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UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01699
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 15, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01699
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






S000015 11 ****3-DIGIT 326
LI OF ORDA HISTORY
TO BOX 1700F FLORIDA
205 SMA UNI 32611-
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Tuesday, November 15, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 249 0 75 cents
*


Man, 63,

charged

with sex

offenses

Inappropriate
touching of two
children alleged.
From staff reports

Authorities arrested
a Lake City man after an
investigation revealed inap-
propriate sexual conduct
with two children earlier
this year, reports say.
Dewey Lee Buffington,
63, no address provided,'
,was charged with sexual
battery on a child in familial
authority, solicitation of a
child and lewd or lascivi-
ous moles--
tation. He
is being
held in the
Columbia
County
Detention
i Facility
Buffngton without
bond.
According to Columbia
County: Sheriff's reports,
one of the children's moth-
ers contacted authorities in
Alabama after she report-
edly saw a message on a
social networking site in
which Buffington allegedly
requested the child' send
Shim pictures of her private
body parts.
When the. mother con-
fronted the child, the child

ARREST continued on 3A


MARCH 2012


By JESSE J. HOLLAND and
MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON-- The Supreme Court on Monday
promised an extraordinarily thorough springtime
review of President Barack Obama's historic health
care overhaul more than five hours of argument,
unprecedented in modern times -- in time for a likely
ruling affecting millions of Americans just before the


presidential election.
That ruling, expected before next summer's
Independence Day holiday, could determine the fate
of Obama's signature domestic achievement, the most
far reaching domestic legislation in a generation but a
political lightning rod as well. It is vigorously opposed'
by all of Obama's prospective GOP opponents.
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
aims to provide health insurance to more than 30 mil-
COURT continued on 5A


High court to hear



health care case


.i= _:- - :- . .... ,---------------- -

ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Supreme Court said Monday it will hear arguments in March over President Barack Obama's health care over-
haul, setting up an election-year showdown over the White House's main domestic policy achievement.


Local UW. chapter nets $63K gant


Another Way, Catholic Charities,
* other groups will benefit from
homeless service Challenge Grant.
From staff reports
United Way of Suwannee Valley has.been
awarded a homeless service Challenge Grant,
officials said. The local United 'Way submit-'
ted the grant application as the lead agen-
cy for the Homeless Services Network of
Suwannee Valley. The application was funded'
for $63,397 and will support five coalition
agency projects. .
These grant dollars will provide Another
Way's Lake City shelter $18,948 for the pur-
chase of shelter food and supplies and for,
transportation costs including vehicle repairs,
maintenance and operation; emergency trans-
portation needs and employment costs for the
advocates providing transportation services


Dancing
with the
ducks
Gracie White, 4,
dances on the
bank of Lake
DeSoto after
feeding bread
to the ducks
Monday after-
noon.


for the agency's participants.
Catholic Charities will receive $18,949 for
the agency's A Hand Up Center, which pro-
vides short-term emergency shelter, showers,
laundry, hygiene products, mail delivery, tele-
phone and fax, food to be utilized in a camp
or motel setting, can openers, paper and.plas-
tic products and Florida identification cards
and/or- birth certificates to secure day labor
and potential other employment These grant'
funds additionally provide for items such as,
sleeping bags, tents, rain ponchos, bug spray
and sun screen for homeless clients. When
the client has a job or family member in
another city which can be verified, the agency
provides relocation assistance through the
provision of bus tickets. While receiving
services through Catholic Charities' A Hand
Up program, clients are provided .referrals to:
mainstream services, and case management.
services are provided as needed.


The local United Way will -utilize $15,000,
of the. grant for the coalition's Homeless
Management Information System providing
community coordinated case management,
the annual homeless point-in-time survey and
coalition coordination expenses.
"The homeless management information
system is required by HUD and provides a
'system for all agencies serving those who are
homeless or at risk of homelessness to coor-
dinate their services and reinforce the client's
case management plan," said United Way
of Suwannee Valley Homeless Coordinator
Jennifer Lee. "The annual HUD-required
- homeless point-in-time survey enables our
coalition not only to collect information on
those who are experiencing homelessness
but also to conduct outreach' to help these
clients access services."
GRANT continued on3A-


0III !II


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


8364
Isolated T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ...............
People .................
Advice & Comics
Puzzles .................


La


Vinson

seeking

freedom

In mental health
facility since 2005
shooting incident.

Py TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A Columbia County' man
who shot up a deputy sheriff's
car with an AK-47 assault rifle
in 2005 is seeking conditional
release after he was found not
guilty by reason of insanity
and committed for treatment
pursuant to a
court order.
Prosecutors
and local law'
enforcement
officials have
concerns with
the man being
released. Vinson
Thomas
Pierce Vinson, 57, was
charged "with' attempted
first-degree murder of a law
enforcement, officer while
discharging a firearm 'He
was originally arrested Feb.
4, 2005 on charges of aggra-
vated assaulting a law officer
and a shooting into an occu-
pied conveyance. Vinsoni also
faced three counts of shoot-
ing into an occupied vehicle
and one count of criminal mis-
chief, but 'no action was filed
on those charges, according
to courtrecords. '
The defense 'and state
entered .an agreement 'in
which four doctors filed
reports to Circuit Judge Paul
S. Bryan on April 27, 2008,
finding Vinson insane at the
time of the offense.
Bryan ruled accordingly,
and Vinsoff was committed to
a mental health facility.
;.Last week a motion hear-
ing was held'in Circuit Court.
before Judge David Fina, where
Vinson's attorney, Robert Rush,
filed a motion for Vinson's con-
ditional release. Rush declined
comment for this story.
According to court docu-
ments, Fina will rule at a later
date, but briefs from the state
as well as from the defense
attorney must' be submitted
by Nov. 19,, along with orders.
No hearing date has been
scheduled for Fina's decision.
"He (Fina) heard from
Vinson's,son, and Dr. Umesh
Mahtre and I presented testi-
mony from one of the depu-
ties that was at the original
2005 incident," Third Judicial
Circuit State Attorney Robert
"Skip" Jarvis said. "The defen-
dant and the treating profes-
sionals are asking the court
to grant a conditional release
to Mr. Vinson. That condi-
tional-release would include
that he live with his son under
the treatment of local mental
health officials in that area.
The state attorney and the
sheriff's office is opposing
this conditional release. Mr.
Vinson had been under con-
tinuing treatment programs
prior to the 2005 incident
where he shot at the depu-
ties. We're not certain that the
mere factor that he's been in
treatment in that structured
and closely monitored envi-
ronment has kept his con-
dition under control. We're.
concerned that if he's not in
this structured environment
he could decompensate and
his condition revert to its
dangerous form which could
place officers or the public in
danger in the future."
A motion for Vinson's con-
ditional release was originally
filed in May, but Circuit Judge
Vernon Douglas denied the
motion. The defense attorney,
VINSON continued on 3A


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


Saturday:
Afternoon: N/A
Evening: N/A


te


Saturday:
Afternoon: N/A
Evening: N/A


M


Saturday:
Afternoon: N/A
Evening: N/A


SSaturday:
N/A


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Theron talks single life in Vogue

NEW YORK Charlize
Theron likes being single
for the first time in her
adult life.
The Oscar winning 1/ .- '
actress tells the December
issue of Vogue magazine
this is the "first time" she's
been unattached since she
was nineteen. She used to
go from one relationship to
another some within a ... . .
month saying she found
a "comfort zone" being
monogamous.... -
The 36-year-old Theron
dated actor Stuart
Townsend for nearly 10
years before their breakup,,
in 2010. She says she
pulled back on her career ,
as-an.effort,to save the
union when the relation-
ship began to go downhill,
calling that '"the priority"
and that she "wouldn't do it
any different way.",
Theron is now ready to
work with the romantic,
comedy "Young Adult"
written by Diablo Cody and'
directed by Jason Reitman.
It opens Dec. 16. I
The December issue of
- Vogue magazine goes on
sale Nov. 22.

Timberlake at,
Marine ball

RICHMOND, Va. -
Justin Timberlake followed
through on a promise to
take a marine to her unit's
annual ball. The singer and
actor posted a photo along ASSOCIATED PRESS
with a letter on his website This image provided by Vogue shows, he cover of the December 2011 issue of Vogue maga-
Sunday on the event zine, featuring actress Charlize Theron. The December issue of Vogue magazine goes on
Associated Press sale Nov. 22. .. .


Celebrity Birthdays


* Bill Richardson is 64.
* Director-actor James Wid-
does is 58.
* Rock singer-producer Mitch
Easter is 57.
* Former "Jay Leno Show"
bandleader Kevin Eubanks
is 54.,
* Comedian Judy Gold is 49.
* Actress Rachel True is 45.
* Country singer Jack Ingram
is 41.,


* Actor Jay Harrington is 40.
* Actor Jonny Lee Miller is
39.
* Rock singer-musician Chad
Kroeger is 37.
* Christian rock musician
David Carr (Third Day) is 37.
N Rock musician Jesse San-
doval is 37.
* Actress Virginie Ledoyen
is 35
* Actor Sean Murray is 34.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ..... )(386) 752-1293
Fax number'............ 752-9400
Circulation ..............755-5445
Online... www.Iakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter an aftilate of
Comrriunity Newspapers Inc.. is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
'E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla 32055
Periodical postage paid at Lake City. Fla
' Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press
"AlI material herein Is property of thaeLake
City Reporter; Reproduction Ih whole or
In part is forbidden without the:permis-
slon of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880. ,,. ;
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City reporter, P.O. Box 1709,.
Lake City, Ra. 32056. .,
PublisherTbdd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS ,
Editor Robert Bridges ..... 754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreportercom)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher.. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com) -
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m..
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m., to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery, or. ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day ie-deivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks............. $26.32
24 Weeks............ ....... $48.79
52 Weeks...... .............. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mail rates
12 Weeks............... . $41.40
24 Weeks...... ........ $82.80
52 Weeks................... $179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errorsof fact in news
items .,If you have a concern; question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA THE



Report: Officer fired 10
SHOWERS

rounds at colleague

DAVIE A South Florida police officer clean record and surrendered peacefully. HI 83 LO 64


accused of tiring several shots at a fellow
officer he once dated was ordered held,
without bond Monday after the weekend
shooting, authorities said..
.Kristopher John Bieger, a Lauderhill
Police officer, is charged with premedi-
tated attempted murder and discharging
a firearm after allegedly firing 10 rounds
at former girlfriend and fellow Lauderhill
officer Brittny Skinner, authorities said.
Authorities say Bieger fired at.Skinner
around 7:30 p.m. Saturday as she was
working an off-duty security job outside
a Denny's restaurant. One bullet struck
Skinner's protective vest, but she wasn't
injured and wasn't taken to the hospital;,
Lauderhill Police Capt Constance Stanley
told the Sun Sentinel (http://sunsent
nl/sedUKT )'.
Bieger subsequently drove 16 miles to,
a restaurant where he ordered some slic-
es of pizza to go.,The 30-year-old officer
was arrested outside that restaurant as he
waited for his order.
During Bieger's initial court appear-
ance Monday, defense attorney Alberto
Milian argued unsuccessfully for pre-trial
release of his client, noting Bieger has a


Browarda county judge j oni1 jay
Hurley declined the request and ordered
Bieger to have no contact with Skinner.
"If any calls are made to her from the
Broward County jail, I will cut off your
phone privileges," Hurley said. "You've
made many, many phone calls to Ms.
Skinner."
Milian said he would enter a not guilty
plea on behalf of Bieger..
Skinner, 31, was on leave for several
days, which is routine when an officer is'
involved in a shooting. An internal investi-
gation was under way, but Stanley refused
to comment on any motive.
"They work together on the same
shift," she added.
Bieger joined the Lauderhill police
force in 2006 and Skinner in 2009. Hurley
said the two worked uniformed patrols
during the midnight shift and once had
dated. .
Skinner broke up with Bieger and told
him to stay away fr6m her, according to a
probable cause affidavit
"There was jealousy, mistrust ... and
harassment," Hurley said.
Associated Press


Medicare fraud: Problems persist


MIAMI Contractors
paid tens of millions of
taxpayer dollars to detect
fraudulent Medicare
claims are using inaccu-
rate and inconsistent data
that makes it extremely
difficult to catch bogus
bills submitted by crooks,
according to an inspector
general's report released
Monday.
Medicare's contractor
system has morphed into
a complicated labyrinth,
with one set of contractors
paying claims and another
combing through those
claims in an effort to stop
an estimated $60 billion
a year in fraud. The U.S.
Department of Health
and Human Services


inspector general's report
- obtained by The
Associated Press before
its official release found
repeated problems among
the fraud contractors over
a decade and systemic
failures by federal health
officials to adequately'
supervise them.
Health officials are
supposed to look at key
criteria to find out whether
contractors are effec- ,
tively doing their job for
instance, how many inves-
tigations the contractors
initiate. But investigators
found that liealth offi-
cials sometimes ignored
whether contractors were
opening any investigations
at all.


The contractors are sup-
posed to detect fraud by
checking basic data, such
as what type of service
was given, how much of it
was given and how much
it cost But not all contrac-
tors were looking at the
same types of data, and
some of the information
was inaccurate.
The same issues were
identified 10 years ago by
inspector general inves-
tigators, and dozens of
reports in the past decade
also have found problems.
* Associated Press


WEATHER


ISOLATED
ST-STORMS


H1 82 0L55


Tallahassee *
81/64


Lake
83,1


Pensacolab Ga
78/67 PamaCity 8
76/66


ICIC-~~l'I.


-M


CHANCE $ PARTLY PARTLY
OF RAIN CLOUDY CLOUDY


175LO42 HI72 LO 50 H77052


*Jacksonville
Q. r ir r


Sity 0u,O Daytona Beach
'64 Ft. Lauderdale
inesvile Daytona Beach Fort Myers
3,'65 84U69 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
8366 Key West
Orlando Cape Canaveral Lake City
85,'69 83/70 Miami
Tampa Naples
84/69 West Palm Beach Ocala
83, 72 Orlando
FLLauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 84, 75 Pensacola
86/69 Naples Tallahassee i
85/70 Miami Tampa
Wt 1 84/74 Valdosta
Key West, W. Palm Beach


83169... pc
84. 71,'pc
84,'68/ c
83.1 58.,sr,
81,61' pr.
82i 74, pc
82. 55. s.h
84,'72,'pc
83, 69, pc
83.'62.'c
85 69,.. C
i6, 57. I
77'53'pc
80 54, I
83.67 'pc
81,54,'in
83'70,1/pc


LAKE CIT ALM i AN


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
SYear total
SNormal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


82
48
75
52
88 in 1906
31 in 1963

0.00"
0.03"
31.30"
0.98"
44.61i"


SUN
'Sunnse today
Sunset today,
Sunnse torn.
Sunset torn.


6:56 a.m.
5:34 p.m.
6:57 a.m.
5:34 p.m.


,MOON
Moonnse today 9:43 p.m.
Moonset today 10:52 a.m.
Moonrise tom. 10:43 p.m.
Moonset tom. 11:34 a.m.

o OO


Nov. Nov.
18 25
Last New


WFAMER BY -THE-HOUR


Int
30 imues to un
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
a scale from 0

to I


76,'61,'pc
83. 72/pc
82/61.,pc
75, 47.pc
72, 50.' pc
81,' 73, p
75.'42pc
82, 73,'pc
84,68 pc
76.54, pc
78.'60, p,:
71 '56,.
70,50,s
81,'59.pc
71 42.pc
82,'70,'pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.


Sweatherom


Dec. Dec. IV& Forecasts, data and
2 10 .) 1 M graphics 02011 Weather
First Full i | Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpublisher.com


On this date in
2008, Santa Ana
winds started
and continued for
4 days. bringing
record highs to
soutnern Ca1ifornia.
Wind gusts of over
70 mph were record-
ed in the Santa Ana
Mountains.


SCnned e
AiiVSSSBECSCi11BSSSillil


/


Daily Scripture

"For Christ also suffered once
for sins, the righteous for the
unrighteous, to bring you to
God. He was put to death in
the body but made alive in the
Spirit."


I Peter 3:18 NIV


Lake City Reporter


82/lI


2A


-1U1/iNE I


S L,


I


-&A.


LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


State cleared on handling of investments


By GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE A state panel con-
cluded Monday that Florida's massive pen-
sion fund did nothing wrong when it hired
a company with ties to the fund's executive
director.
Florida Chief Financial Officer Jeff
Atwater asked an advisory panel last month
to look into a decision by the state to invest
$125 million with a firm that specializes .in
shaking up or breaking up companies in
order to make money for investors.
Atwater made the request after a
Republican state senator asked for records
related to the transaction approved by the
"state agency that manages Florida's $100-
billion plus pension fund for public employ-
ees. The State Board of Administration ini-
tially told Sen. Mike Fasano it would cost
nearly $11,000 to turn over the records,
a move that was called "indefensible" by
Attorney General Pam Bondi.
Ash Williams, the executive director
for the board, has insisted that he had


no role in the state's decision to hire the
investment firm. Williams once worked at
a hedge fund whose clients included the
head of the company that set up the firm,
which is now known as Starboard Value.
A panel of financial experts picked by
Gov. Rick Scott, Bondi and Atwater spent
hours on Monday discussing the process
and procedures that led to the hiring of
Starboard. Members of the Investment
Advisory Council said they did not see
anything that showed that the state or.
Williams had done anything wrong.
The council heard from an outside con-
sultant that reviewed the hiring and also
went over a timeline that showed that the
state was first told about the firm in early
October 2008, nearly three weeks before
Williams was hired.
Panel members, however, also defended
the idea that Williams had contacts in the
financial industry,
"We need to realize, this isn't a huge
industry and people are going to know
people," said Charles Newman, a council
member and president of KGI Capital.


"Just because you know someone doesn't
make it a conflict."
Williams called the decision "a reason-
able outcome" and said he has been saying
from the start that he in "no way inserted" .
himself to "alter the normal following of
process."
Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New Port Richey,
and the legislator who pushed to get more
information on the hiring of Starboard,
was skeptical of the decision.
"I. hope that they made their decision
based on all the information and not just
on information Ash Williams gave them,"
.Fasano said.
Some of the public documents present-
ed to the council show that Williams was
emailed several times by Thomas Strauss,
president and CEO of the company that
eventually broke off Starboard'as a sepa-
rate company. Williams' former company
had Strauss as a client.
But another email from a senior port-
folio manager with the State Board of
Administration says that Williams "made
it crystal clear" that if the company wasn't


a good investment the state shouldn't go
forward.
On Monday, the council also discussed
Fasano's public records request and decid-
ed that there was no need to change the
way the SBA handles public records.
Williams previously justified the nearly
$11,000 cost by maintaining his agency
would have to spend hours to ,make ure
it would not release private business infor-
mation that could lead to a lawsuit against
the pension fund.
But in the wake of the controversy,
Williams has, started out handing over
records to Fasano for free.
Several council -members, however,
weren't happy to learn that on Monday.
They said that some pensioners might be
unhappy if they: found out that .the pension
fund ,absorbed the cost of large, public
record requests.
Fasano countered that he is making his
request on behalf of 450,000 constituents,
many of whom are likely enrolled in the
state pension fund.


Study finds many patients shun free heart drugs


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Chief Medical Writer

ORLANDO Give people free pre-
scription drugs and many of them still
won't bother to take their medicine.
Doctors were stunned to see that hap-
pen in a major study involving:heart attack
survivors. The patients were offered well-
established drugs to prevent a recurrence
of heart trouble,' including cholesterol-low-
ering stations and medicines that slow the


heart and help it pump mole effectively.
I "My God, we gave these people the
medicines for free and ohly half took it,"
said one of the study's authors, Dr. Elliott
Antman of Harvard-affiliated Brigham and
Women's Hospital in Boston.
In fact, the researchers couldn't even
give the stuff away: They had trouble just
signing up patients to take part in the
study.
Nevertheless, Aetna, the insurance
company'that footed the bill, thinks this


approach will save money in the long run
and plans to start offering certain hart
drugs free to some patients. In the study,
patients offered medicines at no cost suf-
fered fewer heart problems and saved
$500 on average over roughly a year.
It is no secret many Americans don't'
'follow their doctors' instructions. In one
survey, one-third said they didn't fill a pre-
scription or used less medicine than they
should because of cost. The researchers in
this study wanted to see what would hap-


pen if they took cost out of the equation.
The results were disheartening.
"Adherence in America is miserable,"
lamented Dr. Eric Peterson of'Duke
University, who had no role: in the study.
He noted that only, 10 percent of the
patients were taking all the medicines they
should one year.after a heart attack.
ThestudywasledbyDr. NiteeshChoudhry
of Brigham and Women's, who presented
the findings Monday at an American Heart
Association conference in Florida.


GRANT: Local agencies will benefit from $63,000 award, say UW officials


Continued From Page 1A
Vivid Visions requested.
$4,500 to *provide shel-
ter and retain a part-time
children's advocate at the
domestic violence center's
emergency shelter.
CDS Family & Behavioral
Health Services will be
sub-granted $6,000 tbo iuild
a privacy fence to better
separate the shelter efroam'
the adjoining residential
neighborhood and fence the
retention pond 'adjacent to
the shelter. These activities
would enhance the safety
and comfort level of partici-
pants engaged in outside
activities. Homeless, run-
away and other troubled
youth will receive short-
term residential shelter care
to address and meet their
needs for safety .and well-
being. Youth will receive
intake and assessment ser-
vices, case management and
counseling with the goal
of successfully reunifying
them with their families or
another appropriate place-
ment where they will be safe


and able to work toward self-
sufficiency
United, Way of Suwannee
. Valley Board President Mike
McKee expressed pride
regarding United Way of
Suwannee Valley's repeated'
receipt of the Challenge
Grant.
"Our local' United Way
'established t4hree1 ci.1mu-
nity 'impact areas, ensuring
our children's future; fur-
nishing food, shelter and
safety; and promoting inde-
pendence and wellness,'
he said."While the 'annual
community fundraising
campaign proceeds are criti-
cal, our local United Way's'
Board of Directors has long
recognized the limitations on
the resources which can be
'raised through 'our annual
community fundraising cam-
paign and the grant funds
available to be accessed
to further our community
impact initiatives. Ourboard
of directors is pleased with
our United Way's ability to
support our community with


Sany funds secured."
United Way of Suwannee
Valley serves as .the lead
agency for the Homeless
Services Network of
Suwannee Valley, which
serves the counties of
Columbia, Suwannee,
Lafayette and Hamilton.
The 'network. includes
agencies and individuals


interested in the services:
available to those who are
homeless or threatened'
with homelessness. United
Way of Suwannee Valley is
a community impact and
fundraising organization
which, utilizing volunteers
on all levels, advances the
common 'good by identi-
fying unmet community


ARREST: Man charged
Continued From Page 1A

reportedly told her she had in which a woman
been fondled numerous Buffington had inapp
times by Buffington. ate sexual contact wi
Columbia County author- child.
ities contacted the social That child said
networking site as part of Buffington touched
the investigation and saved the genital area, both
a copy of the page and and beneath her clh
requested that law enforceL reports said.
ment officials interview the Detectives'
child, interview the child. Buffington .into ci
The next day a Columbia. without incident Sa
County Sheriff's detec- morning.
tive received another call,


said
propri-
ith her

d that
her in
above
thing,

took
custody
,turday


needs and seeking to alle-
viate those needs through
United Way of Suwannee
Valley initiatives and the


funding of 22 affiliated
health and human service
agencies.


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GBI Disability, Inc. Free Consult beation
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20 years oftSocial Socurity:Disability Experience
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VINSON'
Continued From 1A
Rush, re-filed the motion
and added to it the opinion
of Dr. Mahtre and two other
doctors.
* "I'm just afraid to set a
time bomb out where it
might go off," Jarvis said.
Assistant state attorney
Roberta Getzan said there
was another request, by
Rush that was filed earlier
this year saying Vinson is
now mentally healthy and
should be released.
She said several local
enforcement officers had
concerns with the possibil-
ity of Vinson getting a con-
ditional release.
'There were several
Columbia County Sheriff's
-Office deputies' and law
enforcement (officers),
that appeared during the
last court hearing to testify
about their concern for the
community," Getzan said.
According to 2005
Columbia County Sheriff's
reports, deputies were sent
to Vinson's residence in
Fort White after Vinson's
doctor advised deputies
perform a well-being check.
The doctor reportedly said
Vinson could be suicidal.
When deputies
approached the residence,
Vinson opened fire win an
AK-47 automatic rifle. Six
bullet holes were found in
one deputy's car.


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Florida Tax Payers
,please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous fallacy
of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of Columbia High
School, and Fort White High School students and alumni. All of them
are offspring of Adam and his female wife Eve and therefore are created
by God, in the image of God. (Compare Holy Bible versus Florida Biology 1
End-if-Course Assessment Test Items Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1;
page 52 SC.912.L.15.10
http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)
I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com
In The Year of our Lord 2011
Paid for by Kenny Merriken


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Edward Jones Financial Advisor
MAhING SENSE OF INVESTING
S148 North Marion Ave."
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Bus. 386-752-1215
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TE 888-152-1215,
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OPINION


Tuesday, November 15, 201 1


ONEIIl11


ONE
OPINION


Super

committee

is failing

miserably

As the Thanksgiving
deadline approach-
es;for the congres-
sional super com-
mittee on deficit
reduction to complete its work,
the whole thing is starting to
look like a big, fat turkey.
Itfs difficult to gauge which
is worse: the committee's lack
of progress toward a deal to
cut the federal deficit by at
least $1.2 trillion, or the total
absence of sunshine on the pro-
ceedings. No wonder Congress'
approval rating has sunk to
single digits, a new low.
The fact that the nation's
future is being negotiated in
,secret, during closed hearings,
is an affront to Americans and
should outrage.Republicans and
,Democrats alike. Advocates of
pen government are demand-
ing that any bill that goes
'before the House or Senate be,
posted online for all to see at
east 72 hours in advance of any
vote. Amen to that
In retrospect, it was Pollyanna
optimismm to think a committee
like this could bridge the huge
%gap between Democrats and
Republicans on the deficit We
"'had hoped compromise would be
spurred by the prospect of dev-
'astating cuts that automatically
,are triggered if the comipittee
W fails to reach agreement Instead,
the bigger mostly have inspired
creative proposals from both'
sides of the aisle to avoid defense
and domestic cuts without solv-
ing anything.
The super committee must
agree on a proposal by Nov.
21 for Congress to vote before
Thanksgiving, as required
by the summer budget deal.
SHouse Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, and Democratic.Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-,
Nevada, have'a lot riding on this,
although you wouldn't know it
from Behner's rigid stance.
Miracles occasionally do hap-
'pen.
But unless there is a major
breakthrough this week,
'Americans will have few tea-
tsons to be thankful for the work
.of our nation's'leaders this holi-
Qday season.
V: San Jose Mercury News


LET


TERS


POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
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spaced. Letters should not exceed
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,length and libel. Letters must be
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Verification. Writers can have two
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and guest columns are the opinion of
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180 E. Duval St. downtown.
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W whatever hap-
pened to men?
That's a
common ques-
tion today,
being asked by social com-
mentators, parents and single
women dverywh6re. They are
lamenting young men's shrink-
ing status in academia, the
workplace and, maybe espe- .
cially, marriage.
Young women as a group now
outperform young men, some-
times significantly, in college,
in employment rates and even,
in terms of average earnings in
major cities.
,. Social commentators like Bill ,"
Bennett point out that, in 1970,
80 percent of American men'
ages 25 to 29 were married, and
that, in 2007, only 40 percent -
of men in that age group were
wed. Many others are living'
in their parents' basements,
undoubtedly playing video
games for hours on end.
Now I'm quick to note this
is not all their fault I've long
bemoaned, for starters, how
men in general and fathers in
particular are now the butt of
jokes in our popular culture.
While I am by no means letting
young men off the hook here,
its simply the case.that too
often today's males are living up
to the low expectations the cul-
ture has for them.
In any event, weighing in on
the debate (with a new book
is Bennett, former education
secretary and current radio-talk-
showhost.
"The Book of Man: Readings
on the Path to Manhood"
(Thomas Nelson, 2011) is filled
with accounts of what it means
to be a man in six distinct envi-


I t was always pfoblem-
atic whether the so-
called supercommittee
charged with designing
a major debt-reduction
scheme would be able to do
so. The odds against the 50-50
bipartisan panel meeting the
Thanksgiving deadline get lon-
ger daily, much to the conster-
nation of the Pentagon, where
mandatory cuts would fall.
The defense budget would
take a $500 billion hit if the
committee's Republicans arid
Democrats fail to free them-
selves from the debilitating
glue that has stuck each in
seemingly rigid positions,
with Republicans rejecting
any attempt to include raising
taxes and Democrats just as
solidly opposed to reforming
entitlements Social Security and
Medicare/Medicaid as part of
any reduction plan.
Meanwhile, this glorious
mess brought about by inglo-
rious lawmakers finds both
members and nonmembers of
the panel frantically preparing
legislation that would stop the
assault on the Pentagon budget
There seems to be nothing that


www.lakecityreporter.com


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com-

ronments: in war, at work, in
play, in the political world, with
women and children, and in
prayer and reflection.
From the ancient, such as
"The Campaigns of Alexander
the Great" as told by Roman
historian Arrian; to later pieces,
such as "The Influence of a
Father" by John Stuart Mill;
and to accounts of modern-day
dads loving their families well,
commit ailatin f portraits in
manliness.
One essay in particular stands
out to me. David Gelernter, the
renown Yale computer-sciences
professor who was injured in an
attack by the Unabomber, talks
about how he is bringing up his
own sons against the culture.
He says that "... a man's role in
respect to women is to protect,
to help, to support, to cherish as
opposed.to consume. We are a
consumer society and the num-
ber one consumption is that of
women."
Amen to that!.
I talked with Bennett (Full
disclosure: He provided a blurb
for my own book, "It Takes a
Parent") He told me he is actu-
ally encouraged that more and,
more people, including some
feminists, are admitting and fac-
ing the problem of the demise
of manliness. That's a start He


Dan K.Thomasson
would prevent them from sup-
planting the Pentagon cuts with
budget reductions elsewhere
- wherever that is.
Common-sense appeals by
former budget directors from
past administrations, both
Republican and Democrat,
have failed to budge the com-
mittee toward agreement. And
the co-chairmen of a presi-
dential commission, whose
dictates President Obama has
pretty much ignored; have
gotten nowhere. All have sug-
gested a balanced approach
that would increase revenues
through tax action, adjust
Social Security and Medicare
to meet the current age demo-
graphic and reduce spending
at all levels.
The fact is, defense spend-
ing has plenty of give without


also shared that the answer has
to come from the culture of the
home, since our larger culture
does not seem to want to shift
much here. At least not yet
This means families need to
teach young men what it means
to be responsible, to work hard
and to be prepared to someday,
get married and care for a wife
and children. (Even if more and
more of those wives can and do.
provide for themselves.)
I would argue that we.
might also teach our daughters
to respect men.' Real men, not
the men concocted for treacly
romantic comedies. And to
respect themselves enough to
wait for that man in every sense
of that word.
Oftentimes, single moms can
raise their sons to be good men.
In fact, they simply have to,
Bennett told me. And one of the
ways they can do this is by sur-
rounding them with good men
and role models to the best of
their ability.
A case in point is Bennett
himself. He and his brother,
celebrity,attorney Robert
Bennett, were raised in difficult
circumstances by a divorced
mom.
Bennett said this extensive
collection of essays is meant
.to encourage and to help us
"remember what men are and
what they can be."
It does just that. But to me,
ifts still a sad commentary on
our culture that we so need the
reminder.


Betsy. Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


destroying our military viability.
The decision to end any occupa-
tion of Iraq should save dramati-
cally, and it seems doubtful that
our presence in Afghanistan
will continue for much longer.
Together, these wars, have
drained billions upon billions
from the treasury. Waste and
cost overruns are quite large
in military contracts and dupli-
cations are standard. Former
Defense Secretary Robert
Gates, Panetta's predecessor,
acknowledged that he could no
longer support a freewheeling
defense budget that is greater
than that of all our allies com-
bined.
As for the entitlement pro-
grams, the.country's strongest
lobbying arm, led by AARP,
seems adamantly opposed to
any change despite the aging
model of both Social Security
and Medicare, at least as part
of any plan agreed to by the
supercommittee. It is doubtful
that any such initiative will be
taken before the election, if
ever.
* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


Hardly

Pearls of

wisdom

SM 3 y brother,
Kenneth, says
his last whipping
From Mother '
came when he
was just shy of 16. He had scolded
our innocent, little rat terrier,
Whitey, and Mother didn't like his
tone of voice.
"Go get the razor strap," she
told him. (Our dad, by the way,
called it a razor "strop," and for
years I thought he was mispro-
nouncing the word "strap." But I
didn't have the nerve to correct
him. Turned out, he waS. right"
The razor strop, a flexible, strip
of leather barbers used to sharp-
en their straight razors, was an
unfortunate gift from an uncle
who ,owned a barber shop.)'
What Mother didn't know,
Kenneth says--and he had for-
gotten at the time-was that he
carried in his back pocket a "tor-
pedo," a foil-wrapped July 4th
firecracker that would explode
when thrown onto pavement
Torpedoes also explode when
struck firmly by a razor strop.
Which this one did-and
blew the back pocket of my
brother's pants clean.off, fortu-
nately backwards.
'We both cried for a while,"
Kenneth recalls.
I'm using my brother, instead
of myself, in anr-example of
corporal punishment simply
because none of my whipping
ended that dramatically. I did
not carry torpedoes in my back
pocket But I received ample
doses of punishment
No doubt most of the whip-,
pings were justified. But would
I recommend such discipline
to other parents? No, I would
not Besides, you don't need
my advice.
And you don't need the advice
of folks like Michael Pearl, a
Tennessee preacher who, along
with his wife, Debi, has written
a self-published book titled 'To
Train Up a Child," which advis-
es parents to use a switch on
children as young as 6 months
old to discourage bad behavior.
The Pearls describe other imple-
ments, including a quarter-inch
flexible plumbing line, to teach
children to submit tp authority.
Some parents have taken
such advice way too far. In
Sedro-Woolley, Wash., prosecu-
tors have charged the parents
of an 11-year-old girl who was
found naked and emaciated
in the backyard. Forced to go
without food for days and made
to sleep in an unheated barn,
the girl died of hypothermia and
malnutrition. She also had been
beaten with a plastic tube, as
recommended by the Pearls.
Two other investigations
have been tied to similar
advice, police say. In California,
a mother and father are serv-
ing long prison terms after
beating their 7-year-old daugh-
ter for hours, with pauses for
prayer. The girl died. In North
Carolina, a mother who had
read the Pearls' website has
been charged with suffocating
her 4-year-old. She had beaten
the child daily with a plumbing
tube.
I'm not here to condemn or
commend corporal punishment
of children. My.wife and I used
other methods of discipline.
Whipping seemed to work for
my parents; none of us three
kids, even my exploding broth-
er, was permanently scarred.
But it's not for all parents. And
there's one simple reason for
that
Some parents don't have
enough sense to be parents.


* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


Manning up


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With Congress, expect


more intransigence










5A


COURT: Supremes will hear oral arguments on health care next March

Continued From Page 1A


lion previously uninsured Americans. But
Republicans have branded the law uncon-
stitutional since before Obama signed it in
a ceremony in March 2010.
The court's ruling could be its most sig-
flificant and political decision since George
W. Bush's 2000 presidential election vic-
tory. But the justices left themselves an
opening to defer the outcome if they
choose, by requesting arguments on one
lower court's ruling that a decision must
wait until 2015, when one of the law's
many provisions takes effect
Legal experts have offered a range of
opinions about what the high court might
do. Many promifient Supreme Court
lawyers believe the law will be upheld
by a lopsided vote, with Republican and
Democratic appointees ruling in its favor.
But others predict a close outcome, with
Justice Anthony Kennedy, a Republican
appointee who sometimes joins his four
colleagues appointed by Democratic presi-
dents, holding the deciding vote on the
nine-member court -'
The White House has pushed for a
final ruling as soon as possible, and
Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer
said the administration was pleased the
justices agreed to take the case now, with
arguments in March. "It's important that
we put to rest once and for all the issue of


maybe the law will disappear," said Health
and Human Services Secretary Kathleen
Sebelius.
Republicans also said they were happy
the high court would hear arguments on
the constitutionality of the provision at the;
heart of the law and three other questions'
about the act The central provision in
question is the requirement that individu-
als buy health insurance starting in 2014
or pay a penalty. ,
"That the Supreme Court is taking this
up, 'I think, is a positive signal that there
are legitimate concerns surrounding the,
constitutional aspects of mandating that
individuals purchase health care insurance
and purchase it according to Washington's
guidelines,"-said House Majority Leader
Eric Cantor of Virginia.
The exceptional:five and a half hours
allotted for argument demonstrates the
significance the justices see in this case.
Normally, they allow only one hour, split
between two sides. In the modern era,
the last time the court increased that time
anywhere near this much was in 2003
for consideration of the McCain-Feingold
campaign finance overhaul. That case con-
sumed four hours of argument
This argument may even spread over
two days, as the justices rarely hear more
than two or three hours a day.


The health care overhaul would achieve
its huge expansion of coverage by requir-
ing individuals to buy health insurance
starting in 2014, by expanding Medicaid
and by applying other provisions, many
yet to take effect
The central question before the court is
whether the government has the power to
force people to buy health insurance. The
White House says Congress used a "quint-
essential" power its constitutional ability
to regulate interstate commerce, including
the health care industry when it passed
the overhaul.
But opponents of the law, and the 11th
'US. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta,
say that Congress overstepped its author-
ity when lawmakers passed individual
mandate. A divided Atlanta court panel
ruled that Congress cannot require people
to "enter into contracts with private insur-
ance companies for the purchase of an
expensive product from the time they are
born until the time they die."
The Atlanta court is the only one of
four appellate courts that found the man-
date unconstitutional. The federal appealss
court in Cincinnati upheld the entire law,
as did appellate judges in Washington,
D.C., in recent days. The appellate court
- in Richmond, Va., ruled a judicial decision
on the law cannot be rendered until 2015,


after the penalties for not having insurance
have gone into effect.
Supporters have been encouraged that
the appellate rulings in Cincinnati and
Washington to uphold the law were joined
by two prominent conservative judges
appointed, by Republican presidents:
Jeffrey Sutton, appointed by George W.
Bush, and Laurence Silberman, appointed
by Ronald Reagan.
In Atlanta, however, Frank Hull, appoint-
ed by President Bill Clinton, joined with a
Republican colleague in striking down the
mandate.
Earlier District Court rulings followed
political affiliation: Judges appointed by
Democratic presidents upheld the law, while
Republican appointees struck it down.'
\ In addition to deciding the constitution-
ality of the central mandate, the justices
also will determine whether the rest of the
law can take effect even if that core is held
unconstitutional. ,The law's opponents say
the whole thing should fall if the individual
mandate falls. -
The administration counters that most
of the law still could function, but says that
requirements that insurers cover anyone
and not set higher rates for people with'
pre-existing conditions are inextricably
linked with the mandate and shouldn't
remain in place without it


House GOP leader Cantor says deficit deal likely


By DAVID ESPO
AP Special Correspondent

WASHINGTON -. Sidestepping
controversy, House. Majority Leader
Eric Cantor, R-Va., declined to take
sides Monday on a proposal for high-
er tax revenues backed' by fellow,
Republicans on Congress' supercom-
mittee, yet expressed confidence the
panel would agree on a deficit-reduc-
tion plan of at least $1.2 trillion by a
Nov. 23 deadline.
A proposal for $300 billion in
higher taxes has stirred grumbling
within the ranks of .'congressional
"Republicans, for whom opposition
to such measures has been political
bedrock for more than two decades.
Two of the party's presidential
hopefuls said during Monday they
wouldn't support .any committee
deficit-reduction plan that includes
-higher taxes.
Former House Speaker Newt


Gingrich, campaigning in Iowa, said
he would "do everything in my power
to defeat" any such proposal.-
A spokesman for Rick Perry said
the Texas governor "wants to look at
details but if those details include a
tax increase he's not going to be for
it He does not favor higher taxes,"
added David Miner .
Additionally, officials said that Sen.
Pat Toomey; R-Pa., who outlined the.
-plan last week in a closed-door meet-
ing of four Republicans 'and three
Democrats, has encountered criticism
from fellow conservatives. despite
strong credentials as an opponent of
higher taxes. "There's been a little
bit, but it's been pretty muted," his
spokeswoman, 'Nachama Soloveichik,,
said of the response.
Cantor's- spokeswoman turned,
"aside several' efiiiled' reqfiests for.
the majority leader's views on the
proposal. She said he hadn't seen the
plan, and she referred to his com-


ments 'at a news conference earlier
in the day when he told reporters,
"I'm not going to be opining as to any
reports, hypothetical or anything
connected with their work."
Despite that pledge, Cantor was
bullish in predicting agreement
before the deadline and adding that
a fallback' requirement to cut $1.2
trillion from domestic and defense
programs wouldn't be triggered.
The committee has been at work
for two months, hoping to succeed at
a task that has defied the best efforts
of high-ranking political leaders past
and present
Despite intense talks late last week,
there has been' little 'indication of
progress as age-old political divisions
have re-emerged.
The principal stumbling blocks
revolve around 'taxes on the one
hand, and the large federal programs
of Medicare, Medicaid and Social
Security on the other.


Gingrich: GOP taking second look


By THOMAS -BEAUMONT
Associated Press

JEFFERSON, Iowa -
His public' support grow-
ing, Republican presidential,
candidate Newt Gingrich
said Monday that voters
are- taking a second look
at his candidacy because
he proved during recent'
debates that' he under-
stands the enormity of the
nation's problems.
But he didn't really have.
to make the ,point. Lillie
Anderson made it for him.-
. "I didn't enter this cam-
paign a Gingrich fan," the
76-year-old Des .Moines
Republican told Gingrich
after he addressed more
than 100 employees of a Des
Moines-area insurance com-
pany. "I'r closer than I was.
I'm more interested now."
Gingrich would have
GOP voters like Anderson
in Iowa and other early vot-
ing states believe he is on
the verge of an astound-


big rebound, after losing
most of his campaign staff
in June After a spiral of bad
news, including embarrass-
ing financial revelations,.
and awkward comments
about the House Budget
Committee chairman.
'But the former House
speaker returned Monday
neat the top in a new round-
of national surveys. He
promised to dispatch staff
to Iowa for the first time in
five months and sharpened.
his attack on a congres-
sional panel's effort to cut
federal spending.
Gingrich is getting
that second look; he said,
because GOPvoters, having
tested several alternatives
to former Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney, are
drawn to his policy acumen
and background as a leader
in Congress during tough
times in the 1990s.
'This is bigger, deep-
er, harder than Barack
Obama," Gingrich said in


the company's, cafeteria.
"In all honesty, I don't think
there's anybody else with.
the range of experience,
range of background, the
willingness to take the heat,
that I've exhibited."
"I find it very formidable
to think that I might win,"
'he said.
Gingrich still has a long
way to go to cap a turn-
around. .
He had the support of
just 7 percent of likely Iowa
GOP caucus-goers in The
Des Moines Register's
late-October poll, virtually
unchanged from June. He
also had just $353,000 in
his campaign account at
the outset of October.
But Gingrich said fund-
raising has seen an uptick
after a series of fall debates
where he has stayed out
of .the testy back-and-forth
between Romney and
Texas Gov. Rick Perry.
Gingrich later joked
about what he described


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich, speaks at the CBS News/National Journal
foreign policy debate at the Benjamin Johnson Arena, Saturday in Spartanburg, S.C.


as a "politically near-death
experience."
"W 'e were saved by the
Internet," he told more
than 100 central Iowa GOP
activists who packed into
a community center meet-
ing room in Jefferson. "We
never would have raised
money inside the regular
GOP establishment They
are all too practical..They
don't vote out of idealism."
And Gingrich's posi-
tive tone won him big
applause from the 1,000
Iowa Republicans at the
state party's marquee
fundraiser in Des Moines
this month.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


Raid on the Suwannee set for weekend


LIVE OAK The 3rd
Annual Raid on the
Suwannee, a Civil War re-
enactment presented by
Hardee's Corp Civil War
re-enactors, will be held
Nov. 18-20 at The Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park.
Presented in living color
with authentic uniforms and
artillery, authentic encamp-
ments and two Civil War
battles, this American his-
tory lesson on the Civil War
is an event not to be missed
by anyone who wants to
feel they have been taken
back to America's Civil War
fought from 1861-1865. It's
an opportunity for you
and your children to see
up close and actually hear
history during the battle
re-enactments!
You can be sure it is
authentic, complete with
live battle action by re-enac-
tors representing the South
,and the North in authentic
*uniforms with guin fights,
.soldiers being "wounded"
and "doctors" tending to
'the wounded. It's so realis-


tic, you'll forget it's 2011!
Guests may visit the
encampments of both
Confederate and Union sol-
diers Saturday and Sunday,
getting a realistic view of
how these soldiers lived
during the war between the
states. Camps are authen-
tic and soldiers and their
families use the same type
of equipment to cqok and
go about their daily chores
as did their fellow soldiers
in the 1800s. You may also
shop the Sutler merchants
who have Civil War area
items to delight one and
all.,

ADMISSION-Admission
is only $6 per adult with
children under .8 free.
School Day is Friday, Nov.
18 for area schools which
have been invited to bring
their students for this his-
toric event Students who
attend the Friday event will.
receive a pass to return
on the weekend with their
parents.


CIVIL WAR HISTORY -
During the Civil War years
of the 1860s, Florida was a
major participant in many
ways. Not only did Florida
field troops for every aspect
of the conflict that led to a
truly united America-but
Florida was the most pro-
ductive state in the South
in the closing years of the
Civil War. The pioneer
families of Florida were.
enterprising, producing
farm product, cattle, goods
and services of all types.
The Union fully recognized
this, leading to a series of
skirmishes all over Florida.
One of the goals of the
Union was to control ship-
ping, and more important-
ly, the well established rail
lines, in Florida. This led to
the well known Battle of
Olustee some 30 miles to
the east of where the Raid
is held today. Less well
known were the numer-
ous "probes" all along the
coastal accessible area of
the state.


There are earthworks
reminding us of the
encampments and hastily
erected fortification at the
nearby Suwannee River
State Park. A "spur line"
that served a river land-
ing with mule drawn cargo
cars still borders The Spirit
of the Suwannee Music
Park, with roots into the
19th Century.

"SCHEDULE

This year's events
' will feature full afternoon
battles at 2 p.m. Saturday,
Nov. 19 and Sunday Nov.
20
. The event opens at 9
a.m. and closes at 5 p.m.
Saturday and 4:30 p.m.
Sunday

A 10 a.m. drill and
weapons inspection will be
held Saturday

A formal Ladies Tea
will be held Saturday


Scene from a prevoiu Raadn the Suwannee.


Grand Ball Saturday
night (public may attend
for a fee Civil War period
clothing required)

Authentic church ser-
vice Sunday morning at 10
a.m. at the SOSMP chapel
on Rees Lake

A grand review of the
troops will be held at 1:30
p.m. Sunday before the last
battle at 2 p.mn


See the SOSMP web site
at www.musicliveshere.
com for a full schedule.
For more info, go to www.
floridareenactorsonline.
com/SuwanneeGenInfo.
htm. For additional infor-
mation, please contact Bob
"General" Goodrich, 352-
493-0625 or T. F. Smoak,
event planning, 386-935-
2662.


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Legal experts focus on


Florida's death penalty
By BIL KACZOR '.' 1:^ .*. :'' 'M


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press '
" ,TALLAHASSEE A panel that.
,included legal experts, academics
and lawmakers on Monday renewed
.a push for changes to try to make
Florida's death penalty more just and
'prevent innocent, people from being
executed.
Participants' views : about their
chances of success ranged from hope-
ful to despairing in a state that leads
the nation with 23 death row inmates
who have been exonerated.
"It seems to be a problem that may
not be able to be solved," said former
State Attorney Harry Shorstein of
Jacksonville. "What the public doesn't
understand is how expensive this liti-
gation has been over the years."'
Shorstein, who participated by tele-
phone, supports the death penalty
but said he's troubled with the lack
(of movement toward fixing its prob-
lems.
Florida State University's law
school sponsored the forum'to mark
the fifth anniversary of an American
'.Bar Association study that criticized
,the state's death penalty procedures
and made a number of recommenda-
,tions.
One was that juries be unanimous
in recommending death sentences.
Florida is the only death penalty state
that lets juries make sentencing deci-
sions or recommendations by a sim-
ple majority. Florida judges have the
final say but must give great weight
to jury recommendations.
State Sen. Thad Altman for a sec-
ond year is sponsoring a bill (SB
:772) that would require unanimous
findings of aggravating factors as well
as death sentence recommendations.
His legislation failed without so much
as a committee hearing earlier this
.year.
"I'm hoping ... we can at least get
a hearing," the Viera Republican told
other panel members. "I don't think
that's asking too much."
The panel's moderator, Mark
Schlakman, senior program direc-
tor at Florida State's Center for the
Advancement of Human Rights, was
more optimistic.


Schlakman noted the new bill would
apply only to crimes committed after
Oct. 1, 2012. Prosecutors had been
,:worried about it being retroactive to
existing cases.
Also, since the last legislative
session, U.S. District Judge Jose E.
Martinez in Miami has ruled Florida's
death sentence law is unconstitutional
because jury recommendations don't
have to be unanimous. The state is
appealing.
"Irrespective of where the appeal
goes, it underscores the concern
about that process," Schlakman said
in an interview.
Some lawmakers have opposed
changes because they were afraid
that might result in more appeals.
Martinez' ruling shows the opposite
may be the case, Schlakman said.
In a prerecorded video presenta-
tion, former Florida Supreme Court
Justice Raoul Cantero said the high'
court as long ago as 2005 had urged
unanimous jury recommendations..
Noting he was appointed by
Republican former Gov. Jeb Bush,
Cantero also criticized Bush's deci-
sion to abolish a state office that
represented death row inmates on
-appeal to save Ifioney and replaced
it with private lawyers. Two simi-
lar state offices covering the rest of
Florida were not closed.
North Florida inmates often are
represented by inexperienced or
unqualified lawyers and some of their
'briefs have been "atrocious," Cantero
said.
He said it's not a liberal versus
conservative or Democrat versus
Republican issue.
"This is an issue about rational-
ity, about making the justice system
rational and making sure that only
those that are guilty are convicted
and only those who commit the most
egregious murders are sentenced to
death," Cantero said.
Schlakman also is hopeful Gov.
Rick Scott,e Republican businessman
who never ran for public office before
last year, will be receptive.
"Gov. Scott approaches issues,
whether one agrees or disagrees with
his policy, with a fresh look and an
open mind without having had much


in the way of political background
on these issues and tends to look at
issues in general within the context of
business practices," Schlakman said.
He pointed out there has been
some progress with the Supreme
Court adopting the ABA's recommen-
dations for changes in death penalty
jury instructions.
. Chief Justice Charles Canady also
has createdlan Innocence Commission
that's working on recommendations
for ways to avoid wrongful convic-
tions for crimes of all kinds. The
commission's'executive director, Les
Garringer, a former Monroe County
judge, said a separate panel should
be formed to examine issues unique
to the death penalty.
Schlackman also was hopeful a
death penalty documentary planned
by Florida State's College of Motion
Picture Arts would help shift public
opinion.
The forum was held just one day
before the scheduled execution of
Oba Chandler. He was convicted of
killing an Ohio woman and her two
teenage daughters and throwing their
bodies into Tampa Bay in 1989.
ThQ focus, though, was not on
the execution or whether the death
penalty is right or wrong but on
improving the administration of jus-
tice although one lawmaker has filed
a bill to abolish it.
"Our goal and role is to change the
conversation," Schlakman said.
3 9 w,-w.akecityreporter.corm

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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


Bulletin Board

NEWSABO T OU R SCO S *


CAMPUS
CALENDAR



ColumbiaHigha
community pep ,
rally
To celebrate the Tiger
football team making it
to the district playoffs,
students are throwing a
community pep rally with
music, games and food.,
The football-team, cheer-
leaders, Tigerettes, band,
step team and other club,
.will take part.
When: Nov. 17 at 6 p.i
Where: Tiger Stadium
* : Admission: Free. Sma
'fee for food.

Richardson Middl
.Christmas band
concert
-Richardson Middle's
symphonic band, jazz
band, beginners band an(
drumline will perform in
-their annual concert under
-director Sherod Keen. /
:Community members and
family are welcome to
attend for an evening of
"entertainment.
Z When: Friday, Dec. 2 a
,6:30 p.m .
Where: Richardson'
"Middle auditorium


Corbett Duncan, 11
Parents: Burt & Cissy
Duncan
School: Pinemount
,'Elemeintary School
-Grade: 5 ...
What Clubs or.orga-
nizations do youbelong
to? Pinemount Chorus,
Student Council and
Pinemount Cupstacking: .
Team
: What would you like
to do when you corn-
plete your education? I
would like to be ;a musi-
cian, playing the guitar.
Achievements: A-.
Honor Roll since 2nd
Grade, Scoring a 6 on
Florida Writes, and being
voted Publicity Chairman


Kyler Larsen, 10
Parents: Eric and Tina'
Larsen
School: Fort White
Elementary School
Grade: 5
What clubs or orga-
nizations do you belong
r to? First Baptist Church
d High'Springs, Jonesville
Youth Socier League. -
What would you like
to do when you com-
t plete your education?
Attend the University of
Florida. Become a video
game designer.
Achievements: Highly
Advanced Reading and
Math groups. Writer of the
month. Master the high-
est achievement levels


for Student Council.
What do you like
best about school?
EVERYTHING!
Teacher Mik Jones'
comment about Corbett:
qorbett is a wonderful
student!' He is full of great
character and judgement
It is an honor just to be his
teacher. He loves learning
and helping.
Principal'Donna
McAdnms' comment '
about Corbett: Corbett
is one of those students
who excel at whatever they
do. It is a pleasure to have
Corbett here at Pinemount
I know he will have great
success as he continues
his education.
Corbetes comment'


in many different video '
games,
What do you like best
aboutschool?I like to
learnnew things and make
new friends. .'.
Teacher Nairvette -
Kelly's connmments about
Klyar: Kyler is a very hard
working, enthusiastic stu-
dent He has an extremely
positive attitude, is always
smiling, and is a joy for
any teacher..
Principal Wanda
Conner's comments
about Kylar: Kyler
Larsen is a thoughtful,
intelligent young man.
Fort White Elementary is
proud to honor him as the
Student of the Week.
Kylar's comments


Corbett Duncan


.uunlMor


concerning honor: I feel
honored and respected! I
feel happy and proud and I
know 'my parents probably
.are!


Kylar Larsen
concerning honor:'
I'm happy that I was cho-
sen out of 700 students, at
my school! Thank you for
selecting me.


Lake City Reporter



Columbia's Top Talent


.From staff reports
For the eighth year,
Columbia High School
has searched the campus
for talent and will narrow
the contestants in a talent'
s,.show on Dec. 2 at the
'school. Tickets are now
on sale. For tickets and
information contact Ronny
Collins, school security
officer, at' (386) 755-8080.
Contestants are
Carltonette Claridy, '
Lauren Ogburn, Shontorja
Harris, Monte Tisdale,


Valena Davis, Shannon
Alexander, Tania Wa;ler,
Nicole Bryant, Taylor
Thompson, Marcus Elliot,
Tori Hammond, Jessi Ann
. Hingson, Miranda Van
Vleck, Breyon Jennings,
Paula Coe, Kara Compo,
Arnereanna Baryant,
Jordan Hill, Alexus
Branscome, Jessica Land,
Blake Chapman, Ashley
Bostain, Stephanie Harris,
Brendon Brownfield and
Jasmine Horton.


Eastside Elementary
Fall festival

Eastside Elementary celebrated
anotherfabulous Fall Festival! Parents
learned what the "UNRAVEL" pro-
cess is all about Teachers attended a
workshop in the summer where they
'learned an exciting way to reinforce
reading strategies.
Teachers have been teaching stu-
dents to use the steps of UNRAVEL
with any material 'that they need to6
read and understand; Teachers have
also been emphasizing the 12 power-
ful words that all students need to
understand in order for them to be,
more successful when reading. The
students have learned the words and
the motions to a song that will help
them remember key words and skills
so that they can better understand
what they. are reading and be suc-
cessful when test time rolls around.
A, video was shown of Eastside stu-
dents doing the movements and sing-
ing the song.
Once the presentation was done,
parents and students. enjoyed games,
cakewalks, picture booths and deli-


CAMPUS NEWS


cious food. Special thanks go out to
Mr. Keith Hudson for donating pump-
kins for each classroom to decorate.
and display, Little Caesar's Pizza ,of
Baya Avenue, Hal Jones Construction
(Greg Bedenbaugh) for supplying
extra lighting, NAPA for donating.
water, the Cox family for working
overtime to make the booths for the,
festival, the Bielling Family for donat-
ing hay, and Eastside PT'O for their
hard work in supporting this event

Field trips
October and November have been
months full of exciting learning activi-
ties. Pre-Kindergarten and first grade
students enjoyed a field trip to the
Columbia County Fair. They were
excited to see the exhibits on dis-
play.
In addition .first and second grade
students, visited Rogers Farm in
Gainesville. They had a terrific.titne,
and returned to school with pump-
kins from their pumpkin patch.
Third grade and fifth grade stu-
dents went to see Kid Power at the
Shriners Club. They learned about
nutrition and how their body works.


Fourth grade students enjoyed their
annual trip to Stephen Foster Folk
Days. It is always a great trip for
fourth grades students, tp see. and
learn about how Florida use to be.
Students churned butter, saw how
cane syrup was made and saw how -
people lived,, and demonstrations
of quilting, blacksmithing- stained
glass making, and other craftsi.,.

Melrose Park Elemehtary
Kindergarten
Kindergarten at, Melrose Park
Elementary School had a wonderful
time on our field trip to the Roger's
Farm. We learned about the differ-.
ent kinds of farm animals, fed the
animals such as goat, sheep and
pigs, rode ponies, went on 'a hay-
ride to the pumpkin patch and then'
picked out a pumpkin of our very'
own to take home. We also had fun
at our Fall Festival. We played many
different games and earned all kinds
'of prizes. We are now learning about
living things, including, plants and
insects. There is something new and
exciting to learn each day!


Teachers,facing low salaries, opt to moonlight


By CHRISTINE ARMARIO
AP Education Writer

MIAMI By. day, Wade
Brosz teaches American
history at an A-rated Florida
middle school. By night, he
is a personal trainer at 24
Hour Fitness.
Brosz took the. three-
night a week job at the
gym after his teaching sal-
ary was frozen, summer
school was reduced drasti-
cally, and the state bonus
for board certified teachers
was cut. He figures that he
and his wife, also a teacher,
are making about $20,000
less teaching' than expect-
ed to, combined..
"The second job was
.to get back what was lost
through cuts," said Brosz,
a nationally board certified-
teacher. "It was tougher
and tougher to make ends
meet. I started personal
training because, it's flex-
ible hours."
Second jobs are not a new
phenomenon for teachers,


who have historically been
paid less than other profes-
sionals. In 1981, about 11
percent of teachers were
. moonlighting; the number
has risen to about one in'
five today. They are bar-
tenders, waitresses, tutors,'
school bus drivers and
even lawnmowers.
Now, with the severe
cuts many school districts
have made, teachers like
Brosz, who hadn't, con-
sidered juggling a second
job before, are searching
the want ads. The number
of public school teachers
who reported holding a
second job outside school
increased slightly from
2003-04 to 2007-08. While
there is no national data for
more recent years, reports
from individual states and
districts indicate the num-
ber may have climbed fur-
ther since the start of the
recession.
In Texas, for example,
the percentage of teach-
ers who moonlight has


increased from 22 percent
in 1980 to 41 percent in
2010.
"It's the economy, pri-
marily," said Sam Sullivan,
a professor at Sam Houston
State University, which con-
ducts the survey.
Rita Haecker, president
of the Texas State Teachers
Association, said cuts
in education have forced
many teachers to take fur-
lough days. It's an extra
strain because, unlike in
the past, many teachers are
now the primary breadwin-
ner, either because they
are a single parent or their
spouse is unemployed,
Haecker said.
"It affects their morale in
the classroom," she said. .
The average salary for
a public school teacher
nationwide in the 2009-10
school year was $55,350, a
figure that has remained
relatively flat, after being
adjusted for inflation,
over the last two decades.
Starting teacher salaries


can be significantly lower;
compared to college gradu-
ates in other professions,
they earn more than
$10,000 less when begin-,
ning their careers
"I think people have felt
the need to supplement
their teaching salaries in
order.to have a middle class.
lifestyle," said Lawrence
Mishel, president of the
Economic Policy Institute,
which published a study
this year concluding the
average weekly pay of
teachers in 2010 was about
12 percent below that of
workers with similar educa-
tion and experience.
The Organization for
Economic Cooperation and
Development, which col-
lects data on student per-
formance across the globe,
advised the United States
earlier this year to work at
elevating the teaching pro-
fession in order to improve
student performance.


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Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


Oakland raid latest in Occupy crackdowns


By TERRY COLLINS
Associated Press
OAKLAND, Calif. Police clad in riot
gear and armed with tear gas cleared out
Oakland's anti-Wall Street encampment
early Monday, the latest law enforcement
crackdown amid complaints around the
country of health and safety hazards at
protest camps.
The raid at the Occupy Oakland camp,
one of the largest and most active sites
in the movement, came a day after police
in Portland, Ore., arrested more than 50
people while shutting, down its camp amid
complaints of drug use and sanitation
issues.
Police in Burlington, Vt, also evicted.
protesters after a man fatally shot himself
last week inside a tent.
Police staged a previous raid on the
Oakland encampment Oct 25, but Mayor
Jean Quan allowed protesters to re-estab-
lish their tent city. On Monday, however,
Quan said officials could no longer ignore
the problems the camp j 'sed.
"We came to this poirlt because Occupy
Oakland, I think,.began to take a different
path than the original movement" Quan
said. "The encampment became a place
where we had repeated violence and last
week a murder. We had to bring the camp
to an end before more people got hurt."
Demands increased for Oakland protest-
ers to pack up after a man was shot and
killed Thursday near the encampment at
the City Hall plaza.
Protesters claimed there was, no connec-
tion between the shooting and the camp.
But police identified the slain man as
Kayode Ola Foster, 25, of Oakland, saying
his family confirmed he had 'been staying
at the plaza.
Witnesses also told police that one of
two suspects in the shooting had also been .
a frequent resident at the plaza. The names
of the suspects have not been released.
Monday's raid came as no surprise to
protesters after the city issued its fourth
order to abandon the camp. About 300 offi-
cers from the Oakland Police Department
and seven other law enforcement agencies
moved in around 5:30 a.m., arresting 33
people and tearing down about 150 tents.
Another man was arrested later in the
morning for trying to break through police
barricades and spitting on officers.
Protesters vowed .to regroup- and
return. :
"I don't see how they're going to disperse
us," said -Ohad XReer, 30. of Oakland.
"There are thousands of people who are






Xj i


going to come back."
Officials declared the operation a suc-
cess, saying all arrests were peaceful and
there were no reported injuries to protest-
ers or officers. Police said those taken into
custody likely will face charges of unlawful
assembly and lodging.
"This had been a very difficult situa-
tion," Quan said. "I'd tried to do what was
right for the city and keep the most people
safe at. every step."
Not everyone in Quan's camp agreed
with the show of force.
Dan Siegel, one of the mayor's top legal
advisers, resigned over Monday's raid,
saying officials should have done more
to work with protesters before sending in
police. Siegel, a longtime friend of Quan
who worked as an unpaid adviser, has
been a vocal critic of Oakland police and
their handling of the Oct. 25 raid.
Video footage of a protest after the Oct
25 raid showed officers using flash-bang
grenades and firing beanbag rounds into
the crowd, injuring a number of people and
prompting cries of police brutality.
Marine Corps veteran Scott Olsen was
left in critical condition after suffering a
head injury during that protest His case
became a rallying cry for the Occupy Wall
Street movement around the nation.
Olsen, 24, issued his first statement
Sunday since leaving a hospital.
"You'll be hearing more from me in the
near future and soon enough we'll see you
in our streets!" he posted on his Google+
account with a photograph of himself with
a neck brace and apparent bruising around
his left eye.
Protesters in Portland had been ordered
to leave their encampment by midnight
Saturday. However, in the hours leading
to the deadline, thousands of protesters
flooded two blocks of parkland where an
Occupy encampment first appeared Oct
6.
Riot police moved into the Portland
camp shortly after noon Sunday, using
a loudspeaker to warn that anyone who
resisted risked arrest and "may also be
subject to chemical agents and impact
weapons." Demonstrat6rs chanted '"we are
a peaceful protest."
Officers used batons to shove a cluster
of protesters out of the camp and dragged
out those who resisted, including some
.Who were holed up in a makeshift fort
made of plywood, pallets, shopping carts
and other debris.
A total of 51 protesters were arrested
during the Sunday afternoon action.


Police surround an encampment as a police helicopter flies overhead at a Occupy Wall Street.
demonstration in Oakland, Calif.dn Monday. 'Police in Oakland began clearing out a weeks-old
encampment early Monday after issuing several warnings to Occupy demonstrators.


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ROM;

MN.
-------------------
..................










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


SPORTS


Tuesday. November 15. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B,


BRIEFS

YOUTH FOOTBALL
Memorial Bowl
final tonight
The 2011 champion
in the Junior Midget
League will be decided at
6 p.m. today at Memorial
Stadium. The Lake City
Panthers and Lake City
Bears will play for the
title.
The Panthers
advanced with a 12-8
semifinal win over the
Lake City Cowboys. The
Bears squeaked by the
Lake City Gators, 34-32,
in two overtimes in their
semifinal.
The Madison Lions
will play the Madison
Steelers in the Midget
championship game,
which will be in Madison.

YOUTH BASKETBALL
Travel team
fundraiser set
The Lake City
Recreation Department
and Richardson
Community Center/
Annie Mattox Park
North, Inc., is sponsoring.
two benefit basketball
games featuring women's
and men's teams from
Columbia and Suwannee
counties. The games
are at 6 p.m. (girls) and
7:30 p.m. (boys) Nov. 25
at the Lake City Middle
School gym. Admission
is $5 (children ages 6
and younger free), with
all proceeds going teo- -:-
benefit the boys USSSA
travel basketball teams.
Columbia High's girls
basketball team will staff
a concession stand.
For details, call Mario
Coppock at 754-7096.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Lake City team
seeking players
The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team
is seeking players for
the upcoming season,
and dancers for a dance
squad. Players must be
18 years old or older.
For football, call Luis
Santiago at (386)
697-6956; for dance, call
Clara at (386) 697-5249.

* From staff- reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High
soccer vs. Keystone
Heights High,. 7 ,p.m.
(girls-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball vs. Branford
High, 7 p.m. (JV-5:30)
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Lincoln High
at CYSA field, 7 p.m.
Wednesday
N Columbia High boys
soccer at Chiles High,
7 p.m. (JV-5)
Fort White High girls
basketball at St. Francis
Catholic High, 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6)
Thursday
Fort White High
boys soccer at Hamilton
County High, 6 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High girls
soccer at Mosley High,
4p.m.
Columbia High
football at St. Augustine
High in Class 6A regional
quarterfinal, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at The First
Academy in Orlando
in Class 3A regional
quarterfinal, 7:30 p.m.
Columbia High boys
soccer at Mosley High,


8 p.m.


Cross country regions


hosted at Alligator Lake


Fort White High's
girls place 1 th in
Class 2A field.
From staff reports

Alligator Lake Park in
Lake City was the site of
the, Region 1 cross country
meets for Classes 1A, 2A
and 3A on Saturday.
Fort White High's girls
team qualified for the meet
with a runner-up finish at
district The Lady Indians
placed 11th in Class 2A's
14-team field.
Running for Fort White
were: Sydni Jones, 33rd
place among team runners-
21:07.97 time in the 5K run;
,Ashley Jones, 56th-22:31.11;
Seaira Fletcher, 59th-
22:37.77; Carolee Marrow,
72nd-23:55.57; Marissa
Fletcher, 73rd-24:00.74;
Sheridan Plasencia, 78th-
24:43.35; Colby Laidig, 91st-
31:21.67.
Seaira Fletcher, Marissa
X-COUNTRY continued on 2B


COURTESY PHOTO
Sydni Jones placed 33rd to lead Fort White High's girls team
in Saturday's Region 1-2A meet at Alligator Lake Park.


Rk
I. LSU I
2. Okla. St. 2
3.Alabama 3
4. Oregon 4
5. Okla. 5
6.Arkansas 6
7. Clemson 8
8.Va.Tech 9
9. Stanford 7
10. Boise St. II
I I.Houston 10
12.S.Car. 15
13.Kan.St. 17
14. Georgia 14
15. Mich. St 12
16.Nebr. 16
17.Wise. 13
18. Michigan 18
19.TCU 21
20. So. Miss 20
21. Penn St. 19
22.Baylor. 25
23.Texas 28
24.-Auburn 32
25. Fla. St. 23


Harris
Pts
2875
2750
2620
2545
2379
2297
2024
1949
2041
1766
1792
1324
1092
1366
1471
1260
1390
896
692
699
765
145
88
16
261


Pet
1.0000
0.9565
0.9113
0.8852
0.8275
0.7990
0.7040
0.6779
0.7099
0.6143
0.6233
0.4605
0.3798
0.4751 I
0.5117
0.4383
0.4835
0.3117
0.2407
0.2431 I
0.266 I
0.0504
0.0306
0.0056
0.0908


USAToday
Pts
1475
1410
1340
1300
1228
1170
1042
1045
1024
831
927
727
501
698
791
615
745
477
392
386
361
56
27
0
189


Pct
1.0000
0.9559
0.9085
0.8814
0.8325
0.7932
0.7064
0.7085
0.6942
0.5634
0.6285
0.4929
0.3397
0.4732
0.5363
0.4169
0.5051
0.3234
0.2658
0.2617
012447
0.0380
0.0183
0.0000
0.1281


Computer
Rk Pct
tl .980
tl .980
3 .910
t4 .860
t4 .860
6 .800
8 .670
9 .640
11 .620
12 .610
13 .450
10 .630
7 .770
14 .410
18 .270
17 .290
28 .010
t19 .250
t19 .250
21 .230
23 .180
15 .320
16 .310
21 .230
29 .000


BCS
Avg
0.9933
0.9642
0.9099
0.8755
0.8400
0.7974
0.6935
0.6755
0.6747
0.5959
0.5673
0.5278
0.4965
0.4528
0.4393
0.3817
0.3329
0.2950
0.2522
0.2449
0.2303
0.1361
0.1196
0.0785
0.0730


Fort White



hoops tips



off tonight


Lady Indians
host Branford in
season-opener.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.comrn

FORT WHITE Fort
White High basketball for
the 2011-12 season gets
under way at 7 p.m. today
when the Lady Indians
host Branford High.
The junior varsity game
begins at 5:30 p.m.
Fort White's boys open
the season at 7:30 p.m.
(JV-6 p.m.) Nov. 22 at
Newberry High.
. The new district for
Fort White is 5-4A, which
returns Santa Fe High
and Williston High and
adds Bradford, Interlachen
and Keystone Heights


high schools.
DeShay Harris returns,
as head coach.
The Lady Indians got
a break when last year's,
champion, NewberryHigh,
and runner-up, Suwannee,
High, were moved to other,
districts. ,
However, Bradford was..
a district runner-up last
year and Keystone,
Heights has a powerful.
history in girls basket-,
ball. The Indians won the
state championship in1
1994-95-97 and were state
runners-up in 1977-88.
Santa Fe and Williston,,
along with Keystone,
Heights, were in the play-
offs as recently as 2009.
Fort White is coming off,
a pair of winless seasons,
HOOPS continued on 2B


State


.-"v-"'--- *^ -' -*




cha


Hannah Bums
swims to title in
100 breaststroke.
From staff reports

Columbia High's Hannah
Burns, was seeded first in
the 100 breaststroke' for
the Class 2A state meet in
Orlando, and she sealed the
deal.
Burns won the first state
championship in swimming
for Columbia with a time
of 1:04.44 in the 100 breast
She improved on her
qualifying time of 1:05.18
to hold off the field
at the Central Florida
YMCA Aquatic Center on
Saturday.
Burns almost made it two
titles. She placed second
in the 200 individual med-
ley with a time of 2:03.84.
The freshman lowered her
school record time in the
event
Kelsey Buckley of Tarpon
Springs High won state in
2:01.40.
Heather -Bilrns placed


seventh in the 200 freestyle
with a time of 1:57.44, and
10th in the 500 freestyle
with a time of 5:08.72 a
personal best
Danielle Valley of
Lakewood Ranch High won
both events, swimming
the 200 free in 1:48.17 and
the 500 free in 4:43.56.
Lindsay Lee qualified
19th in the 50 freestyle with
a time of 25.43.
Columbia's 400 free-
style relay team of Heather
Burns, Micheala Polhamus,
Lee and Hannah Burns
placed 11th with a school
record time of 3:45.85.
Chiles High won the relay
in 3:31.37.
Chiles (298.5 points)
won the 2A girls competi-
tion, followed by Suncoast
Community High (183) and
Martin County High (136).
Columbia accumulated
68 points, good for 14th in
the field represented by 51
schools.
Gainesville High won
the 2A boys with Mosley
High in second and Barron
Collier High in third.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High swimmer Hannah Burns stands atop the winner's platform for the Class 2A
100 breaststroke championship at the Central Florida YMCA Aquatic Compleoon Saturday.


Football regular


season wraps up


Indians' playoff
run starts Friday
in Orlando.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE The
season is over for five of
Fort White High's 2011
football opponents. The
other half is headed to the
playoffs.
Fort White also is
playoff bound following
its 19-10 home win over
Santa Fe High last week.
The Indians (7-3, 0-1


District 3-3A) face The
First Academy in Orlando
on Friday.
Santa Fe (8-2, 4-1 District
5-5A) plays at Pasco High.
Trinity Catholic High
(5-4, 1-0 District 3-3A)
hosts Melbourne Central
Catholic High in Friday's
first round. The Celtics lost
to District 10-5A champion
Palmetto High at home
last week, 42-20.
Union County and
Wakulla high schools are
the other Fort White foes
that won district titles.
INDIANS continued on 2B


BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES'


Ir


I










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 am.
ESPN Drexel at Rider
8 a.m.
ESPN Morehead St. at Coll. of
Charleston
10 a.m.
ESPN Kent St. at WestVirginia
Noon
ESPN Belmont at Memphis
2 p.m.
ESPN San Diego St.at Baylor
4 p.m.
ESPN Rhode Island at Texas
7 p.m.
ESPN Dukd vs. Michigan St., at
NewYork .
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Florida at Ohio St.
9 p.m.
ESPN Kentucky vs. Kansas, at New
York
10 p.m.
ESPN2 -Austin Peay at California
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Colorado at Pittsburgh
SOCCER
Noon
ESPN2 Men's national teams,
exhibition, Slovenia vs. United States, at
Ljubljana, Slovenia
WOMEN'S COLLEGE
BASKETBALL,
6 p.m.
ESPN2- Miami at Tennessee

FOOTBALL

NFL standings


New
N.Y.
Buff
Mia

How
Teni
..Jack
Indi


Pitt
Bait
Cin
Cle

Oak
San


AMERICAN CONFERENCE.
East
W L T Pct PF P
w Engand 6 3 0.66725921
.Jets 5 4 0.556 21521
alo 5 4 0 .556 229 2
mi 2 7 0'.222158 1
South
W. 'L T Pct PF P
uston 7. 3 0.700273 Ii
nessee 5 4 0.556 186 IT
sonville 3 6 0.333 115 I6
anapolis 0 10 0.000 131 31
North
S W L T Pet PF BP
sburgh 7 3. 0.70d0220 h
more' 6 3 0.667 225'1!
cinati 6 3 0 667212 I
veiand 3 6 0 .333 13 I'
,. .West .
W L.T Pct FFPA
dard 5 4. ,0.556 208,2
Diego 4 5 0.44421622


PA,
00
30
18
78
'A
66
72
166
300
'A
79
52
64
83
A
)33
28


Denver 4 5 0 .444 188 234
Kansas City 4 5 0.444 141 218
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
-P t PA


N.Y.Giants 6 "3 0 667218211
Dallas 5 4 0.556 223 182
Philadelphia ', 3 *,6 0 333 220 203
Washlningo 3 ,.6 0.333 136J78
South
W L T Pc PF. PA
New Orleaps 7 3 0.700313228
anta 5 4 0 .556 212 196 ,
Tampa Bay 4' 5 q.444 156 233'
Carolina 2 7 0.222 190237.
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Boy 8 0 01.000 275 179.
Detroit 6 3 0 .667 252 184'
Chicago 6 3 0 667237 187
Minnesota 2. 6 0.250J '199
West.,
SW L T Pt PF PA
San Francisco .8 I 0.889233 138
. Seattle 3 6 0.333 144202
Arizona 3, 6, 0.333 183.213
St. Louis 2 7 0'G.222 113 223
k Thursday's Game
Oakland 24, San Diego 17 .
Sunday's Games,.
Dallas 44, Buffalo 7 .
Denver 17, KansasCity 10
Miami 20,Washington 9 '
St. Louis 1.3, Cleveland 12
Arizona 21, Philadelphia 17
Tennessee 30j Carolina 3
Pittsburgh 24. Cincinnati 17
Houston 37, Tampa Bay 9
New Orleans 26'Atlanta 23, OT
Jacksonville 17, Indianapolis 3 "
Seattle 22, Baltimore 17
San Francisco 27 N.Y. Giants 20
Chicago 3A. Detroit 13 '..
New England 37, N.Y. Jets 16
S Monday's Game
Minnesota at Green Bay (n)
Thursday, Nov. 17
N.Y. Jets at Denver, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday; Nov. 20
Tampa Bayat Green Bay, I p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, I pm. .
Carolina at Detroit, I p.m.
Dallas atWashington, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Cleveland, I p.m.
Cincinnati at Baltimore, I p.m.-
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago 4: 5 p.m.
Tennessee at Atlanta, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 21
Kansas City at New England,.
8:30 p.m.
Open: Houston, Indianapolis, New
Orleans, Pittsburgh

College games

Today
Ball St. (6-4) at N. Illinois (7-3), 8 p.m.

BASKETBALL

700 coaching victories

Through Saturday
Coaches with 700 victories who have
spent a minimum of 10 seasons in Division
I with last school listed (x-active):
I. Bob Knight,Texas Tech 902
I. x-Mike Krzyzewski, Duke 902
3. Dean Smith, North Carolina 879
4.Adolph Rupp, Kentucky 876
5. x-Jim Boeheim, Syracuse '857
6. x-Jim Calhoun, Connecticut 856
7.Jim Phelan, Mt. St. Mary's, Md. 830
8. Eddie Sutton, San Francisco 804


9. Lefty Driesell, Georgia State
10. Lute Olson,Arizona
1I. Lou Henson, New Mexico St.
12. Henry Iba, Oklahoma State
13. Ed DiddleWestern Kentucky
14. Phog Allen, Kansas
15. John ChaneyTemple'
16. Jerry Tarkanian, Fresno State
17. Norm Stewart, Missouri
18. Ray Meyer, DePaul-
19. Don Haskins, UTEP


AUTO RACING

Kobalt Tools 500

At Phoenix International Raceway
Avondale,Ariz.
Sunday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (10) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 312 laps,
112.3 rating, 47 points, $202,233.
2. (9) Carl Edwards, ,'.rd, 312, 123.6,
43, $210,141.
3. (8) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 312,
136:2,43, $188,033.
4. (14) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 312,
107.7,40, $126,350.
5. (30) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 312,
95.6,39, $155,850.
6.'(2) A J AIImendinger, Ford, 312,
114.3,38, $136,836.
7. (7) David Reutimann, Toyota, 312,
103.7,37,$115,458.
8. (3) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 312,
104.3, 36,$114,166.
9. (11) Paul Menard, Chevrolet. 312.
87.7,35, $90,275.
10. (28) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 312,
80.8,34, $123,058.
.II. (25) Joey Logano,Toyota, 312,81.7,
33, $87,150.
,. 12. (33) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 312,
72.9,32, $121,375.
13. (29) Greg Biffle, Ford. 311, 70.8.
31, $92,075.
14. (16) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
31 I,71.5,30,$124,761.
15.(26) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
31 1;.77.5,29,$l 1,683. .
16. (4) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 311,
78.6,28, $81,150.
17. (6) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
.311,84.3,27;$107,364.
18. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 311,
89.1,27, $97,208.
19. (27). Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 311,
80.9,25, $117,036.
20. (5) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 311,
84.7,24, $80,375.
21. (31) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 311,
61.1,23, $98,645.
22 (17) Kurt Busch. Dodge. 311, 102 3.
23. $112.975
23. (18) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 311,
67.5,21, $98,439;. .. ,
S24 (22) Dale Earnhardt Jr, Chevrolet,
31f0, 57.9.20, $79,925.
25 (19) ColeWhitt,Toyoca, 310, 58.1,
0 $07;,175.
26. (38) Casey Mears, Toyota, 309, 56,
18, $70,875.i
27. (43) DaveBliney. Chevrolet, 309,.
'45.8,17, $67,925.
28. (41) JJ. Yeley, Ford, 309, 45,17,
$84,483.
29 (21) Landon Cassill.Chevrolet,309.
50 9,0, $81.758
30. 139) Mike Bliss. Ford. 308. 42.2, 0.
$80,572.
31 (42) David Gilliland, Ford, 307,38 4,
S13, $69,400. ..
32: (23) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 306,
54.8, 12, $10693:6.
33. (13) David Ragan, Ford; 298, 32.8,
I1,$75,325.
34. (1) Matt Kerseth. Ford. accident.
238.88.1. I $108,986
,35. (20) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
accident, 218,44.5,9, $65,850.
36. (34) Kyle Busch, Toyota, engine,
188,61 4. 8, $113,816.
37..(40) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet,
accident, 153, 33.1,7, $65,575.
38. (15). Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
accident. 62,28.5,6, $92,070.
39: (24) Scott Speed, Ford, electrical,


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,o .
to form four ordinary.words.


60,32.4,0, $65,325.
40. (35) Michael McDowell, Toyota.
transmission, 46, 38.9,4, $65,175.
41. (32) Joe Nemechek.Toyota, brakes,
30,34.1,0, $65,020.
42. (36) Mike Skinner, Ford, brakes, 25,
31.5,0, $64,895.
43. (37) Travis Kvapil, Ford, brakes, 20,
30.3,0, $65,274.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
112.918 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hoprs, 45 minutes,
47 seconds.
Margin ofVictory: 0.802 seconds.
Caution Flags: 8 for 30 laps.
Lead Changes: 14 among 7 drivers.

Top 12 in Points: I. C.Edwards, 2,359;
2. TStewart, 2,356; 3. K.Harvick, 2,308;
4. Bra.Keselowski, 2,294; 5. J.Johnson,
2,29 I1; 6. M.Kenseth, 2,289; 7. D.Earrhardt
Jr., 2,257; 8. Ku.Busch, 2,252;9. R.Newmah,
2,252; 10. D.Hamlin, 2,249; 11. J.Gordon,
2,247; 12. Ky.Busch, 2,224.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Sunday's Games
Philadelphia 3; Florida 2
Chicago 6, Edmonton 3
Minnesota 3,Anaheim 2
Vancouver 4, N.Y. Islanders I
Monday's Games
Philadelphia at Carolina' (n)
Buffalo at Montreal (n)
Tampa Bay at Winnipeg (n)
Todky's Games
New Jersey at Boston, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Tronto, 7 p.m
N.Y. Rangers at N.Y.,lslanders,7 p.m.
Minnesota at Columus; 7 p.m.
Colorado at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit.at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Washington at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Florida at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Qttawa at Calgary, 9 p.m.
SWednesday's Games
Carolina at Montreal, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS Cup

Sunday
Houston vs. Los Angeles, 9 p.m.

TENNIS

BNP Paribas Masters

At Palais OmnisportsdeParis-Bercy
Paris
Sunday
Singles
Championship
Roger FedErer (3). Swiczerland,def.jo-
Wilfried Tsonga (6), France, 6-1,7-6 (3).
Doubles
Championship
S Rohan Bopatina, India, and Aisam-ul-
Haq Qureshi (7), Pakistan, def. Jullen
Benneteau and Nicolas Mahut, France,
6-2 6-4.

ATP singles wins

Open Era (1968-present)
(x-active)
Jimmy Connors 109
Ivan Lendl 94
John McEnroe 77
x-Roger Federer 69
Pete Sampras 64
Bjorn Borg 63
GuillermoVilas 62
AridreAgassi 60
Ilie Nastase 57
Boris Becker 49


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

i. Nicole, shouldI l


Answer here: I I W1
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: CHURN COUPE PROMPT ZOOMED
Answer: When he was too sick to go to school, this would be
the only thing he'd be attending HOME ROOM


Braves' Kimbrel, Rays'


Hellickson top rookies


Associated Press

NEW YORK Atlanta
Braves closer Craig
Kimbrel has been chosen
the NL Rookie of the Year
in a unanimous vote and
Tampa Bay pitcher Jeremy
Hellickson has won the AL
award.


The honors were
announced Monday.
Kimbrel set a major'
league.record for saves by
a rookie with 46. The hard-
throwing righty earned all
32 first-place votes in ballot-
ing by the Baseball Writers'
Association of America.
Kimbrel easily outpointed


Braves teammate Freddie
Freeman.
Hellickson went 13-10
with a 2.95 ERA in helping
the Rays win the AL wild-
card spot He drew 17 of
28 first-place votes and fin-
ished ahead of Los Angeles
Angels first baseman Mark
Trumbo.


INDIANS: 5 opponents in playoffs


Continued From Page 11

Union County (9-0,
4-0 District 7-1A) hosts
Wildwood in the open-
ing round of the playoffs,
following an open date last
week.
Wakulla (8-2, 3-0 District
2-5A) hosts Gulf Breeze
High on Friday after tuning
up with a 35-7 home win
over Escambia High.
Taylor County High


(7-3, 2-1 District 1-4A)
beat visiting Florida High,
37-6, in last week's final
and will travel to Yulee High
for the opening round.
Hamilton County High
,(2-8, 1-2 District 5-1A) lost
at Yulee last week, 56-0.,
Fernandina Beach High
(4-6, 0-2 District 2-4A)
closed the season with a
34-14 home win over


Oakleaf High.
Rickards High (1-9, 1-2
District 2-5A) lost, 32-7, 'to
host Leon High in a match-
up of Tallahassee schools.
Newberry High previ-
ously ended its season at
2-8 and 1-3 in District 7-1A.
Independent Williston
High lost at home to
Dunnellon High, 42-28, and
closed the season at 4-6.


HOOPS: Boys' season opens Nov. 22

Continued From Page 1B


and will follow up today's
home-opener with a game
at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at
St Francis Catholic High;
' Fort White's boys were
not so lucky with its return-
ing district teams.-
Williston was district
champion last year and
Sanita Fe was runner-up.
The Red Devils made the
third round of the playoffs,
beating the Raiders in the
second round.
Among the new teams,


Bradford was a district
champion last year and
advanced to the third
round.
Keystone Heights last
made the playoffs in 2009
and Interlachen in 2008. -
Indians head coach Isiah
Phillips also coaches foot-
ball and the plan is for him
to be away quite a while
during football's playoff
run. That elso includes
returning starters Trey
Phillips, A.J. Legree and


Melton Sanders.
Fort White was 5-14 last
year. The Indians split with
Columbia High and had a
victory in ihe district tour-
nanment opening game.
Phillips said he expected
Raul Colon to be back with
the team, but is not sure of
the junior varsity; players
that may come up and any
new players.
, He has coach C:C. Wilson
working with the team until
football is finished.


X-COUNTRY: Finals in Dade City


Continued From Page 11

Fletcher, Plasencia and
Morrow ran personal best
times. :
Columbia High's Hayley
Lewis qualified otr.,.region_
as an individual in Class
3A. Lewis placed 71st with
time of 21:31.11.
Region winners (top
three teams, individual):
Class 3A boys (16.
teams) Fort Walton-
Beach High, Bartram
Trail High, Washington
High; individual-Thomas
Howell of Niceville High in
15:29.75;


ACROSS
Ostrich
look-alike
False front
Messy person
Open-wide
word
Cad's rebuke
Turn white
Ghosts
Elevator guy
Outback
maker
"Anyone
home?"
(hyph.)
Ocean fish
Noncom
Bombay
nannies
Ran after
Printed
error
Icy precip
Above, to p
bard
Diligent insect
Cleopatra's
wooer


11-15


Class 3A girls (16
teams) Chiles High,'
Creekside High, Fort
Walton Beach; individual-
Lily Williams of Chiles in
17:49.30; .
S Class 2A boys (14
teams) Bishop Kenny
High, Bolles School,
Pensacola Catholic High;
individul-Michael Barr of
Bishop Kenny in 16:08.90;
,Class 2A girls (14-
teams) Bolles,. Bishop
Kenny, Episcopal High;
individual-Kaysi Roberts
of West Florida High in


,35 Small fly
36 Move upward
38 Usher's beat
39 Double curve
40 "Wheel" buy
(2wds.)
41 Hogan dweller
44 Candy
48 Geishas'
sashes
49 Practice Zen
51 Yokel
52 Astonish
53 Call - day,
.54 Like good.
cheddar
55 Mi. above'sea
level
56 Shirt or
blouse

DOWN
1 Atlas contents
2 Honolulu's
island
3 Moby Dick
pursuer
4 Lone Star
nine


18:53.56;
Class 1A. boys (13
teams) Maclay -School,
Bishop Snyder High,
Pensacola Christian
Academy; individual-
Travis Court of Maclay in
16147.36;
Class 1A girls (12
teams). Providence
School, Maclay, St. Johns
Country Day School; indi-
vidual-Stefanie Kurgatt of
Maclay in 18:16.88. '
The FHSAA Finals are at
Little Everglades Ranich in
Dade City this Saturday.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


HOE WEDS USE
E B B-I *R 1 A
C I BBS ISEE RIA
K E YING EENY


MOREL HAWS..ER
VIED VOTE ZAP
PSI HIPS CRIB
ENABLE URlALS

A S AR INVEST

S SIR TACH NAE
D, IF= l
Sl R N1A E.


5 Rain bringer.
6 Woolen cap
7 Thread
purchases
8 Strip of
wood


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
12 13I 4 IS1 I6 7 18 1 I I


10 "Eso -"
(Anka tune)
13 Mind reader
16 Tex-Mex
snack
20 Iridescent
stone
23. -
moment's
notice
24 Chatty pet
25 Many NYC
homes
26 Ask for ID
27 Untold
centuries
28 Begin a hand
30 Horse-drawn
cabs
32 Tpk.
34 Screen
35 Economy-size
37 Halted
38 Consecrate
40 Kareem -
-Jabbar
41 Ibsen heroine
42 Snug 'as

43 Intuition
45 Minnows
46 Klemperer or
Preminger
47 Tide type
50 LGA info


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


Vv L I rctr









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DEADLINE
very Thursday, 5:00 pm


iJ UM M! ~TIE BREAKER (NFL): (scoms)
in.Spendi9g Jaguars vs Browns__

NAME
CONTEST RULES


On Tuesday selected games will be sponsored in each of the ads of the participating ADDRESS
merchants. Indicate which team you think will win by writing the team name beside the
sponsoring merchant's name in the entry blank. Entries may be mailed or dropped off at
the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055 or fax to 386-752-9400. PHONE
Entries must be received by,5:00pm on Thursday following the contest. Prize will be
awvidedi weekly on the basis of most games selected correctly. In case of a tie, the
winner will be determined by the most accurate guess on the Tie-Breaker (score AGE
required). You must be 18 years of age to enter; one entry per person. Participating
sponsors and their families, employees of the Lake City Reporter and their families are
not eligible to center.


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Rountree Moore

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This week's reader winner: Eugene Baldwin


"TIMlr~ __


LAKE CITY REPORTER









Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011 4B


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


PU
NT
/ V.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Cancer patient is stunned

by woman's tasteless joke


DEAR ABBY: I have
been battling breast cancer
and have been blessed to
have a lot of support from
family, friends and some
awesome medical provid-
ers. My husband's best
friend and his wife social-
ize with us quite often, and
the friendship is important
to him. I recently celebrat-
ed a birthday and these
friends had us over for a
belated birthday dinner.
They bought me beauti-
ful flowers and a gift. The
card attached made a joke
about my "aging breasts,"
which she found quite
funny.
Abby, I had a mastec-
tomy, which she knew
about! To make matters
worse, my hair has just
started to grow back from
the chemo, so I decided
to have some highlights
put in, and she told me
she didn't like my new
hair.
I am hurt and dumb-
founded by her insensitive
behavior. Unfortunately,
this isn't the first time
she has said things like
this. How do I tell her, I'm
offended by her rudeness
without compromising
my husband's friendship
with them?'- HARRIED
FRIEND,
DEAR HARRIED
FRIEND: You nailed it
The woman is insensitive
but you said she has also
made tasteless comments
in the past. For the sake
oi the friendship between


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
your husbands, tune her
out and spend less time
with her one-on-one. It's
OK to tell her that her joke
about your "aging breasts"
hurt your feelings in light
of your mastectomy, and
that as your hair is grow-
ing back you thought
you'd like to try something
"different." However, if you
use the word "offended"
she'll probably become
defensive, so avoid that
,word..
A final thought: Most
people are terrified of
cancer.. People some-
times try to make jokes
about things that make
them uncomfortable in
an effort, to diffuse those
feelings. This may be the
reason the woman tried
to joke about it, so don't
let it cause you to carry a
grudge.

DEAR ABBY: I have
recently reconciled with
my girlfriend of six years,
"Molly." It has been five
months since our last fall-
out and longest breakup.
While we were apart, a
woman I knew through,
rly business made it clear


that she was interested
' in me. One thing led to
another and '"Tish" and I
slept together. Now she's
pregnant.
I'm happy to be back
with Molly now, but have
been contacted recently
by Tish with proof of the
pregnancy. I'm afraid
Molly will leave me if she
knows about it She's the
woman of my dreams
and the one I want to
spend the rest of my life
with. Help, please. IT'S
COMPLICATED IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR IT'S .
COMPLICATED: I'll try.
Talk to.Molly about this 'j
and consult an attorney.
Molly should not hold
against you something
that happened while you
were separated. Whether .
the child is yours can be .'
determined by a paternity
test. If it is yours, you will
be responsible for provid- i
ing child support until he
or she is an adult and emo-
* tional support well beyond.'..
If Molly is, indeed, the
woman of your dreams,
she'll stand beside, you.
If not, you are better off
without her.
And in the future, please
use birth control, so'you
can plan the number of off-'
spring you bring into this
world.

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Do what you can to
improve your home and
domestic life financially
and emotionally. You'll face
criticism if you are too
busy pleasing outsiders
instead of the ones who
are always in your corner.
Do something nice for the
ones you love. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Short trips are high-
lighted. Engage in con-
versation that brings you
knowledge about some-
thing you want to pursue.
Getting the OK from peo-
ple you love will be easy
if you are straightforward
about the details. **** -
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Your desire for change
may not make everyone
close to you happy. Your
best bet is to inch your
way in the direction you
want withoutmaking a
big splash. Once you have
things in order you can
share your plans and your
success. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Share your feelings.
Added responsibilities can
be lifted if you are hon-
est abotit what you can
and are willing to do and
what you are not. Don't be
afraid to apply a little pres-
sure if someone gives you
a hard time. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You need a change of pace
and a change of scenery.


THE LAST WORD your future. *****
Eugenia Last' SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Work behind the
scenes. Finish your work
Make plans that will allow before you reveal what
you the freedom to.inter-, you are trying to accom-
S-act-with-peoplewho'can -.plish. It's better to surprise
contribute to some ot your ,everyone than to fall hort -.
ideas and plans for the of the expectations you
future, Love is highlighted have raised in others.
during the evening hours. -k^
CAPRICORN (Dec.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22-Jan. 19): Getting along
22): Be careful how you with others will be half
approach touchy topics the battle. Put your time w
when dealing with friends, and effort into building a
relatives or your lover, strong and stable base at ui
Kindness and compassion home emotionally, finan-
will help you get what you cially and physically. Spend
want; criticism will not. time with the people who
Expand your interests if really mean something to
it will help you share a you. ***
special moment with some- AOTTARTTT n 9i- t


one. ***.*
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Not everyone will be
on your side. Be careful
when sharing your ideas
and plans, especially with
colleagues or someone
who can make an impact
on your future. Allow a
little time for something
entertaining. It will lift
your spirits. **
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Question anyone
who is dubious. It's up
to you to ferret out any
information that you need
to know before making a
decision, especially if it has
to do with your income.-
Someone from your past
may be the ideal partner in


t1WC tUUUO UM. LkJ ... '
Feb. 18): Communication
can resolve misunder-
standings. Engage in
heartfelt communication
and you will find out where.
you stand with people in. ;'.
your personal and profes-
sional world. Diplomacy
and charm will help you
win trust as well as favors.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March
r20): Watch what you
say if you socialize. Not
everyone will share your
opinion, and you may be
judged harshly. Greater
effort put into earning, a
living or finding ways to
subsidize your income will
bring positive results as
well as praise. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 equals D
"UDG KEJC XDW CHSG JM GEN RHC AW
H YJV H XW?"
"J UHCX XE YNX H OJCF JC X-DW
NCJSWVBW." BXWSW KEAB


Previous Solution: "I think our chances are not looking great today, but the only :
way to fail for me is just not to try." Garry Kasparov
S 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-15


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


CLASSIC PEANUTS











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


Lake City Reporter




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In Print and Online
www.lalkeeityreporter.com


a Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 11-243-CA '
RONALD D. POOLE
Plaintiff,
vs.
LUCYS N. PORRO, ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER, AND AGAINST THE HERE-
IN NAME DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
Defendant,
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UN-
DER P.S. CHAPTER 45 :
NOTICE GIVEN, that in accordance
with the Default Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated November 7, 2011
in the above-styled cause, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the Columbia County Court-
house, 173 NE Hemando Ave.,.Lake
City, FL 32055 at 11a.m. on Decem-
ber 7, 2011, the following described
property: .
THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTH
1/2 OF THE SOUTH 1/2 OF THE
SOUTHWEST, 1/4. OF THE
SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION
21, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE
16 EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Dated: November 7, 2011
P. DEWitt Cason
Clerk of Court ,
By:/s/B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk ,


Legal

The North 1/2 of Lot 28, Great South
Timber: /
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST
Section 24: Commence at the SE
comer of said Section 24 and run
thence N 89*30'55" W along the
South line of said Section' 24, a dis-
tance of 1345.14 feet to the West
right-of-way line of a 40 foot wide
County graded road known as Shep-
herd Road; thence N 01"19'57". E
along the West right-of-way line of
Shepherd Road 401.48 feet to the
Point- of Beginning; thence run N
89*30'55" W 547.38 feet to the West
line of Lot 20 of Paradise South, a
subdivision as recorded in Plat Book
6, Pages 67-67A; thende run N
015'54" W along the East line of
said Lot 20 and a Northerly exten-
sion thereof, a distance of 396.03.
feet; thence run S 89*30'55" E
556.14 feet to the West right-of-way
line of Shepherd Road; thence S
02707'47" W along the West right-
of-way line of Shepherd Road, 99.65.
feet; thence run S 01'"19'57" W
along the West right-of-way line of
Shepherd Road 296.45 feet to the
point of beginning. Containing 5.01
acres more or less.' Columbia Coun-r
ty, Florida. p'
shall be 'sold by the Clerk of this
Court, at public sale, pursuant to the
Final Judgment in the above .styled
action dated November 3, 2011, at
the Columbia' County Courthouse in
Lake' City, Columbia County, Flori-
da, at 11:00 A.M., on Wednesday,
December 7, 2011, ,to the best and
highest bidder, for cash. Any person
claiming an interest in. the surplus
from the sale, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pen-
dens, must file a claim within 60


05529061 ,, days after the sale.
November 15,22,2011 WITNESS my hand and the official
IN T cCUIT COURTOF seal on the State and County afore-
said this 3rd day of Novemnber,'2011
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN P. DEWrITCASON
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY, Clerk of Court
FLORIDA .- By:/s/'S. Barry
CASE NO. 2010-CA-724 Deputy Clerk
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION, puy -,
Plaintiff, 05528936
vs. November 8, 15,2011
KARENA, HICKERSON November 8,. 201.
Defendant. NOTICE IS HEREBY, GIVEN
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE THAT PURSUANT TO a Writ of
SALE ; -. Execution issued in the County
Notice& is hereby given that the, un- Court of Baker County, Florida, on
designed, Clerk of Circuit 'Court, the 8th day of March 2011 in the
'Columbia County, Florida, will on cause wherein Country Federal Cred-
i the Ilth day of' January,' 2012, at it Union as plaintiff and' Charles.
11:00AM, at the 3rd Floor Court- Latham as Defendant, being 'case
room (1).of the Columbia County number 95-105-SPin said Court. I`
Courthouse, 173 NE Hemando Mark Hunter,' As Sheriff of Colum-'
Street, Lake City, Florida, offer for bia County, Florida, 'have this day
sale and sell at public outcry, one by levied upon all the, right, title and in-
one, to the highest bidder for cash, terest. of' the Defendant, Charles'
the property, located in, Columbia Latham in and to the following de-,
County, Florida. as follows: scribed personal property
Lot 4, N Rw 9Hpes s, ,U.4ni. a,. ,d4988 Ford F-150 PK (Gray) VIN#
according to the plat thereof, record- 1FTDF15N5JNBO9794
.ed in Plat Book 5, Page 79, Public I shall offer this property for sale De-
Records of Columbia. County, Flori- cember .16, 2011, at the Columbia
'.da., County Detention Facility located at
Together with a 1987 Mobile Home 389 NW Quentin St. LakeCity, Flor-
with ID#GBIS90019A and ida, 32055 at the hour of 10:00 A.M.,
ID#GBlS90019B' which is perma- or soon thereafter as-possible. I will
nently affixed to the lands above de- offer for sale all of the said defend-
scribed and as such is deemed to be a ants, right, title, and interest in the
fixture and part of the real estate. aforesaid personal property, at public
pursuant to the Final Judgment of auction and will sell the same, sub-
Foreclosure entered on November 2, ject to taxes, all prior liens, encum-
2011, in the above-styled- cause, branches and judgments, if any to'the
pending in said Court: highest and best bidder for CASH IN
Any person claiming an interest in HAND. The proceeds to be applied
.the surplus from the sale, if any, oth- as far as may be to the payment of
er than the property owner as of the. cost and the satisfaction of the above
date of the .lis pendens must file a described, execution.
claim within 60 days after the sale. MARK HUNTER,
P. DeWittCason, Clerki SHERIFF OF COLUMBIA COUN-
Clerk of Circuit Court TY, FLORIDA
By:/s/ B. Scippio BY: Sgt. Robert Holloway
Deputy Clerk Deputy Sheriff
'. In accordance with the American
05529079 with Disabilities Act, persons need-
November 15, 22, 2011 ing a special accommodation to par-
I IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD ticipate in this proceeding should
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN ANDrFOR contact the individual or agency
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA. sending this notice no later than sev-
'CASE NO. 08-550-CA en days prior to the proceedings at
LENVIL H. DICKS, TRUSTEE 173 'N.E. Hemando Ave, Lake City,
LENVIL H. DICKS LIVING. 'Florida 32055 Telephone (386) 758-
'TRUST A 1109.


Plaintiff, .
vs.
ROBBIN HOSTTETER. and FLOR-
IDA PEST CONTROL & CHEMI-
CAL COMPANY, a Florida corpoia-'
non,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE.
Notice of hereby given that the fol-
lowing described real property: ,
SEE SCHEDULE A -ATTACHED
HERETO
SCHEDULE A TO NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE
LENVIL H. DICKS, TRUSTEE v.
HQSTETTER.


05529074.
November 15, 22, 29,2011
*December 06, 2011


020 Lost & Found
S, Besi friend Lost
Know where he is?
Call 386-249-0164'
Seen close to 252
outside of Lakp'
City. facebook.com/chewylost


020 Lost & Found
CAT FOUND. Gray with
White Chest & Feet, Friendly,
age? On SR 252 near old CC Rd.
386-365-5099
MISSING: "Buster" Black and
White Male Boston Terrier. .Old
Country Club Rd. Please call Kelly
288-8897 Reward Available

100 Job.
100 Opportunities
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
WRITER needed
Must have experience.,
$1000. wk. 386-758-4757
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN
needed. $1,500 week.
Must have experience and tools.
386-758-4757
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Cloth Cutter: Person to cut cloth
from patterns in small sewing
company. Sewing exp. helpful.
Call Hafners 386-755-6481


Construction Engineering &
Inspection. Seeking Inspectors,
Contract Support and Compliance
Staff. CTQP Qualified.
email resumes to; ,'
SuzannaM(N)via-cs.com '


Experienced Roofers
Needed,
Please call
(850) 2714199


Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN), wanted at North
Florida Community College..
See www.nfcc.edu for details.


Sales Help at Florida Visitors
Center. Benefits, hourly wage. .
plus commission. Excellent
opportunity with National'.
company. Westgate Resorts.,
CallEd. 904-540-2314 or
Connie 386-344-0082
STYLIST NEEDED at
Southern Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info. -
Whack A -Do now hiring Stylist.
Full time/Part time Hourly pay +
commission. No Clientel needed
Contact Darlene. 386-984-6738

120 Employment _

05528667
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy.Course..
Suffered in Lake City. FLA
Certificate program.
S (904)566-1328

05529630
RN/LPN needed for infusion
center. MUST have IV
certification w/2yrs exp. PT- 3
to 4 days weekly. Fax resume
to: Attn Cheryl 386-754-3657 or
email to office manager: at
primarvcaremedic.com

05529055
Fast-paced physical therapy
center hiring a licensed-Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. Hands-on training .w/some
exp. preferred. Personal training
or fitness background a plus.
Basicknowledge of anatomy
and exercises are a MUST.
.Candidate must be. confident,
have good people skills, a great'
attitude and be'willing to learn.
Extreme motivation promotes
rapid grosw th. Send resume to:
pla7 140Shotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.


RECYCLE
YOUR
PAPER


' .
'- r


SSchools &
240 Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/28/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
2 CUTE FREE KITTENS
Boots & Mittens. One black&
white Female, one gray & white
Male, 9 weeks, 386-4384128.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free.from. intestinal and external
parasites. Manyspecies of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


Livestock &
330 Supplies


Cattle For Sale.
Bulls, Brood Cows,
Bred Heifers & Yearlings.
All gentle. 386-365-1352
WANTED: I Buy and Sell:sed
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay cash. Call 386-935-1522


407 Computers.
DELL Computer,
-$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

41 Lawn & Garden
410 Equipment
JOHN DEERE 2009 42.
Mower With 2 Bag bagger
$750.00
386-755-1002 Leave Message
TV.Radio-&
4*19 Recoiding
209' SONY,
Triniton TV.
$50.00
386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large.or small tracts. ,
Call 386-961-1961.
*Wafited Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 &'up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386-752-3648.,


430 Garage Sales.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
Never worn Wedding Dress,,
Size 10, Halter Neckline, Mermaid
cut, beaded. Other Ace. Veil,
Slips, etc. $400. 386-623-6652
USED SET (3) Danton tires.
S185/60/15
$65.00
3 8 0-94-6A7 310


450 Go tThings
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-9634138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House'in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.


630t Mobile Homes
Sfor Rent
16X80 Almost new. 10 mi S of
Lake City, off Branford Hwy. 3/2
fenced yd, Dish Washer private.
$650. mrho + sec. No Pets. 984-747


2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MIHP
386-752-6422


2/2 Units.,
October. Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2bedrm/2bth $500 mo.,Also, Res
denial RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for term
3br/2.5baS of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 md plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.coi
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-228


. Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779


.6' A Mobile Homes
OU4 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies: 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master., Garden tub. South side of'
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $72,500 623-6896
3/2 MH on 1 acre in nice sub.
paved rd. metal roof. completely
remodeled, new everything! Only
$39,500 386-249-1640
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"'Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a- dream kitcheit and more.
'Ndith'Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
4br/2ba, Long carport,
Front & back porches.
Reduced to $37,000.
'Call 386-752-4258
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps.No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl, (352)872-5566


Palm Harbor Homes
.Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To35K
800-622-2832
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or D5oubles. Must have
clear title. Call North PointHomes
(352)872-5566

650 MobileHome
650 & Land.
Nice 1620sf 3br/2ba DW on 4
wooded acres, owner finance avail.
$119,900 Brenda Forrester,
Forrester Realty 352-339-6069
Owner Finance, 3/2, on 2.5 acres,
Mayo area, small down/$675 mo,
w 386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com


.710 Unfurnished Apt
REPORTER Classifieds orRent'

In Print and On Line all utilities included.
wwwakClotecmse '(727o the VA.15-2207
WWWJ~kchtredkerCom (727)415-2207


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confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


I I __


Classified Department: 755-5440


I.


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6-lA











LAKE CITY.REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


710 Unfurnished Apt. 730 Unfurnished
UFor Rent i Home For Rent


05528965
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1,2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $99.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex,w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Move It Madness. 2/1, 2/L5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move'in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining; living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, lg 2 br Apt.;
Close to town
$485 mo + $485 dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $99. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts:com


SPACIOUS 3BR/2BA in
Gatorwood S/D. Washer/dryer
hook up, clean. $650. 1st, last +
security. 386-867-9231
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move.in-$99. -Spacious bedroom
washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Move In Madness! $99. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 cl. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com

7 0 Furnished Apts.
2v For Rent
Rooms for.Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $ 150. weekly
386-752-5808

n730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2br/lba Brick Duplex. Water, lawn
.care &garbage pickup incl. Near
High School $595 mo plus dep.
386-752-0118 or 623-1698


Corial Homes
by Arthur Rulenberg
.:1' ';!'.ir .l : H .iTi LI .:~~1 I- '
1"s~e 4'm r


3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, corner of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
/ TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
Bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553
3br/2ba nice home fine
neighborhood. $875.mo..3br/2ba
bonus room. Fine home, newer
neighborhood. $995. mo..Security
deposit and application req'd.
386-935-1482 or 386-269-0150
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1100. mo.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
DWMH 3BR/2BA on
40 ac. near CR 18 & 131.
$750. mo.
Call 386-916-6734
For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.
home brick, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083
For lease-Lakewood sub. LG
brick, 2600 sq. ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lglot by Lake Jeffrey. $1275.m
+last+sec. Bruce 386-365-3865

75O Business &
Office Rentals
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000.sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or. oe 386-935-2832.

770 Condos For Rent


2BR/2BA, all appliances,
water/sewer, basic cable,
pool & tennis cts.
$1150/mo, call 386-344-0433

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race; color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or'any intention to make
such preference, limitation or.
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women'and
people securing custody. of chil-
Sdren under the age of'18. This
newspaper will not knowingly .
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is-in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the tQll free
telephone number to the hearing
'impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


227 Beliflowe Drive
'Modd Homw:
Open Daily 12-5pm
SaL: 10-4 Sun: l-4pa
Call ryan Zecher'
(386) 752-8653


820 Farms &
82 Acreage


$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
12 acres+/-, Northwest comer oq
CR-18 and 81st Ave. Asking Price
$745,000. Call (801) 715-9162 for
more information
4.1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com.
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad rurfs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-editlon.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price..
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.



c S


2001 Pontiac
Grand Am
Cold A/C, great gas
mileage, 4 new tires,
low mile engine. Looks
and runs great.
$3,500 OBO
Call
386-965-1600


810 Home for Sale
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 $129,000 Call Paula
Lawrence. 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate
COUNTRY CLOSE 3/2 brick, 3
acres, pole barn, workshop, fruit
trees. $129,900 #78096
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
HUD HOME 4.77 ac, near
G'ville. 3/2, as is $95,500 Call
Robin Williams 365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com 091-
434983 Hallmark Real Estate
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large
oaks, wood floors, -fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba./
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25.
fenced ac.,Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896
SHORT SALE 3/2, Built 2007,
wood floors,Game room.
REDUCED! Call Ginger Parker
386-365-2135
HallImark Real Estate


1986 Chevy
Monte Carlo SS
Maroon on maroon,
one owner, non-smoker,.
84,000 orig. mi., never'
wrecked, solid body.
$10,000 OBO
Call
904-718-6747


Announcements

Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over
100 Papers throughout Florida for one LOW
RATE! Call (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-
classifieds.com

Autos.Wanted

CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year.
We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car
or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer:
(888)420-3807

Business Opportunities


6 FIGURE INCOME 100,000 RX Discount
Cards Placed in 80 Pharmacy Locations @.03
each. You earn $1.50 for each new prescription
& $.75 for refills. Accumulating residual income.
(877)308-7959 Ext.231 www.freerxadvantage.com


Education


ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend
college 100% online. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.
CenturaOnline.com

Financial Services

$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free:
(800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com


Help Wanted *


Need 13 Good Drivers Top 5% Pay & 401K 2
Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782
www.meltontruck.com

Drivers:' Run GA, AL, MS, TN & FL HOME
WEEKENDS, Earn Up to 390/mi, 1 yr OTR
Flatbed exp. Call: SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC
(800)572-5489 ext. 227

Driver Refrigerated lanes with lots of miles,
hometime choices, daily pay and single source
dispatch. Modem equipment! CDL-A, 3 months
recent experience required. (800)414-9569. www.
driveknight.com

Land For Sale

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY!! 1 waterfront
& 4 lake access lots, $84,400. Gated lake community
near Athens, GA. Excellent schools. Financing'


KIW

2003 Allegro 30 DA
Workhorse Chassis
.Only 18,000 miles, garage
kept motorhbme. Excellent
condition w/many extras.
$45,000
Call
386-754-5660


,available. Call the Bank Direct. (888)308-6729.

Pre-Grand Opening Sale! Sat. November
19th Only. 6.34 acres w/ direct lake frontage
only $29,900! Brand new, never before offered!
Gorgeous wooded setting with deep water frontage
on spectacular lake. Paved rds;power, phone, mucd1
more. Unheard of prices excellent financing. Hurry
out for 1st pick! Call now (866)952-5302,'x 71


Miscellaneous

SAWMILLS from only $3997- MAKE MONEY
& SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship.
FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com
(800)578-1363 Ext.300N

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance. Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-
5165 www.CenturaOnline.com

AIRLINES ARE' HIRING Train for hands on
Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved
.program. Financial aid if qualified Housing
available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance
(866)314-3769

FREE S&H FLORIDA CITRUS: 201b. Gift
Pack Only $34.95. Navel Oranges or Ruby Reds.
www.box-o-fruit.coih Text "oranges" to 72727 to
win!


Real Estate


BANK ORDERED AUCTION 174 Bank
Owned Assets AL, GA, NC & TN. December
6th, 7th & 8th Homes, Acreage, Residential Lots
& Commercial Properties (800)323-8388 or
RowellAuctions.com

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Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week
accelerated program. Hands on environment.
Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement
Assistance! (877)359-1690




ANF

ADvER1IIrNG NEIWOPI S OF FLORIDA

Classifie Display I Me o Daily



SWeek of November 14, 2011


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
FSBO, Ten acres, partially wood-
ed. 41 South, 1/2 mile off Cather-
ine Rd., fully fenced, power acces-
sible. $38,000 386-344-0504

Q83 Commercial
OJv Property
MOBILE HOME PARK with 1g.
brick owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84 Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
870 Real Estate
70 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

~951 Recreational
95 Vehicles
1973 Air Stream Land Yacht.
31 ft. New carpet and vinyl.
Great Shape. Reduce to
$4,500 obo. (386)292-9341
2003 Allegro 30DA. Workhorse
Chassis. 18000 miles, garage kept.
Excellent cond. w/many extras
$45,000. 386-754-5660
AIJO SKYLINE.
2 axle camper travel trailer.
19 ft. $400.
386-292-4169


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.
own ^^^^^^


andd s c



ADVERTISE YOUR


GARAGE SALE

WITH THE
LAKE CITY REPORTER.

Only






4.TINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS!



(386) 755,-5440


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