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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01703
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 19, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01703
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32G11-1943


Reporter


Saturday, November 19, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 253 0 75 cents



Tip leads to arrest of Fort White man


Bust nets $140K
in pot, say police.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Authorities
confiscated more than $140,000
worth of marijuana as the result
of an anonymous tip and arrested
a Fort White man Thursday night


when a marijuana grow house was
raided in southern
Columbia County,
reports say.
Todd Martin
Dorsett, 32, 1357
SWWilsonSprings
Road, was charged
with cultivation of
marijuana and pos-
session of more Dorsett .,
than 20 grams
of marijuana in connection with


the case. He was booked into the
Columbia County Detention Facility
on $20,000 bond.
" According to sheriffs reports,
the Columbia Cbunty Multi-
Jurisdictional Task Force execut-
ed a search warrant at the home
after patrol deputies were led to
the ;home by an anonymous tip.
Detectives found 142 live marijuana
plants growing in various locations
inside the home and in a green-
house on the property


The Multi-Jurisdictional Task
Force is composed of detec-
tives from the Columbia County
Sheriffs Office, Lake City Police
Department, Florida Department
of Law Enf6rcembnt and the U.S.
Drug Enforcement Administration.
Sgt Ed Seifert, Columbia County
Sheriffs Office public information
officer, said more than 100 grams
of dried marijuana were found in
the home and he noted that the esti-
mated street value of the marijuana


is in excess of $140,000.
"The house was a single wide
mobile home located in a rural area
of Ft White," Seifert said. 'The
suspect did have lighting, fertilizer
and various growing paraphernalia
in the home."
He said the greenhouse was
approximately 30 x 40 feet is size
and located on the property.
"Additional arrests may be pos-
sible as the investigation moves
forward," Seifert said.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Judge E. Vernon Douglas and Karen Woulf hang ornaments on the 12-foot-tall Relay for Life/American Cancer Sopiety Tree of Hope and Honor Friday at
the Lake City Mall during the inaugural tree lighting ceremony., ,



A tradition in the making


Tree of Hope and Honor
unveiling ceremony to
become an annual event.

By TONY BRIT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Residents, family members and loved ones,
who have battled cancer were honored with
keepsake ornaments hung on a Lake City Mall
Christmas tree Friday night
The ceremony was part of the inaugural,
Relay for Life/American Cancer Society Tree'
of Hope and Honor unveiling ceremony.
Judge E. Vernon Douglas, who came up
with the idea for the fundraiser, said the event
will become an annual occasion so people can


remember their friends and family who fought
the good fight against cancer with courage.
"We're starting a tradition here in this com-
munity where everyone can publicly honor
the folks that they want to :remember and
their family' members that are fighting," he
said. "All the money in that honor will go to
the American Cancer Society and the folks
will have-a keepsake, a commemorative, num-
bered ornament for their relative."
Nicholson placed the first ornament on the
tree in honor of the Lake City Reporter on
behalf of Douglas, who is an event sponsor
along with Glenn Hunter and Dr. Anthony
Trott Douglas placed an ornament on the tree
in honor of his father, Elmer Douglas, who
died of cancer. Trott placed an ornament on
the tree in honor of Wayne Douglas.
S' TRADITION continued on 3A


Nathan Pence watches as his wife,.Kelly (center),
is hugged by lymphoma survivor Karen Woulf.
Kelly Pence, a unit executive director, survived
ovarian cancer and will be celebrating her one-
year anniversary on Dec. 13.


Jobless

rate in

county

drops

Unemployment
down 0.7% over
one year ago.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com.
Columbia County's jobless
rate for October fell seven-
tenths of a point from a year
ago, according to figures
released by the state Friday.
According to the Florida
Department of Economic
Opportunity, the unemploy-
ment rate for October was 9.8
percent, down .5 percent from
September. The October 2010
rate was 10.5 percent.
Phyllis Marty, Florida
Crown Workforce Board
Project director, said unem-
ployment for the Florida
Crown Workforce Board
Region 7, which includes
Columbia, Dixie, Union and
Gilchrist counties, was 9.6
,percent in October, down sev-
I en-tenths from the'previous
period last year.
"In October 2011, the
region's unemployment rate
was 0.5 -percentage points
below the state rate of 10.1
recentt, she said. "Out of a
labor force of 49,900 people in
the region, there were 4,812
people unemployed."
Marty said the local trend
is in line with state statistics.
"Job growth, the number of
jobs in the state is up 93,900
6ver the year an increase
of 1.3 percent from October
2010," she said. "The over-the-
year growth rates in the past
two months were the stron-
gest since March 2007."
With the Christmas Holiday
JOBLESS. continued on 3A


Woman tries historic crossing


ASSOCIATED PRESS
British adventurer Felicity Aston poses fob a photo by a map in Punta Arenas,
Chile. Aston plans to ski.by herself across the Antarctica, all the way to the other
side of the frozen continent. If she manages to complete this journey of more
than 1,000 miles in late January, she'll become the first human person to cross
Antarctica alone under her own power.


By MICHAEL WARREN
Associated Press

BUENOS AIRES,.Argentina Reaching the
end of the Earth has become almost routine
these days: One hundred years after Norway's
Roald Amundsen beat Britain's RE Scott to the
South Pole, more than 30 teams are trying for it
this year.
Some will kite-sail over the vast Antarctic ice
and snow. Others will drive in from the coast.
A wealthy handful will be dropped off at one-
degree north latitude, for relatively leisurely
guided treks to the pole.
But Felicity Aston has been there, done that.
Weather and her own considerable stamina per-
mitting, the 33-year-old British adventurer will
only pause at the pole long enough to pick up
more food and fuel. Her plan is to keep on ski-
ing, by herself, all the way to the other side of the
frozen continent and become the first person
using only muscle power to cross Antarctica


il CALL US*: Opinion ................ 4A
(386) 752-1293 7 5 5 7 People................. 2A
SUBSCRIBE TO Obituaries ..............6A
THE REPORTER: Partly Cloudy Avc i
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alone.
If she manages to complete this journey of
more than 1,000 miles (1,700 kilometers) in late
January, she would also set a record for the lon-
gest solo polar expedition by a woman, at about
70 days.
"This is my first solo expedition, the first time
I will have spent this length of time without
company," she said in a phone interview with the
Associated Press. "It's part of the challenge of
the expedition, to see how I'll cope with it"
Aston spoke from Punta Arenas, Chile, where
she was boarding a charter flight Friday after
losing a precious week waiting for weather to
break. From a base in Antarctica, she'll then take
a second plane to her starting point at the foot of
the Leverett Glacier, where the Ross Ice Shelf
meets the rocky coast /
Already, she was "channeling down," getting
her mind set on what would be a grueling rou-
tine.
CROSSING continued on 3A

iN PEOPLE COMING
TODAY SUNDAY
Obama sends note Local news
to Heavy D funeral roundup


La










2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


FLORIDA"
u Wednesday:
10-24-34-37-39-45
x4


AH3. Friday: 4- Friday:
Afternoon: 5-7-7 Afternoon: 4-8-5-7


na Thursday:
9-11-24-26-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Wagner not a suspect in Wood's death


LOS ANGELE,

sheriffs detective says
Robert Wagner is not a
suspect in the 1981 death
Wo. f his wife, actress Natali
Wood.
Lt John Corina said that new
information is substantial enough
to take another look at the case.
Wood's body was found floating off
a Southern California island as the
couple were on a boating excursion.
The death was ruled an accidental
drowning.
Corina was asked if Wagner is a
suspect and the detective said no.
The police news conference
comes as a captain of the boat said
on national TV Friday that he lied,
to investigators about Wood's death
and blamed Wagner for her drown-
ing.
The circumstances of her death
remain one of HollywQod's endur-
ing mysteries and continue to create
renewed intrigue, with homicide
detectives on Thursday unexpected-
ly re-opening the case that had lpng
been classified as a tragic accident
On Nov. 29, 1981, Wood drowned
after spending several hours drink-
ing on Catalina Island in a yacht witt
Wagner, fellow actor Christopher
Walken and the ship's captain,
Dennis Davern.

Obama sends note for
Heavy D funeral
MOUNT VERNON, NY Hip-
hop star Heavy D was remembered
through laughter and tears at a
funeral service Friday that included
anecdotes from longtime friend
Diddy'and words of encouragement
for his young daughter, delivered
in a letter, from President Barack
Obama.


Natalie Wood and her husband Robert
The Fine Young Cannibals," in 1959.


h1 Heavy D, whose real name was
Dwight Myers, was influential in the
development of rap as it grew into
phenomenon in the late 1980s and
1990s.' He stood out from the pack
With his rhymes, typified by a posi-
tive vibe and a lightheartedness that
endeared him to so many.,
Schwarzenegger bruised,
battered. filmingmovie
'ALBUQUERQUE, NM.M 'Arnold
Schwarzenegger has been banged
around.and bloodied while filming
a contemporary Western movie in.
Albuquerque. ,


ASSOCIATED PREn
Wagner areiade up for their roles in "All


The New York Postreports the
former talifornia governor posted
on Twitter that he got a little banged
up on the set Thursday of "The Last
Stand," in which he portrays a small
town sheriff who takes on a drug
Kingpin,
' Schwarzenegger thanked the med-
ical staff who returned him to action
an hour later.
A photo shows what appears to be
a bloody cut running down from the
'middle of Schwarzenegger's fore-
'head. I
Schwarzenegger did not provide
details of what happened,
(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Actor Alan Young is
92.
Talk show host Larry
King is 78.
Talk show host Dick
Cavett is 75.
Broadcasting and
sports mogul Ted Turner
is 73.
Fashion designer
Calvin Klein is 69.


Newscaster Ann
Curry is 55.
Actress Meg Ryan
is 50.
Actress-director Jodie
Foster is 49.
Actor Jason Scott Lee
is 45.
Olympic gold medal
gymnast Kerri Strug is 34.
Actor Reid Scott is 34.


Lake Cit
HOW TO REACH US
Main number... ... (386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through .Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City; Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City. Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon...'.754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.comn)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by. 630 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service. .
In Columbia Counrty, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties whehe home delivery
Is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ...............,755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
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Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
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52 Weeks.................. $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.,
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
,executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
,space.. Andthanks;for reading.


.AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER .


Overpaid official
abruptly resigns
TALLAHASSEE An
official with Gov. Rick
Scott's administration -
given three years to repay
the state $21,000 is no lon-
ger on the job.
Dean Kowalchyk,
general counsel for the
Department of Elder
Affairs, abruptly resigned
earlier this week.
It appears that the
resignation was forced
as Kowalchyk says in his
letter that he has decided
to pursue other opportu-
nities. He did not respond
immediately to a request
for comment. A spokes-
woman for the agency
refused to discuss person-
nel matters.
Kowalchyk in late
December was given a
check to cover his unused
vacation when it appeared
the Scott administration
planned to replace him..
But Kowalchyk never
left his job and it wasn't
until July that he started
repaying the state. He
made his first payment
just days before he
received a raise.

Judge deemed
unfit; removed
TALLAHASSEE The
state Supreme Court has
removed a central Florida
judge from the bench.
The justices on Friday
unanimously ruled
Circuit Judge N. James
Turner of Osceola County
was unfit to hold office
due to a pattern of unethi-
cal and illegal conduct.
That includes repeat-
edly hugging and kissing
a female court worker
without her permission'
and injecting himself into
her personal life.
The justices also found
Turner violated judicial
ethics by representing his
mother in a foreclosure
case while he was a sit-


ting judge.
They said he violated
the state's campaign
finance law by accepting
and failing to report a
$30,000 campaign loan
from his mother. The loan
also violated a $500 con-
tribution limit.
Turner's removal had
been recommended by
the Judicial Qualificatidn
Commission. The
Supreme Court suspend-
ed him in September.

Scott says health
law won't prevail
WEST PALM BEACH
- Gov. Rick Scott says
he's convinced, the land-
mark federal health care
law will not prevail at the
U.S. Supreme Court.
In an editorial board
interview Thursday
the Republican says he
believes the challenges of
Florida and other states
will win at the high court.
He says, "It's not the
law of the lan~d. I don't
believe it will ever be the
law of the land."
Scott is a multimil-
lionaire former hospital
executive who founded
Conservatives for
Patients' Rights, which
opposed President Barack
Obama's health care
efforts.
He says if the Obama
administration prevails
at the Supreme Court,
Florida will implement
the law.

Tortoise permits
streamlined
KEY LARGO, Fla. -
Developers will have an
easier time getting per-
mits to relocate Florida
gopher tortoises from
prematurely cleared land
inhabited by the threat-
ened reptiles.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission agreed to
streamline the permit-


ting process at a meeting
Thursday in Key Largo.
The panel's gopher
management plan coordi-
nator, Deborah Burr, said
the revision balances tor-
toise conservation with
the needs of people.
It will conform with
the plan's objective of
decreasing tortoise
deaths on lands set for
development through
relocation.
The new permitting
process also will help
meet another goal of
repopulating public con-
servation lands that have
few or no tortoises.
'The creatures can live
up to 60 years. They once
were common in Florida
and widely hunted for
food.
Now rare, their main
threat currently is loss of
habitat.

Jury recommends
death for slaying
TAMPA A jury has
recommended by a vote
of 8-4 that a Tampa Bay
area man be executed for
fatally shooting a police
officer.
The Hillsborough County
jury made its recommenda-
tion Thursday. The same
panel found Humberto -
Delgado Jr. guilty Tuesday
of first-degree murder. A
judge will make the final
decision.
Authorities say Tampa
Cpl. Mike Roberts stopped
Delgado and searched him
in August 2009. Delgado
pistol-whipped Roberts and
then shot him while he
was on the ground,
A defense attorney
asked jurors for leniency,
explaining that Delgado's
mental problems contrib-
uted to the'shooting. The
judge could still ignore
the death penalty recom-
mendation and sentence
Delgado to life in prison.
(AP)


;- PARTLY .. MOSTLY|
I CLOUDY SUNNY


HI 75L057 HI80LO60


Talaahassee Lake Ciy
73/56 .. 75/57
Peaesv
70/61 PamaCity 77/5
70/58


Tam
82/


TEMPERATURES
High Friday
Low Friday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low .

PRECIPITATION
Friday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


72
46
74
51
88 in 1957
29 in 1970

0.00"
0.97"
32.24"
1.26"
44.89"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today


6:59 a.m.
5:32 p.m.
7:00 anm.
5:32 p.m.

12:45 a.m.


MOSTLY
SSUNNY


HI 80 LO 53


*ad'itle Cape Canaveral
\ 73/59 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
file Daytona Beacidi Fort Myers
9 78j/63 Gahiesvllle
Ocala Jacksonville
79/60 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveralake Cty
81/63 78/66 Miami
pa 0 Naples
66 West Palm Beach Ocala
81.71 Orlando
Ft Lauderdal Panama City
FL Myers 81 174 Pensacola
85/66 Napes Tallahassee
84/67 Miami Tampa


MM3E

Today's
ultraviolet
radiation risk


Sunday
79/67/pc
80/64/s
82/75/pc
85/67/pc
80/62/pc
77/61/s
80,'73' pc
80;60,'pc
83/73/pc
85, 68, pc
80,63 'pc
82/64-/pc
7 7, 61 ,pc
77/63/pc
19,'55,'s
83,'66'pc
78/55/pc
82,72. pc


Monday
78/64/pc
79/61/pc
82/71/pc
83'64./pc
80,56.' pc
77, 58, pc
80/72/pc
81,'55, pc
82.'69,pc
84,/65/pc
81/57,pc
82. 61,'pc
78.57,s
77.'62,s
80,/53/s
81, 63.pc
79.56/s
81.'6 7'pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Moonset today 1:26 p.m. for the area on
Moonrise tom. 1.48 a.m. it 1
Moonsettom. 2:02 p.m.
Oll Hweather.com

Nov. Dec. Dec.. Dec. A Forecasts, data and
25 2 10 24 3 graphics 2011 Weather
New First Full New wF| | YF Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
*Wa P wwwweatherpublishercorn


On this date in
1981, an early
snowstorm brought
as much as a foot
of snow to the Twin
Cities of Minnesota.
The weight of the
snow caused the
newly inflated fab-
ric dome of the
Hubert Humphrey
Metrodome to col-
lapse.


Daily Scripture
"Sanctify them by the truth;
your word is truth."
-John 17:17

Thought for Today

"It is always brave to say what
everyone thinks."
George Duhamel
French author (1884-1966)


uKey Wei 82/72 Valdosta
-y.West w. Palm Beach


tA*EbT ALM ANAC


__ s80/ 73


SATURDAYl^


SUNllj


,ETI IY TEHU


"*II. II a NeJ I U t..11.1 i

Like Cit Reporte









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011 3A


Respect .iI.'" 3

a part of

Muslims'


protest

By CHRIS HAWLEY
and EILEEN SULLIVAN
Associated Press
NEW YORK Hundreds
of Muslims prayed in a
lower Manhattan park
and marched to New York
Police headquarters Friday
to protest a decade of police.
infiltrating mosques and
spying on Muslim neigh-
borhoods.
Bundled in winter
clothes, men and 'women
knelt as the call to prayer
echoed off the cold stone of
government buildings.
"Being Muslim does not
negate our nationality,"
Imam Talib Abdur-Rashid
told the crowd of about 500
gathered in Foley Square,
not far from. City Hall and
local courthouses. "We are
unapologetically Muslim
and uncompromisingly
American."
The demonstration was
smaller' and more sub-
dued than the Occupy Wall
Street protests that led to
clashes with police and
made headlines worldwide.
Police wore windbreakers,
not riot gear, and protest-
ers called for improved
relations with police.
"We want for, you to


People from New York's Muslim'community chant slogans during a rally in Foley Square on
Friday in New York. -


respect us," Abdur-Rashid
said, "and we will respect
you."
It was the first organized
opposition to the NYPD's
,intelligence tactics since an
Associated Press investiga-
tion revealed. widespread
.spying programs that doc-
umented .every -aspect of
Muslim life in New York.
Police infiltrated mosques
and student groups.
Plainclothes officers cata-
logued Middle Eastern res-
taurants and their clientele.
Analysts built databases
on Arab cab drivers and
monitored Muslims who
changed their names.
"Had this been happen-
.ing to any other religious
group, all of America


would be outraged," said
Daoud Ibraheein, 73, a
retired graphic artist from
Brooklyn.
Following the prayer ser-
vice, the Muslims joined
by about 50 Occupy Wall
Street demonstrators :-
crowded the sidewalk for
the short walk to the large.
police headquarters build-
ing known as One Police
Plaza. They stayed only
briefly, chanting for Police
Commissioner Ray Kelly's
ouster, before returning to
Foley Square.
Protesters carried signs
that said "NYPD Watches
Us. Who Watches NYPD?"
A dozen or so uniformed
police officers monitored
the demonstration and fol-


lowed the march, but there
were no clashes between
protesters and police
At an unrelated news
conference Friday, Kelly
told reporters that he "cat-
egorically" denied the idea
that the NYPD was spying.
Kelly and his intelligence
chief, David Cohen, have
transformed the NYPD into
one of the nation's most
aggressive domestic intelli-
gence agencies. It operates
far outside the city borders
and its manpower and bud-
get give it capabilities that
even the federal, govern-
ment does not have. NYPD
analysts were among the
first to study the thorny
question of how people are
radicalized.


Kentucky teen killed as SUV hits buggy


By BRUCE SCHREINER family's farm Friday in Hart County to
Associated Press pay their respects. There were about
R16 buggies parked at the farm, and all
CUB RUN, Ky. An Amish teen- had reflective orange safety triangles.
ager was killed when the horse-drawn Byler was not driving a traditional
buggy he was driving without a safety buggy, but a two-wheeled cart that
reflector was struck from behind by was low to the ground, said a neigh-
a sport-utility vehicle in south-central bor who was visiting the family Friday
Kentucky. afternoon and wished to be identified
Aaron. Byler, 18, of Cub Run was only with his last name as Mr. Miller.
thrown from the buggy by the! colli-. Mafny Amish decline to identify them-
sion late Thursday afternoon and died, selves to reporters and reject outward
while being airlifted to a hospital. "_ -ign odf pride-or'self-ptblicity.' '
Dozens of Amish were at the Byler Miller said Byler had stopped on


the road less than a mile from his
farm to give his. younger brother a
ride when the SUV struck Byler from
behind.
Miller said the Amish in the area
commonly display the reflective slow-
moving vehicle signs on their bug-.
gies. He didn't know why Byler's cart
Byler didn't have a sign.
"Like boys do, he didn't have it on,"
he said. -
The. farm is located on a narrow
windng state highway ini a hilly sec-
tion of south-central Kentucky.


"Your life reduces to eating, sleeping
and skiing. It's a form of meditation.
You get into a rhythm, and all you can
hear is your own breathing, your own
heartbeat, the sound of your clothes
and your skis. It's kind of an altered
state," she said. "A trip like this is all
about keeping going the stamina,
endurance, keeping going day after
day after day."
Aston has plenty of experience in
long-endurance expeditions. She spent
nearly three years as a meteorologist
with the British Antarctic Survey, and
in 2009 led an all-woman group from
the coast to the South Pole. Her long
list of travel adventures includes ski-
iig across the Canadian Arctic, cross-
ing the Greenland ice sheet and trek-
king over Siberia's frozen Lake Baikal.
She's also run across Morocco's
Sahara Desert and tracked jaguars in
Paraguay.
"I've been preparing for 10 years
and only now do I feel capable of
this. Every. trip teaches you some-
thing: how tough you are, what your
personal limits are, how to wrap up a
blister better, how not to get sick," she
said. "Particularly on the psychological
side, each journey I've had has taught
me something about how to feel better
about a situation, how to react, how to
behave."


The 5-foot-11 (1.80-meter) Aston
Weighs around 170 pounds (77 kilos)
and she'll be hauling up to 187 pounds
(85 kilos) of gear on a sledge. It
includes freeze-dried food, fuel and
a camp stove for melting snow. She's
also bringing along a solar recharger
and two MP3 players one has music
donated by her friends, everything
from peaceful ska tunes to heavy metal
and. "fluffy pop songs;" the other has
mostly audio books from her father
on "the whole of British history ... 300
hours of itt"
Antarctic Treaty rules require pri-
vate support teams to be able to pull
people out in a pinch, and Aston is
carrying two Iridium satellite phones
. and a GPS beacon to keep in touch
with hers.
"She has to 'have the beacon,
because it's so easy for a solo person
to get in trouble," said David Rootes, a
veteran polar guide who runs Antarctic
Logistics and Expeditions. The com-
pany is supporting most of this year's
trips, making about 20 flights into
Antarctica and moving about 500
people around the continent in all.
Most are traveling in groups, hoping
to make it in time for a polar party on
Dec. 13, (South Pole time), the centen-
nial of Amundsen's achievement
'"What Felicity is doing is not routine


at all," Rootes, said. "Until she hits the
pole, she's really out of contact with
anybody at all."
Rootes met Aston years ago at a
Royal Geographic Society function in
London, and has followed her exploits
in the clubby world of -adventurers
ever since.
"She's avery substantial woman. You
have to have a hell of a lot of drive and
single-mindedness to do this, because
everything in the world will get in the
way to stop you," he said.
Once Aston sets off, climbing
thousands of feet (meters) in altitude
through the Transantarctic Mountains
and onto the continent's vast central
plateau, she'll be utterly alone, with no
other living thing in sight Then, she'll
have to push through fierce headwinds
for more than 300 miles (500 kilome-
ters) as she follows a route along 132
West Longitude to the pole.
Her way out skiing along the 80
West Longitude line to the company's
base camp on Hercules Inlet on the
Ronne Ice Shelf would presumably
be easier.
"The West Winds, quite notorious.
That's the bit I'm most worried about
in terms of weather, but once I'm past
the pole, I've got the wind at my back,"
she said. "So in the scheme of things, it
works out pretty good this way!"


McDonald's


egg supplier


told to get lost


By STEVE KARNOWSKI
Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS -
McDonald's Corp. said
Friday it has dropped a
Minnesota-based egg sup-
plier after an animal rights
group released an under-
cover video of operations at
the egg producer's farms in
three states,
. The video by Mercy for
Animals shows what the
group calls animal cruel-
ty at five Sparboe Farms
facilities in Iowa, Minnesota
and Colorado. Its images
include a worker swinging a
bird around by its feet, hens
packed into cramped cages,
male chicks being tossed
into plastic bags to suffocate
and workers cutting off the
tips of chick's beaks.
"The behavior on tape is
disturbing and 'completely
unacceptable. McDonald's
wants to assure our custom-
ers that we demand humane
treatment of animals by our
suppliers," Bob Langert,
McDIonald's vice president
for sustainability, said in a
statement
The move also followed
a warning letter to Sparboe
Farms dated Wednesday
from the U.S. Food and
Drug Administration that
said inspectors found
"serious violations" at five
Sparboe facilities of fed-
eral regulations meant to
prevent salmonella.J The
warning said eggs from
those facilities "have been
prepared, packed, or held
under insanitary conditions
whereby they may have
become contaminated with
filth, or whereby they may:
have been rendered injuri-
ous to health."


Sparboe Companies LLC-
'issued a statement calling
the video "shocking" and
saying an internal investiga-
tion identified four employ--
ees "who.were complicit in
this disturbing activity" and
were fired this month.
"I was deeply saddened
to see the story because this
isn't who Sparboe Farms-'
is," owner and president
Beth Sparboe Schnell said
in a statement posted on'
a company website. "Acts'
depicted in the footage are
totally unacceptable and,
completely at odds with our'
values as egg farmers. In
fact, they are in direct viola-'
tion of our animal care code
of conduct, which all of our-
employees read, sign and
follow each day."
Sparboe, which is head-'
quartered in Litchfield, also'
said on the website that'
it has made management
changes, taken corrective
actions sought by the FDA,'
arid begun retraining all
barn workers in proper ani-'
mal care procedures.
Sparboe describes itself
as the fifth-largest shell egg
producer and marketer in
the United States, operat-
ing seven processing plants
supported by 33 egg-laying
and 'pullet production sites
in Iowa, Minnesota and
Colorado. The company
!says it serves retail, whole'
sale and foodservice cus-
tomers in 26 states..
Sparboe, spokesman
Lyle Orwig said Friday the
company has a "zero toler-
ance policy" for any animal
abuse or cruelty. He said all
employees are trained by a
veterinarian and work with
a crew leader who also has
been trained.


JOBLESS: Ratfterps


Continued From Page L
season quickly approaching,
'Marty projected data would
show continued decreases
in unemployment rates.
"We can look forward
to a continued job growth
through the holiday season
and into the beginning 'of
next year," she said.
Florida's unemployment


o" e! i .
rate for October was 10.3
percent the lowest since"
June 2009 when it was 10.2
percent Florida's unem-
ployment rate is down'
three-tenths of a point from
September and is 1.5 per-;
centage points lower than
the October 2010 rate of
11.8 percent


TRADITION: Tree of Hope


Continued From Page L
Kim Nicholson, Columbia
County Relay For Life vol-
unteer event chairman,
said the event was held for
awareness and educational
purposes, but also serves as
a fundraiser.
"We wanted to honor
everyone in Columbia
County who is a cancer sur-
vivor and raise hope and
awareness that we might
be able to find a cure,"
Nicholson said. 'We also
wanted to honor our loved
ones thathave passed. There-
are a lot of us that have lost
people to this ugly disease


and we wanted to make sure
they honor them too."
The ornaments are $20
each and only 500 orna-
ments will be placed on the
Christmas tree each year.
The American Cancer
Society will have a table
setup outside TJ Maxx from
4-8 p.m. Monday Fridays
and during mall hours on,
the weekend for people who
wish to purchase one of the
ornaments. The tree will
be in the mall until January
2, 2012 and then the orna-
ments will be returned to
family members.


NOTICE OF MEETING
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
CITY OF LAKE CITY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Lake City Community Redevelopment
Agency will hold a meeting on Monday, November 21, 2011. The meeting is scheduled for
6:30 p.m.. at City Hall, 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for any of the meetings
identified above, as addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact the City
'Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

All interested persons are invited to attend.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


Reverse Mortgage

INCOME FOR LIFE
CSESE5I. .


MCELHANEY'S
MORTGAGE SERVICES ,
Your Local Mortgage Connection
291 SW Sisters Welcome Rd. NDI


CROSSING: British woman attempts to make history

Continued From Page 1A


*


l













OPINION


Saturday, November 19, 2011


ONE.


ONE
OPINION


Obama's


Kenyan


move
T" he Government
Accountability Office
(GAO) released
a report Monday.
confirming Obama
administration meddling in the
drafting of controversial provi-
sions of Kenya's constitution,
which were ratified last year.
Officials funneled $18 million
in taxpayer cash to a number
of groups, at least one of which
-openly worked to reverse the
African country's ban on killing
the unborn. U.S. law prohibits
lobbying for or against abortion
with foreign aid money.
The U.S. Agency for
International Development
(USAID) skirted the ban by
using grant recipients to help
re-write the country's charter.
"The groups that were supported
are the pro-abortion groups in
Kenya not just some group
that may have an interest," Rep.
Christopher H. Smith told The "
Washington Times.
In 2008, Kenya charged a "'com-
mittee of experts" with drafting
anew constitution that would be
presented to voters for approval.
This committee's original draft
only stated that "every person has
the right to life." The International
Development Law Organization
(IDLO), which took $400,000 in
administration cash, provided
'Inpuft to the committee. The
next draft allowed abortion when
the "health of the mother is in
danger, or if permitted by any,
other written law." This language
made it to the final, ratified consti-
tution. -
The loophole essentially gives
the government the freedom
to grant abortion on demand.
'"Health can be defined to be virtu-
ally anything," said Mr. Smith.
The Siljander Amendment, a
provision of federal appropria-
tions law, has outlawed overseas
abortion lobbying since 1981.
However, the grant recipients
and subrecipients were merely -
"civic education groups" that
took money to correct "misun-
derstandings" about the abortion
provision. :
It's bad enough President
Obama is pushing a hard-left
agenda on the United States. He
'shouldn't use taxpayer dollars to
spread his "change" overseas as
well.
The Washington Times

Lake City Reporter
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through the teamwork of professionals
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work.
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A s we sort through
our reasons for
gratitude this
Thanksgiving,
we can thank our
lucky stars that Newt Gingrich
will never be president of the
United States.
Gingrich, currently the flavor
of the GOP minute, is an inter-
esting man with larger-than-life
strengths in that he is a shrewd,
bombastic collector of opinions.
He also has some staggering
weaknesses, such as arrogance,
lack of discipline and hypocrisy.
But let us not savage the man;
he's already self-destructed more
times than seems humanly pos-
sible.
Where to start? He was
ejected from his post as speaker
of the House for ethics violations.
Since such travesties abound in
the House, that is really saying
something. -
He fought hard to impeach
former President Bill Clinton for
lying about Monica Lewinsky
when, at the same time, he,
Gingrich, was cheating on wvife
No. 2 (with whom he had cheat-
ed against wife No. 1 while she
was recovering from cancer sur-
gery) with wife No. 3. Gingrich
also was found guilty of lying by
the House ethics committee.
After complaining that he was
seated at the rear of Air Force
One on a presidential trip to
'Israel, Gingrich shut down the
government in 1995. The New
York Daily News lampooned him
on its front page as a giant baby
in diapers under the headline:
"Cry Baby." ,
His current campaign for pres-
ident stumbled when we found
out he had a line of credit for


mericans love their
horses, both real and
fictional Not long
ago, a book about a
beloved Depression-.
era racehorse, Seabiscuit,
became a bestseller and an
Oscar nominee for best picture.
Two things Americans won't
do for their horses is eat them'
or much care for them in their
old age and when they are in
surplus. Other countries in
Europe and Asia do, however,
eat them.
At one time U.S. slaugh-
terhouses did a decent busi-
ness in butchering horses for
foreign consumption. But this
offended the sensibilities of
many Americans and pressure
grew on Congress to stop it.
The horse advocates had sen-
timentality on their side; the
slaughterhouses, economics.
Sentimentality won.


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANO
VI


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.org.
over a million dollars at Tiffa8y's,
the posh New York jewelry store.
But even as his campaign was
falling apart, he went-on vacation
with his wife on a cruise off the
coast of Greece. Most of his cam-
paign staff quit in disgust
And now we know that after
publicly trashing Freddie Mac,
the troubled mortgage giant
recently taken over by the gov-
ernment, we found out that he
was paid at least $1.6 million by
the same Freddie Mac, which
is anathema to conservatives.
He first said he was paid as an
"historian." Yeah, right That is
extremely surprising to the bulk
of the world's historians who
won't make that in a lifetime.
Later Gingrich acknowledged
his company, Gingrich Group,
was paid because he was a
former speaker of the House
and gave "strategic advice" to
Freddie Mac. True, he was not
a registered lobbyist but he was
paid for his influence, as are
many ex-lawmakers. Gingrich
also gave "strategic advice" to
such big companies as Microsoft
and IBM.
Hypocritically, Gingrich would
like to imprison Rep. Barney
Frank, D-Mass., and former sen-
ator Chris Dodd, D-Conn., spon-
sors of legislation aimed at more
tightly regulating Wall Street, for


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
In 2005, Congress cut off
funds for U.S. Department of
Agriculture inspection of horse
slaughter facilities and without
those inspections the meat can-
not be shipped across'state lines.
Horses are still slaughtered
by rendering plants for animal
food and hides, and an estimat-
ed 140,000 live U.S. horses are
shipped each year to slaughter-
houses in Canada and Mexico.
The clause with the ban was
quietly dropped this week from
a must-pass federal spending


their ties to lobbyists; Frank, for
his ties to a lobbyist who sup-.
ported Freddie Mac.
Of Frank in particular,
Gingrich said in a GOP debate,
"Go back and look at the lobby-
ists he was close to at Freddie
Mac. Everybody in the media
who wants to go after the busi-
ness community ought to start
by going after the politicians who
have been at the heart of the
sickness."
Frank responded that
Gingrich is "a lobbyist and a
liar." Dodd, now Washington
representative (lobbyist) for the
Motion Picture Association of
America, defended the banking
legislation.
Gingrich is trashing people
he once praised (Nancy Pelosi),
says he has found maturity and
religion (no more divorces?)
and called out President Barack
Obama for having a "Kenyan"
world view. In a 24-hour period,
two different pundits said
Gingrich has more baggage than
a 747 jet and all the skycaps at
JFKAirport,
Gingrich is momentarily on
top of the GOP heap because of
support from tea partiers, who
are desperate for any candidate
but Mitt Romney. But Gingrich
has a history of even more flip
flops than the former governor
of Massachusetts and although
tea partiers say they hate
Washington, Gingrich is the con-
summate Washington insider.
Speaking of turkeys ... But that'
is an insult to a great American
bird.

Ann McFeatters writes this
column for Scripps Howard News
Service.


bill that will again make it pos-
sible for U.S. processors to
butcher horses for human don-
sumption here and abroad. It is
likely to pass.
A coalition of horse breeders,
slaughterhouses, veterinarians
and exporters say lifting the ban
will create jobs and be good for
the economy and, moreover, cut
down on the number of horses
abandoned or starved.
Animal rights activists have
vowed to win passage of a bill
that would permanently ban
horse slaughter in the U.S. and
the export of horses to foreign
packinghouses. But most mem-
bers of Congress, in an election
year, have little appetite for
getting into a fight over horse-
meat

* Dale McFeatters is an editorial
writer and columnist for Scripps
Howard News Service.


4A


THEIR
E W


Insider,

trading

on the Hill

Want to get rich?
Get elected
to the U.S.
Congress.
Recent rev-
elations show that alot of
members of Congress came to
Washington to do good and
stayed to do well. Very well.
The most celebrated case
involves Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-San
Francisco, the speaker of the
House of Representatives from
2007-10 and the current House
Democratic leader. A segment
of CBS' "60 Minutes" Sunday
reported that she and her hus-
band "have participated in at least
eight" initial public offerings of
stock, which generally provide
lucrative profit opportunities.
"60 Minutes" said that one
such IPO came in 2008 from
the credit card company Visa,
"just as a troublesome piece
of legislation that would have
hurt credit card companies
began making its way through
the House. Undisturbed by a
potential conflict of interest, the
Pelosis purchased 5,000 shares
of Visa at the initial price of
$44. Two days later it was
trading at $64. The credit card
legislation never made it to the
floor of the House."
Ms. Pelosi's spokesman,
Drew Hamill, denounced the
CBS report as "a right-wing
smear." The report did rely
partly on a'book, 'Throw Them
All Out," by Peter Schweizer,
an editor at the conservative
Breitbart news site. But CBS
long has been considered the
most liberal TV network. And
"60 Minutes" also reported on
similar profits made by current
House Speaker John Boehner,
an Ohio Republican, on health
stocks while medical legislation
was before Congress..
And in Mr. Schweizer's book,
the most egregious example
of using insider information
for profit involved a conserva-
tive Republican, Rep. Spencer
Bachus of Alabama, chairman
of the House Financial Services
Committee. He made "no less
than 40 options trades," the
book reports, from July to
November 2008, just as the
financial crisis' stuck America,
profiting handsomely from his
inside information.
A bill has been introduced in
Congress to reduce such deals.
It's HR1148, by Rep. Timothy
Walz, D-Minn., and is called the
Stop Trading on Congressional
Knowledge (STOCK) Act In
the congressional summary, it
would "prohibit commodities
and securities trading based on
nonpublic information relating
to Congress, .to require addi-
tional reporting by Members
and employees of Congress of
securities transactions, and for
other purposes."
Profiting from insider
information is illegal for Wall
Street traders. Although theo-
retically illegal for members of
Congress, current loopholes
effectively make it legal.
It's a complicated matter, Kirk
O. Hanson told us; he's execu-
five director of the Markkula
Center for Applied Ethics at
Santa Clara University. For
example, if a congressman gives
a speech on pharmaceuticals,
does that influence markets, or
is it just a speech?
We'll keep an eye on HR1148
as it moves through the leg-
islative process. We certainly
favor more disclosure of these
politicians' investment actions.
In the meantime, voters need to
put in place better politicians.
But the bigger problem is
the immense influence of govw
ernment on every aspect of
our lives. Smaller government
would mean fewer temptations
for lawmakers to game the sys-
tem and more prosperity and
freedom for the rest of us.


* The Orange County Register


Thank goodness Newt


will never be president


They're going to eat


horses, aren't they?


I














FAITH &


VALUES


Could you be the sacrifice?


e knew what it would take
for there to be a sacrifice.
As Isaac was walking with
his father Abraham, he
keeps thinking, "Here's
the wood, here's the fire, Daddy has
the knife, but where's the lamb?" When
young Isaac could hold his curiosity no
longer, he asked his father, "Where is
the lamb?" Abraham's reply was, "God
will provide..."
When they got to the place God had
selected for Abraham to offer the sacri-
fice, Abraham built an altar, laid wood on
it, and reached for Isaac. He tied up his
son, and placed him on the altar. What
if you had been Isaac? Would you have
allowed your father to place you on the
altar? What thoughts would have gone


through your mind, if you
had been Isaac, and looked
up to see your father, hold-
ing the knife in the air,
knowing he was about to
kill you?
In Romans 12:1, Paul tells
us that'Christians are to be
"a living sacrifice." What
is our attitude about sac-
rificing our time to serve
the Lord? What is our


BIBLICAL MEDITATION


.~

Li


Carlton McPeak
carton_mc@mnsn.com


attitude about sacrificing
hours on the clock at work
so that we can serve the Lord? What is
our attitude when our supervisor wants
us to work overtime, conflicting with a
standard scheduled church service?
Jesus was 'willing to be like Isaac iri that


he submitted to the will of
His father. Jesus was will-
ing to allow Himself to be
sacrificed.
How grateful do you think
Isaac was to hear the angel,
tell his father not to kill his
child? What feelings would
have gone through your
mind if you had been on
that altar and you heard'
the voice from Heaven tell-
ing-your father not to harm
you?


Do we have the reverence and the respect
for our Heavenly Father that Isaac had
for his earthly father? Do we have the
trust in our Heavenly Father that Isaac
had in his. earthly father, to accept that


what is needed "will be provided"?
The thought we need to meditate upon
is: "Are our lives a sacrifice?" Isaac
"allowed" his body to be used by his
father so that Abraham could obey'God.
In our lives we should allow our bodies to
be used to help other'people serve God;
so that they can learn more about God;
so that they can see an example of how
God wants us to serve Him.
Sacrificing our bodies is our purpose. You
can be the sacrifice God wants you to be!


* Carlton G. McPeak is an evangelist work-
ing with the Lakeview Church of Christ in
Lake City. All Scriptural quotations are from
the New American Standard Bible, Holman
Bible Publishers, unless otherwise stated.
i .I *


Why we should be more thankful


(Psalms 100)
ost people residing in
the United States have
at least a general idea
of why we celebrate
Thanksgiving. We cel-
ebrate Thanksgiving in part to -show
our thanks for everything that we have,
but also as a tribute to the pilgrims who
came here from Europe.. The history of
Thanksgiving in the United States begins
with the pilgrims who came over from
England and landed on Plymouth Rock in
Massachusetts in 1621.
The pilgrims shared a feast in the fall
time, probably October, of that year with
the Wampanoag Indians. Although this
W as technically the first Thanksgiving,
Thanksgiving would not become an
.annual event until many years later and
would not become a federal holiday until
1941. In addition, many of the traditions
like turkey and pie that we associate with
Thanksgiving did not occur at the first


Thanksgiving, instead BIBLE STUDIES cution.
evolving over many years. The celebration, at the:
It took avery long time, had a very obvious
time for Thanksgiving to patriotic and anti-English,
become an annual event, subtext. For whatever \
for it to have a univer- reason they suggested
sally accepted date, and it, people began celebrat-
for it to be celebrated as ing Thanksgiving Day
a federal holiday. Various more regularly. However,
Thanksgiving-type celebra-. depending on where you
tions were held irregularly Hugh Sherrill Jr. were, the day of celebra-
during the fall months for ems-hugh43@comcastnet tion might be different.
nearly 150 years before In 1817, New York was
it was suggested by the the first state to adopt
Continental Congress that the country Thanksgiving as an official holiday.
should have nation day of Thanks. By the time the Civil War erupted in,
Some historians suggest that this was a the 1860's, every state had also made
political move as much as anything. The Thanksgiving a state holiday. In 1863,
emerging country was in need of its own PresidenfAbraham Lincoln declared
traditions and customs to help create a a nation day of Thanksgiving on the
separate non-English, American identity.. last Thursday of November. Since
Thanksgiving was perfect because it was a that time, every president has issued a
way to honor the pilgrims, the people who Thanksgiving Day Proclamation every
originally left England to be free of perse- Thanksgiving, declaring it to be a national


day of thanks. In 1939, President Franklin
Roosevelt declared that the Thanksgiving
would be on the third Thursday in
November. Congress approved that decla-
ration two years later in 1941.
In the winter of 1621 there were 102 pil-
grims. The following fall, probably October,
only 51 were left. These few found it impor-
tant to give thanks to God that had brought
them to a land of freedom.
In the Old Testament seven days were
set aside for the Feast of Thanksgiving.
In 1621 three days were set aside. Today
we set aside one day and spend most of it
focused on food and football. James 1:17
says "Every good gift and every perfect -
gift is from above and comes down from
the Father of Lights".
In this season, let's make time to thank
God most of all for His son, Jesus, and the
sacrifice He made for us.

* Hugh Sherrill is a Bible teacher at Eastside
Baptist Church.


('?~.
: ."'aY~i


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1571 E DuvalStreet Lake Cly
Sunday 10.30AM & Wednesday 7:00PM
wwwifstassembtylcc rn

GLADTOIDNGSASSEMBLY OF GOD
993NW Lake Jeffery Road
386-752-0620
Sunday Worship 1030AM & 6PM
Wed. Fam Bible Study 700PM
"A church where JESUS it Real"

BAPTIST
BEREABAPTISTCHUCH O H
SR47 S 755-0900
Sunday School 9:30AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM &6PM
Wednesday Eve Service 7PM
Interim Pastor: Kenneth Edenield

EASTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
196 SE JamesAve.* 386-752-2860
Sun. BleStudy 9:45AM
Sun. Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed. Prayer Mg/Bible Study 6PM
Rev.Brandon GWt

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Sunday Bible Study 9:15AM
SundayWorship I30AM & 6:00PM
Wed. 600PM Prayer Service, &
Chldrens Ministry 6:15PM
Downtown Lake Ciy 752-5422

OLIVET MISSIONARY BAPST CHURCH
541 N.E.Davis Street
(386)752-1990
Ronald V.Walters, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00AM
Wed Mid-Week Worship 6.0PM
"In God's Word, WVil &Way"


PINE GROVEBAPTIST CHURCH
1989 N US Hwy 441
386-752-2664
Sunday Bible Study 9 45AM
Sunday Worship 11AM & 6PM
Wed Kids & Youth Ministry 6:30PM
Pastor RonTbompson

SALEM PRIMITIVEBAPTIST,
Sunday Seces 10:30AM
Pastor: Elder HermanGriffin
752-4198

SOUTIKSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
S 38 SE Baya Drive' 755-5553,

BibleStudy 9;15AM
Morning Worship 10:30AM
Evening Worship 6-15PM
Wedr, w .eslay:
AWANA '5:45PM
Prayer & BieStudy : 6:15PM

TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH
(Independent Baptist)
144 SEMontrosAve. 752-4274
Sunday School 10AM
Sun. M ,orn. a ship 11 AM
Sunday Eve. 6 PM
Wed. Prayer Meeti ng7:30 PM


Pastor Mike Norman

THE VINEYARD
Sunday School
Sunday Worship 1
Sunday Night
1832 SWTomaka Terrace
(off SW Bascom Norris Dr.)
thevinevardolakecity.com


9:30 AM
0:30 AM
6:00 PM


CATHOLIC
EPIPHANY CATHOUC CHURCH
1905 SW Epiphany Court 752-4470
Saturday Vigil Mass 5:00 PM
Sunday Mass 8:15 AM, 10:30AM,
12:30 PM (SpanishIEnglish)
Sunday School/Religious Education
9:00 AM-10:15AM

CHRISTIAN
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY
239 SE Baya Ave.
Sunday Service 11:00AM
Wednesday Evening Service 7:30 PM


OAVRW

Tires for every need.
US 90 West across from Wal-Mart
752-0054


. "" OBSTETPICS A GYNECOLOGr
I.V..' -V.I T . P. I. ', ,, 1 r
* (386) 466-1106


LAFE CITY CHRISIicTt&J l.,I:H
RiyV 24 ?S. '755-9436
Sunday Schoui 9:30.
Sun Mo'n Vlrslnp 10:30A
VWed Praye Mfretirg 7


CHURCH OF CHRIST
NEW HORIZON
oturchti c' rl
,e,'t. & Times 386-623-7438.


CHURCH OF GOD
LAKE CITY CHURCH OF GOD
167 Ermine St;7:. ,
Sunday School 9:45
Sun, Worship in i'Oi, 'r
'WAF Family Night 7
Wen. Youth Service 7:
llh,r I'aa,-, i...,


AM
AM
PM


5AM

'PM
'PM


EVAMGEL CHURCH OF GOD
., 5 .i S M,.nitr Li.en* 7:' ,. ,
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship i ," 6 3.l*
Wed. Spntual Ennchment 7PM
3tv'kt.y:,url &'ti'i' V

.Bible Study
Pastor: John R, Hathaway

EPISCOPAL
5T JAMES FF'ISCOPn ip ..iiH
2423 SW Bascom Norris Dr.,
Lake City FI lMi? 386-752-2218
Wrt'i.sle a ,rt, a lld tii., ;" 1) l
HOLY EUCHARIST
Sunday .. 8:00 & 10:00AM
Wednesday 6:00PM
Priest -nts. M..ni ':r o,

LUTHERAN
OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN CHURCH
LCMS
1 "-2 T,,!. S J '55 i,. '4 H 9 ;7
755-4299


Sunday Services
r.IU rer y PFo;.,,,'],
Christian Education Hour
For all ages at 10:45AM
Pa ito. Rel P u ar' :..


9:30AM


IMorrell's
Your Complete decorating and
home turnishin,- store'
SW 1 tvkJlt I)rw I i,-, a ;';;'1.1A, :-1' ni Rd
MM Si!< ',!? '*! (' i I'il2


P .RJi OF CHRIST LUTHERAN
".y '"iJ iT ileWesit l 1-75*752-3807,
Su1di1y iV:.ririp 9:30AM
Nursery Avail.
\' i-' P,)l LLk M f iWor, ;hD .PM
PF-I.! Rei.:erd jurin David Brani


METHODIST
First, United Methodist Church
973 S. Marion Ave.
386-752-4488


'tL rd.iy :r.'', 9:45AM
r 1. ,' u 'i na ', ,: rip
IC.! ]3l n,'Lr'iliS f'vicE 8:50AM
"[iadnllI -,I';[ p 11;O AM
Pirn ,,rri.,r:;.K5uMi-ie ailjule 'i ,ail 3ieas

For a complete schedule
: Iri: :hW, u:n office at
752-4488
'TIR I, UNITiEDI METHODIST CHURCH
: un1iy ':S:r.-:. 9 45AM Worship 11 OOAM
Wed. Bible Study7:00PM Mon. Prayer Noon
Friday Prayer 6:00-7:00PM
Pastor Rev Fatia M DeSue

fitESLF MEMORIAL I.ITIED
.1272 SW McFarlane 752-3513
Aii11t Ino Sumnirme S(hi'Ij
<,rt.'=ng 8:00 & 1000AM
Praise & Worship 6:00PM
SundaySchool 9:00AM
Nursery provided
,, a ,,: ,5:30-7:30PM
Pastor: The Rev. J. Louie Mabrey
wmw.wesleymem.com

WATERTOWN CONGREGATIONAL
METHODIST CHURCH
,i 9. : m,r ,ri in r te: (r .l o quality
Ir- gri bn Okir,'av.'j
Sunday School 9:45 AM
,U f i:,p1 i1AM & 6 PM
y,,j nfl,;: 'v>rjcs 7PM
Pastor, Randy Ogbum

NAZARENE
.. (iT, i:HI.TRiH OF THE ,AZALFNE[
Services:
Sunday School 9:45AM
Sunday Worship 10:45AM
Wednesday 6:30PM
Adult. Youth Ministry, Children's Ministry
Pastor: 1.rji Hendrson
Nursery Provided
SW SR 47 and Azalea Park Place


\>iFR'ON( COl I H V RCO., INC.
CO.I1MERIICLL A INDUiSUAL
alt- Prepar.ion Road iKuiihn i';irking ltLs
crading & Drjjnagw
752-7585
871 NW Guerdon St., Lake City


PENTECOSTAL
FIRST FULL GOSPEL CHURCH
NE Jones Way & NE Washington St
SundaySchool 10:AMA
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Evangelsisc Service 6:00 PM
'Wuli Seri[ts wnPsiay 7:oPM
Mid-week Service -Wednesday 7:00 PM
h Fr ir all ;5:,-5-34 EQ i'uEtf ,'iyielim'e
Pastor: Rev. Stan lis'

PRESBYTERIAN
FIRST PRESB^itRiAN CLURCi
S697 SW Baya Dive 752-0670
Sunday School 10:00AM
Sunal /Worship Service
Contemporary 9:00AM
'radillral 11:(00A
NURSERY PROVVIEDE
ail0r Di RoyA Mart n
Dirocor of Music Bii Poplin

NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHRIST CENTRAL MINISTRIES
Celebration Service 9:30& 11:15AM
Wednesday Servie 7:00PM
217 Dyal Ave', from Hwy90 take
Silei's welcome Rd go mile, South
church on left 755-2525
ead'Pastor Lanne Jini;
"A Church on the Move"

CHRISTIAN HERfITAGE CHURCH
Corner SR. 47 & Hudson Circle \
Sunday Celebration 10:30 AM
Pastor Chris Jones *752-9119
FALUNG CREEK CHAPEL
Failing Creek Road 755-0580
First and Third Sundays 9:30 A.M.
:aond and Fortn Suiray 3 00 Pi.
Paiolr Rei' C'ieryl H Pnii el

NEW BEGINNING CHURCH
Highway 242 E. of Brantford Highway
Sunday School 10:00AM
Morning Worship 1t:OOAM
Sunday Evening 6:00PM
Vrednesaay 7:00PM
A Full Gospel Church EveryonWelcomed
(386) 755-5197


Central States '
Enterprises
(Colmibta County's Feed Headquarters
,WED PIT SUPPLIES IlAWN & GARDN
A. -NMAI. FALTH
668 NW Waldo St. 386-755-7445

MIKELaS POWER EQMIPiENT, INC.
Your Lawn & Garden Headquarters
MOWERS CHAIN SAWS TRIMMERS
1152 US 90 WEST* LAKE CITY, FL.
386-752-8098



LAKE CITY
5"e 755-7050

BAYWAYjawtorit Servies
FIRE & Water Restoration
Floor & Carpet Care
ResidentiWil & Commerml
755-6142

M North Florida
It Pharmacy
7 Locations to Serve You
Lake City, Ft. White, Branford,
Chiefland, Mayo & Keystone Heights


Supercenter
"LOW PRICES EVERYDAY"
US90WEST a5-2427

GW Hunter, Inc.
ch- Chevron Oil
w Jobber



Holly ectic, Inc.
"Quality ,work at a reasonable price"
We also do solar hook-ups
(386) 755-5944


FOOD STORES
Opes7? D)a Week
0610E D al St.. Lakc Cay FL
(386) 752-0067
Fresh Meat. F[reh Produce!


RISK'S (CRANE SERVICE
Located at 25A (Old
Valdosta Hwy)
386-752-5696 br
386-867-2035
after hours


Saturday, November 19, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


5A


N ayecCoWpeW, k
Competitive rates, non-profit,
right here in your community.
Lake City District 386-752-7447
clayelectrlc.com


1 HARRY'S
M OW.a ,Csw.- Heatrg & Air Conditioning Inc.
HarryMos'ey, Presdent

Pon 752-2308 wv -


A










6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


Arrests made in Ohio in suspected murder plot


By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS
Associated Press
CALDWELL, Ohio When a
South Carolina man answered a
Craigslist ad seeking a farmhand
in Ohio, there was no job waiting
for him. There was a freshly dug
grave.
The man was shot and wound-
ed in what investigators say was
a murderous robbery scheme
that used bogus help-wanted
ads to lure victims. He escaped,
but another job-seeker was later
found dead in a shallow grave
nearby. And two suspects a
man and a 16-year-old boy are
under arrest
Neighbors living near the


property where the graves were
dug were shocked by the blood-
shed. Some figured the arrests
had closed the case, while oth-
ers, like Angie Noll, put credence
in rumors of more bodies to be
found.
"We're a rural community,
maybe there's 15 houses up here,
and right in our backyard this stuff
is going on," said Noll, a 28-year-
old maintenance production clerk
who lives just a few houses away
from the neighbor whose door
the South Carolina man knocked
on after escaping. "I feel kind of
dumbfounded about it."
The sheriff said it is unclear
how long the ad had been
online or whether there are


other victims.
The wooded piece of land sits
on the former site of a strip mine
and is owned by a coal company
and rented out to himters. It is
isolated, with no lights and only
one-lane gravel roads running in
and out.
"Ift's an ideal place to get rid
of a body," said Don Warner, a
rancher who lives nearby.
A judge issued a gag order in
the case Friday, and the names
of the two victims and the adult
suspect were not released.
Before the order was imposed,
Sheriff Stephen Hannum said that
the South Carolina victim was
taken Nov. 6 to the desolate area,
where he managed to deflect a


gun cocked at the back of his
head and ran. Wounded in the
arm, he hid in the woods for
hours, then showed up covered
in blood at the first well-lighted
place he could see, a farmhouse
outside Caldwell, about 80 miles
east of Columbus.
' This week, cadaver dogs were
brought in, and authorities found
one hand-dug grave they believe
was intended for the South
Carolina man and a second grave
that held the body of a Florida
man.
The Akron Beacon Journal iden-
tified the suspects as a 52-year-
old man from Akron, about 90
miles away, and a high school
student from the Akron area. The


teenager was charged Friday with'
attempted murder. While his name
appears in court documents, The-
Associated Press generally does
not report the names of minors
charged with crimes.
No charges were immediately
brought against the man.
The South Carolina man who
escaped to a neighbor's house told
the homeowner, Rose Schockling;
that he had answered an ad on
Craigslist for a job and was told
he would be erecting fences for a
cattle farm. -
But Schockling said there is nT
farm of the size the man described
nearby, with most of the surround-
ing countryside either woods or'
strip mines.


Boy, 12,

guilty in

shopping

cart case

By JENNIFER PELTZ
Associated Press
NEW YORK A 12-year-
old boy admitted Friday to
his role in a stunt that seri-
ously hurt a stranger drop-
ping a shopping cart that
plummeted onto a woman's
head from a walkway four
stories above.
The day before a 13th
birthday he'll spend in cus'-
tody, the boy pleaded guilty
to assault in a case that has
spurred soul-searching and
commentary well beyond
the city limits. Another
12-year-bld also has been
charged, both of them as
juveniles.
The boy who pleaded
guilty could face a punish-
ment of up to 18 months in
a juvenile facility, time that
could be extended annually
up to his 18th birthday. A
judge is due to decide Dec.
6; he remains in detention
in the meantime.'
With -his. mother- and
lawyer beside him, the boy
acknowledged "he'd held
the shopping cart over a
walkway railing Oct. 30 at
a shopping center in strug-
gling East Harlem.
"I knew people was down
there and somebody could
have got hurt," he said in a
quiet voice.
Somebody did get hurt,
arid badly: Marion Salmon
Hedges, a real estate broker
and active volunteer with the
Junior League, a community
center for needy children
and senior citizens, and
other charity organizations.
While she-lives in a brown-
stone across town, she was
at the shopping center with
her teenage son to load up
on Halloween candy at .a
discount store, since her
block was a magnet for chil-
dren from a range of nearby
neighborhoods, her friends
and family have said.
After the shopping cart
plunged onto her, the
47-year-old Hedges was in
a medically induced coma.
She remained in.serious con-
dition Friday, said Leah S.
Schmelzer, an attorney with
the city Law Department
It represents the govern-
ment in Family Court here.
Hedges' son wasn't hurt


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now.
.......


ASSOCIATED PRESS
the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif. As the ministry famous for its "Hour of Power" television program muddles
through bankruptcy, churchgoers face the possibility of seeing the property sold to the Roman Catholic Diocese of
Orange and being forced to move to a new location.


Crystal Cathedral looking at


risky future without church


By AMY TAXIN
Associated Press /
SANTA ANA, California The
sale of the Crystal Cathedral to the'
Catholic church could mark an end'
to the storied televangelist ministry
broadcast around the world that came
crashing down in hard times.
While the church's spiritual lead-
ers vow to carry on in a new loca-
tion, the cathedral's own financial
expert says it is impossible to see the
future once the congregation loses its
famed, glass-spired home.
What began more than 50 years
ago as a weekly prayer service atop
a drive-in movie theater snack bar
in Orange County evolved into a tel-
evangelist empire broadcasting from
the striking sanctuary that became an
icon of the Rev. Robert H. Schuller's
ministry.
The church raked in millions
in donations through its "Hour of
Power" television program to pay for
the elaborate building and 40-acre
grounds in Garden" Grove filled with
Biblical messages and statues. But it
saw revenue plummet in 2008, and
despite massive budget cuts, sought
bankrtptcy protection last year.
Now, congregants question the.
future of the church without the
building they have come to love -
and that has given the ministry its
name. And many worry the "Hour
of Power" broadcast the source of


,.70 percent of the church's revenue
- is doomed once the congregation
moves to a new location that is unfa-
miliar to viewers and pales in com-
parison,to the glimmering church
that lets worshippers see the sky and
swaying palm trees through its glass-
paned walls.
I "People think the ministry isn't
about a building. Usually they're
right But that one represents Jesus
Christ, positive thinking, and if you
believe in yourself and believe in the
Lord there. isn't anything you can't
do," Sherwood Oklejas, a congregant
who opposed the diocese's bid, told a
federal bankruptcy court judge at a
hearing on the church's future. "If the
ministry no longer has the Crystal
Cathedral to operate from, in my
opinion, it will not last at all."
The Crystal Cathedral is selling its
property to help pay creditors more
than $51 million and emerge from
federal bankruptcy protection. After
weeks of intense bidding, a federal
bankruptcy judge on Thursday night
approved the church's sale to the
Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange.
The diocese plans to use the build-
ing designed by renowned archi-
tect Philip Johnson as a long-sought
countywide cathedral.
Oklejas is one of many congregants
who rallied for the church to accept
a competing bid on the property
from Orange County's Chapman
University. that would have paid up


Labor board rushes to approve jobs


Associated Press
WASHINGTON The National Labor
Relations Board is rushing to approve new
rules before the end of the year that would
make it easier for unions to organize new
members.
The board announced Friday thatit plans to
hold a public vote on Nov. 30. Its Democratic
majority is expected to approve a plan that
could dramatically shorten the time frame
for union elections.
The rules would be more limited than the
sweeping plan proposed earlier this summer,
a move designed to let the board approve
them more quickly.
Business groups have denounced the plan,
saying the new rules would allow so-called
"ambush elections" that don't give company
managers enough time to counter organizing
drives.
The latest move prompted the board's
lone Republican member to rebuke his col-
leagues in a letter to House lawmakers,
saying the board's Democratic members


are ignoring established procedures in their
haste to approve the rules.
Unions are hoping the new rules will
help them make inroads at businesses like
Target and Wal-Mart, which have success-
fully resisted union organizing for years.
The NLRB has issued a number of pro-
union decisions over the past year, making it
a target for Republicans who say the agency
is leaning too much in favor of organized
labor at the expense of business interests.
The board says it wants to move quickly
to vote on the rules because it will not have
enough members to approve them next year.
The five-member board is now down to
three members two Democrats and one
Republican. The term of Democratic mem-
ber Craig Becker expires at the end of the
year, and the remaining two members could
not legally issue decisions or make rules.
"They are looking to scale this down in
order to get to a vote before the board
loses its quorum," said NLRB spokeswoman
Nancy Cleeland.


to $59 million and let them continue
using the church which they see
as critical to their ability to survive.
But the ministry's board of direc-
tors flip-flopped at the last minute
and instead backed a $57.5 million
offer from the diocese, arguing the
sale will preserve the campus as a
religious, not an educational, institu-
tion as donors intended.
Under the plan, the Crystal
Cathedral will be able to lease the
building for up to three years, but,
then must move to a new location,
possibly a smaller Catholic church
up the street that the diocese will
vacate.
Crystal Cathedral leaders insist the
ministry founded by Schuller under
the auspices of the Reformed Church
in America will survive even without
the landmark building, noting its edu-
cational programs and efforts to help
the homeless will continue just at
a new location.
"Crystal Cathedral church is not
a building. A church is comprised of
people who are dedicated to practic-
ing through words and works," senior
pastor Sheila Schuller Coleman -
the daughter of the founder said
in a statement
Church attorney Marc Winthrop
said the congregation could
even keep its name, though U.S.
Bankruptcy Court Judge Robert N.
Kwan said he didn't see how that
would be possible.


OBITUARIES


Clifton William Wilson
Mr. Clifton William Wilson, 65,
of Lake City, passed away Thurs-
day afternoon, November 17,
2011 in the MacClenny Nursing
and Rehab Center following an
extended illness. A native of Co-
lumbia County, Mr. Wilson had
been a lifelong resident of both
Columbia and Baker counties.
He was the son of the late Wood-
row and Ethel Spradley Wilson.
Mr. Wilson was a member of the
Columbia High School graduat-
ing Class of 1965. He owned
and operated his own water well
drilling business in MacClenny
for several years and then opened
and operated the "Scrubtown
Sawmill" until his ill health be-
gan two years ago. In his spare
time, Mr. Wilson enjoyed hunt-
ing, fishing, being in the out-
doors and "bull skating" with
his friends. Mr. Wilson was pre-
ceded in death by his parents and
his siblings, Odell Wilson, Toby
Wilson and Louise Stephens.
He is survived by his son, Clifton


W. Wilson Jr. (Andrea); a Broth
er, Ronnie Wilson and a sister
Diane Wilson all of Lake City
Funeral services for Mr. Wilsoi
will be conducted at 2:00 P.M
on Sunday, November 20, 201
in the Deep Creek Advent Chris
tian Church with Rev. Howarn
Thomas officiating. Intermen
will follow in the Scott Cemetery
(which is adjacent to the church
The family will receive friends a
the funeral home from 4:00-6:0(
Saturday afternoon. Arrange
ments are under the direction o
the DEES-PARRISH FAMILY)
FUNERAL HOME, 458 Soutl
Marion Ave., Lake City, FI
32025. (386)752-1234 please
sign our online family guestbool
atparrishfamilyfuneralhome.con


Obituaries are paid advertise
ments. For details, call the Lakf
City Reporter's classified depart
ment at 752-1293.


Court
stunned

by man's

confession!
Associated Press
BEND, Ore. The judge
called it bizarre, and the vidc
tim's sister fled the court-!
room in disgust The pros-
ecutor said they .were the
words of a sociopath.
Just before he was ser
tenced to life in prison for ki4I
ing his wife, Steven Blayloc'
said he dumped her body
in the North Santiam Riverj
because she had said tha4
if her remains couldn't be7
blasted into space or buried
at sea, she wanted to "feed
my friends, the fish."
There' were gasps in th1
courtroom Thursday aftei
noon as Blaylock's statemer|
to the judge brought the trik
to an end.
Blaylock was arrested.
year ago after co-worker
reported that Lor 'Woody'l
Blaylock failed to show up foa'
a shift at the Bend hospital
where she'd been a respiraP
tory therapist for more thanii
20 years.
Initia.y,,,,Steven Blaylock'
told investigators she had|
walked away after an argu-
ment over a World Seriesl
bet J
Later, he showed investi-
gators were he had put her
body in the North Santiamd
River 70 miles northwest of
Bend. Investigators say h%
carried it down a 100-foot
embankment, hid some ol
her clothes behind a stump
and put it into the cold andi
turbulent river, .
SHer body has not been
found, Kayakers reported;
glimpsing a body, but it was
gone by the time authorities
could get to it 1
During the trial, Blaylock's
lawyers argued that he killed
his wife in self-defense durl
ing a struggle. The prosl
ecution said the part-time
plumber's assistant was after
her money. His defense took
about a day, and Blaylock did
not testify.



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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES
zocemsow/ ? o WA
0 TNo O T / c S?
PGT, va cwl
B T-ND'1 IE 6 '1 r 1






BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST.


DEAR ABBY


Birthday gift of bunny could

flop without parents' approval


DEAR ABBY: My dad
and I raise rabbits. My
friend "Zoe" has always
wanted one. Recently one
of our rabbits had a litter,
and Zoe fell in love with
one in particular. Her
birthday is coming soon,
and I'm thinking about
giving her this rabbit as
a present I would also
include several days' worth
of food.
My problem is, I don't
know if I would be impos-
ing on her parents. Should
I ask them first? And
do you think I should
also include a cage?
- KENTUCKY BUNNY-
LOVER
DEAR BUNNY-LOVER
You should never give a
live animal as a gift unless
you're positive that the
creature will be welcomed
and have a good home.
That's why it's important
to get the approval of Zoe's
parents before giving her
the rabbit Be sure the
family knows everything
they need to about suc-
cessfully raising a rabbit,
including its behavior and
the space requirements for
exercise. You'll be doing
them and the bunny a
favor if you do. If Zoe's
parents approve of the gift,
it would be generous to
include the cage.

DEAR ABBY: I'm a 14-
year-old guy. I have been
growing my hair out for a
long time, and my bangs


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
are now down to my nose.
It looks and feels really
cool.
My problem is, now that
I'm in high school, adults
get on my case about my
hait. I can hardly go one
day without some teacher
yelling at me to "get your
hair out of your eyes!" I
flip it to the side, but they
still seem annoyed.
I'm tired of hearing
about it. One day, five dif-
ferent teachers all got mad
about it What can I say to
stop people from freaking
out over my hair? JOSH
IN MICHIGAN,
DEAR JOSH: Is this
,the only problem you're
having with the teachers?.
Their concern may be that
your hair is now so long
you can no longer see the
blackboard. And because
they can't see your eyes,
they may be unable to
gauge whether you're "get-
ting" the lesson they're
trying to convey.
While you and I may
think that what's inside
your head is more impor-
tant than what's on it, if
several teachers have been
commenting on your hair,


it's time to do something
about it
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: From time
to time you have printed
letters in your column from
people who don't know
what to do with their lives.
I'm an intelligent woman
in my mid-20s. I did well
in high school, quickly
selected a major in college,
excelled there, graduated
and found a job in my field. I
worked for three years, and
then was let go. As you can
imagine, I was devastated.
My plans for my life had
fallen through.
That was several months
ago. Since then, I have
taken time to explore other
options and interests. I may
even head back to school, '
something I have wanted to
do because I love to learn. I
have also focused more on
my social life and am in the
first serious romantic rela-
tionship of my life.
To those of your read-
ers who are unsure:
Understand that life
doesn't always go accord-
ing to plan, but there is
nothing wrong with that
- MOVING ON IN UTAH
DEAR MOVING ON:
Your letter illustrates
that when one door closes,
another one opens. Your'
attitude will serve you well
in life.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't take on too
much. All work and no
play will cause dissatisfac-
tion. Love is in the stars,
and you must make time
for romance. If you must
work, make it a fun project
that you can do with peo-
ple whose company you
enjoy. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Expand your hori-
zons. Venture out, meet
new people and try new
things. The more active
you are, the better you will
do. Participation will lead
to new friendships. Avoid
overspending and ques-
tionable investing. Don't
take a risk. *****-
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Someone will anger.
you. Contain your feelings.
You will get much further
ahead if you are harmoni-
ous in the way you handle
others. A simple "no" is
sufficient if you don't like
what you are being asked
to do. Make love, not war.
**
CANCER (June 21-July
.22): Home is where the
heart is, and that's where
you should be spending
your time. Invite friends
over or spend a nice,
quiet time with someone
you love. Put work out of
your mind and enjoy the
moment Ask and you will
receive. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Get out and have some
fun, but remember that'
too much of anything is a
waste. Focus on exhilarat-
ing challenges rather than
overindulgent pastimes.
Children and friends can
help make or break your
day. Don't overspend to
impress. ***
VIRGO (Adg. 23-Sept
22): Not everyone will
see things your way. Bide
your time and give others
the benefit of the doubt
Making a scene will not
get you the answers you
need or the satisfaction
you want Opportunity is
apparent if you open your
eyes. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct
22): Don't let anyone take
advantage of your kind-
ness or your generosity.
You can offer suggestions
without paying for some-
one's mistakes. Steer clear
of anyone trying to pres-
sure you into something.
Stick close to the people
you love. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Working overtime on
something you feel can
help you get ahead profes-
sionally will be well worth
your time and effort
Someone from your past
who shares your interests
or works in the same


field can be of help now.
****
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): You'll face oppo-
sition if you are too verbal
about whatyou can do.'
Bragging will invite criti-
cism as well as a challenge
that may cost you your
reputation. Keep things
simple and you will avoid
discord. **
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You'll have
good insight into financial
options that can ease your
stress. Don't let someone
you feel responsible for
hold you back or redirect
you. An emotional situa-
tion can end up costing
you financially. *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Someone or
.something that isn't good
for you may entice you, but
with a little discipline you
will be able to overcome
whatever is being dangled
in front of your face. Think
"mind over matter" and
your success will boost
your confidence. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Focus on what's
important to you. Don't let
anyone sidetrack you or
stand in the way of your
success. Put a little.muscle
behind your plans and you
will capture the attention
of someone you have been
trying to impress for some
time. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S ,CLUE: Z equals V
"NPTEV SDJ, LDG, WDH NPRX LDDG
CRWK, TEG WDHLRZK JX RW BK GD


EDN CDZK RN KE DJLP."


- LTHHRXDE


V K R C C D H


Previous Solution: "Talking about dreams is like talking about movies, since
the cinema uses the language of dreams." Federico Fellini
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-19


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


* ADvantage


4 lines $ 750
3 days 1
Includes 2 Signs dth tddiTnioul line 165


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only. v.'
4 lines, one month.... 92.00
$10.80 each adatiornal line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,.,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories Will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the' Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear Call by: Fax/Emall by:
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only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
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ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
'reserves the right, to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
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S One Item per ad
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One Item per ad
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Rats applies to private Inddual sllng
Personal merchandise totalling $4,g0,or less.i
SEach Item must include a prid




One It s per ad $ .3 ra


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-252-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF LORETTA
VIRGINIA NIXON A/K/A LORET-
TA NIXON A/K/A LORETTA
MCKEONE NIXON A/K/A LOR-
ETTA V. NIXON
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Loretta Virginia Nixon a/k/a Loretta
Nixon a/k/a Loretta McKeone Nixon
a/k/a Loretta V. Nixon, deceased,
whose date of death was August 28,
2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida 32055. The names and
addresses of the personal representa-
tives and the personal representa-
tives' attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER .THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is November 12, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
By:/s/ John J. Kendron.
Robinson, Kennon, Kendron, P.A.
Attorney for Linda K. Skeie
Florida Bar Number: 0306850
P.O. Box 1178
Lake City, FL 32056-1178
Telephone: (386)755-1334
Email: jjk@rkkattomeys.com
By /s/: Linda K. Skeie
9425 West Maiden Court
Vero Beach, Florida 32963
05529051
November 12, 19, 2011
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE: JIM'S
AUTO SERVICE gives Notice of
Foreclosure of Lien and intent to sell
these vehicles on 12/05/2011, 08:30
am at 2550 SW MAIN BLVD.
LAKE CITY, FL 32025, pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the Florida
Statutes.
JIM'S AUTO SERVICE reserves the
right to accept or reject any and/or
all bids.
1B7FL26X5RW126348
1994 DODGE
2G1WW15E729333333
2002 CHEVROLET
05529196
November 19, 2011


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 11-254-CP
Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF CLARENCE E.
BROWN, JR.
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
CLARENCE E. BROWN, JR., de-
ceased, whose date of death was
September 18, 2011, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Columbia
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 173 NE Her-
nando Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. The names and addresses of
the personal representatives and the
personal representatives' attorney are
set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other person havingclaims or
demands against decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is November 12, 2011.
Attorney for Co-Personal Represen-
tatives:
By:/s/ MATTHEW C. MITCHELL
Attorney for Co-Personal, Represen-
tatives
Florida Bar Number: 0028155
Brannon, Brown, Haley & Bullock,
P.A.,
P.O. Box 1029
Lake City, FL 32056
Telephone: (386)752-3213
Fax: (386)755-4524
Email: mcm@bbattomeys.com
Co-Personal Representatives:
By /s/: THOMAS W. BROWN
3P3 NW Overflow Lake Drive
Lake City, Florida 32055
BY:/s/ Clarence E.'Brown, III
788 SW El Prado Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32025
05529017
No, ember 1-2,19, 2011


Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-FREE
WORKPLACE


100 Job
0 Opportunities
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

1 Medical
120 Employment

05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

240 Schools &
240 Education


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 10-775-CA
PEOPLES STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
DEBRA M. KIMMONS, n/k/a
DEBRA LINDEMANN, a/k/a
DEBBIE LINDEMANN,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 16, Fairway View, Unit 1, a sub-
division according to the plat thereof
recorded in Plat Book 3, pages 97,
98, 99, public records of COLUM-
BIA County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated November 10, 2011, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Columbia, County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
January 11, 2012, to the best and
highest bidder-for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in any surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County .aforesaid this
10 day of November, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio, Deputy Clerk
05529192
November 19, 26, 2011
IN THE COUNTY COURT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE NO. 11-750-CC
BULLARD PROPERTIES, INC.,
a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES L. DODDS, IlI and LI-
SA KOONS
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property:
Lot 27, Cypress Creek Subdivision.'
Being a portion of the SE 1/4 of Sec-
tion 3, Township 4 South, Range 16
East, Columbia County, Florida.
shall be sold by the Clerk of this
. Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above styled
action dated November 8, 2011, at
the Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., on
Wednesday, December 7, 2011, to
the best and highest bidder for cash.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, other than
the property owner as of the date of
the notice of lis pendens, must file a
claim-within 60 days after the sale. :
WITNESS my hand and official seal
in the State and County aforesaid this
8th day of November, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
-Clerk of Court
By:/s/Sarah Barry
Deputy Clerk
05529052
November 12, 19,2011

020 Lost & Found

FOUND: Terrier. Comer of
Lake City Ave. & Archer St. on
Monday, Nov. 14. Please call to
identify. 386-867-9679
100 Jo0b
1A0 Opportunities
05529145
REGISTERED NURSE
The Columbia County Health
Department is seeking an OPS'
Registered Nurse, PSN
#64901181. This is a part-time
(20 hrs per week) non-benefited
position working in the Ryan
White clinic. Must have a
Florida RN license. Must be
fingerprinted and drug screened.
This employer uses E-Verify.
May be required to work during
or beyond normal work hours or
days on the event of an emer-
gency. Rate of pay $14.75 hr.
Applications will be
accepted online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/
State of Florida applications
may. be mailed to State of
Florida, People First, Staffing
Administration, P.O. Box
44058, Jacksonville, Fl 32231
or faxed to (904)636-2627 by
11/28/11. EEO/AA/VP
Employer

Experienced Roofers
Needed.
Please call
(850) 271-4199
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
STYLIST NEEDED at
Southern Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info.






FOOD STORES
is Franchising with a National
Restaurant Chain
Now Hiring Management
Competitive Wages
Benefits available for Full-Time
employees
(Health, dental & life insurance,
vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the S & S


CHRISTMAS PUPPIES
3/4 Chihuahua, 1/4 Dachshund.
2 male, 1 female. $50. ea.
386-496-1397
FREE TO GOOD HOME.
Miniature Dachshund.
Call 386-752-1125

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by .Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &'
3 Supplies
WANTED: I Buy and Sell used
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay cash. Call 386-935-1522


407 Computers


DELL Computer,
$100.00 '
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

ACROSS


1 Lavish party
5 Thieve
8 Icicle locale
12 Freeway
clogger
13 Mother lode
material
14 Potato buds
15 Toucan
feature
16 Spring fest
sites
18 Many-eyed
giant
20 Foot part
21 Mimic
22 Instants
25 Onassis
nickname
28 "Shane" star
29 Camel's back
33 Horselaugh
35 Mystiques
36 Chorus
platform
37 Sunflower
state
38 Familiar auth.


11-19


39 Bin


419 TV-Radio &
Recording

Need a TV for your kids
Christmas present? Or just an
Extra? 20" Sony Triniton TV..
$50.00386-984-7510


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales


05529194
Holiday Gift Warehouse Sale
Up to 90% OFF Retail Prices
All Items Under $2.00
v Great Closeout holiday Gifts
Personal presents
Buy if bulk for school store
School carnival items
Fun Festival prizes & gifts
Bring your friends'
Buy to the piece or bulk/case
November 14th-23rd. 9am-5pm
Cady Fundraising Services
2140 SW Main Blvd. Lake City
800-234-5561
2 Family. Sat only. 7-2 Baya to
100 rt to Price Creek Rd. Rt on
Plant St, Rt on Goldie Way turn,
left on Carob. Too much to list.


Big Multi family Fri 9-1 Sat 7-3
Comer of Grandview & Lake
Montgomery. Brighton & Coach
purses, toys, furn, clothes, knick
knacks, Christmas stuff & more.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form. four, ordinary words.

I TOMHLJ


A:
(Answers Monday)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FETCH AROSE SMOOTH AVATAR
Answer: When he caused trouble in calculus class, the
student worried about the AFTERMATH

g Crosbv Answer to Previous Puzzle


tune
41 Oz. or lb.
42 Soft drink
(2 wds.)
45 Pleasure
48 Mr. Chaney
49 Boom box issue
53 Arcane
56 Sporty trucks,
for short
57 Thin Man's
terrier
58 Cotton gin
name
59 Mounties' org.
60 Sapling
61 Poppa
62 Leg part'

DOWN
1 Rium-cnsoaked


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Wreaths, Fall & Christmas Decor
Candles, lots of pictures, mirrors
& floral arrangements. Home de-
cor. Overstock of new items.
25%off all Fall decor excluding
candles. 590-4085 16012 CR 137

40 F Good Things
450 to Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor-
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pls leave, message
we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
63v for Rent

2 & 3 br/lba Mobile Homes for
Rent. CH/A includes water, sewer,
garbage:. $475./ $525. mo. 1st &
last mo + $300 dep. 386-961-8466

2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


TIWYT l.



NA- G -.

-4 1 r F WA5 EA5Y FOR
HIM TO VIEW THE
CONSTELLATION5 BECAUSE
ANPHUC w ^ -
-- -- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


C RO HO|S E EV E
S Y U S L_ IED
RAS D RI PPI NG
RA
SEN ORS IRATE




L FH
D|AR Y L MMASON



M ADOW O VIERIT
P UN RUN
Q UEST T, UREENS
U NV7|l LED D CLOTn
E I C LI E
ADE EIRE K LEE
YON SPAR SAL


cake 5 CD- -
2 Violinist 6 Gave an
Leopold address
3 Bachelor's 7 Over and above
party 8 Want-ad letters
4 Utter 9 Jean Auel .
nonsense heroine


10 Prez's
stand-in
11 Latin I verb
17 Animal friend
19 Type of
eclipse
23 Gullet
24 Avoid
25 Taj Mahal site
26 Bankrupt
27 In that case
(2 wds.)
30 Bear
constellation
31 Sir's
companion
32 Furtive
whisper
34 Wetlands
35 Burr or
Copland
37 "Keystone"
lawman
39 Doted on
40 Kind of folder
43 "Grand -
Opry"
44 Rains cats
and dogs
45 Remarkable
deed
46 Ex-superpower
47 Jot down
50 Have a rash
51 Freight hauler
52 Cable channel
54 kwon do
55 British FBI


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/28/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-'
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
* Continuing education .
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
2 CUTE FREE KITTENS
Boots & Mittens. One black &
white Female, one gray & white
Male, 9 weeks, 386-438-4128.


Bi U Y I T


ELLiii


F~IN#TI











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
2/2 Units.
Monthly Specials
$550. mo. Free Water.
386-984-8448
2br/2ba $500 mo. new flooring,
fresh paint. ,Also, Resd'l RV lots.
Btwn Lake City & G'ville. Access
to 1-75 & 441 (352)317-1326
3br/2ba SW, 10 min to
Lake City. $550 mo $500 sec.
NO PETS.
386-330-2316
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779

640 Mobile Homes
64 v for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
3/2 MH on 1 acre in nice sub.
paved rd. metal roof. completely
remodeled. new everything! Only
$39,500 386-249-1640
OWNER FINANCING
SWMH on 2 lots, fenced, paved
streets, close to town. MLS 79218,
$49,900. Coldwell Banker Bishop,
Elaine Tolar 386-755-6448
EXCELLENT LOCATION
3br/2ba MH, deck, porch. Well
maintained. MLS 79304 $55,000.
Coldwell Bainker Bishop, Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K
800-622-2832"

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
3br/2ba SW 1 ac. Off 41 on 246.
Between 1-10 & 75. 10 min to LC.
$28,500 obo. Ideal rental .NO
owner Finance. 386-330-2316


DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862'Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$120,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well Maintained MH on 10ac. 2
car, covered carport, huge deck.
Wood laminate flooring. MLS
79417, $94,900 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
-Nice 1620sf 3br/2ba DW on 4
"'ooded ac re', o.'. ner tinjnce a3 a11
S$119,900 Brenda Forrester,
Forrester Realty 352-339-6069
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 2.5 acres,
Mayo area, small down/$675 mo,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www suwanneevalleyproperties corn

7j ~
710 'Unfurnished Apt.
SFor Rent
0552896i
*.SPRING HILL VILLAGE .
Excellent High Springs location
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
.some %%ith garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or Vi.ii our "ebsite:
www.springhilh illage.net


Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Pado area Beautiful yard:
Washer/drierhkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Moe in special.
386-754-1800. v mvf1apts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V A. & Winn Diie, Pet
Friendly Moe in Special $99
Pool. laundry &' balcony.
.386-754-1800. % wv myllapLs corn
Duplex w/garage spacious. 2/1.
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/AM.
$650.month & bckgrnd chk, .
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
For rent 4 br/l/2 ba to%\rihouse apt.
$800 mo & $300 dep. Rent in-
cludes % after. sewer. garbage and
lawn maintenance. 386-208-5252.


710 FUnfuenished Apt.
U10 uFor Rent 805 Lots for Sale


Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt.
CH/A Ig walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. mo and $350. dep.
(904)563-6208
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, lg 2 br Apt.
Close to town
$485 mo + $485 dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA in
Gatorwood S/D. Washer/dryer
hook up, clean. $650. 1st, last +
security. 386-867-9231
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts. ,
Move in $99. Spacious 2bedroorn
washer/dryer. Behind.Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free'
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181.' "


Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent


- Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town.41S,
$133 wk. 386-755-0110.


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
*Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
38.6-752-5808

3 Unfurnished
730 Home For "Rent
3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, comer of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
S$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
/ TOWNHOUSE 2br plus'
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Located in the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mo. $500 Deposit
386-752-3225
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750, mo + full security.
386-965,7534 or 386-365-1243
For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.
homee brick, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083
For lease-Lakewood sub. LG
bnck, 2600 sq.'ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lg Idtby Lake Jcffrey. $L275,m
+lst+sec.-Bp-uce 386-365-3865

740A Furnished
740 Homes for Rent


Come see. 2br/I ba w/office, ramp,
CH/A, W/D, micro, lawn/garb.
Non-smoking osner. Wood floor.
Great shady area in town. Avail
.12/1. $750.'mo. 386-755-0110
75 .Business &
750 Office Rentals-
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqf office space units or,
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.

770 Condos For Rent
2BR/2BA, all appliances,"
water/sewer, basic cable,
pool & tennis cts; ,
$950/mo, call 386-344-0433


Corial Homes
b Arthur Rutenberg
I ;. ,, .' ,-I,' ,, L, 'I C i I, i... I -j .


2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
Only 18,000 miles, garage
kept.motorhome. Excellent
condition w/many extras.
$45,000


Call
386-754-5660


. ..


.Thc P.rv'at




(38S)'75ZJ653.


1986 Chevy.
Monte Carlo SS
Maroon on maroon,
one owner, non-smoker,
84,000 orig. mi., never
wrecked, solid body.
$8,000
Call
904-718-6747


BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Gorgeous 20.02 ac. Ready for new
home. Land has 2 power poles, 2
wells & 24X30 slab. MLS 78126
$132,000. REO Realty Group
Heather Craig 386-466-9223
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race; color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our'readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
.impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for sale,
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307


I


830 Commercial
.830 Property
MOBILE HOME PARK with Ig.
brick owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84 Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
860 Investment
800 Property


810 Home for Sale
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large
oaks, wood floors, fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Lake Home in town. 4b/3b. For-
mal LR, DR & modem Kit,
f'place, upgrades. MLS 76085,
$299K. Coldwell Banker Bishop.
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Nice 4/2 on 4 ac. w/open floor
plan. 2 living rooms, eat-in-
kitchen, dining room & more.
MLS 76150. $79,000 Result Real-
ty. Brittany Stoeckert. 397-3473
4/2 Immaculate new carpet &
fixtures. Lg Kitchen, fenced yard.
2 cas garage. MLS 77602.
$159,200. REO Realty Group.
Nancy Rogers. 386-867-1271
Amazing 4/3 Ranch Style home
w/over 2,000 sf. 56.28 rolling ac.
Too mane extras to list. $500,000.
MLS 78420 REO Realty Groip.
Heather Craig 386-4669223.
NICE 4br/2ba Cedar home,
outside city limits, big rooms.
Reduced to sell. MLS 78769.
$169,000. Coldwell Banker
.Bishop. Br ce Dicks, 243-4002
Lovely 2 story on 7 ac. 3br/2ba,
fenced, fish ponds, pole barn, Ig
.kitchen, oaks, fruit trees. MLS
79306 $174,900 Cl1dwell Banker
Bishop Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896


810 Home for Sale

PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
SHORT SALE 3/2, Built 2007,
wood floors, Game room.
REDUCED! Call Ginger Parker
386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate


820 Farms &
Acreage

12 acres+/-, Northwest comer of
CR-18 and 81st Ave. Asking Price
$745,000. Call (801) 715-9162 for
more information

4 1/2.acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
Installed, Beaunifully wooded
iv/cleared Home Site, owner fin",
no doxn, $39.900. $410 mon
',Call 352-215-1018
w w.LandOg.nerFinancing.com
20 AC Wooded utract.
Very nice piece of Land. 10 m miles
from Cedar Key. MLS 78886,
$70,000. Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots. Deas Bullard/BKL'Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.c6m'


LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY, ,
INC. 755-5110 #78278


PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPSAGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BArecently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities'
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl-in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 $129,000 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
COUNTRY CLOSE 3/2 brick, 3
acres, pole barn, workshop, fruit
trees. $129,900.#78096
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Great home in Woodcrest. super
location. 3br/2ba. New A/C,
covered back porc. NILS 75198,
S $129,900 Coldwell Banker
SBishop. Elaine Tolar 755-6488
HUD HOME 4.77 ac, near
G' die. 3/2, as is $95.500 Call.
Robin Wiliams 365-5146
www-.hudhomestore com 091-
434983 Hallmark Real Estate


Lake City. 05 Brick-home w/shop,
3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189.900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper.and online E-edition,
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional rVn.


i -Y o r
Vehcl Sld


a 'd


It's quickan esy


1.) Go to www.lakecityreporter.com

2.) Click the "Share Photos" icon




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Share Photos
of your family,
frlents arid
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Submit Events Comment am
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3.) Click: SubmitPhoto

4.) Attach your photo (Choose File)

5.) Select the best album for your photo

6.) Complete the form and Submit

Albums will change during the year.
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SPease r,ubalr ynou, pio to our Aclle c 'r ,ai per allo i po'eic must rui appiovfa by our Web staff beforethey will appear on th
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Submit a photo tothIsGatery! (Currpntiy we only accept images In the Jpeg format, thank you!)
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Send in your favorite photos

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GREAT INVESTMENT,
building features 2 units w/
2by/2ba, Income producing. MLS
79271, $230,000. Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert. 386-397-3473


870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

950 Cars for sale
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS. Ma-
roon on maroon. 1 owner, non
smoker. $84K original mi. Never
wrecked. $8,000 904-718-6747

951 Recreational
5. .Vehicles
AIJO SKYLINE.
2 axle camper travel trailer.
19 ft. $400.
386-292-4169

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter I


- I


Classified Department: 755-5440











Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter






SPORTS


SaturdayNovember 192 1


SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
AUTO RACING
I p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, pole qualifying for Ford 100, at
Homestead
S 2:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole
qualifying for Ford 400, at Homestead
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, Ford 300, at Homestead
BOXING
10:30 p.m.
HBO- Champion Julio Cesar Chavez
Jr. (43-0-1) vs. Peter Manfredo Jr. (37-6-0),
for WBC middleweight title, at Houston
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Noon I
ESPN Nebraska at Michigan or
Wisconsin at Illinois
ESPN2 Wisconsin at Illinois or
Nebraska at Michigan
FSN Kansas at Texas A&M
VERSUS Harvard atYaie
2:30 p.m.
ESPN CLASSIC- NCAA, FCS, Florida
A&M vs. Bethune-Cookman; at Orlando
3:30 p.m.
ABC Regional. coverage, Penn St .
at. Ohio St., Texas Tech at Missouri, or
teams TBA
CBS Mississippi St. vs Arkansas, at
Little Rock,Ark.
ESPN Regional coverage, Penn St. at
Ohio St. or teams TBA
FSN SMU at Houston
VERSUS Colorado St. atTCU
4 p.m.
NBC Boston College at Notre
Dame
7 p.m.
ESPN LSU at Mississippi
FSN UCF at East Carolina
7:30 p.m.
ESPN2 -Teams TBA
VERSUS Colorado at UCLA
8 p.m.
ABC Oklahoma at Baylor or teams
TBA
FX Kansas St.at Texas
10:15 p.m.
ESPN Southern Cal at Oregon or
California at Stanford
GOLF
8 a.m.
NBC PGA Tour, Presidents Cup,
third round, at Melbourne, Australia
(same-day tape)
9:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Johor .
Open, third. round at Johor, Malaysia
(same-day tape)
1:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Titleholders, third
round, at Orlando
6:30 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Presidents Cup,
final round, at Melbourne,Australia
SOCCER
7:30 a.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Arsenal at
Norwich City

FOOTBALL

Top 25 schedule
Today
No. I LSU at Mississippi, 7 p.m.
No. 3 Alabama vs. Georgia Southern,
2 p.m.
No. 4 Oregon vs. No. 18 Southern
Cal, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Oklahoma at No. 25 Baylor,
8 p.m.
No. 6 Arkansas vs. Mississippi State at
Little Rock,Ark., 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Clemson at NC State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Stanford vs. California,
10:15 p.m.
No. 10 Boise State at San Diego State,.
8 p.m.
No. I1I Houston vs. SMU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 Michigan State vs. Indiana,
Noon
No. 13 Georgia vs. Kentucky,
12:21 p.m.
No. 14 South Carolina vs.The Citadel,
Noon
No. 15 Wisconsin at Illinois, Noon
No. 16 Kansas State at Texas, 8 p.m.
No. 17 Nebraska at No. 20 Michigan,
Noon
No. 19 TCU vs. Colorado State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 21 Penn State at Ohio State,
S3:30 p.m.
No. 23 Florida State vs. Virginia,
7:30 p.m.
No. 24 Notre Dame vs. Boston
College, 4 p.m.

College scores
Thursday
Marshall 23, Memphis 22
SE Louisiana 31, Nicholls St. 14
UAB 34, Southern Miss. 31
VirginiaTech 24, North Carolina 21

BASKETBALL

APTop 25 schedule
Today's Games
No. 2 Kentucky vs. Penn State, Noon
No. 5 Syracuse vs. Colgate, -1 p.m.
No. 8 Louisville at Butler, 2 p.m.
No. 14Wisconsin vs.Wofford, 8 p.m.
No. 18 Vanderbilt vs. N.C. State,
6:30'p.m.
No. 20 Cincinnati vs. Presbyterian,
4 p.m.
No. 21 Marquette vs. Drake or
Mississippi 6 p.m.


No. 22 Gonzaga vs. Hawaii, 9 p.m.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Tigers take i


JASuON mAii lt E WALrcRn/LaKe Cuiy Reponer
Columbia High's Braxton Stockton (22) barrels over Darren Burch (36) in order to evade a tackle
from Middleburg High's Duece Johnson (2) during the homecoming game on Oct. 21.




Indians hold on for 21-14


win over First Academy


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

ORLANDO Fort White
High held offaFirstAcademy
football team that refused to
roll over. The Indians posted
a 21-14 win in Friday's open-
ing round of the class 3A
playoffs in Orlando.
Andrew Baker threw for
194 yards and three touch-
downs, while A.J. Legree
caught passes on both sides
of the ball. Legree had two
interceptions one in the
end zone to go with two
touchdown passes and a 43-
yard diving catch to help
set up Fort White's final
score.
Fort White pushed out
to6a 21-7 lead darly in the
fourth quarter. Just when
it was time to run out the
clock, First Academy made it
interesting.
A 75-yard touchdown on
a screen pass from Curt
Cramer to Lloyd -Hylton
started the comeback.
Hylton then blocked his.
second punt of the game to
set up the Royals at the Fort
White 32 with less than two
minutes left in the game.'
First Academy moved to a
first-and-goal at the' one, but
Fort White's defense held
them out of the end zone.
Jonathan Dupree put the
fourth down nail in the cof-
fin with a sack.
Soron Williams caught
Baker's first touchdown pass


.to cap an 80-yard drive on
Fort White's opening posses-
sion of the game.
"We made critical mis-
take, but I'm proud that the
guys fought until the end,"
Fort White coach Demetric


Jackson said. "Ifs a win and
we keep moving on. I was
hoping to beat them pretty.
soundly, but I'll take a sloppy
win any day rather than a
loss when you played a good
game."


,aCL1A ,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Trey Phillips (5) catches a pass thrown by quarterback Andrew Baker (12) as Soron Williams (21)
looks on during the Battle for the Paddle game against Santa Fe High on Nov. 11.


Tebow never ceases to amaze


He just does
it. That's the
only way you
can sum up
watching Tim
Tebow.
Professional football's
most criticized
quarterback continues to
amaze me. What amazes
me is how there are those
out there that still fail to
believe he will succeed.
Tebow has won at every
level.
In high school, Tebow
guided Nease High in
St. Augustine to a state
championship. At the


FROM THE SIDELINE,
I W i I


Brandon Finley
Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@lakecityreportercom
collegiate level, he was
an influential part of two
national championships at
Florida.
. What has Tebow done at
the NFL level? This year,


he's 4-1 as a starter.
He hasn't looked pretty.
It's not the kind of game
you'll see from Peyton
Manning, but there's one
thing that Tebow and
Manning share getting
it done when it matters
most.
Some people are
fascinated with Tebow's
completion percentage.
I'm fascinated with his
winning percentage.
Look at what he did on a
game-winning,
95-yard touchdown drive
against the New York Jets
- arguably one of the


best defenses in the NFL
- on a nationally televised
Thursday night game.
With the country watch-
ing, Tebow delivered when'
it mattered most
Trailing late, Tebow
delivered a go-ahead score
to cap a 95-yard drive in
which Tebow was involved
directly in 11-of-12 plays.
He accounted for 87 of the
95 yards on 3-of-5 passing
for 29 yards and six rushes
for 58 yards.
Some may look at his
9-of-20 overall passing
line and doubt, but look
who Tebow is throwing


to. There were catchable
balls that could have been
hauled in, but you expect
a couple of drops when
Eric Decker is your No. 1
receiver.
It can't be explained
how Tebow keeps'getting
it done. He doesn't have
that defining characteristic
like Manning that shows
how he wins.
Tebow just has the it
factor and whatever it is, it
has accounted for wins.

* Brandon Finley covers
sports for the Lake City
Reporter.


Page IOA





it, 24-9


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakec(tyreporter.com

ST AUGUSTINE Columbia High coach Bria
Allen said all week that it would take 17 points to
beat St Augustine High in the first round of the
6A state playoffs. As it turned out, the Tigers only
needed 10.
After trailing 9-7 at the. half, the Tigers scored
17 second-half points to take the sting out of the
Yellow Jackets, 24-9, in St. Augustine on Friday.
St Augustine used a ground attack to drive 85
yards on its first possession but settled for a 42-
yard field goal by Drew Clukey for a 3-0 lead with
5:54 remaining in the first quarter.
Columbia answered on its first drive. Sparked by
a 23-yard pass from Jayce Barber to Nigel Atkinson.
the Tigers went 80 yards in 11 plays to score. Barber
capped the drive with a touchdown pass to Shaq
Johnson from 11 yards out.:
Hayden Lunde had a 32-yard field goal attempt
blocked on the Tigers next drive and the Yellow
Jackets would use the Momentum to put together a
touchdown drive of their own. Matt Morabito capped
the drive with a one-yard score to give the Yellow
Jackets a 9-7 lead going into the half.
"I told the guys that St. Augustine had never seen a
second half like we were about to give them," Allen said:,
"We. were only down 9-7 and hadn't played our best
football."
Columbia's best football came in the second half
Following Columbia's only mistake of the game an
interception by Barber deep in Yellow Jackets territo-y
-the Tigers' Ben Kuykendall picked offa Sandon Mims'
pass to give Columbia the ball back.
The Tigers made the most of their opportunity going
73 yards in nine plays for a score and a 14-9 lead. Barber
hit Nate Ayers on a sluggo route from 24 yards away for
the score.
With 7:50 remaining, Columbia's defense held S.i
Augustine on a fourth-and-one from midfield and thqn
faced a fourth-and-four situation of its own. Instead of
punting, the Tigers used a fake and Trey Marshall ran.
27 yards for the first down. Lunde then got a chance
to redeem himself and put the Tigers up eight points
with a 47-yard field goal. The kick was good.
"pDevontae Levy intercepted 'a pass on the YelloW,
Jackets' following drive and ran it back 32 yards f6r
a touchdown and the Tigers advanced to the second
round of the playoffs, 24-9.