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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01696
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 11, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01696
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








HIToITT 326


Reporter


Friday, November I I, 201 1www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 246 E 75 cents


J, Mo I I leW Wv MLKRn jLaKe n Cly rweporte[r
Veterans share stories after a Veterans Day service Thursday'at the Robert H. Jenkins, Jr. Veterans' Domiciliary Home of Florida. Pictured are Coleman
Tyson (from left), 67, Vietnam (Navy); Pearl Harbor survivor James Campbell, 90, WWII (Army); Keith Keene, 43, Persian Gulf (Army).; and Dan Blocker, 79,
Korean War (Navy).





4 FACES OF FREEDOM


Service to the land they love is common bond


Four men from different eras of American his-
tory, but with one thing in common. When their',
country needed them they were there. In honor of
Veterans Day, staff writer Laura Hampson spoke ,
with them during a recent visit to the Robert
H. Jenkins Jr Veterans' Domiciliary Home of
Florida here in Lake City.


James M. Campbell,.90, of
Savannah; World War II, Army
Pearl Harbor survivor

James .M. Campbell joined the Army at 17
years old. On the morning of Dec. 7, 1941 he
was 20, and working on underground cables
at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii.
All the fighter planes were out of their
hiding places, lined up about three feet
from where Campbell and three others were
working.: When the Japanese attacked, they
destroyed all the planes. He said the first
explosion was right over their heads and sent
them diving down into the hole.
"It was a beautiful Sunday morning," he
said, "No one was expecting something like
that."
"Between the first and second wave we
managed to get out and get our weapons," he
said. But they were always kept locked up.
"We had a heck of a time finding the keys
to get them out," Campbell said.
Being in the manhole at the time of the
attack saved his life, he said.
Campbell was raised on Fort Screven, on
Tybee Island, Ga., his father having served
on the Mexican border and in France during


LAURA H. mrPS ,LounjLKe iy Repurtei
Congressman Ander Crenshaw shakes hands
with Oscar Boykin, 82,. while Mike Prendergast,
executive director for the Florida Department of
Veteran Affairs, looks on. Boykin and other vet-
erans were given certificates and recognized
Thursday at a Veterans.Day event at the Robert
H. Jenkins Jr. Veterans' Domiciliary Home of
Florida.
World War II. His father's service was the
reason he joined the Army, he said.
Campbell has gone back to Pearl Harbor
several times. He was most recently there for
the 50th anniversary of the attack. Campbell
said he will not go this year for the 70th anni-


versary this year. "I don't think I'll be alive,"
-he said. ..
A member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors
Association, he said the group recently voted
to dissolve at the end of the year. "We are all
just about gone. There's not enough living to
support a national organization," he said.
The regional, chapters will to continue
on as long as there are still members. The
group's executive board voted to transfer the
association's financial and historical assets
to the National Park Service, who Campbell
said he trusts to keep Pearl Harbor's history
alive. '
"Most of us don't talk about it. It's just his-
tory now. It brings up too many memories,"
Campbell said. .
Campbell was medically discharged from
the Army on Aug 9, 1943 and went into the
U.S. Merchant Marines until 1958.
He said he came out of the service an
alcoholic and had a hard time holding a
job. Dealing with the scarring memories of
his experiences made him turn to alcohol.
He straightened his life out, quitting drink-
ing and smoking, when he married his first
wife, Maryellen Campbell. "I give her all the
credit," he said.
Campbell outlived Maryellen; his second
wife, Eleanor; and third wife Ormadean, the
mother of his four children. Campbell has
grandchildren and great grandchildren, but
he can't give a count.
Campbell said the best way to honor vet-
erans is to never forgot what they endured.
"You'd be surprised how many people don't
know about it," he said of Pearl Harbor.
FACES continued on 3A


Woman

charged

in hit-run

Left motorcyclist
seriously injured in
Suwannee, says FHP

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
A Live Oak woman faces
multiple charges after inves-
tigators said she rear-ended
a motorcycle on U.S. 90 in
Suwannee County early
Thursday morning and left
the accident scene with
the motorcycle driver lying
unconscious on the side'of
the road..,
motorcy-
cle driver,
Ro yce
Pittman, 52,
of Live Oak,
was thrown
99 feet from
the collision, Quinn
police said.
Pittman
regained consciousness
long enough to get a brief
glimpse of the vehicle that
struck him at 12:58 a.m.
He told police he saw what
appeared to be a pickup
truck drive away after the
accident
Investigators said Pittman
was initially taken to Shands
Live Oak before he was
transported to Shands UE
He is listed in stable condi-
tion and is being treated
for head and back injuries,
said Al Hughes, a Florida
Highway Patrol trooper.
"He would be dead right
now if he didn't wear a hel-
met," Hughes said.
While Pittman was being
treated for injuries, Rebecca
Lynn Quinn, 50, was stopped
on Lake Jeffrey Road by a
Columbia County deputy at
2:05 a.m., a little more than
a hour after the accident
in Suwannee County. She
was driving a 1972 Ford
Ranchero when she was
pulled over for a burned out
headlight violation, investi-
gators said.
She was charged with.
driving while, intoxicated
and an open container
violation by the Columbia
County deputy.
When the deputy looked
closer at the front of Quinn's
vehicle, he noticed damage
that was consistent with a
collision. Shortly after the
wreck in Suwannee County,
police issued an alert to be
on the lookout for a pickup
truck with front-end dam-
age.
The deputy contacted
the Florida State Patrol and
described the damage on
Quinn's vehicle. A trooper
went to Columbia County
and found evidence that led
CHARGED continued on 5A


Penn State shaken by firing


By GENARO C. ARMAS
Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. After
nearly a half-century .on the job, Joe
Paterno says he is still getting used
to the idea of not being Penn State's
football coach. So is the rest of the
shaken campus, after one of the most
tumultuous days in its history.
In less than 24 hours Wednesday,
the winningest coach in major college
football announced his retirement at
the end of the season then was
abruptly fired by the board of trust-
ees.
Also ousted was Penn State
President Graham Spanier one of


the longest-serving college presidents
in the nation as the university's
board of trustees tried to limit the
damage to the school's reputation
from a child sex abuse scandal involv-
ing one of Paterno's former assistant
coaches.
Paterno's firing sent angry students
into the streets, where they shouted
support for the 84-year-old coach and
tipped over a news van.
In less than a week since former
assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was
charged with sexually assaulting
eight boys over a 15-year period, the
scandal has claimed Penn' State's sto-
ried coach, its president, its athletic
director and a vice president.


"Right now, I'm not the football
coach. And I've got to get used to that
After 61 years, I've got to get used to
it," Paterno said outside his house
late Wednesday night. "Let me think
it through."
Paterno had wanted to finish out
his 46th season Saturday's game
against Nebraska is the last at home
- but the board of trustees was clear-
ly fed up with the scandal's fallout.
"In our view, we thought change
now was necessary," board vice chair-
man John Surma said at a packed news
conference where he announced the
unanimous decision to oust Paterno
and Spanier.
FIRING continued on 5A


Penn State students flip a television news van during a riot
after it was announced that Joe Paterno would no longer be
head coach of Penn State Football on Wednesday.


SCALL US: O f % Opinion ................ 4A
(386)752-1293 -, 6 3 5 1 People..................2A
SUBSCRIBE TO Obituaries ..............5A
THE REPORTER: Sunny
Voice: 755-5445 WEATHERAdvce & omics ......... 3
S84264 00020 1 Fax: 752-9400 WEATHE 2A Puzzles .................2B


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE SATURDAY
Billy Crystal Veterans Day
hosts Oscars. coverage.


I ~ I I )








2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011


.FLORIDAA
' O2i Wednesday:
1 r9-16-29-44-48-51
x5


,AH 3. Thursday:
i Afternoon: 2-0-1


ka 4.) Thursday: 1 .
Afternoon: 4-6-8-7


Wednesday;
2-5-15-29-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Hall of Famers: HotWheels, blanket


ROCHESTER, N.Y
Is Linus jumping for joy?
The blanket, an all-purpose
plaything and a comfort for
generations of thumb-suckers
like Charlie Brown's best
friend in the "Peanuts" comic strip,
landed Thursday in the National Toy
Hall of Fame along with Hot Wheels
and the dollhouse.
The three take their places at The
Strong, a children's and cultural his-.
tpry museum in upstate New York,
alongside 46 other classics ranging
from the bicycle, kite and teddy bear
to Barbie, Jack-in-the-Box and Mr.
Potato Head.
Curators said the blanket was a,
special addition in the spirit of two
earlier inductees, the cardboard box
and the stick. They praised its abil-
ity to serve either as recreational
raw material or an accessory trans-
formed in myriad ways by a child's
daydreams. .
"Every now and again we like to
shake things up, remind folks there's
play experiences that happen purely.
creatively ... rather than coming with
rules, a path, a backstory you feel::
Constrained into," said Christopher
Bensch, the Rochester museum's
chief curator.

Crystal takes over
Oscar hosting honors,
LOS ANGELES Billy Crystal is
doing it again.
- The 63-year-old comedian and
-eteran Oscar host said Thursday on
Twitter that he is hosting the Feb.
26, 2012, Academy Awards "so the
young woman in the pharmacy will.
Stop asking my name when I pick up
my prescriptions."
"Some of the best moments of my
career have happened on the Oscar
stage,',' said Crystal in a later state-


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Hot Wheels is introduced into the National Toy Hall of Fame on Thursday. The
blanket and the dollhouse also landed in the hall of fame .


ment from the Academy of Motion
Picture Arts anrd Sciences. "I am
thrilled to be back there." .
'Academy president Tom Sherak
added: "I'm thrilled to welcome
Billy back to the Oscar stage. He's a
.comic legend and Oscar icon, and it
feels good to have him back where
he belongs."

Prince William will
deploy to the Falklands
LONDON Prince William will
be deployed to the politically sensitive
Falkland Islands next year as an air
force search and rescue pilot, Britain's
defense ministry said Thursday.
The second in line to the British
throne will spend six weeks in
February and March at the British ,
outpost 290 miles (460 kilometers) ,
east of Argentina's coast in the Atlantic
Ocean, the Defense Ministry said.


He will be part of crew of four
Royal Air Force personnel on the
deployment The prince, known in the
military as Flight Lt William Wales, '
is an RAF helicopter
pilot, currently based
in Wales.
The defense mini-
try said William, 29,
would not undertake
any ceremonial royal
duties during the
deployment
His wife Kate, Prince William
Duchess of
Cambridge, will
remain in Britain.
Britain has ruled the Falklands for
more.than 180 years, but Argentina
claims sovereignty over the islands
it calls Las Malvinas. Next year is a
sensitive time the 30th anniver-
sary of the Falklands War.
.(AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Comedian Jonathan
Winters is 86.
Author Carlos Fuentes
is 83.
Actress Bibi Andersson
is 76.
Golfer Fuzzy Zoeller
is 60.
Singer Marshall
Crenshaw is 58.
Rock singer Dave Alvin
is 56.


Rock musician Ian
Craig Marsh (Human
League; Heaven 17) is 55.
Actor Stanley Tucci is 51.
Actress Demi Moore
is 49.
Actress Calista
Flockhart is 47.
Actor Leonardo
DiCaprio is 37.
m Actress Christa B.
AlUen is 20.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 742-1293
Fax number ,..............752-9400
Circulation ........ ...755-5445.
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com '
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of.
Community Newspapers. Inc., is pub-'
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
'All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or
:.in part Is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
: POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City; Fla.32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecltyreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS.
Controller Sue Brannon... .7544419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
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should ,be completed by 630 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Pjease call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County customers should
call before 10.'0 a.m; to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
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vice related credits will be issued.
In all otherfcourntles where home delivery
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vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
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Rates indude 7% sales tax
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12 Weeks............... .$41.40
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52 Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORIDA


THE WEATHER


Cain tops Romney
in Forida poll
TALLAHASSEE-
Florida Republicans prefer
Herman Cain over Mitt
Romney in the presidential
primary, but Romney does
better in a matchup with
President Barack Obama.
That's according to a
Quinnipiac University poll
released Thursday. Cain
received 27 percent sup- -
port, followed by Romney
with 21 percent and Newt
Gingrich with 17 percent.
The margin of error was
plus or minus 4.3 percent.
Overall, 45 percent of
voters said they would
vote for Romney and
42 percent for Obama.
Obama polled slightly
better than Cain or
Gingrich. The margin of
error was plus or minus
2.9 percent.
, And 52 percent of vot-
ers said they disapprove
of the job Obama is doing
and 41 percent approve..
Gov. Rick Scott's num-
bers were also bad only
36 percent approve of his
performance while 50 per-
cent disapprove.



cemetery discovered
WEST PALM BEACH
- Archaeologists have
discovered what they
believe to be a slave cem-,
dtery at a 19th-century
plantation in Jacksonville.
The discovery at the
Kingsley Plantation was
made last year but finally
announced Thursday
after conducting addition-
41 research and making
contact with descendants
6f the slaves.
SSix gravesites have
been found and dated to
the time period of the cot-
ton plantation.
' No decision has yet
lieen made whether to
mark the site; which is a
national park, or to have
further excavations.


~J~.1


- DAY


ASOOUCIATI CD PRE
Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain speaks
Wednesday during a debate at Oakland University in Michigan.


No black bear
hunting planned
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida black bears may
become hunting targets
in the future, but not
now.Hunting would.
continue to be banned
under a proposed black
bear management plan
released Thursday by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission..
The panel's executive
director, Nick Wiley, says
that doesn't'mean that
hunting couldn't be consid-
ered in the future.
The commission now
will seek public comment
before taking final action
next year. The management
plan is in response to the
commission's prior recom-
mendation that black bears
be-taken off Florida's threat-
ened species list
The bear population
dropped to an estimated
500 in the 1950s, but it has
since rebounded. Wildlife
officials now estimate
Florida has between 2,500
and 3,000 black bears.

Jury awards $100M
hi priest abuse case
MIAMI A Miami jury
returned a $100 million
verdict Thursday against
a retired Roman Catholic
priest accused of sexually


abusing dozens of boys
over many years an
amount unlikely to ever
be collected, but one a vic-
tim's attorney said sends
a strong message to child
predators.
"It sets a standard," said
attorney Jeff Herman,
who represented Andres
Sousana in the case
against the priest, Neil
Doherty. "Now we know
what a jury thinks about
these cases. No. 2, it sends
a message that we hope
will protect other child:
dren."

Man nearly drowns
in escape attempt
FORT LAUDERDALE -
A man in a courtroopi for
a hearing on drug charges
almost drowned when
he ran out of the build-
ing and jumped into Fort
Lauderdale's New River in
an attempt to get away.
The Fort Lauderdale Sun
Sentinel reports 45-year-old
Ryan McKenzie overheard
a U.S. Border Patrol agent
inquiring about him.
Fort Lauderdale police
spokesman Travis Mandell
says McKenzie was able to
swim across the river, which
flows behind the Broward
County Courthouse. He
became distressed and
wasn't able to get out on the
other side.
(AP)'


SUNNY MOSTLY MOSTLY
'SUNNY -SUNNY


H1I72L04 H178L051 H1i82L054


,:;" "' .... **';'., -"'- fit- fcW ^

Tallahassee Lake City,
63/30 06/31
hPensacola Gainesville
66/62 Panama City 2/33
63/43 5 Ocala
63/35


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
| Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday .
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


Jacksnde
62/42

Daytona Beach
6V 49
0


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Kev Wesf


S OrandoCapi, Canavel '
/ 66/45 65/55 Lake City
Miami
Tana Naples
, 67/40/ West Palm Bacl Ocala
72/61 Orlando
*\ Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft. Myers 75/63 Pensacola
70/49 Naples Tallahassee
S' 2/55 M(ani Tampa
'Ke t* " 74/64 Valdosta
K73ey W. Palm Beach
"' 73/66-0 " '". ... .


79
47
*76
52
87 In 1942
30 in 1913

0.00".
0.03"
31.30"
0,70"
44.33"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset torn.
MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tornm.
Moonset tornm.


6:52 a.m.
5:36 p.m.
6:53 a.m.
5:36 p.m.

6:11 p.m.
7:34 a.m.
6:59 p.m:
8:27 a.m.


3000
Nov. Nov. Dec. Dec.
18 25 2 10
Last New First Full


v ..


On this date in
1911, Oklahoma
established a re
high of 83 degre
and record low c
17 degrees the
same day. In soL
eastern Kansas,
the temperature
at Independence
plunged from 83
degrees to 33
degrees in just c
hour.


5


Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


Saturday
72,'60./s
71/57/s
77/66/pc
79/58/s
72/44/s
68/49/s
77/70/pc
72/44/s
77/66/pc
77/60/pc
73/49/s
75/58/s
69/53/s
71/54/s
69/42/s
77/57/s .
69/42/s
75/68/pc


Sunday
77/63/s
78/62/s
81/70/s
83/62/s
78/52/s
75/56/s
80/74/pc
78/51/s
81/70/pc
83/65/s
79/54/s
80/61/s
75/59/pc
74/57/pc
77/49/pc
81/60/s
75/49/pc
79/71/pc


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Phannal


for the area on ullu
a scale from 0 I
to 10+

'weather.com

yad Forecasts, data and
graphics 0 2011 Weather
erIYV central, Lp Madiso, Wis.
Weather www.weatherpublisher.com





e s ord

uth-



Dne


Daily Scripture
"God's voice thunders in mar-
velous ways; he does great
things beyond our understand-
ing. He says to the snow, 'Fall
on the earth,' and to the rain
shower, 'Be a mighty down-
pour."
Job 37:5-6

Lake City Reporter


mMMOfiRoMIN~


. I .-~


------ _-----~ I- I ~-


112 STURAY


imlEUE


LMANAO'5'4!


I


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011 3A


Dan H. Blocker, 79,
of Chipley
Korean War, Navy

At 19 years old, Dan H.
Blocker saw joining the Navy
as a great adventure. At that
age you don't think of danger
or even think of your service
as important, Blocker said. "It
was just a new experience."
Blocker was in the National
Guard beforejoiningthe Navy.
He served aboard the USS
Maddox, a destroyer. ."My
duty aboard the Maddox was
a great experience," he said.
As a yeoman second class he
took care of ship's records.
.i've really been rewarded
far more than any sacrifice on-
: my part," he said.
If there are any heroes in
our family, its my mother, he
said. During the Depression
she raised three sons on her
own and watched them all
go to war. She was left alone.
Blocker said he sent her all
the money he earned, which
bought her her first home.
Bldcker's oldest brother,
Robert Blocker, was in the
Army Air Forces. He was shot
down in the Pacific during.
World War II.
"I remember the day she
got the telegram about my
oldest brother. She turned
down his picture on. the table.'
.That probably was my sad-
dest moment," said Blocker,
who was 12 at the time.
His middle brother ,Glenn
was first to join the Navy. Only
year apart; Dan Blocker said
they were like twins.
S Blocker said he has never
asked his brother' why he
joined the Navy "I know why
I went, because he went,"
Blocker- said, Glenn, who
lives in Tallahassee,. still acts
like he's 50, Blocker said.
After the war he only ..
talked about his.experience
with other ex-military people.
When he came home from
the- war, he just picked up-
with his regular life. 'I never'
had any experiences that
would scar me," he sad. Tm-
grateful for that"
Blocker attended the
University of California- on
the G.L Bill and taught mid-
dle school, high school and
community college. He also
worked in textbook publish-

Diagnosed with cancer-10
years ago, Blocker was treat-
edby VA hospitals.
I Blocker said the best way
to honor veterans is to keep
America strong and support
the military, A strong military
will ensure the America is,
protected,.,he said.'"I woul-
hate to think that my brother
died for nothing."

Coleman Tyson, 67,
of Rhode Island
Vietnam War, Navy


At 20 Coleman Tysonwas
drafted by the Army but didn't
wantto go.
Being a soldier meant walk-
ing, running, lying in dirt with
heavy equipment on your
back, he said. He was scored,
too. Luckily, he said, a friend,
who was a Navy recruiter,
steered him in that direction.
For about three years
Tyson was an engineer on
the Albany, a light cruiser.
He was also on-the English, a
destroyer.
When he first got on the
ship, he didn't immediately
have a job, Tyson said. So
he found a place to take a
nap. "I did not.realize I was
right under where the rockets
launch," he said.
DuringtheVietnamWarhis
shipwas in the Mediterranean
Sea. "If you ever want to tryto
learn a language and fail at it,
Greek is the language to go
for," he said.
Tyson said he was on a
ship that took three, two-week
cruises with reserve sailors
out of Jacksonville. He saw


his wife and children stand-
ing on the dock every two
weeks, but wasn't allowed to
leave the ship to visit them,
he said.
In 1966 a plane flying over
the Mediterranean Sea lost
an atomic bomb in-an acci-
dent. Tyson was on the ship
that found and retrieved the


bomb.
While in high school Tyson
started a janitorial service
business for private homes,
office buildings and new
construction. He continued
the business after the navy
and had 13 employees at one
time.
Tyson said Americans
should think about and
respect veterans all year long
as a tribute to those who died
fighting. "'These are just the
guys that made it home."

Keith Keene, 43, of
Gainesville
GulfWar, Army


FACES: Proudly served

Continued From Page 1A


For Keith Keene, the Gulf Lrst lVu"Ioou like stickls
Waris stillbeingfought When but there aren't sticks in the
he closes his eyes, he sees the desert, he said.
haunting images of war. The "It's just the raw power of
night terrors wake him up in the weaponry that man canI
a pool of sweat, screaming build; You feel the ,ground
or crying. The backfire of a shake from not only the weap-
car still makes him hit the ons but the bombs going off,"
ground, he said. he said. Ifs exciting and scary
Keene has suffered from at the same time.
Post Traumatic Stress He said he still remembers
Disorder since his four years the heat from the hundreds
of war. 'Tm scared to go to of burning oil wells. Soot anrd
bed," he said, oil constantly rained down on
Keene-was mechanic in the Keene and the other soldiers.
89th Military Police Brigade. It f if wasn't someone live
was his responsibility to keep firingatusitwasboobytraps."
56 vehicles up and running to He said Saddam Hussein's
make sure troopss were.:not. forced army of merchants and
,sitting ducks for the enemy, farmers were afraid to, ur-
,he said.
he"Soliderirstmechanicsec- render to American troops,
Soderfstmechanic sec- because they knew Hussein
ond," he said. would kill their families. '1
An Air Force brat. Keene doi't know what happened to
said he grew up on bases in them men but I cried about
the Philippines and Germany. them many nights.", Even
Keene's father was in the Air though they weremy enemy
Force and his brother served they were sfil men, he sid.
too.they were still men, he said.
too. Keene said'his best friend,



Orace ilarbor HinistPies

Would like to thank everyone who
came out, encouraged, contributed
to, prayedfor, andparticipated in
this year's 10th Annual Hallelujah
Festival. JVhat you.have done
will not be forgotten. You will
be blessed in your work for the
Kingdom of God! .


Rachel
Mae


Alexander

November 11, 1937-
May 22, 2006

Wife, mother and
grandmother


Remembering her and
the love she gave and
the precious Imoments
she left with us.
We go on with the
knowledge that one day
we will all be together,-
in Heaven, with our
Lord and Saviour


Keene said he was part of
the ground troops that would
go in first and clear the area
to make sure it was safe for
the rear. '"It was very stressful
because they are always on
the go."
He received his first com-
bat patch during Operation
Just Cause. His group went
into Kuwait right after Desert
Shield, "there was thousands
of aircraft in front of us, just
blowing everything to bits,"
Keene said.
He rode with the platoons
and if a vehicle was damaged
he either towed it away or
removed sensitive materials
and destroyed the vehicle.
Images of the war still
haunt Keene. He witnessed
"smoldering bodies that were
alive just seconds before."
He said he saw arms stick-
inrg nut of the ground. that at


Richard Christen Avey, died
on the desert battlefield
AfterthewarKeenereceived
an Army Achievement Medal
and two Bronze Stars Medals.
He is the only mechanic ever
giventhemilitarypolice'shigh-
est award, a Commandants
Award.
The severe anxiety and
health issues from PTSD
have left Kenne unable to
work. To prove his PTSD is
combat related, Keene said
he has filled out mountains
of paperwork, but still does
not receive enough in VA ben-
efits to afford a place of his
own. Although he may not
have lost a limb, this PSTD
is. a battlefield injury just the


same, he said.
Keene said his hands and
face swell up in the morning,
one of the symptoms of Gulf,
War syndrome, unexplained
illnesses many Gulf veterans
experience.
In May, Keene said, his
house in Palatka burnt down.
His mother, Diane Floyd, died
in the fire, although he tried to
save her. In June, Keene was
in a car accident that broke his
neck, shattered his shoulder
and injured his leg. His hospi-
tal case manager found his a
spot at the Robert H. Jenkins
Jr. Veterans Domiciliary Home
of Florida, where Keene has
lived for three months. "If it
wasn't for the domicilary, I


NOTICE OF LAND USE CHANGE

The City Council of the City of Lake City, Florida'proposes to regulate use of land within the area as
shown on the map below by amending the Future Land Use Plan Map of the City of Lake City
Comprehensive Plan, hereinafter referred to as the Comprehensive Plan, as follows:
CPA 11-04, an application by Letha Waters, as agent for Arthur W. Coward, to amend the Future Land
Use Plan Map of the Comprehensive Plan by changing the future land use classification from COUNTY
COMMERCIAL, HIGHWAY INTERCHANGE to CITY COMMERCIAL on property described, as
follows:
A parcel of land lying within Section 34, Township 3 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Begin at the Northwest-corner of the
Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 34; thence South 89'04'51" East, along the North
line, of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 34, a distance of 422.40 feet; thence
South 0650'09" West 480.67 feet to the North right-of-way line Qf U.S. Highway 90 (State Road 10);
thence North 06352'56" West, along the North right-of-way line of said U.S. Highway 9Q (State Road
10) a distance of 445.70 feet; thence North 06049'04" East 289.80 feet to the North line of,the ,
Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 34 and the Point of Beginning,


. Containing 3:68 acres, more or less.
t


AND
A parcel of land lying within Section 34, Township 3 South, Range 16 East, Columbia County,
Florida. Being more particularly described, as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the
Southwest 1/4 of said Section 34; thence North 89004'51" West, along the-North line of the Southwest
1/4 of said Section 34, a distance 353.93 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence South 0711'32" West
403.14 feet; thence North 62046'02" West 30.00 feet; thence South 07*11'32" West 350.00 feet to the
North right-of-way line of U.S. Highway 90 (State Road 10), said point being also on the arc of a
curve concave to the right having a radius of 11,409.15 feet and a central angle of 0635'00"; thence
Northwesterly, along the arc of said curve and along the North right-of-way line of said U.S. '
SHighway 90 (State Road 10) a distance of 90.94 feet; thence North 6352'56" West; along the North
right-of-way line of said U.S. Highway 90 (State Road 10) a distance of 509.47 feet; thence North
06o50'09"'East 480.67 feet to the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 34; thence South
8904'51" East, along the North line of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section 34, a distance of 602.14 feet
. to thd Point of Beginning.
Containing 8.20 acres, more or less.
All said.lahds containing 11.88 acres, more or less.


The first of two public hearings will be conducted by the City Council to consider the amendment,
conduct a first reading of the ordinance adopting the amendment and consider transmittal of the
amendment to the Florida Department of Economic Opporturnity. The public hearing will be held on
November 21, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard, in the City Council
Meeting Room, City Hall located at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida. The title of said
ordinance reads, as follows: .

ORDINANCE NO. 2011-2019 "
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF LAKE I2ITY, FLORIDA, AMENDING THE FUTURE LAND
USE PLAN MAP OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN,
AS AMENDED; RELATING TO AN AMENDMENT OF MORE THAN TEN ACRES OF LAND,
PURSUANT TO AN APPLICATION, CPA 11-04, BY THE PROPERTY OWNER OF SAID
ACREAGE, UNDER THE AMENDMENT PROCEDURES ESTABLISHED IN SECTIONS 163.3161
THROUGH 163.3248, FLORIDA STATUTES, AS AMENDED; PROVIDING FOR CHANGING THE
FUTURE LAND USE CLASSIFICATION FROM COUNTY COMMERCIAL, HIGHWAY
INTERCHANGE TO CITY COMMERCIAL OF CERTAIN LANDS WITHIN THE CORPORATE
LIMITS OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; REPEALING
ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE

The public hearing may be continued to one or more future dates.- Any interested party shall be advised
that the date, time and place of any continuation of the public hearing shall be announced during the
public hearing and that no further notice concerning the matter will be published.
At the aforementioned'public hearing, all interested persons may appear and heard with respect to the
amendment and the ordinance adopting said amendment on the date, time and place as referenced above.
Copies of the amendment and the ordinance adopting the amendments are available for public inspection
at the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall located at 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida, during
regular business hours.
All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decisions made at the public hearing, they will
need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose, they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should
contact 352.463.3169 (Voice & TDD) or via Florida Relay Service 800.955.8771.


wouldn't have a place," Keene
said. "God must have sent
me to this place." He said the
nurses and staff there have
become his family and helped
in overcome many hardships.
Keene said he will soon
start going to a PTSD thera-
py group. Despite all that he
endured during the war and
repercussions he still faces,
Keene said he would do it all
again without a thought to
defend this country and com-
plete strangers.
* "It was an awesome thing
to serve my country but it
was the scariest thing," he
said. "My medals and awards
belong to the men who were
left behind."


City of

Lake City


SCPA 11-04
[ City Limits


1 inch = 45,Ofeet


'












OPINION


Friday, November II, 2011


OU R I


0 U.R
OPINION


Celebrate


and say

thanks

T he Greatest
Generation spent
four years defeat-
ing one of the worst
threats freedom has.
known, a true Axis of Evil that,
for a time, snuffed the flame of
liberty throughout much of the
globe.
By contrast, we'll have spent
10 years in Afghanistan- and
that's assuming the planned
withdrawal goes as planned
before seeing an end to the
action.
None of that matters on a
day like today, though, when
we take a moment to thank
those who've fought, and those
who fight now, to preserve our*
freedom.
No, the mission's not the
same as it was nearly 70 years
back, and no, the world doesn't.
await the outcome with'the
same .terrible sense of urgency
(though perhaps it should)..
Yet none of that makes the
commitment, drive and sac-
rifice of today's troops any
less than it wasat Iwo Jimna or
Omaha Beach.
Our soldiers, sailors, airmen,
' Marines, National Guardsmen
and reservists give it their all
every day, on foreign soil and
at home.
They do, everything they're
asked and then some. We know
well that whatever the threat,
whatever form is taken by.an
enemy of freedom, these men.
and women will be there to step
up and give challenge.
thing they've done, and every-
thing they may be called upon
to do for us in the future.

H I GH LI G" H TS
IN HI ISTO RY.

Today is Friday, Nov. 11, the
316th day of 2011. There are
-50 days left in the year. This'
is Veterans Dayin the U.S.,
Remembrance Day in Canada.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Nov. 11, 1918, fighting,
in World War I came to an end
with the signing of an armistice
between the Allies and Germany.
On this date:
In 2004, Palestinian leader
Yasser Arafat died at a military
hospital in Paris at age 75.'

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride-for residents of
Columbia and surrounding countes by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build-
strong communities --"Newspapers
get things done!" :
Our primary goal is to'
publish distinguished 'and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETT E R S
POLICY
SLetters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of


the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


lMichaetMooreds


insufferable occupation.


heavily weight- Enterprise Institute dem-
S' ed down with I onstrates with figures from
concern for fel- the Census Bureau, income
-low Americans ".. inequality has increased
his nation harbors "possibly the relatively little over the past 16
dumbest people on the planet," years. Perry can also show how
he once said was tromping all income groups have been
around in Denver the other Jay Ambrose advancing over the past three
day. And no, even though I was Speaktojoy@ool.com. decades.
just 25 or so miles west of him Another economist, Donald
in my house, I did not feel the The "Fahrenheit" film made Boudreaux of George Mason
earth quake. a bigger profit than any docu-. University, quotes the IRS as
I did catch him in the news m' entary in history, but Moore showing that, as of 2005, 57.4
being vicious with. one of those should return all that money percent of those in the top 1
he thought stupid, to cheated viewers. An overall percent economically in 1996
"You're just punk media is all bash of President George W. had dropped to lower income
you alre.i6u elieY, u ie t peo- 'Busih, wit particular atten- groups.
ple," he growled to a TV report-: fion to the war in Iraq, it con- That's not to say jobless-
er covering his appearance at trained 59 deceits, according to ness doesn't haunt us. Here's
a local version of Occupy Wall research by Dave Kopel that is, why: a fiscal crisis brought on
Street. These occupiers, you. absolutely convincing. Kopel by the Federal Reserve; and
may have heard, aren't exactly is research director for a lib- mostly liberals conniving in
sure what they believe except ertarian think tank in Denver, Congress -with Fannie Mae
that many talk like they are to Independence Institute;,with and Wall Street to get mort-
the left of Lenin., They shudder which I myself have had an gages in the hands of people
at anything as free as our mar- uncompensated association. who could not afford them.
kets used to be and appear to' All of which brings us back That gave us a fiscal crisis
believe we are divided between to Occupy Wall Street. It eeks and a recession made worse
1 percent who are rich and the of the same kind of hallucina- by President bbama's mis-
other, 99 percent who are grov- tory zaniness, not the least of management of deficits and
eli g in misery. which is this business of the additional regulations scaring
The reporter wanted-to know rich getting away with taxpayer businesses out of expansion.
whether Moore was one of the murder. But there are still Americans
1 percent. He asked whether For the genesis of The Big making money. Capitalist
reports were true that Moore Lie, go back to the Bush tax Moore was in Denver not just.
was worth $50 million, and cuts that did give tax breaks to to parade with the occupiers,
Moore though conceding the rich but also gave plenty to but to sell a book to those
he did "very well" called the the middle class, even relieving "dummies.".I forget its title.
question a lie, which is peculiar some workers of any federal tax
as it was a question and not an burden at all. Jay Ambrose writes this column
assertion. As the economist Mark for Scripps Howard News Service.


LETTERS


TO


TH E E D.IT.O R


Reporter leans too far rigt


To the Editor:
or the past several
months the Lake City
Reporter newspaper
has in my opinion
openly shown a pro-
pensity to denigrate President
Barack Obama in every possible
way. '
Many of the newspaper editori-
als, cartoons and articles have
attempted to distort, ridicule and
bash President Obama. The paper
has engaged two sycophants
African-American writers Star
Parker and Deroy Murdodk, to
join in the editorial frenzy of bash-
ing President Obama.
The Reporter and some
Republicans appear to pander to
and follow the tea party crowd,
whose major objective is to "take
our country back" and to keep
President Obama from being
elected to a second term. Several
Republican Congressmen also
stated that their major goal is
to deny the President a second
term. They appear to be so
obsessed with this goal that they
are willing to destroy America.
Much of the legislation that
the president has presented to
.Congress was orchestrated and
espoused earlier by Republicans.


Their response to this was and
is . No! No! No! Hell NO!
President Obama has attempted
repeatedly to compromise with
Republicans, all to no avail.
Republicans could care less (as
the world can see) about econom-
ic growth and job creation. Their
single obsession is distort, ridi-
cule, blame, and bash President
Obama.
Many Americans realize that
the stimulus was a success, despite
all of the whining that it was afail-
ure. The auto and banking indus-
tries, and other corporations were
saved and have rebounded suc-
cessfully, many have repaid their
debts. Americans are being hired.
The jobs of policemen, firemen,
teachers and others were stimulus
* extended in 2010. If there had
been sincere cooperation from the
Republican Congress, think how
much further along this country
would be today. Probably without
policemen many towns would be
over-run by the criminal element.
In spite of all of the Republican
and tea party foot-dragging, the
economy is slowly rebounding,
the jobless rate has dropped to
9 percent! Democracy is on the
rise in other countries. Osama
Bin Laden, Kadhafi, and other
terrorists leaders have been extin-


guished under President Obama's
leadership. i
In 2010, Republicans and the
tea party crowd campaigned on
jobs, jobs, jobs and the economy.
However, once in office they
changed their attention and phi-
losophy to demonizing President
Obama. How many jobs or-
bills have the Congressional
Republicans passed or even
brought before Congress? Look,
at their public rating the lowest
ever! Republicans have stripped
workers of basic rights, disman-
tfled environmental protections,
made deep cuts to education
and infrastructure, eliminated
critical funding for women's
health care, threatened and
crippled Americans' right to vote.
Terrorists could not do a better
job of destroying America!
In 2010, the Supreme Court
opened the floodgates for Karl
Rove and his cronies to spend
tons of secret cash in support of
a new wave of tea party extrem-
ists. These folks have announced
plans to spent some $440,000,000
to defeat the President and other
Democrats in the 2012 election.
Wake up America!
Glynnell Presley
Lake City


4A,


ANOTHER
VIEW


Returning:

vets aren't':

a problem

The U.S. soldiers, sail-.,
ors and aircrews and.
the vast uniformed .,
logistics apparatus
that supported them:
in the harsh, grueling and
often desperately boring slog
to victory in World War II did
not think of themselves as a
problem.
The veterans later recalled
thinking of the war as a simple
proposition: They had been
given a job to do, which the
overall majority willingly
accepted, even though it was
dangerous, and, in 1942, there,
was no end in sight. They did
that job with efficiency and
dispatch. And they wanted to
get it over and done with for
one 'reason: So they could go
home.
But, privately, some in gov-
ernment wondered if these vet-,
erans wouldn't be a problem -
a happy one to have, certainly,
because they were safely home
but a problem nonetheless.
'Over 15 million veterans,
mostly young men whose
schooling and careers hd
been cut short almost before
they had started, were flocking
back to an economy that had
recently been in a deep depres-
sion and one that, without the
powerful engines of the war
industries, might easily relapse
into depression.
Congress worried about this
problem'well.into 1944. That
June, the lawmakers, strug-
gling to do the right thing
in the short term, enacted
legislation that was more far-
reaching than even the most
insightful of them knew, a law
that reshaped our society and
economy the G.L Bill. It was
big government being big- .
hearted.
The actual name of the
law reflected the modesty
of its original intentions: the
Servicemen's Readjustment
Act
In past wars, the govern-
ment strived, in President. '
JAbraham Lincoln's eloquent'
words, "to care for him who
shall have borne the battle and
for his widow and his orphan
..." In other words, repair the
visible damage, and leave the
others to get on with their
.lives.
The G.I. Bill had, intention-
ally or not, a far loftier aim:
To give returning veterans
not only a future but a better
future. During .the 12 years of
the original law it has been
modified and extended several'.,'
times since 7.1 million vets, g
', who had gone into the service
when education beyond high
school was more the exception'..
than the rule, had obtained
college educations or advanced.
vocational training under the
bill.
They staffed America's great
corporations, and the 2.4 mil- .:
lion who took advantage of the .
bill's low-cost home loans were'
integral to the creation of the
modern American suburb. '
Now we are faced with the,
all-volunteer military coming
home from the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan to a sluggish econ-,
omy with a 12.1 percent unem-
ployment rate for post-9/11 vets
and 9 percent overall. About 1
million more service members
are expected to join them in the
job market by 2016.
President Barack Obama has
proposed, and Congress is con-
sidering, financial incentives for
businesses to hire unemployed
vets.
The financial incentives are


fine, but what is needed is a
change in the national mind-
set. These disciplined, skilled,
initiative-taking veterans should
be treated not as a national
problem but as a national
opportunity.
* Scripps Howard News Service









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011 5A


Scott official given


years to repay $21,000


By GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press "
TALLAHASSEE An
official with Gov. Rick
Scott's administration is
getting three years to repay
the state after he was given
more than $21,000 in a
possible violation of state
policy.
Dean Kowalchyk, the
general counsel for the
Department ofElderAffairs,
was given a check to cover
his unused. vacation last
December'when it appeared
the incoming Scott adnminis-
tration planned to replace
him.
But Kowalchyk never left
his job and it wasn't until
July that he started repay-
ing the state in monthly
installments of $663,. The
Associated Press has,
learned. Kowalchyk is the
lead attorney for the agency
that helps Florida's 'senior
citizens and which has come
under fire for its handling
of the program; that acts
as a watchdog over nursing
homes.
Kowalchyk, -who has
been with the state four
years, made his. first pay-
ment just days before he,
received a $6,500 raise that
brought his annual salary to
$98,500.
I In a written response
to questions from the AP,
Kolwalchyk said he could
not repay the full amount
right away because he was
responsible for roughly
$6,000 that 'was- deducted
for taxes. He alo6 said he
used some of the money
to pay bills and 'prepare to
open a law office. '
A spokeswoman for
Department of Elder Affairs
Charles Corley said he was
aware of the payment, but
did not specifically autho-
rize it. '


Ashley Marshall acknowl-
edged that Kowalchyk got a
pay raise on Aug. 1. But
she said that Corley gave
Kowalchyk a 7 percent
raise in order to place his
salary in line with "compa-
rable colleagues" who work
as lead attorneys at other
social service agencies in
state government. This
pay raise was given even.
though rank-and-file state
workers have not had an
across-the-board pay raise
in five years. '
Kowalchyk,; who worked
for state government in the -
1980s and returned in 2007
after running his own firm,
was hired as general counsel
while former Gov. Charlie
Crist was in office. Last
November, the outgoing
Crist administration asked
that all top agency officials
submit letters of resigna-
tion the usual procedure
when a governor is leav-
ing office so that the new.
administration can hire its
own staff. In the weeks that
followed many were told by
Scott's transition advisers
that they needed to leave
theirjobs by the time Scott
took office in January.
But Scott's transition
team then asked several.top
officials to stay on the job for
at least two to three months
as it became evident that
some people sought out by
Scott were turning down
job offers.
Kolwalchyk was told Dec.
17 that his resignation had
been, accepted. Marshall
said Kowalchyk decided to
step down Dec. 27 and this
triggered administrative
tasks related to his depar-
ture.
- Senior employees
throughout state govern-
ment are allowed to get paid
uptfor up to 480 hours, or 12
weeks, 'of unused vacation


Defensive coordinator
Tom Bradley will serve as
interim coach, and the uni-


est men, who mr
of you know
football coach. I


when they leave. versity scheduled a news privilege and th
But a Department of conference with him for work for him,
Management Services later Thursday. Provost with him. He's
spokesman said that it is" Rodney Erickson will be dynamic impa
state policy to pay for any the interim school presi- many, so many
unused vacation 31 days dent. again, so many
after a state worker exits. "I take this job with players' lives."
Marshall, however, said very mixed emotions due He added: "It's
state rules do "not preclude to the situation," Bradley respect that I sr
an earlier payment" said at a news conference and I'm proud to
Kowalchyk said he asked Thursday morning. "I have worked for him.
to get the money early in been asked by'the board of As word of
order to help his transition trustees to handle this. I spread, thousai
to the private sector., told them I would do it dents flocked to
"In this economy, employ- last night. I will proceed istration build
ment is difficult for attor- in a matter that Renn State ing, "We want
neys just as it is for' every- expects." and "One mo
one else. I basically had a He also said: "- have no They then hea
little over two weeks notice reservations about taking town to Beave
to be prepared to be unem- this job." where about
played," Kowlachyk wrote Bradley said he called wearing helmet
the AP. "Since employment Paterno after the firings trying pepper s
with a firm could not be last night but declined to on standby. Wits
found, I had to prepare to divulge what was said. some rocks a
open a law office and be "I think that's personal were thrown,-a
able to pay both my law in nature," he said. was toppled ai
office expenses and person- However, when asked, van was knock<
al expenses. Waiting the 31 he 'was clear about his' windows kicked
day 'best practice' period admiration of and devotion State College
would have left me with no to the man he is replacing early Thursday
income for 31 days, and no for the time being., still gathering i
funds to do the things I "Coach Paterno has on any possible
needed to do in order to meant more to me than Paterno ha
have an income." anybody except my father. under increasing
In his responses, I don't want to get emo- including fr
Kowalchyk said that initially tiorial talking- about that," the community
he thought he was going to Bradley said. "Coach Happy Valley
remain on the job another Paterno will go down in" doing more tc
60 to 90 days. Marshall said history as one of the great- alleged abuse b
the Scott administration on -
Jan. 3 asked Kowalchyk
to remain for "a period of
time." She said that the, CHARGED: N bond
department's personnel .
office on Jan. 20 first asked
Kowalchyk to pay back the Continued From Page 1A


state.
Kowalchyk eventually
worked out a repayment
schedule that has him repay
the money -without inter-
est over a three-year peri-
od. He said the length of the
repayment period was not
selected by him but by the
payroll bureau that reports
to Chief Financial Officer
Jeff Atwater;


him to believe Quinn's vehi-
cle was theone they were
searching for in the hit-and-
run investigation.
The trooper found purple
,paint on the damaged area
of Quinn's car that appeared
to match the paint on
Pittman's Kawasaki motor-'
cycle.
When she was ques-
tioned by a trooper, Quinn


naybe most
as a great
've had the
he honor to
spend time
had such
ct on so
, I'll say it
people and

s with great
peak of him
o say that I

the firings
nds of stu-
the adinin-
ng, shout-
Joe back!",
re gaie!":
ded down-
er Avenue,;
100 police
ts and car-
spray were
nesses said
nd bottles
a lamppost
nd a news'
ed over, its
I out.
police said
they were
information
arrests.
ad come
.g criticism
*om within:
known as
- for not
o stop the
yrSandusky.


denied being involved in an
accident earlier that night
She told the trooper that
nobody else drove her vehi-
cle and she was unaware of
any front-end damage..
"She claims, she didn't
know she /hit somebody,"
Hughes said. :"She could.
not tell me where she had
been [earlier'that night]."
Quinn was charged with


Some of the assaults took
place at the Penn State
football complex, including
a 2002 incident witnessed
by then-graduate assis-
tant and current assistant
coach Mike McQueary.
McQueary went to
Paterno and reported
seeing Sandusky assault-
ing a young boy in the
Penn State showers.
Paterno notified the ath-
letic director, Tim Curley,
and.a vice president, Gary
Schultz, who in turn noti-
fled Spanier.
CGurley and Schultz have
been charged' with failing
*to report the incident to
authorities. Pennsylvania
Attorney General Linda
Kelly has not ruled out
charges against Spanier.
Paterno is not a target
of the criminal investiga-
tion, but the state police
commissioner called his
failure to .contact police
himself a lapse in "moral
responsibility."
Paterno said in his state-
ment earlier Wednesday
that, he was "absolutely
devastated" by the abuse
case.
"This is a tragedy,"
Paterno said. "It is one
of the great sorrows of
my life. With the benefit
of hindsight, I wish I had
done more."


felony DUI with' serious
bodily injury and leaving
the scene of an accident
without rendering aid,
also a felony. She was also
charged with first-degriee '-
DUI with'property damage
and leaving the scene'of a
crash with injury, both mis- ,
demeanors. And she was
ticketed for careless driving ,
with serious injury, reports
said.
Quinn is held at the
Suwanutee County Jail with
no bond.


June Alma Eastman Reece
June Alma Eastman Reece,
70, of Lake City, passed away
on Thursday, November 3,
2011 at Shands at Lake Shore.
Born December 27,1940 in
Lake City, she was the daugh-
ter of.the late James and Mary
Eastman. She loved gardening,
her animals (Missy & Poppy),
sewing, watching Wheel of
Fortune, and scratch off tickets.
Survivors include daughters;
Debbie Cannon, Cynthia Scott,
Barbara Owens, and Angela
Lawrence, grandchildren; Brian,
Cannon, Craig Cannon, Crystal
Tucker, Steven Green, Benja-
min Owens, Sabrina Owens,
Donald Lee Waters Jr., and Ja-
mie Lawrence, great grandchil-
dren; Philip Maddox IV, Carson
Maddox, Jaren Cannon, Kaid-
ance Green, Natalie Green Ab-
bie Green, and Ashlie Green.
Memorial service willbe conduct-
ed 2:00 P.M. Saturday, Novem-
ber 12, 201f at Gateway Lawn
Forest Funeral Home 'Chapel
with Lavern Brannon officiating.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of GATEWAY FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
(386) 752-1954, 3596 S US
Hwy 441, Lake City, Fr. 32025.
Please sign our guest book at
www.gatewayforestlawn. comr
Richard Grayson Odom, Sr
Richard "Dickie" Grayson
Odom, Sr, born July 14, 1950,.
passed away November 8, 2011,
after an extended illness. He is
survived by the love of his life,
Rose Griffis Odom, as well as his
beloved mother, Doris J. Odom.
Children Richard G. Odom, Jr.
(Julie) Ardmore, Al, Jarrett D.
Odom, Lake City, Stephanie
Odom Wattles, Branford, Chad
Griffis, Raiford,. Jeremy Griffis,
Raiford, FL; Brothers and sister
H.D. "Doug" Odom, Jr. (Candy),
Sumter, SC, David' F. Odom
(Lorraine), Lloyd, FL, and Debra
Odom (Khrys), White Springs,
FL. Grandchildren Derek and
Laura Odom, as well as the ex-
tended family of John D. and
Sarah Odom (grandparents). He
is proceeded in death by his fa-
ther, H.D. "Doug" Odom, Sr.
The Vernon Griffis (Raiford, FL)
family is his loved second family.
Richard lived the majority of
his life in Columbia Cour*y. He
graduated from CHS in 1969,
and continued his education at
LCCC, as well as other advanced
classes qualifying him to become'
a vocation educational teacher at
CHS, and also at the Department
of Corrections. He helped many
with life and job skills through
his.work. He went on to a long
career with the Department of
Corrections. most recently serv-


ing at Maintenance: Superinten-
dent at Suwannee DOC, Live
Oak, where the welfare of his
coworkers and quality of service
was always a priority for him.
His greatest joys were his wife,
Rose, his mother, his chil-
dren and grandchildren. Tar-
pon fishing and turkey hunting
with his family were two of his
most favorite things. He pos-
sessed'a special talent creating
carvings from old fat lighter
knots and making exquisite
turkey calls from wing bones.
Memorial service will be held at
GATEWAY FOREST LAWN,
3596 S. US HWY 441, Lake
City, FL 32025 (386.752.1954)
Saturday, November 12, 2011
at 11:00am. Memorial dona-
tions are requested in lieu of
flowers to Haven Hospice,
618 SW Florida Gateway
Blvd, Lake City, FL 32024.
Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments.. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


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NOTICE


DR-529
R. 12/09


SI O A Rule 12D-16.002
TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD' Florida Administrative Code


DEPARTMENT
OF REVENUE


Columbia County


Tax Year 2 1 1


Members of the Board

be dyyre Cm 'i"i" DisotrniytCo
Honorable Scarlet Frisina Board of County Commissioners, District No. 5

Honorable Jody DuPree Board of County Commissioners, District No. 3

Honorable Charles Maxwell School Board, District No. 2

Citizen Member Brad Dicks Business owner within the school district

Citizen Member Huey Hawkins Homestead, property owner

The Value Adjustment Board (VAB) meets each year to hear petitions and make decisions relating
to property tax assessments, exemptions, classifications, and tax deferrals.

Summary of Year's Actions

Number of Parcels Reduction in Shift in

Type of Property Exemptions Assessments* Both County Taxable Value Taxes
Withdrawn
Granted Requested Reduced Requested or raws Due to Board Actions Due to Board Actions
or settled
Residential 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Commercial 0 0 3 9 8 $ 0O$ 0.00
Industrial and
stialan 0 0 3 7 7 $ 0$ 0.00
miscellaneous
Agricultural or
Agricultural or 0 0 15 17 15 $ 0 $ 0.00
classified use
High-water recharge 0 0 0 0 0 $ 0$ 0.00
Historic commercial 7 0 0 0 $ 000
0 7 0 0 0 $ 0 $ 0.00
or nonprofit
Business machinery 0 0 2 8 7 $ 0 $ 0.00
and equipment
Vacant Iotsand
acantotsand 0 0 2 2 2 $ 0$ 0.00
acreage _ __________ ___

TOTALS 0 7 25 43 39 $ 0 $ 0.00

All values should be county taxable values. School and other taxing authority values may differ.
*lInclude transfer of assessment difference (portability) requests.


If you have a question about these actions, contact the Chair or the Clerk of the Value Adji

Chair's name Scarlet Fisina Phone 386-758-1326

Clerk's name P. DeWitt Cason Phone 386-758-1191


ustment Board.


FIRED: 'One more game!' fans shout

Continued From Page 1A


OBITUARIES


i..









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL AND NATION FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011



Faces & Places

Scenes from the seventh annual Signature Chef's Auction hosted by the March of Dimes Tuesday in Lake City


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Kyle Hunter, 22, and Stephanie Pilkington, 18.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City I
Krystale Defee (left), 21, and Christian Reliford, 19. I


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter JASON MA IHEW WALKIKILaKe lCty Reporter
Tammy Crews (left) and Judi Clemmons. Schiefer Buckless (left), 19, and lan Cosentino, 15.


Heather Turbeville (from left), Tonia Edenfield, Becky
Edenfield and Mikala Edenfield.


Shirley Munoz (left) and Joyce Crawford-Spencer.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mattie Jones and Lynward Jones. Josh Miller and Amy Miller.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Jim Moses and Sally Moses.


Afterbeing found guilty, Jackson's doctor to defend self

By LINDADEUTSCH with propofol.Thiswas not Jackson as "a desper
AP Special Correspondent something I introduced to man, desperate" during I
AP SpecialCorresponent I IT%'4''7"nA fl: nnl l 1 1 ...


LOS ANGELES -
Michael Jackson's doctor,
who refused to testify at
his trial, said in an inter-
view broadcast Thursday
that the singer lied to him
about his medical history
and never revealed he had
an addiction problem.
"I would hate to put blame
on Michael as an individu-
al," Dr. Conrad Murray told
the 'Today" show in the
interview, done days before
the doctor's conviction.
"I only wish maybe in our
dealings with each other
he would have been more
forthcoming and honest.to
tell me these things about
himself," he said.
Interviewer Savannah
Guthrie asked: "Do you
think he lied to you?"
"Definitely," Murray said.
"About what?" she asked.
"Certainly he was decep-
tive by not showing me his
whole medical history, doc-
tors he was seeing, treat-
ments that he might have
been receiving." Murray
answered.
"Did you really not know
he had an addiction prob-
lem?" Guthrie asked.
"Absolutely not," said
Murray. "Did not have a
clue."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Deputies place handcuffs on Dr. Conrad Murray after his conviction on involuntary man-
slaughter charges in the death of pop star Michael Jackson, in Los Angeles Superior Court
Monday.


Murray was convicted
Monday of involuntary
manslaughter for supply-
ing the insomnia-plagued
Jackson with the powerful
operating-room anesthetic
propofol to help him sleep
as he rehearsed for his big
comeback.


During the interview,
Murray was shown video of
bottles of medications from
other physicians arrayed
on Jackson's bedside table,
suggesting Murray's sus-
picions should have been
raised.
"IcannotpreventMichael


Experts testified at
Murray's trial that propo-
fol should not have been
administered in Jackson's
home, but the doctor dis-
agreed.
Murray revealed Jackson
was under the influence of
propofol during a record-
ing found on the doctor's
cell phone. Murray said
the recording, in which the
heavily drugged Jackson
talked in a slurred voice
about his goal of building
a major children's hospital,
was made by accident
Murray, 58, described


his


Asked by Guthrie how
it felt to be blamed for
Jackson's death, he said, "I
loved Michael too. I'm as
much of a fan as any of the
others. To be blamed for his
death has not been an easy
thing."
"Are you the cause :of
Michael Jackson's death?":
Guthrie asked:
"No, I am not,' Murray
said.
The interview with the
Houston cardiologist wa6
being aired Thursday ad'A
Friday. Other excerpts wef
released Wednesday.


from seeing other. doctors
for whatever reason," the
doctor said.
"You must have realized
the reason he hired you
was to give him this drug,
propofol," Guthrie said.
"No, not at all," Murray
replied. "I met Michael


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JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter


I CHARITY CHICKEN BBQ
PLATE WITH SOFT DRINK
$6.00
Youth Hotdog Plate also.
Saturday, November 12
11AM thru 4PM
Ivey Memorial Park, Branford, Fl
US Hwy 27 & Suwannee River
American Legion Glisson-James
Post 59, Branford, FL
Proceeds to aid Fisher House For
Families of Rehabilitating Veterans.










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakectyreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Friday, November 11,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


CHEAP SEATS







Tim Kirby
Phone: (386) 754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Buckets,

paddles

Fort White High
toyed with the
idea of moving
today's game
against Santa
Fe High'to Thursday.
The deal was not struck.
Too bad.
Fans could have
attended both games -7
something they did not
get to do this season.
Fort White football has
a lot of ties to Columbia
High and today's game is
an important one for the
Tigers as they celebrate
100 years of football.
(It would have been
nice for Columbia fans to
see what the Battle for.
the Paddle is all about,
and for Fort White fans
to check out an Old
Oaken Bucket game.
In Columbia's 100
years, Suwannee has
been the team Columbia
has played the most
- 80 times at last count.
The earliest listed
matchup was in 1927.
The Old Oaken Bucket'-#-
tradition began in 1951..
Another thing that
makes today's game
significant is it falls on
Veterans Day. For many
years Columbia and
Suwannee played on
Nov. 11 when it was
Armistice Day, no matter
what day it fell on during
the week.
The Fort White
connection to Columbia
begins with head coach
Demetric Jackson, who
starred for the Tigers in
the early 1990s.*
Among the other Fort
White coaches, Isiah
Phillips once picked off
five passes in a game for,
CHS. His son, Trey, plays
for the Indians:
Kendyll Pope earned
Parade All-American
honors while at CHS,
and played for the 1997
Tigers which went 14-1.
Dan Marsee, Chris
Martinez and Blaine
Crews played for.
Columbia, as did middle
school coaches Mike
-Hunter and Pat Daniels.
Ken Snider coached
at CHS. His son, Kellen,
plays for the Indians.
Rick Bicknell also
coached for the Tigers.
A scan down the 2011
Indians roster reveals
more connections.
Andrew Baker's
grandfather, Donnie
Williams, was one of
the great players for the
Tigers. He was among
those who ushered in the
Paul Quinn era at CHS.
In Williams' three years,
the Tigers were 28-4-2.
Terry Calloway's
namesake dad played
for the Tigers in the
1990s. The moms ofA.J.
Legree, Dalton O'Dell
and Brayson Caley
graduated from CHS,
as did the Voice of the
Indians, Shayne Morgan.
Families and friends
deserve a chance to
see both teams at least
once during the season.
Maybe that will happen
next year.
* Tim Kirby is sports editor


of the Lake City Reporter. I


Heisman


race still


Luck's to lose


(
t


B
A


i
th
c
y
a
r
fa
c
w
tb
s


Stanford QB No. 3 Stanford plays No.
)f display. 6 Oregon. It's the biggest
S game on the Cardinal's
his weekend. schedule and it's the show-
case game of the college
3y RALPH D. RUSSO football weekend scan-
Associated Press dals aside.
If Luck helps avenge last
Andrew Luck came year's 52-31 loss in Eugene,
nto this season as one of and keeps the Cardinal in
he most overwhelming the national championship
leisman Trophy favorites race, his Heisman stock
college football has had in should soar. If he and the
rears. Stanford stumble, the race
Luck has played well, would be wide open.
ibeit against Stanford's Luck's, statistics are
relatively weak schedule so excellent (2,424 yards, 26
ar,, and according to the touchdown passes and a
Veb site Heismanpundit. 174.1 passer rating that is
om, which conducts a fifth in the country), but
weekly straw poll of voters, not much different than
he junior quarterback is other Heisman contender
till the clear front-runner. quarterbacks.


For better or worse, that
can change Saturday when


PICKS continued on 6B


*J.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Stanford's quarterback Andrew Luck (12) scrambles for a first down. during the second half of
an NCAA football game against Oregon State in Corvallis, Ore. on Saturday.


I .


r


,Tigers look to
retain Oaken
Bucket tonight.


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporrer.com
Since taking over as
Columbia High coach in
March, Brian Allen has
heard one game talked
about. The annual rivalry
game against Suwannee
High is now here and the
talking will be laid to rest.
"From the people in the
community, the conversa-
tion has been consistent,"-
Allen said. "I was in a
church service after -I got
the' job and everyone was
saying congratulations, but .
they're going to beat us.
They'll be ready to play."
S'Suwannee has had a hard
time beating much of any-
one this season with its 1-8
record.
Columbia, on the other
hand, has found its stride
over the latter part of the JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
season. The Tigers have ABOVE: Columbia High defenders trample over a Middleburg runner while playing in a game
allowed six points total in on Oct. 21.
their last three contests and BELOW: Fort White's Soron Williams (21) escapes a tackle while playing against Rickards
each were close to shut- High on Oct. 28.
outs.
The Tigers (6-3, 4-1
District 4-6A) want to keep
things the same as much as
possible this week to stay
on routine for the playoffs
which start next week at
St. Augustine.
'We don't want to deviate
from the plan," Allen said.
"No matter if we're play- .
ing the spread, Wing-T or
whatever, our keys have to '
remain the same. We have c s
to trust the system either
way."
Allen's defense has been
a big reason for the team's
improvement and will tell
the story of the playoffs .
and Oaken Bucket game
as well.
"We teach that the guy
lined up in front of us is
going to tell the story,"
Allen said. "We have to,1 ....1110
do the things we are sup- .
posed to do from what we r
read and see. We have to
remain sound and execute .
on offense and defense."
And Allen doesn't expect .
CHS continued on 2B .% ." ..'..'.. ... "


-Fort White seniors
look to extend
winning streak.
By TIM KIRBY
rkirbytvlakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High and Santa Fe
High., hook up today in a
Battle for the Paddle game
that should live up to expec-
tations.
The Raiders visit
Arrowhead State for a
7:30 p.m. kickoff.
Fort White (6-3) and
Santa Fe (8-1) are both
heading for the playoffs -
the first time in the 11-year
history of the series that
boy teams qualified in the
same season.
The Indians are coming
off a 49-14 district loss at
Trinity Catholic High, a
game in which Fort White
lost five fumbles and threw
three interceptions.
"'The biggest thing is we
have got to execute," Fort
White head coach Demetric
Jackson said after the game
in Ocala. "We have to hold
on to the ball and not turn
it over. If our defense will
keep making plays, we'll be
fine."
The Raiders'are coming
off back-to-back District 5-
5A shutouts, in which they
outscored opponents by a
combined 88-0.
Tommy Keeler is head
coach at Santa Fe after six
seasons at Newberry High.
The two teams have opened
the season against each
other for several years. This
season, Santa Fe won 17-16
in overtime.
With Fort White riding
a six-game winning streak
in the Paddle series, you
can bet Keeler would like to
bookend the regular season
with those two wins.
Fort White receiver coach
Isiah Phillips has heard the
rumbling.
"It is going to be a battle,"
Phillips said. "Santa Fe is
fired up. Everywhere I go,
people are talking about it
and they are saying Santa
Fe is coming for you."
It is Senior Night at Fort
INDIANS continued on 2B


- . -1 7 - - - - - - 7 -











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
8 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, practice for
Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, at Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates
1:30 p.m.
ESPN2 NWASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for KobaltTools 500,atAvondale,
Ariz.
5S30 p.m.
ESPN2 NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Kobalt Tools 500, atAvondale.Ariz.
BOXING
10 p.m.
FSN --- Champion Diego Magdaleno
(20-0-0). vs. Emmanuel Lucero (26-7-1),
for NABF super featherweight title, at

II p.m.
SHO Middleweights, Michael
Oliveira (15-0-0) vs. Rudy Cisneros
(12-3-0); champion Austin Trout (23-0-0)'
vs. Frank LoPorto (15-4-0), for WBA
super welterweight tide, at El Paso,Texas
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
p8 P.m.
ESPN2 South Rorida at Syracuse
GOLF
4 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Lorena Ochoa
Invitational, second round, at Guadalajara,.
Mexico
8 p.m.
TGC" PGA Tour Australasia,
Astralian Open, third round, at Sydney
I a.m.
TGC-European PGATour,Singapore
Open, third round (delayed tape)
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN Michigan St. vs. North
Carolina, at San Diego
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Men's national teams,
exhibition, France vs. U.S., at Paris

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 5 3 0.625 222 184
N.Y.Jets 5 3 0 .625199 163,
Buffalo 5 3 0.625222174
Miami I 7 0.125 138 169 -
South
W L. T Pct, PF PA
Houston 6 6.3 0 .667 236 157
Tennessee 4 4 0.500 156 169
Jacksonville 2 6 0..250 98 163'
Indianapolis 0 9 0 .000 128 283
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinati,"' -2 '* ,-7501O95"l-l0


Balidmboe
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


, .: 2:
6 3
3. 5
West


0.750 208 130
0.667 196 162
0.375 119 170


W L T Pct PF PA.
Kansas City 4 4 0.500 131 201
San Diego 4 4 0.500 199204
Oakland 4 0,.500 1042166
Denver 3 5.. 0.375 171 224.
NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Philadelphia
.Washington


New Orleans
Atlanta
Tampa Bay
Carolina


Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis


East '
W L T Pct PF PA
6 2 0.750 198,184
4 4 0.500 179 175
3 5 0.375 203 182
3 5 0.375 127 158
South
W L T Pct PF PA
6 3 '0.667 287 205
5 3 0.625 189 170
4 4 0.500 147 196
k2 6 0:250 187207
North
W L T Pct PF PA
8 0 01.000 275 179
6 2 0 .750 239 147
5 3 0.625200 174
2 6 0.250 172 199
West
W L T Pct PF PA
7 I 0.875206 118
'2 6 0.250 122 185
2 6 0.250 162 196
I 7 0.125 100211


Thursday Game
Oakland at San Diego (n)
Sunday's Games


Buffalo at Dallas, I p.m.
Denver at Kansas City, I p.m.
Washington at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Tennessee at Carolina, I p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, I p.m.
.Houston atTampa Bay, I p.m.
New Orleans at Atlanta, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
New England at N.Y. Jets, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 17
N.Y. Jets at Denver, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 20
Tampa Bay at Green Bay, I p.m.
Oakland at Minnesota, I p,m.
Carolina at Detroit, I p.m.
Dallas atWashington, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Cleveland, I p.m..
Cincinnati at Baltimore, I p.m.
Buffalo at Miami, I p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m.
Seattle at St. Louis, 4:05 p.m.
San Diego at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
Tennessee atAtlanta, 4:15 p.m.
Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 21E.
Kansas City at New England,
8:30 p.m.
Open: Houston, Indianapolis, New
Orleans, Pittsburgh

College games

Today
South Florida (4-4) at Syracuse
(S-4), 8 p.m.

College scores

Wednesday
Temple 24, Miami (Ohio) 21

Div. I-A coaching wins

Top 10 NCAA Division FBS (formerly
I-A) coaching victories:
Coach W L T
Joe Paterno 409 136 3
y-Bobby Bowden 389 129 4
Bear Bryant 323 85 1.7
PopWarner 319 106 32
AmosAlonzoStagg 314 199 35
LaVell Edwards 257 101 3
Tom Osborne 255 49 3
Lou Holtz 249 132 7
Woody Hayes 238 72 10
Bo Schembechler 234 65 8
y-Due, to sanctions Imposed by the.
NCAA, the NCAA recognizes Bowden
with 377 victories.

Top 25 schedule
Saturday
'No. I LSU vs. Western Kentucky.
7 p.m.
No. 2 Oklahoma State at Texas Tech,
Noon.
No. 3 Stinford vs Nb. 6 *Oregon,
8 p.m.
No.-4 Alabama at Mississippi State,
7:45 p.m:
No. 5 Bdise State vs.TCU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8Arkansas vs.Tennessee, 6 p.m.
No.- 9 Clemson ys: Wake Forest,
Noon
No. 12 Penn Statevs.No. 19 Nebraska,
Noon
N6.13 Michigan State at Iowa, Noon
No. 14 Georgia vs. No. 24 Auburn,.
3:30 p.m. ,
No. 15 South Carolina vs. Florida,
Noon
No. 16 Wisconsin at Minnesota,
3:30 p.m.
No. 17 Kansas State vs. Texas A&M,
3:30 p.m.
No. 18 Southern Cal vs. Washington,
3:40 p.m. .
No. 21 Texas at Missouri, Noon
No.22 Michigan at Illinois, 3:30 p.m.
No. 23 Cincinnati vs. West Virginia,
Noon
No. 25 Southern Miss vs. UCF,
8 p.m.

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. I North Carolina vs. Michigan'
State in San Diego, 7 p.m.
No.2 Kentucky vs. Marist, 7 p.m.


No. 3 Ohio State vs. Wright State,
9 p.m.
No. 4 Connecticut vs. Columbia,
7 p.m.
No. 6 Duke vs. Belmont, 9 p.m.
No.7 Vanderbilt vs. Oregon, 10 p.m.
No. 8 Florida vs. Jackson State,
7 p.m.
No. 9 Louisville vs. UT-Martin, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Pittsburgh vs. Albany (NY),
7 p.m.
No. 12 Baylor vs. Texas Southern,
8 p.m.
No. 13 Kansas vs.lowson, 8 p.m.
No. 14 Xavier vs. Morgan State,
7 p.m.
No. 17 UCLA vs. Loyola Marymount,
10:30 p.m.
No. 18 Michigan vs. Ferris State,
7 p.m.
No. 19 Alabama vs. North Florida,
8 p.m.
No. 22 Marquette vs. Mount St. Mary's,
9 p.m.
No. 23 Gonzaga vs. Eastern
Washington, II p.m.
No; 24 California vs. UC Irvine,
10:30 p.m.
No. 25 Missouri'vs. Southeast Missouri
State, 8 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week,

NASCAR
/ SPRINT CUP
KOBALT TOOLS 500
Site:Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule: Today, practice (ESPN2,
1:30-2:55 p.m., 5:30-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, 1:30-3 p.m.); Sunday,
race, 3 p.m. (ESPN, 2-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway
(oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 312 miles, 312 laps.
NATIONWIDE
WYPALL 200
Site:Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule: Today, practice; Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, noon-1:30 p.m.), race,
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2,3-6 p.m.).
Track Phoenix international Raceway.
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
AUTO CLUB NHRA FINALS
Site: Pomona, Calif.
Schedule: Today, qualify-
ing; Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2,
Sunday, 12:15-2 a.m.); .Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2,7-16I p.m.).
TrackiAuto Club Raceway at Pomona.
FORMULA ONE
ABU DHABI GRAND PRIX
Site:Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m.), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-1.0 a.m:; 4-6:30 p.m.).r
TrackcYas Marina Circuit (road course,
3.45 miles).
Race distance: 189.8 miles, 55 laps.

HOCKEY L

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers 3, Ottawa 2
Tampa Bay 2, Philadelphia I, OT
Nashville 4,Anaheim 2
Thursday's Games
Edmonton at Boston (n)
Chicago at Columbus (n)
Toronto at St Louis (n)
Florida atWinnipeg (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Colorado (n)
Montreal at Phoenix (n)
Vancouver at Los Angeles (n)
Minnesota at San Jose (n)
Today's Games
Washington at New Jersey, 7 p.m
Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver atAnaheim, 10:30 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Buffalo at Boston, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Toronto, 7, p.m.
New Jersey at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Detroit, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Nashville, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 8 p.m.'
Calgary at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Minnesota at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Phoenix at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.


BRIEFS


YOUTH GOLF CHS BOWLING

Free golf clinic Gas card raffle
offered for girls for fundraiser


A free golf clinic for girls
ages 9-17 will be offered
from 10 a.m. to noon
Saturday at Quail Heights
Country Club. Instructors
are looking for future Lady
Tiger golfers for Columbia
High.
For details, call coach
Todd Carter or Chet
Carter at 365-7097.

RUNNING

Community run
after regions

The FHSAA Region 1I
cross country meet for
Classes 1A, 2A and 3A will
be at Alligator Lake Park
on Saturday.
A free community run
will be offered following
the FHSAA competition.
The community run will
begin at 10:30 a.m.
For details, e-mail Dusty
Smith at dusty@
halfmiletiming.com.


The CHS bowling team



Unscramble these four Jumbles,'
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

IWDETO I


is selling raffle tickets for a
$250 gas card.
For details, call Brian
Saunders at 755-8080.

I From staff reports
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


LDOUFM vTAN5- 46
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon. 52

Ans: 55
(Answers tomorrow) 58
Yesterday's Jumbles: PROUD ADAGE NOTION BARREN
I Wh esth l w ertayhs dtMA
I-


nswer: en e genera was n e moo
chicken dinner, he did this ORDERED IT


League reports
Lake City Bowl league bowling:
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Oddballs
(33-15); 2. Legal Ladies (29-19);
3. The Sandbaggers (28-20).
High handicap game: 1. Joanne
Denton 243; 2. (tie) Cythe Shiver, Iva
"Jean" Dukes 236.
High handicap series: 1. Shirley
Highsmith 639; 2. Karen Clampett
635; 3. Susap Mears 628.
(results from Nov. 8)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. McGhghy's
Navy (31-13); 2. WGASA (30.5-13.5);
3. The Untouchables (28-16).
High scratch game: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 206; 2. Cheryl Jacks 171;
3. Jennifer Freeman 166. 1. Mark
Moore 246; 2. A.J. Dariano 226;
.3. Jon Cadle 224.
High scratch series: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 542; 2. Linda Sutton 444;
' 3. Maureen Osborn 432. 1. Mark
Moore 659; 2. A.J. Dariano 594;
3. Bill Price 588.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
172.5; 2. Cheryl Jacks 155.73;
3. Jennifer Freeman 150.88. 1. Dan
McNair 209.06; 2. A.J. Dariano
195.45; 3. Mark Moore 188.33.
(results from Nov. 6)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Perky Pals
(30-14); 2. Farmers (26-18); 3. Pin
Busters (25.5-18.5).


Week 11 winners/
qualifiers in, the American
Legion Post 57 Texas
Hold 'em Champions
Tournament,
Oct. 31 Martin
Woods, first; Frank
Capallia, second; Mariamne


to see much in the way of sur-
prises for this week's game.
"As this point, we've
faced a 4-3, a 3-4, a 3-3
stack," Allen said. "We're
going to coach the same
way. We want to make sure
we have a focus."
Allen said things can't
change much. in a week
and the Tigers must rely
-'on what got- them to this
point


BOWLING

High handicap game: 1. Janet
Nash 233; 2. Janie Posey 217;
3. Sandi Johns 216. 1. Wendal Shay
232; 2. Wayne Johns 222; 3. Joe
Peterson 220.
High handicap series: 1. Yvonner
Finley 648; 2. Bea Purdy 646;
3. SherI Reeve 599. 1. Keith Herbster
698; 2. Chuck Shorter 634; 3. Dan
Ritter 599.
(results from Nov. 1)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Ronsonet
Buick/GMC (215-85); 2. Rountree-
Moore (184-116); 3. Team 12
(166.5-133.5).
High scratch game: 1. Gregg
Moravec 279; 2. Robert Stone 267;
3. John McFeely Jr. 258. ,
High scratch series: 1. Robert
Stone 764; 2. Jeff Deitz 714; 3. Zech
Strohl 696.
High handicap game: 1. Gregg
Moravec 292; 2. John McFeely Jr.
279 3. .Robert Stone 267.
High handicap series: 1. Robert
Stone 764; 2. Jeff Deitz 753; 3. Gregg
Moravec 729.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl
226.83; 2. Robert Stone 222.87;
3. Curtis Gutzmer 218.2.
(results from Oct. 31)
WATERGUARD
High scratch- game: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 227; 2. Debbie Walters 223;
3. Lori Davis 203. 1. Tom Sewejkis
238; 2. (tie) Jesus Camacho, Mark,
Davis 215; 4. Luke Milton 213.


Densmore, third; Holly
Chopie, fourth;
Nov. 3 Jo'seph
May, first; Frank Capallia,
second; Ray Benoit, third;
Jason Johnson, fourth; ..
*Nov.5-FrankCapallia,
first; Judith Berube,'


"You can go to ;a chem-
istry clinic, but if you don't
know cheniistry, you're-
going to be just as lost as
when you walked in," Allen
said. 'We want to continue
to try to take advantage
of the things an opponent
gives us and go execute."
With St Augustine loom-
ing; Allen has taken a 166k
at some of the things the-
Yellow Jackets do. on film,


High scratch series: 1. Mary
Lobaugh 572; 2. Lori Davis 531;
3. Lorrime Geiger 520. 1. Luke Milton
612; 2. Mark Davis 603; 3. Tom
Sewejkis 588.
High handicap game: 1. Debbie
Walters 271; 2. Lau Sapp 253;
3. Cathey Creel 242. 1. Seve Greaves
248; 2. Tom Sewejkis 246; 3. Nick
Nlquette 238.
High handicap series: 1. Lori
Davis 645; 2. Mary Lobaugh 623;
3. Lorrie Niquette 619. 1. Jack
Stanfield 688; 2. Jesus Camacho 666;
3. Dess Fennell 658.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 188,
Mark Davis 203.
(results from Nov. 1)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. BMW (32-16);
.2. 4 S's (31.5-16.5); 3. Quirky Quad
(31-17).
High handicap, game: 1. Doreen
Waters 247; 2. Pat Hale 232; 3. (tie)
Louise Atwood, Betty Carmichael
225. 1. Ross Meyers 261; 2. Wayne
Johns 253; 3. Thom Evert 248.
High handicap series: 1. Yvonne
Finley 660; 2. Amy Musselwhite 629;
3. Aggie Mumbauer 616. 1. Dan Ritter
684; 2. David Duncan 677; 3. Winton
Brewer.670.
High average: 1. De De Young
155.35; 2. Betty Carmichael 152.12;
3. Jane Sommerfeld 151.94. 1. David
Duncan 193.33; 2. Bill Dolly 190.06;
3. George Mulligan 176.42.
(results from Nov. 3)


second; Jim Grimsley, third;
Allan Kellett, fourth.
Total qualified 54;
Royal Flush Jackpot. -
$415.
Participants do not have
to be members of the
American Legion.


but he doesn't plan on let-
ting his team delve into the
playoffs until Monday. He
knows the most important
thing is retaining the Oaken
Bucket -- something the
Tigers have done for three-
consecutive years.
This year's group of
seniors can go out unde-
feated against the Bulldogs
starting at 7 p.m. tonight in
Live Oak.


INDIANS: Introductions start at 7 p.m.


Continued From Pa


White and the Indian
be looking to celebrate
game with introduce
and post-game with

ACROSS
1 Electrical
measure
4 Shot meas.
7 Kind of rally
10 kwon do
11 Narrow
margin
13 Devious
14 Go-aheads
15 A Guthrie
16 Route for
Ben-Hur
17 Billiards
parlor
19 Corn bread
20 Tall bird
21 Rock concert
venue
23 majeste
26 More feasible
28 Circulars
29 Legal matter
30 Wide tie
34 Carlo
36*Feel under par
38 Not just mine
39 Ill-chosen
41 Griffith or
Gibb


age 1B


is will Paddle.
e pre- Introduction of players,
actions cheerleaders, dance team
, the and band members, and their

42 Courage Answe
under fire
44 Belt maker's
tool TOP 1
46 Upright A L I NE
timber ECT
47' Set free N E /
52 Follow a trail 0 F
53 Aunt Bee's G uQ
charge
54 Cheyenne's st T E T E
55 Like summer HEIDI
tea
56 Diluted ESOC
57 Fortify YEA
58 Went first
59 Coast Guard
off. VOW 1
60 Pipe joint A I A I


parents, will begin at 7 p.m.
Parents are asked to join their
child in the north end zone
before the introductions.

or to Previous Puzwzle


R I IENT ATSP
CPA
I TH BRA
I TSE LIL
FRO NOISE
SAME NMEX
DEL LPN


Tl
T I


DOWN MEN SA
Surmounting PETEJRJ
Dangerous 7 Rock

100 centavos devices
Type of 8 Helen, in
bracelet Spanish
Live it up 9 Ceremonial
Barn neighbor fire


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QulllDriverBooks.com


AVILA


"Gladiator"
extra
Windshield
devices
"Annabel -"
Actual
Flee hastily
Shogun's
capital
W-2 info
Cousin of
PDQ
Gambling
town
Chili care
Belly dance
instrument
Hear a case
Engaged in a
joust
Popular
cuisine
Turn signal
Pie -
mode
Bass or
soprano
Inquired
Calendar
rows
Silvers or
Donahue
Fencer's
blade
Nail a fly
Fictional
governess
Igloo shape


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


AMERICAN LEGION HOLD 'EM


CHS: Looking to retain Bucket

Continued From Page 1B


JS|SI


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


11-11










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011


DILBERT
STOPLIGHT I MAKE MY
THERE. DON'T TELL | DECISIONS BASED
MAE THE TECHNICAL ON WHAT I KNOW
DETAILS OF YOUR ABOUT THE PEOPLE
IDEA. INVOLVED.


8


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Vacation caretaker leaves her

neighbors' home open to theft


YOU KNOW
LESS ABOUT
ME THAN 1YOUR
YOU KNOLWJ IDEA
ABOUT MY PALE AND
IDEA. POORLY
IDEA. DRESSED?


:K


DEAR ABBY: Before
we went on vacation, we
trusted our 15-year-old
neighbor "Mia" to feed our.
cat, take in the mail and
water the plants. While
we were away, she invited
some of her friends and
their .friends to our home.
Some of them she knew by
their nicknames and only
for a short time.
When Mia's parents
learned about the party,
they forbade her to go.
However, she failed to.
mention she'had left our
door unlocked for strang-
ers to enter. It was obvious
when we returned that
people had been there
because things were out
of place and garbage was
left behind. We're missing
about $100 worth of beer
and liquor, $50 in change
and $150 in old coins. Mia
claims she doesn't know
who was there, and her
friends aren't being hon-
est .
I'd like to get the police
involved. Mia, her parents
and my husband think
I'm "unfair" for wanting
toinvolve the police. I
believe a crime has been
committed and don't ,
understand why I'm being
treated like the bad guy
when I'm the victim. The
police have told me Mia
would not geft"into trouble
as long as she cooper-
ates. Am I overreacting?
- VIOLATED NEIGHBOR
IN PENNSYLVANIA


friends. These men don't
frighten me, but I don't
understand their motiva-
tion. Do you? GRANNY
IN HER 70s.
DEAR GRANNY: There
isn't a blanket explanation
for the behavior you have
described. Some of your
'friends' husbands may be
trying to console you; oth-
ers may have lecherous
intentions. As to your male
cq-workers, big hugs and
kisses are a no-no in the
workplace and you should
tell them so.
If these incidents hap-
pen repeatedly with the
same people, you WILL
have to speak up and
say they're making you
uncomfortable. And. as to
your friends' husbands,
try this: Stiff-arm them
when you greet them
with a sweet smile, then
turn your, cheek when
you see them coming at
you.

DEAR VETERANS: I
salute you for your service
to this country. gMy thanks
to each of you, as well as
to the brave and dedicated
men and women who are
still on active duty. You
are, the personification of
patriotism and self-sacrifice
for your dedication to this
country.,- ABBY

M Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069,


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Don't try to convince
yourself that someone
from your past will change
or treat you differently. Put
up yourguard:andfocus
on what lies ahead, not
behind. Value your ethics
and integrity and protect
your reputation. Love is in
the stars. ***
. TAURUS. (April 20-May
20): Enjoy getting out and
meeting people. Share
your ideas and. you will
attract interest in a proj-
ect you want to pursue..A
partnership will be invit-
ing, and the prospects look
promising. A celebration
late in the day will enhance
your personal life. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Your versatility will,
save the day. Jumping
from one thing to another
is what you do best. Your
keen sense of what works
and what doesn't will give
you. an edge when faced:
with a challenge or compe-
tition. Love is highlighted.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Not everyone will be
honest Question anyone
who is trying to impress
you. Business proposi-
tions or promises will
come with baggage, and
disappointment will: result
if you aren't practical and'
realistic. Protect your
assets.***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


'THE LAST WORD life. Keep your money in a
e L. as safe place. ',***
Eugenia Last SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
SDec. 21): You are likely to
Change will be inviting, receive fal e information
and adapting to new sur-, ; opbsacused of exag..
i r noundings, people or ways; -geratirigthe truth. Stick to
of doing things will be basics and keep whatever
exciting. You'll be inspired you do, say or pursue sim-
to contribute your unique ple. Too much of anything
touch to whatever you will work against you.
pursue, and you stand to Caution will put you in the
be praised for your, insight driver's seat ***
Love is on the rise. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept Jan. 19): Put more into
22): Explore new people, home and your domestic
places and pastimes. Your life and you will reap the
encounters will be fulfill- rewards. Your ability to
ing, and what you learn deal with money matters
along the way will help you will help you avoid a loss.
deal with pressing person- Dealing with institutions or
'al matters. Reassess your. agencies will be advanta-
domestic situation and act geous if you make a pre-
quickly, before things esca- sensation. *****
late. ***** AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 18): Don't let what others
22) i Don't take a risk. Size., say get to you. Follow your
up your situation. Once heart and you will make the
you see where things are choice best suited to your
heading you will make needs. You have more going
the right choice for you. for you than you realize,
Enjoy friends or consider and your success will be the
taking a mini-trip that will best revenge you could pos-
enhance your relationship. sibly ask for. **
with the people you lov PISCES (Feb. 19-March
most*** 20): Stick to what you
,SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov. know. Telling the truth
21): Put a little extra into and keeping promises are
your job and you will get a a must if you want to get
high return. Your dedica- ahead. Stick close to.home
tion will impress someone and avoid trips that might
who is watching from the lead to problems with
sidelines. Don't let some- authority figures. Protect
one you used to know your reputation and your
interfere in your personal position. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by' Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 equals Y
"KFLY SBKLHS G LTT UZWBLS KFZ
TBSX HN KFZ N.UZZ HSTO YH THSJ BY
LK LY" KF.Z FHWZ HN KFZ IUBEZ." -
ZTWZU X BE LY


Previous Solution: "If there's a golf course in heaven, I hope'it's like Augusta
.National. I just don't want an early tee time." Gary Player
02011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-11


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
DEAR VIOLATED: I
don't think so. The party
animals who invaded
your home are guilty of
trespassing and theft. You
should be compensated for
anything that was taken
and those responsible. held.
accountable. Now that the
"kids' have' seen where
everything of value in your
house is located, you could
be further victimized.
You did the right thing in
informing the police.
* ** ** ** *
DEARABBY: I am
recently widowed. Men
I work with and the hus-
bands of some of my
friends have been hitting"
on me. They'll ask me out
for a meal, give me:big
hugs and:a couple of
them have even kissed me
on the mouth. \ .
I don't lead them on,,
and besides, I'm a chubby
great-grandmother. What
drives men to do this? Do
they think they're "con-
soling" me? When these-
things happen, I act as if
they never' did and go on
as usual because to do oth-'
erwise would be hurtful .
to their wives, who are my


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


ADvantage


Legal

ATTENTION COMCAST CABLE
CUSTOMERS
On December 13, 2011, Comcast
will add Discovery Familia, channel
646, and HITN, channel 649, to the
Cable Latino tier.
These channel changes affect 'current
and new residential and commercial
subscribers in St. Augustine, Palatka,
Welaka, Lake City, Live Oak and
Alachua County.
A digital-ready television set arid/or
"digital equipment may be! required to
view some channels. Additional
service charges may apply. Services
not available in all areas, restrictions
apply.
For more information, please call 1-
800-934-6489.
05528957 ,
November 11, 2011
Registration of Fictitious Names
We the undersigned, being duly
sworn, do hereby declare under oath
that the names of all persons interest-
ed in the business or profession car-
ried on under the name of GATOR
HEATING AND AIR (This fictitous
business name is owned by Swamp
Heating and Air LLC ID:
L11000101545 at 158 SW CONES-
TOGA WAY, FORT WHITE, FL,
32038
Contact Phone Number: 386-497-
2323 and the extent of the interest of
each, is as follows:
Name: MICHAELRADZIMINSKI
Extent of Interest: 100%
Submitted by- Andy Perez

05529032
November 11, 2011


One5em per ad 0
4 lines 6 days c had ditional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $00 or less.
Each item must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rat.a



One tem per ad 1 |
4 lines 6 days ine $ additional







Rate applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $,00 or less.



Each Item must Include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.'



One Item per ad $2 7 |i
4 lines 6 days Each ditional
Rate applies to private Individuas selling
personal merchandise totalling $2,500 or less.
Each item must Include a pct
This n a non-reundahbl ratepr



One Ham per ad 27
Slineso 6 days Each additional
Rate apples to private lindividuals selling 5
personal mchandis totaling S$4,000 or less.
.Each Iars must include a price.
This is a non-refundable rate.



One Ham per ad addition
4 lines 6 days oin1s5
R a apies to private Individud seing 0
per.n'.r.s. m hr-'a' toa l qiblag S 000 0o .ss
Ea.:r. Ic., luse ,.cce a pr
hi i -refndableaaOe.


Counair Club Rd. Please call Kelly
50 288'8897 Reward Available

3 days 15 Opportunities
includes 2Sgns Opportunities


Limited to service type advertis-'
ing only.
4 lines, one month...:s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
fnhcludes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their,
classified ads in person, and some'
ad categories will require prepay-'
rrient Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please '
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com

I-I


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only the charge for the ad space
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Should further information be
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the. Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify elr advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
cation.. Credit for published errors
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for that portion of the advertisement
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Advertising language' must comply
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In Print and Online
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05529019
First Federal Bank of Florida
has a position open for an
Administrative Assistant.
Performs various secretarial and
administrative services. Ability,
to multi-task and strong,
attention'to detail with complete
confidentiality. Three to five
years previous executive
administrative experience
required. Must be proficient in
Microsoft Word, Excel and
Outlook. Applications may be
obtained fromany First
Federal Branch and submitted to
Human Resources,
P.O. Box 2029, Lake City, Fl.
3205,6 or emailed to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com.
Equal Employment
Opportunity Employer

05529039
The Third Judicial Circuit
currently has the following
I position available:
Administrative Secretary I
For more information go to:
www.jud3.flcourts.org

5529063 --



Holidao lnn
Lake City's only full service
hotel is seeking the following:
o Night Auditor
Apply in person.
Mon-Fri 12-5pm or visit
www.ihg.jobs.net
'213 SW Commerce Dr.
EOE/DFWP.

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.iakecityreporter.com


100 Job
SOpportunities
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
WRITER needed
Must have experience.
S$1000. wk. 386-758-4757

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN
needed. $1,500 week.
Must have experience and tools.
386-758-4757
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn'bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Construction Engineering &
Inspection. Seeking Inspectors,
Contract Support and Compliance
Staff. CTQP Qualified.
email resumes to:
SuzannaM(S)via-cs.com
Experienced Roofers
Needed.
Please call
(850) 271-4199
Customer Service Representative.
for call center. Must be fast friend-
ly & efficient. Please send resume
to: 197 SW Waterford Ct. Lake
City, Fl 32025- Att: Joey Kitaif.
Please send resume for call center
position only. There are no other
positions at this time.
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details..
Production Technician needed.
Must be over'21/clean driving
record. On call wkwnds/after hrs.
Call for appt.,386-754-0261 ,


Sales Help at Florida Visitors
Center. Benefits, hourly wage
plus commission. Excellent
opportunity with National
company. Westgate Resorts.
Call Ed. 904-540-2314 or
Connie 386-344-0082 :


STYLIST NEEDED at
SouthernExposure.
386-7524614
Call for info.


Wanted mentor/care provider
.P/T for 15 yr male to asst w/home-
Swork & monitor activity. Must
have own car. 386-623-9228
Wee iCare of Columbia City
is hiring CDA Teachers
Experience required.
Apply in person.

A Medical
- .U Employment

05528667
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05529016 '
Medical Billing
Must have experience in all
aspects of coding, billing,
and collections.
Send resume.in confidence to:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com or
Fax-# 386-758-5987

05529030 .
RN/LPN needed for infusion
center. MUST have IV
certification w/2yrs exp. PT- 3
to 4 days weekly. Fax resume
to: Attn Cheryl 386-754-3657 or
email to office manager: at
primarvcaremedic.com

2 Schools &
240 Education

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/28/10
Phlebotomy national certifica--
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingserVices.com


310 Pets & Supplies
3 beautiful AKC Long Hair
Chihuahua puppies. Born 8/20.
Ready for the holidays.
386-364-7040
Black, female, Toy Poodle. Pa-
rents on Premises. Avail the end of
Nov. Deposits being taken. Will
hold til Christmas. 386-758-7706
SFREE to Good Home
Orange & white Kittens'
Litter box trained.
(386)288-2504 or 288-4481
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you, are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

A -3 Livestock &
3 Supplies -
* WANTED: I Buy and Sell used
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay cash. Call 386-935-1522

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

10 Lawn & Garden
4l Equipment
JOHN DEERE 2009 42'
Mower With 2 Bag bagger
$750.00
386-755-1002 Leave Message


419 TV-Radio &
1 Recording


20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$50.00
386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Upf
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pin 386- 752- 3648
WANTED: Used Juke boxes
that play 45 rpm'records'
that work. ,
386-397-4489,

430 Garage Sales
2 Family Sale Sat 10-3. 2 miles
down Branford Hwy on the right.
Golf clubs, furniture, clothes, Prin-
cess House dishes. Look for signs.
619 NW Holiday Dr. Sat 8a- Super
Nintendo, NES & Atari games,
controllers & systems. Toys, other
electronics. Golf clubs, cookware.,
Baby/kids/maternity clothes,baby
items,bassinets,household,fumi-
ture,appliances,books. Fri-Sat. 8-1.
Woodcrest SD Woodview Way.
Fri 8a-2p.& Sat. 7a-2p Frmn, appli-
ances, ladies plus sizes & big men
clothes. Lake Jeffery to Bo Ct. on
left. Look for signs & balloons.
Multi Family Fri & Sat. 8-3.
Hwy 47 & Alice Gin. 1 mi. N of
1-75. QUALITY hsehold, name,
brand clothes, Christmas items.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

SAT. 11/12, 7-3,.183 Mockingbird
,Way, off Cty. Rd. 242, household
items, funit.., deco. items, sm. ap-.
pli., lamps, fireplace accessories.
Thurs,Fri & Sat. 7:30-1:30. 190
SW Fabian Way. Close to 242 &
247. Look for signs. Scuba items,
Disney snow globes. Much More!


440 Miscellaneous
Never worn Wedding Dress,
Size 10, Halter Neckline, Mermaid
cut, beaded. Other Acc. Veil,
Slips, etc. $400. 386-623-6652
USED SET'(3) Danton tires.
185/60/15
$65.00
386-984-7510

450 Good Things
45 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
Firewood:for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pis leave message
we will call you back.

i Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

16X80 Almost new. 10 mi S of
Lake City, off Branford Hwy. 3/2,
fenced yd, Dish Washer private..
$650. mo + sec. No Pets. 984-7478
2&3 BR MH. $395'- $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422,
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2bedrm/2bth $500 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 38,6-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
Country Living, -
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779 -
Nice clean 2 & 3br. inm 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
.No Pets. 386-961-1482

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale- ''
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $164,900 623-6896


3/2 MH on 1 acre in nice sub.
paved rd. metal roof. completely'.
remodeled. new everything! Only
$39,500 386-249-1640
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and'
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
4br/2ba, Long carport,
Front & back porches.
Reduced to $37,000.
Call 386-752-4258
'NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566

PalmHarbor Homes Has 3
Modular Homes Available
at HUGH Savings
Over 40K Off 800-622-2832
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or Doubles. Must have
clear title. Call North Point Homes
(352)872-5566


'710 Unfurnished Apt.
i7 0 For Rent








SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.

some with garages.
Call 386.454-1469
www.springhillvillage.net

Ibr Apt with
all utilities included.
Close to the VA.
(727)415-2207
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
*386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arm A Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry,& balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
.1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH4/A,
$650 month &,bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated'Apt, w/tile
'floors/fresh paint. Great area.
* From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800'wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com-
'NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, lg 2 br Apt.
Close to town
$485 mo + $485 dep.
* 386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome.with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741


Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms'Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private.
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181


720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent


Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2br/lba.Briclk Duplex. Water, lawn
care &garbage pickup incl. Near
High School $595 mo plus dep.
386-752-0118 or 623-1698


020 Lost & Found
CAT FOUND. Gray with
White Chest & Feet, Friendly,
age? On SR 252 near old CC Rd.
386-365-5099
Lost Dog In Eastwood Boston Ter-
rier, Black and White named Har-
ley. Likely blue collar. Very
friendly. Roughly 35 lb $50 Re-
ward. HE'S BEEN FOUND!!.
MISSING: "Buster" Black and
.White Male Boston Terrier. Old


4i:'
,^^

an


confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


I


JBUYIi


[SEL hITc

Y fITn


i


t










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011


S Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05528950


SM IrtLR. SIU FAST.tS
The Darby Rogers Company
315 Piedmont St.
4/2 in Live Oak $790./mo
775 SW EL Prado.
Lake City 3/1 w/screened
porch and large fenced back
yard $775./mo
222 SW 3rd St.
3/2 totally'remodeled in
downtown Jasper $800./mo
1320 NW Labonte.
3/2 located in Gwen Lake
area of Lake City $800./mo
847 SW Applewood Glen.
.Ft White 3/3 DWMH in the
country $800./mo
199 SW Brandy Way.
family friendly 4/2 in
Springfield Estates
Lake City $950.00
16652 Spring St.
Historic 3/2 two story home
totally remodeled in down
town White Springs
$1000./ mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650 or
BJ Federico 386-365-5884

3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, corner of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
i TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plug
$250 damage dep; 386-752-8553
3BR/1BA HOME off McFarlane.
CH/A, Ig yard, No pets.
$575."mo $575. dep.
850-421-3617 or 850-294-4778
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North, of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
4BR/3.5BA Executive Hdrme on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Oldlbrick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610 .
. 4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to,
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1100. mo.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.'
home brick, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007..$1275..
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083


For lease-Lakewood sub. LG
brick, 2600 sq. ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lg lot by Lake Jeffrey. $1275.m
+last+sec. Bruce 386,365-3865


7 075 Business &
Office Rentals
05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth-:;: ':
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
Midtown Commercial Center,
brand new executive front suite &
suite w/warehouse.
Call Vicki or Joe 386-935-2832.

770 Condos For Rent
2BR/2'BA, all appliances,
water/sewer, basic cable,
pool & tennis cts. "
$1150/mo, call 386-344-0433

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% ownerfinancing,
no qualifying,'$395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065


r


805 Lots for Sale t
FOR SALE: 2 valuable lots locat-
ed next to Lake Shore hospital in
Lake City. $20,000. serious in-
quires only please. 910-874-1565
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838


BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 $129,000 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate .,
COUNTRY CLOSE'3/2 brick, 3
:acres,.pole bain, workshop, fruit.
trees. $129,900 #78096
Call Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate
HUD HOME 4.77 ac, near
G'ville:3/2;,as:is $95,500'Call :'
Robin Williams 365-5,146 ,
www.hudhomestore.com 091-
434983 Hallmark Real Estate
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large
oaks, wood floors, fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!!" 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
* $169,900 386-623-6896
SHORT SALE 3/2,-Built 2007,
wood floors, Game room.
REDUCED! Call Ginger Parker
386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate


820 Farms &
2 Acreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086

830 Commercial
8 Property
MOBILE HOME PARK with 1g.
brick owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84 Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
8f7 Real Estate
7/ Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price -
386-269-0605

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


950 Cars for Sale
1974 FORD Galaxy.
Clean, runs fair, spotless interior.
4 -door. $2,300!
386-754-8885
2000 Lincoln LS $3200;
1999 Pontiac Minivan $1995;
1999 Ford Mustang $3900;
1999 Chrysler 300M $2695.
352-538-0292/514-2950

O91 Recreational
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PICKS: Stanford's Luck can make Heisman case this weekend with win
Continued From Page 1B


Wisconsin's Russell
Wilson has 2,238 yards, 21
touchdowns and a 196.7
rating. Baylor's Robert
Griffin III has 2,781 yards,
26 touchdown passes and a
188.1. Boise State's Kellen
Moore has 2,229 yards, 29
touchdowns and a 179.5.
Oklahoma State's Brandon
Weeden has 3,212 yards,
26 touchdowns and a 158.5
rating.
Then there is Houston's
Case Keenum, who has
been setting NCAA career
records weekly and put-
ting up crazy stats for the
Cougars. Keenum's line:
3,626, 34 and 192.4.
Alabama's loss last week
against LSU was a setback
for running back Trent
Richardson, but he certain-
ly shouldn't be eliminated
from the Heisman race. The
Tide's bruising tailback was
the best offensive player on
the field in a 9-6 game, with
89 yards rushing and 80
receiving.
He was second in the
Heismanpundit.com poll
this week. Moore and
Keenum were tied for
third.
But this Heisman is
Luck's to lose.
The picks:
SATURDAY
Western Kentucky
(plus 41 1-2) at No. 1
LSU
Tigers should get a few
touchdowns this week ...
LSIJ 48-3.
No. 2 Oklahoma State
(minus 17) at Texas
Tech


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State safety Terrence Parks (right) tries to strip the ball from the hands of Boston College running' back Roland Finch
(28) during the second half of a college football game in Boston on Nov. 3. Florida State defeated Boston College 38-7.


Since beating Oklahoma,
Red Raiders have been out-
scored93-27... OKLAHOMA
STATE 49-28.
No. 6 Oregon (plus
3'1) at No. 3 Stanford.
Luck doesn't disappoint,
but Cardinal do ... OREGON
38-34.
No. 4 Alabama (minus
17'2) at Mississippi St.
Tide won't leave it to


the kickers this week ...
ALABAMA 35-14.
TCU (plus 15) at No.
5 Boise State
This Frogs defense play-
ing nothing like recent
stingy editions ... BOISE
STATE 42-28.
Tennessee (plus 14) at
No. 8 Arkansas
Maybe Razorbacks
should have volunteered


to move to SEC East ...
ARKANSAS 31-14.
Wake Forest (plus
16'/2) at No. 9 Clemson
Deacons can win Atlantic
division by winning out ...
CLEMSON 35-21.
No. 19 Nebraska
(minus 31) at No. 12
Penn State
Impossible to know how
Nittany Lions will respond


... NEBRASKA 21-14
No. 13 Michigan State
(minus 2'A) at Iowa
Spartans can all but lock
up Legends Division ...
MICHIGAN STATE 27-21.
No. 24 Auburn (plus
13) at No. 14 Georgia
Bulldogs two wins
from SEC East title, and
next game is Kentucky ...
GEORGIA 28-17.


Florida (no line) at No.
15 South Carolina
Gators trying to play
spoiler to Gamecocks.
Strange days for SEC East
... FLORIDA 17-16.
No. 16 Wisconsin
(minus 27) at Minnesota
Gophers have played
much better recently, but
Badgers might still be class
of Big Ten ... WISCONSIN
55-17.
Texas A&M (minus 4'h)
at No. 17 Kansas State
Each team is loss away
from promising season get-
ting away from it... KANSAS
STATE 35-31.
Washington (plus 12)
at No. 18 Southern
California
Huskies have won two
straight decided on last play
of game ... USC 42-28.
No. 21 Texas (minus
1) at Missouri
Big 12's top two rushing
teams ... TEXAS 28-24.
No. 22 Michigan
(minus 1) at Illinois
Wolverines won 67-65
in triple OT last year ...
MICHIGAN 27-21.
West Virginia (plus 3h)
at No. 23 Cincinnati
Bearcats can put the Big
East race in a headlock ...
WEST VIRGINIA 27-24.
UCF (plus 9) at No. 25
Southern Miss
Golden Eagles heading
toward CUSA title game
showdown against Houston
... SOUTHERN MISS 42-17.
Last week's record:
10-7; Season record: 146-
31.


Tebow

not

taking

big hits

By ARNIE STAPLETON
Associated Press -
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
- Twice in the three
weeks since he took over as
Denver's starting quarter- -
back, Tim Tebow has had
one of his sacks erased by
the NFL's statistics keepers
after reviews of the game
film.
The bruises are for
keeps.
Tebow has been sacked a
league-high 14 times in his
three starts but just once at
Oakland last week, when
the Broncos installed the
read-option as a major com-
ponent of their unorthodox
offense.
Including that sack and
another that was later
changed to a zero-yard
rush, Tebow was hit 17 -
times by the Raiders on
Sunday, when he took a hel-
met to the chin that split his
lower lip.
For all those who say
he's more susceptible tuck-
ing the ball and running,
Tebow insists it's safer than
getting hit in the pocket


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420