<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01702
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 18, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01702
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








000015 120511
JLD OA *"GIT
Po OF'K FLORIDA HSTR
P0 BOX 117007HSTR
205 SMA JUNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


326 'V


Reporter


Friday, November 18, 2011


www.,a..-, tyreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 252 E 75 cents


$1M in bonuses for county workers
By GORDON JACKSON officers, non-tecurring budget, which had more ees a bonus."
By GkON JaC O The bonus is a reward for employees than $1.9 million in the account before the The motion to award the one-tin
gJackson@lakecityreporter.com who assumed extra job responsibilities vote to give employees a bonus. bonus was made by commissioner Rona
Columbia County employees will have a when the county was making budget cuts. "We asked employees to .do more with Williams -and seconded by Stephe
merry Christmas this year. The total cost, with worker's compensa- less," County Manager Dale Williams said. Bailey.
Commissioners at Thursday's meeting tion insurance also paid by the county, is "We need to share with the people respon- The vote was unanimous, but commit
approved a $2,000 Christmas bonus for $1,097,751. .sible for saving the county money. We sion chairman Jody DuPree was absent
all 502 employees on the county payroll, The money will come from the county's have enough money to give our employ- the meeting.


including those working for constitutional


ie
ad
en
is-
at


- i^E-onomic
Broadway star takes stage at FGC tonight Economic



development


chief OK'd


I ,IA.U MAI I IW Wp wLI.nMejLaKe ,iy Repone
Broadway star and former Florida Gateway College student Norm Lewis rehearses with the FGC Choir Thursday at the
Alfonso Levy Performing Arts Center. Lewis will be performing tonight at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are still available.



Debt plan would hit popular tax break


Many deductions
would be eliminated
under one proposal.


By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
Associated Press
WASHINGTON- Millions of taxpay-
ers who take advantage of deductions
for mortgage interest, charitable dona-
tions and state and local taxes would be
targeted for potential tax hikes under a
GOP plan to raise taxes by $290 billion
over the next decade to help reduce the
nation's deficit
Some workers could also see their
employer-provided health ,benefits
taxed for the. first time, though aides
cautioned that the proposal is still fluid.
The plan by.Sen. Pat Todmey, R-Pa.,
who serves on the 12-member debt
supercommittee, would raise revenue


by limiting the tax breaks enjoyed
by people who itemize their deduc-
tions, in exchange for lower overall
tax rates for families at every income
level. Taxpayers who already take the
standard deduction instead of itemizing
- about two-thirds of filers could
see tax cuts. The one-third of taxpayers
who itemize their deductions might find
themselves paying more.
The top income tax rate would fall
from 35 percent to 28 percent, and the
bottom rate would drop from 10 percent
to 8 percent The rates between would
be reduced as well.
About 50 million households item-
ized their deductions in 2009, according
to the nonpartisan Joint Committee on
Taxation. About 35 million households
claimed the mortgage interest deduc-
tion, and 36 million deducted charitable
donations. Nearly 41 million claimed
deductions for paying state and local


taxes.,
A GOP congressional aide said th(
plan is designed to raise taxes on house
holds in the top two tax brackets. Tha
would, affect individuals.making more
.than $174,400 and married couples
making more than $212,300.
Some Republicans say. the plan
offers a potential breakthrough ir
deficit-reduetion talks that have stalled
over GOP opposition to tax hikes and
Democrats' objection'to cuts in benefit
programs without significant revenue
increases.
Democratic and Republican mem
bers of the supercommittee met sepa
rately Thursday, with.no sign of prog
ress on a deal.
Republicans are becoming increasing
ly divided over the issue of raising taxes
A growing number of Republicans ii
Congress say they would support a ta
PLAN continued on 5A


Jesse Quillen set
to assume duties
in December.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com


Commission
mously approve
cial package
to hire a nev
County
Development
director at
meeting.
The vote pa
for Jesse Quille
his new duties
said County M
Williams.
"I think Jes
to be a ver
for Columbi:
Williams said.
Quillen,. 52,
Ala., current-
ly services
as direc-
tor of the
Washington
County
Eco, nomic
Develop-
m e n t
Initiative in.
the Mobile,
- Ala. area. He
t has a master'
economic deve
s Quillen, in a
an e-mail Thi
a he was attract
position beca
county's phy
structure, pro
Stwo interstate
e good rail acc
College, lar
location to ne
politan areas,
leadership anm
he experience
toured the are
"After a co
n its to Columbi
x is obvious to


economic
climate is
stable and
apparently
trending in
a positive
*direction,"
he said.
TT


mn


,H e
iers unani- emphasized Quillen
....e i emphasized
edthefinan- the impor-
necessary tance of supporting exist-
w Columbia ing businesses because
Economic they currently provide jobs
Department and represent the most
Thursday's likely source of growth in
the future.
ves the way "I would like to begin
en to assume immediately to develop a
s on Dec. 5, formal strategic plan for
manager Dale Columbia County econom-
ic development efforts," he
3se is going said. "I would like the com-
y good fit munity to understand that
a County, they will be included in
of Chatomthis process. Everyone is
of Chatom, needed and
everyone
"The economic cli- has a role to
mate is stable and play."
Q uillen
apparently trending will be paid
in a positive $110,000 a
.. year, plus
direction." benefits,
Jesse Ouillen to county
_records.
Before
s degree in the vote, commissioner
elopment. Scarlet Frisina described
response to her meeting with Quillen
ursday, said last weekend.
acted to the .I was really impressed
ruse of the by him," she said.
rsical infra- Quillen plans meet key
)ximnity near business leaders as soon
e highways, as possible and start to
ess, a local work.
ge airport, "I look forward to meet-
sarby metro- ing and greeting and build-
strhospital ing the Columbia County
d hospitality hEconomic Development
-hen o team," he said. "By work-
ea ing together, we can
uple of vis: accomplish great things-in
ia County, it the community."
me that the


Man was struck with

pool cue case, say police


Incident during
billiards league play.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

A Lake City man was
arrested Wednesday night
after an argument at a local
pool hall turned violent and
he allegedly struck another
patron with a pool cue case
during a billiards league
competition.
Hector Torres, 52, 182
SW Pilots Way, was charged
with aggravated battery
after the incident He was
booked in to the Columbia
County Detention Facility


on $25,000
bond.
Accord -
ing to
Columbia
County
Sheriff's
reports,
deputies
were called Torres
to Pockets, -
a local billiard parlor, in ref-
erence to a battery.
According to the victim,
he and other pool league
players were engaged in a
game and an argument fol-
lowed.
The alleged victim said
he attempted to apologize,
but Torres told him to get
away and when he turned


* to walk 'away and looked
back, Torres struck him in
the face repeatedly with his
pool stick case, reports say.
The deputy reported the
victim had injuries to his
nose and lip, but refused
medical treatment
Torres could not be found
at the scene and the deputy
went to Torres' residence.
Torres told the deputy
that he and the victim were
arguing, but the victim
slapped him first. Torres
reportedly told the deputy
that he punched the victim
with his fist after throwing
him to the ground. Torres
denied hitting the victim
with the pool case.
STRUCK continued on 5A


SDoing their part


Students with the Richardson Middle School Beta Club grab bags full of groceries for
Thanksgiving dinner'to distribute to families in need Thursday at the Catholic Charities Lake
City Regional Office. See story, more photos in Sunday's paper.


CALLUS: Opinion ................ 4A
(386)752-1293 O 4People.................. 2A
SUBSCRIBE TO Obituaries ..............5A
THE REPORTER: Mostly sunny
Voice: 755-5445W EATHER, 2A Advice & Comics ......... 4
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER 2APuzzles.................2B
184264 00020 1


PEOPLE COMING
Demi Moore SATURDAY
to divorce Local news
Ashton. roundup


s


I- _













2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011

I Celebrity Birthdays


, FLORIDA'
.M M Wednesday:
S 10-24-34-37-39-45
x4


P A3e, Thursday:
SAfternoon: 3-1-4


4-1-'- Thursday: -Unatzh- Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-6-7-7 't%4, 8-22-27-32-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Demi Moore to divorce Ashton


LOS ANGELES
emi Moore is ending
her marriage to Ashton
Kutcher, the 49-year-
old actress told The
Associated Press on
Thursday.
Moore and Kutcher, 33, were wed
in September 2005. The couple's
.relationship became tabloid fodder
in recent months as rumors swirled
'about Kutcher's alleged infidelity..
"It is with great sadness and a heavy
heart that I have decided to end my
six-year marriage to Ashton. As a
woman, a mother and a wife there are
certain values and vows that I hold
-sacred, and it is in this spirit that I
have chosen to move forward with my
life. This is a trying time for me and
. my family, and so I would ask for the
same compassion and privacy that you
would-give to anyone going through
a similar situation," according to her
statement to the AE
The pair.frequently used Twitter to
communicate with each other as mil-
lions of fans followed along even
amid rumors of Kutcher's infidelity.
The day before their sixth wedding
anniversary, Moore ominously quoted
philosopher Epictetus: "When we are.
offended at any man's fault, turn to
yourself and study your own failings.
Then you will forget your anger."

Regis feels 'pretty good'
as he prepares to exit
NEW YORK- Regis Philbin says
fans have told him he makes them
happy every morning.
S Tm glad I did that," he says, 'cause it
*made me happy."
'- But his decades of regular visits with -
Yviewers end after Friday, when he steps
:,down from the New York-based show'
he has co-hosted for 28 years.
"I feel pretty good," he told reporters


Demi Moore is ending her six-year marriage to Ashton Kutcher.


after Thursday's edition of "ive! With
Regis and Kelly" But he noted that he
may not feel that good next week.'
Jerry Seinfeld will join Kelly Ripa on
Monday as the first of a series of guest
co-hosts. A permanent replacement will
be named later.. ,

Tyler Perry defends
casting Kardashian in film
ATLANTA Filmmaker Tyler
Perry is defending his controversial
decision to cast reality television star
Kimrn Kardashian in an upcoming film
about marriage.
Perry announced that Kardashian.
will have a role in "The Marriage
Counselor" shortly before she ended


her 72-day marriage to NBA player
Kris Humphries, creating a buzz on
.social media sites.
Perry says he want-
ed a younger cast,
which Kardashian .'
rounds out, to help
attract younger
viewers. -In a state-
mert on his website,
Perry gays he thinks
"it would be a very Kardashian
responsible of her to
be a part of this film" :
and good for young people Who see,
her as a role model to "see her in a
"film that is about what happens in life
when you make the wrong choices."
Perry asked for his fans' under--
, standing. (AP)


Author-poet Margaret
Atwood is 72.
M Comedian Kevin
Nealon is 58.
Pro Football Hall of
Fame quarterback Warren
Moon is 55.
Actress Elizabeth
Perkins is 51.
Rock musician Kirk
Hammett (Metallica) is 49.


Actor Owen Wilson
is 43.
Singer Dutican Sheik
is 42.
Actor Mike Epps is 41.
Actress Peta Wilson
is 41.
Actress Chloe Sevigny
is 37.
Actor Damon Wayans
Jr. is 29.


Daily Scripture
"Nun Your word is a lamp for
my feet, a light on my path."
Psalm 119:105

Thought for Today
'It can't happen here' is number
one on the list of famous last
words."
David Crosby
rock.singer-musician


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO-REACH US
Main number.;......(386) 7562-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon....754-0
Circulation. ............ 755-5445 (sbranon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online..., ww.lakecltyreporter.com CIRCULATION .
.'The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of .
Community Newspapers Inac., is pub- Home deliven of the Laie C; y Rep
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by. 6:30
E. Duval' St., LaKe Crty. Fla. .32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
'Member Audit-Bureau of Circulation and Plese call386-755-5445 to report
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All materialherein- Isp~pertyoftheLIake In Columbia County, customers sh
City Reporter: Reproduction In whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a
in part is forbidden without the permnis- 'error f reelivery.
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 100 avice error fom., next day re-delivery or
No. 100 a:m., next day lve0 or
No..310-80vice related credits will be issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all othercounties where home del
to Lake Ciy R epoer. P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or
.Laike Cty, Fla 32056vice related credits will be issued.
.,Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418 ,
(lwilson@lakecityreponer.comi Circulation"............. 7554
(circulation@lakecityrep:rter.com).
NEWS . Home delivery rates .
Editor Robert Bridge ..... 754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rbdidges@lakcldtyreporter.com) 12 Weeks.............. $2
* ,,.. '24Weeks.............. .$4
ADVERTISING 52 Weeks..................$8
Director AshleV Butcher ...754-0417 Rates include7%salestax.
Mali rates
.,(abutcher@iakectyreporter.com). 12 Weeks.............. $4
CLASSIFIED 24 Weeks...................$8
To Place a classified ad, call 755-5440 52 Weeks.............. $17!


orier
a.m.
7o30

any

should
ser-
After
ser-

ivery
ser-

445


6.32
48.79
3.46

1.40
2.80
9.40


CORRECTION,

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Nick Loeb nixes
U.S. Senate run
MIAMI BEACH Sofia
Vergara's fiance Nick Loeb
is ending speculation about
a possible political run.
-I The Republican busi-
nessman and the star of
ABC's hit comedy "Modern
'Family" held a news con-
.ference Thursday at the
'Sagamore Hotel in Miami
Beach to say Loeb won't
-run next year.
He is still recovering from
getting hit by a car last year.
'The accident shattered his
pelvis.
* Loeb had been eying
' Democratic Florida Sen. Bill
-Nelson's seat Loeb previ-
ously ran for the Florida
state Senate but eventually,
dropped out as he dealt with
his pending divorce.

Fla. women first in
Obama campaign
POMPANO BEACH
The Obama campaign
is kicking off its outreach.
to women with a round of
house parties, phone banks
and training.
Campaign organizers say
first lady Michelle Obama
will participate in the nation-
al call-ins Thursday, and the
house parties will be held in
Pompano Beach, Orlando'
and around the state.
The president badly
needs women's votes. They
chose him over Republican
candidate John McCain by
13 percent Obama won the
male vote by just one per-
:centage point.
But recent polls show
'many are frustrated by the
-economy and far less enthu-
siastic about Obama than
'they were three years ago.

Baby manatee
saved from inlet
ORLANDO -Wildlife
Officials in central Florida
rescued an orphaned baby
manatee from Sebastian Inlet


THE WEATHER

I I


MOSTLY
SUNNY


HI i 10 46


Sofia Vergara, star of ABC's hit comedy "Modern Family,"
looks on as her fiance, Republican businessman Nick Loeb,
right, speaks during a news conference on Thursday.


Pensacola
63/52


i^m FI 3'


~Zf~* I


iSOLATED PARTLY PARTLY PARTLY
SHOWERS SUNNY CLOUDY CLOUDY
HIO LT PARTLY 81 -'PAR. TLY 3 HI. PARTLY
411

HI 71L056 H181L055 HI81LO53 HI 801058


Tallahassee *
67/44

SPanama City
68/47


* Vata
.66/44
Lake City.
68/46
Gainesville *
69/149
Ocala
71,52


Tampa *
76/58


FL Myer
77/61

K
8i


City
* Jlacksonville Cape Canaveral
65/53 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
71'60 Gainesville
Jacksonville
Oriando Cape Canaveral Key West
73,59 71./66 Lake City
Miami
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
i6. 74 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
s 78. 74 Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
79/66 Miami Tampa
79/74 Valdosta


ey West
EL- . .


a a I


The manatee was taken
to SeaWorld Orlando where
it is scheduled for a num-
ber of tests on Thursday.
Park officials say the baby
is between three and six
months old and is swim-
ming on its own.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports that animal experts
from the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission don't
know why the baby was
orphaned.

Gag grouper gets
more protection
KEY LARGO Gag
grouper are getting more
protection, but bag limits
are being increased for red
grouper in Florida waters
of the Gulf of Mexico.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission approved the
changes Wednesday in
Key Largo.
Recreational bag lim-


its for red grouper will
increase from two to four
fish on Dec. 23.

Boy arrested
after taking truck
.EATONVILLE -
Authorities say a 10-year-old
central Florida boy broke
into an impound lot by scal-
ing a 10-foot chain-link fence
and stole a pickup truck.
Eatonville police
spokesman Eric McIntyre
says the boy drove the
truck through a fence
Wednesday and took off
down the street Someone
noticed a child driving
and called police. The
boy drove several blocks,
throwing the truck into
reverse to avoid police cars
along the way.
-Reports said the boy
crashed into a light pole. An
electric wire fell, setting a
house on fire, but the boy
escaped with no injuries.
(AP)


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high-
Normal low
Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Thursday
SMonth total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


80
69
74
51
89 in 1957
26 in 1970


0.94"
0.97"
32.24"
1.19"
44.82"


90 .".7 TO, nm,b'iT. ,


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
t Sunrise tom.
L Sunset tom.

I MOON
Moorise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset tom.


6:58 a.m.
5:33 p.m.
6:59 a.m.
5:32 p.m.


12:50 p.m.
-12:45 a.m.
1:26 p.m.


@000
Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec.
18 25 2 10
Last New First Full



6a On this date in
turday 1989, a surge
of cold, arctic air
brought cold tern
peratures to par
of the north cen
United States. A
%mi. few cities report
record lows, inci
ing 4 degrees be
zero at Rocheste
Minnesota.
tinvntne


W. Palm Beach


Saturday
76,68. pc
78, 63,,pc
82/73/pc
85,67'pc
78, 57/pc
75.62.-'pc
81 74,'pc
77.56..'pc
81 73 pc
83.'68,pc
80 60. pc
80. 64 'pc
72/60/pc
71. 61,c
73,53, p;
82 ,65'pc
74' 53,- pc
80, 73/pc


Sunday
S7,, 67; pc
79,'63,pc
82; 72/pc
85.. 66,- pc
81- 56,p
78. 60..pc
81.74 pc
81 '55..pc
81.' 72.. pc
85.,'68opc
82,'59'pc
81/63'pc
77,159/pc
7560,. pc
80 ,53' pc
84.'65..-pc
79/52, pc
81/72,pc


An exclusive
service
S brought to
Mi0lEIEM our readers
30imles b bumby
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0 "
to 10+.

weather.com

Forecasts, data and
we ,ths e graphics 0 2011 Weather
fli tV Central, LP, Madison, W, .
weather" www.weatherpubllsher.comrn


r
n-
ts
tral
ed
ud-
elow
er,


Get9 oede


<:::


AROUND FLORIDA


S7a Ip 7p la
Friday Sal







Frecasted tempnati *Feihike


. ...... .'- .. .- .-- i. --


-i


L-


----- --------------------


7~i~-~~" *:'"~'~~-'a311s~911~plLlarr


~-~---------------~L- --------


1419


-- -----------------------------


.I


f


,,


4




SLAKECITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 3
IIpr I !


If


- -~


.. ,. WT ,. v. .nsfr-


grTS
lCE$.


4 Great


oseout idif
oseout holiday gift
uti ho


/Personal presents
c Buy in bulk for your sc
/ School carnival items


4 Fun Festival pri


zes


hool


& gifts


4 Bring your friends


4 Buyto th


iece


or in bulk/per case


Dale s November 14th 23rd 9:00 AM


(Opben lam


- 3pm on Saturday closed on Sunday],


VCady Fundraising
services
2140 SW Main Blvd


Lake City FL


32025


800-234-556


tor


S5l:00l B


Cow06A


eie~


l


'^WB?^'I *MDry













OPINION


Friday, November 18, 2011


ONE


ONE
OPINION


The


return of


Gabby


Giffords

Rep. Gabrielle
"Gabby" Giffords
has three goals: to
get better; have a
baby with her astro-
n~iut husband, Mark Kelly; and
return to her seat in Congress.
We wish her the best of luck
in achieving all three.
Last January, the Arizona
Democrat, now 41, was shot
point-blank in the head by
a deranged man who also
killed six people at a Tucson
shopping center. The feds are
now trying to medicate the
suspect enough so that he is
mentally capable of standing
trial.
Giffords, meantime, has been
through an excruciating pro-
cess of rehabilitation restor-
ing her memory; her ability to.
talk; her eyesight; her skull,
from which a piece had to be
temporarily removed.
She did not leave the rehabil-
itation hospital until June, with
a brief furloughlin. May to see
the launch of the space shuttle
that her husband commanded.
Her appearances have since
become more frequent such
as an Aug. .1 appearance on the
House floor to vote in favor of
raising the debt ceiling.'
Incapacity is rinot a total dis-
qualifier for Congress. Sen.
Tim Johnson, D-S.D., was out
for 10 months*following brain :
surgery and still had speech
issues when he returned.
Their constituents returned
Sens. Strom Thurmond,
R-S.C., and Robert Byrd, D-W..
Va., to office even though both
had clearly been incapacitated
by age.
Giffords must decide this
spring whether she will run-
again. If she feels up to it, we
hope she does. Not because
of her politics. That's up to
her Arizona constituents. But
as a testament, proven too
many times, unfortunately, to
American democracy's capacity
to weather tragedy and con-
tinue as a government of the
people. A gunshot may change
much, but it can't be allowed to
change that.
Scripps Howard News-Service

Lake City Reporter
'Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We. believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.-
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
.Tom Wood, chairman

LETT E RS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor 'should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


wo of my four chil-
dren were born
in my "advanced ,
maternal age" years
that is, over age
35. Though the babies I carried
were at higher risk for several
conditions, the one we hear
about most being Down syn-
drome, I did not do any recom-,
mended prenatal testing of the
babies besides a sonogram.
In the United States, studies
routinely show that more than
90 percent of women choose
to end pregnancies diagnosed
with Down syndrome. But
since my then-husband and I
knew that we would not abort
in any event, and the available
invasive tests themselves, such
as amniocentesis, carried a risk
of ending the pregnancy, we
, said no thanks:
Down syndrome, which
impacts cognitive and physical
ability and appearance, results
from a chromosomal abnor-
mality, but it is hardly uncom-
mon, One in every 691 babies
is born with it, according to
the National Down Syndrome
Society. According to the orga-
nization, about 400,000 families
in the United States have a
child with Down syndrome, and
about 6,000 babies with Down
syndrome are born each year.
Well, perhaps ironically, the
further into those AMA years I
progressed, the less I worried
about the babies I carried. With
the first I had been frantic. I
wouldn't fill my gas tank myself
* for fear of the fumes affecting
the little one. By baby No. 4,
though I.was more at risk for
genetic abnormalities then
ever, I didn't worry about them
much at all. I suppose partly
because I had figured out by
then that every child comes
with some set of challenges.
Anyway, because of the risks


To the Editor:
In response to the letter to
the editor that appeared in
the Friday, Nov. 11 edition
of the Lake City Reporter,
first, I don't think it has ever
crossed my mind that the
Reporter leans too far right,
but that might be my point of
view!
I appreciate the articles
on "both" sides, how can we
ever solve our problems if
we don't understand what
each other is thinking? I
have a "'Take America Back"
bumper sticker on my car; it


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANO
VI


Betsy Hart
www.betsysblog.com
involved with invasive genetic
testing for Down syndrome,
such. tests are not routinely
administered to women under
the age of 35, when 80 percent
of instances of Down syndrome
actually occur. (As a result of
the much higher fertility rates
in that demographic.)
But a new test is a game-.
changer.
Weeks ago, a San Diego com-
pany, Sequenom, introduced for
clinical use a simple blood test,
MaterniT21, that is inexpern-
sive, very accurate in diagnos-
ing Down syndrome and cannot
itself impact the pregnancy.
Some review: The vast major-
ity of instances of Down syn-
drome occur in babied carried
by women 35 and younger, but
that age group has historically
been less likely to get invasive
testing for Down syndrome...
Now. a simple and accurate
blood test for this condition
can be safely and routinely
administered to virtually any-
one who wants it as long as a
doctor authorizes it There is
little doubt that more and more
pregnant women at every age
will get it.
So for the math: If over 90
percent of women who find out-
they are pregnant with a baby
with Down syndrome abort,
does this mean we might even-
tually have almost no babies
born with Down syndrome?
Will we have gotten rid of a
supposedly "undesired" human


doesn't mean "from the pres-
ent Administration", it means
back to the Constitutional
Republic that we were found-
ed to be! It is not, and never
was, our government's duty
to bail out industries, create
jobs, furnish health care, etc.
etc. If we had not gotten so
far off track, we would not
be in the financial mess we
are in. Speaking as a mem-
ber of the Tea Party, I am
furious with every member
of Congress, President, etc.
(past or present) who has not
upheld their oath to the U.S.
Constitution and allowed this


condition by getting rid of the
people themselves who carry
it?
And what does that do to the
rest of us?
Look, I- am the first to admit
that I'm not signed up on any
"adopt a baby with Down syn-
drome" list. I also didn't sign up
on the "raising four children on
my own" list We never know
what challenges life is going
to present. Accordingly, what
a false sense of security a "no
Down syndrome" test result
can give parents.
Sure, the new test is just a
tool, after all. If used to pre-
pare expectant parents for.a
baby with Down syndrome so
they can learn about it before
their little one enters the world.
- great Maybe they can be
assured that life expectancies
and outcomes for children with
Down syndrome are so much
better than what they were
even 30 years ago.
Early intervention for c6gni-
tive development and surgi- ,
cal and other treatments for
physical impairments have
fundamentally and positively
changed the playing field for
babies born with Down syn-
drome today. And the testimony
of many parents of children
with Down syndrome the joy
and the challenges these gentle
souls bring into family life is
often incredible.
But how many minds will"
change when they have this
information? We live in a sup-
posedly humane and tolerant
age. I question that Not when
we apparently still have so little
tolerance for humanity that
might look a little different.


Betsy Hart is a nationally syn-
dicated columnist for Scripps
Howard News Service.


country to become $15+ tril-
lion in debt. This is a debt
that our children and grand-
children will bear the conse-
quences for!
I encourage all of us to
read the Constitution, realize
again what our Constitutional
Republic is supposed to be,
work on becoming the self-
reliant people we used to
be, and then elect people
that you hope will uphold
their oath, and let's get busy
TAKING AMERICA BACK!
Sharon Higgins
Lake City


4A


THEIR
EW


Supreme

showdown

coming on

health care


made the long-
awaited announce-
ment Monday that
it will finally decide
what to do about Obamacare.',
Though much attention has
been given to the impact a rul-
ing could have on the upcoming
presidential campaign, the impli-
cations reach far beyond the
electoral cycle. This is one'of the
most important cases setting the '
direction of America's future.
The Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act covers a
fifth of the U.S. economy, and
everyone is affected. The high
court generally allocates an.
hour of oral argument to go
with the stacks of legal briefs in
a normal case. Important issues
get two hours. This one gets
5 1/2, showing just how big a .
deal the justices understand
this decision will be.
Two hours' worth of debate
'is set aside for the issue of the
federal governments authority
to enact the individual mandate,
which requires every person .
either to buy health insurance
or to pay a fine. This time also
will cover the establishment
of state health exchanges and
minimum coverage of health
insurance provisions. Another
90 minutes will be spent on the
question of whether the rest of
the Obamacare legislation can
survive if the individual mandate
is found to be unconstitutional.
One hour of argument will focus
on the question of-whether the
Anti-Injunction Act prohibits the
courts from ruling on the issue of.
the individual mandate because
the law doesn't go into effect until,.
2014. The remaining time will be .
allocated to whether the health
care takeover violates the 10th
Amendment and state sovereign-
ty, particularly with the provisions -
that expand Medicaid programs.
The Supreme Court could
strike down the entire law. It ,
also could choose to strike
dowp only the individual man-
date, but without this piece
Obamacare is unworkable. The
individual mandate is neces-
sary to stop a health insurance .
"death spiral" from happen-
ing. Without the individual
mandate, there is nothing to
stop people from waiting until
they are sick to buy insurance,
which defeats the purpose of
getting insurance to spread the'.,,
risk among the healthy and
those who are not
Until these questions are
resolved, the states would be
wise to put plans to implement
Obamacare on hold. The big-
gest immediate expense is put-
ting insurance exchanges into'
place, which can cost as much
as $10 million a year for a state
as small as North Dakota, which
wisely has voted against imple-
mentation. Michigan, on the
other hand, despite being one
of the litigants in the case pend-
ing before the Supreme Court, .,
has voted to start creating an
exchange. The argument is that
it would be easy tp dismantle
the exchange if it is found to be
unconstitutional. That ignores
the millions in taxpayer dollars
to set up the new bureaucracy
and the many millions of dollars,
presumably, to operate it It's
never easy, and usually is impos-
sible, to get rid of a government
entity once it's created.
There's enough evidence
already that Obamacare is far
more expensive than originally
estimated, and states shouldn't
suffer those costs right now.
It's better to wait a few months
for the Supreme Court to clar-
ify whether the words of the
Constitution still mean some- -


thing with a ruling that there "
are limits on what the govern-
ment can do. :
* The Washington Times .


Anew test for


Down syndrome
4 -. .


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


Reporter fair


in opinion articles









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & NATION FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011 5A



Christmas tree dedication set for this afternoon


By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityrepor ter. corn
Those with cancer will be hon-
ored and remembered today at
5:45 p.m. with a Christmas tree
dedication at the Lake City Mall.
To remember those who have.
.lost their battle with cancer and
honor those who have fought or
are still fighting, Vernon Douglas,
Columbia County circuit court
judge, and American Cancer
Society volunteers will dedicate the
tree at the east end of the mall.
The group will' also sell orna-


ments that can be -
dedicated to loved
ones with cancer to |
raise money for the
American Cancer
Society and Relay --
for Life. The orna-
ments will deco- L
rate the mall tree
and be returned to Bennett
the purchaser in
January:. The ornaments are $20
and available at the dedication,
from Relay for Life team mem-
bers and by mail. Ornaments will
feature the name of -a loved one,


a message to. that person and the
Relay for life logo. Profit from the
oraments will go to the American
Cancer Society, about $14. To pur-
chase by mail send the name of a
loved one with cancer, a message,
your name and a $20 check or
money order to American Cancer
Society, c/o Kim Nicholson, 295
NW Commons Loop Ste 115-392,
Lake City, FL 32055: For informa-
tion call 288-2871.
A cancersurvivorshares her expe-
rience:.
In 2008 Colleen Bennett, 67,
noticed a lump in her neck that


was sore to the touch. Doctors
found cancer in her throat where
her tounge is attached. After sur-
gery, they gave her two years to
live.
Radiation directly into the
throat made it so hard to swallow,
Bennett said she was hospitalized
for dehydration and malnutrition.
Although it is was an aggressive
cancer, Bennett has been cancer
free for three years.
"At first I didn't understand why
I was spared. When I got involved
in Relay for Life I understood," she
said.


As the team development chair-
woman for the Coulmbia County,
Relay for Life Bennett works to
sign up new and old teams and"
raises money for the American
Cancer Society.
'"Twently years ago I would have
died," she said.
"I survived because I was sup-
posed to be here to do this and try
to keep other people from going
through it."
Relay for Life will be April 27 at
Columbia High School. Last year it,
raised about $70,000. This year the.
goal is $100,000, Bennett said.


Crash

ruled

murder-

suicide

By MEAD GRUVER
Associated Press
CHEYENNE, Wyo. -
A fiery, head-on crash that
killed five people ii' central
Wyoming last week was
a murder-suicide by a dis-
traught teen who veered his
SUV into a family in a mini-
van at nearly 100 mph on
a dark highway, authorities
said Thursday.
The crash happened. just
after- midnight Nov. 10 four,
miles south of Lander, a.
town of about 7,400 at the
foot of the Wind River Range.
Seventeeri-year-old Matthew
Denton deliberately turned
the 2002 Chevrolet Suburban
he was driving into oncom-
ing traffic, Fremont County
Coroner Ed McAuslan said.
The Suburban was going
97 mph when it crashed
head-on into a 2005 Dodge
Caravan, instantly killing all
four people in- the minivan.
Denton, who was alone in the
Suburban, died at a Casper
hospital shortly after the
wreck.
The van was going between,
50 and 55 mph. There was no
evidence Denton was tatget-
ing anyone inside the van,
officials said. ,
"I don't think he had a clue
who he was running into. It
was dark He picked the next
vehicle thatwas coming down
the road, is what it looked like
to us," Wyoming Highway
Patrol Lt Tom Adams said.


$3,300 donation


JHJ .Un m 'in i I... n+ n.. ii. r lii.,' i,
Representatives of Pepsi Beverages Company presented a check for $3,300 to the Christian
Service Center Thursday. Pictured are PBC unit sales manager Nile Bryant (from left), CSC
assistant director Charlie Suydam, PBC regional sales director Mark Alexander, administrative
assistant Polly Murray, CSC executive director Shirlpy McManus, PBC territory sales manager
Josh Olmstead, CSC board president Randy Cox and PBC Human Resources Manager Alex
Pullen.



Ohio mom charged in death

of 28-pound teen daughter


By LISA CORNWELL
Associated Press
CINCINNATI A mother and a nurse
were charged Thursday in the death of
'the woman's 14-year-old daughter, who had
cerebralpalsy and weighed only 28 pounds,
a prosecutor said.
A Montgomery County grand jury in
Dayton indicted, the mother and the nurse
on involuntary manslaughter charges. Two
other nurses were indicted on lesser charges
of failing to report child abuse or neglect, All
were being held in the county jail, prosecu-
tors said.
"Iqis is a tragic and sad case wherein four


PLAN: Democrats offer criticism

Continued From Page lA -


reform package that increas-
es revenues, if it is coupled
with significant spending
cuts, enough to reduce the
deficit by about $4 trillion
over the next decade.
The so-called "go big" strat-
egy has been endorsed by a
bipartisan group of about 150
lawmakers from the House
and Senate. A rival group of


72 House Republicans sent a
letter to the supercommittee
Thursday, urging members
.to oppose any tax increases.
"We must recognize that
increasing the tax burden
on American businesses and
citizens, especially during a
fragile recovery, is irrespon-
sible and dangerous to the
health of the United States,"


adults were responsible for the care of this
14-year-old special-needs girl, and they all
utterly ignored and failed to do so," county
prosecutor Mathias Heck Jr. said in a state-
ment "'The conduct of these four defendants
transcends all bounds of human decency."
Heck said that the girl undoubtedly would
still be alive "if just one of these defendants
had acted responsibly."
Makayla Norman died March 1 from nutri-
tional and medical neglect complicated by
her chronic condition, the county coroner's
office ruled.
-"She was the worst malnourished child
this office has ever seen," Ken Betz, director
of the coroner's office, said Thursday.


would generate less revenue
than advertised.
They note that Toomey's
plan assumes that tax cuts
enacted under former
President George W. Bush,
and extended through 2012
under President Barack
O ama, would continue,.
Toomey's plan would then
cut the tax rates even more.
Republicans say Toomey's
tax overhaul plan would
increase tax revenue by $250
billion over the next decade.
An additional -$40 billion
would be raised by using a
new measure of inflation to
adjust the tax brackets each
year.



HangOn
k a minute-7, i

Our customers receive
a Complimentary
copyofthe
Lake Cioty 'Reporter
when they drop off&
WhileSu lies Last
31 ualS.aLkeCt


said the letter, circulated
by Rep. Patrick McHenry,'
R-N.C.
Democrats, meanwhile,
have panned Toomey's
plan, saying the rate reduc-
tions would cut taxes for the
wealthy so much that taxes
on the middle class would
have to be raised. They also
argue that Toomey's plan


OBITUARIES


Wayne Phillip Richards
Wayne Phillip (Bull) Richards,.
62, died November 9, 2011 re-
sulting from an accident at his'
home in Bran-
ford, FL. He
was born Feb-
ruary 5, 1949
in Baltimore,
Maryland to
Rose Marie
and Leo Rich-
ards who pre-
ceded him in
death. He is predeceased by his
wife of 30 years, Edna (Sprout)


Richards. He is also survived
by his fiance, Cindy Irvin and
her son Anthony Irvin of Bran-
ford, FL. One daughter. Karen
Shipley, Baltimore, MD. Sons:
Wayne Richards,
Jr., Baltimore,' '
MD., Wayne
(Regina) Mont-
gomery, Blue- ':
field, W. VA.,
Ronnie (Cerica) Montgomery,
Bristol, TN., Brian (Vicki) Ward,
Princeton, KY. One sister, Bon-
nie (Ed) Warf, Middleboume,
VA. Seventeen grandchildren.
Also, David and Joey Maddox,


families of Branford, FL. His
beloved pets, Silk, Breezer and
Roxie. Blll was a Vietnam Vet
1968-1970 Combat wounded.
He was an avid Harley Rid-
er, Loving father, companion
and devoted friend to all he
met. Bull you will be missed,,
you are in our hearts forever.

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Is economy best

birth control? U.S.

births dip again


By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer
ATLANTA The econo-
my may well be the best form
of birth control.
.U.S. births dropped for the
third straight year espe-
cially for young mothers -
and experts think money
worries are the reason.'
A federal report released
Thursday showed declines
in the birth rate for all races
and most age groups. Teens
and women in their early 20s
had the most dramatic dip, to
the lowest rates since record-
keeping began in the 1940s.
Also, ,the rate of cesarean
sections stopped going up for
the first time since 1996. ,
Experts' suspected the
economy drove down birth
rates in 2008 and 2009 as
women put off having chil-
dren. With the 2010 figures,
suspicion has turned into
certainty.
"I don't think there's any
doubt now that it was the
recession. It could not be
anything else,"' said Carl
Haub, a demographer with
.the Population Reference
Bureau, a Washington, D.C.-:
based research trgafiization.
He was not involved in the
new report
U.S. births hit an all-time
high in 2007, at more than
4.3 million. Over the next two
years, the number dropped
to about 4.2 million.and then
about 4.1 million.
Last year, it was. down to
just over 4 million, according
.to the new report from the
Centers for Disease .Control
and Prevention.
For teens, birth rates
dropped 9 percent from
2009. For women in their
early 20s, they fell 6 percent.
For unmarried mothers, the
drop was 4 percent


Experts believe the down-
ward trend is tied to the
economy, which officially
was in a recession from-
December 2007 until June'
2009 and remains weak. The
theory is that women with
money worries especially
younger women feel they
can't afford to start a family
or add to it
That's true of Mary
Garrick, ,27, an advertising
executive in Columbus, Ohio.
She and her husband, David,
married in 2008 and hoped to
start having children quickly,
in part because men in his
family have died in their 40s.
But David, 33, was laid ,off
that year from his. nursing
job and again last year.
He's working again, but
worries about the economy
linger. "It kind of made us
cautious about life decisions,'
like having a family. Ifs defi-'-
nitely something that affect--
ed us," she said.
Kristi Elsberry, a married-
27-year-old mother of two,
had her tubes tied in 2009
after she had trouble find--
ing a job and she and her
husband grew worried about'
the financial burden of any
additional children. "Kids 'are
so expensive, especially in'
this day and age. And neither"'
of us think anything's going-
to get better," said Elsberry,
ofLeland, N.C.
Many of the report's find-'
ings are part of a trend and'
not surprising. There was a'
continued decline in the per-
centage of premature births'
at less 'than 37 weeks. And-
as in years past birth"
rates fell in younger women
but rose a little in women 40
and older, who face a closing-
biological window for having'
children and may be more'
worried about that than the
economy.


STRUCK: Arrest made

Continued From Page 1A


The deputy reported that
he looked at Torres' hands
and there were no fresh
marks on them. The deputy
also examined the pool case
and reported it didn't appear
to have any blood or marks


on it
Based on statements from
witnesses and the victim's
injuries, Torres was arrested
and booked into the Columbia
County Jail. His pool case
was taken as evidence.










6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011


Chu: Solyndra loan based on merits, not politics


By MATTHEW DALY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON An unapolo-
getic Energy Secretary Steven Chu
defended a half-billion-dollar fed-
eral loan to a solar-panel manufac-
turer that went belly up, even as he
told a House committee Thursday
he was unaware of dozens of key
details that led to the debacle over
Solyndra Inc.
, Under hours of hostile question-
ing from Republicans on the House
Energy and Commerce Committee,
Chu declined several opportunities
to say he was sorry, but acknowl-
edged that in hindsight the deal
was "extremely unfortunate" and


"regrettable."
"Certainly know-
ing what I know
now, we'd say 'no,'"'
Chu said during a
daylong hearing
before the energy
panel's subcom-
mittee on investi-
gations. "But you Chu
don't make deci-
sions fast-forwarding two years in
the future and then go back. I wish
I could do that"
Rep. Cliff Stearns, R-Fla., chair-
man of the subcommittee, said after
the hearing that Chu should be
fired.
"I just think he has failed the


test The fact that he's unaware of
so many things makes me think
that he's not the best person for the
position," Stearns said.
Chu insisted that politics played
no role in his department's decision
to loan Solyndra Inc., $528 million
before it went bankrupt and laid off
1,100 workers.
Testifying under oath on a widen-
ing controversy, Chu took responsi-
bility for the disastrous 2009 loan,
but said he was unaware of many
details about the loan or financial
problems that Solyndra faced -
including predictions by Energy
Department staff two years ago
that the company was likely to face
severe cash-flow problems.


Chu repeatedly said he didn't
know until recently of problems
with Solyndra or suggestions of
political interference on the com-
pany's behalf by the White House
or Energy Department officials.
"I am aware of it now," he said at
least five times.
Chu refused to apologize for the
loan debacle, calling it "extremely
unfortunate" but based on factors
beyond his control. He blamed the
company's demise on "totally unex-
pected" market changes includ-
ing an influx of cheap imports
from China and the collapse of the
European market for solar panels
- that led to a steep decline in the
price of Solyndra's product.


Solyndra, of Fremont, Calif., was
the first renewable-energy company
to receive a loan guarantee under
the 2009 stimulus law, and the
Obama administration frequently
touted it as a model for its clean
energy program. Chu attended a
2009 groundbreaking when the
loan was announced, and President
Barack Obama visited the com-
pany's headquarters last year.
Since then, the company's implo-
sion and revelations that the admin-
istration hurried a review of the
loan in time for the groundbreaking
has become an embarrassment for
Chu and Obama and a rallying cry
for GOP critics of the administra-
tion's green energy program.


200-plus

protesters

arrested

By KAREN MATTHEWS 'I'
Associated Press '
NEW YORK Occupy .
Wall Street protesters clogged
streets and tied up traffic
around the U.S. on Thursday
to mark two .months since
the movement's birth and sig-
nal they aren't ready to quit,
despite the breakup of many
of their encampments by
police. More than 200 people
were arrested, most of them
.in New York.
The demonstrations Staci DeGeer looks out the door of her home ir
which took place in such trees were tossed into her kitchen and bedroom
cities as Los -Angeles, Las
Vegas, Albany, N.Y, St Louis,
Washington and Portland,
Ore.- were for the mostpart Tornadoes i
peaceful. Most of the arrests
were for blocking streets, and ix t
the traffic disruptions were i l s II. fla tti
brief
Chanting "All day, all week, By MICHAEL BIESECKER and MITCH WEISS
shut down Wall Street," more Associated Press
than, 1,000. protesters gath-
ered near the New York Stock LEXINGTON, N.C. A day after deadly
Exchangeandsatdowninsev- tornadoes struck the Southeast, survivors
eral intersections. Helmeted looked for whatathey could salvage, huddled
police broke up some of the in loved ones' hospital rooms and shared sto-
gatherings, and operations at ries of how they made it through the furious-
the- stock market were not storms.
disrupted. .Some were also mourning. Peoplein ahard-
?Adarkness fell, a crowd of hit North Carolina neighborhood marked the
. several thousand people, their spot where a 3-year-old girls body was found
ranks swelled by union mem- with an American flag. The little girl and her
bers, jammed Manhattan's grandmother were among six killed i three
Foley Square, where their states Wednesday. ,
chants boomed off the sur- The two were alone in the small house in a
rounding courthouses and rural area south of Lexington when the storm
other government buildings. hit, leaving behind only the foundation. The
From there, they began a house's splintered remains were scattered
march over the Brooklyn hundreds of feet The family's Dodge minivan
Bridge. ended up propped against a nearby tree, its
SThe protestscame two days windows smashed and roof caved in.
after police raided and demol- Firefighters and volunteers searched for
ished the encampment at the girl, whose name wasn't immediately
New York's Zuccotti Park tiat released, for more than two hours before find-
had served as headquarters ing her buried in a pile of shattered lumber
:of the Occupy movement. and furniture. -
"This is a critical moment "She was just beautiful big blue -eyes
for the'moyement given what and so sweet," said Maegan Chriscoe, whose
happened the other night," daughter played with the young victim.
;said demonstrator Paul Elsewhere, the storms killed three people
'Knick, a software engineer in South Carolina, and a Georgia motorist was
from Montelair, NJ. "It seems died when a tree crushed his SUV north of
like there's a concerted'effort Atlanta.
'to stop the movement, and Dozens more were injured across the
Sm here to make sure that region, scores of buildings were dam-
doesn't happen." aged and thousands were without power.
At least 177 people were Meteorologists confirmed Thursday that tor-
:arrested in New York. Some nadoes had struck Louisiana and Alabama
.were bloodied during the a day earlier and twisters were suspected in
;arrests. One man was taken Mississippi, Georgia and the Carolinas.
into custody for throwing liq- '"It looked like the 'Wizard of Oz,"' Henry
uid, possibly vinegar, into the. Taylor said, describing a funnel cloud outside
faces of several police officers, his home near Rock Hill, S.C. "It was surreal,
authorities said. and for a moment, a split second, you say to
yourself This ain't real,' then reality sets in,


ASSOCIATED PRI
n Auburn, Ala., Wednesday, Nov. 16. Several
n during a windstorm.


n Southeast


en houses
and you know it is."
The 50-year-old Taylor said he and his wife
sought.refuge.in a closet as the storm roared.
Part of his roof was torn off, windows were
blown out and trees had been snapped in two.
But he and his wife escaped injury.
"I held my wife closely in the, closet and I
prayed. I said, 'Oh my God, this is it I'm going
to be buried in the debris. We're going to die,"'
Tayloi- said Thursday, wiping back tears.
Jerry Neely said his wife, Janet, was home
alone and fled to the bathroom for safety. The
tornado lifted the bathtub, pinning her under-
neath, Jerry Neely said by phone from his
wife's hospital room Thursday.
S"Its going to be hard to overcome this. I
don't know what we're going to do. It's just so
hard," Jerry Neely said, adding that his wife
will recover from her injuries. '
The sheriff for surrounding York County
asked South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley for
state assistance in cleaning up the debris.
Authorities blocked roads leading into the
area and only allowed emergency workers
and power crews in.
Ideal conditions for severe weather were
created when a cold front stretching from
the Gulf of Mexico to the Northeast collided
with unseasonably warm air, forecasters said.
Temperatures dropped in some areas from
the low 70s to the 50s as the front passed.
Still, it's not unusual for the region to have
severe storms in November because tem-
peratures can fluctuate wildly, said National
Weather Service meteorologist Neil Dixon.
In Alabama, the National Weather Service
confirmed that tornadoes hit communities in
the western and central parts of the state and
continued to assess a suspected twister that
demolished mobile homes at a pair of housing
parks near Auburn University. The campus
was spared major damage.
It was the worst bout of weather for the
state since about 250 people were killed dur-
ing a tornado outbreak in April the state.


States up use of teacher evaluations


By KIMBERLY HELPING
AP Education Writer
WASHINGTON -
Teachers and principals.are
worrying more about their
own report cards these
days.
They're being graded
on more than student test
scores. The way' educators
are evaluated is changing
across the country, with a
switch from routine "sat-
isfactory" ratings to actu-
al proof that students are
learning.
President Barack
Obama's recent use of exec-
utive authority to revise the
No Child Left Behind edu-
cation law is one of sev-
eral factors driving a trend
toward using student test
scores, classroom observa-
,tion and potentially even
input from students, among
other measures, to deter-


mine just how effective edu-
cators are. A growing num-
ber of states are using these
evaluations to decide critical
issues such as pay, tenure,
firings and the awarding of
teaching licenses.
Two years ago, only four
states used student achieve-
ment as a predominant
influence in how teacher
performance is assessed.
Today, the number is 13,
according to a recent report
from the National Council
on Teacher Quality. Ten
other states count student
achievement in a lesser
but still significant way in
teacher evaluations. In 19
states and the District of
Columbia, teachers can be
fired based on the results,
the report said.
Even more changes
are anticipated in coming
months.


Obama said in September
that states wanting relief
from the Bush-era No Child
Left Behind law could apply
for a waiver from the law's
tofigh-to-meet require-
ments for student achieve-
ment in reading and math.
To get a waiver, one thing
states must do is come up
with ways to use teacher
and principal evaluations to
make personnel decisions.
This week, 11 states


.applied for waivers, and
an additional 28 states, the
District of Columbia and
Puerto Rico say they will be
seeking waivers, too.
In addition to Obama's
waivers, a major driver has
been the administration's
high-profile "Race .to the
Top" competition, which
had states competing for bil-
lions in prize dollars if they
adopted stronger evaluation
systems.


White House


shooter had


Jesus delusion


Idaho man charged
with trying to
assassinate Obama.
By JESSICA GRESKO and
JESSIE L. BONNER
Associated Press
BOISE, Idaho An.
Idaho man accused of firing
an assault rifle at the White
House believed he was Jesus
and thought
President -5
Barack

Antichrist,
according to
.court docu-
ments and
those who Ortega
knew him. At
one point, he even suggested
to an acquaintance the presi-
dent was planning to implant
computer tracking chips into
children.
Oscar Ramiro Ortega-
Hernandez, 21, was charged
Thursday with attempting to
assassinate the president or
his staff. He is accused of fir-
ing nine rounds at the White
House last, Friday night -
one of them cracking a win-
dow of the first family's living
quarters -. when Obama
and the first lady were away. '
If convicted, Ortega faces up
to life in prison.
Ortega was arrested
Wednesday at a western
Pennsylvania hotel when a
desk clerk there recognized
him and called police.
Ortega's public defender,
Christopher Brown, declined
comment after his first court
hearing in Pennsylvania.
Ortega's mother has said he
has no history of mental ill-
ness, though when authori-
ties were looking for him,.
they reported he had "men-
tal health issues."
In Idaho Falls, where
Ortega is from, a com-
puter consultant told The
Associated Press that the two
met July 8 after Ortega asked
for help editing a 30-minute
infomercial. Monte McCall
said that during the meeting
at Ortega's family's Mexican
restaurant, Ortega pulled out
worn sheets of yellow paper
with handwritten notes and
started to talk about his pre-
dictions that the-world would
end in 2012.
"He said, "Well, you know
the president is getting ready
to make an announcement
that they're going to put GPS
chips in all the children, so
they're safe,'" McCall said.
"... And then he said, That's



4 Northside


just what the Antichrist is
going to. do to mark every-
body.'".
Kimberly Allen, the moth-
er of Ortega's former fiancee,
said he had been well-man-
nered and kind in the four
years she had known him.
But he recently began mak-
ing statements to her daugh-
ter that were out of character,'
including that he believed
he was Jesus. Allen said the
family was worried when he
went to Utah recently, where
he said he had business, and
didn't come back. Ortega's
family reported him missing
Oct 31.
Allen said they were flab-
bergasted to hear he was
wanted in Washington.
"I believe that the boy
needs help," said Allen, of
Shelley, Idaho.
Her daughter, Jessica
Galbraith, was engaged to
Ortega and is the mother
of. their 2-year-old son.
She declined to comment
Thursday except, to say: :"I
love, him, and I'm here fi-
hini."
Itwas unclear why or when
they split
Reached by the APl on
Thursday, Ortega's mother
said she didn't have anything
to say. She earlier told the
Post Register in Idaho Falls
her son has no history of
,mental illness.
"He has different ideas
than other people, just like
everyone, but he was per-
fectly fine the last time I saw
him," Maria Hernandez told
the newspaper. "He might
be saying weird stuff that
sounds crazy, but that doesn't
mean (he) is crazy. He might
be confused and scared." '
At his first appearance
in court in Pennsylvania,
Ortega sat quietly, his hands
free but his feet shackled. He
said only, "Yes, ma'am" when
he was asked if he under-
stood that he would be going
back to Washington to face
the charge.
According to a court docu-
ment released after the hear-
ing, authorities recovered
nine spent shell casings
from Ortega's car, which was
found abandoned near the
White House shortly after
the shooting. An assault
rifle with a scope was found
inside.
A person who knows him
subsequently told investi-
gators that he had become
increasingly agitated with
the federal government and
was convinced it was conspir-
ing against him, the docu-
ment said.


Sli


Church of

Christ

8th Annual Clothes &


Can Food Giveaway
Saturday, November 19, 2011
8:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
Gingerly used & some new clothes
378 NW Gibson Lane
Lake City, Fl
Directions: 41N., pass Badcock's Home Furniture Store, second left after the intersection light.
.* .o. ..* .. .* *.. . .** .. .. ..


wvvvv-r-yfla ts-com


.









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Friday, November 18, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS
| "


Community

shows support

for CHS football


Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirb)y@akecityreporter.com


Forget

Horace

Greeley

ort White has
had enough
of Horace
Greeley.
After four
playoff openers in
Pensacola, Greeley's
dictum paraphrased as
"Go west, young man"
was getting on the
nerves.
The Indians go in
another direction today
when they visit The First
Academy down in Disney
World-land.
This is the fourth
playoff appearance for
Fort White, with the
first in 2002 under coach
Mike Hunter.
Since taking over as
coach in 2007, Demetric
Jackson has had the
Indians in the playoffs
every year except 2009.
In all of the previous
years, Fort White had to
play Pensacola Catholic.
The Indians won one of
them, in 2007, then had
to make a shorter trip
west to Madison County.
"It is a long ride and
there is so much you
have to do," Jackson
said about the trip to the
Panhandle. "It-gets you
out of your routine and
so many of the young
guys can't handle that"
Compared to those
rides, the run to Orlando
will seem like a short
sprint. Fort White's fans
travel well and this will
be a welcome change.
Trinity Catholic hosts
Melbourne Central
Catholic. The
mini-bracket winners will
meet next Friday..
.Columbia High faces
an old opponent in its
playoff game, another
plus for fans in this
100-year celebration
season of Tiger football.
St Augustine first
showed up on Columbia's
schedule in 1924. The
teams have met 29
previous times, including
an eight-year run from
1936-43 and a 10-year
stretch from 1962-71. The
teams most recently met
in 1981-82, 1991-94 and
1997-98.
In the 1960s, the
Tigers and Yellow
Jackets were members of
the newly formed Florida
Star Conference.
Palatka, Starke and
Live Oak made up the
other points of the star.
Columbia leads the
series 20-7-2 and
St. Augustine was a
whipping boy in the
late 60s. From 1965-70,
St. Augustine did not
score on CHS.
These are not your
granddaddy's Yellow
Jackets with coach Joey
Wiles at the helm.
Under Wiles,
St. Augustine has made
the playoffs every year
since 1999, winning a
state championship in
2005 and being a
runner-up in 2001, 2007,.


* Tim Kirby Is sports editor
of the Lake C/ty Reporter,


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High students Carter Jackson, Emily Jordan, Sam Bass and Danielle Mathis show
their school spirit at the community pep rally held at Tiger Stadium on Thursday.


Playoffs


Columbia must
stop Yellow Jackets
rushing attack.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High begins its
playoff trek today hoping
for a state championship.
The Tigers will travel to
St Augustine High at 7:30
p.m. to take on the peren-
nial power Yellow Jackets.
Coach Joey Wiles has led
his team to a 9-1 record
and' district championship
in order to host the Tigers
today.
Coach Brian Allen led his
team to a .7-3 record after
falling to an 0-2 record to
begin the season. In the
final four games of the regu-
lar season, Allen's defense
has allowed nine points
total. He's hoping that the
Tigers can continue to keep
that going in the first round
of the playoffs.
For the Tigers to shut
down the Yellow Jackets,
Columbia must stop the
run first. Levent Sands has
rushed for 1091 yards and
11 touchdowns this season
for St. Augustine. He's aver-
aging 8.3 yards per carry.
"He's fast and can hit
the home run," Allen said.
"They're going to run to
set up the passing game.
They're going to try to get
it on the ground and set up
the play-action sutff."
CHS continued on 3B


Fans show up
pepped for
playoffs Thursday.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.comrn
It was a show of faith for
the Columbia High football
team as hundreds showed
up to show their support for
the Tigers in a community
pep rally at Tiger Stadium
on Thursday.
The event featured
games, dancing and words
from coaches, players and
administrators.
"I want to thank every-
one for the support of our
Tigers," Columbia High


kick


coach Brian Allen said.
"With a great community
behind us, there's no rea-
son we can't win (against
St. Augustine High in the
first round of the playoffs).
With a community full of
athletes, there's no rea-
son we can't win. With the
best fan base in the world,
there's no reason we can't
win. The 12th man makes a
difference."
Allen was followed
by Tiger players' Jayce
Barber and Quayshaun
Monismith.
The theme of the night
was getting fan support
behind the Tigers for
tonight game at 7:30 p.m.
in St. Augustine.


off


:. : ..







JASON MATTHEW WALKE-RLake City Reporter
Columbia High's Hayden Lunde (24) kicks the ball in a game against Middleburg High on Oct. 21. Columbia travels to St.
Augustine today to take on the Yellow Jackets in the first round of the state 6A playoffs.


_Playoff run

S.begins tonight


JASON MATTHEW WALKERil.ik 1Cai V ,!|p~1l I
Fort White's Soron Williams (21) is Idr.i j-d down by Santa Fe defenders while making a play
during the HBjlth for the Paddle on Nov. 11,


First Academy
coach expects
tough game.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirbv6@lakecity epot er com
FORT WHITE The
Class 3A football play-
offs start today and Fort
White IHigh is traveling to
Orlando to take on The
First Academy. Kickoff is
7:30 p.m.
Fort White (7-3) qualified
as the runner-up tear inl
District 3; First Academy
(8-2) won District -I and
earned the rlit to host the


first round.
Royals head coach Leroy
Kinard, a graduate of West
Orange High in Winter
Garden, said his team's suc-
cess was a bit of a surprise.
"We're young, only five
seniors on the whole team,"
Kinard said on Thursday. "I
didn't expect us to win dis-
trict. We have some good
skill players and that over-
rode what I thought would
be next year's team. I think
our district is down."
Watching films on the
Indians caught Kinard's
attention.
INDIANS continued on 3'?


I'











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
II a.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
practice for Ford 200, at Homestead
12:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Nationwide
Series, practice for Ford 300, at
Homestead
3 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Ford 400, at Homestead
4:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, pole
qualifyingfor Ford 200, at Homestead
6 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Ford 400, at Homestead
8 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Truck Series,
Ford 200, at Homestead
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Oklahoma St. at Iowa St.
GOLF
12:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Titleholders, second
round, at Orlando
3 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Presidents Cup,
third round, at Melbourne,Australia
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 2K Sports Classic, third
place game, Texas A&M-Mississippi St.
loser vs. St. John's-Arizona loser, at New
.York -
7 p.m.
ESPN2 2K Sports Classic, cham-
pionship game, Texas A&M-Misslsslppi St.
winner vs. St. John'J-Arizona winner, at
NewYork
r ; 9p.m. :.
ESPN2 Puerto Rico Tip-Off, semifi-
nal, teams TBD, at San Juan, Puerto Rico
PREP FOOTBALL
10:30 p.m.
FSN CIF-SS Playoffs, first round,
.teams and site TBD

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule,

Thursday's Game
N.Y.Jets at Denver (n)
Sunday's Games
Tampa Bay at.Green Bay, I p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, I p.m.'
S Carolira at Detroit, I p.m.
Dallas atWashington, I p.m.
.Jacksonville at Cleveland, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Tennessee at Atlanta, 4: 5.p.m. -
Philadelphia at N.Y Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Kansas City at New England, 8:30 p.m.
O Open: Houston, Indianapolis, New
Orleans, Pittsburgh' .
n Thursday, Nov. 24
Green Bay at Detroit, 12:30 p.m.
Miami at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
San Francisco at Baltimore, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 27
Arizona at St.Louis, I p.m.
Tampa Bay atTennessee, I p.m.
Cleveland at Cincinnati; I p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Houston at Jacksonville, I p.m.
Carolina at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Minnesota atAtlanta, I p.m.
Chicago at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Washington at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
Denver at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Kansas City, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 28
N.Y. Giants.at New Orleans, 8:30 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Today
No. 2 Oklahoma State at Iowa State,
8 p.m.
Saturday
No. I LSU at Mississippi, 7 p.m.
No. 3 Alabama vs. Georgia Southern,
2 p.m.
No. 4 -Oregon vs. No. 18 Southern
Cal, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Oklahoma at No." 25 Baylor,
8 p.m.
No. 6 Arkansas vs. Mississippi State at
Little Rock,Ark., 3:30 p.m.
No. 7 Clemson at NC State, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Stanford vs. California,
S 10:15 OSp.m.
SNo. 10 Boise State at San Diego State,
8 p.m.
No. II Houston vs. SMU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 Michigan State vs. Indlanr,
Noon
No. 13 Georgia vs. Kentucky,
12:21 p.m.
No. 14 South Carolina vs.The Citadel,
Noon
No. 15 Wisconsin at Illinois, Noon
No. 16 Kansas State atTexas, 8 p.m.
No. 17 Nebraska at No. 20 Michigan,
Noon
No. 19 TCU vs. Colorado State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 21 Penn State at Ohio State,
S 3:30 p.m.
No. 23 Florida State vs. Virginia,
7:30 p.m.
S No. 24 Notre Dame vs. Boston
S College, 4 p.m.

College games

Today
Toledo (6-4) at Cent. Michigan (3-8),
8 p.m.
Oklahoma St. (10-0) at Iowa St. (5-4),


8 p.m.

College scores

Wednesday
Ohio 29, Bowling Green 28
W. Michigan 24, Miami (Ohio) 21

Division III playoffs

Saturday's First Round
Thomas More (9-1) at Franklin (9-1),
Noon


Christopher Newport (8-2) at Kean
(9-1), Noon
Western New England (10-1) at
Salisbury (9-1), Noon
St.John Fisher (8-2) at Johns Hopkins
(10-0), Noon
Norwich (7-3) at Delaware Valley
"(10-0), Noon
Hobart (7-1) at Wesley (9-1), Noon
Illinois College (9-1) at Wabash
(10-0), Noon
Hampden-Sydney (8-2) at Centre
(8-1), Noon
Bendelctine (III.) (7-3) at Mount Union
(10-0), Noon
Albion (6-4) at Wis.-Whitewater
(10-0), I p.m.
St. Scholastic (10-0) at St. Thomas
(Minn.) (10-0), I p.m.
Monmouth (IlI.) (9-1) at Illinois-
Wesleyan (9-1), I p.m.
Redlands (8-1) at Mary Hardin-Baylor
(10-0), I p.m.
McMurray (7-2) at Trinity (Texas)
(10-0), I p.m.
Dubuque (9-1) at North Central (Ill.)
(9-1), I p.m.
Cal Lutheran (8-1) at Unfield (9-0),
3 p.m.

NAIA playoffs

Saturday's First Round
Grand View (Iowa) (8-3) at Marian
(Ind.) (10-0), I p.m.
Valley City State (N.D.) (9-1) at
Carroll (Mont.) (10-1), 2:07 p.m.
Benedictine (Kan.) (9-2) at
Georgetown (Ky.) (10-0), 1:30p.m.
Southern Nazarene (Okla.) (9-2)
at MidAmerica Nazarene (Kan.) (9-1),
2 p.m.
Bethel (Tenn.) (8-2) at Saint Xavier
(1I.) (10-1),2 p.m.
St. Francis (111.) (9-2) at Morningside
(Iowa) (9-I),2 p.m.
Saint Francis (Ind.) (8-2) at Missouri
Valley (9-1), I p.m.
Ottawa (Kan.) (9-2) at Azusa Pacific
(Calif.) (8-2j,TBD


GOLF

Presidents Cup

At Royal Melbourne Golf Club
MelbourneAustralia
Thursday
S. Foursomes
UNITED STATES 4,
INTERNATIONAL 2
Bubba Watson and -Webb Simpson,
United States, def. Ernie Els and Ryo
Ishikawa, International, 4 and 2.
Bill Haas, and Nick, Watney, United
States, halved with Geoff Ogilvy and Charl
Schwartzel, International. ;
Dustin Johnson and MattW Kuchar,
United States, halved with Aaron Baddeley
and Jason Day, International.
Phil Mickelson and Jim Furyk, United
States, -def. Retief Goosen andRobert
Allenby, Interrational. 4 and 3.
Hunter Mahan and David Tomns,
United States, def. K.T. Kim and Y.E.Yang,
International, 6 and 5.
Adam Scott andK.J.Choi, International,
def. Tiger Woods and Steve Stricker,
United States,7 and 6.. /


AUTO RACING.

Race week

SPRINGN CUP
FORD 400
Schedule. Today, practice (ESP.N2,'
3-4.30 p m. Speed. 6-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, 2:30-4 p.m.); Sunday,
-race, 3p.m. (ESPN, 2-7 p.m.).
Track Homestead-Miami Speedway
(oval, 1.5 miles).
Race distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps.
NATIONWIDE
FORD 300
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
.12:30-2 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying (Speed,
1-2:30 p.m.), race, 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2,
4-7:30 p.m.).
Track Homestead-Miami Speedway.
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
FORD 200
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
II a.m.-12:30 'p.m.), qualifying (Speed,
4:30-6 p.m.), race 8 p.m. (Speed, 7:30-10
p.m.).
Tracde Homestead-Miami Speedway.
Race distance: 201 miles, 134 laps.


BASKETBALL

AP Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 3 Ohio State vs. Jackson State,
9 p.m.
No. 6 Duke vs. Davidson, 6 p.m.
No. 13 Xavier vs. Miami (Ohio),
7p.m.
No. 15 Arizona vs. No. 19 Texas A&M
or Mississippi State at Madisori Square



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I CTFHE I


Garden, 4:30 or 6:30 p.m.
No. 16 Alabama vs. Colorado or
Wichita State at Coliseo de Puerto Rico,
San Juan, Puerto Rico, 6:30 or 9 p.m.
No. 21 Marquette vs.Winthrop at UVI
Sports & Fitness Center, St.Thomas,Virgin
Islands, 8:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. 2 Kentucky vs. Penn State at
Mohegan Sun Arena, Uncasville, Conn.,
Noon
No. 5 Syracuse vs. Colgate, 4 p.m.
No. 8 Louisville at Butler, 2 p.m.
No. 14Wisconsin vs.Wofford, 8 p.m.
No. 18 Vanderbilt vs. N.C. State at
the IZOD Center, East Rutherford, N.J.,
6:30 p.m.
No. 20 Cincinnati vs. Presbyterian,
4p.m.
x-No. 21 Marquette vs. Drake or
Mississippi at UVI Sports & Fitness Center,
St.Thomas,Virgin Islands, 6 p.m.
No. 22 Gonzaga vs. Hawaii at Rogers
Arena, Vancouver, British Columbia,
9 p.m.
x-Marquette plays Saturday if it loses
today, Sunday if it wins today

FSU 79, Stetson 66

AtTallahassee
STETSON (2-1)
Mdnerney 1-4 0-0 2, Pegg 3-8 0-0
7, Graham 4-17 0-0 10, Naburgs 6-16
0-0 14, Perez 3-7 5-7 I I, Diaz 1-2 0-0 3,
Green 1-3 1-2 3, Paul 2-2 0-0 5, Patterson
0-3 0-0 0, Weston 4-5 0'0 II. Totals
25-67.6-9 66.
FLORIDA ST. (3-0)
James 7-8 1-2 15,White 8-11 2-2 18,
Gibson 2-4 2-2 6, Loucks I-4 2-4 4, Snaer
3-7 3-3 9, Dulkys 6-6 0-0 16, Peterson
1-4 0-0 2, 'Shannon 2-5 0-3 4,Whisnant
II 0-3 0-0 0, Kreft 2-4 1-1 5.Totals 32-56
11-1779.
Halftime-Florida St. 42-34. 3-Point
Goals-Stetson 10-33 (Weston 3-4,
Grahanm 2-8, Naburgs 2-10, Paul I-J,'Diaz
1-2, Pegg 1-3, Green 0-, Patterson 0-1,
Mclnerney 0-I, Perez 0-2), Florida St. 4-10
(Dulkys 4-4, Peterson 0-1, Gibson 0-1,
Snaer 0-1, White 0-I, Whisnant II 0-2).
Fouled Out--None. Rebounds-Stetson
34 (Green 8), Florida St. 36 (James I I).
Assists-Stetson 14 (Graham, Naburgs 4),
Florida St. 15 (Peterson 7). Total Fouls-,
Stetson 14, Florida St. 12.A-6,424:

BASEBALL

Manager of the Year

As selected by the Baseball Writers'
Association of Amnerica:
(Tabulated on a 5-3-1 basis)
National League


-Manager Ist
Kirk Gibson 28
Ron Roenicke 3
Tony La Russa I
Charlie Manuel
Fredi Gonzalez -
.Bruce Bochy.
Clint Hurdle
Terry Collins
Don Mattingly
American
Manager 1st
Joe Maddon 26
Jim Leyland I
Ron Washngton I
MannyActa
Joe Girardi .
Mike Scloscia


2nd 3rd Tot
4 152
25 2 92
2 13 24
I 7 10
4 4
2 2
2 2
I I1
I I
League
2nd 3rd Tot
I - 133
13 10 54
7 5 31
3 7 16
3 5' 14
1 I 4


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Los Angeles 2,Anaheim I, SO
Montreal 4, Carolina 0
New Jersey 5, Buffalo 3
Chicago S,Vancouver I
Thursday's Games
Columbus at Boston (n)
Montreal at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Phoerix at Philadelphia (n)
Pittsburgh atTampa Bay (n)
Florida at St. Louis (n)
Toronto at Nashville (n)
Colorado at Minnesota (n)
Washington atWinnilpeg (n)
Ottawa at Edmonton (n)
Los Angeles at Anaheim (n)
Detroit at San Jose (n)
S Today's Games
Buffalo at (arolina, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 9 p.m:.
Chicago at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia at Winnipeg, 3 p.m.
Detroit at Los Angeles, 4 p.m.
Phoenix at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Washington at Toronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Boston at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Columbus at Nashville, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Edmonton, 10 p.m.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


BOWLING


League reports.
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Oddballs
(34-18); 2. The Sandbaggers (31-21);
3. Legal Ladies (29-23).
High handicap game: 1. Judy
Daniels 243; 2. Karen Clampett 238;
3. Jackle Alford 233.
High handicap series: 1. Cythe
Shiver 734; 2. Skeet McDonald 643;
3. Anna McDonald 621.
(results from Nov. 15)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
'(32.5-15.5); 2. Farmers (29.5-18.5);
3. Pin Busters (26.5-21.5).
High handicap game: 1. Joanne
Denton .234; 2. Louise Atwood 225;
3. Roberta Glordano 222. 1. Keith
Herbster 262; 2. Earl Hayward 249;
3. Morrell Atwood 247.
High .handicap series: 1. Bea
Purdy 632; 2. Elle DeRosa,.613;
3. Janie posey 608. 1. Joe Peterson'
681; 2. Ric Yates 659; 3. Chuck
Shorter 655.
(results from Nov. 8)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. Maggie
Battle 212; 2. Mary Lobaugh 202;
3. Lori Davis 182. 1. Willie Frazier
258; 2. Mark Davis 256; 3. Adam
Alford 233.
High scratch series: 1,. Mary,
Lobaugh 558; 2. Maggie Battle 513;
3. Lori Davis 494. 1. Mark Davis 632;
2. Bill Dolly 623; 3. Willie Frazier 607.
High handicap game: 1. Maggie
Battle 252; .2. Carla Nyssen 233;
3. Unda Andrews 227.1. Willie Frazier
286; 2. Mark Davis 261; 3. Adam
Alford 258.
High handicap series: 1. Staci'
Greaves 639; 2. Marty Sanders 637;


3. Linda Oliver 627. 1. Vernon Black
693; 2. Dan Cobb 679; 3. Bill Dolly
677.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 188,
Mark Davis 204.
(results from Nov. 8)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. Quirky Quad
(34-18, 31,073 pins); 2. BMW (34-18,
30,730 pins); 3. 4 S's (33.5-18.5).
High handicap game: 1. Betty
Carmichael 275; 2. Judy Sanders
253; 3. Shirley Highsrnith 233. 1. Ray
Denton 243; 2. (tie) Thomrn Evert, Jim
Burnett 235.
High handicap series: 1. Bea
Purdy 658; 2. Yvonpe Finley 641;
3. June Pat Klock 628. 1. Elaine
Nemeth 645; 2. Lee McKinney 636;
3. Ross Meyers 633.
High average: 1. De De Young
155.08; 2. Betty Carmichael 153.72;
3. Louise Atwood 152.21. 1. David
Duncan 193.56; 2. Bill Dolly 189.05;
3. George Mulligan 177.13.
(results from Nov. 10)
'TGIF
Team standings: 1. Back At Ya
AgalnI (35-9);. 2. Fun Tyme Travel
(31-13); 3. Print This & That (29-15).
High scratch game: 1. Tarl Jbhnson
239;.2. Shannon Brown 233; 3. Ida
Hollingsworth 226. 1. Zech Strohl
266; 2. Jason Howell 259; 3. (tie)
Kamara Hollingsworth, Joe Ganser
258.
High scratch series: 1. Shannon
Brown 656; 2. Ida Hollingsworth 571;
3. Tari Johnson 532. 1. Zech Strohl
725; 2. Jason Howell 670; 3. Brook
Sherrod 661.
High -handicap game: 1.I Tari
Johnson 286; 2. Carol Younger' 283;
3. Shannon Brown 261. 1. Kamara
Holllngsworth' 282; .2. Joe Ganser
278; 3. (tie) Jason Howell; Brock
Sherrod 274.


High handicap series: 1. Shannon
Brown 740; 2. Chrissy Fancy 698;
3. Carol Younger 692.1. BrockSherrod
784; 2. Zech Strohl 725; 3. (tie) Jason
Howell, Kamara Hollingsworth 715.
(results from Oct. 28)


Youth leagues

MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Balls to the
Wall (88.5-55.5); 2. Ninja Bowling Co.
(84.5-59.5); 3. Angry Birds(: (69-75). .
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 237; 2. Courtney Schmitt
226; 3. Sara Sykes 197. 1. Cody
Howard 241; 2. Cody Stuart 231;
3. Gary Beames 226. :
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 653; 2. Sara Sykes 498;
3. Christine Peters 468. 1. Gary
Beames 637; 2. Cody Stuart 625;
3. Cody Howard 564.
MAJORS
Team standings: 1. Bubblegum
(24.5-11.5); 2. Splitz "Happen
(21.5-14.5); 3. Turks (20.5-15.5).
High handicap game: 1. Tiffany
Ritch 236; 2. Chelsea Gore 226;
3. Alyson Everett 225. 1.. Jesse
Morrow 283; 2. Anthony Cohrs 263;
3. Jimmy Milewski 259.
High handicap series: 1. Tiffany
Ritch 673; 2. Alyson Everett 644;
3. Chelsea Gore 619. 1. Anthony
Cohrs 681; 2. Jesse Morrow 658;
3. Jimmy Mllewski 649.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Heaven
Camacho 159; 2. Jadyn Freeman
153; 3. Mikhiya Hendon 149.
1. Carson, Lyons 165.
High handicap series: 1. Heaven
Camacho 444; 2. Jadyn Freeman
433; 3. Mikhiya Hendon 429.
1., Carson Lyons 431.
(results from Oct. 22)


AMERICAN LEGION HOLD 'EM


Week 12 winners/
qualifiers in the, American
Legion Post 57 Texas
.Hold 'eIM Champions
Tournament
'Nov. 7-Judithoerube,
first; Frank Capallia,
second; Terry Newth,
third; Martin Woods,
fourth;
Nov. 10 Frank
Capallia, first; Terry
Newth, second; Linda
Feld, third; John Quinn,
fourth;
Nov. 12 Frank
Capallia, first; Todd Yaxley,
second; Jim Grimsley,
third; Yuula Faucher,
fourth.
Total players qualified
for championship round
- 56; Royal Flush Jackpot
-$430.


COURTESY PHOTO
American Legion Post 57's monthly Hold 'em fundraiser
.tournament was NoP~y.11.-Post 57 netted $225 forjts 17th
fundraiser to bring.the total-to more than $7,000 to use for
the benefits of veterans and children in Columbia County.
The top four players who split the $440 pot are
Jack Stanfield (clockwise from left front), Rich Crawford,
Terry Newth and Robert Lamberson.


Get Connected .
S Get Connected a www.lakecityreporter.com


* Ads OnI l......


1
4
8
11
12

13
14
15
17

19
20

21
22

25
28
29

31
33
35


37
38


ACROSS
- -Magnon
Vacuum part
Festive night
Methods
Raucous
laughs
Conducted
Pitchers' stats
Very wet
Graduating
class
Steamed
"Alice"
waitress
Psst!
Actress -
Hannah
Brickworkers
Greek P
Fortas and
Vigoda
Hamelin pests
Shout
Aahs'
companions
Twice DI
Wildflower
habitat


. Wa
Check out the "Ju
1 a0


40 In plain view
42 Groaner,
maybe
43 Dash off
44 Knightly
journey
47 Large bowls
51 Revealed
53 Thicken
54 Lemon cooler
55 Dublin's land
56 MOMA artist
57 Hither and -
58 Warm up for a
bout
59 "My gal" of
song

DOWN
1 Safekeeping
2 Meg or
Nolan


3 Harden into 8 Charles Lamb
bone 9 Volcano
4 Kind of power fissure
5 What we have 10 Border
6 Travel on 11 -
powder Montgomery
7 Glimpses of jazz
nt more puzzles?
st Right Crossword Puzzles" books


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: I I I. T I I
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: DOUSE TEMPT SOCIAL 'AROUND
I Answer: After realizing he'd misplaced the map, the
hiker LOST IT


11-18


16 He played The
Wiz
18 Earthenware
pot
21 Diner fare.
22 Boring
23 Excuse me!
24 Cattle-call
reward
25 Pet plea
26 Appoint
27 Mix together
30 Timely
blessing
32 Take a chair
34 Expire
36 Curdle
39 Obligations
41 Some
sweaters
(hyph.)
43 Less
courteous
44 Dock
45 Take apart
46 Level
47 Trillion, in
combos
48 Raines of
1940s films
49 Eggnog
season
50 Sault Marie
52 Teacup rim


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Answer to Previous Puzzle


LUN E DA TU A
AFFORD DEPOSE
GOL FED ACTUAL
S OCTANE RNS
WART LAID






STRUM STORCUED
SERA SWANS
HER B | RS ATE


BONSAIL AERAT
STRJUMS STORE
SERA SEAR


I


OTHOSM




TAARAV |
?~s ~ 1~^ 1 "
^- --__SAis^_









Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Houston quarterback Case Keenum (7) passes as Tulane defensive end Austen Jacks (50) is
blocked by Houston offensive lineman Jacolby Ashworth (76) during an NCAA college football
game in New Orleans on Thursday.


Houston could give C-USA

expensive parting gift


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

Case Keenum and unde-
feated Houston could give
Conference USA one heck
of a parting gift.
The high-scoring
Cougars are trying to
become the first team
from C-USA to earn a bid
to the Bowl Championship
Series.
No. 11 Houston is also
one of three C-USA teams
being pursued by the Big
East, along with SMU and'
Central Florida.
The picks:
TODAY
No. 2 Oklahoma State
(minus 26%1) at Iowa
State
Last step toward Bedlam
forCowboys... OKLAHOMA
STATE 45-24.
SATURDAY
No. 1 LSU (minus 29)
at Mississippi
Rebels suspended start-
ing quarterback and tail-
back for game :.. LS, 42-0.
Georgia Southern (no
line) at No. 3 Alabama
Bulldogs could win an
FCS title ... ALABAMA
52-10.
No. 18 Southern
California: (plus 15) at
No. 4 Oregon
Ducks have scored
100 points in winning two
straight against USC ...
OREGON 43-27.
No. 5 Oklahoma
(minus 14%1) at No, 25
Baylor
A big game could make
Bears QB Robert Griffin


III Heisman finalist ...
OKLAHOMA 50-28.
Mississippi State (plus
13) at No, 6 Arkansas at
little Rock
Razorbacks are 8-0-
1 against Bulldogs in
Arkansas ... ARKANSAS
24-14.
No. 7 Clemson (minus
71k) at North Carolina
State
Tigers have been vulner-
able on road ... CLEMSON
33-14.
California (plus 19) at
No. 8 Stanford
Andrew Luck's Heisman
no lock anymore
STANFORD 42-17
No. 10 Boise State
(minus 18) at San Diego
State
Broncos now playing for
Las Vegas Bowl? ... BOISE
STATE 35-21.
SMU (plus 19) at No.
11 Houston
Mustangs RB Zach Line
is sixth in nation in rushing
... HOUSTON 42-38.
Indiana (plus 28%) at
No. 12 ,Michigan State
Spartans back in control
of Legends Division race ...
MICHIGAN STATE 42-10.
Kentucky (plus 301)
at No. 13 Georgia
After all ,the Bulldogs
have been through, not
about, to slip up now ...
GEORGIA 45-13.
The Citadel (no line) at
No. 14 South Carolina
Finally, an opponent
on which the Gamecocks
can pile up some points ...
SOUTH CAROLINA 48-16
No. 15 Wisconsin


(minus 14) at Illinois
The wheels might be
coming off for Illini coach
Ron 'Zook ... WISCONSIN
38-14.
No. 16 Kansas State
(plus 9) at Texas
K-State first team since
AP went to Top 25 in 1989
to allow 50 in three straight
and stay ranked... KANSAS
STATE 31-24.
No. 17 Nebraska (plus
31) at No. 20 Michigan
Cornhuskers at the Big
House. That's why in con-
ference realignment, Big
Ten wins ... NEBRASKA
24-21
Colorado State (plus
33) at No. 19 TCU
TCU's Gary Patterson,
Mountain West Conference
coach of the year ... TCU
45-7
No. 21 Penn State
(plus 7) at Ohio State
No Paterno. No Tre$sel.
,Who would have imagined
that 12 months ago?
OHIO STATE 20-7.
Virginia (plus 17) at
No. 23 Florida State
Seminoles have look-
iig like team they were
expected to be ... FLORIDA
STATE 28-14.
Boston College (plus
24%) at No. 24 Notre
Dame
Eagles are 3-1 in last
four trips to South Bend ...
NOTRE DAME 38-10
Last week's record:
17-3 .(straight); 13-7 (vs.
spread).
Season record: 173-41
(straight); 106-84-1 (vs.
spread).


CHS: Tigers begin playoff run today
Continued From Page 1B


Of course, the Yellow
Jackets have a pretty good
passing game as well.
'Sandon Mims leads the
attack through the air as
he has completed 84-of-166
passes this season for 1206
yards. His turnover to inter-
ception ratio stands at 15-6.
"They justwantto do what
they do," Allen said. "It's not
going to be anything fancy.
They won't change up their
scheme this week. It should
be about what we've seen
on tape."-
One of the big things that
Allen is stressing is that he
wants his players emotional
heading into the contest


Some coaches would guard
against it, but Allen feels
that the Tigers could use it
to their advantage.
"We want that, emotion,"
he said. "I think it's good
to go in with emotion and
our adrenaline pumping.
We don't want to hold.back.
Some of these guys have
never played in.a game like
this and others remember
playing in one two years
ago. They've played 10
weeks to earn this. This is
the fruits of our labor and
now we have to go out and
earn another one."
Allen was down on the
Tigers after a sloppy win


against Suwannee High in
the regular season finale,
but feels the players have
responded in practice this
week.
"There had to be nothing
in the world more impor-
tant to us than this game,"
Allen said. "We had to
focus and hold the rope for
the guys standing next to
us."
Directions: Take
1-10 E toward Jacksonville;
Merge onto 1-295 S to St
Augustine; Merge onto
1-95 S toward Daytona
Beach; Exit SR-16 onto SR-
16E; Turn left onto' Varella
Ave.


INDIANS: Pep rally at 8:45 a.m. today


Continued From Page 11

"Fort White is very good,
one of the best teams we've
seen," Kinard said. "Their
quarterback (Andrew
Baker) is solid and that
No. 21 (Soron Williams)
and No. 3 (A.J. Legree) are
good. That No. 51 (Jonathan
Dupree) is a good player.
I'm not sure we have any-
body to block him."
Kinard said though his
team is young, and suffered
several injuries throughout
the season, it has risen to
the occasion.
"I look at the skill play-
ers and look at the line and


I think Fort White is bet-
ter than us," Kinard said.
"Somehow we end up
winning games. If we can
execute, we have a chance
against anybody. We need
to make sure it's a close
game in the fourth quar-
ter; it gives us a chance to
win."
Fort White head coach
Demetric Jackson had a dif-
ferent take earlier in the
week.
"They are fundamentally
sound and don't hurt them-
selves," Jackson said. "You
have got to beat them, they


won't beat themselves."
Fort White has a pep rally
planned at 8:45 a.m. today in
the courtyard at the school
to send the Indians off on
their playoff run. Everyone
is invited.
Directions to The First
Academy: Take Interstate
75 south and merge onto
the Florida Turnpike; exit
at Interstate 4; go east and
exit at John Young Parkway;
turn left (north) at light and
go to third light; turn left to
First Baptist Church prop-
erty and football field is at
the first right.


POP WARNER FOOTBALL


COURTESY PHOTO

Peewees
Members of the Lake City Pop Warner Football 2011 Peewees are (alphabetical order)
Jamille Bullock, Lamarick Claridy, Shamarick Claridy, Cody Collins, Carlos Ford,
Ta'Davius Freeland, Bobby Fulton III, Henry Godbolt IV, Lorinza Jelks, Latorrence Jones,
Ma'Leak Miller-Gaskins, Jaylan Mills, Jeremiah Mobley, Gilshard Newkirk, D'Angelo Perry,
Stephen Pilkington, Matthew Raulerson, Troy Sheppard and Davion Smith. Richard Keen
(head coach), Timmy Collins, Mark Dace, Stephen Pilkington, Alfred Smith and
Trent Walker are coaches.


COURTESY PHOTO

Jr. Peewees
Members of the Lake City Pop Warner Football 2011 Jr. Peewees are (alphabetical order)
Tyrese Austin, Jaylen Brown, Danny Burroughs, Eddie Cooper; Kristopher Farmer,
Deven Gibson, D'Andre Jefferson, D'Khari Jernigan, Hunter Keen, Zane McCranie,
Pierre McCray, Tray Miller, Julius Moreland, Tyrone Mullins, Jalen Perry, Avery Scippio,
Michael Scippio,-Cameron Sheppard, Ryan Stubbs, Ethan Urmstead and Steele Wren.
Virgil Scippio (head coach), Leon Brown, Gregg Jefferson, Anthony Perry and^.'
Caleb Umstead are coaches. .... ..


COURTESY PHOTO

Mitey Mites
Members of the Lake City Pop Warner Football 2011 Mitey Mites are (alphabetical order)
Wendel Acosta, Jaelin Brown, Ke'Shawn Brown, Landon Coleman, Travis Dicks,
Garrett Fennell, Mikah Gustavson, Tyquan Ivey, Aidan Jolliffe, Gavin Justice, Hakeem Kelly,
Garrison Land, Izaya Latham, De'Savion Lee, Braden Sherrouse, Trent Steedley,
Brayden Summers, Alexander TUcker, Brandon Waldron, Sylvester Warren IV,
Nickia Whitehead Jr., Jakai Williams and Austin Yawn. Allen Pope-(head coach),
Benjamin Bell, Shawn Brown, Broughton Land and Joshua Steedley are coaches.


COURTESY PHOTO

Tiny Mites
Members of the Lake City Pop Warner Football 2011 Tiny Mites are (alphabetical order)
Isaac Broxey,.Dawson Bulthuis, Caden Cassels, Codi Clay, Luke Dotson, Adeon Farmer,
Amare Ferrell, Tyler Folsom, Hercules Gilmore, Thomas Greene, Hayden Gustavson,
Kade Jackson, Ty Jackson, Kristopher Louder, Jake McCranie, Spencer McCranie,
Louden Minnich, Peyton Minnich, Caden Perry, Jayce Puni, Jaden Robinson,
Zachary Shaw, Alfred Smith Jr., Austin Varney, Nicholas Whitehead and Hunter Woodley.
Mike Ferrell (head coach), Tim Folsom, Christopher Greene, Christopher Minnich and
John Woodley are coaches.









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Bride-to-be is feeling blue
bk ft -. .f vm 'mi hf e- 4 l svm mi


because ance at


DEAR ABBY: My fiance,
"Todd," and I have been
together for foir years. He
proposed this summer and
our wedding is planned for
next year. I thought plan-
ning our wedding would
be fun, but it has turned
out to be a nightmare.
I want orange as our pri-
mary color, but now Todd
is saying he "hates" the
color orange, although he
never mentioned it before.
I tried to get him to agree
to pair it with a color of his
choice, but he refused.
Todd is being unreason-
able and will not agree
with me on the color. Since
it mainly affects the bridal
party, I feel it should be
my decision. He says it
isn't, and that he won't
' even wear an orange tie
or anything like it What,
is your opinion? STUCK
ON THE COLOR IN
GEORGIA
DEAR STUCK: This
isn't just "your" wedding;
it's Todd's wedding, too.
If he would find standing
at the altar opposite a line
of bridesmaids clad in
orange to be a turnoff and
dislikes the color so much
that h6 refuses to wear a'
tie or boutonniere that's
orange then agree on
some other color. This is
only one of the many com-
promises that lie ahead
for you, so start practicing
with this one.

DEAR ABBY: Two
months ago, my brother


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
and his wife asked me to
move in with them. If s
beautiful here, they have
a lovely home and have
been extremely hospitable
for the most part The
problem is they fight like
cats and dogs. It gets so
bad sometimes that the
neighbors have to call the
police.
Once a week without
fail, they have a huge spat
about one thing or another
and argue at all hours of
the day and night They
break things, curse and
call each other names I
wouldn't call my worst
enemy.' If I had known they
were this unhappy, I would
never have moved in.
.They've been together
for so long, this may just
be their way of communi-
cating, but I can't put up
with the long days and"
sleepless nights. It's begin-
ning to wear on my sanity.
How do I tell them I
appreciate them for let-
ting me stay, but I can no
longer take the constant
fighting? THANKS, BUT
NO THANKS
DEART, B.N.T.: Thank
them for their hospitality
and for offering to share.


their lovely home with youth
but that you will be mov-
ing to a place of your own.,
If they ask you why, tell "
them that you love them
both, but the long days
and sleepless nights when?
they argue are preventing',
you from getting the rest
you need. It's.the truth,
and it probably won't be
the first time they've heard
it

DEAR ABBY: I am
a middle-aged woman
who is Baptist by faith.
I believe that when I .
die I will go to heaven.
My problem is, if going .
to heaven means being
reunited with my parents
and other family mem-
bers, then I don't want to
go! The idea of spending I
eternity with them is more
than I can stand, but I i
don't want to go to hell,
either. Any thoughts? -
ETERNALLY CONFUSED
IN MISSISSIPPI
DEAR ETERNALLY
CONFUSED: Yes. When '
you reach the pearly gates,
talk this over with St.
Peter. Perhaps he would
be willing to place you in'
a different wing than the
one your parents and other.'
family members are stay-
ing in. And in the mean-
time, discuss this with
your minister.'

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
LOOK, IF E LIZ7BE--T'H BUT,f NNE, yoU HIVE
DOESNTLIKEFLlycfl/Ti R NEr B smi, friD
FIX-LERPNF-1R FoI R0-EMSOF YOUR
LWrTH ME! l- OLON ,


ARIES (March 21-Aprl
19): -Mix business with -
pleasure and you will make
some new and worthwhile
connections. You don't
have to be excessive; to
impress someone in a
power position. Taking
action and doing what
you say will be enough
to prove you're skilled.

TAURUS (April 20-May.
20): Someone will deceive,
you. You will have to ques-
tion what you are being
told. Not everyone is on
your side, but as long as'
you vet the facts yourself, -
you will be able to out-
smart anyone trying to put
one over on you. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): You'll be drawn to an
investment or someone
offering something that is
too good to be true. Don't
let your emotions lead you
in a direction that will be
difficult to reverse. Bide
your time rather than mak-
ing an untimely move. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You will receive a.
great response if you ask
for favors and offer your
services. You will make
worthwhile gains work-
ing alongside others. A
partnership can begin just
as quickly as it can end
depending on whether
or not it's good for you.
****


THE LASTWORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Minimize your. expendi-.
tures. You will, make a
good itripression if you
are frugal. A job prospect
looks encouraging. Send
out your resume or sign
up with aheadhunteir.
Celebrate life and love dur-
ing the evening hours with
someone special. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Listen to reason before
making a judgment call:
Lo6k at your choices and
diversify as much as pos-
sible to get the most out of
whatever situation you face.
Don't let domestic problems
stand in the way of your
advancement ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): What you do for
others will translate into
favors when you need
help. Love is on the rise,.
and your agenda' should
include spending time with
someone special or find-
ing a partner if you are
single. A domestic change
will increase your assets.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Keep your feelings to
yourself until you know
where you stand. Someone
is likely to lead you on if
you are too open and hon-
est Focus on improving


*J


your skills and using your
talents'to bring in more
money. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): A change of
pace will do you good. Set I
out on an adventure that; r
entails meeting interest-
ing people or learning
something that you can
use to your advantage. A
change at home may not
be expected, but it will be
good foryou. *****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): More time spent
at home or nurturing an
important partnership will,
pay off. Invite friends or
relatives over and you will
get helpful suggestions
about worthwhile altera-
tions to your living quar-
ters. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.!,
18): The more involved you,
become kith a worthwhile t
organization, the closer
ydu will get to someone,
who shares your dedication'
to what you are working
toward. Love is on the rise, ,.
and a new relationship will iT
be inspirational. *** ,I
PISCES (Feb. 19-March;?
20): Don't let anyone know
your thoughts or your
plans. A problem with a
colleague or peer will esca-
late if you aren't willing to
compromise. Someone you'
work with or for will not }
view an emotional reaction
favorably. *** 7


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by. Luis Campos 3
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: R equals D
"FMJS'DYC MELKF RZWMNP DP JD SW
FMJSDYC MELKF NLADWP, PDYTW FGWN
TDYWNM K'PWP FGW JMYCKMCW LB
RZWMNP." BWRWZDTL BWJJDYD


Previous Solution: "The greatest conflicts are not between two people but
between one person and himself." Qarth Brooks
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-18

CLASSIC PEANUTS


1


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415











Classified Department: 755-5440


IBUs-gI


SELL IT^


iaFIND 11T


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


SADvantage


Limited to service type advertise --;,i
ing only., .,. : :.
I 4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes.an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,'
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
.ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office, is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified ./
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





AdlstoAppea: ,Cal by: Fax/Emall by:
Tuesday Mon., 11:0 a.m Mon., 9:0a.m.
Wednesday Mon., 10:00 a.m. Mon.,9:00 :im.
Thursday Wed.,'10:00a m. Wed., 9:00 a.m.
Friday Thurs, 10:00a.m. Thurs. 9:00a.m.
Saturday Fri.,10:00a.m. Fri.,9:00 am.
Sunday Fri.,1000am. Fri.,9:00 am.
These deadlines are subjectto change without notice.




'Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-6440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billion Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the PRblisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
'be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
.will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
.Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
'nation in employment, housing-and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
'not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.com


one eer ad $250
4 lines 6 days Eah itional
Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $100 or less.
Each item must Include a price..
This Is a non-refundable rate.



One iatem per ad $1010d
te apps to private Individual selling
personal merchdise to ng $500 or less.
EachItem must include a price. ,
Thisisa non-refundable rate.



o ne rtem per ad 6 a .
4 lines 6 days ad tonal

Rate applies to private Individuals selling


personal merchandise totalling ,000 or iess.J
Each Item must Incudesa price.
This leaeno-refunTdablerate.




fOne e per ad Eac additional
4 lines 6 days inEoch a s
|Rate applies to pri Intdvduo I 0
S Each Item must Include a price
'.This Isla non-retuondob ete.




days Eru7 nil
elprivate noo lseellsng
Personal merchsttdise toteiIng $4,000 ens.






Ralte applies to private nd vidua seew ng
personal merchandise totelling $T6 or oess.


Registration of-Ficltious Names '
We the ,undersigned;v being -duly;.
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that'the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of.FLOOR-'
N-DECOR at 4784 W US HWY 90
,#103., LAKE CITY, FL., 32055

Contact Phone Number: 386-755-,
5862 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: FLOOR-N-DECOR, INC
Extent of Interest: 100%-
by:/s/ Caroln J. Woolsey
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF COLUMBIA
Sworn to and subscribed before me'
this 16th day of November, A.D.
20117
by:/s/ KATHLEEN A. RIOTTO
05529157
November 18, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-183-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF ELLA MAE
RUIS f/k/a ELLA MAE SMITH
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Administration).
TO ALL- PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS.
'AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified:that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of ELLA
MAE RUIS f/k/a ELLA MAE
SMlI1TH, deceased, File No. 11-183-
CP, by the Circuit Court for Colum-
bia County, Florida, Probate .Divi-
sion, the address of which is 173 NE
Hernando Avenue, Lake City, FL
32055; that the total cash value of
the estate is $-0 and that the names
and addresses of those to whom it
has been assigned by such order are:


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-205-GP .
IN RE: ESTATE OF JEFFIE FRAN-
CES SWEAT,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
(Summary Adminstration)
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR. DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE:
You are hereby notified that an Or-
der of Summary Administration has
been entered in the estate of JEFFIE
FRANCES SWEAT, deceased, File
No. 11-205-CP, by the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is 173 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, FL 32055; that the. total cash
value of the estate is $-0 and that the
names and addresses of those to
whom it has been assigned-by such
order are:
NAME
Dwight T. Sweat
ADDRESS:
1394 NW Labonte Lane,
Lake City, FL 32055
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
'against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the'date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this C6urt
WITHIN' THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
^*THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
-AFTER THE PATE OF, SERVICE
OF A COPY .OF-THIS NOTICE ON
THEM .
'All other creditors of the decedent
and persons, having claims. or de-
mands against the estate of the' dece-
dent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS'NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is November.18, 2011.
Attorney for Person Giving notice:
By:/s/TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328.
Iake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone: (386)752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Person Giving notice:
By:/s/ Dwight T. Sweat
1394 NW Labonte Lane
Lake City, FL 32055
05529117
November 18, 25, 2011


FOUND: Terrier. Comer of
Lake City Ave. & Archer St. on
Monday, Nov. 14. Please call to
identify. 386-867-9679

100 Job,
A Opportunities
05529076
Awesome .Jobs!
Now hiring 18-25 guys and gals.
Travel entire USA with unique
business group.
$500 sigr-or-onds. '
Call 866-298-0163
or 877-853-7654
www.sunshinesubscription.com

05529145 ,
REGISTERED NURSE
The Columbia County Health
Department is seeking an OPS
Registered Nurse, PSN
#64901181. This is a part-time
(20 hrs per week) non-benefited
position working in the Rynm
' White clinic. Must have a
Florida RN license. Must be '
fingerprintd1-and drug screened.
This employer -uses E-Verify
May be required to work during.
or beyond normal work hours or
days on the event of an emer-
gency.. Rate of pay $14.75 hr.'
Applications will be
accepted online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/
State of Florida applications
may be mailed to State of
Florida, People First, Staffing
Administration, P.O. Box
44058, Jacksonville, Fl 32231
or faxed to (904)636-2627 by
11/28/11. EEO/AA/VP /
Employer

Experienced Roofers
Needed. '
Please call
(850) 271-4199
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
STYLIST NEEDED at
Southern Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info.


Legal

NAME
James Robert Davis
ADDRESS:
806 SE Defender Drive,
Lake City, FL 32025
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this (ourt
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent,
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the dece-
dent must file, their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREV-
ER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is November 18, 2011.,
Attorney for Person Giving Notice:
By:/s/ TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328
Lake City, F.. 32056-1328
, Telephone: (386i752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Person Giving notice: .
By./s/ James Roben Davis ',
806 SE Defender Drive
SLake Citt, FL 32025
.;05529118 -
November 18, 25, 2011


020 Lost & Found
'."." Best friend Lost
SKnow where he is?
SCall 386-249-0164
Seen close to 252
outside of Lake
City. facebook.com/chewylost


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Sales Position available for
motivated individual Rountree -
Moore Toyota, Great benefits, paid
training/vacation. Exp. a plus but
not necessary. Call Anthony
Cosentino 386-623-7442

120 Medical
0 Employment

05529186
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

24 Schools &
240 Education

05528912.
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/28/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstraiinngseivices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
-2 CUTE FREE KITTENS
Boots.& Mittens. One black &
white Female, one gray & white
Male, 9 weeks, 386-438-4128.
CHRISTMAS PUPPIES
3/4 Chihuahua, 1/4 Dachshund.
2 male,' 1 female. $50. ea.
386-496-1397
FREE TO GOOD HOME.
Miniature Dachshund.
diCall 386-752-1125

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs,
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old.and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites; ,.Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for-inforfiation.

330t Livestock &
3 v .Supplies
WANTED: I Buy and.Sell used
SHorse Tackin good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
W11l pay cash: Call 386-935-1522,


407 computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
'386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

419 -TV-Radio &
Recording
Need a TV for your kids
Christmas present? Or just an
Extra? 20" Sony Triniton TV.
$50.00 386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
.We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Big Multi family Fri 9-1 Sat 7-3
Comer of Grandview & Lake
Montgomery. Brighton & Coach
purses, toys, furn, clothes, knick
knacks, Christmas stuff & more.


3/2 MH on 1F acre in nice sub.
paved rd. metal roof. completely
. remodeled, new everything! Oily
$39,500 386-249-1640 ,.
OWNER FINANCING
SWMH on 2 lots, fenced, paved
streets, close to town. MLS 79218,
$49,900. Coldwell Banker Bishop,
Elaine Tolar 386-755-6448
EXCELLENT LOCATION
3br/2baMH, deck, porch. Well
maintained. MLS 79304 $55,000.
Coldwell Banker Bishop, Lori
Geibeig Simpson 386-365-5678
Palm Harbor Homes
S$ Red Tag Sale .
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K
800-622-2832

6 Mobile Home
65 &Land

3br/2ba SW 1 ac.Off 41'on 246.
Between 1-10 & 75. 10 min to LC.
$28,500 obo. Ideal rental .NO
owner Finance. 386-330-2316
DWMH on 1 acre 3 br/2 ba for
rent or sale $600. mo $300. dep.
Sale price $45,000. obo.
Columbia City. (352)535-5618
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473


430 Garage Sales
Multi Family Sale
Fri 11/18 8a-? 47 S to 242
follow signs to Beth Dr.
Household, bikes, furn.,& more
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Wreaths, Fall & Christmas Decor
Candles, lots of pictures, mirrors
& floral arrangements. Home de-
cor. Overstock of new items.
25%off all Fall decor excluding
candles. 590-4085 16012 CR 137

450 Good Things
5v to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
PinemountRd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several, good Varieties.
.386-752-6896

460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288:-
if no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.

6a0 Mobile Homes
oJU for Rent
:2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP,
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special .
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2br/2ba $500 mo. inew flooring,
fresh paint. ,Also, Resd'l RV lots.
Btwn Lake City & G'ville, Access
to 1-75 & 441 (352)317-1326
3br/2ba SW,10 minrto
Lake City. $550 mo $500 sec.
.NO PETS.
386-330-2316
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397 2779

640 Mobile Homes
.. for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba pils-bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
SLake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896


,Move in Special from $1.99-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown.:Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, lg 2 br Apt.
Close to town
$485 mo +-$485 dep.
386-344-2972






FOOD STORES
is Franchising with a National
Restaurant Chain
Now Hiring Management
Competitive Wages
Benefits available for Full-Time
employees
(Health, dental & life insurance,
vacation, sick leave)
Apply in person at the S & S
Office:
134 SE Colburn Ave.
Lake City, FL 32025
NO PHONE CALLS DRUG-FREE
WORKPLACE


'1 r


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land-
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$120,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Well Maintained MH on 10ac. 2
car, covered carport, huge deck.
Wood laminate flooring. MLS
79417, $94,900 Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Nice 1620sf 3br/2ba DW on 4
wooded acres, owner finance avail.
$119,900 Brenda Forrester,
Forrester Realty 352-339-6069
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 2.5 acres,.
Mayo area, small down/$675.mo,
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com

Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05528965
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;'
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
j www.springhillvillage.net






1BR/1BA FURNISHED apt.
All utilities included. $135. week
$135. deposit.
,386-758-6939
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkip. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in speciall
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. floated 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move;in:Special $99.
Pool, laundry &,'balcony.
386-754-1800. wwwmviflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft,.W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
For rent 4 br/1/2 ba townhouse apt.
$800 mo & $300 dep. Rent in-
clides water, sewer, garbage and
lawn maintenance. 386-208-5252.
Greentree Townhouse
Move In Madness. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio;'
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
'386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large & clean. lbr/lba apt..
CH/A lg walk in closet. Close to
town. $395. nimo and $350' dep.-
(904)563-6208
.Mbve "_ Specia fro S19- ii3_--


confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED


710Unfurnished Apt. 810 HomeforSale
I1)For Rent81HoefrSl


Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA in
Gatorwood S/D. Washer/dryer
hook up, clean. $650. 1st, last +
security. 386-867-9231
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $99. Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1,2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2H For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
7 0 Unfurnished
730 nHomeFor Rent
3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, comer of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
/ TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.'
Quail Heights CC. $750; mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553'
3BR/1BA w/CH/A, Locatedin the
country. Credit check required.
$500. mp. $500 Deposi t
1 386-752-3225
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75, Close to
town; great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1100. mo.
$1000.Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
DWMH 3BR/2BA on
40 ac. near CR 18 & 131.
$750. mo.
Call 386-916-6734'
For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.
home briek, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083-
For lease-Lakewood sub. LG
brick, 2600 sq. ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lg lot by Lake Jeffrey. $1275.m
+last+sec. Bruce 386-365-3865
740 HFurnished
740 -Homes for Rent


Come see..2br/lba w/office, ramp,
CHI/A. W/D. micro, lawn/garb.
Non-smoking owner. Wood floor.
Great shady area in town. Avail
12/1. $750. mo. 386-755-0110
7 f5 l Business &
5v Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya-Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft.,386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite.&
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.

770 Condos For Rent
2BR/2BA, all appliances,
water/sewer, basic cable,
pool & tennis cts.
$950/mo, call 386-344-0433

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Gorgeous 20.02 ac. Ready for new
home. Land has 2,powver poles, 2
wells & 24X30 slab. MLS 78126
$132,000. REO Realty Group
Heather Craig 386-466-9223
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing.
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278 '
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 $129,000 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
COUNTRY CLOSE 3/2 brick, 3
acres, pole barn, workshop, fruit
trees. $129,900 #78096
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
Great home in Woodcrest, super
location. 3br/2ba. New A/C,
covered back porch. MLS 75198,
$129,900 Coldwell Banker
Bishop. Elaine Tolar 755-6488
HUD HOME 4.77 ac, near
G'ville. 3/2, as is $95,500 Call
Robin, Williams 365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com 091-
434983 Hallmark Real Estate.
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large
oaks, wood floors, fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Lake Home in town. 4b/3b. For-
mal LR, DR & modem Kit,
f'place, upgrades. MLS 76085,
$299K. Coldwell Banker Bishop.
Mary Brown Whitehurst 965-0887
Nice 4/2 on 4 ac. w/open floor
plan. 2 living rooms, eat-in-
kitchen, dining room & more.
MLS 76150. $79,000 Result Real-
ty. Brittany Stoeckert. 397-3473
4/2 Immaculate new carpet &
fixtures. Lg Kitchen, fended yard.
2 car garage. MLS 77602.
$159,200. REO Realty Group.
Nancy Rogers. 386-867-1271


Amazing 4/3 Ranch Style home
.w/over 2,000 sf. 56.28 rolling ac.
Too many extras to list. $500,000.
MLS.78420 REO Realty Group.
Heather Craig 386-466-9223
NICE 4br/2ba Cedar home,
outside city limits, big rooms.
Reduced to sell. MLS.78769
$169,000. Coldwell Banker
Bishop. Bruce Dicks, 243-4002
Lpvely 2 story on 7 ac. 3br/2ba,
Sfenced, fish ponds, pole barn, Ig
kitchen, oaks, fruit trees. MLS
79306 $174,900 Coldwell Banker
Bishop Elaine Tolar 386-755-6488
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac.:Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large reardeck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
SHORT SALE 3/2, Built 2007,
wood floors, Game room.,
REDUCED! Call Ginger Parker
386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate

O80A Farms &
820Acreage
12 acres+/-, Northwest comer of
CR-18 and 81stAve. Asking Price
$745,000. Call (801) 715-9162 for
more information
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFipancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
20 AC.Wooded tract.
Very nice piece of Land. 10 m iles
from Cedar Key. MLS 78886,
$70,000. Brittany Stoeckert
Results Realty. 386-397-3473
Owner Financed land with only
$300 down payment. Half to ten ac
lots.'Deas Bullard/BKL.Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


830 QCommercial
8 Property

MOBILE HOME PARK with 1g.
brick owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84 Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate

860 Investment
8 Property

GREAT INVESTMENT,
building features 2 units w/
2br/2ba, Income producing. MLS
79271, $230,000. Results Realty,
Brittany Stoeckert. 386-397-3473

870 Real Estate
870 Wanted

I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


950 Cars for Sale

1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS. Ma-
roon on maroon. I owner, non
smoker. $84K original mi. Never
wrecked. $8,000 904-718-6747

951 Recreational
951 Vehicles

AIJO SKYLINE.
2 axle camper travel trailer.
19 ft. $400.
386-292-4169
... ..



- Contact us9


atthe paper,.













SUBSCRIPTION




ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS

386-752-1293


ETRONIC ADS SEN) I T

ecityrepo


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



Vehicle So S ldC l


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.



-SUBSCRIBERS-

Stign up today for EasyPay* and receive
one month FREE added to your subscription.


6ea& dtawi 386.755.5445




















Its quick and easy



1.) Go to www.lakecityreporter.com

2.) Click the"Share Photos"icon



Your Commun-ty
~ ...


Share Photos
of your family,
friends and
community




3.) Click:


CALENDAR






Submft Events
to be posted on
our online
calendar



Submit Photo


Comment and
connect with
other local
online users on
our guest book


4.) Attach your photo (Choose File)

5.) Select the best album for your photo

6.) Complete the form and Submit

Albums will change during the year.
Most photos will remain online for at least one month.


Photo Gallery > Submit a Photo
Please submit your photo to our onlirne photo gallery. All photos nu.t ae r ', :.ur' Wet' afl f w.r tiret, ,,i asoear on th
Web sie.
Submit a photo to this Galleryl (Currently we only accept Images in the Jpeg format, thank youl)
(Choose ile no file selected
t Potos Brds
Name:

Email:

itle: The title is the name of your photo.


Photographer:

Caption:

The caption is the description of your photo
that will be seen by viewers.



SPhoto Gaflery Home



Send in your favorite photos

and share them with everyone!


2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
Only 18,000 miles, garage
kept motorhome. Excellent
condition w/many extras.
$45,000
Call
386-754-5660


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2011