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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01695
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 10, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01695
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text








000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


y Reporter


Thursday, novemucr *v, ..


--. -- -.. ecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 245 0 75 cents


Lake City man faces rape charges in Citrus


Woman endured
two-day ordeal,
say authorities.

By GORDON JACKSON
gackson@lakecityreporter.com .

A Lake .City man accused
assaulting and kidnapping a 35-ye
old Citrus County woman earl
this month was arrested Tuesd
at a family member's home in sou
Suwannee County.
Douglas Lewis Maxfield, 32, w-
taken into custody without incide


10-year

wildfire

record

may fall


Forestry officials
urge caution when
burning yard waste.

By GORDON JACKSON
gackson@lakecityreporter:com

This year has the poten-
tial to be the busiest wildfire
season in a decade; accord-
ing to the Florida Forest
Service.
So far, Suwannee
Forestry Center firefight-
ers have responded to 451
wildfires the most since
2001, when 456 wildfires
were reported in the six-
county district. A total of
8,920 acres have burned in
the district this year.
And with nearly eight'
weeks until the end of the
year and' dry conditions
throughout the region, it's
possible the decade-long
record could '-be broken,
said Kurt Wisner, a forest
service mitigation special-
ist and public information
officer. -I
"Extended drought in
our area made fuel condi-
tions extremely volatile for
most of the year," Wisner
said. "That, drought was
enhanced by a La Nina
weather pattern which' kept
our conditions drier than
normal."
. The National Weather
Service is predicting nor-
mal to below normal tem-
peratures and below nor-
mal precipitation through,
February. The weather fore-
cast means the potential for:
more wildfires will increase
throughout the region, in
coming months, according
to The National Interagency
Fire 'Center.
. With thunderstorm sea-
son winding down, lightning
is unlikely to be a major
threat for more wildfires.
"It's. people not being
careful," he said. "The No.
WILDFIRE continued on 3A


by Suwannee Countydeputies after
they went to a home at 21819 47th
Drive to ask family members if they
knew where he was
staying. The home
bears a Lake City
address but is in
Suwannee County.
Gail Tierney, a
spokeswoman for
the Citrus County
~Sheriffs Office,
Maxfield said Suwannee dep-
uties were asked to
go to the home by
Citrus County deputies investigating
the alleged crime.
The victim reported the incident to


CARC will

re-open

thrift shop

Boutique is located
within House of Bargains,
which remains closed.

By LAURA HAMPSON
thampson@lakeciy reporter.com


authorities on Nov. 5, two days after
it happened, Tierney said. She told
investigators that she and Maxfield,
who was unemployed, argued the
evening of Nov. 2 after she confront-
ed him about e-mails he sent to other
women on her computer. The victim
also argued about text messages
Maxfield sent to wbmen on his cel-
lular phone, investigators said.
The victim. told deputies that
Maxfield had been drinking,' which
she had never seen him do in the five
months they were dating. During
the argument Maxfield threw items
at her and attempted to tie her up,
the victim told investigators.
Maxfield severelybeatthewoman,


held a gun to her head and eventu-
ally raped her, Tierney said. .
The following day, Nov. 3, Maxfield
forced the woman to drive him to
Lake City, Tierney said. During the
,drive, Maxfield reportedly beat the
woman again.
After they drove to Lake City,
Maxfield allowed the woman to
return home to Hernando, a small
town in central Citrus County.
Tierney said the victim didn't-
report the assault for two days
because she was in severe pain from
the beatings she endured from the,
assaults.
A deputy investigating the inci-
dent said the victim suffered one


After a two month absence in
downtown Lake City, Valerie's
Encore Boutique will reopen
Saturday. The upscale thrift shop
will have a pre-grand opening from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake Cily Repi
The boutique is inside the House Valerie's Encore Boutique manager Brittany Greek sets up a mannequin in prepi
of Bargains, which is not yet open. ration for the store's opening on Saturday. The store, located in downtown Lake
Profit from both stores benefits City, offers clothing, accessories and footwear for men and women of all ages.
CARC, a non-profit organization 'We will offer an upscale, unique shopping experience at competitive prices,'.
CARC continued on 3A Greek said.


of the most severe beatings he has
ever seen. There wasn't a part of her
body that wasn't bruised, Tierney
said.
"This one outdid them all,"
.Tierney said a deputy describing the
victim's injuries told her.
The victim is expected to recover
from her injuries, Tierney said. '
Maxfield is charged with sexual
battery with a firearm, kidnapping
while armed, and battery, authori-
ties said. Citrus County deputies
are expected, to transport Maxfield
back to the county jail in Inverness
sometime soon, butTierney said the
exact date and time can't be revealed
for security reasons.


Paterno

to retire

as coach

Penn State officials
could still insist he
leave immediately.

By GENARO C. ARMAS
Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -
Joe Paterno, the Penn State
football coach who.preached
success with honor for half
a century but whose legend
was shattered by a child
sex abuse '
scandal, said
Wednesday
he will retire
at the end of
this season.
Paterno
said he was
"absolutely
devastated" Paterno
by the case,
in which
his onetime heir appar-
ent, Jerry Sandusky, has
been charged with molest-
ing eight boys in 15 years,
80 including at the Penn State
football conimplex.
He said he hoped the
Steam could finish its season
with "dignity and determi-
nation."
The school's board of
trustees could still force
Paternd to leave immediate-
ly. It also could take action
against the university presi-
dent, Graham Spanier.
Paterno said the trustees,
who had been considering
his fate, should "not spend
a single minute discuss-
ing my status" and have
more important matters to
address.
The 84-year-old Paterno
has been engulfed by out-
rage that he did not take
more action after a graduate
assistant, Mike McQueary,
.came to him in 2002 and
reported seeing Sandusky
in the Penn State show-
ers with a 10-year-old boy.
orer t Paterno notified the ath-
a- letic director, Tim Curley,
and a vice president,, Gary
Schultz.
PATERNO continued on 3A


Plenty ofVeterans Day events taking place in Lake City
j~~n' eve/ j **


Holiday will be
observed locally
today, tomorrow.

From staff reports
Thursday, Nov. 10
The Lake City VA. Medical Center will
host a Veterans Day ceremony today at
10 am. on the front lawn. Mayor Stephen
Witt will be among several speakers. Adam
Widner, Wounded Warrior and former Army
sergeant, will provide the keynote address.'


Widnier suffered spinal cord, shoulder and
ankle injuries in Afghanistan on July 24,2008.
:"Today, my issues are difficult to describe,"
he said. The men and women you serve
with are your brothers and sisters, and when
they fall, you fall. But now I have hope and
support from people who have been there -
people struggling through the same trauma
I did. And as I improve, I want to help those
who need aid through civilian integration."
The presentation of colors will be lead by
the American Legion Post 57 Color, Guard.
Art Lowe, American Legion Post 57 com-
mander, will lead everyone in the Pledge of


Allegiance. It is open to the public. The hos-
pital is located at 619 S. Marion Ave. in Lake
City. For information call (386) 755-3016, ext.
2135.
Friday, Nov. 11
Hospice Veterans Day event
Haven Hospice of Lake City will have
a veterans' event today from 10 am. to 2
p.m. with a pinning ceremony for veterans,
barbecue lunch and guest speaker Deborah
Grassman.
The event is free. Veterans and their fami-
lies are encouraged to attend.


Grassman personally cared for veterans
in her 25 years of hospice Work. She is the
author of Peace at Last, a collection of stories
for veterans and their families.
The event will be at-the Suwannee Valley
Hospice Care Center community room, 6037
West Highway 90 in Lake City. Call (386) 752-
9191 for information.
Veterans Day Parade
The 11 am. parade will begin at the Florida
Department of Transportation Headquarters
on South Marion Avenue. It will head north
on Marion Avenue to Washington Avenue
and then west to Young's Park.


1 8464i,0002 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


7236
Isolated Showers
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................ 4A
People ................. 2A
Obiuaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 3B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY
iN PEOPLE
Eddie Murphy
, quits Oscards


COMING
THURSDAY
Local news
roundup


Wall of honor


Columbia High School senior Troy Gaskins, 17, photographs the Wall of Honor Wednesday while on his way to class.
The banner features more than 600 names of past and present veterans related to the school's students and staff.
Students from Wendy Stevens' and Amy Wacha's junior and senior advisement classes collected names from at least 8
homerooms.


,, II -


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~--ab~--l ~-3 ~ass~-~-B~srsss~---- ----------~--~-~~-a~aEl--~-ara.~l~-~










2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011


Saturday:
1-4-5-37-38-51
x5


H H3. Wednesday:
. 1 Afternoon: 6-9-9


VhI&Y*-


ky,4 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-6-1-7


Tuesday:
3-6-9-19-28


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Michael Jackson's furniture for sale


LOS ANGELES
Softer Michael Jackson's
death on June 25, 2009,
"* the gated mansion at
100 North Carolwood
rive where the pop star
lived with his three children while
'preparing for his comeback con-
'certs became part media camp, part
Jackson tribute ground.
Hundreds of tearful fans left cards,
flowers, balloons'and handwritten-
notes in front of the three-story
home resembling a French chateau,
while dozens of reporters jumped at
'any development in the death inves-.
ltigation. Anyone coming in or out of.
.the property was bombarded with
questions.
Now, as Dr. Conrad Murray sits
in a jail cell awaiting sentencing
for involuntary manslaughter in
'Jackson's death, the contents,of the
home including the queen-size
'bed where Jackson took his last
breath sit neatly on display, just
-as they were, awaiting the auction
block.
"We want to preserve the history
,of these items," said celebrity auc-
tioneer Darren Julien, president of
Julien's Auctions, which next month
will sell the various antique furnish-
ings, paintings and sculptures that
surrounded the King of Pop in his
final days.
Located on a leafy corner in the
posh Holmby Hills neighborhood,
the Carolwood home where Jackson
lived from December 2008.until
his death is separately up for sale.
The house and its furnishings were
leased to Jackson while he and his
family lived there.
A note from one of the children
remains on a chalkboard inside the
home's sprawling kitchen, where
'three barstools were lined up against
,the center island a perfect bredk-


Items from Michael Jackson's bedroom at the Carolwood Drive home where the
singer passed away in 2009 will be auctioned this December.


fast spot for the kids. "I (heart)
Daddy. SMILE, it's for free," the ,
chalk note reads in childlike scrawl.
The chalkboard will be sold as-is,
and is expected to fetch more than
$400.
The bedroom shown in evidence
photos at Murray's criminal trial was
actually considered a "medication
room" by the Jackson team. Murray
was convicted of supplying an insom-
nia-plagued Jackson with the power-
ful operating-room anesthetic propo-
fol to help him sleep as he rehearsed
for a series of comeback concerts in
London,

Eddie Murphy follows
Ratner, quits Oscar gig
LOS ANGELES Eddie Murphy
has bowed out of his gigas host of the
Academy Awards,following pal Brett


Ratner's decision to leave the show as
producer because of an uproar over a
gay slur.
The news of Murphy's departure
came Wednesday, a day after Ratner
quit as producer of the
Feb. 26 show.
Ratner left amid
criticism of his use of
a pejorative term for
gay men in a question-
and-answer session
at a screening of his
action comedy'Tower
Heist," which opened Murphy
last weekend and stars
Murphy and Ben Stiller.
Murphy's exit deprives Oscar prga-
nizers of a top star for an often'thank-
less job thafs tough to fill, since some
past hosts have found little to gain '
frm 'the gig and plenty to lose if they
do a poor job as emcee ofHollywood's
biggest party.


Celebrity Birthdays


Film composer Ennio
Morricone is 83.
Country singer Donna
Fargo is 70.
Sen. Saxby
Chambliss, R-Ga., is 68.
Lyricist Tim Rice is
67.
Actor Matt Craven is
55.
Actor-comedian
Sinbad is 55.


Actress Mackenzie
Phillips is 52.
Actress Vanessa Angel
is 48.
Actor-comedian
Tommy Davidson is 48.
Actor Michael Jai
White is 47.
Country singer Chris
Cagle is 43.
Actor-comedian Tracy
Morgan is 43.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number........ (386) 752-1293
Fax number.............752-9400
Circulation .............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-'
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
,All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction In whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, RO. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Dlrecr Ashley But cer .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityrqporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place'a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
tall before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation .............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
24 Weeks..................$48.79
52 Weeks:..................$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks................ $41.40
24 Weeks.................. $82.80
52,Weeks..................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Two injured in
powerboat crash
KEY WEST A violent
'crash during the first of
'three race days at the Key
:West World Championship
lhas sent two offshore
,powerboat racers to the
'hospital.
Big Thunder Marine -
a 46-foot Skater catamaran
'with four 1,200 horse-
power engines crashed
.during the third lap of.
Wednesday's race inside'
,Key West Harbor. Robert
'M. Morgan, of Sunrise -
Beach, Mo., and Jeffrey
Tillman, of Kaiser, Mo.,
were piloting the boat as
,throttleman and driver
'respectively.
'Rescue divers were
deployed within a min-
ute of the accident, and
,the crew members were
'transferred to Lower
Keys Medical Center. One
.victim was subsequently
transferred by air trauma
'helicopter to the south
'Florida mainland.
Officials have not
released any details of
.the accident including the
crewmembers' conditions.


Scott vows to

reform insurance
TAMPA-- Gov. Rick
,Scott is vowing to make
changes that will combat
fraud in Florida's no fault
,auto insurance system.
Scott met Wednesday in
Tampa with Hillsborough
County sheriff's officials
aand law-
'makers to
discuss the
state's man-
datory per-
sonal injury
protection
coverage.
The gov-
ernor heard Scott
from inves-
tigators,
citizens and others who
say fraudulent insurance
claims for staged crashes


THE WEATHER


~I~I,


* 1.*


^j^^ I m I'^


*1,


MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY


H1i78L051 HI80L057


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rescue personnel work on extracting offshore powerboat rac-.
ers Ropert M. Morgan and Jeffrey Tillmanafter their 46-foot
catamaran was involved in an,accident Wednesday.


take advan'fage of PIP loop-
holes.
All Florida drivers must
carry no fault insurance.
That entitles them to
$10,000 in medical.care
for injuries suffered in
Sa wreck, regardless of
blame.
Scott said the number
of crashes in Florida is
declining but the cost of
insurance is growing due
to fraud. He added that the
state's poor and elderly are
affected most by the cost
increases.


Train kills person
in South Florida
PALM BEACH-
GARDENS Fire rescue
officials say a person was
struck and killed by a train
in Palm Beach County.
A spokesman for Palm
Beach Gardens Fire
Rescue says one of the
department's crews was
returning from a training
exercise about 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday when they spot-
ted the train stopped along
the tracks. An engineer
who was inspected the
tracks indicated the train
may have hit someone.
The Palm Beach Post
reports a body was found
near the tracks.
No further details were


'immediately available.
Police and officials with
Florida East Coast railroad
were continuing an inves-.
tigation.


Municipal pension
plans graded
TALLAHASSEE A
Tallahassee think tank is
giving 67 percent of the
municipal pension plans in
Florida's 100 largest cities
a grade of C or better.
Only 15 percent received
an F on Wednesday from
the LeRoy Collins Institute.
Some cities are targeting
expensive pension plans
to help overcome budget
shortfalls.
The institute's "report
card" includes 208 defined
benefit plans because most
cities have more than one.
It does not include defined
contribution plans or the
state's retirement system
in which some cities par-
ticipate.
Many cities have
separate plans for police,
firefighters and general
employees.
A key finding is general
employee plans make up
a larger share of the well-
funded plans. The general
plans also have more par-
ticipants and tend to cost
less than the others. (AP)


Pensacola
69/40


Tallat
68,
'
Pa


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


.. ...... 67/36
hassee o Lake City
/34 ,, 72/36
Gainesville .
nama City 76'37
69/42 Ocala
77,.41
Oi
8
Tampa *
nQr ,',1


80
59
76
53
88 in 1986
28 in 1976


0.00"
0.03"
31.30"
0.63"
44.26"


lacksonvile
\76/43

Daytona Beach
82'50


rando Cape Canaveral
1/52 79/56


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples


West Palm Beach Ocala
80s60 Orlando
FL Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers 80;62 Pensacola
81/55 Naples Tallahassee
80/57 Miami Tampa
80/62 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach
78/68


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise tom.
Moonset torn.


6:52 a.m.
5:37 p.m.
6:52 a.m.
5:36 p.m.


5:28 p.m.
6:40 a.m.
6:11 p.m.
7:34 a.m.


030C
Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec.
10 18 25 2
Full Last New First



6a On this date in
riday 1997, a waters
came ashore at
Newport Pier, C
becoming a torn
before quickly d
sipating over we
ern Costa Mesa
California. Wind
were estimated
60 to 70 mph.


Friday
68.56/s
66/50/s"
76/62/c
73. 52' p:
63 35. s
61 42, s
75'66 pc
63.'35/s
76/63/c
74 55,'pc
64 39.
6951 ,S
64.39 5
66 52 s
64/,38. s
70,,51/s
63/37/s
74. 61 'pc


Saturday
74/61/s
72/59/s
78/66/s
79 59 s
73.49 s
70 53..pc
7,. 69/pc
73/47/s
78/66!s
796 1,/s
73. 50..s
75 58.'s
67; 50.s
70'56's
70. 46,.s
77/59/s
71/45/s
76.'64.s


An exclusive
|service
brought to
HitM our readers
30mniestolbum
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
-radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.

weather.corn

Forecasts, data and
) eat h graphics 2011 iWeather
SIIV Centra'l, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpublisher.com


pout
alif.,
iado,
is-
ast-
sat
at


FLORIDA

AWX32


Daily ScriDture


"Come now, let us settle the
matter," says the Lord. "Though
your sins are like scarlet, they
shall be as white as snow;
though they are' red as crimson,
they shall be like wool."
Isaiah 1:18


Lake City Reporter


.AROUND FLORIDA


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SHOWERS


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011 3A


State abortion foes regroup after loss


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE Spon-
sors of an anti-abortion
citizen's initiative in Florida
wereregroupingWednesday
after voters in Mississippi
defeated a similar "person-
hood" proposal.
The Florida Division
of Elections, meanwhile,
accepted a revised proposed
state constitutional amend-
ment called "Florida ProLife
Personhood." The changes
included adding the stylized
word "ProLife" to the title.


"We'recontinuingon,"said
the Rev. Bryan Longworth,
director of Personhood
Florida. "Obviously, the
defeat in Mississippi means
we have to work all the more
harder."
More volunteers have
joined the Florida petition
drive as a result of what
happened Tuesday in
Mississippi, the .Port St.
Lucie pastor said in a tele-
phone interview.
"A lot of people thought it
was in the bag," Longworth
said. "They thought
Mississippi couldn't lose,


but Mississippi did lose."
The Florida amendment,
like the one in Mississippi
and those proposed in sev-
eral other states, would out-
law abortion by declaring
that life begins at fertiliza-
tion.
It will take 676,811 sig-
natures to get on the ballot
in Florida. Then, at least
60 percent voter approval
would be needed to adopt
the amendment
Sponsors abandoned
efforts to get on Florida's
2012 ballot even before the
.Mississippi vote. They are


focusing on 2014.
That's partly because
a provision in a new
Republican-sponsored elec-
tion law reduced the shelf
life, of petition signatures
from four to two years.
"We have to speed every-
thing up," Longworth said.
'We're obviously going to
have to step it up."
The provision has gone
into effect in 62 of Florida's
67 counties, and the state is
seeking approval from a fed-
eral court in Washington,
D.C. for the other five coun-
ties.


1 concern in our district is escape
debris from people burning yard
waste. Fires will escape and they will
run. When they do, .that's when we
have to go into action."
Burning yard debris was the No.'
1 cause of wildfires in the region
throughout the year, accounting for
35 percent of fires this year. In com-
.parison, lighting accounted for 229
percent of the fires, forest service'
officials said. "
While burn permits are not manda-
tory for many home owners, Wisner
encourages anyone who plans to burn
yard debris to call the forest service
to see if conditions are safe. Wind,
humidity and ground, moisture are
considered when the forest service'
issues burn permits, Wisner said.
"If conditions are such that we


aren't issuing burn permits, you prob-
ably shouldn't do it," he said. "Call for
advice before you burn yard debris."
When forest service officials deter-
mine a wildfire's cause is by accident
or negligence from someone burning
yard debris or trash, they typically get
a warning.
"For the most part, we try to make
it a learning experience," he said.,
But repeat offenders can get a
notice of violation and be respon-
sible for paying fire suppression costs,
which can be expensive.'
Wisner said everyone living near
a forest, should be wary and take
precautions to minimize the risk of
property damage from a fire.
Forest officials recommend proper-
ty owners establish a "lean, clean and
green" perimeter of 30 feet around all


structures with minimal trees, shrubs
and plants. They suggest property
owners regularly water their lawns to
keep the ground moist.
"What you're trying to do is avoid
fires creeping up." he said.
One of the best ways to protect
a home is with a metal roof or fire-
proof shingles. They cost more, but
fire-proof shingles greatly reduce the
likelihood a house will catch fire dur-
ing a wildfire.
Home owners should also keep the
roof and gutters clean of debris.
"The vast majority of house fires
from wildfires are caused by embers
on the roof," he said. "Pay the extra
money to get something fire resistant
or fire proof. It's cheaper than replac-
ing your house."


PATERNO: To step down

Continued From Page 1A


Curley and Schultz
have since been charged
with failing to report the
incident to the authori-
ties. Paterno hasn't been
accused of legal wrong-,
doing. But he has been
assailed, in what the state
police commissioner called
a lapse of "moral responsi-
bility," for not doing more
to stop Sandusky.
"This is a tragedy,"
Paterno said in a state-
ment. "It is one of the great
sorrows of my life. With
the benefit of hindsight, I
wish I had done more."
Paterno met with his
coaching staff and play-
ers in the football build-
ing at Penn State for about
10-15 minutes Wednesday
in what was described as
a very emotional session.
,Standing at a podium,
Paterno told them he was
leaving, and broke down
in tears.
Players gave him a
standing ovation when he
walked out
Junior quarterback
Stephon Morris said some
players also were nearly in
tears as Paterno spoke.
"I still can't believe it,"
Morris said. "I've never
seen Coach Paterno like


that in my life."
Asked what was the
main message of Paterno's
talk, Morris said: "Beat
Nebraska."
The decision to retire
by the man affectionately
known as "Joe Pa" brings
to an end one of the most
storied coaching careers,
not just in college football
but in all of sports. Paterno
won 409 games, a record
for major college football,
and is in the middle of his
46th year as coach.
His figure patrolling the
sideline thick-rimmed
glasses and windbreaker,
tie and khaki pants was
as unmistakable at Penn
State as its classic blue and
white uniforms and the
name Happy Valley, a place
where no one came close
to Paterno's stature.
The retirement
announcement came three
days before Penn State
hosts Nebraska in its final
home game of the seasori,
a day set aside to honor
seniors on the team.
Penn.State has bounced
back from a mediocre
2010 season to go 8-1 this-
year, with its only loss to
powerhouse Alabama. The
Nittany Lions are No. 12


-- -. -P" fl


CARC: Upscale thrift'shop to re-open Saturday

Continued From Page 1A


the helps people with dis- Before it was run like an Depending, on the turn-
abilities. indoor yard sale, with ultra out Saturday, the boutique'
Shoppers can look' for- cheap prices and shoppers will open on weekends and.
ward to gently-used design- bargaining for better deals. eventually during the week,
er shoes, clothing and Now items willhave a final she said. The CARC Board
accessories for men, women price, she said. The store of Directors has not yet
and children. Prices will be looks 100 percent better, she decided when the stores will
significantly cheaper than said. be open on a regular basis,
retail. Prices will how be more in Greek said.
The stores closed earlier line with other thrift shops, At least 10 people a day
this year because profit was like Goodwill. "We have :to call the stores or stop by to
not covering the costs ofrun- be competitive or we are see when they will reopen.
ning the store, said Brittany defeating the purpose" .of There is a large demand for
Greek, store manager. running the store, she said. these stores, she said.


'"We really need the com-
munity's support," she said.
Greek is also the manag-
er of the CARC eBay store,
which sells designer items
online. The online store can
be found by typing CARC in
the nonprofit search at ebay-
givingworks.com.
CARC is always looking
for store volunteers and
gently used donations. ,GCll
(386) 752-1880 for informa-
tion.


THE WOOD STOVE
AND FIREPLACE CENTER
6 1 300-524-2675 (352) 377-9535
611 N. Main S -F 9:30-5:30
Gainesville SAT 9:30-4:00


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WILDFIRE: 10-year arearecord could come down

Continued From Page 1A


I - -


*"aK"












OPINION


ThursdayNovember 10, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


OE


.ONE
OPINION


Cain

shrinks


under

scrutiny

running for president
in the United States
Sis atrialby fire, and
.H Ierman Cain's cam-
., paignis ready to burst
into flames. This is asit should be.
SThe long primary process
exposes the pasts and views of
candidates, particularly ones
: who haven't previously held
high office, to meaningful scru-
tiny, often for the first time. This
Sis especially true of candidates,
,-like Cain; who suddenly vault
: to the top of the polls, unleash-
ing a frenzy of media attention.
And what we are finding when .
"we place Cain under the micro-
scope is a very flawed candidate
who is never going to be presi-
Sdent of the United States.
The ever-widening accusa-
tions that Cain is a serial sexual
harasser and his insistent news
conference denial are the part of,
"-'the process bringing the high-
est ratings, but might not be
the most damaging. No, what
will sink Cain, if the harassment
Allegations don't, is that scrutiny
has revealed he doesn't know
enough to be president; or have
any desire to learn.
His 9-9-9 tax plan would
hammer the poor and enrich
the wealthy while driving up
deficits. He appears to believe
China has no nuclear weapons.
He keeps changing his position
on abortion. And he scoffs at ,,
the idea that he should know
anything about the small foreign
countries where terrorists hatch
S plots against the United States..
The process of weeding'
South inappropriate candidates
: is working,,and that's what's
I going to happen to Herman
'Cain, harassment'or no.
S. Newsday

HIG HLIG HT S
IN H ISTO R-Y
Today is Thursday, Nov. 10,
the 314th day of 2011.-There
*are 51-days left in the year.
SOn this date:
In 1969, the children's educa-
Stional program "Sesame Street"
made its debut on National
'Educational Television (later ,
PBS).
Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
SWe believe strong newspapers build
Strong communities -'Newspapers
i get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
,' community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to.truth, integrity and hard
Work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman
LETTERS
POLICY
SLetters to.the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and' libel. Letters must be
.signed and include the writer's name,
.address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of


the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or diop off at'
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


Trends


Today there are major
trends in the world
and in the United
States. They have
a huge influence on
our daily lives and our futures.
, Wouldn't it be helpful to recog-
nize them, predict the direction
they're headed, and use that,
information? World popula-
tion reached 7,000,000,000
last month. That's 7 billion.
.The United States population
doubled in the last half century.
The world climate has a his-
tory of making major changes,
sometimes in a single lifetime.
How about the economAy!
Many European countries, like
'Greece, stand on the brink of
'bankruptcy. Maybe our coin-
try isn't far behind. What can
we do? What should we do?
And it's not just world prob-
lems. What about trends in
your school, job, or neighbor-
hood? Wouldn't it be valuable
to you if you could predict the
direction of trends that influ-
ence your life, and make the
best education or career choic-
es? How can you meet all your
needs in an uncertain future?
Trends; and shortages may be
barreling down on you. It may'
be difficult to find affordable
'housing, avoid excess debt,
choose a career with a secure
future, keep up with technology
and your education, and to find
a pleasant, favorable environ-
ment to live in?
"Futurists" are part of a
growing careerfield of experts


Robert Denny,
, Bob.Denny8@gmail.com

who work to identify and under-
stand major trends. Their find-.
ings can offeradvice to help
us prepare for an uncertain
future. They find and use cues,
like atmospheric and ocean
temperatures, currents, polar
sea ice thickness, droughts and
floods, and even sunspots and
solar flares: They study fluctu-
ating national economies, aver-
age personal incomes, trends
in migration, occupations, land
Use; resources, and population
factors like age and. fertility.
They monitor politics and poll
voters.
Trends can be worldwide,.
>national, state, or local. But
they can also be individual.
How about your own personal
trends? Are you keeping up
with changing technology,
career opportunities, your ,
borrowing habits, your saving
and spending habits, and your
health and fitness?' Here are
some ideas that might help you,
turn trends into opportunities,
and to keep a step ahead of the
game:.
Stay informed. Instead of
watching celebrities 'dance


on TV or sitting through still
another sitcom, substitute a
news program now and then.,
Read a newspaper. Use a van-
ety of sources.,
.Maintain your health. ,
Schedule that annual physical
exam. Choose a healthy diet
Avoid excesses, or habits like,
cigarettes or alcohol. Get at
least some kind of exercise.
Just regular walking or swim-
ming can make a big differ-
ence. ,
Put energy into a healthy
social life. Reach out. Stay
connected. Mend fences.
Maintain happy, supportive
relationships with family,
friends, and everyone you
know.
-Keep a written budget of
your income and expenses,
Plan your money so it goes
where you want it to rather
than letting it slip through your
fingers:'
Extra money or time on your
hands? Invest in yourself, your
family, your career, your home,
and your continuing education.
That's still the safest investment.
Take charge of your own life.
If you don't, I guarantee that
someone else is happy to take
charge of it for you.

Bob Denny has counseled
troubled, youth and families in
, Florida for 15 years, and teaches
psychology at Florida Gateway
College. Your comments and
jdeas are appreciated at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.comr


We allnee d something


or someone to pull for


T hey say a picture is.
worth thousand'
words- especially if
i it is seen through the
eyes of love.
Recently, after Clemson lost .
its first football game, ending any
hopes for an undefeated season,
I called my brother in South
Carolina to offer my condolences.
He didn't answer. I wasn't ,
surprised. He probably wasn't in
much of a talking mood.
Joe is totally blind. He has never
seen a football But saying that he
loves the Clemson Tigers is like
saying God loves sinners. Joe's
devotibn to Clemson began when
he married Tommie Jean. She,
too, was totally blind, and a big
Clemson fan: They dated three
weeks before they were married.
' Upon hearing the news, our
mother threw a fit, questioning
both the wisdom of the decision
and Joe's mental health.
His reply was simple, but reso-
lute: "Mama," he said, grinning,
"even a blind man can fall in love
atfirst sight"
They were married for 10 years,
constant companions, the light of
each other's lives, faithfully follow-


Sharon Randall
www.sharonrandall.com
ing Clemson's games on the radio.
Then, in a matter of weeks, he
lost her to cancer. For a while,
after her death, Joe seemed to lose
all enthusiasm for things.
Imagine my relief the night I
called him after a Clemson victory
and heard again that old spark
back in his voice.
Last week, after I left him a mes-
sage that said, in effect, "Sorry
about your Tigers; call me or else,"'
Joe called me back
We spoke briefly about the loss.
Joe was philosophical. ,
"Maybe it was good they lost
a game, just to keep 'em humble
and playing their best."
Then, to my surprise, he said
he didn't call to talk about football.
Instead, he wanted to tell me how
happy he was to get the photo of


his baby nephew.
He meant Henry, my 2-month-
old grandson. My daughter had
sent birth announcements with a
photo of Henry looking like a very
wise, very old man.
"How did you know it was
Henry?" I teased, as if rd forgotten
Joe gets a friend to read his mail
forhim.
"Well, Sister," he said, "I held
the picture up to my eyes and pre-
tended I could see it And I could!
He had a big smile and a full head
of hair, cute as he could be. I saw
him perfectly!"
For a moment, I closed my eyes
and pictured Joe as a baby, not
much older than Henry. I was 4
when he was born. I remember
the day my mother told me that he
was blind.
"He can't be blind," I said. "He
always smiles at my face."
"He smiles at your voice,"
she said. "He'll never see your
face."
My mother was wrong about
my brother. Even a blind man
can see his baby nephew.
* Sharon Randall writes columns
for Scripps Howard News Service.


ANO
VI


T HER
E W


GOP has


second

thoughts


about

revenues

Congressional
Republicans are
slowly coming
around to the reality
that controlling the
deficit will require tax increas-
es. They wouldn't call them tax
increases, of course.
The search is now under
' way for-ways to raise revenue
without violating or, at least,
'appear to not violate the
no-tax pledge that has so ham-
strung the GO.
Said the Capitol Hill
newspaper Politico: "It is a
sharp departure from the
all-spending-cuts rhetoric, as .
Republicans realize that they
have to at least sound like
they're willing to deal with both
sides of the ledger to pitch a
credible deficit deal that might.
win over a few Democrats." Not
to mention convincing the pub-
'lic and the agencies that rate '
the soundness of U.S. debt
So far, the Republicans
advising the deficit-reduction
congressional supercommit-
tee have proposed a grab bag
ofrevenue-generating elimi-
nations of tax subsidies and
deductions, fees for govern-
ment services and programs,
and increased Medicare premi-
ums for high-income seniors.
The problem with closing loop-
holes is that there is a huge
army of lobbyists dedicated to
reopening them.
And, there's a question
of whether those proposals,
would make.any kind of dent
in terms of the $1.2 trillion in .
,cuts the committee is supposed ,
to come up with by Nov. 23'.
If the panel fails, cuts are to
take place automatically across
the board beginning in 2013.
The Pentagon has already said
that would devastate national
defense.
The search for a solution ias
turned the discussion in some.
quarters back to the 2001 and
2003 Bush taix cuts; New York
City Mayor Michael Bloomberg
has called for eliminating the
tax cuts for the wealthy.
The think tank Citizens for
Tax Justice says that extend-'
ing the tax cuts, due to expire
next year, for the wealthiest
5 percent, those making over <
'$176,000 a year, would cost
the Treasury $2 trillion over
the' decade. If that figure were
revenue, it would more than
make up for the $1.2 trillion the
supercommittee is seeking.
SThe wrangling over preserv-
ing tax privileges comes as the
Census Bureau, in recalculat-
ing its figures, offered a darker
view of poverty in the United
States. The Census said that
49.1 million Americans, or 16
percent of the population, lived
in poverty ip 2010, up from the
previously estimated 46.2 mil-
lion. The poverty threshold for
a family of four is $24,343.
Grimmer yet was that the
new metrics showed a poverty
rate of 15.9 percent among
those 65 and older, consider-
ably higher than the 9 percent
using the old measure.
That came out simultane-
ously with a USA Today report
that exit packages for departing
CEOs have routinely begun to
top $100 million $170 million in
the case of IBM's outgoing CEO.
The nation looks forward
to how Republican hard-
liners explain that raising their
income taxes 4.9 percent and
capital-gains taxes 5 percent,
which would void the breaks
they got under the Bush cuts,
is class warfare. How is it even
unfair?


i Scripps Howard News Service


4A









LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10,2011 5A


Utility

may have

broken

laws

By STEPHEN SINGER
Associated Press
HARTFORD, Conn. -
Connecticut's attorney gen-
eral said Wednesday he will
research whether the state's
largest power utility broke
any laws in its handling of
outages that left thousands
of people in the cold and the
dark for more than a week in
the wake of a pre-Halloween
snowstorm.
Connecticut Light &
Power is facing at least five
investigations into the out-
ages triggered by the Oct. 29
storm, which brought trees
down on power lines across
-the state and-cut electricity to
a total of :more than 830,000
customers. But the probe
by Attorney General George
Jepsen could carry the most
serious consequences.
Jepsen told The Associated
Press in an interview that
his office will develop a legal


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, center, ,speaks to the media during a news conference at the
Emergency Operations Center as State Attorney General George Jepsen, left, and Lt. Gov.
Nancy Wyman, right, look on, at the Hartford Armory in Hartford, Conn.


theory that could determine
if CL&P violated any laws.
The storm dumped more'
than two foot of snow and
knocked out power to more
than 3 million customers in
the Northeast Power was
restored to the vast majority
within days, but several thou-:
sand in Connecticut were still
in the dark as of Wednesday


-11 days after the storm.
Jepsen said he does not
believe outrage by custom-.
ers arid elected officials will
fade anytime soon.
"Theie's a level of anger
I've not seen in 56 years,"
he said. "People are already
stressed economically and.
stressed" because of the
severity, of last winter's


- storms and Irene. People are
very stressed. They're at the
breaking point-"
Jepsen is asking the Public
Utilities RegulatoryAuthority
to gather emails, correspon-
dence and other documents
to determine if CL&P had a
plan to manage its electrical
system during and after the
storm.


Texas jobs fund misses job creation goals


Gulf Coast upset

over OK to wrap

up BP cleanup


By CAIN BUREAU
and DINA CAPPIELO
Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS Word
that the government is let-
ting BP end its cleanup of
the Gulf Coast left many
residents seething and fear-
ful over who would monitor
or respond to any lingering
effects of the worst oil spill
in U.S. history.
Estimates that 90 percent
of the region's shores have
been cleaned of oil from
last year's spill belie the
sentiments of many locals
who are likely to think
first of BP when they spot
tar balls or mats of weath-
ered oil in the sand: Such
waste has washed ashore
for years from a variety of
sources, but the spill's trau-
matic aftermath has linked
it with BP in the minds of
many.
"Everything 'is just not*
how it used to be. When
you pull a fish up, it doesn't.
look like it is supposed to.
look, like they' did before".


.said Ryan Johnson, a fish-
ermen in Pensacola Beach.
The agreement approved
last week by the U.S. Coast
Guard ends BP's cleanup
responsibility for all but a
small fraction of the coast,
and marks a shift to resto-
ration efforts that will likely
include planting new vege-
tation and adding new sand
to beaches. Under the plan,
BP PLC won't be required
to clean up oil that washes
ashore in the future-unless
-officials can prove it came
from the blown-out well
that caused the 2010 catas-
trophe a link that the
company concedes will be
harder to establish as time
passes and the oil degrades.
Still, a top company official
said BP is ready to respond
to any oil that's deemed its
responsibility.
'We are finally at a stage
where!.scientific data and
assessment has defined the
endpoint for the shoreline
cleanup," said Mike Utsler,
head' of BP's Gulf Coast
Restoration Organization.


Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas A gov-
ernment watchdog grouping
Texas said Wednesday that
a job creation program tout-
ed often by Gov. Rick Perry
as he seeks the Republican
presidential nomination has
delivered on barely a third
of the jobs it promised to
bring to the state by the end
of last year.
But Perry's office fired
back immediately at Texans
for Public Justice, arguing
the end of 2010 is" a false
deadline and the report,
an unfair judgment on
the success of the Texas,
SEnterprise Fund. The, fig-
ures cited by the group,
a left-leaning organization"
that'soften critical of Perry,
are future job-creatiori 'tar-
gets that were never meant
to be reached bylastyear, a'
Perry spokeswoman said.
The fund, Perry spokes-


O8ITUARIES

Robert H. Dice
Robert H. Dice. 70, Lake City, FL
passed away on Monday, Novem-
bei 7, 2011 after a short illness.
The,. Missouri '
native moved to
Lake"City from ,
Texas in 2004.
Mr. Dice retired **"
from the Air Force after 21 years.
and Was of Catholic faith. He is
survived by his wife: Laureine
Dice, Lake City, FL;.two daugh-
ters::Tina Johnson,'England, Jill
Dice Law, Texas; one son: Jeffry
Dice, Texas; two sisters: Wil-
lie Mae Dice, Cavanaugh, MO,
Norma Jean Hohimes, MO; three
brothers: Fred Dice, MO, George
Dice, MO, .Roland Dice, MO
and seven grandchildren. He was
preceded' in death by his parents:
Tom & Rose Dice; two sisters:
Darlyri, Cynthia and one brother:
Paul Dice. Services will be held
Friday, November llth at 9:00
am at Daniels Memorial Cha-
pel. Interment will follow in the
Jacksonville National Cemetery.
DANIELS FUNERAL
HOMES & CREMATORY,
INC., of Live Oak and Branford,
FL in charge of arrangements
John Thompson
After an extended illness, John
Thompson, 83, died peacefully at
3:00 am on November 9, 201.1 in
the VA Hospital
in Gainesville, ,
Florida. John -
is survived by
his wife, Jea- "- -
nette; and his
children, Bruce, Robert, Jerry,
eight grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren. Preced-
ing him in death is his daugh-
ter, Judy, and one grandchild.
Lying about his age, John en-
listed iii the Navy during WWII
and participated in the occupa-
tion Qf Japan. He later joined
the Army, and rose to the rank
of Captain while helping .to'
pioneer Army aviation. He was
one of the first helicopter pilots.
John will be buried in the
Jacksonville National Cem-
etery irn Jacksonville, Florida


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


woman Lucy Nashed added,.
"continues to, be ,one of the
state's most 'competitive
deal-closing tpols."
/


The Texas Enterprise opment grants to private
Fund has handed out $440 companies since its creation
million in public money in in 2003 in an effort to bring.
the form of economic devel- jobs to Texas. ,


Find out how you can help protect your family for less, build cash value, or even
get your premiums back if the life insurance benefit has not been paid.out at the
end of the level premium period. Lke a good neighbor. Stale Farm is thee
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Florida Tax Payers
please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemousfallacy
of The Scientific Theory of Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hominid evolution which flies in the face of the Word, who
made all things. He became flesh in the womb of the Virgin Mary at
conception. She was a descendant of King David...son of Jocob, son of
Isaac, son of Abraham...son of Adam, son of God. (Compare the New
Testament versus Florida Biology 1. End-if-Course Assessment Test -Items
Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L.15.1; page 52'- SC.912.L.15.10 ,
http://fcat.fldoe.org/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf) i

I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. KennyMerriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com .
In: The Yecr of our. Lord 2011
'*"[ Pad Ior b) kern, MNlemker .


RAIN OR
SSHINE!,


TO THE PUBLIC


BRIAG YOUR
WAREF






6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011


Ohio poll worker

jailed in voter

nose bite claim


Associated Press
CLEVELAND An Ohio
poll worker suspected
of trying to bite off the
nose of a voter during an
Election Day argument has
surrendered to sheriff's
deputies.
Cleveland police say
James Williams sur-
rendered Wednesday.
Sgt. Sammy Morris says
Williams has been jailed to
await the filing of charges.
Williams is accused of
trying to bite off the nose


of a voter who helped a
campaign volunteer in an
argument over signs near a
Polling place Tuesday.
Authorities say the head-
butting and nose-biting
landed voter Greg Flanagan
in a hospital for treatment
and he was still feeling
dizzy after his release.
Williams was an Election
Day rover, checking for
voting problems. The elec-
tions board says he had a
clean record in eight elec-
tions but won't be rehired.


campaign worker who was in
an argument with an election
employee over a sign posted
near the polls on Tuesday.


Man jailed for citing Harvard on resume


Associated Press without bail Wednesday after
WOBURN, Mass. A admitting he violated his pro-
Delaware mn convicted of bation by citing the university
fraud for faking his way into onAdam Whob resume, was sen-
Harvard was ordered held AdamWheeler,25,wassen-


-At


tenced last year to 20 years in
jail and 10 years on probation
for identity fraud and other
charges. The sentence was
mostly suspended.


You must have been
.a beautiful baby...

Cause "Doc" look
at you now!


European debt worries lead

to drop in world oil prices


By CHRIS KAHN
AP Energy Writer
-NEW YORK Oil prices were lower on
Wednesday following a broad sell-off on
Wall Street that was stoked by fears that
Europe would be overwhelmed by a moun-
tain of debt
Benchmark crude fell $1.06 to end the
day at $95.74 per barrel in New York, while
Brent crude lost $2.69 to finish at $112.31
in London.
The Dow Jones industrial average, the
S&P 500 and the Nasdaq stock indexes
dropped more than 3.5 percent. Investors
sold off as Italy's borrowing costs soared
and talks collapsed in Greece on forming a
new government. Both countries are strug-
gling to pay off huge government debts
and implement drastic spending cuts.
The eurozone is expected to use less oil
next year as countries cut back on spend-
ing and economies slow. If governments
default, some analysts worry that wide-
spread bank failures could reach across
the Atlantic and slow down spending in the
U.S. as well.


The Lake Ci

would like to

Gold Buyers

on their November 3, 2011 ri


"If Europe falls apart, it heightens the
likelihood of a recession across the globe,"
independent oil analyst Jim Ritterbusch
said.
In the U.S. motorists are paying record
prices for gasoline this year. At $3.43 per
gallon, the national average on Wednesday
is 55.5 cents less than the peak price of
almost $4 a gallon in May. But pump prices
now are still 79 cents higher than they were
last year.
Americans are spending 8.4 percent of
their monthly income on gasoline this year,
surpassing the 2008 record of 7.9 percent,
according to a report by the Oil Price
Information Service. OPIS, which ana-
lyzed Energy Department and U.S. Census
data for the report, said U.S. households
are spending an average of $50 more per
month to fill up.
'Those costs could go up to 10 percent"
of monthly household income by next
year, said Tom Kloza, OPIS's chief oil
analyst. 'That's going to put a lot of pres-
sure on people, especially those that are
already living paycheck-to-paycheck."



ty Reporter

congratulate

of Lake City

ribbon cutting ceremony for


9


r


November is National Hospice Month,
and Haven wants to answer your
questions about living wills.


HAVING A LIVING WILL, ALSO KNOWN AS AN ADVANCE
DIRECTIVE, IS IMPORTANT. NOT ONLY DOES IT TELL YOUR
HEALTH CARE PROVIDER AND FAMILY YOUR WISHES, IT EASES
THE .-URDEN OF ANSWERING DIFFICULT QUESTIONS THAT
SOMETIMES COME WITH SERIOUS ILLNESS. IT'S A GIFT TO YOUR
LOVED ONES, LETTING THEyI KNOW YOUR WISHES.

Available through Haven Hospice, Five Wishes is a livingwill that's
easy to use and understand. You chose who will make decisions if
you're not able to, and how you want to be treated.

All you have to do is check a box, circle a direction or write
a few sentences. It's that easy. Your family will have peace of
mind, and you'll know decisions made during end-of-life care are
just what you wish.



HAVEN
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LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011 7A



Hike seen in greenhouse gas threat


By SETH BORENSTEIN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
global output of heat-trap-
ping carbon dioxide jumped
by the biggest amount on
record, the U.S. Department
of Energy calculated, a sign
of how feeble the world's
efforts are at showing man-
made global warming.
The new figures for 2010
mean that levels of green-
house gases are higher than
the worst case scenario out-
lined by climate experts just
four years ago.
"The more we.talk about
the need to control emis-
*sions, the more they are
growing," said John Reilly,
co-director of MITs Joint
Program on the Science and
Policy of Global Change.
The world pumped about
564 million more tons (512
million metric tons) of car-
bon into the air in 2010 than
it did in 2009. That's an
increase of 6 percent That
amount of extra pollution
eclipses the individual emis-
sions of all but three coun-
tries China, the United
States and India, the world's
top producers of green-
house gases.
It is a "monster" increase
that is unheard of, said
Gregg Marland, a professor
of geology at Appalachian
State University, who
has helped calculate
Department of Energy fig-
ures in the past
Extra pollution in China
and the .U.S. account for


more than half the increase
in emissions last year,
Marland said.
"It's a big jump," said
Tom Boden, .director of
the Energy Department's
Carbon Dioxide Information
Analysis Center at Oak
Ridge National Lab. "From
an emissions standpoint,
the global financial crisis
seems to be over."
Boden said that in 2010
people were traveling, and
manufacturing was back
up. worldwide, spurring the
use of fossil fuels, the chief
contributor of man-made
climate change.
India and China are huge
users of coal. Burning coal
is the biggest carbon source
worldwide and emissions
from that jumped nearly 8
percent in 2010.
"The good news is
that these economies are
growing rapidly so every-
one ought to be for that,
right?" Reilly said Thursday.
"Broadereconomicimprove-
ments in poor countries
has been bringing living
improvements to people.
Doing it' with increasing
reliance on coal is imperil-
ing the world."
,In 2007, when the
Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change issued its
last large report on global
warming, it used different
scenarios for carbon diox-
ide pollution and said the
rate of warming would be
based on the rate of pollu-
tion. Boden said the latest
figures put global emissions


ASSOCIATED PRESS


A pair of coal trains idle on tracks in Wyoming recently.


higher than the worst case
projections from the cli-
, mate panel. Those forecast
global temperatures rising
between 4 and 11 degrees
Fahrenheit by the end of
the century with the best
estimate at 7.5 degrees.
Even though global warm-
ing skeptics have attacked
the climate change panel-
as being too alarmist, scien-
tists have generally found
their predictions too con-


servative, Reilly said. He
said his university worked
on emissions scenarios,
their likelihood, and what
would happen. The IPCC's
worst case scenario was
only about in the middle
of what MIT calculated are
likely scenarios.
Chris Field of Stanford
University, head of one of the
IPCC's working groups, said
the panel's emissions scenar--
ios are intended to be more


accurate in the long term and
are less so in-earlier years.
He said the question now
among scientists is whether
the future is the panel's worst
case scenario "or something
more extreme."
"Really dismaying,"
Granger Morgan, head of
the engineering ,and pub-.
lic policy department at
Carnegie Mellon University,
said of the new figures.'
"We are building up a hor-


rible legacy for our children
and grandchildren."
_ But Reilly and
University of Victoria
climate scientist Andrew
Weaver found something
good in recent emissions
figures. The developed
countries that ratified
the 1997 Kyoto Protocol
greenhouse gas limiting
treaty have reduced their
emissions overall since
then.


Federal judge blocks graphic


images set for cigarette packs


Of EYE CENTER of North Florda
J General Eye Care & Surgery

Elm- jJ mlR,


By NEDRA PICKLER ':
Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
judge on Monday blocked"
a federal requirement that
would .have begun, forcing.
tobacco compares next
year to put graphic images
including dead and diseased
smokers on their cigarette
packages.
U.S. District Judge
Richard Leon ruled that it's
likely the cigarette makers
will succeed in a lawsuit to
block the new standard. He
stopped, the requirement
until after the lawsuit is.
resolved, which could take,
years.
A similar case .brought
by the tobacco companies
against the labels is'pend-,'
ing, before the U.S., 6th:"
Circuit Court of Appeals
in.Cincinnati. U.S.: District
Judge Joseph McKinley
upheld most of the market-
ing restrictions in the law in
January 2010. The appeals
court heard arguments in
the case in July but is not
expected to rule for several
months.
Leon"- found the nine
graphic images approved
by the Food and Drug
Administration in June go
beyond conveying the facts
about the health risks of
smoking or go beyond that
into advocacy a critical
distinction in a case 'over
free speech.
The packaging would
have included color images
of a man exhaling cigarette
smoke through a tradhe-
otomy hole in his throat; a
plume of cigarette smoke
enveloping an infant receiv-
ing a mother's kiss; a pair
of diseased lungs next to a
pair of healthy lungs;, a dis-
eased mouth afflicted with
what appears to be cancer-
ous lesions; a man breath-
ing into an oxygen mask;
a cadaver on a table with
post-autopsy chest staples;
a woman weeping; a prpe-
mature baby in an incuba-
tor; and a man wearing a
T-shirt that features a "No
Smoking" symbol and the
words "I Quit"
"It is abundantly clear
from viewing these images
that the emotional response'
they were crafted to induce


is calqulated,to provoke the motivating smokers to quit,"
viewer to quit, or never to Myers' said in a statement.
start smoking an objec- "Because of that evidence,
tive wholly apart from dis- at least 43 other countries
seminating purely factual now require large, -graphic
and uncontroversial infor- cigarette warnings."
nation," Leon wrote in his .Congress instructed the
29-page opinion. He point- FDA to require the labels,
ed out -that at least some following the lead of the
were altered photographs Ca"adian regulations that
to evoke emotion. require similarly graphic
The judge also point- -images on 'cigarette packs.
ed out the size, of the Lawmakers approved the
labels suggests they measure with wide biparti-
are .unconstitutional san majorities, and support-
the FDA requirement er Sen. Frank Lautenberg,
said the labels were to D-N.J., also urged appeal.
cover the entire top half "Big Tobacco' will stop at
of cigarette packs, front nothing to keep the cold,
and back and include hard facts off their ciga-
a number for a stop-, rette packages," he said in
smoking hotline-. The 4a statement
labels were to constitute 'The cigarette makers say
20 percent of cigarette their products have had
advertising, and mar- Surgeon General warnings
keters were, to rotate for more than 45 years, but
use of the images. Leon that they never filed a legal
said 'the labels would challenge against 'them
amount to a 'mini-billr until these images were
board" for the agency's approved.
"obvious anti-smoking Tobacco companies are
agenda." increasingly relying on their
The Justice packaging to build brand
Department argued that loyalty and grab consumers.
the images, coupled It's one of few advertising
with written warnings, levers left to them after the
were designed to com- government curbed their
municate the dangers to presence in magazines,
youngsters and adults. billboards and TV, and the
The FDA declined to graphic labels could cost
comment on the judge's them milliolis in lost sales-
ruling, and a spokes- and increased packaging
man for the Justice costs.
Department would not The cigarette makers
say whether,it plans to that sued the FDA are
appeal, only that it is R.J. Reynolds Tobacco
reviewing the ruling. Co. of Winston-Salem,
Matthew Myers, presi- N.C., Lorillard Tobacco
dent of the Campaign for Co. of Greensboro, N.C.,
Tobacco-Free Kids, urged Commonwealth Brands
the Obama administration Inc. of Bowling Green, Ky.,
to appeal the ruling that he Liggett Group of Mebane,
said "is wrong on the sci- N.C., and Santa Fe Natural
ence and wrong on the law." Tobacco Co. of Santa Fe,
He said a delay would only N.M.
serve the financial interests 'Today's ruling reaf-
of tobacco companies that firms fundamental First
spend billions to downplay
the health risks of smoking


and glamorize tobacco use.
"Studies around the world
and evidence presented to
the FDA have repeatedly
shown that large, graphic
warnings, like those adopted
by the FDA, are most effec-
'tive at.informing consumers
about the health risks of
smoking, discouraging chil-
dren and other nonsmokers
from starting to smoke, and.


Amendment principles by.
rejecting the notion that the
government may require
those who sell lawful prod-
ucts to adults to urge cur-
rent and prospective pur-
chasers not to: purchase
those products," Lorillard
attorney Floyd Abrams said
in a statement.


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REGULAR MEETING
LAKE SHORE HOSPITAL AUTHORITY
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trustees of the Lake Shore Hospital Authority will hold their
Regular Meeting on Monday, November 14, 2011 at 5:15 pm at the LSHA Administrative Complex,'Conference
Room, 259 NE Franklin Street, Lake City, Florida. The purpose of the meeting is to take action on regular
business.
All interested persons are invited to attend.
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services for the meeting identified above, as
addressed in the American Disabilities Act, please contact Sue Fraze at (386) 755-1090.
KOBY ADAMS


'll~--~l~llraaapsh









LAKE CITY REPORTER


HEALTH


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011'


CHICAGO (AP) --
Researchers say there's a
new way to tell if infants are
likely to become obese later
on: Check to see if they've
passed two key milestones
on doctors' growth charts
by age 2.
Babies who grew that
quickly face double the risk
of being obese at age 5, com-
pared with peers who grew
more slowly, their study
found. Rapid growers were
also more likely to be obese
at age 10, and infants whose
chart numbers climbed that
much during their first 6
months faced the greatest
risks.
That kind of rapid growth
should be a red flag to doc-
tors, and a sign to parents
'that babies mightbe overfed
or spending too much time
in strollers, and not enough
crawling around, said pedi-
atrician Dr. Elsie Taveras,
the study'slead author and
an obesity researcher at
Harvard Medical School.
Contrary to the idea that
chubby babies are the pic-
ture of health, the study
bolsters evidence that "big-.
ger is not better" in infants,i
she said.
.. But skeptics say not so
fast. Babies often grow in
spurts and flagging the
speediest growers could
lead to putting infants on
-diets a bad idea that
could backfire in the long
run, said Dr. Michelle
Lampl, director of Emory
University's Center for the
Study of Human Health.
"It reads like a very handy
rule and sounds like it would
be very useful and that's


Associated Press
President Barack Obama speaks recently in Washington about government support for health care for Americans in poverty.




Court upholds overhaul


By NEDRA PICKLER.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON A
conservative-leaning panel
of U.S. appellate judges on
Tuesday upheld President
Barack Obama's health
care law. as constitutional,
helping set up a Supreme
Court fight. .
A panel of the U.S. Court
of Appeals for Washington
issued a split opinion
upholding the lower court's.
ruling that found Congress
did not overstep its author-
ity in requiring people to
buy health insurance or pay
a penalty on their taxes,
beginning in 2014.
The requirement is the
most controversial require-
ment of Obama's signa-
ture domestic legislative ,
achievement and the focus
of conflicting opinions from
judges across the coun-
try. The Supreme Court is
expected to decide soon,
perhaps within days, wheth-
er to accept appeals from
some of those earlier rul-
ings.


The suit in Washington
was brought by the
American Center for Law
and Justice, a legal group
founded by evangelist Pat
Robertson. It claimed that
the insurance mandate is
unconstitutional because
it forces Americans to buy.
a product for the rest- of
their lives and that it vio-
lates the religious freedom
of those who choose not
to have insurance because
they rely on God to protect
them from harm..
But the court ruled that
Congress had the power
to pass the requirement to
ensure that all Americans
can have .health care cover-
age, even if it infringes on
individual'liberty.
"The right to be free from
federal regulation is. not
absolute and yields to the
imperative that Congress be
free to forge national solu-
tions to national problems,"
Judge Laurence Silbefman
wrote in, the court's opin-
ion. Silberman was 'joined
by Judge Harry Edwards.
Judge Brett Kavanaugh


disagreed with the conclu-
sion without taking a posi-
tion on the merits of the law.
He wrote a lengthy opinion
arguing the court doesn't
have jurisdiction to review
the health care mandate
until after it takes effect in
2014.
The federal appeals court
in Cincinnati also upheld
the law. The federal appeals
court in Atlanta struck
down the core requirement.
that Americans buy health
insurance or pay a penalty,
while upholding the rest of
the law.
And like Kavanaugh's
dissenting opinion,
an appeals court in
Richmond, Virginia,
ruled it was premature
to decide the law'scon-
stitutionality.
The White House said
Tuesday it is confident
that the Supreme Court
will uphold the law, as the
Washington court did.
Obama adviser Stephanie
Cutter said in a White
House blog post that oppo-
nents who say the indi-


vidual mandate provision
exceeded Congress' power
to regulate commerce "are
simply wrong."
"People who make a deci-
sioi to forego health insur-
ance do not opt out of the
health care market," she
wrote.
"Their action is not felt by
themselves alone. Instead,
when they become ill or
injured and cannot pay their
bills, their costs are shifted
to others. Those costs -
$43, billion in 2008 alone
- are borne by. doctors,
hospitals, insured individu-
als, taxpayers and small
businesses .throughout the
nation."


Milestones


studied for


obesity risks


my concern," Lampl said.
The guide would be easy to
use to justify feeding infants
less and to unfairly label
them as fat. It could also
prompt feeding patterns
that could lead to obesity
later, she said.
Lampl noted that many
infants studied crossed
at least two key points on
growth charts; yet only 12
percent were obese at age 5
and slightly more at age 10.
Nationally, about 10 percent
of preschool-aged children
are obese, versus about 19
percent of those aged '6 to
11.
'Lampl and Edward
Frongillo, an infant growth
specialist at the University
of South Carolina, voiced
concern in an editorial
accompanying the study
in the journal Archives of
Pediatrics & Adolescent
Medicine, released online
Monday. They argue that
more research is needed to
confirm whether the study's
recommendation is really a
useful way to flag infants for
obesity.
"The potential to do more
,harm' than good is actually
very high," Frongillo said.
Taveras said the kind
of rapid growth noted in
the study should be used
to raise awareness about
potential risks but is not a
reason to put babies on a
diet. '
The study involved 45,000
infants and children young-
erithan age 11 who had rou-
tine growth measurements
during doctor checkups in
the Boston area from 1980
through 2008.


FDA clears blood thinner

for irregular heart beat


WASHINGTON (AP) -
More than 2 million new
U.S. patients will be eligible
to receive a next-generation
blood thinner drug called
Xarelto, after the Food
and Drug Administration
approved the medication to
treat a common heart prob-
lem that can lead to stroke.
Federal health officials
approved the drug from
Johrison & Johnson and
Bayer to prevent strokes in
patients with atrial fibrilla-
tion, a condition that causes
the heart's upper cham-
bers beat chaotically and
ineffectively. The irregular
heartbeats can cause blood
clots which travel to the
brain, blocking blood flow
and occasionally causing a
stroke..
'This approval gives doc-
tors and patients another
treatment option for a con-
dition that must be man-
aged carefully," said Dr.
Norman Stockbridge, direc-
tor of FDA's cardiovascular
and renal products division.
The once-a-day pill was
first approved in July to
prevent strokes in patients
receiving hip and knee
replacements. Today's
approval expands the drug's
indication to the much larg-
er group of roughly 2.2 mil-
lion Americans with atrial
fibrillation.
For more than half a
century, atrial fibrillation
patients have relied on the
tough-to-use blood thinner
warfarin, sold under the
brand name Coumadin.
Doctors often have trouble
gauging the right dose of
the drug for each patient.
Too much warfarin can
cause dangerous internal


bleeding, and too little can
result in strokes.
In a setback for the
drugs' developers, the FDA
did not approve a manufac-
turer-requested claim that
Xarelto was superior at pre-
venting stroke and blood
clots when compared with
warfarin. Instead the FDA
states that the companies'
14,000-patient study.showed
Xarelto and warfarin were
about the same in prevent-
ing stroke.
Also, the FDA added a
boxed safety warning, the
most serious kind, stating
that patients should not
stop taking Xarelto without
notifying their doctors first.
Disconfinuing the drug can
increase the risk of stroke.
Numerous drugmakers
have been working to devel-.
op an updated alternative to
warfarin, one of the most
widely-used medications
in the U.S. Last year U.S.
pharmacies filled 32 million
prescriptions for warfarin,
according to data tracker
IMS Health.
Last October, the FDA
approvedlhefstalmrnativetowar-
fanforaifialfibrillafion-Pradaxa,
known chemically as dabigan,
made by the Gman company
BoehigergelhmThatdrugs
label sats thatthe dailypil "sgnii-
camnty reduce stroke and blood
dots inastdyof 18,000patients
In September a panel of
outside advisers to the FDA.
voted 9-2 to recommend
approval for use in atrial
fibrillation. The panel's rec-
ommendation came despite
questions from FDA scien-
tists about the reliability
of some data submitted on
Xarelto.
Xarelto is the first in a


new class of blood thinning
drugs that work by blocking
a clotting protein called fac-
tor Xa. Older blood thinners,
including warfarin,, wok, by
preventing blood platelets
from sticking together.
Known chemically as
rivaroxaban, Xarelto was
discovered by German
drugmaker Bayer and
* co-developed with 'New
Brunswick, N.J.-based J&J.


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S-.g : '

- .- ,, :-.- .< -"."..: .


* .111 j s










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421 '
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday. November 10. 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS.

V". BASKETBALL
Travel team.
fundraiser set
The Lake City
Recreation Department
and Richardson
Community 'Center/
Annie Mattox Park'.
. North; Inc.,. is sponsoring
two benefit.basketball
games .featuring women's
and men's teams from
Columbia and Suwannee
counties. The games are
at 6 p.m. (women) and
7:30 p.m. (men) Nov. 25
at the Lake City Middle
School gym. Admission
is $5 (children ages 6
and younger free), with
all proceeds going to
benefit the boys USSSA
travel basketball teams.
Columbia High's girls
basketball team will sell
concessions.
For details, call.
iHeyward Christie at
754-3607 or Mario '
Coppock at 754-7096.

FLAG FOOTBALL
Turkey bowl
to honor Tigers
The Breon Thomas
STurkey Bowl is planned.
at Memorial Stadium
on Nov. 26. Former;
Columbia High
players from the
mid-to-late 1990s will
field flag football teams
and play. a tournament to
honor and celebrate lost
classmates. The event is
free and food will be
provided. There also will
be concessions.
For details, call Mike
Daies at (678) 595-6769
or Chris Bell at 466-2666.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
fundraiser today
Fort White High
baseball has a Moe's
Night fundraiser planned
for 5-8 p.m. today at
Moe's Southwest Grill.
For details, call Jeanne
Howell at 288-5337;
From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High
soccer vs. Santa Fe High,
7 pm. (girls-5 p.m.)
Sm. Friday
Columbia High girls
soccer vs. Chiles High,
7 p.m. at CYSA field
Columbia High
football at Suwannee
High, 7'30 p.m.
I FOrt White High
football Vs.: Sahta Fe'
High, 7:30-p.m.
Saturday
Fort.. White' High.
girls cross' country in
Region .1A meet at
* Afligator Lake Park in.
SLake- City, 8:55 a.m.;
Columbia High's Hayley
Lewis in Region 2A meet,
7.:30 a.m:
Columbia High
swimming in FHSAA
Finals at Central Florida
YMCA Aquatic Center in
Orlando, TBA


S' JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Antonio Pellham (10) and Darius Williams (2) make a combined tackle to take down a Middleburg High runner on Oct. 21.

Records thrown out in annual rivalry


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. corn
In, a game as big as
the one that takes place
between. Columbia and
Suwannee High schools on
Friday, focus shouldn't be a
problem.
Still, coach Brian Allen is


doing everything he can to
keep the Tigers focused on
the Bulldogs of Suwannee
and not the upcoming
playoff, game against
St. Augustine High.
The Bulldogs come in
with a 1-8'record and no
hope at making the play-
offs. Columbia (6-3, 4-1


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
State swimmers
Columbia High swim team members Lindsay Lee (from
left), Micheala Polhamus, Heather Burns and Hannah Burns
will be competing in the state swimming competition at the
Central Florida YMCA Aquatic.Center in Orlando on Saturday.
The foursome make up the CHS 400 freestyle relay team,
while Hannah Burns, Heather Burns and Lee also qualified in
individual events.


District 4-6A) will travel to
St. Augustine next week for
its first-round playoff game.
Allen hasn't even begun to
speak with the Tigers about
the playoffs yet. His goal is
to keep the Tigers focused
on retaining the Old Oaken
Bucket.
'"We don't have to do,


much to motivate, in terms
of tactics," Allen said.
'"We've got kids from there
like (Quaysean) Monismith.
They're ready to play good
football. We just have to
keep them grounded."
Allen doesn't want the
Tigers to become a victim
of their own success.


"When you're winning,
it's easy to feel good," he
said. 'We can't let oursevIes
slip at. some point. The big
thing is to .stay grounded.
We'ye got to be enthusi-
astic and we can't rest on-,
our lorals. We have to do
CHS continued on 2B


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High head coach Demetric Jackson, displays the Battle for the Paddle trophy
following the Indians' 30-7 win at Santa Fe High last year.


Paddle battle a


challenge in 2011


Indians host
Santa Fe with
trophy on line.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High has dominated


the annual Battle for the
Paddle game against Santa
Fe High.
. The teams renew the
rivalry at 7:30 p.m. Friday
in Fort White. It will be a
matchup of playoff teams,
as both the Indians (6-3)
and Raiders (8-1) qualified
as district runners-up.


Fort White (6-3) has won
the last six meetings in a
row, all four under head
coach Demetric Jackson,
and holds a 7-2 edge in
Paddle games. Santa Fe is
the only team Fort White
has played in each of its
INDIANS continued on 2B


Cooler Weather Means Warmer Beverages!

AU, Fresh-Brewed Java Coast Coffee

or Cappucino and get a
2O40 Little Debble Honey Bun FREE!


Find us on.
Facebook.
or
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vW'hle speaith.'o t the r ea i-ng hc tu t c-tciP1 to/da/!

While supplies last. Special in effect until 11/30/11.


I'' I ~I I I- - .














LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420
Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 75.4-0420


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
SESPN -Virginia Tech at Georgia Tech
GOLF
4 p.m.
TGC LPGA, Lorena Ochoa
Invitational, first round, at Guadalajara,
Mexico
8 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour Australasia,
Australian Open, second round, at
*, Sydney
I a.m.
TGC-European PGATour, Singapore
Open, second round
PREP FOOTBALL
10:30 p.m.
FSN Westlake Village (Calif.) vs. St.
Bonaventure (Calif.), at Moorpark, Calif.

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
SEast
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 5 3 0 .25 222 184
N.Y.Jets 5 3 0.625 199 163 /
Buffalo :5 3 0.625222"174
Miami I 7 0.125 138 169
South
W L T Pct..PF PA
Houston, 6 3 0.667236157
Tennessee 4 4 0.500 156'169
Jacksonville `2 :6' 0.250 98 163
Indianapolis '0 .9 0 .000128 283'
North
SW L .T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati ,6 2 0.750 195 14 d..
Baltimore: 6 2 0.750208 130.
Pittsburgh 6 3. 0667 196 162
Cleveland 3 5, 0.375 119 170
; ' *. W est .. " :". .
S .W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 4 4 0.500.131 201
San Diego 4 4 0 .500 199 204
Oakland 4 4 0.500 184216
Denver 3 5 0.375 171 224
'NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y.Glants 6 2/ 0 .750 198 184
Dallas 4 4 0.500 179 175
Philadelphia 3 5 0 .375 203 182
Washington 3 :5 0 37 .127 158
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 3 0.667287205
Atlanta 5 3 0.625 189 170
Tampa Bay 4 4 0.500 147 196
Carolina 2 6 0. 250 187 207.
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay '8 0 01.000 275 179
petrpit 6 2 0.750239 147
Chicago 5 3 .0.625200 174
-' 'i' [ ,f '4,et' :
... L"T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 7 I 0.875 206 118
Seattle 2 6 0.250122185
Arizona 2 6 0 .250 162 196
St.Louis i 7 0.125 100211
S Today's Game
Oakland at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Buffalo at Dallas, I p.m.
Denver at Kansas City1 I p.m.
Washlngton at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizonra at Philadelphia. I pm. .
Tennessee at Carolina, I pm.
Pittsburgh at Cncinnnai, I p.m.
Houston a.Tampa Bay, I p.mr;.
New Orleans at Atianta, I p.m.
'Jacksonville at'.Indianapolis, I p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.'.-
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 4:S15 p.m. ,:
New England a N Y.Jets. 8:20 pm.
Monday's Game
Minnesota at Green Bay 8:30 p.m.,

College garnes
Today
Ohio (6-3) at Central Michigan (3-7),
A 7:30 p.m.


Virginia Tech (8-1) at Georgia Tech
(7-2), 8 p.m.
Houston (9-0) atTulane (2-8), 8 p.m.

College scores
Tuesday
Northern Illinois 45, Bowling Green
14

Top 25 schedule
Today
No. 10OVirginiaTech at No. 20 Georgia
Tech, 8 p.m.
No. II Houston atTulane, 8 p.m.
Saturday
No. I LSU vs. Western Kentucky,
7.p.m.
No. 2 Oklahoma State at Texas Tech,
Noon .
No. 3 Stanford vs. No. 6 Oregon,
8 p.m.
No. 4 Alabama at Mississippi State,
7:45 p.m.
SNo. 5 Boise State vs.TCU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Arkansas vs.Tennessee, 6 p.m.
No. 9 Clemson vs.' Wake Forest,
Noon
No. 12 Penn State vs. No. 19 Nebraska,
Noon
No. 13 Michigan State at Iowa, Noon
No. 14 Georgia vs. No. 24 Auburn,
3:30 p.m.
No. 15 South Carolina vs. Florida,
Noon,
No. 1'6 Wisconsin 'at Minnesota;
3:30 p.m.
No. 17 'Kansas State vs. Texas A&M,
3:30 p.m. .'
No. 18 Southern Cal vs. Washington,
3:40p.m. .
No.25 Texas at Missouri, Noon'
No. 22 Michigan at Illinois, 3:30 prm.
No. 23. Cincinnati vs. West Virginia,
Noon ,
No. 25 Southern Miss vs. UCF,


BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule
Friday's Games .
No. I North Carolina' vs.: Mchigan
State on the USS Carl Vinsoni San Diego,
7p.m. ', .
No. 2 Kentucky'vs. Marist, 7 p.m.'
No. 3 Ohio State vs. Wright State;
9 p.m.
No. -4 Connecticut vs. Columbia,
7 p.m.
No. 6"buke vs. Belmont, 9 p.m.
No. 7Vanderbilt vs. Oregon, 10 p.m.
No. 8 Florida vs. Jackson State,
7 p.m.
No. 9 Louisville vs. UT-Martin, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Pittsburgh' vs. Albany (NY),
7 p.m..
No. 12 Baylor vs. Texas Southern,
8 p.m.
No. 13 KansaIs 's.Tobson, 8 p.m.'
No. gi Xavier vs. Morgan State.
7p.m. .'- .. ..
No. 17 UCLA vs. Loyola Marymount,
10:30 p.m.
No. 18 Michigan vs. Ferris State,
7 p.m.
No. 19Alabama vs. North Florida,
8 p.m.
No.22 Marquette vs. Mount St. Mary's,
9 p.m.
No. 23- Gonzaga vs. Eastern
Washington, II p.m.
No. 24 California vs. UC Irvine,
10:30 p.m.!
No.25 Missouri vs Southeast Missouri
State, 8:m. ,
Saturday's Games
No 5 Syracuse vs Fordham. 4 pm
No 6 Duke vs Presbyterian. 4 30 p.m.
;No. I SWisonsin vs. Kehnesaw State-
' J' p.m . ':
S./ Sundiay's Games "
No."'I" Irth Carolina at UQNC:
SAsheville,4 pm ,
No. 7 Vanderbilt vs Cleveland' State
2p.m.
SNo. 9 Louisville vs. Lamar, 4 p.m.
No. 10 Pittsburgh s. Rider, 6 p.m.
No. 12 Baylor vs Jackson State, 7 p,m.-
No; 16 Arizona.vs. BallState,6 p.m.
No. 20 Texas A&M vs. Southern U;,
4 p.m (' -,


No. 21 Cincinnati vs. Alabama State,
7 p.m.
No. 24 California vs. George
Washington, 9:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Race week
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
KOBALT TOOLS 500
Site:Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule: Friday, practice (ESPN2,
1:30-2:55 p.m., 5:30-7:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, 1:30-3 p.m.); Sunday,
race, 3 p.m. (ESPN, 2-6:30 p.m.).
Track: Phoenix International Raceway
(oval, 1.0 miles).
Race distance: 312 miles, 312 laps.
Next race: Ford 400, Nov. 20.
Homestead-Miami Speedway, Homestead.
Online: http':/www.nascar.com
NATIONWIDE
WYPALL 200.
Site:Avondale,Ariz.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, noon-1:30 p.m.), race,
3:30 p.m. (ESPN2,3-6 p.m.).
Traclc Phoenix International Raceway.
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps.
Next race: Ford 300, Nov. 19,
Homestead-Miami Speedway, Homestead.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
Next race:. Ford 200, Nov. 18,
Homestead-Miami Speedway, Homestead..
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE'
AUTO.CLUB NHRA FINALS
Site: Pomona, Calif. .
Schedule: Today, qualifying;, Friday,
qualifying; Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2,
Sunday, 12:15-2. a.m.); Sunday, final
eliminations (ESPN2, 7-10 p.m.). '
T. rack:Auto Club Raceway at.Pomona.
Online: http:liwww.nhra.comn
FORMULA ONE:
ABU DHABI GRAND PRIX
Site: Abu Dhabi,. United Arab
Emirates. .
,Schedule riday, practice (Speed,
8-9:30 a.m,), Saturday, practice, qualifying
(Speed, 8-9:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 8 a.m.
(Speed, 7:30-10 a.m.; 4-6:30 p.m.).
TrackiYas Marina Circuit (road course,
3.45 miles).
Race distance: 189.8 miles, 55 laps.
Next race: Brazilian Grand Prix,
Nov. 27, Autodromq Jose Carlos Pace,
Sao Paulo.
Online: http://www.formulal.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
Tuesday's Games
Buffalo 6,Winnilpeg 5, OT
Florida 5,Toronto I
Dallas 5,Washington 2
New Jersey 3, Carolina 2
Edmonton 3, Montreal I
Detroit 5, Colorado 2
St. Louis 3, Chicago '
Minnesota 3, Caigary 0
Los Angeles 4, Nashville 3
Wednesday's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa (n)
Philadelphia atTampa Bay (n)
Nashville at Anaheim (n)
Today's Games
Edmonton at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto at St. Louis, 8 p.r.
Florida at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.rn.
N.Y. Islanders at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Montreal at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Los Angeles. 10:30 p.m.'
Minnesota at San Jose, 10 30 p m.'
Friday's Games
Washington at New Jersey. 7 p m.
Carolina at N Y. Rangers. 7 pm.
Dallas at Pittsburgh. 7 pm.
Ottawa at Buffalo. 7-30 p m
Edmonton at Detroit. 7-30 p m
Calgary at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.:
Vancouver ac Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS CupP
: At Carson, Calif. ,
Sunday


CHS: Tigers try to remain focused

Continued From Page 1B


what got us here. Staying
"grounded is what got us in.
the position we're in. We
have to continue ,to work
hard and not let up."
There is' a real possibil-
ity that the Tigers could be
up in the second half and.
Allen would have to make
a decision .about resting
-his players. It's something
he hasn't talked with' the
Tigers about, but some-
thing that is resting in the
back of his mind.
"If we get to a point in the
second half where we're in
a position to do. that, we
will," he, said. "That's all
going to be a game-time
decision. We know that
they have guys coming in
with no playoffs and this is
what they have for their big
finish."
Allen is concerned that
the Bulldogs will have a
chip on their shoulder to
play spoiler to Columbia.
"There's a lot of reasons
why a team can be down
and we don't know the situ-
ation," Allen said. "What we
have to do is stay in our
philosophy. I imagine they
want to come out and give
us a good ball game. This
will be the last time that


their seniors get to take the
field. They'll want to spoil it
for our team and that's part
of what we've talked about
I imagine they'll come out
and give us everything that
they have."
Win or lose, the Tigers



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

IDOPUR


NRAERB-
---^^-'

:___^!^_


will be on the road against
St. Augustine next week.
Still, the Tigers want to cap
off the regular season with
a Bucket victory.
Columbia travels to
Suwannee -at 7:30 p.m. on
Friday.'

'THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: PATCH NEEDY FOSSIL BURROW
y Answer: He thought locking up his poker winnings
was this A SAFE BET


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Cody Beadles presses the ball upfield during a preseason soccer game
against Providence at Patton Park in Jacksonville on Thursday.


Tigers destroy Trojans


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High's soccer
team started the,2011-2012
season off with a convincing
8-0 win at Hamilton County
High on Wednesday.
Jimmy Blakely continued
upon -a, strong preseason
wtih three goals in the game
to lead the Tigers.


Dylan Sessions had three
assists and a goal. :
Other Tigers to 'score
were: Htinter Grow, Alext
Rhea, Cody Beadles and.
Tristan O'Steen. ', ;':
"The clearance by our'
defense was phenomenal."
Coluimbia' coach Trevor'
Tyler. said. ."We, worked
hard',on that in practice'
before the game and exe-


cuted. We played well with
one game. and one shut-
out Jimmy played well and
Dylan playediwell with three
assists. Our only freshman,
Tristan O'SteeR also played
well with his first goal."
Columbia has a three-
game road stretch nextweek
with games at Suwannee,
Chiles and Panama City
Mosely.


11 seasons. The Indians are
8-3 overall, as the firstPaddle
game was played in 2002.
Fort White breezed" to
a 30-7 win last year, A.J,'
Legree caught two touch-
down passes from Andrew
Baker and Zach Cormieri
ran for a touchdown, as
did JR Dixon. Colton Jones
kicked a field goal and three
PATs. The Indians won 41-
13'the last time the game
was played at Arrowhead
Stadium.
Santa Fe was 1-9 in both
of those seasons, but this
is a different group of
Raiders. .
Tommy Keeler came
in as head coach, leaving
Newberry High after six
years. He has Santa Fe in
the playoffs for the' first
time since 2004." Keeler's
Newberry team made the
playoffs three years in 2006-
08.
Keeler and the Raiders
had to go up against his old
team to open the season.
The Raiders won 17-16 in


ACROSS
1 Pith helmets
6 Promgoers
11 FlaredI
Garment
(hyph,)
12 Sonnet stanza
13" Drink of the
gods
15 Cave
16 U:se a
compass
18 Deadly snake
19 Holster item
21,'Audit ace
22 Monsieur's".
pate
23 Kin's partner
25 Halter
28 Fictional
orphan
30 Mao -tung
31 Dogpatch's -
Abner
32 PC button
33 To and -
35 Static
37 Team cheer
38 Identical


overtime to start a run that
reached 7-0.
*Dixie, County (40-13),'
Suwannee (49-25) and
Buchholz (21-13) high
:schools fell in the streak,
along with District 5-5A
opponents Crystal River
High (32-29) and Dunnellon
High (21-7). *'
Following an open 'date,
Santa Fe was defeated, 38-0,
by North Marion High in a
game that ended up decid-
ing the district. The Raiders
bounced back with shutout
wins over district teams
Belleview High (46-0) and
A Eastside High (42-0). .
Like' Fort White, Santa
Fe has lost its starting
quarterback., Last week,
Jackson said Baker was out
3-4 weeks, and-the Raiders
D.L. Powell waseventually
ruled out for the season
with an ACL tear suffered
against Dunnellon.
Santa Fe running back
Brandon Willis had 13 car-
ries for 50 yards against
Fort White last year.


40 Tabs loc.
41 First U.S. state
42 RN assistant,
43 Pledge
46 Gift-box filler
48 Andre of *
tennis
50 Wiped out
54 Brainy club
55 St. Teresa's'
town
56 Newscaster -
Jennings
57 Allow to enter
(2wds.)

DOWN
1 Catch some
rays'
2 Bullfight yell
3 Photo
4 Chanted
5 Withered
6 Unlawful act
7 Environmental
prefix
8 Jazzy -
James


Willis scored three
touchdowns against both,
Suwannee (one a 92-yard
kickoff return) and Crystal
River, the homecoming
opponent that Santa Fe beat-
in the last "minute of the
game. Willis had 131 yards
rushing in the game. He
scored two touchdowns in
the Belleview game.
Damian Johnson rushed
for 136 yards against
Belleview. He had a 68-
yard touchdown catch
against Dixie County, and
had rushing touchdowns
against. Dixie County,
Dunnellon, Crystal River
and Buchholz.
Troy Presley had a 40-
yard touchdown catch
against Suwannee, and
rushing touchdowns
against Suwannee. and
Crystal River. -
On defense, Chris
Jackson had the daily dou-
ble against Dunnellon. He
scored touchdowns on a
fumble recovery and inter-
ception return.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


RE EAD ABOARD
Sj TARE YESTS




GTE ANYEE


CNA EEAUFAKE SS




S TAR V E Y A S T S
T ENSE0 IS T


9 Volleyball
needs
10 What red
means
14 Cord of
I firewood
15 Pesky insects


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.comI


11-10


17 Typical
examples
19 Migratory
flocks
20 City in New
York
22 Those people
24 Barnyard
scratcher
25 Stadium
hoverer
26 Out of bed
27 Trebek of
"Jeopardy!"
29 Possibilities
34 Pie-chart lines
36 Off base,
maybe
(2 wds.)
39 End of a
threat
43 Mae West
persona
44 Curved
molding
45 Yearn for
46 Bygone
despot
47 Europe-Asia
range
49 Weathervane
dir.
51 Roost
52 Cotton gin
name
53 Aykroyd or
Rather


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


INDIANS: Keelerleads in Santa Fe
Continued From Page 1B


I


-"









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011


DILBERT
HE'S BUSY CONVERTING AFTER THAT,
EVERYTHING YOU DID E HE'S SCHEDULED TO
THIS YEAR INTO A LOWER OUR MORALE.
COMPLETE WASTE THEN HE'LL BE STIRRING
OF TIME. UP TROUBLE IN OTHER
DEPARTrMENTS.



a IF


BABY BLUES


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER OR WORSE
|4TLy,-I'D LII- Y4OU I | u'id KMoIi
I IO M -T -O ,Il -- T 1 HOURS,


DEAR ABBY


Sting of sudden disinheritance

leaves grandchild feeling hurt


DEAR ABBY: I am in a
happy and healthy long-
term relationship. Since
neither of us wants kids, we
don't feel the need to marry.
Because I don't want chil-
dren, my grandmother:has,
decided I don't deserve any
inheritance. qhe has rewrit-
ten her will, leaving every-
thing to my younger cousin
who is the only grandchild
likely to have children.
. It makes me feel awful,
as though I am not worthy
in her eyes because of my
choice. It isn't aoout the
honey, Abby. My feelings
are hurt because my grand-
mother can't accept me
without a child.
Is there a way to broach
the subject without sound-
ing like I'm just after her
money? DISINHERITED
GRANDCHILD IN
COLORADO
DEAR DISINHERITED:
How do you know you have
been written out of your
grandmother's will? Did she
tell you or did you hear it
from someone else?
It would not be confron-
tational to tell your grand-
mother you were hurt when
you heard the news because
it made you feel "less than."
The decision whether or not
to have a child is a personal
one, and couples who don't
want to.be parents are likely
to make less tfian wonderful
ones.
Your grandmother may
or may not have changed
her will because of your
choice, but it's also possible


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
that she would like her
assets to be passed down to
grandchildren and beyond.
You'll never know unless,
you ask.

DEAR ABBY: What does
someone who is an older
adult do when she needs to
be held and' listened to, and
when she has no one to do
this with her?
- I'm sure I'm not the only
woman who has found her-
self in this situation. What
do others do when this is
needed? Sometimes I just
need to be held, listened
to and reassured. IOWA
READER
DEAR READER The need
for human contact is part of
the human condition, and I
can tell you what I did before
I met my husband: When I
was feeling down, rd ask a
friend for a hug, a willing ear
and some reassurance. I can't
imagine anyone refusing. At
some point everyone needs
what you're asking for.
Other ways to combat
the blues include 'staying
occupied with hobbies that
interest you, socializing with
friends and getting regular
exercise. If readers would


like to chime in and share
what they do, Ill be glad
to pass along their sugges-
tions.

DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I stopped at a rest
stop to use the facilities. I
noticed a man with a little
girl who appeared to be
about 3 years old go into the
men's bathroom. I wanted
to ask if he would like me
to take the child into the
women's bathroom while
he waited outside the door
for me to return her to him,
however I hesitated and
didn't do it.
When my husband came
*back to the car I asked him
what the child encountered
in the men's bathroom. He
said she had to pass by the
urinals with the men urinat-
ing. ILfelt terrible for not
speaking up.
Would it have been wrong
to volunteer to take the little
girl into the women's bath-
room? CONCERNED IN
FLORIDA
DEAR CONCERNED:
What the child encountered
when her father took her
into the men's bathroom
was probably a line of men
with their backs to her, and
I assume he took her into
the stall toilet However, it
would have been kind of
you to volunteer, and prob-
ably very much appreciated.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
'Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

So much depends on how
you treat others.,,If you
are too overbearing you
will face setbacks, but if
you are charming and are
willing to pitch in and do,
your share, you will set
a standard that everyone
involved will strive to
reach. ***.
VIRGO (Aug..23-Sept
22): Stick to what you
know and learn from those
who have the experience
you lack. Avoid any trouble
at home or with people
who demand too much of
you. Network, interact with
superiors and don't let
personal matters hold you
back. *****-
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): You'll get all the help
you need if you ask for it
Someone you fancy will
have something to offer
that can help you raise
your income. A pleasure
trip will open up a. window
of opportunity that can
influence your'future.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Choose wisely. You
don't want to upset some-
one who can cause you,
grief at home or at work. A
last-minute change of plans
must not disrupt what
needs to be done. Finish
up before you take off. A


job opportunity looks invit-
ing. ***
SAGrITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): You'll learn
through observation. Don't
initiate change. Let some-
one else be at the helm for
once, while you sit back
and watch the activities
of others. Don't give in to
pressure. It's better to be
safe than sorry. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): You can improve
your personal financial
situation if,you assess and
adjust your investments,
Your whole family can
benefit from the alterations
you make. An opportunity
to get ahead must not be
ignored. Change is appar-
ent *****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Look at the pos-
sibilities and make a move
that will improve your per-
sonal status or professional
position. Ask for favors
arid use your knowledge
to entice people of quality
to take part in your plan. A
little romance will enhance
your chances. **
PISCES (FebN 19-March
20): Slow down and keep
a watchful eye. You will
be criticized if you barrel
ahead without giving any
thought to what others
do. Recalling what has
happened in the past will
save you from making the
same mistake over again.
****


..9 ARIES (March 21-April
19): When it comes to
business, practicality will
be essential. In matters'
of love, trying something
new and exciting will
outweigh being sensible.
Separate your personal and
professional life; and make
the most of both. Your
B charm will help you get
your way. **,*
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Your emotions will be
difficult to control and can
-- lead to unsightly discord
if you are too forthright
p A short trip will help you
E see things more clearly
- and provide a true picture
of someone you may have
misjudged. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): It willbe best to be
quiet about your financial
situation. Keep things
playful and fun and you
will enhance a relationship
with someone special. A
skill you have can be diver-
sified, allowing you to offer
a service that will bring in
extra cash. ***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You can drum up
interest in something you
feel is important or that
can help you reach a per-
sonal or professional goal
you are working toward.
E Worthwhile returns will
.) come with hard work and
dedication. Ask, and you
shall receive. ****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: F equals J
"OS HZUJU'K W PEDS AETJKU OB
ZUWRUB, O ZEIU OH'IK DOVU WTPTKHW
BWHOEBWD. 0 FTKH CEB'.H XWBH WB
UWtJDN HUU HOLU." -PWJN IDWNUJ


Previous Solution: "I grew up below the poverty line.. I think it made me
stronger as a person; it built my character." Justin Bieber
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-10
CLASSIC PEANUTS

M / IT CAN RAINAND RAINAND I'M VERVE BUT IA NOT STUPID!!
RAIN BUT I'M JUT 60IN6 TO TON TjIl
N IT HEE BECAUSE IAM TUBNRN! E if


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415









Classified Department: 755-5440


MWEL
FINDII I

L-~n


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage


[ rnMcns


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ing only. ,
4 lines, one morith....s92.00
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Includes an additional $2.00 per
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-lacingAnA


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Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 pm
Sonie people prefer to place'their
classified ads in person, and some
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East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please .
direct your copy.to the Classified'
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.co r ..m ,


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only the charge for the ad space
In 'error. Please call 755-5440
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tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlinesapply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.coni


Legal.

NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
ORDINANCE TO WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
a special meeting on Tuesday, No-
vember 22, 2011, at the Columbia
County School Board Administration
Building, 372 West Duval Street,
Lake City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. con-
sider the adoption of an .ordinance
entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, FIXING THE
BOUNDARIES.OF THE COMMIS-
SIONER DISTRICTS OF-COLUM-
BIA COUNTY PURSUANT TO
THE FLORIDA CONSTITUTION,
ARTICLE VIII, SECTION 1, SUB-
PARAGRAPH (e); PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS; PROVIDING A
TITLE; PROVIDING FOR PUR-
POSE AND INTENT% PROVIDING
FOR REVISED COMMISSIONER
DISTRICTS BASED ON 2010-
CENSUS; PROVIDING FOR PUB-
LICATION OF THE REVISED
DISTRICTS IN ACCORDANCE
WITH SECTION 124.02 OF THE
FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVID-
ING FOR SEVERABILITY; PRO-
VIDING FOR FILING OF COPIES
AND FURNISHING OF MINUTES;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the'proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County, Administration' Complex,
135 NE Hernando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, between the hours of
8:00. a.m. .and 5:00 p.m., Monday
.thiroUgh Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this, pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the cdnsid-
eration of the ordinance at the above-
referenced public hearing, a record
of the proceeding may be needed'and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that 'a verbatim record of
the public 'hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be'
based.
In accordance. with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpret6er to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior'to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 7th day of Notember,
2011.
By: /s/ P. DeWitt Cason
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of Cour ,, .
05529006
November 10, 2011
PUBLIC AUCTION
2001 MITS
VIN# 4A3AE35G91E002991.
CREAMER'S. WRECKER SERV-
JCE 290 NE SUNNYBROOK ST.
LAKE CITY FL 32055
COLUMBIA COUNTY
386-752-2861'
SALE DATE: November 23,2011
8:00AM
05528990
November 10, 2011
Mi'V Ji n t -%V CLrr T=1 Q AT


ICEnOFS RI anF'Srr a aLE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT. PURSUANT TO WRITS OF'
EXECUTION heretofore issued out,
of the Circuit Court, Marion County,
Florida, Case No. 11-545-CA-B on
July 19, 2011 and Jul5 20, 2011 in
the matter of Gateway Bank of Cen-
tral Florida, 'A Florida Corporation
vs Isaac Construction, LLC, a Flori-
da limited liability company, and
Isaac Bratkovich, individually, I,
Mark Hunter, As Sheriff of-Colum-
bia County, Florida, have levied
upon all thp right, title and interest of
-the defendants Isaac Construction,
LLC, a Florida limited liability com-
pany, and Isaac Bratkovich, individ-
ually, to-wit:
Lot 24 Oak Meadow Plantation, Unit
3, a subdivision according to the plat
thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8,
Page 43-44, of the. Public Records of
Columbia County, Florida.
Parcel Identification Number:
02462-324
and on November 29, 2011, at 10:00
A.M., at 173 N.E. Hemando Avenue
Room 201, Lake City, Florida 32055
or as soon thereafter as circumstan-
ces permit, I will offer the above de-


Legal

scribed, property for sale at public
outcry and sell the same, subject to
ALL prior liens, if any to the highest
and best bidder for CASH IN
HAND, plus Florida State Sales Tax,
if applicable, the proceeds to be ap-
plied as far-as may be to the payment
of costs and satisfaction of the above
described execution.
In accordance with the American
with Disabilities Act, persons need-
ing a special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding shall con-
tact the individual or agency. sending
notice not later than seven days prior
to the proceeding at the address giv-
en on notice. Telephone (386) 758-
1109; 1-800-955-8771 (+TDD) OR
1-800-955-8770 (V), via Florida Re-
lay Service.
Mark Hunter, As Sheriff
Of Columbia County, Florida
By: Sergeant Robert Holloway,
Deputy Sheriff
05528740,
October 27, 2011
November 3, 10,17, 2011


STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL
JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAIN-
ING COMMISSION,
Petitioner
vs.
CLIFTON C. LIVINGSTON, Case
S#31873
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION,
TOi CLIFFTON C. LIVINGSTON,
Residence Unknown ,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Ad-
ministrative Complaint has been
filed against you seeking to revoke
your CORRECTIONAL Certificate
in accordance with Section
943.1395, F.S., and'.any rules pro-
mulgated thereunder.
You are required to serve a written
copy of your intent to request a heqr-
ing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S.
upon Michael Crews, PROGRAM
DIRECTOR, Criminal Justice Pro-
fessionalism Program, Florida De-,
partment of Law Enforcement, P. 0.
Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida
32302-1489, on or before January 8,
2012. Failure to do so will result in a
default being entered against you to
Revoke said certification pursuant to
Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-
S27, F.A.C.
Dated: November 8, 2011
Ernest W. George
CHAIRMAN - CRIMINAL JUS-
TICE STANDARDS
AND TRAINING COMMISSION
By: -s- Cheryl Perkiis, Division
Representative '
05528731
November 10; 17, 24, 2011
December 1, 2011


.020 Lot & Found

SCAT FOUND. Gray with
White Chest & Feet, Friendly,
age? On SR 252 near old CC Rd.
386-365-5099

Lost Dog In Eastwood Boston Ter-
rier, Black and White named Har-
ley. Likely blue collar. Very
friendly. Roughly 35 lb $50 Re-
ward. IJE'S BEEN FOUND!!.
100 Jobn
1 0 .Opportunities
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
WRITER'needed
Must have experience.
$1000. wk 38-758-4757.

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN
needed; $1,500 week.'.
Must have experience and tools:
386-758-4757

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
.1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Construction Engineering &
Inspection. Seeking Inspectors,
Contract Support and Compliance
Staff. CTQP Qualified.
e-mail resumes to: '
SuzannaMOvia-cs.com


Experienced Roofers
Needed.
Please call
(850).271-4199


100 Job
100 Opportunities
Part Time Bull Dozer Operator
needed for
FJ Hill Construction
Call 386-752-7887


Customer Service Representative
for call center. Must be fast friend-
ly'& efficient. Please send resume
to: 197 SW Waterford Ct. Lake
City, F1 32025 .Att: Joey Kitaif.
Please send resume for call center
position only. There are no other
positions at this time.
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.-
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
Production Technician needed.
Must be over 21/clean driving
record. On call wkwnds/after hrs.o
Call foroappt. 386-754-0261
STYLIST NEEDED at
.Southern Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info.
Wee Care of Columbia City
is hiring CDATeachers
Experience required.
Apply in person.

120 Medical
I2 Employment
05528667 '
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City. FLA
Cerrificaie program.
(904)566-1328

05529016
Medical Billing
Must have experience in all
aspects of coding, billing,
and collections.
Send resume in confidence to:
mafaisalrnd@gmail.com or
Fax #386-758-5987

05529030
RN/LPN needed for infusion
center. MUST have IV
certification w/2yrs exp. PT- 3
to 4 days weekly. Fax resume,
to: Attn Cheryl 386-754-3657 or
-email to office manager:. at
primarycaremedic.com


Orthopedic Surgeon seeks
. Medical Transcriptionist.
Experienced candidates need only
to apply. Please fax resume to':
386-758-6995.

Schools &
240 Education
05528912 '. -' ,
Interested in a Medical Career?,
Express Training offers
courses for, beginners & oxp.
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-l1/28/IQ, -
Phlebotomy national certifica-,
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplie


FREE to Good Home
Orange & white Kitte
Litter box'trained.
(386)288-2504 or 288-4


FREE TO GOOD HOME
S2 yr old Jack Russell
386-288-5578
Leave message
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold'to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a.licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
lifbe licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


330 Livestock &
SSupplies
WANTED: I Buy and Sell used
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay cash. Call 386-935-1522

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

410 Lawn & Garden
1U Equipment
JOHN DEERE 2009 42'
Mower With 2 Bag bagger
$750.00
386-755-1002 Leave Message

419 TV-Radio &
SRecording
20" SONY
6 Triniton TV.
$50.00.
386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy


K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
'Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

,Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans. ,
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO tide needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

2 Family Sale Sat 10-3.2 miles
down Branford Hwy on the right.
Golf clubs,.furniture, clothes, Prin-
cess House dishes. Look for signs.


619 NW Holiday Dr. Sat 8a- Super
Nintendo, NES &Atari games,
controllers. & systems. Toys, other
electronics. Golf clubs, cookware.,
Baby/kids/maternity clbthes,baby
items,bassinets,household,furni-
ture,appliances,boks. Fri-Sat. 8-1.
Woodcrest SD Woodview Way.
Fri 8a-2p & Sat.7a-2p Furn, appli-
ances, ladies plus sizes & big men
clothes. Lake Jeffery to Bo Ct. on
left. Look for signs & balloons.
Multi Family Fri & Sat. 8-3.
Hwy 47 & Alice Gin. 1 mi. N of
1-75. QUALITY hsehold, name
brain c'16theis ,'hristmas iten s. -
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid..

Thurs,Fri & Sat. 7:30-1:30. 190
SW Fabian Way. Close to 242 &
247. Look for signs. Scuba items,
Disney snow globes. Much More!

440 Miscellaneous
Never worn Wedding Dress,
Size 10, Halter Neckline, Mermaid
cut, beaded. Other Acc. Veil,
Slips, etc. $400. 386-623-6652


USED SET (3) Danton tires.
eS 185/60/15
S $65.00
e 386-984-7510


ns
481


450 Good Things
450 toEat ,


'The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
- 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville .
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

16X80 Almost new. 10 mi S of
Lake City, off Branford Hwy. 3/2, /
fenced yd, Dish Washer private.
$650. mo + sec. No Pets. 984-7478
2&3 BR MH. $39.5 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur- V
nished. Cannon Creek MHP I 1
386-752-6422
2/2.Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2bedrm/2bth $500 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake -
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com,-:
Country Living' .
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280 /i
Mobile Homes for rent in \
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside &.3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +-dep. .
No Pets. 386-961-1482 "

640 Mobile Homes
for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser- 7
ies. 3br/2ba plus bornus rm,adjoins .
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to G'ville
MLS # 78411 $164,900 623-6896 '"
3/2 MH on 1 acre in-nice sub. ).'
paved rd. metal 'roof. completely
remodeled; new everything! Only
$39,500.386-249-1640


It's Here. Jacobson Homes a,
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home 3.
-with lots of tape and texture and o
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes,.Gainesville
(352)872-5566. .
4br/2ba, Long carport, ,
Front & back porches.
Reduced to $37,000. me
Call 386-752-4258
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80 ;
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and :
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes Has 3 -
Modular Homes Available
-. at HUGH Savings
Over 40K'Off 800-622-2832
WE BUY HOMES! 9
Singles or Doubles. Must have. ?
clear title. Call North Point Homes-
(352)872-5566

Unfurnished Apt. ,
710 For Rent







05528965
SPRING HILL VILLAGE '>
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
wwiv.springhillvillage.net


IbrApt with ..
all utilities included.
Close to the VA.
(727)415-2207
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com


Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com


confused?




Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!



WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440















LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt 730 Unfurnished
I For Rent R Home For Rent


Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, lg 2 brApt.
Close to town
$485 mo + $485.dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
Sacred 8 mi nw ofVA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep .386-961-9181

,720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town.'41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. .Weekly
or monthly rates. I person $135,
2 persons $150.'weekly'
386-752-5808,

730 Unfurnished
73U Home For Rent


3 BR/I BA. newly renovated,
CH & A, corner of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security.
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.


4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on r
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
/ TOWNHOUSE 2br plus,
bonus room: w/1.5 bath.
QuailHeights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243


4BR/3BA, close to 1-75..Close to..:
town, great schools. Wel'water &
septic, Clay electric. $1100. mo.
$1000 Dep. (850)346- 318 Chris

For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.
home brick, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083
For.lease-Lakewood sub. LG
brick. 2600 sq. ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lg lot by Lake Jeffrey $1275 m'
+last+sec. Bruce 386-365-3865


Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days 7-7A Bar Sales, Inc.
7 ses

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals


FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
. Court house.,
Call 386-755-3456

For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


770 Condos For Rent

2BR/2BA, all appliances,
water/sewer, basic cable,
pool & tennis cts
$1150/mo, call 386-344-0433


05528950



SMAR lI.BOUIiER.F FASTER.
The Darby Rogers Company
* 315 Piedmont St.
4/2 in Live Oak $790./mo
775 SW EL Prado.
Lake City 3/1 w/screened
porch and large fenced back
yard $775./mo
S222 SW 3rd St.
3/2 totally remodeled in
downtown Jasper $800./mo
1320 NW Labonte.
3]2 located in Gwen Lake
area of Lake City $800./mo
847 SW Applewood Glen.
.Ft White 3/3 DWMH in the
country $800./mo .
199 SW Brandy Way.
fariiily friendly 4/2 in
Springfield Estates
Lake City $950.00
16652 Spring St.
Historic 3/2 two story home
totally remodeled in. down-
town White Springs
$1000:/mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650 or
. BJ Federico 386-365-5884


810. Home for Sale


PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5 `10 #77307
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000 "
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY;
INC. 755-5110 #78278


PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971


IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110-#79233
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
>386-755-5110 #78838
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039$129,000 Call Paula


830 Commercial
oJ3 Property


MOBILE HOME PARK with ig.
brick owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84 Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386- ,
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

950 Cars for Sale
197,4 FORD Galaxy.
Clean, runs-fair, spotless. interior.
4-door. $2,300!
386-754-8885
2000 Lincoln.LS $3200;
1999 Pontiac Mini% an $1995,
1999 Ford Mustang $3900;
1999 Chrysler 300M.$2695.
352-538-0292/514-2950


Lawrence 386-623-1973 /\ .
S Hallmark Real Estate
COUNTRY CLOSE 3/2 brick, 3 RECYCLE
acres,>pole barn,wotkshop, fruit YOUR
trees. $129,900 #78096 .Y..OU
Call Gingr keParker386-65-2135 PAPER
Hallmark Real Estate ; '
HUD HOME 4.77 ac, near
G'ville. 3/2, as is $95,500 Call
Robin Williams 365-5146
www.hudhomestore.com 091-
434983 Hallmark Real Estate
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop, .
.3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft.,'d6uble lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189.900 neg. Call 417-396-2134


ON WHEELS & WATERCRAFT


14 -


2007 SeaFox
17 ft. center console,
approx. 40 hrs. Mercury
90hp. New 551b trolling
motor. Alum. trailer.
Pay off
$12,600
Call '
386-758-7766


2001 Pontiac
Gradd Am
Cold A/C, great gas
mileage, 4 new tires,
low mile engine. Looks
and runs great.
$3,500 OBO
Call
386-965-1600 .


...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:.I,
Home delivery:
To subscribe call
755-5445.



I'll
ignffsiffffwH~.f


1986 Chevy
Monte Carlo SS
Maroon on maroon,
one owner, non-smoker,;
84,000 orig. mi., never -
wrecked, solid body.
$10,000 OBO
Call
904-718-6747


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
: classified line ad online. ,; .',
* You must lhcUdtie vehicle price.) ,-
SAll ads are prepaid. .
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.

.Call
*386-555-5555
If you don'tsell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor:


805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
FOR SALE: 2 valuable lots locat-
ed next to Lake Shore hospital in
Lake City. $20,000. serious in-
quires only please. 910-874-1565
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the;fair :
housing.act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference," :
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion; sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make'
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with.parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept.any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are. hereby in--
formed that all dwellings adver-'
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUDtoll free.at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large'
oaks, wood floors, fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS #71594 $149,900 623-6896
-PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan;,Large rear deck MLS 78103
." '$169,900386-623-6896
-SHORT SALE'3/2, Built 2007,
wood floors, Game room.
REDUCED! Call Ginger Parker
386-365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate

820 Farms &
O' Acreage.'
$10,000 reduction on our 10-actre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties .
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous OaksiPavedRd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!'
$59,900.,$525mo 352-215-101'8.'
www.LanidOwnerFinancing.com
-4 acres, Wellborn,New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site. owner fin, .
no down, $39.900. $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018 '
wwm .LandOw nerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo
386-961-1086


Classified Department: 755-5440


*














Hopkins could be difference vs Miami


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press


TALLAHASSEE-While ., '
Florida State. has never
beaten Miami with a last-
minute, game-winning
field goal; the Seminoles -
have lost five: games to
the Hurricanes since 1991
because of missed kicks.
If Saturday's- game
comes down to a field goal
at the, finish, Florida State
coach Jimbo Fisher likes
his chances with Dustin
Hopkins, who is. on- pace to
challenge the scoring and
field goal records at the
school and Atlantic Coast
Conference.
"We love our kicker,"
Fisher said Wednesday.
"He's handled those situa-
tions before."
The recorid-setting junior
kicker has hit 15 of 17 field
goals this season and 124
consecutive extra-points.
Hopkins' has converted
56 of 71 field goals in .his
career, including four of
52 yards or longer. He has
been doing it since his first
collegiate game two years
ago when he kicked field'
goals. of 45 and52'yardsin ............ASSOCIATEDPRESS
a 38-34 loss: to Miami. In F"ridda:State's Shawn Powell (45) holds the ball as kicker Dustin Hopkins (18) kicks a 43-yard field goal against North
his first two games in the- Carolina Stafe at Doak Campbell Stadium in Tallahassee on Odt. 29.
series, Hopkins is 10-for-. :-" . ..
'11 on extra-ioints and has .--cobiArip son; Miami inexperienced field goal season and has hit on 8 of "He's been kicking big
field goals covering 52,.45. (5-4i 3- -.ACV) .comes into kicker. Junior Jake Weiclaw 10 and all 36 of his extra- field goals for us and cornm-
and 38 yards. the. ginm'v&wtl1 .a" relatively' took over those duties this point attempts. ing up.big for us all year,"


Injured Gamecocks


prepare for Gators


SPETE IACOBELLI
Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C.- One
starter returns, while anoth-
er's status is in .oubt.
It's. been -that kind -of
season for South Carolina
coach Steve Spurrier as
injuries .and personnel
shifts have struck the 15th-
rainked Gamecocks.
Spurrier said quarterback
Connor Shaw was cleared
to return to practice after
suffering a concussion last
week and is likely to play
against Florida on Saturday.
Safety DeVonte Holloman,
who also had a concus-
sion in the 44-28 loss at
Arkansas, has not yet been
cleared by doctors and is
questionable for Saturday's
game.
Then again, it's been'like
that all year. Star linebacker
Antonio Allen was out of
last week's game with- neck
spasms. Cornerback C.C.,
Whitlock has missed time
with. a concussion. Safety
D.J. Swearinger will miss
most of practice this week
with a.f6ot injury.
On offense, lineman
Kyle Nunr has been out
since September with back
.problems, receiver Bruce
Ellington was slowed by
a hamstring and, perhaps
the most significant loss
of all, star tailback Marcus
Lattimore went down with
a season-ending knee inju-
ry at Mississippi State last
month. .
"Well, it's little unusual,"
Spurrier said Tuesday.
Still, Spurrier said
the Gamecocks (7-2, 5-2.
. Southeastern Conference)
remain in reach of several
milestones when they close
the SEC season with .the
Gators.
A victory would give.
South Carolina six SEC
wins, something it's never
accomplished since joining
the league 19 years ago. It
would also mark b4ck-to-
back wins over the Gators
for the first time since World
War II. And it would keep
the Gamecocks in conten-
tion for the SEC Eastern
Division and a second-
straight trip to the league
title game.
"When you look at the
way our team has played
this year, you have to say,
'Hey those guys are 7-2 and
have a chance to achieve
something this year,' "
Spurrier said. 'We are not


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's Hunter Joyer (41) runs over Jeff Demps'28) as he
attempts to dive'down the field Saturday.in a game against
VanderbUt..


here moping that we are
7;2. We have to play one of
our. best' games' and have
some fire and emotionn"
The. injuries and changes
on,,ffihse-'.-hve" had the
most 'effect'on the team
the Gaiecocds were pro-
jected'to be when the year
begai.. South Carolina
looked Ibaded witl an expe-
rienced, offensive line and a
tri of- skill players in quar-
terback S;.8i'ie.q' Garcia,
receiver'Alliax~ Jeffery and
Lattinl e-wh.-1 ere" major
reasosi- 'the' -Gamecocks
-won'the.'dvsisni&ast year.
But IGarfia the.fifth-year
seioir who.'d thrown for
3,059 yards' aid" 20' touch-
. downs season -ago, rarely
flashed a similar form this
season at-d-w's benched in
favor of.si .homore Shaw
followinga'- f6-13 home loss
to Auburn.: Garcia was dis-
missed for good in October
for failing a substance-abuse
test, .
With little experience
at quarterback, Spurrier
figured he'd keep hand-
ing off to Lattimore and
relying on his highly-rated
defense to control games.
That strategy ended when a
Mississippi State defender
rolled up on Lattimore's left
leg, damaging ligaments
and cartilage in the knee. :
Jeffery caught 88 pass-
es for 1,517 yards both
school records in


2010 and was on- Sports
Illustrated's cover this sum-
mer, poised for an even
-bigger junior year. Jeffery.,
though, has barely made
a ripple on offense with 36
catches and 487 yards.
The :Gamecocks have
averaged fewer :than 19
points a game the past three
contests. -
.!inebacker Shaq Wilson
said-itwould be easy to make
excuses -about injuries.
'" flaafs.Just football," he
said ("you just have to play.
SOnenan. goes .down, next
m'an '-up and has to do a
job."- .
It looked like South
Carolina might .need the
next quarterback up after
a hard hit Shaw took that
sent, him to, the sidelines
late in the, game against
Arkansas. Spurrier said
he'd continue rolling back-
up Dylan Thompson into
practice drills in' case of
any setbacks, but expected
Shaw to be ready for the
crucial game.
Expect to see Ellington
more often in a wildcat
setup at times, too.
"I 'don't think Steve will
change a whole lot of what
he does whether Dylan
Thompson is the quar-
terback. They do some
of the wildcat stuff with
(Bruce) Ellington in the
game," Florida coach Will
Muschamp said.


Miami linebacker Sean
Spence said.
Both kickers, however;
are hoping they aren't fac-
tors in the game.
"I'm not upset if we win by
four touchdowns or what-
ever the score is," Hopkins
said Wednesday.
But they also agree that
a kicker has to embrace a
game-deciding attempt.
Hopkins, who paints his
shoes gold before each
game, has already experi-
enced the agony of a missed
kick and the exhilaration of
a winning one.
The lanky Texas nailed
a 55-yard field goal as time
expired in Florida State's
16-13 win over Clemson last
year just one week after his
40-yard attempt was, natti-
rally, wide right with seven
secondsremaining as North
Carolina escaped with a 37-
35 win in Tallahassee.
"Just knowing you've
been there I'm sure wl
help if the opportunity are-
es again," Hopkins said.
Hopkins, who also han-
dles kickoff duties for the
Seminoles, is known for
accuracy and range, whlch
is accented by his numer-
ous kickoffs into or through
the end zone.
"Those special guys .
that's what separates then"
Fisher said. "That's one of the
things we're blessed with."


ANNOUNCEMENT

Swift Creek Realty is proud to announce .
that C(rrtv (-son has joined our sales
team and is eager to assist you in all-.f
your real estate needs.



SCarrie Cason, Broker Associate
S .. A Cell: 386-623-2806
Carrie@CarrleCason.com
1140 SW Bascom Norris Drive, Suite 106, Lake City, Florida 32025 800-833-0499 %ww.SwiftCreekRealty.net















u Broken & Unwanted Gold, Silv ,
and Platinum Jewery
SteritngFlatware & Sewing Sets
Gold & Silver Colns ,
a Dental Gold
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We do not pawn, we only buy. Coane expeMience tet dltheren.o
WE RALLY WO PAY MORE! Get an ftaddfonftOnal 10% wifth thit ad


": LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420