27,174 tick-
ets won $2 each for picking
2-of-4; and 23,970 won a
free Quick Pick ticket for'
matching the Mega Ball.
The numbers drawn
Friday night were 11-12-
28-39 and the Mega Ball
was 12.

Habitual offender
terms for Fla.
juveniles nixed

TALLAHASSEE -
Juveniles convicted as
'adults cannot be sentenced
in Florida as habitual vio-
lent offenders.
The 1st District Court of
Appeal issued that ruling
Friday in the case of Kirby
Sylvester Shingler.
He was 16 when convict-
ed in Pensacola of armed
robbery and related crimes
in 1991.
Shingler initially got a
life sentence as a habitual
offender.
The U.S. Supreme Court,
though, last year ruled in a
Jacksonville case that juve-
niles cannot be sentenced
to life for crimes other than
homicide.
A judge then resen-
tenced Shingler to 40 years
in prison, again as a habitu-
al violent offender.

(AP)


By Frazier Moore
AP Television Writer
NEWYORK- Regis Philbin couldn't
leave without a joke.
Signing off from morning television
after more than 28 years, he brought
to a close his final hour hosting "'ive!
With Regis and Kelly" by telling view-
ers, "I'll always remember spending
these mornings with all of you."
Then, as the studio audience's .ova-
tion subsided after the program's fade-
out,. he voiced a' kidding postscript to
that crowd in attendance.
"I just thought of something I
SHOULD have. said," he quipped, "I
really want to stay!"
No such luck.
Philbin, who at 80 years old has
logged more than 16,000 hours on tele-
vision in a career that dates back to
the 1950s, was making good on his
decision to leave the daily TV grind,
an announcement he delivered on his
show last January.
And Friday's tribute concluding
weeks of Philbin farewell mania was
good for instant TV history, both 'on-
and off-the-air.
The show had opened with cameras
following Philbin's walk from his dress-
ing room to the stage, knocking on
Kelly Ripa's door along the way.
"I love you," she said softly as they
stepped before the cameras.
Then Philbin barked out the question
his fans have been asking for months.
"Where's Regis going?" he erupted
with a shrug. "Regis don't know. Stop
asking me!"

'Idol' winner McCreery added
in hometown mural
RALEIGH, N.C. "American Idol"
winner Scotty McCreery is being hon-
ored in a mural at his .high school in
North Carolina.
The News & Observer of Raleigh
reports that McCreery winner was on
hand Friday as the new mural was
unveiled at Garner High School (http://
bit.ly/rx7wgw).
The mural honors the school's
sports accomplishments. McCreery is


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Regis Philbin and Kelly Ripa appear on Regis' farewell episode of "Live! with Regis
and Kelly", in New York, Friday. After more then 28 years, Philbin signed off U.S.
morning television on Friday, long after setting a world record for the most time on TV.


pictured because he swung his micro-
phone like a baseball bat at the end of a
song on "Idol."
McCreery is pictured next to for-
mer Garner basketball star Donald
Williams, who was named most valu-
able player during the University of
North Carolina's run to the 1993 nation-
al championship. Hal Stewart, who
coached the Trojans to the 1987 state
football title, is also on the mural.
McCreery is attending his senior
year at Garner High School.


Muppets are heading
to the White House
WASHINGTON -The Muppets are
heading to the White House.
Ahead of Thanksgiving, the White
House will host a special screening
for military families of "Ihe Muppets"
movie.
Guests at Tuesday's screening will
also include Kermit the Frog and Jason
Segel, one of the stars of the movie.


The screening is the latest in a series
of special invitations the White House
has given to military families. President
Barack Obama hosted military fathers
and their children for a movie screening
ahead of Father's Day, and military fam-
ilies were invited to the White House for
the annual Halloween celebration.

Jeremy London sought

in girlfriend's assault
PALM SPRINGS, Calif. Palm
Springs police say they're seeking actor
Jeremy London for questioning after
receiving a call from his girlfriend alleg-
ing he assaulted her.
Sgt Kyle Stjerne says the depart-
ment received a call at about 10:30 a.m.
Friday from London's girlfriend, alleg-
ing the actor assaulted her outside her
Palm Springs home.
Stjerne says a verbal altercation over
custody of the couple's child became
violent and she suffered minor injuries.
The woman's name wasn't released.


Today:
Actress-comedian
Kaye Ballard is 86.
Actress Estelle
Parsons is 84.
Comedian Dick
Smothers is 73.
Actor Samuel E.
Wright (Sebastian in "Little
Mermaid") is 65.
Actress Bo Derek


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ....... .(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wllson .....754-0418
(twilson @ lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


is 55.
Rapper Sen Dog of
Cypress Hill is 46. Actress
Marisa Ryan ("New York
Undercover") is 37.
Country singer Dierks
Bentley is 36.
Country singer Josh
Turner is 34.
Actor Cody Linley
("Hannah Montana") is 22.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakedtyreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30"
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks................... $48.79
52 Weeks................... $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks ..... . . . . . . $41.40
24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks............... ... $179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Regis makes exit from morning TV


Celebrity Birthdays


Daily Scripture

"Blessed is the one who does
not walk in step with the wick-
ed or stand in the way that sin-
ners take or sit in the company
of mockers, but whose delight
is in the law of the LORD, and
who meditates on his law day
and night." Psalm 1:1-2


Lake City Reporter











LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 3A


THANKS: Holiday means added stress on pipes


Continued From Page 1A
up, Rhoden said,
Holidays like Thanksgiving and
Christmas are generally more busy for
Mark Barrs, owner of Barrs Plumbing.
With more people in the house, sewer
lines and septic tanks can get over-
whelmed. Barrs said running hot water
down the kitchen sink will keep grease
frofi building up. When calls come in
this Thanksgiving for a plumbing emer-
gency, Barr said someone will take over
cooking the turkey and he will head
out "'Thafs part of being in business,"
he said.

A GREASY PROBLEM
Frying a Thanksgiving turkey has
been popular in recent years, said Dave
Clanton, executive director of utilities
for Lake City. However those four gal-
lons or so of cooking oil should not go
down the sink.
Let the oil cool, pour it back into the
original container and put it in the gar-
bage, he said. Cooking oil and greasy
food disposed of down-the drain will
clog home and city sewer lines. "'Thafs
a major problem nationwide, not just in
Lake City," Clanton said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
An increased number of guests can
overwhelm the pipes throughout home.
Mullins is prepared, especially after roots
from a tree reversed the flow of some of
the pipes causing sewage to spew out.

When grease is washed down the
drain it sticks to the sides of sewer pipes
as it cools and solidifies. Over time the
buildup causes a blockage either in the
home or down the sewer line, much like
when heart arteries become blocked.,


Residential and commercial clo
can cause problems when the clog
washed further down the line. "T'
grease can go two or three streets do
and cause a problem there," he said.
Ordinances govern commerce
establishments' disposal of grease,
said. To be proactive, city crews are
iting business to make sure they kn
how to properly dispose of grease. ,
Clanton said when cooking wv
grease it is best to wait for the p
to cool, wipe the grease up with
paper towel and throw the towel awv
Food should be scraped into the tr
because even .small amounts of fat
be a problem. "After a while it can bu
up," Clanton said.
Cleaning sewer lines and looking
problems is one duty for two city.cre
of workers. "Its something you ca
ignore, you have to, keep going at
Clanton said.
A camera, can be run down the p
to check out the clog, which is va
umed out of the pipe.
We have to be aware of where we
putting grease and oils, Clanton sa
'Tryto keep it out of the drain."


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CARC: Ex-chief cries foul


Continued From Page 12
Officials with the Florida
Attorney General's Office
said the letter is not subject
to open records laws.
But at least four board
members said it's unlike-
ly Baughman would have
completed her six-month
probation period without
getting fired.
"For the last two months,,
'there has been so much
negative energy at CARC,"
1' said Melinda Moses, a
board member: "I think
there were some other peo-
ple who didn't think she'd
last six months."
Moses said she was
dismayed that Baughman
would speak critically about
her former job and her rela-
tionship with board mem-
bers and employees.
"Nobody wants to get
personal about tlis," she
said. "I'm sorry she has cho-
sen to make this an issue. I
don't want to get into a mud-
slinging thing."
S Judy Lewis, who has
served on the board nearly,
30 years, said Baughman
didn't have the financial
expertise necessary to per-
form her duties and had a
poor relationship with some
board members.
"I don't think she ever
understood -the relationship
between the board and the
director," Lewis said. "It
was a bad fit from the word
go."

CONFUCT BREWING
Cedric Davis, a 17-year
board member, said shortly
after Baughman, was hired,
they .began having prob-
lems. He was concerned
about how she ,managed
staff, dealt with the board
of directors and interacted
with parents of the clients
served by the organization.
"Some stuff 'that should
have been done, wasn't
done," Davis said. "Stuff we
were told was done, wasn't
done."
He said Baughman
unfairly criticized him for
being too involved with
daily operations after her
resignation.
"I'm a very active board
member and want to get
things done," he said. "I
know she bashed me. She's
trying to take the heat off
her. She looked good on
paper, but she didn't pro-
duce."
Glenn Hunter, who has
served on the board 32
years, said "there is no
doubt" that Baughman was
being micromanaged.
"There was a lot of con-
flict around the organiza-
tion-" he said. "The organi-
zation is struggling."
But Baughman deserved
close scrutiny because of
her inability to. work with
other employees and board
members, Davis said.
"She came there and cre-
ated so much havoc," he
said. "Employees were call-
ing to complain every day."
Rather than depend on
staff to learn more about


the organization, Baughman
clashed with staff and board
members clashed soon after
she was hired.
"All the support she need-
ed was there from staff,"
Lewis said.
Hunter said. he urged
board members to give
Baughman a chance to do
her job. -
"I said let's go back to
square one," he said. "Let
this girl run the organiza-
tion."
But conflicts continued
to plague the organization.
The worst disagreements
,were between Bauighman
and former finance direc-
tor Sveta Zhahoronkova,
who'quit on Sept 16, board
members said.
"She just 'resigned 'and
did not give a reason for
quitting," Baughman said.
But Zhahoronkova gives'
a different story. She said
Baughman never under-
stood her role as executive
'director. She didn't go into
the community to generate
support and solicit dona-
tions for the organization,
which is struggling finan-
cially because of cuts in
state funding.
"She didn't express any'
interest, in our financial
situation," Zhahoronkova
said. "I quit her. I didn't,
quit CARC. She didn't care
about the company, it was
all about her. I didn't like
her management methods."
Board members voted to'
rehire Zhahoronkova as a
financial consultant to help'
the organization catch up on
billing the state for services
after the woman Baughman
" hired to manage CARC's
finances quit after less than
a week on the job. -
Baughman was upset
Zhahoronkova was rehired
as a consultant, Davis said.'
Baughman told board
members another employ-
ee saw Zhahoronkova use
a thumb drive to putV data
onto a computer, Davis said.
Baughman suspected the
' former finance director may
have deleted files after she
quit and was using the thumb
drive to replace the missing
documents, he said.


But a technical expert
who examined the organiza-
tion's computers found no
financial records missing or
deleted, Davis said.
"She. [Zhahoronkova]
was authorized to go on the
computers," he said.
Zhahoronkbva said she
did use a thumb drive to put
data back on the computer,
but that's because she rou-
tinely took work home with
her during her six and a half
years at the organization.
"I spent a lot of time here
working at home," she said.
"Of course I, had files 'at
home."

MOVING FORWARD
The challenge now is hir-
ing a new executive director
with the necessary skills for
the job, Hunter said.
"I would 'say we have to'
spend as much time as nec-
essary [to hire a replace-,
ment]," he said. "My game
plan is to hire a director to
run the agency. We've got
to have some strong leader-
ship,"
The organization is near-
ly caught up on billing for
services provided. About 90
percent of" CARC's $2 mil-
lion annual operating bud-
get comes from the state..
Zhahoronkbva iSaid she
is working full time as an;
accountant in Gainesville
and doesn't have the titrie
to manage the organiza-
tion's finance department"
for much longer. But she
said she'd be willing to rain
the person the board hires'
as her replacement
"They don't need anexec-
utive director, they need.
a financial director Wvho
can do the job," she said.,
"Management is the main
problem now." -
Financially, the organiia-.
tion needs community sup-
port and that should be a
key duty for the new execu-
tive director, she said.
."We need the com-
munity to come to us,"
Zhahoronkova said.
"Financially, we have prob-
lems and always will. .The
state has made drastic
changes. We need some-


body to help."
But the organization is not
in danger of shutting down
because of finances, she said. ,
Board members are filling
the key positions until new,
department heads and an
executive director are hired.
While they want to hire a
new executive director as
soon as possible, board mem-
bers said they will take their
time choosing Baughman's
replacement,
"I would say you sped
as much time as necessary,"
Hunter said.
Leadership continuity is
important for an organiza-
tion whose role is to care
for and provide job training
for disabled people. And after
launching the third search for
a new executive director in
less than a year, board mem-'
bers want to hire someone
with strong leadership skills,
good financial knowledge
and a passion for helping the
clients served by the organi-
zation.
"We need some- strong
consistency," Hunter said.
"We need a strong force in
place."
Davis said he is concerned
about the possible damage
the conflictcould bring to the
organization.
"We're a reputable com-
pany," he said. "We. weren't
going in the direction we want
to go in. We're probably going
to look for experience."
Lewis said it was a strug-
gle after the resignations but
operations are now running
smoothly and board members
are more involved with daily
operations. She expressed
optimism public support will
continue.
. "We have always been an
agency that people are happy
to support," Lewis said. "We
will -take our time hiring a
new director."
, Baughmli said she sin-
cerely cares about the clients
served by CARC and hopes
the organization continues to
thrive. But she won't miss
dealing with the board of
directors.
"I don't care what they're
saying," she said. "CARC's no
longer my cause. I don't want
any part of it."


'We concentrate on the
fellowship. If they're alone,
someone will talk to them.
You'll be surprised what you
\ get. It's all walks of life.'

Wally Reichert, one of the event organizers


HOLIDAY: Dinner for all

Continued From Page 1A


es are involved," he said.
To ensure the meal
is reminiscent of one
cooked at home,. it will
not be self-serve buf-
fet style on paper plates
with plastic silverware.
Instead, after guests are
seated, their meals will
be hand delivered to
their tables.
Mike Millikin,. super-
intendent of Columbia
County Schools, arid his
family will be among
those serving guests ddr-
ing the event, Reichert
said.
"The people can come
in and relax," he said.
"There are plenty of
tables."
, The dinner is spon-
sored by the church's
outreach program.
Members have spent the
past two months scout-
ing for sale items, asking
local merchants for dona-
tions and working with
other churches to pre-
pare for the event.
Everything is -home
cooked except the cran-
berry sauce, Reichert
said. As many as 20 vol-


unteers.will start prepa-
rations Tuesday. Besides
cooking plenty of tur-
keys, volunteers will peel
100 pounds of potatoes,
.bake 100 pounds of corn-
bread and dozens of pies,
as well as prepare a wide
variety of side dishes
such as green beans,
sweet potatoes and din-
ner rolls.
Reichert said his'wife,
Edna, came up with the
idea to invite the com-
munity to Thanksgiving
dinner 11 years ago. The
first dinner attracted 200
to 300 people, he said.
"It has slowly grown
each year," he said.
Everyone who eats din-
ner at the church will
be treated like a house
guest, Reichert said.
"We concentrate on the
fellowship," he said. "If
they're alone, someone
will talk to them. You'll
be surprised what you
get. It's all walks of life."
The church is located at
697 SW Baya Drive. Call
(386) 758-7853 to donate
food 'or cash, volunteer
or.for information.


SANTA: On the scene

Continued From Page 1A
because at least 2,000 chil- 7 p.m. on Nov. 26. He will
dren will sit on it between be at the mall in December
now and Christmas. through Christmas eve on
Santa will be at the mall Fridays from 6 p.m. to 9.
from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on p.m. and Saturdays from 10
Nov. 25 and from 10 a.m. to am. to 6,p.m.


OB/ YN
DA NA\GREENEMD
"WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE MOTHER'S, WE UNDERSTAND"


Thursday, NovemC er 24'

ll30a.m. -1:30 p.m.

Everyone is invited to join
friends in sharing food and
fellowship as we thank God
for our manj blessin6s.


C4,wol Siam

Nth W
C*Of...ad


IC.

CAfotC&6


FREE pregnancy tests in the office and
offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries.
SPECIALIZING IN: New Patients Welcome
* Non-Invasive a1paroscopic
Gynecological Surgery Call today for a
* Adolescent Gynecology personal appointment:
* High and Low Risk Obstetrics 386.755-0500
* Contraception
* Delivering at Shands Lake Shore 9 SE Baya Dmre
jn..Offic. ultrsounds for.our pt qp . a. aida|32925
n .. -~ . ..


Florida Tax Payers
please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous fallacy
of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia High
School, and Fort White High School students and alumni. All of them
are offspring of Adam and his female wife Eve and therefore are created
by God, in the image of God. (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1
End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1;
page 52 SC.912.L.15.10
http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiolW.gyFL11Sp.pdfl

I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.corn

Paid for by Kenny Merriken


THANk',.-"GIVING



IDINNE--R


Fws-r111-s --HRIN l~'R I


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


3A


M iU
wl













OPINION


Sunday, November 20, 201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Bonuses


a nice


idea,


but...

N ews of a $2,000
must have come'
as a nice surprise
for 502 county
workers earlier this week.
Commissioners approved the
payout totaling $1 million, at
their Thursday night meeting.
It's a generous gesture, and
we don't begrudge the workers
one bit.
County officials have done a
fine job adapting to recession-
ary conditions and employees
at all levels have responded
admirably, lightening their
.belts and working even harder
to keep Columbia County going
strong financially.
Surely they should be
rewarded.
And were hard times at
an end, what better way to
celebrate than by sharing the
wealth with those who helped
achieve it. -
Problem is, hard times
haven't ended.
While we're optimistic that
better days lie ahead, we have
no idea what's coming or how
long the current downturn will
last.
Sorry, commissioners, but
that million dollars should have
remained in county coffers, at'
least for now. . ,
There will-be plenty of time
to acknowledge everyone's
hard work once the battle is
won. !


HIGH L IG H TS
IN HISTO R Y

Today is Sunday, Nov. 20,
the 324th day of 2011. There
are 41 days left in the year.
On this date:
In 1620, Peregrine
White was born aboard the
Mayflower in Massachusetts
Bay; he was the first child born
of English parents in present-
day New England.
* Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will.be accomplished
through, the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
SDink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake CityReporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


t is encouraging news
.that the Supreme Court
has decided.to con-
sider the constitutional-
ity of key provisions of
Obamacare the Affordable >
Care Act
By the end of next summer
,we'll know if the federal govern-
mernt can force individuals to
buy health insurance and if they
can force states to comply with'
a newly expanded Medicaid
program.
Professor Walter Russell
Mead of Bard College blogs
that in the debates to ratify the
Constitution, it was considered
a weakness "that important
laws could be passed and would
operate for some time before '
people knew whether they were
legal..."
He points out that there are
cleverer ways that forced pur-
chase of insurance could have
been constricted by Obamacare
drafters that would have made
it:less vulnerable to a constitu-
tional challenge.,
.Bt is'that really the point?
Is it not sad that the most
fundamental aspects of our abil-
ity to live as a free people boil
down these days to how nine
Supreme Court justices choose
to read and interpret a word or
phrase?
Is it notsad that most basic
violations of individual liberty
are not intuitively obvious to so
many citizens and members of.
Congress?
Or perhaps even sadder, that
(liberty may no longer be the
objective?
It so happens that yesterday
was the anniversary of Lincoln's
Gettysburg Address, delivered.
Nov. 19, 1863 148 years ago.
Lincoln openedthe address
with his famous "Four score .
and seven years ago our fathers


www.lakecityreporter.com 4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Latest in


long line


of deficit,


failures

he 12-member
six Democrats,
six Republicans
"supercommit-
tee" is supposed
to produce a plan to lower the
federal deficit by $1.2 trillion '
over the next decade.
N While one should never say
never in Washington, it's not '
going to happen. The necessary
political center is just not there.
So what will happen if the panel '
fails in its mission? Nothing, at
least in the short-term.
Each side will blame the
other for the failure. The
Democrats will say accurately .'
that the Republicans flatly
refuse to consider tax hikes, .' .
and the Republicans, with
equal accuracy, will say the
Democrats refused to entertain -
, significant cuts to the major
entitlement programs, Social :
Security and Medicare.
Periodically there would be
reports that the supercommit- ,
tee was closeto an agreement .
'but each time it fell'apart
and always for the same rea-
sons. This past week Sen. Pat "'
Toomey, R-Pa., thought he had;'
a deal: $776 billion in spend-
ing reduction, including major ,.
cuts in health-care programs,
and $401 billion in new tax
revenues.
But Democrats were skepti-
catlthat those new revenues,.
to be achieved through largely
unspecified individual and
corporate tax "reforms," would
ever materialize. They had rea-
son to be doubtful. The deficit ,
enhancing Bush tax cuts were
passed with the commitment
they would expire after 10 .
years. When the time came,
'Congress reneged, and the
Republicans refused to even.
consider letting the cut for
high-income earners expire.
The supercommittee is the fifth
. attempt in the last 12 months to
formulate an attack on the defi-.
cits, which now cumulatively total
over $15 trillion. There was the
report of the presidents Bowles- .
Simpson commission, which
would require more political
courage than most White Houses
and Congresses can muster.
There were the talks between
Vice President Joe Biden and
House GOP leader Eric Cantor, '
which fell apart when Cantor, a'
hardliner on tax increases, walked
out The Senate Gang of Six went
nowhere.
The most promising effort
was in July when President
Barack Obama and House
Speaker John Boehner seemed
close to a "grand bargain" of
$4 trillion, later scaled back to
$2 trillion, but Boehner was
unable to sell it to his own
House members.
With no agreement, $1.2 tril-
lion in across-the-board cuts are'.
to go into effect automatically
but not until 2013. In principle,'.
the two parties could still reach
agreement before then but .
that's unlikely because 2012 is
an election year.
And those cuts are nowhere
near as automatic as the law- :
makers make them sound. One
Congress cannot bind succes- "'
sor Congresses to a course of
action. The new Congress could ,
simply chuck the across-the-
board cuts and start anew.
It all depends on who the
voters send to Washington in
next November's congressio-
nal elections, and ultimately
that's where and how the defi-
cit problem will be resolved
unless the voters, like their ,
elected representatives of the -
last 12 year, decide they prefer..
the problem to any of its pos-.,
sible solutions.


* Scripps Howard News Service


Star Parker
parker@urbahcure.org
brought forth on this contifient
a new nation, conceived in
liberty...-." .
His point of reference defin-
ing the vision of the nation
was 1776 The Declaration of
Independence.
One hundred years after the
Gettysburg address, Martin
Luther King stood in front of
Lincoln's statue and gave his
most famous speech, and the
words he chose to quote also*
were those of the Declaration,
about the "unalienable Rights",
of "Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit
of Happiness."
Now that the Supreme
Court has agreed to review
Obamacare, a lot of jokes are
circulating recalling how cava-
lier then-Speaker Nancy Pelosi
and other leading Democrats
were regarding the constitution-
ality of what they were doing.
But regardless of how they
may-or may nothave thought
about how.the words of the'
*Constitution might justify what
became Obamacare, it would '
be impossible to justify such
actions through the lens of the
ideals of liberty stated in the
Declaration '
To suggest that a nation "con-
ceived in Liberty" can tolerate a
,.handful of Washington bureau-
crats telling several hundred
million citizens what health
insurance is and forcing them to
buy it is beyond absurd.
Perhaps what the ongoing


Lisa Hoffman
lisahoffman@shns.com


cent to the GOP were the Arizona
Cardinals, Dallas Cowboys,
Denver Broncos, Carolina
Panthers, Kansas City Chiefs,
Washington Redskins, Detroit
lions and the Baltimore Ravens,
according to the analysis of cam-
paign finance disclosures.
Just eight teams favored the
Democrats with at least 70 per-
cent of their donations: Seattle
Seahawks, St. Louis Rams,
San Francisco 49ers, Oakland
Raiders, Philadelphia Eagles,
New York Giants, New England


,saga of American history is
'about is the struggle to under-
stand and apply our operating
manual our Constitution in a
manner consistent with the prin-
ciples of our nation's founding.
We, of course, began day one
off track by rationalizing slavery
into the Constitution.
The evidence today. is we.
have a long way to go to align
with those founding principles.
A good start would be to even
think about them and see them
as relevant.
If we did, there is no way
Obamacare would have passed.
Nor would we have concluded
that our financial crisis was
caused by too much freedom
rather than too much govern-
ment. Now we've hamstrung.
our whole financial services'
sector with ill conceived new
laws while the government
backed entities that caused the
whole thing Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac remain stand-
ing unscathed, still sucking up
billions of taxpayer funds and
paying their executives million
dollar bonuses.
How about a government that
wastes hundreds of millions of
taxpayer funds in uneconomic
"clean energy" ventures and'
then rejects a pipeline project
that would deliver millions of
barrels of oil, create tens of
thousands of jobs, and their
only request from government
is a permit?
It's obvious what's wrong
today. We've either forgotten
what being American means, or
we no longer care.


Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author
of three books.


NFL likes GOP best

IRS gets audited


National Football
League teams
don't just deliver
big bucks to their
players. They also
drop substantial sums into the
pockets of politicians.
The top team for donations is
the Houston Texans, whose play-
ers, executives and coaches have
contributed more than $293,000
to assorted candidates since 2009,
according to an analysis by the
Center for Responsive Politics.
No. 2 is the San Diego Chargers,
who shelled out $171,500 over
the same period. No. 3 is the New
York Jets, with almost $148,000.
All tree teams favored
Republicans over Democrats,
giving at least 70 percent of
their contributions to GOP can-
didates.
In fact, the NFL teams tilt
most toward Republicans. Aside
from those three, the other eight
teams that gave at least 70 per-


0.


Patriots and New Orleans Saints.
The Internal Revenue Service
has found itself on the unpleas-
ant end of an audit.
The Government
Accountability Office just
released a critical assessment of
the agency. GAO auditors found,
among other things:
The agency's system for
managing unpaid tax assess-
ments uses software so deficient
that it cannot detect and correct
errors in taxpayer accounts in a
timely manner.
The systems used to pro-
cess taxpayer information lack
security protections to prevent
access by unauthorized users.
That means confidential IRS and
taxpayer records are at risk of
being compromised.
The agency's lack of
controls has led to incorrect
refunds. '
Scripps Howard News Service


AMP V TRW Thi5TVMW


We're ignoring


the Constitution








LAKE CITY REPORTER STATE / NATION SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 5A


Upscale Fla. town in fight


over immigrant prison


By Laura Wides-Munoz
Associated Press
SOUTHWEST RANCHES In
one of South Florida's upscale, rural
enclaves, where peacocks roam and
horse trails are as common as side-
walks, town leaders decided to bring
in much of their money from an
unusual business: a prison.
Only the leaders o,f Southwest
Ranches kept their plans quiet from
residents for almost a decade, and
the project has now ballooned into.
what would be among the feder-
al government's largest immigrant
detention centers. The town would
have to pay $150,000 each year to
keep the prison, but officials say the
town would turn a profit by getting
4 percent of what U.S. Immigration
and Customs Enforcement pays the
company operating the prison to hold
inmates there.
Many residents finally caught wind.
of the idea this year, when the immi-
gration agency announced a tenta-
tive deal, and they're angry. They've
held protests at public meetings,
contemplated whether to recall the
mayor before his March election and
whether to amend the town charter
to make it easier to fire the city attor-
ney pushing the deal.
The objection over the prison has
created an odd set of allies among
the town's affluent residents, many of
whom are wary of illegal immigrants,
and longtime activists who fight; for
immigrants, legal or not


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Diana Bramhall walks with one of her horses at her home in Southwest Ranches
in this photo taken July 26. Town leaders in this upscale rural enclave have plans
to build a.1,500-bed detention center facility for U.S. Immigration and Customs
Enforcement. A growing group of residents from'Southwest Ranches and neigh-
boring cities are seeking to halt the effort.


The proposed facility is part of
the federal government's new plan
to move immigrants from jails to
detention centers it says are better
for holding people with no criminal
background. The centers are also
supposed to be easier to reach for
detainees' relatives and lawyers.
Plans are in the works for other
facilities near San Antonio, Texas,


and in Essex County, N.J. and
Orange County, Calif. But none of
those proposals has drawn the out-
rage seen in Southwest Ranches,
the Fort Lauderdale suburb where
telenovelas are filmed in the shaded
ranches, and wealthy developers,
Miami Dolphins football players and
others seek privacy and a country
lifestyle.


Officials: 32 homes destroyed in Reno fire


By Scott Sonner
Associated Press
RENO, Nev. -The esti-,
mated number of homes
destroyed in a wind-fueled
wildfire more than doubled
on Saturday to a total of
32, but Gov. Brian Sandoval
.said it's a miracle scores
more weren't lost.
A re-evaluation of the
2,000-acre burn on Saturday
found much more destruc-
tion and damage than ini-
tially reported,. Reno Fire
Chief Mike Hernandez
said.
The unusual, out-of-sea-
son blaze spread by gale-


OBITUARIES
David "AMike" Stevens, Sr.

Mr. David "Mike" Stevens, Sr.
53 of Lake City passed away
on Thursday evening, Novem-
ber 17, 2011. He was a native
of Helena,
S Arkansas and
a son to the
late James ,
William
and Edna
Mlae Resch'
Stevens. Mr.
Stevens wvas
a longtime
Stevens resident and
was raised
f w l in Arkansas
and moved toLake City in 2004.
'from Cocoa, Florida. Mike, was
devoted to his family and always
willing to help a neighbor in
need. Mikes strong will was .
evident by the hero's battle he
fought with long term cancer and
other medical conditions. 'He en-
joyed deer hunting, fishing and
doing carpentry work around his
home. Mr. Stevens was of their
Baptist faith and member of the
Victory Baptist Church in Cocoa.
He was preceded in death by one
brother, Calvin Stevens.
Mr. Stevens is survived by his
wife, Cherri L. Stevens, Lake
City, three sons, David Michael.
(Beth) Stevens, Jr.,,Ruston, LA,.
Stormy Ray-Tanner Stevens,
Bryant, AR and Connor Houston
Stevens, Lake City. Three broth-
ers, Wilber (Bernell) Stevens,
Tommy (Janice) Stevens and
Richard (Susan) Stevens, one
sister, Betty Harris and three
grandchildren, Logan Michael
Stevens, Landen Sailor Stevens
and Lawson Ryder Stevens also
survive.
A memorial service celebrating
the life of Mr. Stevens will be
conducted on Monday, Novem-
ber 21, 2011 at 10:00 AM in the
Chapel of Guerry Funeral Home.
In lieu of flowers donations
may be made to the American
Caner Society at P.O. Box 22718
-Oklahoma City, OK 73123-
1718 in memory of Mr. Stevens.
Arrangements are under the
direction of GUERRY Funeral
Home, Lake City. Please sign
the guestbook at www.guerryfu-
neralhome.net.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


force winds and ripped
through the Sierra foot-
hills early Friday, forcing
the evacuation of nearly
10,000 people. Most started
returning to. their homes
Saturday afternoon.
'"This was not only a wild
land, urban-interface type
fire, it was also a metro fire
where wp had homes that


were actively burning in
densely populated areas,"
Hernandez said.
Many families "had to
leave in the middle of the
night with very, very lim-
ited possessions and they
are coming back to devas-
tation, to nothing," he said.
"So our hearts and prayers
go out to those, families."


The governor said after a
helicopter tour. of the area
Saturday that while the
loss of homes, was tragic,
the 400 firefighters on the
lines are heroes for saving
more' than 4,000 houses
that could have burned in
the.blaze investigators sus-
pect was started by arcing
power lines.


NOVEMBER IS LUNG CANCER AWARENESS MONTH


By Lauran Neergaard
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
government delivered a blow
to some desperate patients
Friday as it ruled the block-
buster drug Avastin should
no longer be used to treat
advanced breast cancer.
Avastin is hailed for
treating colon cancer and
certain other malignan-
cies. But the Food and
Drug Administration said it
appeared to be a false hope
for breast cancer: Studies
haven't found that it helps
those patients live longer or
brings enough other benefit
to outweigh its dangerous
side effects.
"I did not come to this
decision lightly," said the
FDA's commissioner, Dr.
Margaret Hamburg. But she
said, "Sometimes 'despite
the hopes of investigators,
patients, industry and even
the FDA itself, the results
of rigorous testing can be
disappointing.'
Avastin remains on the
market to treat certain
colon, lung, kidney and
brain cancers. Doctors are
free to prescribe any mar-
keted drug as they see fit
So 'even though 'the, FDA
formally revoked Avastin's
approval as a breast cancer
treatment, women could still
receive it but their insur-
ers may not pay for it Some
insurers already have quit in
anticipation of FDA's long-
expected ruling.
However, "Medicare will
continue to cover Avastin,"
said Brian Cook, spokesman
for the Centers for Medicare
&. Medicaid Services. The
agency "will monitor the'
issue and evaluate coverage
options as a result of action
by the FDA but has no


immediate plans to change
coverage policies."
Including infusion fees, a
year's treatment with Avastin
can reach $100,000.
The ruling disappointed
patients who believe Avastin
is helping td curb their incur-
able cancer.
"Ifs saved my life," said
a tearful Sue Boyce, 54, of
Chicago. She's taken Avastin
in addition to chemotherapy
since joining a research
study in 2003. Her breast
cancer eventually spread to
her lungs, liver and brain,
but Boyce says she is stable
and faring well.
"So I'm hoping the insur-
ance company will grandfa-
ther me in to continue tak-
ing it," she said.
The Avastin saga began in
2008, when an initial study
suggested the drug could
delay tumor growth for a few
months in women whose
breast cancer had spread
to other parts of the body.
Over the objection of its own
advisers and to the surprise
of cancer groups, FDA gave
Avastin conditional approval
it could be sold for such
women while manufacturer
Genentech tried to prove it
really worked. '
The problem: Ultimately,
the tumor effect was even
smaller than first thought
Across repeated studies,
Avastin patients didn't live
longer or have a higher qual-
ity of life. Yet the drug causes
some life-threatening risks,
including, severe high blood
pressure,. massive bleeding,
heart attack or heart failure "
and tears in the stomach and
intestines, the FDA conclud-
ed. In two public hearings '
one last year and one this
summer FDA advisers
urged the agency to revoke
that approval.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


THE WEATHER


? PARTLY
CLOUDY



HI 79 LO 58


mm


pa PARTLY]


PARTLY CHANCE MOSTLY
CLOUDY -STORMS SUNNY



HI 80 LO5 178LO51 HI72LO46


FORECAST _, S undayI. ,Nvme 0i


Tallahassee
80/56
Pensacola 8/
77/64 ,Panama
-74/59


S aldosta City
80/57 &*Jacksonve Cape Canaveral
* Lake City ,76/58 Daytona Beach
79/58 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
ity 80/57 80j/62 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
81/59 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
82/62 79166 Miami
Tampa Naples
84/65 West Palm Beach Ocala
82/71 Orlando
** FL Lauderdale Panama City
Ft MyerS 82/73 Pensacola
85/65 Naples Tallahassee
'85/68 Miami Tampa
82/72 Valdosta
Key West* W. Palm Beach


80/73


Monday
79. 6-1 p,
80/62/s
81/72/pc
85/64/pc
80/55/pc
77/58/pc
80/72/pc
80/54/pc
82/70/pc
83/65/pc
.81/57/pc
82/61/s
78/61/s
78/63/pc
80/55/s
84/63/pc
79/56/s
80/69/pc


Tuesday
;8 63 p.:
79/61/pc
81/70/pc
83/64/s.
80/57/pc
77/60/pc
80/71/pc
80/56/pc
82/69/pc
82/65/pc
80/58/pc
82/61/pc
73/61/pc
,76/64/pc
79/58/pc
81/64/s
80/57/pc
* 82/67/pc


SNATIONAL FORECAST: A cold front will generate showers in the interior Northeast today,
with some of the rain changing to. snow later in the day. Rainfall will be heavier from the Ohio
Valley to the southern Plains where thunderstorms are also expected. A Pacific storm off the
coast of California will bring wet weather to much of that state with snow expected in the
Sierra Nevada.


I I Ii


Fs LAKCTY'' ALMANAC


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


72
54
74
50
90 in 1906
28 in 2008


0.00"
0.97"
32.24"
1.33"
44.96"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonnse today
Moonset today
Moonrisetom.
Moonset torn.


,7:00 a.m.
5:32 p.m.
7:01 a.m.
5:32 p.m.


1:48 a.m.
2:02 p.m.
2:53 a.m.
2:41 p.m.


Nov. Dbc. Dec. Dec.
25 2 10 IO 24
New First Full New


5
MOODWlE:
30 nits to bum
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on.
a scale from 0
to 10+.
: M


An exchstw


brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Change.


Forecasts, data and
a graphics 2011 Weather
S Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
SRJJlr www.weatherpubllsher.com


Saturday
CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 49/29/0
Albuquerque 58/40/0'
Anchorage -2/-9/0
Atlanta 61/43/0
Baltimore 2! t:
Billings I 4. 0J
Birmingham 68/50/0
Bismarck 16/8/0
Boise 38/26/0.
Boston 53/36/0
Buffalo ". 1 .
Charleston SC i3, J, 1:
Charleston WV 64 29i 0
Charlotte 5 .' 23, u
Cheyenne 35/17/.03
Chicago 54/44/0
Cincinnati 59/29/0
Cleveland 4, 42,
Columbia SC 4 29? 0
Dallas '-, F-,.,"
Daytona Beach 77/69/0
Denver 49/20/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
58/32/c
,.f it.. c,
17/2/sn
69/55/c
6.3'"50'r
32, 1 1,
74/63/c:
'2 12 c.:
41 27 6.:
2. 40 p,:
52 31,
74, 5 p.:
*.3 53, ;r,
6; ', 4.,
43/25/pc
45/39/pc
59.J47 r.
55 39, f,:
81 I.66 .I
80/62/pc
47/32/pc


CITY
Des Moines.
Detroit
El Paso,
Fairbanks
Greensboro
Hartford
Honolulu
Houston
Indianapolis
Jackson MS
Jacksobville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Little Rock
Los Angeles
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Mobile ,
New Orleans
New York
Oklahoma City


Saturday Today Saturday Today


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
i 41 0 ,40/29/pc. Omah
5(, 3. ,: 52/35/pc Orlan
68/51/0 71/49/pc Philai
-31/-36/.01 -20/-33/s Phoel
55/26/0,- 67/51/c Plttsl
-., J 1: 60/37/pc Portl
82/77/0 82/71/pc Portli
79/65/0 83/70/c Raleli
56/45/0 57/45/sh Rapid
74/38/0 79/64/c Reno
77/50/0 76/58/pc Richr
70/49/0 43/36/sh Sacra
60 '50'0- .5 J5 4c St. L
i;... ;J .'. I, r Salt I
60/55/0 60/53/sh San I
69/47/0 73/63/t San I
83/75/0 82/72/pc San I
3' 25 I-' 28/26/pc Seati
72/54/0 30 64 c Spok
78/57/0 P 1, c.. ,: Tamp
51/38/0 63/48/pc Tucsi
y 74/56/0, 49/42/sh Wash


- U--


I CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


= e.....a.... r........ QohcvAnu Tndav
aanuroay iooay ~LLflUO7
CITY CITY Hi/Lo/Pcp. Hi/Lo/W'


HI/Lo/Pcp.
88/75/0
50/34/0

46/32/0 1
46/32/0
46/37/0
90 6.8 0
r:.6, 5,. ,
48/30/0,
84/66/0
Jl 30 18
84/75/0
88/79/0


ooay
HI/Lo/W
:87/75/pc
40/36/c,
61 -4I 8
65/60/pc
48/27/s
37/33/pc
.85765/t-
71, 57: ,
53/32/pc
86/70/pc
, 37/33/c
77/70/pc
89/79/pc


CITY
La Paz
Lima ,-
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo ,
Panaima
Paris


SatUfduay
Hi/Lo/Pcp.
54/39/0
73/64/0
-5 J3 0)
l59 5 i
75/52/0
50/32/0
36/32/0
75. 6:1 :'
82, ; 0
81 P .1 0)
37 32 0
52, .5. .
57/37/0


=vunj
HI/Lo/W
58/40/sh
.73/64/pc
52 -lI i.:
52,, 41 .
73/51/pc
57/18/sh
33 20 si
'2, 62, ;r

. 3. 60.
35/29/rs
86/73/t
55/41/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago, .
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney_
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


HVLo/Pcp.
77/68/0
61/37/0
86 *. 05 -
E 7. : t '
73 5.0 0
90 ;5 0u
S., i66, 0
62/57/.21
72/57/0
54/39/0
37/34/0
37/32/0


HI/Lo/W
76/67/s '
69/47/s
SJ.1 77 .
e3 76 i
6 48 s '
a4 3,".r
57"77't

65/54/sh
67/51/sh
40/28/pc
36/29/pc
36/28/c


KEY TO CONDITIONS: c=cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i-ice, pcpartly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts=thunderstorms, w-windy.


Pay off your home in 10 years! 3 .Q9

l* a you have 30% or more equity in your home...

I m you want to avoid high closing costs... 3i2


Apply online at campuscu.com or call 754-9088 and press 4 today!


10-year FIXED APR' First Mortgage TO'
(Please call for other rates & terms) (





CAMPUS


USA
Membership is open to anyone itn chu, Coumbnion

Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Columbia and Suwann


1. Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position are required.
Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property insurance is required; flood and/or title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. Example: a$1 00,000 loan
at 3.25% for 120 months would require 119 monthly payments of $977.40 and one final payment of $96037, total finance charge of $17,454.57; for a total of payments of $117,287-57. The amount financed is 599,833.00 the APRjs 3.285%.
.-.-,, i....... .- -.... ... *, f.C-. a -. ....n1 i-il .;,1i o f..!S5rare.M ntion thi sa dnd we'l ,waiv the 5.5 new member fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.


TAL CLOSING COSTS'
Loans of $200,000 or less)










Apply Nowl

ee countiesP



LENE R


S Arn=Annuai rercentdgeRae.2. c a s.-. C.re d t n ..o.ad. inta deoi or .. ..ura. .-nto ini ao a H ----e- UMe



S S5in i mm 2 0N hAv.Ocaa397S Co R. E.WstMrin111CorR.Sum'0ed]90USw.4 oin l a 5


la
do
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burgh
and ME
and OR
gh
I City

mond
amento
ouis :"
Lake City
Antonio
Dilego
Francisco
lie
ane
pa
on
ihlngton


HVLo/Pcp.
,.0 3; 01
I 1.3. 4.,
53/34/0
74/53/0

43/37/.01
61/28/0
20/10/.40
40/31/0
57/30/0
54/34/0
62/50/0
35/30/.06
79/66/0
62/59/0
54/43/0
38/33/0
23/21/.04
82/68/0
70/52/0
54/37/0


HI/Lo/W
40/22/pc
82/62/pc
65/49/pc
69/56/pc
55 15 r.

41/36/pc
69/52/pc
30/16/pc
46/25/pc
68 .3 p o
5: .41. : r.
49/43/t
42/25/sf
82/69/c
E-63. .*:
56 Jo ;r.
J2, 33, i :.
30/16/pc
84/65/pc
69/50/pc
63/51/c


I 111- 1 I II I-


kl~fBj


4 THI|jSW


dCiS ItNDEX


II :


I -e-


I










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lokecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, November 20, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


GAMES

Monday
Fort White High
boys soccer vs. Lafayette
High, 5 p.m.
Fort White High girls
soccer at Williston High,
6 p.m.
Columbia High
soccer at Oak Hall
School, 7 p.m. (girls-5)
Tuesday
Fort White High
soccer vs. Interlachen
High, 7 p.m. (boys-5)
Fort White High boys'.
basketball at Newberry
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)
Friday
Columbia High
football vs. Bartram Trail
High in Class 6A regional
semifinal, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Trinity Catholic
High in Class 3A regional
final, 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 28
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Bradford High,
7 p.m. .
Columbia High boys
soccer at Lincoln High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High
girls basketball vs. Baker
County *High, 7 p.m.
(JV-5:30)
Nov. 29
Fort White High
basketball at Interlachen
High, 7:30 p.m. (girls-6,
JV-4:30) .
Fort White High
soccer at P.K. Yonge
School, 7 p.m. (girls-5)
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Mosley High
at CYSA field, 7 p.m.
Dec. 1
SFort White High boys
basketball vs. Bradford
High, 7:30 p.m. (JV-6)


Taylor-made signing


Douglass signs
with Francis
Marion University.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Fans of both Columbia
and Fort White high schools
could cheer on Wednesday
as Taylor Douglass signed
to play softball at Frances
Marion University.
Perhaps Fort White
principal Keith Hatcher
summed it up best when
describing why Douglass
is important to the com-
munity.
"When I told people' I
was coming to CHS for a
signing, they looked at me
strange," Hatcher said. 'To
me, it's not the school you
go to, but the person you
are. I wouldn't have missed
this for the world regard-
less of who she is playing
for."
Douglass played at
Fort White until this sea-
son where she'll finish out
her high-school career for
Jimmy Williams and the
Lady Tigers.
She began her playing
career under her father
Rodney for a travelling
team in Lake City before
developing her game with
Paul Silverman and the
Gainesville Gold.
'To me, three words sum
up Taylor," Silverman said.,
"She's got loyalty, leader-
ship and respect. She's got
a remarkable understand-


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High softball player Taylor Douglass, 18, signs the letter of intent to Francis Marion University in Florence, S.C.,
on Wednesday at the school's auditorium. Pictured are Marilyn (front row, from left), Taylor and Rodney Douglass, Columbia
High School softball head coach Jimmy Williams (back row, from left), Fort White High School athletic director John Wilson,
principal Keith Hatcher and Gainesville Gold head coach Paul Silverman. 'l\m mainly relieved. I'm so excited to go and experi-
ence new things,' Taylor Douglass-said. 'There's hno more pressure. I finally know where I will be spending the next four years
of my life.'


ing of the game and one day
I think she'll make a great
coach."
No matter who was
speaking about Douglass,
they were sure to speak of
her intelligence on the field.
It's one of the things that
will help her moving on.
"She's 'one of the most
intelligent players I've ever


been around," Rodney
Douglass said. "She's just
been an inspiration."-
After a shoulder, injury
forced her to' redevelop her
game during her sopho-
more season, Douglass has
become a'mor'e well-round-
ed player according to her
piers. For her, it was one of
the hardest experiences of


her career.
"It's the hardest thing I've
ever been though," she said.
"It's taken two years to get
back where I can throw com-
petitively, but I'm a much
better player and person for
going through it"
- Now, Taylor is ready for
her senior year and the
next step.


S"I expect our team to be
really good and hope to
help them to win state," she
said.
As for college, she has
goals there as well.
"I want to go in and show
that I can absolutely com-
pete with anyone," she
said.










Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
3 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Ford
400, at Homestead
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Johor
Open, final round, at Johor, Malaysia
(same-day tape)
10:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Alfred
Dunhill Championship, final round, at
Malelane, South Africa (same-day tape)
Noon
NBC PGA Tour, Presidents Cup,
final round, at Melbourne,Australia (shme-
day tape)
1:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Titleholders, final
round, at Orlando
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL'
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Puerto Rico Tip-Off, third
place game, at San Juan, Puerto Rico
6 p.m.
FSN -Paradise Jam,semifinal,Norfolk
St. vs.TCU, at St.Thomas,Virgin Islands
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 Puerto Rico Tip-Off,
championship game, at San Juan, Puerto
Rico
8:30 p.m.
FSN -. Paradise Jam, semifinal,
Mississippi vs. Marquette, at St. Thomas,
Virgin Islands
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants
SOCCER
2 p.m.
FOX Premier League, Liverpool at
Chelsea (same-day tape)
(4:30 p.m. in early NFL markets)
9 p.m.
ESPN MLS Cup, Houston at Los
Angeles

Monday
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
3 p.m.
ESPN2 Maui Invitational,first round,
Michigan vs. Memphis, at Lahaina, Hawaii
5:30 p.m.
ESPN2-Maui Invitational, first round,
Tennessee vs. Duke, at Lahaina, Hawaii
6 p.m.
FSN Paradise Jam, third place game,
at St.Thomas,Virgin Islands
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 CBE Classic, first round,
Missouri vs. Notre Dame, at Kansas City,
Mo.
8:30 p.m.
FSN Paradise Jam, championship
game, at St.Thomas,Virgin Islands
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 CBE Classic, first round,
California vs. Georgia, at Kansas City, Mo.
12 Midnight,
ESPN2. Maui Invitational, first
round, Georgetown vs. Kansas, at Lahaina,
Hawaii
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Kansas City at New England
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Boston at Montreal

FOOTBALL

NFL'standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Buffalo
N.Y. Jets
Miami


Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Pittsburgh
Baltimore
Cincinnati
Cleveland


East
W L
6 3
5 4
5 5
2, 7
South
W L
7 3
5 4
3 6
0 10
North
W L
7 3
6 3
6 3
3 6
West


T Pct PF PA
0 .667 259 200
0.556 229 218
0.5.00228 217
0.222 158 178

T Pct PF PA
0.700'273.166
'0 .556 186 172
0.333 115 166
0.000 131 300

T' Pct PF PA
0.700 220 179
0.667 225 152
0.667212 164
0.333 131 183


W L T Pct PF PA
Oakland 5 4 0.556 208 233
Denver 5 5 0.444 205 247
San Diego 4 5 0.444 216,228
Kansas City 4 5 0.444 141 218
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 6 3 0.667218211
Dallas 5 4 0.556 223 182
Philadelphia -3 6 0 .333 220 203
Washington 3 6 0.333 136 178
South
W L T Pet'PF PA
New Orleans 7 3 0.700 313 228
Atlanta 5 4 0.556212 196
TampaBay 4 5 0.444156233
Carolina 2 7 0 .222 190 237
North
W L T Pet PF PA
Green Bay 9 0 01.000 320 186
Detroit 6 3 0.667 252 184
Chicago 6 3 0.667 237 187
Minnesota 2 7 0.222 179 244
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 8 I 0.889 233 138
Seattle 3 6 0.333 144 202
Arizona 3 6 0.333 183 213
St. Louis 2 7 0.222 113223
Thursday's Game
Denver 17, N.Y.Jets 13
.Today's Games
Tampa Bay at Green Bay, I p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, I p.m.
Carolina at Detroit, I p.m.
Dallas at Washington, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Cleveland, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.


Tennessee at Atlanta. 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Kansas City at New England,
8:30 p.m.
Open: Houston, Indianapolis. New
Orleans, Pittsburgh
Thursday, Nov. 24
Green Bay at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 27
Arizona at St. Louis, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at Tennessee, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Carolina at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Minnesota at Atlanta, I p.m.
Chicago at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Kansas City, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 28
N.Y. Giants at New Orleans; 8:30 p.m.

College scores

Friday
Iowa St. 37, Oklahoma St. 31; 20T
Toledo 44, Cent. Michigan 17

BASKETBALL

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I North Carolina vs. MVSU,
2 p.m.
No. 4 UConn vs. Coppin State at the
XL Center, Hartford, Conn., I p.m.
No. 16 Alabama vs.TBA at Coliseo de
Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico,TBA
No. 25 Florida State vs. South
Alabama, 3 p.m.
No. 21 Marquette vs. Mississippi at
UVI Sports & Fitness Center, St. Thomas,
Virgin Islands, 8:30 p.m.

Florida 91, UNF 55

At Gainesville
NORTH FLORIDA (1-2)
McRoy 3-7 0-0 6, Diaz 4-9 2-2 10,
Jeune 0-4 0-0 0, Smith 4-14 7-7 17,Wilson
1-2 0-0 2,Wallace 5-12 2-3 12,Williams Jr.
0-3 2-2 2, Sauey 2-4 0-2 4, Landers 1-3 0-0
2.Totals 20-58 13-16 55.
FLORIDA (2-1I)
Young 3-7 1-2 7, Murphy 5-8 2-4 13,
Boynton 7-14 4-4 20, Walker 5-12 4-6
17, Beal 5-10 1-3 12, Rosario 5-9 1-2
15, Wilbekin 0-1 2-2 2, Prather 2-3 1-4.
5, Larson 0-0 0-2 0, Pitchford 0-2 0-0 0.
Totals 32-66 16-29 91.
Halftime-Florida 39-22. 3-Point
Goals-North Florida 2-14 (Smith 2-1 I,
Diaz 0-1, McRoy 0-1, Jeune 0-1), Florida
11-29 (Rosario 4-6.Walker 3-7, Boynton
2-8, Murphy 1-3, Beal l-4,Wilbekin 0-1).
Fouled Out-Jeune. Rebounds-North
Florida 37 (Wallace 8), Florida 45 (Beal
10). Assists-North Florida 8 (Wilson
4), Florida 18 (Boynton, Walker 5). Total
Fouls-North Florida 20, Florida 18.
A-10,013.

AUTO RACING

Ford 400 qualifying


At Homestead-Miami Speedway
Homestead Fla.
Lap length: 1. miles
(Car number in parentheses)
S I. (99) CarlEdwards, Ford, 175.467.
2. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
174.808.
3. (4) Kasey KahneToyota, 174.582.
4.'(22) KurtBusch, Dodge, 174.52.
5. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
174.492 .
6. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 174.475.
7. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
174.436.
8. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 174.109.
9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
174.098.
10. (II11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
173.969.
11. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
173.907.
12. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
173.734 .
13. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 173.678.
14. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,;
173.371. .
15. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,


173.332.-
16. (78);
173.321. '
17. (33)
173.277.
18. (9)
173.271.


Regan Smith, Chevrolet,

Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,

Marcos Ambrose, Ford,


19. (18) Kyle Busch,Toyota, 173.249.
20. (21) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 173.16.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
173.155.
22. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
173.094..
23. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,



Unscramble these four-Jumbles,
one letter.to each square,
to form four ordinary,words.

LUCTO


173.082.
24. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, I
25. (5) Mark Martin, Ch(
172.889.
26. (1) Jamie McMurray, Ch,
172.701.
27. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya,Ch,
172.656.
28. (00) David Reutimann,
172.425.
29. (84) ColeWhitt.Toyota, 17:
30. (55) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 171.991.
31. (31) Jeff Burton, Ch<
171.821.
32. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 1\
33. (66) Michael McDowell,
171.059.
34. (35) Dave Blaney, Chi
171.027. i
35. (47) Bobby Labonte,
170.881.
36. (30) David Stremme, Ch
170.881.
37. (87) Joe Nemechek,
170.578.
38. (34) David Gillilanl, Ford, I
39. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, I
40. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford,
Points.
41. (32) T.J. Bell, Ford, Owner F
42. (36) Geoffrey Bodine, Ch
Owner Points.
43. (71) Mike Bliss, Ford, 169.9%

GOLF

Presidents Cup

At Royal Melbourne Golf Club
Melbourne,Australia
UNITED STATES 13,
INTERNATIONAL 9
Saturday
Foursomes
United States 4, Internatior
Bubba Watson and Webb S
United States, def. Robert Allen
Geoff Ogilvy, International, 3 and ;
Ernie Els and Ryo Is
International, def. Bill Haas an,
Kuchar, United States, I up.
Hunter Mahan and DavidToms
States, def. Retief Goosen and
Schwartzel, International, 5 and 4.
Dustin Johnson and Tiger
United States, def. Adam Scott
Choi, International, 3 and 2.
Phil Mickelson and Jim Furyk,
States, def.Aaron Baddeley and Jas
International, 2 and I.
Fourballs
International 3, United Stal
Retief Goosen and Charl Sch
International, def. Bubba Watsi
Webb Simpson, United States, 2 al
K.T. Kim and Y.E. Yang, Intert
def. Dustin Johnson and Tiger
United States, I up.
Geofd Ogilvy and K.J.
International, def. Steve Stricker al
Kuchar, United States, I up.
Bill Haas and Hunter Mahan,
States, def.Aaron Baddeley and Jas
International, 2 and I.,
Jim Furyk and Nick Watney,
States, def. Adam Scott and Er
International, I up.

Friday
Fourballs
United States 3, Internatlo0
Bubba Watson and Webb' S
United States, def. Ernie ,Els ai
lshikawa, International, 3 and I.
Aaron Baddeley and' Jaso
International, def. Dustin Johns
Tiger Woods, United States, I up.
Phil Mickelson and Jim Furyk,
States, def. Adam Scott and K
International, 2 and I.
Geoff Ogilvy and KJ.
International, def. Bill Haas an
Watney, United States, I up.
Matt Kuchar and Steve Stricker
States, def. Y.E. Yang and Robert
International, 4 and 3.
Retief Goosen and Charl Sch
International, def. Hunter Mah
David Toms, United. States, 2 and

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Boston 2, Columbus 1, SO-
N.Y. Islanders 4' Montreal 3
Philadelphia 2, Phoenix I
Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh IY
St. Louis 4, Florida I
Nashville 4,Toronto I
Minnesota I, Colorado 0 ;
Winnipeg 4,Washlngton I
Los Angeles 5,Anaheirn 3
San Jose 5, Detroit 2
Friday's Games
Buffalo I, Carolina 0
Colorado 3, Dallas 0
Calgary 5, Chicago 2
Today's Games
Toronto at Carolina, 5 p.m.
Sai Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m.
Detroit atAnaheim, 8 p.m.
Ottawa at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD (
by David L1 Hoyt and Jeff I


(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: MOUTH WITTY AIMING PAUNCH
Answer: It was easy for him to view the constellations
because he was a NIGHT WATCHMAN


PREP ROUNDUP



Indians soccer notches win


From staff reports


Fort White High's boys
soccer team cracked the
win column with a 1-0
decision over Hamilton
County High in Jasper. on
Thursday.*
The Indians (1-3, 0-3)
host Lafayette High at 5
p.m. Monday. Fort White's


girls play at Williston High
at 6 p.m. Monday. Both
teams bring in Interlachen
High at 5 p.m. (boys) and 7
p.m. (girls) Tuesday.

Fort White basketball

Fort White's girls bas-
ketball team lost, 40-34, to
St. Francis Catholic High ip


Gainesville on Wednesday.
The junior varsity won, 30-


16.
The Lady Indians (1-1)
are off until 7 p.m. Nov.
28 when they host Baker
County High.
Fort White's boys open
the season on the road
against Newberry High at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday.







5-.,


COURTESY PHOTO

Lady Tigers golf awards

Columbia High's girls golf team celebrated a season in which the Lady Tigers placed third
in district and fifth in region with an awards banquet. Award winners are: Brandy Spranger,
Senior Tiger Award (from left); Gillian Norris, Lowest Stroke Average Freshman;
Ashley Mixon, Best Short Game; Darian Ste-Marie, Lowest Stroke Average Senior Award
and MVP; Shelby Camp, Tiger Academic Award; Brooke Russell, Most Improved.


S HC FOOTBALL


BRIEFS

VnUITH BASKETBALL


Quarterback Club Travel team

meets Monday fundraiser F


The Columbia County
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the.
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL

Quarterback Club

meeting Monday

The Fort White .,
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting is 7.p.m.
Monday in the teacher's
lounge at the high school,
For details, call club
president Shayne Morgan
at (386) 397-4954.


ACROSS
AllUnitednby, 1 More than
Allenb med.
wartel, 4 NY
an and baseballers
i. 8 Hedge shrub
11 California fort
12 Urgent
13 Previous
14 Storied
16 Typewriter
key
.17 Forever.
young,
18 Gives off light
20 Play a role
21, NNW opposite
22 Fake bullet.
25 Pianists'
spans
29 Took a gander
30 Bride's reply
(2 wds.)
31 Rescue squad
mem.
32 Foul Uip
33 It glistens
34 Malaria
symptom


FLAG FOOTBALL


Turkey bowl

riday to honor Tigers


The Lake City.
Recreation Department
and Richardson
Community Center/Annie
Mattox Park North, Inc.,
is sponsoring two benefit
basketball games
featuring women's
and men's teams from
Columbia and Suwannee
counties. The games are
6 p.m. and 7:30. p.m. Friday
at the Lake City Middle.
School gym. Admission.,
is $5 (children ages 6 and
younger free), with all
proceeds going to benefit
the boys USSSA travel
basketball teams.
For details, call Mario
Coppock at 754-7096.

Showy Answe
looms
issuee
uocalist- BASH
Sumac A 0UT
Moogoo- B E AK

;ensor AR G
Big prize M
Slow pitch A R I
glaciers
2 wds.) g G U FFA
dexicangold R I E
Mold .
Shred AN N
Ion-rusting S
netal ,
Egg layers FSO NT
-Nimitz E S 0 T
\ 11 A A S0 T A
DOWN TRE
Albright or I
lontez 7 Most
;yclist 'crafty
.eMond 8 Sasquatc
Margin cousin
Center 9 QED par
)epot info 10 Spiders'
loofer's gunk creation


The Breon Thomas
Turkey Bowl is Saturday
at Memorial Stadium. .
Former Columbia High
players from the 1990s and
2000s will field flag football
teams and play to honor
lost classmates.
Contacts for the teams
are: 1995-Ron Jernigan
(904) 924-4634;
1996-Michael Daies
.(678) 595-6769; 1997-
Terrence Harrell (386)
438-7833; 1998-Jarvis.
Byrd, Theis Rossin (386)
288-9858; 2000-Rodney
Johnson (386) 675-3383;
2001-Jerome Carter.

From staff reports

er to Previous Puzzle


CB EAVE
ORE E YES
MAY POL ES
STOE APEN
MOMENTS





AMOR AMT



I. U
___


ch

t

is


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


12 Sweater style
(hyph.)
15 Veld grazer
19 Drop -
line
21 Trash hauler
22 Go off, as an
alarm
23 Early harp
24 Prefix for
dynamic
25 Byron's
works
26 Former Chevy
model
27 Aussie birds
28 Flower
support
30 Concept
34 Take -!
36 PBS "Science
Guy"
37 Bratty
38 Stockpile
40 Pants
41 Fix, as lipstick
42 Petty of
"Tank Girl"
43 Deep black
44 Billie King
45 Amazon
source
46 Elevator
pioneer
47 Cookbook
amts.
50 Amigo of
Fidel


11-21 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


La


I





LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 3B


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


Tigers advance


JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's Braxton Stockton leaps over a group of players for a first down against St. Augustine on Friday.


By BRANDON FINLEY 11 yards out The drive's
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com biggest play came on third-
and-10 with Barber find-
ST. AUGUSTINE It ing Braxton Stockton on
wasn't always pretty as a screen pass for 23 yards
Columbia High used a and a first down.
grind-it-out style to upset The blocked field goal
St. Augustine High and came on Columbia's
advance to the second next drive when Hayden
round of.the class 6A play- Lunde's 32-yard attempt
offs, 24-9, on Friday. was blocked. He would get
Columbia trailed 9-7 a chance at redemption
at the half before coach later in the game.
Brian Allen's key to victory St Augustine reassumed
started taking form for the the lead with an 11-play
Tigers. drive capped by a fullback
Allen had talked all week dive by Matt Marabito from
about needing to win the a yard away. Saridon Mims
turnover battle to have a set up the touchdown with
chance to take the sting out a couple of good passes
of the Yellow Jackets. including a 34-yard catch
Heading into the half, by Phillip Worthington. *
the margin was at 0-0, but The second half began
Columbia had a field goal with a Barber intercep-
blocked from 32 yards to tion thrown deep. in St.
take points off the board. Augustine's territory.
"I told them bend, but "It, was almost like a
don't break," Allen said. punt," Allen said.
"They had never seen a But following Barber's
second half of football like interception, the Tigers
we were going 'to give started to respond.
them. It was 9-7, but we Ben Kuykendall had
hadn't played our best I an interception after the
told them that we averaged Yellow Jackets looked 'to
three turnover a game, but be driving for a score.
hadn't got one yet We just Kuykendall fumbled after
needed to go get one." the interception but was
Columbia ended the able to get it back in a
game by forcing three turn- scrum. i
overs in the second half. The Columbia offense
The Tigers fell behind would make use of the
early when Drew Clukey turnover driving the field
hit a 42-yard field goal on for a 73-yard scoring drive.
the Yellow Jackets' first Barber used nine plays to
drive, lead the troops on a drive
Columbia answered on that included a 22-yard
its first drive with an 11- pass to Nate Ayers early
play, 80 yard march thatwas and a 24-yard sluggo route
capped by Jayce Barber's for a touchdown to cap the
pass to Shaq Johnson from drive. It gave Columbia a


14-9 lead with 2:03 remain-
ing in the third quarter.
"Nate is averaging 28.3
yards per reception this
season," Allen said. "He
got the corner to bite on
the inside and stuck it back
out. It was a big score."
After receiving the ball at
their own 32 in the fourth
quarter, the Yellow Jackets
decided to go for it on
fourth down near midfield.
Mardito was met by a host
of Columbia defenders on a
fourth-and-one attempt and
Columbia took over on its
own 47-yard line.
Faced with a fourth-
and-four look of their own,
Columbia decided to take
a gamble with the special
teams. After lining up, the
Tigers saw something on
the left side, of the Yellow
Jackets formation and the
signal came from coach
Andy Giddens on the side-
line to go with the fake.
Trey Marshall made the
most of it and ran 27 yards
for the first down.
"We tried to set it up
earlier," Allen said. 'Trey
is the fasted kid on our
team and it worked out for
big yardage. It was per-
fect. Without that, we don't
. score."
The fake resulted in
Lunde's attempt at redemp-
tion. The kicker split the
uprights for a 47-yard field
goal.
"I'm extremely proud
of him," Allen said. 'Two
weeks ago, I called him to
the side and told him not
worry about everything.
He's my senior kicker and


I'm not going to pull him.
He missed some, but he
made it when it counted
the most."
From there, Columbia's
defense took over.
D'evonta6 Levy picked off
a Mims' pass and ran it 32
yards for a touchdown on
the Yellow Jackets' follow-
ing drive to give Columbia
the 24-9 final.
For extra measure,
Solomon Bell picked off a
Mims' pass on the next
possession and the Tigers
took knees to end the
game.
Stockton ended the game
with 106 yards rushing on
23 carries. Barber had 91
yards and two touchdowns
on 6-of-12 passing.
Now, the Tigers return
home to host Bartram Trail
in the second round of the
playoffs. Allen is hoping
the crowd can fill the sta-
dium.
"The fans are excited,"
Allen said. "Sometimes
when I looked at the visit-
ing stands it almost looked
like we had more guys than,
St. Augustine. The com-
munity is behind us. Next
week, we want to pack the
stadium for, round two of
the playoffs."
Columbia will host
Bartramn Trail at 7:30 p.m.
on Friday.,
Reserved tickets will go
on -sale at McDuffie's at
noon on Monday. Reserved
tickets are $9. General
admission tickets are $8.
General admission tickets
can also be purchased at
CHS.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida wide receiver Andre Debose (4) catches a 64-yard
touchdown pass over the head of Furman University's
Derrick Murray (28) Saturday at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in
Gainesville. Florida defeated Furman 54-32.



Florida starts


slow, beats


Furman 54-32


Associated Press

GAINESVILLE--Florida
allowed a season-high 22
points in the first quar-
ter before storming back
behind a career-best four
touchdown passes from
John Brantley to secure a
54-32 win over Furman on
Saturday.
The win by the Gators
(6-5) made them bowl eli-
gible to participate in their
21st consecutive post-sea-
son game.
The win was tougher than
expected over the Paladins,
a Football Championship
Subdivision team. Furman
(6-5) stunned Florida on its
first series, gaining at least
17 yards on three of its first
four' plays. That led to. a
1-yard touchdown run by
Jerodis Williams at the 8:31
mark.
Furman added a safe-
ty on Florida's next play
when the center snap sailed
over Brantley's head into
the end zone for a safety.
The Paladins stayed on the
attack by scoring touch-
downs on its next two pos-
sessions as well to open up
a 22-7 advantage after one
quarter before Florida ral-
lied to win.
Florida answered with
three*second-quarter touch-
down to take the lead for
good. After fullback Hunter


Joyner scored on a 1-yard
dive, Brantley threw for two
of his career-high four TD
passes.

Miami 6,
South Florida 3
TAMPA-JakeWie6law's
second field goal of the
game, a 36-yarder as time
expired, gave Miami a 6-3
victory over South Florida
and made the Hurricanes
bowl eligible on Saturday.
Wieclaw finished a clutch
drive that- quarterback
Jacory Harris kept alike
with a couple of crucial
third-down conversions.
Wieclaw calmly sent the
winning kick through the
uprights after USF (5-5)
used a pair of timeouts to
try to rattle the nerves of
the junior, who earlier had
missed on a 41-yard attempt
that was tipped by the Bull,'
Ryne Giddins. .
Harris threw for 259 yard .
but was sacked six times.
USF played most of the sec-.
ond half without quarterback
B.J. Daniels, who left in the
third quarter with an appar-
ent shoulder injury.

FSU vs. Virginia
For results on the
Florida State and
Virginia game check
www.lakecityreportercom


Indians advance with 21


-14 win:


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter. com

ORLANDO The
Indians went from having
their foot on the throat of
The First Academy to feel-
ing hands around their own.
neck.'
Fort White High turned
back a first-and-goal. pos-
session by the Royals late in
the game for a 21-14 win in
the Class 3A regional semi-
final in Orlando on Friday.
Fort White (8-3) will get
a rematch against Trinity
Catholic High, which beat
Melbourne Central Catholic
High, 45-21, on the other
side of the mini-bracket.
The game is 7:30 p.m. this
Friday in Ocala.
First Academy's final
chance began when Lloyd
Hylton blocked a punt and
gave the Royals the ball
at the Indians 32. First
Academy had already used
its time outs, but picked up
a couple of first downs. The
first-and-goal series got as
close as the 1-yard line with
two downs left.
One of the lineman
jumped the gun the only
penalty of the night for First
Academy (8-3) to move
the ball back to the 6. After
an incompletion in the end
zone, Jonathan Dupree
broke through to sack


quarterback Curt Cramer
.on fourth down.
"I have been waiting tc
use that move," Dupree
said about getting by the
blocker. "I stepped in and
went for him."
First Academy's resur-
gence came after Andrew
Baker's third touchdown
pass, and second to A.J.
Legree, gave the Indians a
21-7, lead with 9:44 left in
the game.
The Royals misplayed
the following kickoff and
started at their 2. They
got it out to the 36 when
Legree made his second
interception of the game.
He returned it 18 yards to
the Royals 27.
Fort White ran a few
clock-eating plays and gave
the ball back at the 25. On
first down, Cramer threw a
screen pass to Hylton and
he turned it into a 75-yard
touchdown.
Fort White set the tone
with a couple of 80-yard
drives in the first half.
The first came on, the
opening possession when,
on the 12th play of the drive,
Baker threw an 11-yard
touchdown pass to Soron
Williams on fourth-and-6.
First Academy answered
with a 73-yard scoring
march, capped by Hylton's
26-yard touchdown run..


The Indians then over-
came a blocked punt, a long-
punt return and a 40-yard
field goal try, before starting
the second scoring drive.
Wesley Pitts was a factor
in both drives. He caught a
27-yard pass in the first and
converted a second-and-18
with a 30-yard catch and
run in the second. Pitts also
had a sack late in the half


to make the Royals' second
field goal try from 42 yards
and they missed it
"It feltgood," said Pitts,
whost three catches were
a season high. "Normally I
am just blocking, and it was
nice to get the ball."
Baker threw to Legree
for the touchdown and he
snatched the ball away from
the defender for a 32-yard


play.
Legree also had a diving
catch good for 43 yards orithe
final scoring drive to go with
his two touchdown catches
and two interceptions. The
first came in the end zone
when First Academy had a
first-and-goal at the 3 and a
touchdown would have tied
the game.
First Academy's best


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A Santa Fe High defender goes high in an attempt to block a kick by Fort White High's
Colton Jones (17) on Nov. 11.


skill player, Ben DeLuzio,
missed the gamd after suf-
fering a ruptured spleen in'
the final game of the regu-
lar season.
Hylton did all he could to,
pick up the slack. He rushed
11 times for 108 yards and
caught two passes for 85
yards. He scored both of
the Royals' touchdowns and
blocked two punts.
FirstAcademy 7 0 0 7 14 -
FortWhite 7 7 0 7 21
First Quarter
FW-S. Williams II pass from Baker
(Jones kick), 5:39
FA-Hylton 26 run (Scheer kick), 1:20
Second Quarter
FW--Legree 32 pass from Baker
()ones kick), 2:33
Fourth Quarter
FW-Legree 10 pass from Baker
(Jones kick), 9:44
FA-Hylton 75 pass from Cramer
(Scheer kick), 3:26
FortWhite FirstAcademy
First downs 9 I
Rushes-yards 31-86 39-141
Passing 194 123
Comp-Att-Int 11-19-0 7-17-2
'Punts-Avg. 2-37 2-31.5
Fumbles-Lost 3-2 0-0
Penalties-Yards 7-58 1-5
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, S. Williams
19-56, Baker 6-19, Phillips 2-8, Cormier
2-2, T.Williams 2-1. First Academy, Hylton
1 1-108, Plante I 1-22, Walko 3-8, Settles
6-4, Cramer 8-(- I).
PASSING-Fort White, Baker 11-19-
194-0. First Academy, Cramer 7-17-123-2.
RECEIVING-Fort White, Legree
5-103, Pitts 3-66, S.Williams 2-17, Phillips
1-8. First Academy, Hylton 2-85, Magee 2-
12, Settles 1-14, Mathis 1-7,Williams 1-5.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@takecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


Sunday, November 20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Hired



for the holidays




Local stores bringing

in extra employees

for the seasonal rush


FILE PHOTO
Creasie Miller (left) and Jessica, Smith look at a Galian hand purse last year at Southern Exposure
Boutique & Salon while shopping for Christmas gifts.


By GORDON JACKSON
glackson@lakecityreporter.com
I f you're thinking about applying for
Sa part time job. for the Christmas
holiday shopping season, it's
probably too late.
Local employers say they-
have' already done their hiring to
give them time to train newstaff a
for the rigors they will face during
the busiest time of year.
Will Batte, manager of the Belk
store in Lake City, said his busi-
ness has already hired three new
Employees and will likely add two
more before Black Friday, the busi-
est shopping day of the year.,
Batte said his store will hire at least
one more person than last year in antici-
pation of it being a good shopping season.
'"We truly expect Black Friday and the
holiday month shopping season to be five
to 10 percent better than last year," he


said. "With gas prices the way they are,,
if they can get it in Lake City they'll shop
here."
The Belk store will be especially busy
on Black Friday when the store opens
at 3 a.m. The big incentive for early

'We truly expect Black Frid
.nd the holiday month shopF
season to be five to 10 perce
better than last year.'
Will Batte, manager of the Belk store in Lake,'

shoppers is the first 250 people to walk
through the doors will ket an unmarked
envelope containing a gift card valued
from $5 to $100.
But one lucky early customer will be
especially happy. Every Belk store in the
nation is giving one $1,000 gift card as,


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part of the promotion..
Local employers said they hired
seasonal employees from applications
throughout the year, rather than going to
a temporary employment agency.
Batte said his business is looking for
prospective employees with
prior experience or the ability
lay to learn and a willingness to be
a ,flexible
ing in work hours when they are
ant hired
for the holidays.
At the nearby Big Lots store,.
ity assistant manager Eddie Walton
City said at least five new workers
have been hired. The work
schedule f6r new employees is deter-
-mined by their job performance and the
amount of store business.
"We're the type of store that does fairly


well during the holidays." he said.,'We
expect to be busy."
Bath & Body Works manager Tammy
Cribbs said her store has hired 16 new
employees for the holidays, which is
fewer than the 30 hired last year.
Cribbs said that's not an indication
the, store expects slower sales. The new
Employees will work more hours this year
to give them the ability to interact more
* with regular customers as a way to build
store loyalty.
Workers are trained for six hours
before they deal with customers, she
said .. ,,
"You must try to get to know your
associates and what they are capable of
doing," Cribbs said. .
Even the Lake City Starbucks is hir-
ing extra staff for the holidays. Store
HIRED continued on 2C
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(What should I do if I want to
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A You're smart to look for an
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A If Scruff\'s Chicken Shack
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| I * * . .. . .2011 TiMoTE2Fooi/Disr.YUNME LU K (roRRI c 11/17/2011)


Stocks end little changed


as Europe worries ease


By Daniel Wagner and
David K. Randall
AP Business Writers
Stocks finished about
where they started Friday
as investors balanced
positive signs for the U.S.
economy with a looming
deadline for a deficit-cutting
committee -in Congress.,
Steep declines earlier in the
week left the market. with
its worst weekly loss since
September.'
The Dow Jones indus-
trial average gained 25.43
points, or 0.2 percent, to
close at 11,796.16. The Dow
traded in a relatively narrow
range, rising as many as 84
points and falling as many
as 15. Hewlett-Packard Co.
jumped. 2.6 percent, the
most of the 30 stocks in
the. index, on an analyst


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Trader. Kevin Lodewick
works on the floor of the
New York'Stock Exchange
on Friday.

economy may pick up in the
coming months. But many
investors were cautious


upgrade. as a key Congressional
The Conference Board's committee remained dead-
index of leading economic locked on ways to cut the
indicators rose more than U.S. budget deficit.
Wall Street analysts were A bipartisan panel
expecting, a sign that the must agree on making at


least '$1.2 trillion in defi-
cit cuts by Thanksgiving.
If the committee fails and
Congress takes no other'
action, automatic spending
cuts will take effect begin-
ning in 2013. Economists
worry that a deadlocked
Congress will erode busi-
ness confidence and slow
the already-fragile econo-
my.
The Standard and
Poor's 500 lost 0.48 point,
or less than 0.1 percent, to
1,215.65.
Telecommunications
and technology stocks
fell broadly. The Nasdaq
composite slid 15.49, or
0.6 percent, to 2,572.50.
Salesforce.com' plunged
10 percent after its quar-
terly results came in below
estimates.
The Dow is down 2.9
percent for the week.
Broader indexes fell even
more. The S&P 500 lost
3.8 percent,. the Nasdaq
4 percent. The market


fell sharply Wednesday
and Thursday on worries
that Europe's debt crisis
could spread and hurt U.S.
banks. ,
Encouraging econom-
ic reports this week -
including a drop in un
employment applications
and an increase in indus-
trial, production did
little to help the market
.because a European melt-
down would easily drag
down the U.S. economy,
said Kim Caughey Forrest,
equity research analyst at
Fort Pitt Capital Group.

"Our economy might be
improving, but the fixation
is on what's going to hap-
pen with the world banking
system if defaults happen
in Europe," she said. She
said investors are reluc-
tant to take big positions
because no one knows how
Europe's problems will be
resolved, or how U.S. com-
panies' future profits will
be affected.


Oil price ends week HIRED: Stores bring in help


below $98 a barrel


Associated Press
NEW YORK Oil
prices dropped below
$98 per barrel Friday
to the end a volatile
week that mixed jitters
about Europe's debt
with the prospect of
tighter oil supplies and
improving economic
conditions in the U.S.
The price of oil
ended tht week lower
than it began, despite
a surge of trading that
temporarily pushed
crude above $100 at


midweek for the first
time since July. On
Friday benchmark
crude fell $1.41 to fin-
ish at $97.41 per barrel
in New York, in light
trading ahead of the
Thanksgiving (Nov.
24) holiday week.
The sharp price fluc-
tuations in oil will ripple
through energy mar-
kets, but analysts say
the ups and downs this
week probably won't
have much effect on
retail gasoline prices.


Continued From Page 1C
manager Lynne Andres said
her store has already hired
eight new employees in antici-
pation of the Christmas rush.
While some customers go
to the store to buy gifts such
as ground or whole-bean cof-
fee, mugs and other acces-
sories, the bulk come in for
a hot jolt of caffeine to keep
them going during the hours
they spend shopping.
Andres said her store
opens at 4:30 a.m. on Black
Friday to accommodate
customers and will open for
extended hours during the
holiday shopping season.


An incentive for the part
time workers is some of them
will be hired to permanent
positions if they impress store
managers.
"We've already identified
one who is impressive enough
to keep on," Walton said.
Batte said seasonal employ-
ees should consider their part
time jobs a possible audition
to stay on after the holidays.
"We occasionally keep
some of the seasonal employ-
ees we hire," he said. "It's an
opportunity for a part time
worker to get a permanent
position."


Former American Samoa

official pleads guilty


PAGO PAGO, American
Samoa -. The sister of
American Samoa's lieuten-
ant governor has pleaded
guilty to conspiracy to steal
more than $325,000 in
AmeriCorps grant funds.
Former American
Samoa Special Services
Commission Executive
Director Mine Pase plead-
ed guilty Friday in federal
court in Washington, D.C.
The 62-year-old sister
of Lt. Gov. Faoa Aitofele
admitted she arranged
for herself, commission-
ers and others to receive.
federal grant funds for


their own benefit
The commission is an
agency of the U.S territory
that administers commu-
nity-based programs and
services including tutoring,
literacy training and coun-
seling.
The Department of
Justice says Pase and her
staff received more than
$100,000 in grant money for
official business trips they
didn't take and spent grant
funds on retreats and meals
knowing those expenses
were not authorized.
Sentencing is scheduled
for March 23.


*DANIEL CRAPPS
agency, inc.

Daniel Crapps Agency, Inc. would like to welcome
the following agents:

ROGER LOVELADY, an Army veteran,
J y has been in real estate for 30+
years. In 1983, he and his wfie
6 mpved to Lake City and their family
S- "now includes 4 grandchildren. As
Lake City and North Fla. continue to
t grow, Roger is looking forward to
assisting clients in Residential. Land
and Commercial real estate. Call
Roger at 386-365-7039 or e-mail
rogerlovelady@danielcrapps.com

MILLARG GILLEN began his real es-
tate career in 1975 in Key Biscayne,
Fla. in property management and
i quickly changed to Residential and
e Land sales. Originally from Lake City,
Millard has lived all over the State of
.. Fla. with his wife Eleni. With decades
of depth in real estate experience,
he has provided PROVEN RESULTS
for his customers. Call Millard at
386-365-7001 or e-mail Millard@
MillardGillen.com
CALL ROGER LOVELADY OR MILLARD GILLEN
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 or 1-800-771-5110


SThe Motley Fool
1, 71- A VA L f


~s~p~-~-B--~s~


I ,


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


2C












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights.


Y NYSE
17,28?.47 -293.71


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Vancelnfo 12.52 +3.63 +40.8
Jaguarg 7.70 +2.04 +36.0
Bluegreen 2.64 +.60 +29.4
GlobalCash 4.00 +.89 +28.6
Headwatrs 2.71 +.55 +25.5
AccoBrds 8.98 +1.68 +23.0
PrisaB n 4.90 +.87 +21.6
C-TrCVOL 46.72 +8.22 +21.4
ETr2xSSD 29.66 +5.16 +21.1
CSVS3xinSlv43.80+7.38 +20.3

Losers'($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
TorchEngy 2.55 -3.03 -54.3
Mentor 5.21 -3.18 -37.9
DaqoNwEn 2.00 -.83 -29.3
AMR Cp 398.99 -3.71 -29.2
MoneyG rs 16.25 -6.71 -29.2
Calnetlnfo 2.02 -.70 -25.7
JinkoSolar 5.83 -1.93 -24.9
FordM wt 2.23 -.64 -22.3
K12 26.44 -7.61 -22.3
WstnRefin' 12.51 -3.47 -21.7

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(O0) Last Chg
NTT DOC04295518717.77 -.40
BkofAm 12633969 5.78 -.43
S&P500ETF9851548121.98-4.68
SPDR Fnd4589488 12.50 -.74
iShEMkts 2937294 38.54-2.24
iShR2K 2853339 71.98-2.40
Ciigrp rs 2616312 26.28-3.05
GenBec 2457089 15.65 -.65
FordM 2352789 10.10-1.04
Pfizer 1976422 19.53 -.46

Diary
Advanced 718
Declined. 2,455
New Highs 126
New Lows 97
Total issues 3,205
Unchanged 32
Volume 18,622,605,869


Y Amex
2,240.87 -64.81


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
SynergyRs 3.59 +.79 +28.2
ImpacMtg 2.25 +.39 +21.0
Medgenicn 3.18 +.53 +20.0
NovaGldg 10.95 +1.73 +18.8
LadThalFn 2.30 +.35 +17.9
GIblScape 2.15 +.29 +15.6
AntaresP 2.61 +.29 +12.5
EstnLtCap 2.50 +.25 +11.1
CheniereEn11.70 +1.14 +10.8
RevettM rs 4.86 +.47 +10.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
ConmedH 2.69 -1.15 -29.9
Geokineftcs 2.22 -.77 -25.8
StreamGSv 2.41 -.73 -23.2
Accelr8 2.16 -.62 -22.3
QuestRM g 2.85 -.71 -19.9
Quepasa 3.89 -.91 .-19.0
KeeganRg 4.53 -1.00 -18.1
ComstTR 7.29 -1.55 -17.5
ComerstStr 8.01 -1.62 -16.8
RareEleg 1 5.55 -1.12 -16.8

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
NovaGld g 341690 10.95+1.73
CheniereEn304565 11.70+1.14
NwGoldg 186392 10.31-1.61
GrtBasGg 175572 1.19 -.23
GoldStrg 156504 2:011 -.14
Rentech 134809 1.65 +.07
AntaresP- 107592 2.61 +.29
Minefnd g 85783 11.37-2.13
TmsatlPet 83330 1.39 -.17
VantageDri 82447 1.20 -.10

Diary
Advanced 192
Declined 324
New Highs 29
New Lows 30
Total issues 530
Unchanged 14
Volume 471,538,569


. STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Weekly Dow Jones .


Wkly Wk YTD
Name Ex Div Last Chg %Chg %hg
AT&T Inc NY 1.72 28.64 -.78 -2.7 -2.5
Alcoa NY '.12 9.69 -.91 -8.6 -37.0
AutoZone NY ... 329.40 -8.26 -2.4 +20.8
BkofAm NY .04 5.78 -.43 '-6.9 -56.7
BariPVix NY ... 46.89 +3.35 +7.7 +24.7
BobEvans Nard 1.00 31.61 -2.02 -6.0 4.1
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.75 +.32 +2.2 -.4
CSXs NY .48 21.64 -.85 -3.8 +.5
Chevron NY 3.12 97.88 -8.36 -7.9 +7.3
Cisco Nasd .24 18.42 -.60 -3.2 -8.9
Citigrp rs NY .04 26.28 -3.05-10.4 -44.4
CocaCola NY 1.88 67.39 -.73 -1.1 +2.5
Coming NY .30 15.00 -.11 -0.7 -22.4
Delhaize NY 2.45 59.45 -3.53 -5.6 -19.3
Dell Inc Nasd ... 14.90 -.45 -2.9 +10.0
DrSCBrrs NY .. 31.77 +2.68 +9.2 -32.2
DirFnBrrs'NY ... 46.33 +6.34 +15.9 -1.9,
DirxSCBullNY .. 42.67 -4.49 -9.5 -41.1
FamilyDir NY .72 56.72 -2.01 -3.4 +14.1
FordM NY ... 10.10 -1.04 -9.3 -39.8
GenElec NY .60 15.65 -.65 -4.0-14.4
HomeDp NY 1.16 37.88, -.18 -0.5. +8.0
iShChina25NY .85 35.32 -2.48 -6.6 -18.0
IShEMkts NY .84 38.54 -2.24 -5.5 -19.1
iShR2K NY 1.02 71.98 -2.40 .-3.2 -80
Intel Nasd .64 24.29 -.56 -2.3 +15.5
JPMorgCh NY 1.00 30.62 -2.66 -8.0 -27.8
Lowes .NY .56 23.31 +.20 +0.9 -7.1


Wkly Wkly YTD
Name Ex DIv Last Chg %Chg %Chg


McDnlds NY 2.80
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .80
MorgStan NY .20
NTTDOCONY .63
NYTimes NY
NexlEraEnNY 2.20
NobltyH If Nasd
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
PacEthrshNasd
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShsQQQNasd .41
PrUShS&PNY
RegionsFnNY .04
Ryder NY 1.16
S P500ETNY 2.46
SearsHldgsNasd ..
SiriusXM Nasd .
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDR FndNY .20
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WallsFargo NY .48


92.74 -2.02 -2.1 +20.8
6.29 +.86 +15.8 -21.6
25.30 -1.41 -5.3 -9.4
14.21 -2.15 -13.1 -47.8
17.77 -.40 -2.2 +2.0
7.19 +.01+0.1 -26.6
55.53 -.29 -0.5 +6.8
6.63 +.43 +6.9 -18.2
94.32 -5.49 -5.5 -3.9
30.60 -1.77 -5.5 -2.2
1.27 +.40 +45.8 -74.9
31.57 -2.35 -6.9 -2.3
63.89 +.61 +1.0 -2.2
19.53 -.46 -2.3 +11.5
43.30 -3.56 -7.6 -16.1
55.40 -2.45 -4.2 +1.7
21.15 +1.52 +7.7 -11.0
4.10 -.07 -1.7 -41.4
51.14 -1.68 -3.2 -28
121.98 4.68 -3.7 -30
64.27 -10.07 -13.5 -&
1.78 +.08 +4.7 +9.2
43.20 -.74 -1.7. +13.0
2.62 -.29 -10.0 -38.1
12.50 -.74 -5.6 -21.6
33.61 -1.60 -4.5 +4.5
57.23 -1.97 -3.3 +6.1,
24.69 -.96 -3.7 -20.3'


3 Nasdaq
S2,572.50 -106.25


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Nefist 3.50 +1.58 +82.3
GIblEduc 5.37 +1.97 +57.9
ValpeyFsh 4.08 +1.46 +55.7
ChinaCEd 5.11 +1.17 +29.7
NaturlAlt 7.91 +1.66 +26.6
IntriCon 6.36 +1.17 +22.5
FSI Int 2.61 +.47 +22.0
Respnsysn 9.13 +1.62 +21.6
RDA Micro 12.06 +1.95 +19.3
ChipMOSrs 6.00 +.95 +18.8

I Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Rambus 8.41 -9.44 -52.9
PenyElis 12.54-10.21 -44.9
Telestbne 4.70 -2.90 -38.2
CarverBrs 2.99 -1.31 -30.5
CrumbsBke 3.50 -1.44 -29.1
PetionNwk 3.90 -1.35 -25.7
BonTon 2.83 -.97 -25.5
HampRBrs 2.93 -.99 -25.3
Ctip.com 25.71 -8.56 -25.0
Sky-mobion 380 -1 14 -23.1

Most Active (i1 or more)
Name Vol100) Last Chg
PwShs QC-0315604bi5540-2l45
Intel 3059173 2429 -56
SiriusXM 2873491 1 78 +08
MicronT 2715306 6 29 86
Cisco 2385185 18.42 -.60
Microsoft 2384332 25.30-1.41
PacElti rsh1489257 1.27 +.40
Dell Inc 1408157 14.90 -45
Orade 1266499 30.60-1.77
NewsCpA 1005074 16.32 -.85

Diary
Advanced 732
Declined 1,959
New Highs 80
New Lows 197
Total issues 2,754
Unchanged 63
Volume 9,019,727,438


Currencies


Last Pvs Day


Australia .9987 1.0012
Britain 1.5787 1.5758


Canada


1.0266 1.028


Euro .7398 .7426
Japan 76.97 76.95
Mexico 13.7365 13.7191
Switzerlnd .9177 .9198
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


Dow Jones Industrials -74.70 17.18 -190.57 -134.86 25.43
Close: 11,796.16
1-week change: -357.52 (-2.9%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI


12 ,500 . ................ .... .... ..- . .



12 ,0 0 0 .. ..... ... .. .. ........... .. ....... ........... .... .... ....... ..

11,000. ...........

10,500....`.............. ............ ............................. .......
M A S N


MUTUAL FUNDS
Total Assets Total Return/Rank Pot MinIn n
Name Obh ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
FIMC To~etl Cl.144140+1./E +.7/ NL ,00,00


PIMCOTotRetls Cl
Vanguard TotStldx .LB
Vanguard Instldxl LB
Fidelity Contra LG
American Funds GrthAmA ii LG
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Amerer Funds ln.I:AierA mn MA
Vanguard 500ArJmI LB
Vanguaid ToISllAarr, LB
Arr..n.:an Furnl, CrWidiGrlA m WS
Arrn,.:an Funrs InrvCuArr.A m LB
D.)1,ie Co% Irlrl,. FV
Dodje &Co Slock LV
Arnensa, Fund,. WAMutinvA m LV
Fria3r, T'p-Fr'.hi Income A ri CA
Varnguad inilPlu LB
PIMLOT OlReIlA.IrM Cl
Ainencan Funds EurPacGrA m FB
Vanguard Tolilnt d FB
As-ncan Fundis BlA m MA
Amenan Funais Fr.lnrvA m LB
Vanguard TotBdAdml Cl
American Funds NewPerspA inm WS
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
Vanguard TotStllns LB
Vanguard 5001nv LB
FrankTemp-Templeton GIBondAdv IB


.144,140
59,187
57,894
56,898
55,932
55,236
51,707
51,028
48,798
46,958
43,433
39,276
37,789
37,647-
35,355
34,636
31,685
31,624
30,912
30,776
30,605
30,350
29,209
28,910
27,914
27,754
26,811


+1.8/E
+3.2/B
+3.7/A
+2.0/C
-2.2/E
+1.2/B.
+3.9/A
+3.7/A
+3.4/B
-7.8/D
-0.5/D
-14.8/D
-2.9/E
+7.0/A
+2.6/B
+3.7/A
+1.5/E
-12.2/C
-12.6/C
+4.6/A
+0.1/D
+6.0/A
-5.5/C
+3.7/A
+3:4/B
+3.5/A
-0.7/E


+7.7/A
-0.2/B
-0.7/B
+2.4/A
-0.8/D
+1.1/C
+1.5/C
-0.7/B
. -0.1/B
-0.5/B
-1.2/C
-2.4/A
-4.4/E
-0.5/B
+2.7/C
-0.6/B
+7.5/A
-0.5/A
-2.5/
+2:1/B
+0.3/A
+6.4/B
+1.1/A
+3.2/A
-0.1/B
-0.80B
+9.9/A


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
NL 5,000,000
NL 2,500
5.75 250
5,75 250
5.75 50
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 2,500
5.75 250
4.25 1,000,
NL 200,000,000
NL 1,000,000
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
5.75 250
NL 50,000
NL 5,000,000
NL 3,000
NL 50,000


CA-Cosmere al lfca ioan,Cl 4 arieiate-Te 5Ie ucriES -Eur d. B -Fielgn L FG eBIe, m t F -Lage mowlk, S-'lF
Large Vaue, IH -Woddtilcallan, LB -L ameBleW, -LaneG-thL LV-a Vaue, MA bdaerAacftnMB 4WdCep BeW.,
MC Value, SH ea WS orld Soci., Total Rbetm:Cin"nhAV" vi dividends rnvesled. Rankc Ho performed
otherwithsaimeobjecve:Aisintop 20% in bottorn 20%.Min t Invt inmn$ needed to invest I r. Source:a Moirngr.


New York Stock Exchange


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name DIv Yid PE Chg %Chg Last


AESCorp ... ...
AFLAC 1.32 3.1
AK Stdel .20 2.4
AMR ... .
AT&TInc 1.72 6.0
AbtLab 1.92 3.6
AberFic .70 1.5
SAMD ... ...
Aetna .60 1.5
Agilent
AlcatelLuc .
Alcoa .12- 1.2
Allstate .84 3:2
AlphaNAs .. ...
Altria 1.64 5.9
AMovilLs .28 1.2
AEagleOut .44 3.2
AEP 1.88 4.9
AmExp .72 1.5
A tlntlGrp ... ....
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev 1.00 2.8
Annaly 2.51 15.5
ArcelorMit .75 4.3
ArchCoal .44 .0
ArchDan. .70 2.4
AssuredG, .18 1.8
-.ATMOS "1.38 3.9
Avon .92 5.5
BB&T Cp ..64 2.8
BHP BilILt 2.02 2.8
BakrHu .60 1.1
BcoBrades .80 4.9
SBcoSantSA .84 11.3
BcoSBrasil 1.65 22.0*
BkofAm .04 .7
BkNYMel .52 .2.7
Barclay .36 3.4
Bar iPVix ...
BarrickG '.60 1.2
Baxter 1.34 2.7
BerkH B ..:
BestBuy .64 2.4
BioMedR- .80 4.5
Boeing 1.68 2.5
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32. 4.3
CBREGrp ... ...
CBSB .40 1.6
CFInds ,1.60 1.1
CSXs' .48 2.2
CVREngy ...
CVS Care .50 1.3
CdnNRsgs .36 ...
CapOne .20 .5
CapitlSrce .04 .6
Carnival 1.00 3.1
Caterpillar 1.84 2.0
Cemex ...
CenterPnt .79 4.1
Cntryljnk 2.90 7.8
ChesEng .35 1.4
CJievron 3.12 3.2
Chimera .57 21.2
Cigna .04, .1
Citigrpmis .04 .2
CitigpwtA .
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.7
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
Comerica .40 1.6
CompSci .80' 3.2
ConAgra .96 4.0
ConocPhil 2.64. 3.8
ConsolEngy.40 1.0
ConEd 2.40 4.1
ConstellEn .96 2.4
CooperCo .06 .1
Coming .30 2.0
Covidien .90 2.0


14 -.03 -3.5 11.75
9 -2.56 -25.6 41.98
-.63 -48.6 8.41
-.45 -76.9 1.80
15 -.78 -2.5 28.64
18 -1.01 +11.7 53.52
18 -9.50 -17.9 47.30
4 -.48 -33.il 5.47
8 -1.67 +30.1 39.69
13 -.65 -11.2 36.81
... -.09 -35.8 1.90
10 -.91 ,-37.0 9.69
38 -.66 -18.5 25.98
-52 -4.16 -63.0 22.23
17 -.14 +12.3 27.64
11 -1.56 -15.4 24.25
.16 -.16 -7.0 13.60
10 -.96 +7.2 38.56
12 -3.49 +9.2 46.80
1 -1.97 -54.7 21.88
.. -4.02 +.7 76.70
12 -1.56 -6.3 35.30'
8 -.15 -9.9 16.15
9 -1.72 -53.9 17.57
13 -2.09 -57.6 14.87
9 -.61 -3.9 28.90
20 -1.38 -43.5 10.00
15 -.40 +12.0 34.95
10 -1.39 -42.1 16.84
14 -.90 -13.7 22.68
... -5.94 -22.6 71.92
14 -4.15 -5.5 54.05
-1.24 -18.7 16:49
... -.47 -30.0 7.45
... -1.08 -44.9 7.49
.. -.43 -56.7 5.78
9 -2.59 -37.4 18.92
... -.92 -36.3 10.52
... +3.35 +24.7 46.89
11- -4.33 -8.2. 48.84
13 -4.94 -.4 50.42
16 -1.60 -5.9 75.37
9 -1.03 -21.1 27.06
... -.90 -4.2 17.86
13 +.54 +3.4 67.46
15 -.48 -28.4 5.42
16 -.98 +16.4 30.81
18 -1.21 -26.2 15.11
14 -1,47 +30.1 24.78
8-20.94 +12.2 151.68
13 -.85 +.5 21.64
6 -4.84 +18.2 17.95
15 -1.08 +9.7 38.16
... -1.19 -18.8 36.05
6 -3.33 -2.2 41.64
32 -.04 -13.2 6.16
.13 -1.25 -30.1 32.22
14 -2.20 +.3 93.93
.. -.36 -58.5 4.27
15 -.24 +23.2 19.36
17 -.58 -19. 37.25-
7 -2.12 -6.1 24.33
7 -8.36 +7.3 97.88
5 +.08 -34.5 .2.69
9 -1.68 +14.8 L42.09
7 -3.05 -44.41 .26.28
... -.03 -58.4 .40
5 -1.97 -13.5 67.46
12 -.73 +2.5 67.39
12 -1.57 -41.1 24.90
... -1.27 -49.2 25.21
14 -.49 +7.5 24.28
9 -2.87 +1.7 69.27
14 -4.62 -21.5 38.27-
16 -.90 +17.3 58.14
17 -1.20 +29.4 39.65
17 -8.76 +3.4 58.25
7 -.11 -22.4 15.00
12 -1.98 -.1 45.61


Name DIv Yld
CSVS2xVxS... ...
CSVelIVSt s.... .
CredSuiss 1.40 6.3
DRHorton .15 13.
DTE 2.35 4.6
DanaHIdg ......
DeanFds ...
Deere 1.64 2.2
DelphiAun ...
DeltaAir ... ...
DenburyR ...
DevonE ,.68 1:1
DFnBull rs.
Dr8CBr rs ..
DirFnBrs ...
DrxEnBear ...
DirxSCBull ...
DirxEnBull
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 1.1
DomRescs 1.97 3.9
DowChm 1.00 3.9
DukeEngy 1.00 5.0
ECDangn ...
EMCCp ...
Eatons 1.36 3.1!
EIPasoCp .04 .2
EmersonEl 1.60 3.2
EnCariag .80 4.1
ExcoRes .16 1.5
Exelon 2.10 4.8
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.4
FMC Tch s ...
FstHorizon .04 .5
FirstEngy, 2.20 5.0
FootLockr .66 2.9
FordM ... ...
FordM wt ...
ForestOil s.
FMCGs 1.00 2.7
FrontierCm .75 14.2
Gafisa SA .29 5.1
GameStop .:.
Gap .45 2.4
GenGrPrp .40 2.9.
GenMills 1.22 3.2
GenMotors ..
GenOnEn ...
Genworth.
Gerdau .20 2.5
GoldFLtd .24 1.5
Goldcrp g .41 .8
GoldmanS 1.40 1.5
Goodyear.
Hallibrtn .36 1.0
HartfdFn .40 2.3
HItMgmt
HeclaM .02 ..
Hertz ... .
Hess .40 .7
HewlettP .48 1.7
HollyFrt s .40 1.6
'HomeDp 1.16 3.1
Honwillntl 1.49 2.8
HostHotIs .16 1.2
ING
iShGold
iShBraz 3.42 5.8
iShGer .67 3.4
iSh HK .42 2.7
iShJapn .17 1.9
iSTaiwn' .29 ..
iShSilvpr ....
iShChina25 .85 2.4
iSSP500 2.45 2.0
iShEMkts .84 2.2
iShB20T 3.92 3.3
iS Eafe 1.68 3.4
iShR2K 1.02 1.4


Wlly YTD Wlly.
PE Chg %Chg Last
... +6.00 -9.6 58.50
... -.44 -56.8 5.17
... -2.67 -44.7 22.36
49 -.21 -5.7 11.25
12 -1.05 +13.0 51.21
28 -1.76 -28.1 12.37-
... -.46 +10.0 9.72
12 -1.52 -10.6 74.27
-1.5 21i00
10 -.59 -41.6 ",.:7.36
12 -1.44 -16.9 '15.87
6 -4.75 -18.8 63.72
..-10.15 -58.0 58.49
... +2.68 -32.2 31.77
+6.34 -1.9 46.33
+1.68 -41.2 13.25
-4.49 -41.1 42.67
... -7.75 -23.5 44.70
6 -1.74 +24.3 23.03
14 -1.07 -5.0 35.63
'18 -1.02 +19.5 "51.04
11 -2.24 -24,0 25.95
16 -.58'+13.3 20.17
... -.49 .-81.4 5.03
23 -1.57 +.7 23.07
12 -1.72 -13.5 43.92,
... +.01 +80.2 24.80
15 -1.65 -13.0 49.71
35 -.87 -33.2 19.45
... -1.89 -44.3 10.81
12 -1.38 +4.9 43.68
9 -1.82 +8.5 77.90
31 +1.10 +9.9 48.84
30 -.06 -37.9 7.31
14 -1.17 +19.6 44.28
13 -.84 +14.1 22.38
5 -1.04 -39.8 10.10
... -.64 -72.6 2.23
14 -.66 -46.2 14.70
6 -2.92 -38.5 36.94
35 -.39 -45.5 5.30
... -1.58 -60.6 5.73
8 -2.71 -1.8 22.46
11 -1.57 -14.9 18476
... -.76 -11.5 13.70
15 -1.01 +8.3 38.55
5 -.83 -41.2 21.68
+.03 -27.0 2.78
-.86 -53.7 6.09
-1.00 -42.5 8.04
2 -1.71 -11.9 15.97
20 -3.37 +9.9 50.54
14 -9.75 -45.3 91.91
28 -1.17 +7.7, 12.76
13 -2.63 -11:9 35.96
7 -.32 -34.8 17.27
11 -.80:. -12.6 8.34
15 -.71 -47.0 5.97
13 -1.04 -25.1 10.85
11 -5.36 -22.0 59.73
7 +.41 -33.5 27.99
5 -4.09 +19.6 24.38
16 -.18 +8.0 37.88
14 -1.66 -.8 52.75
... -.31 -22.8 13.79'
-.90 -26.7 .7.18
-.62 +21.0 16.82.
...-2.71 -23.7 59.05
...-1.28 -17.9 19.65
.. '-.68 -18.2 15.47
... -.16 -16.0 9.16
-.47 -20.9 12.35
... -2.34 +4.0 31.40
-2.48 -18.0 35.32
'.. -4.76 -3.1 122.34
... -2.24 -19.1 38.54
... +3.69 +26.8 119.34
... -2.40 -15.1 49.40
... -2.40 -8.0 71.98


SO MUCH PLANNING


GOES INTO RETIREMENT.

HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT TAXES AS WELL?

It's likely that your rctiremernt income may come rfrrm
Inn11111 .~uiri',. M iih r.S.%'i.l Security, pienion distributions.
a 40 1(k) or IRA n ithdlra al-. That's why, if taxes are a
concern for yin.it int iortant to daoose the right investments
hIr %1ur 1irllhilio. At Edward Jones, we have rmnI uiiltiIn
tha ran gic ouu niorr ,riinIrol over your taxes, so ou can
enjoy aimi tii'vr smirkedil hard to achieve.
da.ardil jnis. It: eriL iioyee an ninijr rln I r ,..r,.,ii.r,A pi.,.,le t a.l r, 1 1 is.ld
:ortuii t sth a q.jlal. led i ,spt.o ,ils or prue i rnalr l .ir .. ,s r ip 'Ji .jI ,h t .

Call today to see how our unique, face-to-face approach
makes us best-suited to help long-term investors meet their
current needs and future financial goals.
Steve Jones, CFP
Financial Advisor
2929 West U S Highway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386752-3847 www.edwardjones.com MemWersipc



f ,^^ ^^


Name


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div YId PE .Ch %Chg Last


iShREst 2.18 4.0
ITW 1.44 3.2
IngerRd .48 1.5'
IBM 3.00 1.6
IntlGame .24 1.4
IntPap 1.05 3.7
Interpublic .24 .7
Invesco :.49 2.5
ItauUnibH .84 4.9
IvanhMg 1.48
JPMorgCh 1.00: 3:3
Jabil .32 1.6
Jaguarg ....
JanusCap ..20 3.3
Jefferies .30 3.0
JohnJn 2.28 3.6
JohnsnCtI .72 2.4
JnprNtwk ... ...
KBHome .25 3.5
KeyEngy ...
Keycorp .12 1.7
Kimco .76 4.8
Kinross g .12 .9
KodiakO g ... .
Kraft 1.16 3.3
LSI Corp ... ...
LVSands ..
LennarA .16 .9
UllyEli 1.96 5.3
Umited .80 2.0
UncNat .32 1.6
UoydBkg- .. .


...-1.78
11 -1.99
... -21
14 -2.14
18 -.65
9 -:60
11 -.62
10 -.82
... -1.28
-1.42
7 -2.66
12 -.59
... +2.04
6, -.33
7 -1.07
16 -1.40
13 -2.09
24 -2.32
... -.38
10 -.48
7 -.39
72 -.54
17, -1.43
37 +.04
19 *-.80
11 -.28
26 -1.10
37 -.44
8 -.96
15 -3.08
6 -.77
... -.25


-2.5 54.57
-15.8 44.94
-33.7 31.20
+26.2 185.24
-5.5 16.71
+2.9 28.02
-15.6 8.96.
-19.4 19.39
-28.9. 16.99
-16.5. 19.14
-27.8 30.62
+1.1 20.32
+8.0 7.70
-53.1 6.08
-61.8 10.16
+3.2 63.85
-22.1 29.76
-38.9 22.56
-46.5 7.22
+8.9 14.14
-20.0 7.08
-12.6 15.76
-32.3 12.83'
+17.4 7.75
+10.3 34.77
-5.5 5.66
-1.5 45.27
-5.8 17.67
+5.3 36.89
+33.0 40.86
-30.1 19.45
-61.6 1.58


Wkly YTD Wkly
-Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
LyonBasA 1.00 2.9 ... -1.55 +.4. 34.53
MEMC ... ...-.. .45 -61.4 4.35.
MGIC ... ... ... -.11 -72.2 2.83
MGMRsts ... ...... -.49 -33.9. 9.81
Macys :40 1.3 11 -.78 +20.0 30.36
MagHRes ... ... ... -.31 -38.6 4.42
Manitowoc .08- .7 ... -.99 -17.1 10.87
ManpwrGp .80 2.3 ... -3.19 -43.8 35.30
Manulife g .52 -.91 -35.9 11.02
MarathnOs .60 2.3 6 -2.05 +16.2 26.13
MarathP n 1.00 3.0 ... -4.70 -15.8 32.82
MktVGold .40 .7 ... -5.25 -7.2 57.06
MktVRus .18 .6 ... -1.31 -22.7 29.29
MarlntA .40 1.3 61, -.70 -25.6 30.92
MarshM .88 3.0 17 -1.78 +6.9 29.24
Masco .30 3.3 ... -.54 -28.8 9.01
McDrmInt ... ... 14 -.69 -46.1 11.16
McMoRn ... ...... +.32 -14.5 14.65
Mechel -".. -2.32 -65.0 10.23
MedcoHIth ... ...16 -2.16 -9.8 55.28
Medicis .32 1.0 17 -4.10 +18.9 31.84
Medtmic .97 2.9 12 -1.16 -8.5 33.94
Merck 1.68 4.8 12 -1.02 -3.0 34.95
Mertor ... ... 8 -3.18 -74.6 5.21
MetUfe .74 2.4 8 -2.45 -31.1 30.62
MelroPCS ... ... 13 -.77 -36.2 8.06
Molycorp ... ... 29 -5.09 -43.2 28.36
Monsanto 1.20 1.7 24' -3.71 +2.5 71.39
MonstrWw ... ... 34 -1.13 -67.1 7.77
Moodys .56 1.7 13 -2.09 +23.6 32.80
MorgStan .20 1.4 8 -2.15 -47.8 14.21
Mosaic .20 .4 10 -4.92 -30.8 52.86


Name Div
MotdaMo n ...
NCR Corp :.
NTTDOCO0.63
Nabors
NatGrld 2.92
NOilVarco .48
NYCmtyB 1.00
NewellRub .32
NewmtM 1.40
NextEraEn 2.20
NiSource .92
NobleCorp .55
NokiaCp .55
NorflkSo 1.72
OcciPet 1.84
Och-Ziff 1.07
OfficeDpt ..
OilSvHT 1.82
PG&ECp 1.82
PNC 1.40
PPLCorp 1.40
PatdotCoal ...
PeabdyE .34
Penney .80
PepsiCo 2.06
PetrbrsA 1.34
Petrobras 1.26
Pfizer .80
PhilipMor 3.08
PlainsEx
Potash s .28
PS USDBull...
PdnFncl .70
ProLogis 1.12
ProShtS&P ...
PrUShS&P ...
*ProUltQQQ ...
PrUShQQQ rs...
ProUltSP .31
ProUShl20 ...
ProUSSP500...
PrUltSP500 s.03
ProUSSIv rs...
ProUShEuro...
ProgsvCp 1.40"
ProUSR2K rs...
Prudent 1.45
PSEG 1.37
PulteGrp
QuantaSvc
QksilvRes ...
RadianGrp .01
Raytheon 1.72
RegionsFn .04
Renren n ...
RepubSvc .88
ReynAmer 2,24
RioTinto 1.17
RiteAid
SLMCp .40
SpdrDJIA 3.16
SpdrGold ...
S&P500ETF2.41
SpdrHome .31
SpdrS&PBk .26
SpdrLehHY4.23
SpdrRetl .49
SpdrOGEx .50
SpdrMetM .42
Safeway .58
StJude .84
Saks
Salesforce ...
SandRdge
SaraLee .46
Schlmbrg 1.00
Schwab *24
SemiHTr 2.15
SiderurNac .81


YId


Wkly YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last


.. ... -.29 +33.2 38.76
.. 11 -1:48 +11.2 17.09
3.5 ... -.40 +2.0 17.77
.19 -1.98 -20. 18.59'
5.7 ... +.29 +14.4 50.79
.7 15 -3.55 +.4 67.50
8.4' 10 -.30 -36.7 11.93
2.1 34 -1.05 -16.7 15.15
2.1 15 -5.03 +6.6 65.48
4.0 14 -.29 +6.8 55.53
4.2 20 -.47 +24.9 22.00
1.6 26 -2.52 -2.0 35.07
8.4 ... -.24 -36.9 6.51
2.3 15 -2,40 +16.7 73.29
2.0 13 .-549 -3.9 94.32
135 ... -1.50 -49.2 7.91
... ... -.21 -57.2 2.31
1.0 ... -8.26 '-12.8 122.60
4.7 15 -1.34 -18.5 39.00
2.7 8 -1.18 -13.2,'52.69
4.7 11 -.71 +12.2 29.53
... ... -1.53 -51.8 9.34
.9 11 -4.37 -43.6 36.06
2.5 19 -2.35 -2.3 '31.57
3.2 16 +.61 -2.2 63.89
5.4 ... -.65 -27.7 24.72
4.7 ... -.60 -29.6 26.65
4.1 12 -.46' +11.5 19.53
4.2 15 +1.45 +24.9 73.09
... 56 -2.21 +4.6 33.61
.6 13 -3.56 -16.1 43.30
... 4. +.32 -3.1 22.01
2.9 8 -.27 -27.1 23.75
4.1 ... -.94 -13.2 27.54
...., +1.55 -3.8 42.19
...... +1.52 -11.0 21.15
...... -7.29 -1.4 80.26
4 +3.71 -18.9 47;15
.7 ... -3.46 -9.3 43.56
...... -1.25 -48.3 19.16
... +1.61 -21.4 15.25
.1 ... -6.89 '-19.2 55.18
.: ...+1.63 -67.4 12.81
+.62 -7.8 18.72
2.2 11 -1.05 -6.5 18.58
...... +2.53 -14.7 42.85
3.0 6 -4.07 -17.3 48.53
4.2 12 -1.34 +2.8 32.69
... ... -.29 -27.3 5.47
40 +.20 -2.8 19.36
... 4. +.27 -44.9 8.12
.4 ... -.21 -71.0 2.34
3.9 8-1.54 -4.3 44.00
1.J 24 -.07 -41.4 4.10
...... -.68 -76.2 4.28
3.3 15 -.96 -10.4 26.76
5.6 17 +1.21 +23.0 40.11
2.3 ... -3.85 -28.0 51.63
...... -.16 +32.5 1.17
3.1 14 -1.13 +3.8 13.07
2.7 ... -3.51 +1.8 117.73
...... -6.34 +20.8 167.62
S2.0 ... -4.68 -3.0 121.98
1.9 ... -.50 -8.1 15.99
1.4 ... -.83 -27.2 18.86
10.4 ... -.80 -5.2 37.66
1.0 ... -2.23 +6.2 51.34
.9 ... -3.28 ... 52.75
.8 ... -3.81 -25.4 51.33
3.0 11 -.95 -15.0 19.12
2.3 12 -3.22 -14.5 36.53
.. 22 -1,03 -14.5 9.15
....-16.44 -14.1 113.43
S11 -.14 -2.6 7.13
2.5 13 -.61 +,.6 18.14
1.4 21 -5.22 -14.6 71.32
2.1 17 -1.10 -34.2 11.26
2.1 ...-1.53 .-6.3 30.48
9.2 ... -.68 -47.2 8.81


Name DIv YId PE
SilvWhtng .18 .6 22-
SouthnCo 1.89' 4.4 18
SwstAirt .02 .3 36
SwstnEngy ...... 21-
SpectreEn 1.12 3.9 16
SprintNex ... ... ...
SP Mats .82 2.5 ... -
SPHIthC .64 1.9 ... -
SP CnSt .85 2.7 ...
SP Consurm.61 1.6 -
SPEngy 1.08 1.6 ... -
SPDR Fncl .20 1.6 ..
SPInds .69 2.1 .., -
SPTech .36 1.4
SP Uil 1.36 3.9 ...
StateStr. .72 1.9 12 -
Suncorgs .44 ... 10 -
SunTrst .20 1.1 18 -
Supvalu .35 4.3 68
,Synovus .04 .2.4 ,..
Sysco 1.08 3.9 14
TJX .76 1.3 17-
TaiwSemi .52 4.1 ...
TalismE g .27 ......
Target 1.20 2.3 12
TbckResg .80 ......
TelefEsps 2.14 11.4
TenetHith ... ... 11
Teradyn ... ... 9
Terex
Tesoro ... ... 5
Texlist .68 2.3 13 -
Textron .08 .4 17
ThermoFis ... ... 13 -
3MCo 220 2.7 14 -
TimeWam .94 2.8 13 -
TollBros ... ... 41
Total SA 2.38 4.8 ..
Transocn .79 1.7 ...
Travelers 1.64 2.9 15"
Tycolnt 1.00 2.1 14
Tyson .16 .8 9
UBSAG ... ... ...
USAiwy ... ... 8
UtdContI ... ... 11
UPSB 2.08 3.0 17-
US Bancrp .50 2.0 11
USNGsrs ... ... ...
US OilFd ... ... ...
USSteel .20 .8 ...
UtdhlthGp '.65 1.5 10
UnumGrp .42 1.9 8
ValeSA 1.76 7.1 ...
Vale SA pf 1.76 7.6 ...
ValeroE .60 -2.8 .8
VangEmg .82 2.1 ...
VerizdnCm2.00 5.5 15
ViacomB 1.00 2.2 12
Visa .88 1.0 18
Walgrn .90 2.8 11
WsteMInc 1.36 4.4 15
Weathfintl ... ... 57
WellsFargo .48 1.9 9
WendysCo .08 1.5 ...
WDigital ... ... 8
WstnRefin ... ... 7
WstnUnion .32 2.0 11
Weyerh .60 3.7 19
WmsCos 1.00 3:3 19
WT India .18 1.0 ...
XLGrp .44 2.2 26
Xerox .17 2.2 13
Yamanag .20 1.3 16
Youku n ... ... ...


3.96 -17.2
-.74 +13.0
-.40 -39.8
-3.75 +3.2
-.45 +15.3
-.29 -38.1
.1.91 -13.4
-1.22 +4.3
-.42 +6.0
-1.59 +1.3
4.11 -.1
-.74 -21.6
-1.01 -5.6
-.95, +.1
-.72 +10.5
-2.74 -16.9
-1.28 -19.9
-1.19 -38.7
-.15 -15.8
+.14 -37.1
+.04 -5.5
-1.80 +34.1
-.29 +1.0
-.95 -40.7
+.23 -11.9
-3.74 -44.8
-.68 -17.8
-.69 -32.7
-1.13 -6.2
-1.63 -52.0
-4.53 +27.7
-1.45 -7.5
-.17 -21.7
-2.91 -17.1
-1.75 -6.7
-1.60 +4.5
-.04 -.7
-1.69 -6.6
-2.56 -31.7
-2.21 +.9
+.59 +12.7
-.06 +13.0
-.73' -30.2
-.59 -55.8
-1.43 -30.4
-1.64 -4.7
-.56 -5.9
-.52 -35.8
-.39 -3.0
-.46 -56.0
-2.58 +23.4
-.62 -10.3
-1.19 -28.3
-1.02 -23.6
-2.81 -5.7
-2.16 -18.1
-1.06 +1.9
-.45 +12.2
-4.13 +29.0
-.22 -16.2
-.87 -16.0'
-1.34 -35.4
-.96 -20.3
-.04 +13.0
-.58 -23.2
-3.47 +18.2
-1.10, -12.8
-.48 -13.3
-.89 +23.2
-1.89 -34.4
-1.34 -9.0
-.33 -31.6
-1.05 +20.5
-2.57 -52.5


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ATP O&G ... ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.4
AdobeSy ...
AkamaiT ...
AlteraCp If .32 .9
Amarin
Amazon ....
ACapAgy 5.60 20.0
AmCapLtd ...
Amgen 1.12 2.0
Amylin
A123,Sys ... ...
Apple Inc ...
ApidMatb .32 2.8
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .15 .5
ArubaNet ...
Atmel
Autodesk ... ...
AutoData 1.58 3.2
Baidu
BioFuelEh ...
BioSante ...
BrigExp
Broadcom .36 1.1
Broadwdh ...
BrcdeCm ...
CA Inc .20 1.0
CadencePh...
Cadence ...
CpstnTrbh ...
Celgene ...
CentEuro ... + ...
ChkPoint ...
CienaCorp ...
Cisco .24 1.3
CleanEngy ...
Clearwire ...


... +.15 -58.8 6.90
22 -.66 -3.1 12.05
15 -1.25 -11.7 27.18
28 -1.96 -40.6 27.97
13 -2.15 -1.1 35.21
... -.40 -17.7 6.75
...-20.25 +9.5 197.14
4 -.05 -2.4 28.06
3 -.30 -4.9 7.19
14 -2.01 +1.2 55.57
-.06 -32.3 9.96
... -.60 -75.7 2.32
14.-9.68 +16.2 374.94
8 -1.50 -20.1 11.23
... -.72 +100.2 10.21
.. -3.31 +33.3 27.66
38-1.40 +5.6 22.04
9 -1.11 -26.1 9.11
29 -.70 -12.3 33.50
19 -2.27 +7.8 49.89-
59-10.83 +31.5 126.93
... +.41 -43.7 .98
... -.02 +43.3 2.35
23 +.02 +33.6 36.40
20 -2.56 -24.8 32.77
... +.03 -80.5 .45
19 -.05 -12.3 4.64
12 -1.38 -16.4 20.44
... -.89 -44.8 4.17
26 -.45 +33.7 11.04
... +.02 +15.6 1.11
26 -1.53 +68.6 63.04
1 +.03 -86.6 3.08
23 -4.41 +16.6 53.92
... -.74 -38.9 12.86
16 -.60 -8.9 18.42
... +1.17 -9.5 12.53
... -.46 -71.5 1.47


Name DIv
CognizTech;..
Comcast .45
Comc spcl .45
Cree Inc ...
Crocs
Ctip.com
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTV A ...
DishNetwk 2.00
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips .12
Dunkin n ...
E-Trade ...
eBay
ElectArts
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
FifthThird .32
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
FstSolar ...
Flextm ...
FocusMda ...
GTAdvTc ...
GeronCp ...
GileadSci
Google
GreenMtC ...
HanmiFncl ...
HercOffsh ...
Hologic
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
Incyte
Intel .84


Nasdaq Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
.. 24 -2.59 -9.6 66.23
2.1 15 -1.09 -2.0 21.43'
2.1 15 -1.09 +2.4 21.21
... 30 -2.45 -59.2 26:87
.. 14 -.75 -5.8 16.12
.. 23 -8.56 -36.4 25.71
1.9 22 -1.03 +.9 18.75
8 -.45 +10.0 14.90
... +1.13 -76.1 8.34
... 15 +.78 +16.8 46.62
.:. 8 +.95 +25.8 24.73
7.0 9 -1.13 -14.7 14.91
... 13 -.34 -53.7 2.54
...... -.67 -9.4 25.24
... 34 -.86 -48.6 8.23
22 -1.95 +7.1 29.81
... -1.91 +34.2 21.99
3.7 ... -.36 -14.0 9.92
1.0 16 -.45 +9.4 27.46
... 17 -3.71 -18.6 43.97
2.7 10 -.29 -19.0 11.89
.. 21 -1.00 -37.0 18.69
7.4 12' -.26 -37.9 8.68
.. 7 -.65 -65.1 45.44
... 7 -.54 -26.1 5.80
... 17 +2.14 +16.3 25.50
... 5 -.59 -15.9 7.67
... ... -78 -71.1. 1.50
12 -1.20 +10.0 39.88
.. 19-13.47 +.2 594.88
... 39 +6.74 +53.5 50.45
... 5 -.16 -25.0 .86
... ... -.13 +7.8 3.75
... 29 -.94 -10.6 16.83
5.8 ... -.27 -57.0 5.48
... ... -1.43 -66.1 8.11
... ... -.33 -26.3 12.21
3.5 10 -.56 +15.5 24.29


Wkly YTD Wkly
Name, DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
Intuit .60 1.2 26 -1.98 +5.6 52.04
JA Solar ... ... 1 -.34 -77.3 1.57
JDS Uniph ... ... 39 -.76 -24.1 10.99
JetBlue .. 16 -.42 -44.0 3.70
JoyGIlb .70 .8 16 +.71 -1.0 85.88
KLATnc 1.40 3.2 9 -4.06 +14.9 44.39
LamResrch ... ... 8 -4.40 -21.8 40.48
LeapWidrss ... \. ... -.62 -30.9 8.47
UbtlntAh ... ... 15 +.09 +1.0 15.93
UnearTch .96 3.1 13 -1.66 -11.7 30.54
lululemngs ... ... 47 -4.89 +43.4 49.06
MarinaBio ... ..... +.00 -89.9 .16
MarvellT ... ... 12 -.27 -21.0' 14.65
Mattel .92 3.2 14 -.67 +11.6 28.39
Maximlntg .88 3.4 16 -.86 +9.6 25.89
MelcoCrwn ... ... 50 -.80 +39.9 8.90
MicronT ... ... 42 +.86 -21.6 6.29
Microsoft .80 3.2 9 -1.41 -9.4 25.30
NII HIdg ... ... 13 .-.91 -47.6 23.41
NetApp ... 21 -7.43 -36.8 34.74
Netflix ... ... 18-9.69 -55.6 78.06
Netlist ... ... ... +1.58 +36.7 3.50
NewsCpA .19 1.2 14 -.85 +12.1 16.32
NewsCpB .19 1.1 15 -.78 +2.4 16.82
NuanceCm ... ... 25 -1.96 +31.1 23.84
Nvidia ... ... 13 -1.05 -9.5 13.93
OmniVisn ... ... 5 -.92 -58.4 12.33
OnSmcnd ... ... 21 -.38 -24.9 7.42
Oracle .24 .8 17 -1.77 -2.2 30.60
PMCSra ... ... 20 -.47 -31.9 5.85
Paccar .72 1.8 16 -3.32 -31.7 39.16
PacEth rsh ... ... ... +.40 -74.9 1.27
PaHUTI .20 .9 11 -1.29 -.8 21.37
Paychex 1.28 4.5 19 -1.18 -8.7 28.22
PeopUtdF .63 5.2 22 -.61 -13.1 12.18
Polycom s ... ... 25 -1.84 -13.1 16.93
Popular ... ... ... -.25 -53.8 1.45
PwShsQQQ.41 .7 ... -2.45 +1.7 55.40


Wkly YTD
Div YId PE Chg %Chg


PriceTR 1.24
PrUPShQQQ...
Qualcom .86
RF MicD
Rambus
RschMotn ..
RiverbedT ...
Rovi Corp ...
SanDisk ...
Sanofi rt
SeagateT .72
Sequenom ...
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ...
Staples .40
Starbucks .68
StIlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TD Ameritr,.24
TakeTwo ...
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .90
TibcoSft ...
TriQuint
UrbanOut
VertxPh
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 2.10
WamerCh ...
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
YRC rsh ...
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


2.4 18 -1.83 -18.7
... ... +2.45 -32.0
1.5 22 -.95' +12.5
.. 23 -.47 -10.5
... 56 -9.44 -58.9
... 3 -.30 -68.7
... 74 -2.47 -25.9
... 42 -2.18 -55.5
... 10 -2.94 -2.3
+.39 -43.0
4.5 15 -1.93 +6.5
... ... +.03 -48.1
... ... -5.04 +7.7
... 45 +.08 +9.2
... 14 -2.78 -40.7
2.8 10 -1.33 -38.1
1.6 26 -2.15 +30.8
3.2 11 -.95 -31.5
... 19 -.93 -3.3
1.5 15 -.99 -15.0
... ... -1.14 +10.7
2.0 ... -.31 -40.9
2.3 12 -.85 -23.9
.. 49 -.96 +40.7
... 9 -.60 -60.7
19 -.86 -27.5
-3.10 -19.2
.7 ... -1.45 -15.6
7.8 ... -.80 +2.0
... 32 -2.13 -33.0
8.6 22 -.35 -16.5
1.6 28 -3.70 +17.3
2.4 14 -1.38 +8.6
-.00 -99.0
19 -.89 -7.5
.2 ... -.56 -32.9


Wkly
Last Name


AMEX Most Active


Wkly YTD Wkly
DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AbdAsPac .42 6.0
Adventrx ...
AlldNevG
AmApparel...
AntaresP
Aurizong
AvalRaren ...
'Banks.com ...
BarcGSOil ...
Brigus grs ...
BritATob 3.86 4.2
CanoPet ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
ChiArmM ...
ChinaShen ...
ConmedH ...
DejourEg ...
DenisnMg ...
ExeterRgs ...
GabGldNR 1.68 10.6
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrrag ...
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSilv g ...
Hemisphrx ...
KeeganR g ...
LadThalFn ...
MadCatz g ..
MetroHIth ...
MdwGoldg ...
Minefnd g
NeoStem ...
Neoprobe ...


... -.03 +3.7
... -.08 -76.2
-2.88 +29.0
... -.02 -54.8
. +.29 +53.5
-.60 -23.1
-.41 -52.6
... -.02 -86.3
... -.26 -2.8
... -.15 -37.6
...-2.58 +18.0
... +.01 -64.6
... -.08 -3.3
-.02 -56.6
-1.28 +7.3
... +1.14 +112.0
-.09 -90.7
+.19 -71.9
38 -1.15 -11.8
-.03 +15.6
+.04 -55.8
-.46 -45.9
... -.20 -17.5
... -.01 -45.7
... -.14 -48.6
... -.14 -56.2
... -.28 -24.6
-.23 -59.8
-.31 -18.5
... -.04 -59.5
-1.00 -48.5
... +.35 +96.6
6 +.04 -39.2
12 +.32 +62.4
+.19 +176.2
.. -2.13 +3.0
... -.04 -58.9
19 -.11 +9.7


Name DIv
Nevsun g .06
NewEnSys ....
NwGoldg ...
NAPallg
NthnO&G ...
NovaGld g ..
Ollsandsg ...
ParaG&S ..
PhrmAth ...
PionDrill
Procerars ...
Quepasa ...
RareEle g ...
Rentech ...
RevettM rs ...
RexahnPh )...
Richmnt g ..
Rubicon g ..
SamsO&G ...
SeabGldg ...
TanzRyg ...
Taseko
Tengsco
TmsatlPet ...
TriValley ...
TriangPet ...
USGeoth ...
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDr ...
VimetX
VistaGold ...
VoyagerOG...
Walterlnv .22
Xfone
YMBioQ ...


Wkly YTD Wky
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


-.66 -28.6
-1.06 -89.9
-1.61 +5.6
-.44 -56.5
-.84 -16.4
41.73 -23.3
-.03 -52.4
-.44 -39.3
-.15 -68.1
-.14 +25.7
+1.11 +158.1
-.91 -66.8
-1.12 -65.4
+.07 +35.2
+.47 -.6
-.05 -51.8
-1.47 +111.9
-.47' -37.3
+.05 +62.9
-2.13 -32.5
-.34 -65.8
-.45 -43.6
+.11 +29.7
-.17 -58.3
-.03 -66.7

+.10 -11.8
+.04 -55.6
-.07 -65.6
-.13 -50.6
-.32 -51.5
-.10 -40.9
-.65 +41.8
-.50 +43.5
-.20 -55.7
+.12 +20.8
+.09 -66.7
-.14 -29.2


Money Rates
Last PvsWeek
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.01 0.01
*6-month 0,04 0.03
5-year / 0.92 0.91
10-year 2.01 2.06
30-year 2.99 3.11


Wkly .YTD Wkly
Chg %Chg Last


32.32
43.20
7.81
38.62
28.82
2.62
33.26
32.85
31.06
37.88
68.15
12.50
32.92
25.21
34.64
38.50
30.68
18.09
8.11
1.66
27.79
59.54
12.66
13.15
53:00
34.15
18.74
4.50
13.17
14.90
23.68
30.05
18.52
45.90
80.54
33.61
18.86
49.97
47.47
56.22
46.71
19.45
11.50
4.42
16.59
69.14
25.38
7.69
37.82
25.68
44.55
21.72
24.80
23.08
21.81
39.44
36.48
44.45
90.81
32.63
30.97
14.74
24.69
5.22
26.04
12.51
16.20
16.41
30.45
,17.30
19.86
7.88
15.42
16.63


Stock Footnoles: g Dridends an earinga Ir Canarlan dollars Doe', rfl meralt onLrseialsling loinidtard
If = Late filing wh SEC n = New in past 52 weeks pi = Pretlned rs = Sio'k has urua0ergone a rivers slock spint
of at least O percent wrhitr, lia past year ri = Rignt I buy sunrty at a specified prime s = Siloc has tpinl by atV
least 20 percent wnniin ie latl year un1 = Urnu v = in barkhruoicy or le,.:AverGitip wa = Wrn dislr,i.ul-. li -
Wner, issue a t1 = Warrbanlt
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covanrsg market cosia Is paid ironr, lurid asels d = D,;enrred sali, c riLge. or
reaemptlonleel I rontlobd (sales charges) m= Multiplees" arae charge.l lAnor valuablee p =preaious days
nel asset value s = tr. spill snares during the week x = Fund paid a dlstlnludon dung Ihe week Gainers and
Losers imust be wonhn at least $2 10 be isied in tabres at le Most Actlves musl r e oiln al leas 't1. Volume in
r.undreds ci snares Source: The Associalad Press Sales figures are ur.or-ial


1


'


I II


L


V T


1.0266 1.0280










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011

Lake City Reporter




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In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreportear.com


Legal

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College WILL RECEIVE BIDS
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Renovations to Building 015
Florida Gateway College
Lake City, Florida
FGC Bid No. 12-1-02
Architect's Project No. 1102
Date & Time for Receiving Bids:
Thursday,- December 8, 2011 AT
2:00 P.M.
Date, Time and Place for
Pre-Bid Conference: All interested
bidders are required to attend the
MANDATORY PRE-BID CON-
FERENCE to be held at 10:00 A.M.
local time on Thursday, December 1,
2011 on the main campus of Florida
Gateway College. Conference will
start in Room 001B, Building 003
which is physically located at 127 SE
Student Way, Lake City, Florida
32025
Place for Receiving Bids: Bids may
be mailed as follows:
Florida Gateway College
Purchasing Department
. 149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
Hand delivered bids 'are to be pre-
sented to:
Florida Gateway College
Mail Room (Bldg 025) *
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, Florida 32025-8703
All bids must arrive and be date/time
stamped by a Mail Room representa-
tive prior to the specified bid open-
ing date/time. The College will not
be responsible for Postal or other de-
livery service delays that cause a bid
to arrive at Florida Gateway Col-
lege's Mail Room after the designat-
ed bid opening date/time. Bids that
are mailed must be clearly marked
on the outside of the envelope "BID
# 12-'-02 RenovationS TO building
015, Florida Gateway College, BID
OPENING Thursday, December 8;,
2011". Bids will be opened in a pub-
lic bid opening in
Room 001B, Building 003 which is
physically located at 127 SE Student
Way, Lake City, Florida 32025.
Contractor's Prequalification: 'ALL
PRIME CONTRACTORS WISH-
ING TO BID THIS PROJECT
MUST BE PREQUALIFIED. Con-
tractors who wish to submit a bid on
this project must prequalify with
Florida Gateway College. To be
considered for prequalification, con-
tractors must request, complete and
submit a prequalification package to
the College. Prequalification pack-
ages may be obtained from the Col-
lege's Director of Purchasing, Bill
Brown at (386) 754-4360 or by email
at bill.brown@fgc.edu. COMPLET-
ED prequalification packages must
be returned to the College's Mail
Room which is located in Building
025 not later than 1:00 PM local time
Tuesday, Noverqber 29, 2011. The
College will not be responsible for
Postal or other delivery service de-
lays that cause a prequalification
package to arrive at the Mail Room
after the designated date/time.
Bid Documents
Prepared "By:
CRAIG SALLEY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS
3911 Newberry Road, Suite D
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 372-8424, FAX (352) 377-
4945 .
Bid Documents
Available From:
http://www.csa-
architect.com/bid_documents.htm
Project Description: The work in-
cludes, but is not limited to, the com-
plete renovation of the interior of
Building 015 on the main campus of
Florida Gateway College in Lake
City, Florida.
The work involves extensive demoli-
tion of the interior and new stud
walls, ceilings, flooring and related
work. Included is a new mechanical
room in the interior existing space
with new mechanical and electrical
systems included in the renovation
work.
The existing HVAC system in the at-
tic space is to be demo'd and re-
moved from the attic. The new
HVAC system is to be connected to
the Campus chilled water and steam
systems. .
Exterior work includes a masonry
closure wall, around the perimeter of
the building and various sidewalk
areas to be filled in and/or repaired.
Right to Waive Irregularities and
Technicalities: Florida Gateway Col-
lege reserves the right to waive mi-
nor irregularities and/or technicali-
ties associated with this solicitation.
The Director of Purchasing of Flori-


Legal

da Gateway College shall be the final
authority regarding waivers of irreg-
ularities and technicalities.
FOR THE DISTRICT BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF Florida Gateway
College
Charles W. Hall, President
05529027
November 13, 20, 27, 2011


020 Lost & Found
FOUND: Terrier. Comer of
Lake City Ave. & Archer St. on
Monday, Nov. 14. Please call to
identify. 386-867-9679

100 Job
Opportunities

05529191
NOW HIRING:
COMPANY DRIVERS
Enjoy the open road with
Our Line Haul division!
Now Hiring river Trainers!
CDL-A & 3 mos OTR exp
req'd.




Our tradition of stability gives
you a future of strength!
www.arnoldtrans.com
800-299-4744
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full training provided
Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Experienced Roofers.
Needed.
Please call
(850) 271-4199
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442
STYLIST NEEDED at
Southern Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info.

120 Medical
Employment

05529152
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
For its Student Loan
Forgiveness program. Licensed
Clinicians who serve in our
approved locations may qualify
for up to $60k in Student
Loan forgiveness for F/T
2yr commitment.
Therapists:
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst
Preferred
Case Management
(adult & child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Master's Therapist in
Screening
Medical Services
RN full-time Lake City CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care )
To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply on-
line, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify


120 Medical
)120 Employment

05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


240 Schools
2 Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/28/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

2 CUTE FREE KITTENS
Boots & Mittens. One black &
white Female, one gray & white
Male, 9 weeks, 386-438-4128.

CHRISTMAS PUPPIES
3/4 Chihuahua, 1/4 Dachshund.
2 male, 1 female. $50. ea.
386-496-1397


FREE TO GOOD HOME.
Miniature Dachshund.
Call 386-752-1125


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local.
office for information.

330 Livestock & .
J3 Supplies

WANTED: I Buy and Sell used
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay cash. Call 386-935-1522


407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

419 TV-Radio &
4 9 Recording
Need a TV for your kids
Christmas present? Or just an
Extra? 20" Sony Triniton TV.
$50.00 386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Cafl 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
05529194
Holiday Gift Warehouse Sale
Up to 90% OFF Retail Prices
All Items Under $2.00
Great Closeout holiday Gifts
v Personal presents
v Buy if bulk for school store
v School carnival items
v Fun Festival prizes & gifts
Bring your friends
v Buy to the piece or bulk/case
November 14th-23rd. 9am-5pm
Cady Fundraising Services
2140 SW Main Blvd. Lake City.
800-234-5561
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


4 0. Good Things
450 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert, Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420


The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line.
www.lakecityreporter.com


WANTED

Medical Records/

Medical Receptionist

For busy medical office.

Full time. Pay depends on

experience. Will train right

person. Bring resume to

Southern Internal Medicine

404 NW Hall of Fame Drive




Set your sights
on something


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.

Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2 & 3 br/lba Mobile Homes for
Reti. CH/A includes water, sewer,
garbage. $475./ $525. mo. 1st &
last mo + $300 dep. 386-961-8466
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
Monthly Specials
$550. o. m Free Water.
386-984-8448
2br/2ba $500 mo. new flooring,
fresh paint. ,Also, Resd'l RV lots.
Btwn Lake City & G'ville. Access
to 1-75 & 441 (352)317-1326
3br/2ba SW, 10 min to
Lake City. $550 mo $500 sec.
NO PETS.
386-330-2316
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280


Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
3/2 MH on 1 acre in nice sub.
paved rd. metal roof. completely
remodeled. new everything! Only
$39,500 386-249-1640
OWNER FINANCING
SWMH on 2 lots, fenced, paved
streets, close to town. MLS 79218,
$49,900. Coldwell Banker Bishop,
Elaine Tolar 386-755-6448


EXCELLENT LOCATION
3br/2ba MH, deck, porch. Well
maintained. MLS 79304 $55,000.
Coldwell Banker Bishop, Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Direct Sale
15K-25K Off Models
800-622-2832 ext 210






FOOD STORES
is Franchising with a National
Restaurant Chain
Now Hiring-Management
Competitive Wages.
Benefits available for Full-Time
employees
(Health, dental & life insurance,
vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person pt the S & S
Office:
134SEColburnAve.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-FREE
WORKPLACE


confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


. ADvantage










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


640 Mobile Homes
6 for Sale
All 2011's Must Go!
All Homes at Dead cost! Save up
To $10,000. North Pointe Homes
Gainesville. (352)872-5566
Land and Home Packages
for Mobile homes and modular
homes. No Money down if you
own your land. 100 mile radius.
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
We Need Used Mobile Homes!
Will buy or trade. Top Dollar Paid.
North Point Homes.
(352)872-5566

Mobile Home
650 & Land
3br/2ba SW 1 ac. Off 41 on 246.
Between 1-10 & 75. 10 min to LC.
$28,500 obo. Ideal rental .NO
owner Finance. 386-330-2316
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH On .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows.pride in ownership
$120,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well Maintained MH on 10ac. 2
car, covered carport, huge deck.
Wood laminate flooring. MLS
79417, $94,900 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Nice 1620sf 3br/2ba DW on 4
wooded acres, owner finance avail.
$119,900 Brenda Forrester,
Forrester Realty 352-339-6069
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 2.5 acres,
Mayo area, small down/$675 mo,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

05528965
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yardA.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
For rent 4 br/1/2 ba townhouse apt.,
$800 mo & $300 dep. Rent in-
cludes water, sewer, garbage and
lawn maintenance. 386-208-5252.


710 Unfurnished Apt. 730 Unfurnished
SFor Rent Home For Rent


Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
SCH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, Ig 2 br Apt.
Close to town
$485 mo + $485 dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
.386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA in
Gatorwood S/D. Washer/dryer
-hook up, clean. $650. 1st, last +
security. 386-867-9231
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBi's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.comi
SWindsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

0 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent

Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
pr monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

073 Unfurnished
U Home For Rent
3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, comer of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965.-7534 or 386-365-1243


For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.
home brick, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083
For lease-Lakewood sub. LG
brick, 2600 sq. ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lg lot by Lake Jeffrey. $1275.m
+last+sec. Bruce 386-365-3865

7 4 Furnished
7 4 Homes for Rent
Come see. 2br/lba w/office, ramp,
CH/A, W/D, micro, lawn/garb.
Non-smoking owner. Wood floor.
Great shady area in town. Avail
12/1. $750. mo. 386-755-0110
750 Business &
75 Office Rentals
For Lease: E BayaAve. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.

770 Condos For Rent
2BR/2BA, all appliances,
water/sewer, basic cable,
pool & terfnis cts.
$950/mo, call 386-344-0433

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
- Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065 *
Gorgeous 20.02 ac. Ready for new
home. Land has 2 power poles, 2
wells & 24X30 slab. MLS 78126
$132,000. REO Realty Group
Heather Craig 386-466-9223
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly ..
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.


810 Home for Sale
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
-INC. 755-5110 #78278
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 $129,000 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
COUNTRY CLOSE 3/2 brick, 3
acres, pole barn, workshop, fruit
trees. $129,900 #78096
*Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Great home in Woodcrest, super
location. 3br/2ba. New A/C,
covered back porch. MLS 75198,
$129,900 Coldwell Banker
Bishop. Elaine Tolar 755-6488
HUD HOME 4.77 ac, near
' G'ville. 3/2, as is $95,500 Call
Robin Williams 365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com 091-
434983 Hallmark Real Estate
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large
oaks, wood floors, fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Lake Home in town. 4b/3b. For-
mal LR, DR & modem Kit,
f'place,-upgradds. MLS 76085,
$299K. Coldwell Banker Bishop.
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Nice 4/2 on 4 ac. w/open floor
plan. 2 living rooms, eat-in-
kitchen, dining room & more.'
MLS 76150. $79,000 Result Real-
ty. Brittany Stoeckert. 397-3473
'4/2 Immaculate new carpet &
fixtures. Lg Kitchen, fenced yard.
2 car garage. MLS 77602.
$159,200. REO Realty Group..
Nancy Rogers. 386-867-1271
Amazing 4/3 Ranch Style home
w/over 2,000 sf. 56.28 rolling ac.
Too many extras to list. $500,000.
MLS 7842Q REO Realty Group.
Heather Craig 386-466-9223
NICE 4br/2ba Cedar home,
outside city limits, big rooms.
Reduced to sell. MLS 78769
$169,000. Coldwell Banker
Bishop. Bruce Dicks, 243-4002


Private Estate -,. ,,,.
Within the city limits. Beautiful ; -.
older home with mature land- '
escaping and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5
baths, 3 fireplaces, private paved
drive. 39.7 acres of property in-
cluded with home. $994,000 or
$2,500 per mo. for rent or home .
plus 2 acres only $495,000. Call
for additional info and showings.

Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887

PLi i2r or co-owner (386)397-5131


Classified Department: 755-5440


810 Home for Sale
Lovely 2 story on 7 ac. 3br/2ba,
fenced, fish ponds, pole barn, Ig
kitchen, oaks, fruit trees. MLS
79306 $174,900 Coldwell Banker
Bishop Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
Splan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
SHORT SALE 3/2, Built 2007,
wood floors, Game room.
REDUCED! Call Ginger Parker
386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms &
Acreage
12 acres+/-, Northwest comer of
CR-18 and 81st Ave. Asking Price
$745,000. Call (801) 715-9162 for
more information
41/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
20 AC Wooded tract.
Very nice piece of Land. 10 m iles
from Cedar Key. MLS 78886,
$70,000. Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to teri.ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL Properties,
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

S ComImercial
830 Property; ,
MOBILE HOME PARK with Ig.
brick, owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84 Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate

86Q Investment
,8 Property
GREAT INVESTMENT,.
building features 2 units w/
2br/2ba, Income producing. MLS
79271, $230,000. Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
870 Wanted


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.






(386)755-54406


r


sri


L


* NEWS

* WEATHER

*OPINION

SPORTS

* ARCHIVES

* CLASSIFIED

* COMMUNITY

* ENTERTAINMENT


ST y
a i a c i tirt ponrler corr






-O- -w-O-
CONNECTED



















Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!

Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.


I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick SaleFair Price
386-269-0605

950 cars for Sale
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS. Ma-
roon on maroon. 1 owner; non
smoker. $84K original mi. Never
wrecked. $8,000 904-718-6747


951 Recreational
S Vehicles
AIJO SKYLINE.
2 axle camper travel trailer.
19 ft. $400.
386-292-4169.

G ET .lakeciyreporter.com



CONNECTED








LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


gI



Toa v rieY U u iesI h' e to, I ea cal.75-129


Large Selection of Soap Fragrances
task for your favorite scent
We do favors for:
Weddings, Baby Showers
and any occasion
9 A Soaps
S Dog. Mechanpic ,
On/ coffee & Monogramned


,- ., 275 N. Marion Avenue
ld) ay (3a86) 243-8298
Sik- a n t D uwfiowntl (next 1o ? owire-o
0[mn T>.nda.-Saturday
Durgrk )iw de ( Ovncr
Aik aboWt Gift Crtiwaca
.- ,. ^ sa)i~,! ; afB


TimRELess ElMORoRIES |

i- Cheval Mirrors
"i |& Oak oriCherry

on y ,$
/ Large Zebra Storage Bench, Ottomans and Chairs
'386-466-1888
1034 SW Main Blvd., (next to the Money Man)take City, FL 32055


Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks ,,h ~~mih ~Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks

STOYOV TA 0 -10010 *( WMii*


Please present Rountree
Moore Toyota Bucks at
time of purchase. No casn
value. No reproductions
of the Rountree Moore
Toyota Bucks is allowed.


Not valid with any other ,E K V IE
coupon One coupdn per






% mowe ". deete t oledeta
Sfkme/ i '4 6', e '\ e ?6-,dc,'a
Obstetrics and Gynecology
SWeight Loss $69
ou e PHair Removal $69
4- Accepting all Insurance. No Ins visit 150

(386)466-1106
Located Shands Lake City & Live Oak


North Florida Pecan Company
Fresh Ceorogia Pecans
Raw Halves. Raw Pieces
Gourmet Praline Bags
1 1b. Bags
-Chocolate Pecans '
SGift Baskets
3140 NW US Hwy 41 Lake City 386-365-2586


.4.


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CITY-COLUMBIA COUNTY


BELONG ENGAGE LEAD PROSPER


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?
Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@Jakecityreporter.com


LIFE


Sunday, November 20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


TASTE BUDDIES


Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Air plants'
and more
Some very interest-
ing plants that are
often overlooked
in nature are bro-
meliads, members
of the pineapple family.
There are 16 species of
bromeliads that are native
to Florida and are found
growing in some part of
the state, if not all.
Ten of Florida's 16
native bromeliad species
are listed as threatened or
endangered. A threatened
species is at risk of becom-
ing endangered, and an '
endangered species is at
risk of becoming'extinct
Loss of habitat through
the development of natu-
ral areas and illegal plant
collecting have dwindled
the populations -of these
bromeliads. A non-native
Mexican bromeliad wee-
vil is also a great threat'
because e larvae typically
kill theplant. -
Bromeliads are often
referred to as "air plants"
GARDEN TALK
continued on 2D


Holiday




Help


400 local families
will have traditional
Thanksgiving meals,
thanks to Catholic Charities

By LAURA HAMPSON 1 .
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
T his year 400
'l families in ..
Columbia County
S will sit down '
for a traditional '
Thanksgiving meal; a meal
they might not otherwise -,,,i
have had without the support : ..
of thecommunity. .
For the 11th year, Catholic '.
Charities and the Columbia s.,^.
County School District part- .-, i
nered to provide families in i-j ''
need with a nutritious meal. .
School guidance counselors, -.
knowing those most in need, A .
selected students to receive
a Thanksgiving basket 1_
voucher. Families members
then redeemed the voucher L.._ _'
Thursday and Friday at the
Catholic Charities office. Students with the Rich
,......, ., .,,HELPl for Thanksgiving dinner
continued on 2D' Charities Lake City Re


Kimberly Harden (from left) thanks RMS Beta Qlubs presi-
dent Maria D'Antoni, 13, and vice president Lexia Scott, 13,
after loading groceries in the back of her car. 'This is great,'
said Harden, who maintains a household.of seven. 'I think
it's great that they are doing volunteer work. This saves me
the time of doing grocery shopping.'


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
hardson Middle School Beta Club grab bags of groceries
yr to distribute A ,tomilies inr need Thiqpday at the Cathqp.,.
regional Office.


Genie Norman and
Mary Kay
Hollingsworth
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com
The
Porterhouse
Grill
T hose of you who
are from around
these parts will
likely remember
Derrick's Bar-
*B-Que on the north side
of town and the fabulous
smoked meals they served.
Well, Wendy and Derrick
closed up shop several
years ago arid opened up
The Porterhouse Grill on
SW Main Boulevard. If you
haven't tried them lately,
we'd encourage you to do
just that / ,
If the huge wall filled
with family photos as you
enter doesn't give you a
hint that this is family'
run and family friendly res-
taurant, the smiling face of
Wendy and her great staff
(we love Angie!) welcom-
ing you certainly will.'
While they still serve
several standard barbeque
items, their menu has
grown to include both tra-
TASTE BUDDIES
continued oni'4Y


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2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


'Broadway's Golden Baritone' right at home at FGC


W hen you
think of
Broadway,
visions of
grandiose
costumes, colorful lighting,
the scenery, the make-up,
the props and the audience
typically dance through
your head.
So you must excuse me
when, upon his arrival in
Lake City Tuesday after-
noon, I almost didn't recog-
nize Norm Lewis. Dressed
in a ball cap, gray T-shirt and
a pair of jeans, Lewis stepped
from his rental car outside
the Levy Performing Arts
Center and made his way
toward the door. I'd stepped
outside the PAC for-a minute
to check a voicemail and
greeted him like I would any
other visitor to the college.
Then he spoke.
I may be able to mistake
an appearance, but Lewis'


booming baritone voice is
distinct and instantly recog-
nizable.
Lewis is a bona fide
Broadway superstar, hav-
ing appeared in some of
Broadway's most popular
musicals "Les Miserables,"
"Chicago," .and "Little
Mermaid," to name a few. His
starring role in this Spring's
revival of "Porgy and Bess"
has generated so much buzz
that it's already a possible
frontrunner for a Tony nomi-
nation for Best Musical, and
Lewis himself could possibly
walk away with a Best Actor
award as well.
You wouldn't know this
just by talking to him,
though having dealt with
Lewis for a few months now,
from scheduling the show
through his performance on
Friday night, he is one of the
most down-to-earth perform-
ers I've had the pleasure of


Troy Roberts
troy.roberts@fgc.edu
meeting. Posters promoting
his show had been taped to
. the windows of the PAC for
weeks now, and Lewis was
shocked to find him looking
face-to-face at himself.
"You guys did all of this
promotion for my show?" he
asked.
So you can imagine the
look on his face when we
.told him there were very
few places in Lake City that
didn't have his smiling face
plastered on their windows.


"Wow, I feel like a celeb-
rity," he said sheepishly.
This is coming from a guy
whose face will be all over
New York City in the coming.
months and was just featured
in both the New Yorker and
Time magazine.
Whether he admits it or
not, Lewis is a star he has
been dubbed "Broadway's
Golden Baritone" and
should serve as an inspira-
tion for anyone who aspires
to stardom. This is especial-
ly true for our local students
who are hoping to break
into the music industry or
have Broadway aspirations
- many years ago, Lewis sat
in the same classrooms that
they did.
It's not every day that
a graduate of the college
returns to perform on the
same stage where he got
his start. It's kind of amaz-
ing that someone with such


a strong and mesmerizing
voice didn't have praise
heaped on him from an
early age Lewis said he
sang in his church choir, but
didn't really stand out and
it wasn't until he attended
Florida Gateway College
(of course, it was Lake City
Community College then)
from 1981-1983 that he dis-
covered his God-given talent
for singing. He was a mem-
ber of the college chorus.
and played a pair of roles in
the college's production of
"Grease" Doody and Teen
Angel.
The auditorium may look
different than it did when
Lewis attended the colors
have changed and the seats
have been replaced but
when Lewis stood on the
stage and looked out at the
empty chairs, he seemed
almost overwhelmed.
"You know, it was almost


30 years ago that I stood on
this stage for the first time,"
he said before breaking into
a toothy grin.
Three decades can
change a lot a college stu-
dent named Norm Lewis has
developed into a Broadway
prodigy and Florida Gateway
College has grown exponen-
tially, undergone a name
change and will begin offer-
ing its first four-year degree
programs within the next 12
months.
But when the past met
the present Friday night at
Florida Gateway College, it
produced a sound straight
out of a Broadway musical.

Troy Roberts is
the Public Information
Coordinator for Florida
Gateway College. He can
be reached by calling (386)
754-4247 or by e-mail at troy.
roberts@fgc.edu.


Accents help holiday decor shimmer


By Kim Cook
For The Associated Press
The holidays give us an
excuse to. jazz up the house
with stuff we don't normal-
C, 'e P h Dly "wear" essentially, it's
dress-up time for our living
spaces.
esColors that pop and finish-
es that sparkle help set an
exuberant tone for parties,
while a softly glowing tree'
or table display is a quiet,
often ethereal delight They
enhance -the conviviality of
the holidays, whether your
JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter home is embracing revelers
Someof the sponsors of the Thanksgiving baskets giveaway pose for a photo-Thursday.. and peppermint mojitos, or
Pictured are Kyle Keen (from left), of the county tax collector's office; Kiwanis Club of Lake just the dog and a cup of hot
City president Roger Parish; Dorothy Spradley, volunteer and education marketing coordinator Mrcury glass, once rel-hocote.
for the school district; Suzanne Edwards, Catholic,Charities COO; Cathblic Charities Board egated to the high shelves at
Chair Dorothy Pattison; Kiwanis Club Director Norbie Ronsonet and Mike Pendergraft of antiques stores,.is now mass
Epiphany Catholic Church.


market, and that's great news.
The finish is a little more
understated than ,silverplate,
so it mixes well with both rus-
tic and refined accessories.
At Target, find copper and
glass-etched candle pillars.
Crate & Barrel has jewel-
toned mercury glass candle-
holders.
Amp up your tree's "wow"
factor., with whimsical, glitter-
iced whales, narwhals and
polar bears, and intriguing
bejeweled insect ornaments,
all atAnthropologie. West Elm
offers an edgy yet. beautiful
chain-link crimped aluminum
garland, as well as glass balls
filled with confetti or feathers.
You'll find starbursts, dim-
pled glitter balls, antique glass
polka-dot orbs, and baubles in
copper, sapphire and graphite


at Crate & Barrel Find here
too an unusual garland made
of colorful vintage saris.
For a nice old-world look,
Restoration Hardware has
hand-blown, antiqued-glass,
onion-shaped ornaments,
and beaded snowflakes, while
Garnet Hill offers a set of
creamy glass bead and pearl
stars.
No space for a bushy ever-
green? -Try Target's slim
profile tinsel tree, perfect for
apartments or entryways.
'Glitter-crusted tree cones
lining the middle of your
dining table on a puddle of
Epsom salt snow are a chic
alternative to traditional cen-
terpieces. Finish the table
with blingy chargers and fac-
eted, ornament-shaped place
card holders from Target


HELP: Thanksgiving meals provided


Continued From Page 1D
"Families are much
larger than in the past,"
said Suzanne Edwards,
chief operating officer of
Catholic Charities Lake
City Regional Office.
Extended families are
living together to make
ends meet Families receiv-
ing a basket averaged six.
to 11 people, she said.
Volunteers
made sure each
basket had 'Wi
enough turkey, put a:
vegetables, pota- in T
toes, cranberry T
sauce, stuffing th
and dessert for
every family
member. chief op
We are trying Charities
to but a glim-
mer of hope in


Thanksgiving for th
families, she said.
Many people are
ing whether to put
the table or pay the
she said. People ma
realize their neighb
suffering, she said.
is not something pe
openly talk about
"We take a lot for
ed with food," Edwa


iese

choos-
food on
rent,
ay not '
or is
Hunger
*ople.

r grant-
ards


said.
Student volunteers from
Richardson Middle, Lake
City Middle and Columbia
High schools were on
hand to help the families
load the food in a vehicle
and wish them a happy
Thanksgiving.
More than 50 Catholic
Charities volunteers

e are trying to
glimmer of hope
hanksgiving for
ese families.'

Suzanne Edwards,
berating officer of Catholic
s Lake City Regional Office

worked fbr about a month
collecting and sorting :
food, she said.
"I get as much out' of
it as I put into it," said
Frank Aiello, who volun-
teers at Catholic Charities
several days each week.
Volunteering is a good way
to meet people and get into
the.community, he said.
All 15 Columbia County


schools held can drives to
contribute to the baskets.
Challenge Learning Center
and Epiphany Catholic
School also collected food.
TD Bank, Edward Jones
Investments, Kiwanis Club
of Lake City, the Columbia
County Tax Collector's
office and Dr. Edwin
Gonzalez also donated to
the Thanksgiving baskets.
"Feeding hungry chil- -
dren is a priority. Kiwanis'
main goal is helping
young children," said
Norbie Ronsonet, Kiwanis
Club director.
The partnership
between the .school
district and Catholic
Charities started when
schools were holding
in-house food drives. We
saw that we could help
more families by partner-
ing, said Dorothy Spradley,
,volunteer and education ,
marketing coordinator for
the school district.
"It's such an education
for our children too," she
said. The school food
.drives help students real-
ize there are children and
families in need, she said.


GARDEN TALK: Airplants and more


Continued From Page 1D
because they absorb nutri-
ents and water through
special cells on their leaves.
They don't need soil and
roots like most other
plants. All of Florida's
native bromeliads are epi-
phytes which are plants
that simply use another
plant for support
Most of Florida's brome-
liads are "tank" bromeliads
that can hold their own
water. Tanks are formed
by the way the leaves are
arranged on the stem.
Water collects in the tanks
along with decoinposing
dead insects and plant ,
debris. Water and nutri-
ents from the tank are used
by the plant


Spanish moss is not actu-
ally Spanish, and it isn't
even a moss. It is one of
our native bromeliads that
can be found throughout
the state. Many people
think that Spanish moss
injures their trees. But this
epiphyte doesn't even have'
roots. It prefers bright
areas, so it hangs in trees
that typically have sparse
leaves for some, other rea-
son.,
Columbia County is also
home to Bartram's airplant
and ball moss. Bartram's
airplant is a flowering bro-
meliad that blooms from.
spring to fall. The thin
long leaves are fuzzy gray,
and the small blooms are


violet Ball moss grows in
areas of lower light, and it
clings to other plants with
"false roots."
None of these brome-
liads are parasites and
do not take nutrients
from the tree on which
it is growing. Additional
information can be found
by visiting "Save Florida's
Native Bromeliads" Web
site http://entomology.ifas.
ufl.edu/frank/savebrome-
liads/

N D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


7'4


ENGAGEMENT


Brown-Dempsey


Phil and Cindy Brown, of Anniston,
Alabama, announce the engagement of
their daughter, Jennifer Darlene Brown, to
Matthew Carson Dempsey, son of Carl and
Cindy Dempsey of Lake City.
A wedding is planned for the Fall of
2012.
Jennifer is a 2006 Cum Laude graduate of
Auburn University with a bachelor's degree
in Apparel Merchandising, Production
and Design and a minor in Business. She
is a member of the National Society of
Collegiate Scholars, Dean's List and Kappa
Omicron Nu Honor Society. Jennifer is
currently enrolled in .the Executive MBA
program at the University of Alabama.
Matthew is a 2006 graduate of Florida
State University with a bachelor's degree
in Business Administration and Marketing.
He is a member of the National Scholars
Honor Society, Dean's List and American
Marketing Association.
Jennifer and Matthew both currently
reside and work in Birmingham, Alabama.


Jennifer Darlene Brown and Matthew Carson
Dempsey











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Parents must maintain contact


With daughter needing support


DEAR ABBY: Late last win-
. ter, a sheriff called to tellme,
\ that my daughter "Amy" had
-1 been found standing, bruised
and battered, on a street cor-
- ner in upstate New York. Her
5 arm had been broken. He was
9 convinced that the man she
was living with had beaten ;
;, her and kicked her outside to'
Sfreeze.'Her sister (my.other'
; daughter) paid to put her up
in a hotel for the night.'
SMy husband and I were,
convinced early on in this
relationship that this mon-
C ster was determined to have
, us, support him financially;
because he would leave us
* longthreatening messages
I' demanding money, or else
, our- daughter would be
"homeless."
Amy moved back in with
him, and I heard from her
" sister that the creep was
bringing other women home
for sex. It raised niy hopes
that Amy would give up on
him. Instead, she became
pregnant
S,Now Amy is hurt that I
4oni't call her and share in
this exciting event. When I
try to explain how I feel, she
tells me, "It's not about YOU,
Mom." She's right It's about
the baby. I am ashamed to
not be able to change this
baby's future. What can.I do?
PARALYZED WITH FEAR
OUTWEST
DEAR PARALYZED: Make
every effort to prevent your
Daughter and grandchild from
becoming isolated from your


Abigail Van Buren,
w.dearabby.com

family. Some abusers deliber-
ately impregnate their victims
in order to keep them depen-
dent Keep the contact and the
conversation going, so that
.'when Amy finally realizes that
her boyfriend is a danger not
only to her but also to her baby,
she can come to you for help.

DEAR ABBY: We have two
children, ages 9 and 6, and
live in Northern California.
We'll be traveling to Southern
California soon to attend my
cousin's wedding. We'll be
staying with my parents.
My three unmarried adult
siblings will be coming from
out-of-state to attend the wed-
ding. My brother "Ray" is a
clear favorite with my kids.
He visits often and showers
them with attention, gifts and
outings. He loves them dearly,
but when he's around he con-
sumes all of their attention.
I feel bad for my
parents and other siblings
especially my sister, who
doesn't get to see them often
and feels she can't compete
with the gifts and rough-
house game-playing. Do


you have any suggestions
for how I might temper the
kids' enthusiasm for Uncle
Ray on this trip, so others
get to have meaningful bond-
ing time with their nephew
and niece, whom they rarely
see? MARILYN IN SAN
FRANCISCO
DEAR MARILYN: Enlist
Ray's help with this and start
talking with your children'
NOW about the special rela-
tionships you had with your
parents and your siblings
while growing up. Share
funny stories, which will
make them more "real" to the
kids. Talk about the qualities -
that make each of your family
members special, and be sure
to mention how much your
parents and ALL your sib-
lings care about them. Then
arrange in advance one or
more activities they can enjoy
together that do not include
Ray. That would be some
steps in the right direction.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: What would
you say is the difference
between a friendship and an
emotional affair? UNHAPPY
WIFE IN PENNSYLVANIA
DEAR UNHAPPY WIFE: A
friendship is a relationship in
which the spouse feels includ-
ed. An emotional affair is
one during which the spouse
writes to Dear Abby and signs
her question "Unhappy."
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Someone you share
information and knowledge
with will inspire you to
change your beliefs. Not
everyone you are close to
will agree with your new
outlook or attitude, but you
have to follow your heart and
whatever direction you feel is
best for you. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May,
-20): A day trip will help settle
your nerves and bring you
information that will cqntrib-
ute to something you want to
pursue in the future. Share
your thoughts and engage
in activities that allow you to
expand your knowledge and
friendships. -AAA*'
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Get chores out of the
way. You are best'to keep
busy. Idle time will be the
enemy that leads to a dis-
agreement with someone to
whom you are emotionally
attached. Set up a new bud-
get or update your personal
papers. **
CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Stick to what you know and do
best You don't want to chal-
lenge someone who is looking
for a fight Meddling will leave


THE tAST WORD
Eugenia Word

you sitia precarious
position. A'changeto your -
home or lifestyle will cause an
emotional setback. *
LEO (uly 23-Aug. 22): Plan
to travel or engage in a chat-
lenging activity you enjoy. You
will attract plenty of attention
as well as interest in what you
are up to and what you have
to offer. Someone exceptional
will want to partner with you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
You can expect to face oppo-
sition, no matter what you do
or say. Retreat or go out with
friends who are more forgiv-
ing of your idiosyncrasies.
Travel, shopping or taking
a class of some sort is your
best bet *** '
. LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
An emotional problem will
escalate if you take part in a
secretive act that can damage
a relationship you have with
someone close to you. You
may be trying to keep the
peace, but your efforts will t
backfire, leaving you in an
awkward position. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created front quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each leter In the cipher stands foranother.
TODAY'S CLUE: F equals J'
"XUSF'YMABS AV 0 J USOG GARS
VOZSU. LN.Y BOE WNUR NXAEANEV
TAGPNY-G POZAEJ GN JSG .GPS,
WOBGV." S K TPAGS

Previous Solution: "Thank you, God, for this good life, and forgive us If we do
not love It enough." Garrison Keillor
0 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-21


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): A great idea can turn into
lucrative investment Ask
questions and solicit help if
you need it, but be realistic
and listen to suggestions and
warnings. You can make a
profit by startingismall and
building slowly. ****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Listen and learn.
You will be caught if you do
something wrong or you
exaggerate about something
you did. You may just want
to have fun, but don't do so
at someone else's expense.
Kindness and diplomacy will
get you further ahead. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You'll hit a wall and
experience frustration if you
underestimate the extent
of what needs to be done.
Focus on home, family and
your financial security. Less
spending and more budget-
ing will pay off. *****.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Love is in the stars,
along with partnerships and
doing something you are
proud of. Collaborating with
someone you respect will ,
lead to a great friendship as
well as information that can
help you financially, contrac-
tally or legally. -**
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): It's what you do that
will bring you good fortune,
not what you say or who
you befriend. Don't let ulte-
rior motives lead you in the
wrong direction. You must
think and;do for yourself or
you will be accused of tak-
ing someone for granted.
*** '. .* .'*


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


EITHER WAY By Jeremy Newton and Tony Orbach / Edited-by Will Shortz 11213 4 s 6 7 178 | 10 |l 13 14 15 16


Across
1 Followers of
William the
Conqueror
8 ___ Pepper
11 African menace
'14 Part of a
sentence: Abbr.
17 Tracing.paper,
e.g.
'i8 Twosomes
19 Partner of raised
'21 Who said "Learn
from the masses
and then teach
them"
22 Students err?
24 Bonus reel
fodder
26 Punk offshoot
.27 Pistil
complement
.28 "10" in a bikini
29 Oklahoma city
31 Medusa killer
takes his agent
to court?
33 Feel that one's
had enough, say
37 Temptation
38 Singsong syllable
39 Part of N.C.A.A
Abbr,
- 40 Rig
41 Foreign tender?
44 Open hearings iI
courts
46 Reinforced i6e
cream container
51 What Eng.
majors pursue

For any three' answers,
call from a touch-tone
hone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


52 Kay of "Rich
Man, Poor Man"

54 Info on modern'
business cards
56 Just sort,
supposedly
58 Inferior tour,
vehicle for
Snoop Dogg?.
63 One side in a .
bullfight
66 Em and Bee, e.g.
, 67 Up
68 Recollection
from a winter
tourist in
Poland?
71 Cut, in a way
73 It serves a duel
purpose
74 Flip of a flop
75 Bit of progress
76 One encountered
in a close
encounter-
79 Disparaging
Argentine leader
V badly, injured?
87 Ads
88 Perks
e 89."Shucks!"
.: 90 Actress Thurman
93 With 65-7Down,
stuck
94 The old man
n 95 "We totally
should!"
97 One-on-one job
? for a ladies'
man?
102 Spin means.
103 Place to buy
stage props
104 Stanza
alternative
106 Former J.F.K.
line


109 Rug type
110 "Son'of Darius,
please c.pqfirmi.
m dog is'r'ale" '
113 Hip-hop's ___
Def
114 Rein in
115 Denizens:
Suffix
116 Risk
117 Approx.
118 Guitar great
Paul
119 Emergency *
broadcast
120 "Do it"

Down
1 "Don't think so!"
2 Ooplasm locale
3 Take back
4 Picture of health,
for short?
5 Best effort
6 Long Island
county west of
r Suffolk
7 Part of GPS: Abbr.
8 1970 #1 R&B hit
for James Brown
9 Not be spoken
'aloud
10 Rx qty.
11 French clergymen
12 Way pass
"13 One who gets
things
14 1998 Masters
champion Mark
15 It may be settled
over beers
16 Nativity figure
18 Stopping point?
20 A lack of
compassion
23 Come full circle?


25 "Reading
Rainbow"
.qework
2S "Thai can'tfe

29 Busy
30 Send out press
releases, e.g.
32 The Auld Sod
33 Former N.B.A.
star Spud
34 A pastel
35 "Shoot!"
36 It's stunning
42 Pres. Carter's
alma mater
43 Candy company
whose first
flavor was
Pfefferminz
44 Federal org. with
inspectors
45 Cry with a
forehead slap,
maybe
47 Pipe fitting
48 Drains
49 Cities,
informally
50 Down in the
dumps
55 Dashed fig.
56 They may be sore
after a game
57 Nest egg option,
briefly
,58 Bi.g ___
59 Italian article
60 Start of an aside,'
to tweeters
61 Jah worshiper
62 Total
63 Hampshire
mother
64 SoCal squad
65 See 93-Across


66 Italian vineyard
region
S69 "Too bad!"
70 River islands
71 Whom Han Solo
calls. "Your
Worship"
72 Constantly
shifting
75 TiVo, for one
76 Press
77 They may be
metric ... or not


78 Dedicated
offerings
80 Deluxe
81 Completely flip
82 Scaloppine,
usually
83 Show', as
something new
84 Curio displayers
85 Sound
dumbfounded
86 Their necks cAn
turn 270 degrees
90 Repulsive


91 Skirts smaller
than minis
92 Having a policy
of reverse
seniority?
94 Top 40 fare
96 Lead's
counterpart
98 Wedded
99 Producers of
scuff marks '
.100 "New ,
Sensation" band,
1988
/


101 Former telco
giant
105 Get back to
106 "That's a fact"
107 "#1" follows it
108 Given the
heave-ho
110 Sorority letters
111 Roxy Music co-
founder
112 A street drug,
for short


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
TRE ADAMS PROM ACDC
ROi 0 NORMAN LARA BONA
OMAN NONVIOLENCE S OUR
HALFLIFE DIETS RECKON
SNOOT LLDS SHO CRISPY

MOL AGHA SAR ACTSUP

I NCOG ALTAR SAL AESOP
DCNINE MONOS DAMN I GA

SCL N I NTM N ENS


ORRIS HEF CABOT ADDED
RI EN YOYOMA VERB ER
AGAMAS OIL NEVA VWS
MIDOCTOBER LYSIN
BROACH ANS ACHE TACET
RENNET V OIDS OVERCAME
AYEN RIOTSH FIELDS O K I E
GAGE INRE LENSES METHS
A LAAR BETS RETRO SSS


8 495


2 9


3 8 2


9 543


6 7 1


1 3 7


6 2 5 7


8 1 2 6


6 8 4 2


ZE 617 8 L99


6 9 17Ii L 9 L 8


8 L 9 Z L 9 6 6P


9 6 L 9 8 6 8 L




9 8 L 1 V 9 6 L

V17L9Z 899L L C6



L L 9 8 6 7 J6 Z


79 6 7 9L 8 L 9


- Page Editor: Robert Bridges 754-0428









LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


Beryl O'Connor plays cards with her friends including June
Szabo, left, in her home in Verona, N.J., Friday, Nov. 11.






Aging




in place


Beryl O'Connor stands in front of her home in Verona, N.J., Friday, Nov. 11. Eighty-year-old'Beryl is among a group
of seniors who are embracing the concept of "aging in place" maximizing the prospects for growing old in one's own
longtime home rather than move to a, retirement community or assisted-living facility.

Seniors find a little help can go a long way


By David Crary
Associated Press
VERONA, N.J. -
Retirement communities may.
have their perks, but Beryl
O'Connor says 'it would be
tough to match the birthday
surprise she got in her own
backyard when she turned 80
this year.
She was tending her gar-
den when two little girls from
next door "my buddies,"
she calls them brought
her a strawberry shortcake.
It underscored why she wants
to stay put in the house that
she and her husband, who
died 18 years ago, purchased
in thelate 1970s.
"I couldn't just be around
old people thafs not my
lifestyle," she said. "I'd go out


ditional southern fair and
some really interesting
options from unique salads
and loaded baked potatoes
to over 25 burger options!
Looking over the appetiz-
ei menu, we were intrigued
by the Queso Sticks, a
cheese stick with a twist
Much to our delight, they
offer half-orders of appetiz-
ers so we shared the Quesc
Sticks and Wings Buffalo
style. The Qeuso Sticks
are crispy fried with a tri-
color corn chip breading
that gives way to yummy,
gooey queso cheese in the.
middle. With just a hint of
heat, these are definitely
better than your run-of-
the-mill mozzarella sticks
found at chain restaurants.
The wings came out steam-
ing hot and were perfectly
cooked tender and juicy.
The mild buffalo sauce, just
one of several options to
choose from, had the right
amount of heat and a slight
sweetness that made us
wish fpor more.
Deciding on what to try
for the main event was dif-
ficult just about every
item on the menu sounded
really good. Finally, we
decided on a center cut
fried pork chop lunch spe-
cial (you can also order
it grilled) and the shrimp
platter both came with a
choice of two sides.
Just like their half-and-
half appetizers, you can
split your shrimp order
too. The fried and grilled
shrimp were both cooked
to our liking and the grilled
ones were wonderfully
marinated with a touch of
citrus flavoring to brighten
the taste. The side salad,
with ranch dressing., fea-
tured garden fresh lettuce,
tomatoes lightly topped
with shredded cheese. The
star side was the pile of
sweet potato fries. Now a
typical menu item at many
locales, these were crispy
on the outside and dreamy
on the inside. A side of
ranch, blue cheese or
honey mustard for dipping
these little treats is definite-


of my mind."
Physically spry and social-
ly active, O'Connor in many
respects is the embodiment of
"aging in place," growing old
in one's own longtime home
and remaining engaged in the
community rather than mov-
ing to a retirement facility.
Accordingto surveys, aging
in place is the overwhelm-
ing preference of Americans,
over 50. But doing it success-
fully requires both good for-
tune and support services -
things that O'Connor's pleas-
ant hometown of Verona has
become increasingly capable
. of providing.
About 10 miles north-
west of Newark, Verona has
roughly 13,300 residents nes-
fled into less than 3 square
.miles. There's a transporta-


ly optional and absolutely
not required!
The center cut pork chop
was nicely cooked with
a crispy coating. Not as
tender as we had expected
I but nonetheless enjoyable.
Green beans and cole slaw
rounded out the.meal. We
have to say that the cole
slaw is some of the best
we've tried in the area -
hand chopped, fresh cab-
bage and carrots, marry up
perfectly with the creamy
homemade dressing..
Wendy and Derrick put
their special touch on the
green beans even though
they are "out of a can" the
delicious seasonings make
them better than run of the
mill. :
A fiend of ours tried
out one of those 25 burger
options The Ranch
t Burger with, you guessed
it, sweet potato fries. All
of their burgers are hand-
pattied and cpoked to your
liking. The Ranch comes
with bacon, melted ched-
dar cheese, crispy fried
onions and ranch dressing.
Lettuce, tomato, onion and
pickles are offered on the
side. Ifs definitely a mouth
full and every bite is a true
delight
They.also offer desserts
but we were too stuffed to
give them a try. Maybe
next time.
If you've been there
before or are just hearing
about The Porterhouse
Grill, give them a try! Your
mouff-and tummy will
thank you.
The Porterhouse Grill *
is located at 894 SW Main
Boulevard,.Lake City, Fla.
They are open seven days
a week beginning at 11:00
. am. Call ahead for take-out
orders 386-754-5907.
Genie Norman and Mary
Kay Hollingsworth are
Columbia County residents
who love good food and fun,
at home and out. Their col-
umn on area restaurants
appears twice monthly.
You can contact them at
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@
gtnail.com.


tion network that takes older
people on shopping trips and
to medical appointments, and
the town is benefiting from a
$100,000 federal grant to put
in place an aging-in-place pro-
gram called Verona LIVE.
Administrated by United
Jewish Communities of
MetroWest New Jersey, the
program strives to educate
older people about avail-
able services to help them
address problems and stay
active in the community. Its
partners include the health
and .police' departments, the
rescue squad, the public and
public schools, and religious
groups.


Amongthesupportservices
are a home maintenance pro-
gram with free safety checks
and minor home repairs,
access to a social worker and
job counselor, a walking club
and other social activities.
In one program, a group of
middle-school girls 'provided,
one-on-one computer training
to about 20 older adults.
Social worker Connie
Pifher, Verona's health coor-
dinator, said a crucial part of
the overall initiative is educat-
ing older people to plan ahead
realistically and constantly
reassess their prospects for
successfully aging in place.
"There are some people


who just can do it, especially
if they.have family support,"
said Pifher, "And then you run
into people who think they
can do it, "yet really can't You
need to start educating people
before a crisis hits."
There's no question that
aginginplacehasbroadappeal.
According to an Associated
Press-LifeGoesStrong.com
poll conducted in October, 52
percent of baby boomers said
they were unlikely to move
someplace new in retirement
In a 2005 survey by AARP 89
percent of people age .50 and'
older said they would prefer
to remain in their home indefi-
nitely as they age.


That yearning, coupled
with a widespread 'dread of
going to a nursing home, has
,led to a nationwide surge, of
programs aimed ,at helping
people stay in their neighbor-
hoods longer.
Verona LIVE is a ver-
sion of one such concept
the Naturally Occurring
Retirement Community, or
NORC. That can be either
. a specific housing complex
or a larger neighborhood in
which many of the residents
have aged in place over a
long period of time and need
a range of support services
in order to continue living in
their homes.


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TASTE BUDDIES:

The Porterhouse Grill
Continued From Page 1D


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SBank







SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2011


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz


GARFIELD/ by Jim Davis


6@ 0 00


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FIGURE CAUGHT ME WITH STRONG ARMS...


...'BEFORE A TERRIBLE FORCE PULLED US
ASUNDER AND SENT ME REELING
BACK TO THIS WORLD.


by parker and hart


~1~


....for rest an4 shelter of the night....


The Verse That Could Happen


....for health and4 food.... ...fo


WHERE HAVE W WHERE
YOU BEEN? DO YOU
THINK?


By ..EAN'y f el JoHN AMARSHAU~


CRANBERRY K
SAUCE, FRESH
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. **


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and
WALKER


EVERYTHING I NEED TO
MAKE MY OWN
JTUFFING...


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CLOSE TO HOME/ by John McPherson


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