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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01694
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 9, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01694
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text







,***3-DIGIT 326
000015 120511**
L0B OF FLORIDA HISTORY-
p6 BOX 11707F FLORIDA
205 SMA NIV 32611-1943
GkINESVILLE FL


Reporter


Wednesday. November 9, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 244 0 75 cents


CARC


chief


quits


Baughman is 2nd
director to leave
non-profit in a year.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
A local non-profit orga-
nization that helps people
with mental disabilities is
seeking a new director for
the second time in less than
one year.
Glenn Hunter, a board
of directors
member
of CARC,
said Amber
Baughman
resigned
unexpected-
ly early last
week ,after
less than Baughman
four months
on the job.
She replaced Mike Belle,
who resigned for personal
. reasons after serving as
executive director about six
months.
Baughman did not give
a reason for quitting, but
Hunter speculated that she
left because several employ-
ees serving key roles in the
organization resigned.
Hunter said several
board of directors members
have assumed Baughman's
duties until a replacement,
is hired.
"Hiring a new director as
soon ,as possible would be
in the best interest for the
agency," he said.
Hunter said the goal is to
maintain the same level of
service for the people his
organization serves.
CARC was established in
1974 to provide training and
services for people with dis-
abilities in ColumbiaCounty.
-The non-profit organization
has. about 100 employees
and an annual budget of
about $2 million, with the
bulk of funding from state
and federal agencies.
People-served by CARC
are given training to help
them mainstream into jobs
throughout the county. The
organization also has an
assisted living center where
people with disabilities can
live independently.
CARC also has plans to
reopen a store on U.S. 441,
about a quarter mile north
of U.S. 90, that operated
under the name House of
Bargains until it closed
CARC continued on 3A


March of Dimes Gala


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/L3Ve C ,r Peponer
Zac and Mandy Cook of Lake City hold their 18-month-old triplets Cameron, Courtney and Chelsey on
Tuesday during the Signature Chefs Auction. "I didn't realize until after the babies came how much of the
research impacted us," Zac Cook said. "To us, this is an opportunity to thank the March of Dimes and to
thank the Lord for blessing us. We leaned on the Lord so heavily.",



ON THE MARCH


'Holiday Magic'
nets $42,000 to aid
premature babies.

By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
- In the United States, one in
eight babies is born premature-
ly. Tuesday night, about 400
people gathered to raise money
for healthier babies worldwide
at the March of Dimes Holiday
Magic 2011 Signature Chefs.
Auction.
For the seventh year, the
event brought business lead-
ers and community members
together to bid in silent and live
auctions at the Rountree Moore
Toyota showroom. All auction
items were donated to March
of Dimes and bidders often pay
more because the money goes
to a good cause, said Maureen


The March of Dimes Foundation accepted a check for $10,000
donated by PotashCorp White Springs. From left, honorary chairman
George Ward, co-chairs Vern and Maureen Lloyd and Terry Baker,
general manager of PotashCorp White Springs.


Lloyd, event co-chair.
Between company dona-
tions, ticket sales, and auctions
the event raised over $42,000,
surpassing the fundraising


goal, said Sky Wheeler, com-
munity director for the North
Central Florida March of Dimes
Division.
MARCH continued on 3A


Regina Jones enters a bid during the March of Harry Rosenbloom pours a cup of red wine for
Dimes Holiday Magic 2011 Signature Chefs Auction Mary Summerall during the Signature. Chefs Auction
on Tuesday at Rountree Moore Toyota. on Tuesday.


Papa


John's


will


reopen


Ars.on-damaged
pizzeria to be back in
business.in 3 months.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
A Lake City pizzeria that suffered
serious damage in an Oct. 20 arson fire
will reopen in about three months.
Tish Muldoon, a corporate spokes-
woman for Papa John's, said she is
uncertain if the store is a total loss or
if the extensive damage inside can be
repaired. But she is certain store owner
Jacob Wilkes and his two business part-
ners will operate a Papa John's in Lake
City in coming months.
She said Wilkes is pleased with the
cooperation from the insurance com-
pany. ,
"Jake has a very positive attitude,"
she said. "Support forJake and his part-
ners has been widespread."
Two managers at a local Domino's
Pizza were arrested by Lake City police
eight days after the fire. Bryan David
Sullivan, 21, and Sean Everett Davidson,"
23, both of Lake City, were charged
with deliberately setting the fire that
gutted the building;
Sullivan reportedly told police he
believed his restaurant would attract
more customers without competition
from. Papa John's, located less than a
half mile away. Police said Sullivan con-
fessed to recruiting Davidson to help
set the fire.
Wilkes is currently working at a Papa
John's in Orlando while his restaurant is
rebuilt, Muldoon said. Wilkes could not
be reached for comment in Orlando.
Wilkes is' one of the corporation's
succ es s, starting with the chain
in 2003 as a delivery driver and work-
ing his way toI manager positions. He
and two co-workers pooled their money
to buy the Lake City restaurant earlier,
this year.
"He really has a great American
dream story," Muldoon said. "He only
owned it three months and it was doing
great He really believes in the brand."
Muldoon said she didn't know how
many workers lost their jobs when the
restaurant burned, but a typical Papa
John's employs 10 to 20 people.
The flood of media calls asking for
information about the fire has slowed to
a trickle, she said. But the fire attracted
international attention after the arrests,
with stories published as far away as
Europe.
Muldoon said everyone at Papa
John's has heard about the fire and
the alleged motivation by the suspects
accused of setting the blaze.
"Obviously, were taken aback," she
said. "First and foremost we are thank-
ful no one was hurt in the fire."


Emergency alerts: This is only a test


30-second interruption
of TV radio broadcasts
nationwide is just a drill.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
It doesn't matter which TV network
you're watching or radio station you're
listening to anywhere in the United States.
Big Brother knows exactly what you'll
be tuned into at precisely 2 p.m. Eastern
Standard Time today.
That's when federal agencies will con-


duct the first nationwide Emergency Alert
System test since it was created in 1994,
according to a statement by the Federal
Communications Commission.
And if you think you can avoid the
30-second blackout of regular program-
ming because you have cable or satellite
TV or satellite radio, think again. No mat-
ter what you tune in to, you'll be listening
to the same message.
During the message, listeners will hear
the familiar, "This is a test," announcement
required weekly for local broadcasters and
once a month at the state level. The system
has never been activated simultaneously
nationwide. -


The test will be conducted by the
Department of Homeland Security, Federal
Emergency Management Agency, the
Federal Communications Commission, the
National Oceanic and the National Weather
Service.
Initially, the test was to last three minutes
but federal officials concluded a 30-second
test will allow the agencies to evaluate the
effectiveness and reliability of the system
with limited disruption to the public.
The FCC and FEMA will use the results
to assess the reliability and effectiveness
of the Emergency Alert System as a public
alert mechanism. The agencies will work
with broadcasters to make improvements


CALL US: 'Sj Opinion ................ 4A
(386)752-12930 8 5 B0 People..................2A
SUBSCRIBE TO 8 1 Obituaries ............. 5A
THE REPORTER: Mostly Sunny
Voice: 755-5445 Advce & Comics ......... 3B
Fax: 752-9400 WEATHER 2, 2A Puzzles ................. 2B
1 8426' 00020 1 9


in the system, if necessary.
The alert system is used by local broad-
casters to notify the public about emergen-
cies and weather events and send potential
life-saving information to listeners.
Federal officials chose 2 p.m. as the time
to test the system to minimize disruption
and confusion as much as possible.
"The Nov. 9 date is near the end of
hurricane season and before the severe
winter weather season begins in earnest,"
according to an FCC statement about the
test "The 2 p.m. EST broadcast time will
minimize disruption during rush hours,
while ensuring that the test occurs during
working hours across the United States."


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE THURSDAY
DaVinci stars in Local news
major art show. roundup


a


i


r









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


Saturday:
1-4-5-37-38-51
x5


AI Tuesday:
m w,' "Afternoon: 7-0-6 .


f Tuesday:
Afternoon: 1-2-6-4


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Da Vinci stars in major art show


LONDON
t has masterpieces, media
frenzy, i contested gem -
everything but the "Mona
Lisa." London's latest block-
buster art show confirms
Leonardo da Vinci as a Renaissance
rock star.
A new exhibition ofthe artist's
paintings at London's National
Gallery is opening amid A-list levels
of hype and anticipation.
The BBC asked viewers: "Is this
the greatest art exhibition ever?"
Tuesday's VIP preview is being
broadcast live on television and in 40
British movie theaters..
"Leonardo: Painter at the Court'
of Milan" focuses on da Vinci's for-
mative years as a court artist in the
1480s and 1490s. The gallery spent
five years persuading museums
in Italy, France, the United States,
Russia and Poland to lend fragile'
works for the show, which gathers
nine of Leonardo's 15 surviving
paintings and dozens of his draw-
-, ings.
There are sights to stir art-lovers'
hearts, including two versions of
the Biblical scene "The Virgi of
- the Rocks" which have never been
shown together. One usually hangs
S: in the Louvre in Paris, while the
other once thought to be a studio
copy but now restored and validated
as the master's work is owned
by the National Gallery. The show's
curator, Luke Syson, said even .
Leonhardq'probably never saw them
m''. inthe same room.;

Hollywood comedy writer.
Hal Kanter dies at 92
LOS ANGELES Hollywood
comedy writer Hal Kanter has died
in Los Angeles at 92. He wrote for
Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, directed


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Francesca Sidhu views 'Cecilia Gallerani, The Lady with an Ermine' by Leonardo
da Vinci, part of the 'Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan' exhibition ..
shown at the National Portrait Gallery in London on Monday


Elvis Presley in "Loving You" and
created the landmark "Julia" TV
show.
The Writers Guild ofAmeica says.
Kanter died on Sunday. Daughter
Donna Kanter tells the Los Angeles
Times he died from pneumonia com-
plications at Encino Hospital..

TV's Duggar .couple
expecting 20th child
LIITLE ROCK-- TLC reality show
"19 Kids and Counting" may soon
need a new name.
Arkansas couple Jim Bob and
Michelle Duggar appeared with their
burgeoning clan on NBC's 'Today"
show Tuesday and announced they
are expecting their 20th child in April.
Forty-five-year-bild Michelle
Duggar said she's in good physical


.

shape and that she's not worried,
despite complications during her last
pregnancy that led to the premature
birth of their youngest child two
years ago. She says she's made it
through her first trimester safely.

Letterman's son has
birthday on train
DURANGO David Letterman's
son celebrated his 8th birthday with a
ride ona historic tourist train in south-
western Colorado.
The Durango Herald reported that
Letterman and his son, Harry, took
a ride on the Durango & Silverton
Narrow Gauge Railroad on Saturday.
Railroad owner Al Harper told the
newspaper that six adults and four
children were aboard a private train
for the trip. (AP)


Celebrity Birthdays


Baseball Hall of
Famer Whitey Herzog is
80.
Baseball Hall of
Famer Bob Gibson is 76.
Actor Robert David
Hall ("CSI") is 63.
Actor Lou Ferrigno


is 60.
Actress Ion Overman
is 42.
Rapper Pepa (Salt-N-
Pepa) is 42.
Rapper Scarface (Geto
Boys) is 41.
Actor Eric Dane is 39.


Daily ScriDture


"But if serving the Lord seems
undesirable to you, then choose
for yourselves this day whom
you will serve, whether the gods
your ancestors served beyond
the Euphrates, or the gods of
the Amorites, in whose land you
are living. But as for me and my
household, we will serve the
Lord."
S-Joshua 24:15


Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number............:752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ............ .755-5445 (sbranion@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an, affiliate of- CIRCULATION
Community Newspapers :Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake Cily Reporter
lIshed Tuesday through Sunday.at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake' Cty,. Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
Periodical postage paid at Lake City. FlRa a.m: on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please cal 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems wih your delivery service
All material herein Is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or call before 10.30 a.m to report a ser-
in panIsortidden tIut the pormis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
ston of the publisher. US Postal Service 10:30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
No, 316-Mo vice.y
o. 3'- ,8,- , vice related credits will be Issued.
:POSTMASTER: Send address changes in allother counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, PO. Box 1709, y
to Lake City Reportei', P.C. Box 1709, .is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ............. .755-5445
(circulatlon@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS Home delivery rates
Editor Robert Bridges ....754-0428 (Tuesday through Sunday)
(rtridges@lakecityreporter.com) 12 Weeks .............. $26.32
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CORRECTION.

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executiveeditor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


New attraction
coming to SeaWorid
ORANDO SeaWorld
Orlando on Tuesday
announced fhe most ambi-
tious expansion in the
nearly 40-year history of
the theme park, including
a sea turtle exhibit with a
domed 3-D theater and an
immersive penguin experi-
ence that promises to drop
guests down in the middle
of frigid Antarctica
"TurtleTrek," with huge
tanks of live sea turtles
arid manatees, will feature
a first-of-its-kind domed
theater with computer-
generated 3-D images that
will "put guests under
water with the animals into
an amazing journey into
their lives," park president
Terry Prather said.
The turtle exhibit will
open sometime in the ....
spring of next year along
with a new area called,
"Freshwater Oasis" at
SeaWorld's adjacent swim-
with-the-dolphins boutique
park, Discovery Cove.
That attraction will put
people in a clear spring
under a rainforest-type
canopy of trees to swim .
alongside Asian otters and
marmosets.'
In spring 2013, SeaWorld
will open "Antarctica'-
'Empire of the Penguin,"
which officials said is the
largest single expansion
project ever undertaken at
the Orlando park. Parts of
- the experience will include
shops and restaurants with
an interactive ride at its
center along with a radical
temperature change. "This
will be the coldest attrac-
tion ever constructed,"
promised Brian Morrow,
the park's chief designer.

Ex-aide lobbies
for Internet cafes
STALLAHASSEE- A
former aide tp House
Speaker Dean Cannon is
now lobbying for one of


THE WEATHER


M MOSTLY
SSUNNY


S HI 81L050
liiiinll 11111111 1 1111111' iilt


SeaWorld executives talk about
Empire of the Penguin that is sc

the companies involved in
the fight over gambling,.
Julie Fess left her job as
Cannon's legislative aide *
in September. Last month ,
she registered as a lobl
'byist for Arcola Florida
Systems, a company that
makes software used by
Internet cafes.
S Internet cafes offer
sweepstakes entries to
customers who purchase,
Internet time. Critics con-
tend they are a form of
illegal gambling. But those
who run the cafes insist
they are legal' operations.

Auction benefits
Miami arts school
MIAMI A boutique
hotel in Miami Beach is
hosting an art auction to
help raise funds for the New
World School of the Arts.
The silent auction will be
held Tuesday evening at the
Sagamore Hotel. Proceeds
will go to the school's visual
arts department
The event 80" of Art
will showcase the work ,
of more than 75 graduates
of the school. Many of them
have exhibits in some of the
most prestigious galleries
across the U.S.
The Miami-based school
is celebrating its 25th .'
year. It was created by the'
Florida Legislature as a cen-
ter of excellence in the per-
forming and visual arts and


a new attraction, Antarctica,
heduled to open 2013.-: -

is an educational partner-
ship of Miami Dade County
Public Schools, Miami Dade
College and the University
of Florida.

PoliCe investigate
Tampa shooting


TAMPA Authorities
said five people were
injured Tuesday following
a shooting outside a night-
club in Tampa's Ybor City
district.
, A gunman started firing
in the parking lot about
2:45 a.m. as patrons fil-
tered out of Club Manilla,
police said.
According to a police
news release, a 22-year-
old man is in serious but
stable condition at a local
hospital, while four others
have non-life threatening
injuries and are being
treated as well.
Police are still searching
for the gunman and detec-
tives are analyzing surveil-
lance video and interview-
ing witnesses.
The club has had prob-
lems in the past and extra
officers are brought in on
Monday nights to help
'with crowd control, author-
ities said.
Club Manilla is several
blocks from Club Empire,
which recently closed after
pressure from the city and
other businesses.
(AP)


,CHANCE

HOMERS

1 74LO41


Tallahassee* La
78/57
Peisacola .
'.77/50 PaMnam ity
77/58


SUNNY ,, MOSTLY MOSTLY
SHI L0 SUNNY SUNNY


HI 66 LO 35 HI74LO48 HI 77 L 52
I1I '. rl nI ll l llllll I*^ .1..I


V,. City7
S*jackdsonvile Cape Canaveralu
e Cty, 79/51' Daytona Beach
1/50 Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville Daytona Beach Fort Myers
,81/51 77J60 Gainesville
Ocala Jacksonville
82/54 Key West
Odiando Cape CanaveralekeC
81/59 79/62 MiLake City
Tampa Naples
81/62 West Palm Beach Ocala
80/65 *, Orlando
Ft Lauderdal~ Panama City
Ft.Myers 81/68 Pensacola
82/61 Naples Tallahassee
'80/62 Mrmi Tampa


Ke 81/66 Valdosta
KOn- W. Palm Beach


8U/70U


A *i


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday
Low Tuesday
Normal high.
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal 'month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


79
61
76
53
86 in 2003
34 in 2010

0.00"'
0.03"
31.30"
0.56"
44.19"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torn.
Moonset tom.

030
Nov. Nov.
10 18
Full Last


7a lp 7p la 6a
Wednesday Thursday







Fmeasw itneswml *" "k&ie' tqmead


6:51 a.m.
5:38 p.m.
6:52 a.m.
5:37 p.m.

4:50 p.m.
5:46 a.m.
5:28 p:m.
6:40 a.m.


Nov. Dec.
25 2
New. First


On this date
in 1991, cool
Canadian high
pressure over th
Great Lakes pro-
duced record loy
temperatures frc
Texas and the G
Coast into the 0
Valley. Record Io
included 9 degree
at Peoria, Illinois


Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


Thursday
77/60/pc
77/54/pc
81/66/pc
81/57/pc
75/42/pc
76/44/sh
79/69/pc
74/41/pc
80/64/pc
79/58/pc
78/45/pc
80/55/pc
70/39/s
70/47/pc
70/40/sn
81/53/pc
68/42/sn
80/62/pc


Friday
69/56/pc
68/50/pc
77/65/pc
74/53/s
66/35/s
64/38/s
76/68/pc
66/35/s
78/63/s
75/56/pc
67/39/s
68/51/pc
63/37/s
66/52/s
64/33/s
70/52/s
64/38/s
74/60/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
hsannal


for the areajon .
a scale from 0 .

weather.com

S* Forecasts, data and
4 t, graphics 02011 Weather
'l fl'1 Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
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LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9,2011


Slot machine decision

appealed to higher court


LAURA HAMPSON/Lake City Reporter
Pictured are Michael Millikin, Columbia County School District superintendent; Rebecca
Golden, Global Logistics Academy teacher; Terry Huddleston, Columbia High School princi-
pal; Allison Megrath, real estate manager for Plum Creek; and Linard Johnson, school board
,chairman.



A $IOK donation,


with more to come


By LAURA HAMPSON
Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School's Global Logistics
Academy received $10,000, 'the first install
ment of a $30,000 grant from Plum Creek,
private landowner. The grant will go tdwar
construction of a training warehouse or
campus where students can learn; skills in
receiving, packing, inventory, pallet-build
ing, staging, labeling, and shipping through


- real-world experiences, instead of traveling
to t-he school district's warehouse. "Plum
Creek recognizes the importance of pro-
s hiding training in schools that is directly
- related to local industries and job oppor-
a, tunities," said Allison Megrath, real estate
manager for Plum Creek. "CHS is offering
their students a superb opportunity to learn
useful skills and we are proud to support
- this program." The check was presented at
Tuesday night's school board meeting.


MARCH: A seventh successful year
Continued From Page lA


By BILL KACZOR'
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE An
appellate court decision.
that said the Legislature can
approve slot machines any-
where 'in the state is being
appealed to the Florida
Supreme Court.
If allowed to stand, that
ruling would allow lawmak-
ers to permit destination
casino resorts in Florida.
Bills have been filed for the
2012 legislative session,
-which starts Jan. 10, to
license three. such resorts
in South Florida.
' Also, the Palm Beach
County Legislative Delegation
voted 9-1 Tuesday to file a
local bill that would allow slots
at the Palm Beach Kennel
Club, a dog racing track. Such
bills affecting a single juris-
diction ordinarily pass with
little or no opposition if they
are backed by the local del-
egation, but any expansion of
gambling can expect to draw
heavy opposition. ,
The casino legislation
is being opposed by some
on moral grounds as well
as competing interests.
Tourism-related businesses
such as Walt Disney World
also are lining up against
casinos because of the fear
they'll tarnish Florida's. fami-
ly-friendly image.
A three-judge panel of the
1st District Court of Appeal


last month upheld a 2009.
law allowing the machines
at Hialeah Park although the
horse racing track had been
excluded from a 2004 state
constitutional amendment
permitting slots at other pari-
mutuel facilities in Miami-
Dade and Broward counties.
Appeals have been filed
by competing pari-mutuels
that received slots approval
through the amendment
Joel Perwin, a lawyer for
two of those competitors,
said on Tuesday hell argue
the Hialeah law is inconsis-
tent with the amendment
"The district court took a
very narrow view," Perwin
said.
Perwin's clients, Flagler
Dog Track and Florida
Gaming Centers Inc., which
owns Miami Jai-Alai, filed
their notice of appeal last
week as .did. Calder,., Race
Course Inc.
The Supreme Court first
must decide whether to take
jurisdiction. If it does, the jus-
tices then will hear arguments.
on the merits of the case.
The appellate court ruled
the amendment doesn't
prohibit lawmakers from
approving slots at facilities
..other than those that meet
'the amendment's criteria. ,
Adopted by voters in 2004,.
it permitted slot machines at
seven horse and dog tracks
and jai alai frontons that had
been active in Miami-Dade


and Broward in the two years
before the amendment went
into effect if approved in
local referendums. Broward
voters authorized slots in
2005. Miami-Dade voters fol-
lowed in 2008.
Hialeah didn't. qualify
because it, had suspended
racing during those two
years. The 2009 law .also
allows the machines at any
pari-mutuel that held -live
racing in the two calendar
years before applying for a
slots license. Hialeah has
since resumed racing and
meets that criteria. *
If the Supreme Court
takes the case, it will hear
two different arguments
from Hialeah's competitors.
Flagler and Florida
Gaming say the amend-
ment allows slots only at the
seven Broward and Miami-
Dade pari-mutuels. That
interpretation Would bar the
Legislature from permitting
slots anywhere else includ-
ing casino resorts.
Calder's position is the
amendment applies only
to pari-mutuels. That view
would exclude Hialeah but
let lawmakers authorize slots
at. casino resorts because
:they are not pari-mutuels.
The* legal dispute does
not affect casinos operat-
ed by the Seminole Tribe.
They are covered by federal
law and an agreement with
the state.


Walking on water.


Auction items included
S decorated Christmas trees,
vacations at beach condos,
sightseeing flights and dia-
monpd jewelry. Chefs from.i
area restaurants, bakeries-
and catering companies
offered samples of their
specialties.
Across the. country,
March of Dimes divisions
hold similar signature chefs
events, said Betsy Trent,'
executive director 'of the
North Central Florida
March of Dimes Division,
which covers nine counties.
November is Prematurity-
Awareness 'Month and
its., a great 'way to focus
on premature birth educa-
tion and research, she said.
.Premature babies can have
lifelong problems.
'This is. just an incred-
ible event in the Suwannee
Valley area," Trent said.
Krystale Defee, a Florida
Gateway College nursing
student, volunteered at the
event because she has seen
first/ hand what March of
i Dimes does for babies.
Her son, James, was
born eight weeks early and,
weighed just three pounds.
Until his birth her prieg-
nancy had been normal,
she said. He was a month.
old before he could. be
held, said Defee, of Mayo.
Seeing James hooked up.
to tubes and monitors in
the Neonatal Intensive Care
Unit at Shands in Gainesville
took a toll on her and her
husband, Jimmy, she said.,
"I wouldn't wish it on any-
body," she said.
She said James is now
doing well, but will always
develop at slower speeds
than other kids his age.


Boy fatally

shot in

hunting

accident
Associated Press
CROSS CITY -
Authorities say a 12-year-
old north Florida boy was
fatally shot during an appar-
ent hunting accident.
The Dixie County
Sheriff's Office reports that
Bryan Austin Osteen was
hunting with his grandfa-
ther on private land- near
Cross City on Tuesday.
Authorities say the boy
was at a tree stand when his
shotgun fired and hit him in
the upper torso.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mike McKee (right) applauds as Lake City Walmart store man-
ager Hemando Mendoza, holding his son, Ethan, 2, announces
that the company Will donate $3,000 to the March of Dimes.,


. I
Seeing nurses.,work with
NICU babies made her real-
ize she also wanted to be a
neonatal nurse, Defee said.
She will graduate from FGC
in 2012..
'During the eventWalmart
of Lake City made a $3,000
contribution to March of
Dimes. Hernando Mendoza,.
store manager, said he has
seen premature babies in
both in.his native Columbia.
and the United States and"
was happy to support the
March of Dimes.
Terry Baker, general
"manager of Potash Corp,
- White Springs, donated
$10,000 to March of Dimes
on behalf of the company.
"Each of us as parents real-
ize how important children.
are as the next generation,"
Baker said. "It's the right
thing to be a good commu-
nity partner."
Guest speaker Zac Cook,
of Lake City, said he was.
grateful for the work March
of Dimes does', especial-
ly after he and his wife,
Amanda, had triplets. Their.


Florida IhternationalUniversity s


daughters were born at 34 for a class project Tuesday for tl
weeks shy of the recom The first person to cross the finis
mended 39 weeks but con- who make it across get an A for
sidered good for triplets.
March of Dimes.research
has significantly reduced CARC: Store
the number of premature
babies and birth defects, .
he said. "We prayed every Continued From Page 1A
night fof three happy, about two months ago.
healthy, beautiful babies. Thy needed to get a
whole fresh look," Hunter
Fundraising, a school fund- d
raising company, Cook said said.
raising.,company, Cook said The store will reopen
he often travels for work. at the same location in a
"Every time I walk in the few days, probably with
door it's like getting rushed new name. An exact
by a peewee football team. a new store hours
There's nothing like it dateandnew store hours


LKQ has the largest inventory of
OEM Recycled Auto Parts & ,
Aftermarket Parts by Keystone


Please call us at
386-755-0013 or 888-849-7887
4686 E. US Hwy 90
Lake City, Florida


SLKQ
OEM Recycled Afternprkel by Keystone


ASSOCIATED PRESS
students attempt to cross a, lake using homemade water shoes
he College of Architecture and the Arts on the campus in Miami.
sh line on the 175-foot lake, receives $500 and all the students
the project and the opportunity to drop their lowest grades,,


to reopen in a few days


have not been set, Hunter other items will be avail-
said. Quality used cloth- able at the store when it
ing, furniture and many 'reopens.

October 31, 2011, my daughter,.
30 year old Latonia Hills, had tb
endure her 2nd open heart surgery.
The day after her surgery, she gave
birth to my .1'.grandson Zachirius
KVAunte' Hills, wh6 left us to.
go onto glQry.,
Zachirius' ashes will be scattered
on November 9, 2011, on top of'
Pike Peak Mountain in Colorado.
The family request your prayers and
any special donations may be made to:
Albert Adams and Family Y
6089 SW SR 47
Lake City, Florida 32024 .
Special thanks tho e arrffof
Sthe ake City Country Club*
.


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Christian Ashliegh Joseph Anthony
IMykal.Norlon PUcci
DOB: 4/17/90 DOB: 3/24/89
Height: 61"- Weight: 190 lbs.eight6'1"
Hair: Brown-Eyes: Blue H
Wanted For: Grand Theft III x2; Weight 260 Ibs.
VOP Possession of More Than 20 i Hair Brown
Grams Marijuana; Possession of Eyes: Green
Controlled Substance With Intent Wanted For Grand Theft ill
To Sell or Deliver, Tampering
iWith Evidence
WANTED AS OF 11/7/2011
ANYONE VYITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

3 J fCALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
F COUMBIA COUNT www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


.'-^^


LAKE CITY REPORTER












OPINION


Wednesday, November 9, 2011


ONE


ONE
OPIN I 0 N


Rally

'round


veterans

, Jeave Iraq and
Afghanistan, more
than 1 million mili-
tary personnel will
come home over the next five
years. Will there be jobs wait-
ing for them?
With Veterans Day coming
up Friday, President Barack
Obama focused on that issue
Monday, calling on Congress
to pass tax credits encouraging
businesses to hire them.
"We ask our men and women
in uniform to leave their fami-
lies and their jobs' and risk their
lives to fight for our country,"
he said, "and the last thing they,
should have to do is fight for a
job when they come home."
He's right, of course.
Already, there are more than
850,000 unemployed veterans;
about a quarter of.them served
after 9/11. The jobless rate last
month for post-Sept. 11 veterans
was 12.1 percent, well above the
overall 9 percent rate.
Obama issued three executive
orders'to make it easier for veter-
ans to search for jobs. While they
are helpful steps, they don't actu-
ally make jobs available. That's
where tax credits come in,
A new one would give compa-
nies a $2,400 tax credit for each
unemployed vet they hire, $5,600
if the vet has been unemployed
for six months or mdre.iThe other
would extend a tax credit-worth
as much as q9,600 for hiring vet-
erans with a service-related dis-
ability.' The credits'are projected
to cost about $120 million over
two years.
They are part of the president's
overall $447 billion jobs package
that Republicans have obstructed
and that Obama is tryingto'get
passed in separate bills. GOP
leaders say they're standing firm
on principle against tax hikes and
deficit spending, but its hard not
to assume their stand has some-
thing to do with undermining the
president's reelectign prospects.
Republicans have blocked
provisions of Obama's jobs pack-
age designed to prevent layoffs
of teachers and firefighters and
to' put construction workers
back on-the job repairing bridg-
es and roads. Well soon see if
measures to benefit veterans
will suffer the same fate.
The Sacramento Bee
Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The, Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-riented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
S work.
ToddWilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
, spaced Letters should not exceed
400 words and will- be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters.
and guest columns are the opinion of
thewriters and not necessarily that of -
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box .1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
- BY.FAX:'(386) 752-9400.,
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


FLIP ItD -





Statistics show Floridians


love their libraries


.Despite deep budget
cuts and a slow
economy, Florida's
libraries continue
to be resilient and
essential community treasures.
We can assess the value
of libraries by the number ,.-
of patrons and by how the
services are used. For the
second year, the Florida
library Association and the
Florida Division of Library and
Information Services worked
with the American library
Association to hold "Snapshot
Day," so named because the'
activities let the public see
libraries in real time.
On this day, according to an
official website, library staffs
compile statistics and gather
stories, photographs and any-
thing else that depicts "a day in
the life" of their libraries. The
Florida Library Association's.
Public Relations Committee
posts the results online.
This year, Florida held two
Snapshot Days, one in January
'and one last Wednesday: The
November numbers will be -


L ETT ERS


w-
Bill Maxwell
max ell.gptimes.comn ,
posted soon. Those from
January indicate that Floridians
love and use their libraries.
Here is. a sampling of the state-
wide statistics for a single day:
255,268 Floridians visited
libraries and borrowed 332,732
booksDVDs and magazines.
61,664 used a library com-
puter and 10,090 learned com-
puter skills.
44,139 asked questions at
the information desk.
16,755 children, teens and
adults attended programs at
1,290 library programs state-
wide.
Elaine Birkinshaw, manager
of St Petersburg's main library
and the branches, said that
in addition to affirming the


library's social and cultural
value, Snapshot Day has a prac-
tical side,
"It shows that Florida librar-
ies are, a good investment in
the community, returning
$8.32 in value for every dollar
spent," she said. "What if librar--
ies went away, even for a day?
What would.the impact be on
our community and the people
we serve? What would hap-
pen if there were no libraries?
Libraries are busier than ever,
providing incredible service
in these challenging economic
times. ... Snapshot Day enables
library advocates to prove the
valuejof their libraries to deci-
sion makers-and increase pub-
lic awareness."
On a typical day at any St
Petersburg public library,,
Birkinshaw said, dozens of peo-
ple look for jobs online, apply
for unemployment or other ser-
vices, check out books or col-
laborate on projects or study.

* Robert Maxwell writes'
editorials and columns for the
St. Petersburg Times.


TO T HE EDITOR


Obama, Biden playingthe

American people


To the Editor:
President Barack
Obama and Vice- *
President Joe
Biden are play-
ing the American
people like puppets, on strings..
Unfortunately a huge segment
of Americans are sucking up
the lies these two men are
spreading like a hoard of mos-
quitoes at a summer camp.
They are totally counting on
the idea that.most people will
not realize that they are being
treated like fools!
Ameica may never recover
* from the astronomical debt that
President Obama has burdened.
the taxpayers with. His first stimu-
lus did nothing but fatten the
wallets of high-level CEOs and
his friends that will generously
reward his campaign coffers.
If the United States Congress
really had any concern about the
financial well-being of America
why don't THEY start by paying
their taxes? Hey, that would be a
novel idea! If we, as citizens, for-
get to include something on our
tax return we receive all kinds of
threatening letters. We are threat-
ened with everything from fines
to jail time. If it should be discov-
ered that a member of Capitol Hill
has neglected paying his or her
taxes for years, it is just an over-
sight It must be'great to have so
many millions of dollars that you


don't even notice that you happen
to have a few million in unpaid .
taxes laying around that "due to
an oversight" you forgot to pay.
Now Obama is trying to black-
mail Congress to approve another
500 billion dollar stimulus for him
to throw in the toilet The only
people that will benefit from this
money will be his fat cat friends
getting our unsolicited tax dollars.
All this time Joe Biden is bounc-
ing around like a big rubber ball
having no idea, and not really
caring if there is any truth in
anything he is saying. By the way,
you can'expect to get the same
. amount from this new stimulus
that you got before ... nothing.
The southwestern area of
the United States has become
a haven for the importation of
drugs, illegal immigrants, the
selling of illegal weapons, and
the good Lord only knows what
else. However, Attorney General
Eric Holder and President
Obama have known about this
for some time. American citizens
should not have to live every day
of their lives in fear that their
homes may be destroyed or
worse yet, their families sadisti-
cally murdered because they live
in the southwestern part of our
great nation.
Why would our federal gov-
ernment almost appear to be
protecting what is going on in
the southwestern United States?
Who all in Washington has bank


accounts in the Cayman Islands?
This question came from some-
one else.
Wake up, people, the federal
government will waste any kind
of tax increases faster than it can
be collected. There has to be an
end to Obama's sprawling gov-
ernment growth. And before we
start pushing current taxpayers
on any level to pay more, let's
start requiring the 50 percent of
Americans, including the politi-
cians that pay no taxes, to start
paying their share! Wow, what
would that do for Obama's slush
funds?
Americans have got to stop
just listening to what our politi-
cians say and watch how they
v9te. We have got to stop think-
ing in such a way that President
Obama and Congress thinks we
are all too stupid to recognize
what is happening.
For anyone that thinks they
would like to have a socialistic
form of government like Obama
wants, why don't you move to
Iran or Venezuela? President
Ahmadinejad of Iran, or President!
Hugo Chavez in Venezuela will
be very happy to tell you how to
live your life, in fact, they will
insist on it. Be assured, their
governments run everything!
God, please save America
before it is too late.
Edward Hunter
Lake City


A


4A~


ANOTHER
.V I -E .W


TO LGT ,


President Charles de Gaulle
died at age 79.


'It /


Mutual


mistrust?

F" 1or1 all but geopo-
litical wonks, the
formation of the
six-nation Shanghai
Cooperation
Organization in 2001 went
largely. unnoticed.
That's despite the SCO claim-
ing to account for 60 percent of'
the landmass of Eurasia and a
quarter of the world's popula-
tion. With its "observer merm- -
bers" and "dialogue partners,"' "
it claims to account for half of
the human race.
Those ambitious claims.
deserve some scrutiny. The
SCO is basically China and
Russia plus the former Soviet
republics of Kazakhstan,
Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and
Tajikistan.
China accounts for most of
the people, Russia's Siberia for ,
much- of the landmass and the
others, well, Tajikistan's popula-
tion, is just over 7.6 million. Th6e.
observer members include,
perhaps with varying, degrees :
of enthusiasm, Mongolia,
Pakistan, Afghanistan and
Iran. Belarus and.SriLanka
are dialogue partners. (One is ,
reminded of that great Cold
War alliance between China
and Albania when both were on",'
the outs with the Soviet Union:-)
Their stated goals, which are .-.
hard to argue with, are mutual -
investment, economic develop-.,,',
ment and security. Russia and
China make no secret that,
the organization is meant to .
counteract U.S. influence in the.
region.
Russian Prime Minister ,
' Vladimir Putin speaks often of -
a "Eurasian Union" stretching''".
from Europe to the Pacific,
presumably with Russia at its -...
head. But under the old maxinr-;
of "Hold your friends close and '-
your enemies closer," it's hard :'
to dispel the notion that Russia,
is doing this to keep an eye on -,.
China. ,
China's population is growing';
rapidly, putting a great strain o6;;
its resources, and its industries->
are desperate for raw materi- -
als. Russia shares a 2,600-mile --
border with China. The Russiatf"'
Far East is resource-rich, but ,
it is losing population, down., -,
20 percent since the fall of the: 'r
Soviet Union.
At a meeting of the SCO
in St. Petersburg, Putin
announced Monday that
Russia would put in $500 mil- -
lion toward a $2 billion elec-
tric transmission line from
Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan to
Afghanistan and Pakistan.
The project had been shelved'
because of the unrest and
instability in Afghanistan. Putin
explained, without elaboration:
"Considering the improvement
of the situation there, we could-
renew the project"
He neglected to thank
the U.S. and NATO for that
improvement Apparently not
all U.S. influence in the region
merits- counteracting by the
SCO.

Scripps Howard News Service


HIGHLIGHTS.
IN HISTORY

On this date:
In 1918, it was announced
that Germany's Kaiser Wilhelm
II would abdicate. He then fled
to the Netherlands.
In 1938, Nazis looted and
burned synagogues as well
as Jewish-owned stores
and houses in Germany
and Austria in a pogrom
that became known as
"Kristallnacht."
In 1967, a Saturn V rocket
carrying an unmanned Apollo
spacecraft blasted off from
Cape Kennedy on a successful -
test flight.
In 1970, former French










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


Henriette Marie "Sophie"
Amerson
Henriette Marie "Sophie" Am-
erson-A remarkable wom-
an and a remarkable life.
Henriette Ma-
rie *'Sophie"
Amerson
died at Haven
SHospice in
Lake City sur-
rounded by her
loving family
on November
6, 2011. She is survived by: six
children and their spouses, John
Frangois and Ellen Amerson, Pat
and Linda Amerson, Gary and
L, inda Amerson, Bridgett and
Tom Singleton, Paul and Kim
Amerson, and Phil and Kelly
Amerson; 16 grandchildren,
ages 20 to 39: Chad Amerson
(39), Cynthia Gaston (36), Ra-
chel Campbell (35), Michael
Amerson (35), Micah Amerson
(33), William Broward Roberts
(31), Colin Amerson (30), Emily
I Amerson (27), Jennifer Amer-
son (27), Hayley Singleton (25),
Lauren Amerson (25), Ryan Am-
erson (25), Alicia Amerson (24),
Lindsey Kanzler (23), Grey Sin-'
gleton (21), and Thomas Amer-
son (20); and eight great grand-
children, ages 6 months to 14:
Nicholas Amerson (14), Morgan
Gaston (13), Sarah Campbell
(12), Madison Gaston (10), Lu-
cas Amerson (10), Hannah Am-
erson (3), Remington Hipp (2),
and Ethan Amerson (6 months).
Born in La Rochelle, France,,So-
phie was a remarkable woman
that lived a remarkable life. She
was the daughter of a wealthy
shipping magnate, a graduate
of the Sorbonne University in
Paris, and an eyewitness to the
travesties of WWII. She watched
the German troops marching
through the streets of Paris;,
her brother, John Frangois, ar-
rested and placed in a concern
tration camp; and her parents
lose everything when' .Hitler
confiscated the family's estate.
Sophie met her husband, Wil-
liam Broward Amerson of Lake
City, while working as a war-
time interpreter, for the Ameri-
can Red Cross. He was assigned
by _the Airhy to be her .driver
and' body guard, and" as life's
good fortune would have it, she
: .would become his beloved wife
Determined .and strong-willed.
.she' married' Broward against
the wishes of her parents.
As the son of' a, sharecrop-
per. the> considered him to
be beneath her in social rank.
With courage and conviction, she
left her home in Paris, for a place
she had never been, to be part,
of a family, she had neVer met.
Her journey to the United States
took Browvard nearly four months
to arrange. As a member of the
French Underground and Re-
sistance, Sophie had to be spir-
ited'out of the country, disguised
as a Na%- sailor, escorting a
group of American war brides.
She arrived at Broward's farm
outside of Lake City in.the dark'
of night As she would tell her
new family man3 ) ears later, the
moss in the trees, Iit by the moon-
light, nearly scared her tp death..
With the comfort'and luxuries
of her former life behind her,
she embraced the hardships.
and. realities of farm life. She
learned to hand. and string to-
babco and to live off the land.
And over the next ten years she
gave birth to six' children: five
boys and a girl, named Bridgett.
There are many funny stories
from this time: These include:
Sophie's attempt to ride a horse,
without first tightening the girth;
her one and only attempt to ride.
a motorcycle, which ended badly
when she crashed into the family
car; Sophie being stopped by a
policeman for driving without a
driver's license, and talking her
way out of a ticket by refusing,
to speak Efiglish; and learning to
make grits for the first time, and
raking way more than the fanm-
ily could possibly eat in a week..
Asshewouldlatersay, she learned
a lot of things in the country; but
she never learned to like grits.
Tragically, Broward died an ac-
cidental death in 1962,,four years
after the birth of Phil, their sixth
child. Broward had just sold the '
family farm to purchase a larger
farm and had moved the family to
a temporary home on two acres.
Unable to farm and wanting
to keep 'the family together,
Sophie moved the family to
Gainesville, where ,she could.
get a job, and John Frangois,
her eldest son, could go to col-
lege. As a school teacher at the
Catholic high school and later as.
a manager at the Florida Book
Store, she worked for the-next
25 years to raise her children,
as a single mom. She did this at
a time when women were not a
common sight in the workplace,
let alone the principal provider.
t After she retired, Sophie suf-
fered a stroke that limited her
mobility. Although that was
almost 20 years ago, she re-
mained active and continued to *


volunteer at the:H6pe Lodge in
Gainesville, where she provided
support to other stroke victims.
To all her friends at Still Waters,
where she has lived for the past
five years, and at Haven Hospice,
she was "Sweet Sophie." The
family wishes to thank them all
for their kindness and generosity.
Asthe matriarch ofthe ever-grow-
ing Amerson flock, which today
numbers 41, Sophie has stead-
fastly watched over her family.
Determined and strong-willed;
with courage and conviction:
these are the words that best
describe Sophie and, the val-


ues she instilled in her'children.
These are the lessons of life
Sophie has bestowed upon
us all. She will be remem-
bered as a remarkable woman,
who lived a remarkable life.
Visitation will occur oh Friday,
November 11, from 10-11 a.m.,
followed by a service celebrat-
ing the life of Sophie Amerson at
11:00 a.m. at the Querry Funeral
Home in Lake City, 2659 SW
Main Blvd, Lake City, Florida.
In recognition of the loving care
provided to Sophie by Still Wa-
ters Assisted Living Residence,
a non-profit Christian organiza-
tion, friends and family are en-
couraged to make donations, in
lieu of flowers, to Still Waters
at 507 NW Hall of Fame Dr.,
Lake City, F1 32055, 386-755-
6560. Please sign the guestbook
at www.guerryfuneralhome.net

Marguerite Darby
Blanchard
Rosa Marguerite Darby
Blanchard, 100, passed away-
SWednesday, November 2, 2011.
Born in Olus-
tee, .FL and
raised in Lake
City,' FL.,. she
lived in Tampa
for 72 years
until mov-
ing to Jupiter,
FL in 2007.
Mom, Grammy, Marge and
Aunt Marge as she was known
to her family, celebrated her
100th birthday at a special, fam-
ily reunion on October 8th.
Surviving are her sons, Warren
Jr. (Anne) of West Palm Beach
and Darby (Lynn) of Cocoa.
Beach, grandchildren, Warren
III (Polly) of Bloomington, IL,
Richard ofAlbany, GA, Michael
(Clara) of Palm Beach Gardens
and two, great granddaughters,.
Emma and Rose of Blooming-
ton, IL. 'She is also survived by'
two brothers, Herbert Darby pof
Lake City, FL and Edgar Darby
of St, Michaels, AZ, a sister, Bet-
ty Darby Evans of Honea Path,
SC and numerous nieces, neph-
ews and -their loving families.
She was predeceased b\ her hus-
band, Warren Blanchard Sr. arid
, n-;' '*'*'-, :: ',' "* '


granddaughter, Kim Blanchard.
She was a longtime member of
Trinity United Methodist Church
and later Palma Ceia United
Methodist Church in Tampa.

Althea Hicks Wallace
Althea Hicks *Wallace passed
away on November 7, 2011
surrounded by her three daugh-
ters and family. Althea was
born September 24, 1933
in Big Stone Gap, Virginia.
She was of the Baptist faith.
She worked at Lake Shore
Hospital until retiring in .1983.
Althea lovingly devot-
ed her life to her /family.
She was preceded in death
by her parents James Cleve-
land & Annie Phillips, her
five brothers, five sisters and
her husband Vilous Hicks.
Survivors include her daugh-
ters, Fran Smith.: Slaymaker
(Chuck), Phyllis Hicks Leslie
(Gene) & Sandra Hicks Sweat
(Greg); sister, Jean Hampton
(Ray); grandchildren, Stacy Har-
ris, Bobby. Strjckland, Justin
Ferguson (Amy), Garrett .Sweat
(Amanda), Brandon Leslie,
Cameron Sweat, & Evan Leslie;
great grandchildren, John Stuart,
Jackie. Daly (Marcus), Stepha-
hie Stuart, Ryan Ferguson, Sa-
vanndh Strickland and many
niece and nephews also survive.
Graveside funeral services will
be conducted Friday, Novermber
11, 2011 at 3:30 P.M. in Forest
Lawn Memorial Gardens with
Pastor Randy Ogburn officiat-
ing. Visitation will be held one
hour prior.to' service time at the
funeral home. In lieu of floxw-
ers, donations to the Suwan-
nee Valley Care'Center (Haven
Hospice), 6037 U.S. Hwy 90
West, Lake City, Florida, 32055,
or to the Childrens Home So-
ciety of Florida, ATTN: De-
velopment Office, 1485 South
Semoran Blvd. Suite 1448',
Winter Park, Florida 32792,
.would .be greatly. appreciated.
GATEWAY-FOREST LAWN
.FUNERAL I OME, 3596
South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake City,
Florida 32025 is in charge of ar-
rangements. (386) 752-1954.


Homer Murray Williams
Mr. Homer Murray Williams, 86,
of Snellville, GA passed away
on Monday, November 7, 2011
at his home. He was a son to
the late Elias Murray and Sarah
Nellie Williams and was born on
December 2, 1924, in Wellborn,
FL. He worked for about eight
years with the State of Florida
and was tasked with surveying
the Interstate 75 project through
r Paynes Prairie. He enjoyed tell-
ing the family of the large snakes
and alligators they encountered.
He also worked at Bayfront
Medical 'Center and at Pepsi-
Cola in St. Petersburg until he
retired. He was a member of the
Saint Petersburg First Church of
the Nazarene and was preceded
in death by two brothers, Fred
Williams and Ernest Williams.
He is survived by his sister,
Mary McGhin, Waycross, GA,
sister-in-law Alfreda Williams,
Wellborn, Fl, hischildren Larry
and wife Becky of Loganville,
GA, Ron and wife Kuilei of
Kaneohe, HI, Patsy and husband
Thurman McGuire of Snellville,
GA and daughter Judy Hawkins
of Greer, SC. Also nine gragd-
children, Kenneth and Thomas,
Sarah, Michelle and Brett, Chad
and Luke, Kyle and Blake, and
five great-grandchildren survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Wil-
liams will be conducted. on
Thursday, November 10, 2011
at 2:00 PM in the Chapel of
Guerry Funeral Home with Rev.
Joe Allinders officiating. 'Inter-.
ment will follow at a later date
at Godbold-Williams Cemetery.
Visitation with the family will
be one hour-(1-2:00 PM),prior
/ to the service. Arrangements are
under the direction of GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME, Lake
City. Please sign the guestbook
at www.guerryfuneralhome.net



Obituaries 'are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.
,*. '


Cain accuser's past

includes financial woe


By JACK GILLUM
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Her
motives and personal history
under scrutiny, the woman
who publicly has accused
Republican presidential can-
didate Herman Cain of grop-
ing her inside a parked car
in July 1997 says she came
forward out of duty.
Cain rejected Sharon
Bialek's claims as "totally fab-
ricated," with his campaign
pointedly noting her histo-
ry of bankruptcies, unpaid
debts and legal troubles.
'I tried to remember if I
recognized her, and I didn't,"
Cain said at a Tuesday
news conference. "I tried to
remember if I remembered
that name, and I didn't. The
charges' and allegations, I
absolutely reject They sim-
ply didn't happen."
Bialek was flanked by
prominent celebrity attor-
ney and Democratic activist
Gloria Allred Tuesday as she
appeared on the morning TV
news shows, recounting her
story of how Cain harassed
her when he ran the National
Restaurant Association in the
late 1990s. Her details con-
nected the first face to a trail
of anonymous accusations
from at least three, other
women, marking a poten-
tially dangerous turn as Cain
seeks the GOP presidential
nomination.
But just as details unfolded
about Cain's alleged behav-
ior, so have specifics about
Bialek's personal life as a
50-year-old, single, stay-at-
home mother in. Chicago.
Bialek has a 13-year-old


son and lives with her fiance,
Mark Harwood, in a two-sto-
ry, suburban Chicago home.
Harwood, 50, who works in
the medical-device industry,
told The Associated Press
in an interview that he sup-
ported Bialek's decision to
come forward.
Fourteen years ago, Bialek
worked for the restaurant
association's educational
foundation in Chicago. As
a foundation manager, she
helped oversee an outreach
program- for teenagers who
wanted careers in the hospi-
tality business. By 1997, she
was dismissed for not raising
enough money,.a charge she
disputes.
Partly on the advice of her
then-boyfriend, a pediatrician
not publicly identified, Bialek
said she contacted Cain for
help finding another job.
She met him in Washington,
where Bialek said he ran
his hand under her skirt as
they sat in a parked car on a'
downtown street after having
dinner.
Bialek 'remained silent
about the encounter and later
took a job at WGN Radio.
Her marketing job there
for five years was a, brisk
15-minute commute from her
41st-fl6or luxury condo along
Chicago's famed Lake Shore
Drive;
Meanwhile, Bialek filed
for bankruptcy, according to
court records, and claimed
few personal assets while
owing $4,500 in unpaid rent
and at least $13,000 to four
credit card companies. Asof
July 2009, Bialek owed more
than -$5,100' in federal back


taxes. ,


-~ ~ ~ ~


OBITUARIES


: :i








6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011

-Lohan's father appears in court


Associated Press
SARASOTA A south-
west Florida judge ordered
a permanent injunction
to keep Lindsay Lohan's
estranged father away from
his on-again, off-again girl-
friend.
The Herald-Tribune
reports that during a


court hearing in Sarasota
Tuesday, Michael Lohan
and Kate Major agreed to
a permanent injunction to
keep Lohan at least 500 feet
away from her and unable
to make contact with her.
Lohan will face anoth-
er court hearing in
Hillsborough County on


Wednesday, where he was
arrested on Oct. 25. Hig
bail was set at $5,000 and
a judge warned him not
to make any contact wiCth
Major. Two days later, he
was accused of violating the
terms of his release by mak-
ing a harassing phone call
to her.


,ouruIwy photU
Pictured are Jeff Simmons, former scoutmaster; David Finley, former scoutmaster; -Sam
Martin, Eagle Scout; Colin Madden, Eagle Scout; and Jim Martin, current scoutmaster. Harold
Scott, former scoutmaster, also helped the Eagle Scouts, is not pictured.

Two attain Eagle Scout rank


From staff reports
Local Boy Scouts Colin
Madden and Sam Martin
of Troop 85 were awarded
their Eagle Scout rank Oct.
31. Madden, son of Richard
and Dawn Madden, land-
scaped and cleaned an area
at Columbia High School.
Martin, son of Pastor Roy
Martin 'and Mary Cuneo,
did a food and supply drive
for the Columbia County
Humane Society.
To earn 'the ranking
the scouts earned about
21 merit badges, become
a leader within their troop


and planned, organized
and performed a commu-
nity service project within
the community. The Eagle
Scout award is only award-
ed to about 5 percent of
Boy Scouts. Troop 85, spon-
sored by First Presbyterian

Bear captured
Associated Press
SIMMOKALEE
Authorities have captured a
black bear spotted roaming
through a populated area in
southwest Florida.


Church of Lake City, has
been in Lake City for 88
years and has produced over
90 Eagle Scouts. The Sons
of he American Revolution
and the Marine Auxiliary
also presented awards to
the scouts.

in Immokalee
The Collier County
Sheriff's Office reports that
deputies and officers from
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
caught the bear with tran-
quilizer darts on Monday.


r air
ANNOUNCEMENT
Swift Creek- Realty is proud to announce
that Carrie Cason has joined our sales .
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:WlFT C AEEK I..
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COUPON REQuIREO EXPIRES NOVEMBER, 2011



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Includes Lenses & Frames
SSome Restrictions Apply.
COUPO REQU RED EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30 2011
U UR, ,1E E m Ug -AmEm 6 ,

Buy one complete pair of glasses at
.Like us on regular price & receive a
Facebook,_ -



Some Restrictions Apply.
OUPON REQUIRED EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30 2011
7 5 2- 3 m U m U l m


$60001


CRIME STOPPERS WILL PAY UP TO $1000

AN ADDITIONAL REWARD OF UP TO $5000 IS BEING OFFERED
BY AN ANONYMOUS DONOR.

THIS REWARD EXPIRES OCTOBER 31,2012.
FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO THE ARREST OF THE SUSPECTS) RESPONSIBLE FOR THE BURGLARY AND
GRAND THEFT OF A UTILITY TRAILER THAT CONTAINED 2 ALL TERRAIN VEHICLES, 2 DIRT BIKES, WATER
SPORTS EQUIPMENT AND USED AIRCRAFT PARTS. THE THEFT OCCURRED IN THE OVERNIGHT HOURS OF
OCTOBER 18,;2011 ON HWY 100AND NEWELL DRIVE, LAKE CITY, FL.


A v







....... .... ......
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ABOUT THIS CRIME IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS.

WE-DO NOT WANTYOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!


CALL (386) 754-7099

OR SUBMIT A

CSEBIAeONTY WEB TIP AT
6UMBIC UNTYLwww.columbiacrimestoppers.net

Funded wholly or in part by the Office of the Attorney General, Crimes Stoppers Trust Fund


I I I II I i I I III










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Wednesday. November 9. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Moe's Night
fundraiser set
Fort White High
baseball has a Moe's
Night fundraiser planned
for 5-8 p.m. Thursday at
Moe's Southwest Grill in
Lake City.
For details, call Jeanne
Howell at 288-5337.
YOUTH GOLF
Free golf clinic
offered for girls
A free golf clinic for
girls ages 9-17 will be
offered from 10 a.m. to
noon Saturday at Quail
Heights Country Club.
The instructors are
looking for future
Lady Tiger golfers for
Columbia High.
For details, call coach
Todd Carter or Chet
Carter at 365-7097.
RUNNING
Community run
after regions
The FHSAA Region
1 cross country meet
for Classes 1A, 2A and
3A will be at Alligator
Lake Park on Saturday.
A free community run
will be offered following
the FHSAA competition..
The community run will
begin at 10:30 a.m.
For details, e-mail
Dusty Smith at dusty@
halfmniletiming.com.

Veterans Day Run,
Walk, Roll 5K
Gainesville Fisher
House Foundation has a
Veterans Day 5K event
planned at the University
of Florida. The event
begins at 8 a:m.,
preceded by registration
at 6:30 a.m. Registration
is $25 (day-of is $30).
For details, go to www.
G rinesvilleFisherHouse.
org.
SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL
Lake City team
seeking players
The Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team
is seeking players for
the upcoming season,
and dancers for a dance
squad. Players must be
18 years old or older.
Call Luis Santiago
at (386) 697-6956; for
dance, call Clara at
(3,86) 697-5249.
N From staff reports

GAMES
Today
Columbia High'
bowling in FHSAA Finals
at Boardwalk Bowl in
i Orlando, TBD
Thursday
U Fort White High
soccer vs. Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (girls-5 p.m.)
Friday
Columbia High
football at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football vs. Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Fort White High
girls cross country in
Region 1A meet at
Alligator Lake Park in
Lake City, 8:55 a.m.;
Columbia High's Hayley
Lewis in Region 2A meet,
7:30 a.m.
Columbia High
swimming in FHSAA
Finals at Central Florida
YMCA Aquatic Center in


Orlando, TBA


CHS in playoffs,

look to retain

Oaken Bucket


Tigers not looking
ahead to playoffs,
face Bulldogs.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Throw out the records,
it's time for the Battle for
the Old Oaken Bucket
Columbia High trav-
els to Live Oak to take on
the Suwannee Bulldogs. in
the annual rivalry game at
7:30 p.m. on Friday.
It's a game between two
teams that have went in.
opposite directions this sea-
son.


Since dropping its first
two games, the Tigers have
rebounded by winning six
out of its next seven games
to walk into the rivalry at
6-3 (4-1, District 4-6A).
Suwannee's season can
be considered anything but
a success. A win against
the Tigers would do a lot
to salvage a season that the
Bulldogs would like to oth-
erwise forget.
The Bulldogs fell 40-8
in their first game of. the
season against Madison
County High, but rebound-
ed to win in week two on
CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (5) hands the ball off to Braxton Stockton (22) in. a
game against Middleburg on Oct. 21.


New look for

Columbia has '
new faces in
quest for district.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia. High's boys
soccer team will break in
a new batch of Tigers this
season without much expe-
The Lady Tigers return a
group that is experienced,
buttrying to'learn to take it
to the next level. ,
For both teams, there
will be unknown territory ABOVE: The varsity Columbia High School soccer team are Dakota W<
as Columbia breaks into Alex Rhea, Tucker Stanton, Travis Berry, Dylan Sessions, Nikil Swaroo[
a new district during the Bryce McCarthy, Rogelio Sosa, coaches Troy Robinson (back row, fromrr
2011-2012 soccer season. Cody Beadles, Nigel Merricks, Tyler Rix, Dalton Parker, Hunter Grow, T
"I don't know what we'll and head coach Trevor Tyler. BELOW: The Columbia, High girls varsity
have knows a team they're harbut Meghan Collins, captains Holly Boris and Alyssa Sphalski, Alexis Angsta
workers," coach Trevor Ellie Garcia-Gomez, Christy Everett, assistant coach Scott Busby (back
Tyler of the boys soccer Brittany Bethea, Rachel Umstead, captain Michaela Burton, Joanne Ort
team said. "They'll give 110 and head coach Ashley Brown. Not pictured, are assistant coaches Lind
percent." .
Ashley Brown returns in
her second full season as
coach of the Lady Tigers I
after taking over at the half-
way point of the 2009-2010 o .
season; 7.50. 1,L UM a ',UMBIA
"We want to improve 'on 5
last year," Brown said. "We
have most everyone return-
ing and I think the big thing
now is for us just to believe zn O.. 1 \oik- LB
that we can. We can be a 6 i 21 '.6
competitive team."
Both teams enter a new
,district, which will bring
about the unknown for the


Tigers


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
waters (frorit row, from left), Anthony Picklo,
p, Brandon Sauls, Tristan O'Steen, Andrew Picklo,
i left) and Geoff Beardsley, Shane Hartopp, ;
y Williams, Kevin Pitmann, Jimmy Blakely, Caleb Hill
soccer team are Jaime Vincent (front row, from left),
adt, Keeley Murrey, Kaitlyn Daniel,
row, from left), Ashtyn Vincent, Lucie Faris,
tiz, Danielle Mathis,.Sara Woodfield, Ashleigh Bridges,
sey Beach and Michelle Pope.


SOCCER continued on 3B


Indians went

through tough

season scldule


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A group of Fort White defenders struggle to bring down a Rickards High runner on Oct. 28.


Fort White faced
three district
winners in 2011.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High's football
schedule for 2011 ended
up including three district
champions and two runners-
up.
The playoff teams were
finalized in the final set of
district games, which were
played last week.
Trinity Catholic High
beat Fort White, 49-14,
on Friday in the game to
decide District 3-3A- The
Celtics (5-3, 1-0) have a final


game against Palmetto High
this week before hosting
the opening round of the
playoffs.
Santa Fe High (8-1, 4-1)
nailed down the runner-up
spot in District 5-5A with
a 42-0 rout of Eastside at
home on Thursday.
The Raiders will invade
Fort White (6-3) for the
annual Battle for the Paddle
game on Friday. Kickoff at
Arrowhead Stadiuni is 7:30
p.m.
Union County High (9-
0, 4-0) completed a perfect
District 7-1A and regular
season with a 14-7 home
win over Newberry High.
The Tigers are off this
INDIANS continued on 3B


- -- /I I I I


I













LAKECIT REPORT SPRTS WEDNSDA, NVEMER 9 201 Pge Eito: Tm Kiby,754042


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN Miami (Ohio) atTemple
GOLF
a p.m.
TGC PGA Tour Australasia,.
Australian Open, first round, at Sydney
I Zm.
TGC- European PGATour,Singapore
Open, first round
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Lehigh at St.John's
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Duquesne at Arizona
NHL
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Philadelphia at Tampa Bay

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
N.Y. Jets
Buffalo
Miami


Houston
Tennessee-
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Cincinnati
Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


East
W L T Pct PF PA
5 3 0.625222 184
5 3 0.625 199 163
5 3 0.625222 174
I 7 0.125 138 169
South
W L T Pct PF PA
6 3 0.667236 157
4 4 0.500 156 169.
2 6 0.250 98 163
0 9 0.000128283
North
W L T Pct PF PA
6 2 0.750 195 140
6 2 0.750208130
6 3,.0.667 196 162
3 5 0.375 119 170
West
W L T Pct PF PA
4 4 0.500 131 201
4 4 0.500199204,
4 4 0.500184216
3 5 0.375 171 224


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
S East .
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 6 2 0.750 198 184
Dallas 4 4 0.500 179 175
Philadelphia 3 5, 0.375 203-1.82
Washington 3 5 0 .375 127 158
South
S W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 6 ,3 \0.667 287 205
Atlanta 5 3 0.625 (89 170.
Tampa Bay 4 4 0.500 147196
Carolina 2 6 0 .250.187 207
North
.W L T Pct PF PA.
Green Bay 8 0 01.000 275 179
Detroit 6 2 0.750 239 147
Chicago 5 3 0.625200174
Minnesota .26 0 .250 172.I!9
West
W LT Pct PF PA
San Francisco 7 I 0 .875 206 118
Seattle 2 6 0.250 122 185
Arizona 2 6 0.250 162 19.6
St.Louis I 70 .125 100 211
Sunday's Games
Dallas 23, Seattle 13
Miami 3 I, Kansas City 3
New Orleans 27,Tampa Bay 16
Houston 30, Cleveland 12
San Francisco 19,Washington II *
N.Y. Jets 27, Buffalo II
Atlanta 31, Indianapolis 7
Denver 38, Oakland 24
Cincinnati 24,Tennessee 17
Green Bay 45, San Diego 38
Arizona 19, St.Louis 13, OT
N.Y. Giants 24, New England 26(
Baltimore 23, Pittsburgh 20
Monday's Game
Chicago 30, Philadelphia 24
Open: Carolina, Detroit, Jacksonville,
Minnesota -
Thursday's Game
Oakland at San Diego, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 13
Buffalo at Dallas, I p.m.
Denver at Kansas City, I p.m.
Washington at Miami, I p.m.
St. Louis at Cleveland, I p.m.
Arizona at Philadelphia, I p.m.
Tennessee at Carolina, I. p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, I p.m.
Houston atTampa Bay, I p.m.
'New Orleans at Atlanta, I p.m.
Jadcsonville at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 4.05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 4:15 p.m.
New England at N.Y. Jets, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 14
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.

College games

Today
Miami (Ohio) (4-5)' at Temple (5-4),
8 p.m.
Thursday
Ohio (6-3) at Central Michigan (3-7),
7:30 p.m.
Virginia Tech (8-1) at Georgia Tech
(7-2), 8 p.m.
iHouston (9-0) atTuilane (2T8), 8 p.m.
Friday
South Florida (4-4) at Syracuse
(5-4), 8 p.m.

ACC standings

Atlantic Division
W L PF PA
Clemson 5 I 226 161
Florida St. 4 2 214 109
Wake Forest 4 2 161 186
NC State 2 3 103 127
Boston College I 5 101 168
Maryland I 5 139 201
Coastal Division
VirginiaTech 4 I 123 99
GeorgiaTech' 4 2 160 144
Virginia 3 2 114 I II
Miami 3 3 183,143
North Carolina 2 4 167 178
Duke I 4 83 147

SEC standings


Georgia
South Carolina
Florida
Kentucky


PF PA
170 128
189 123
154 174
66 178


Vanderbllt I
Tennessee' 0
West
LSU 6
Alabama 5
Arkansas 4
Auburn 4
Mississippi St. I
Mississippi 0


5 10 152
5 51 142


187 47
205 46
156 132
139 159
90 114
87 209


Top 25 schedule

Thursday
No. 10VirginlaTech at No. 20 Georgia
Tech, 8 p.m.
No. II Houston atTulane, 8 p.m.
S Saturday
No. I LSU vs. Western Kentucky,
7p.m.
No. 2 Oklahoma State at Texas Tech,
Noon'
No. 3 Stanford vs. No. 6 Oregon,
8 p.m.
No. 4 Alabama' at Mississippi State,
7:45 p.m.
*No. 5 Boise State vs.TCU, 3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Arkansas vs.Tennessee, 6 p.m.
No. 9 Clemson vs. Wake Forest,
Noon
No. 12 Penn State vs.No. 19 Nebraska,
Noon
No. 13 Michigan State at Iowa, Noon
No. 14 Georgia vs. No. 24 Auburn,
3:30 p.m.
No. 15 South Carolina vs. Florida,
Noon
No. 16 Wisconsin at Minnesota,
3:30 p.m.
No. 17 Kansas State vs. Texas A&M,
3:30 p.m.
No. 18 Southern Cal vs. Washington,
3:40 p.m. ,
No. 21 Texas at Missouri, Noon *
No.22 Michigan at Illinois, 3;30 p.m.
No. 23 Cincinnati vs. West Virginia,
Noon
No, 25 Southern Miss vs. UCF,
8 p.m.

BASKETBALL

Top 25 schedule

Today's Games
No. 16 Arizona vs. Duquesne, 9 p.m.
No. 20 Texas A&M vs. Liberty, 8 p.m.
Friday's Games
No. I North Carolina vs. Michigan
State on the USS Carl Vinson, San Diego,
7 p.m. \
No. 2 Kentucky vs. Marist, 7 p.m.
No. 3 Ohio State vs. Wright State,
9 p.m.
No. 4 Connecticut vs. Columbia,
.7 p.m.
" No. 6 Duke vs. Belmont, 9 p.m.
No. 7Vanderbilt vs. Oregon, 10 p.m.
No. 8 Florida vs. Jackson State,
7 p.m.
No. % Louisville vs. UT-Martin, 7 p.m.
No. 10 Pittsburgh vs. Albany (NY),,
7 p.m. '
No. I' 'i"ayior vs. Texas Southern.
"8 p.m. 5...'
No.,3 iKansas vs.Towson;8 p.m. ;,
No. 14 Xavier vs. Morgan State,
7 p.m. '
No. 17 UCLA vs. Loyola .Marymountk
10:30 p.m.,
No. 18 Michigan vs. Ferris State,
7 p.m.
No. 19Alabama vs. North Florida,
8 p.m.
No. 22 Marquette vs. Mount St. Mary's,
9 p.m.
No. 23 Gonzaga vs. Eastern
Washington, II p.m.
No. 24 California vs. UC Irvine,
10:30 p.m.
No.25 Missouri vs.Southeast Missouri'
State, 8 p.m.
Saturday's Games
No. 5 Syracuse vs. Fordham,4 p.m.
No.6 Duke vs.Presbyterian,:4:30 p.m.
No. IS Wisconsin vs.'Kennesaw State,
I p.m. * k. d "
I Sunday's Games
No.' I North Carolina at UNC
Asheville, 4 p.m. '
No. 7 Vanderbilt vs. Cleveland State,
2 p.m,
No. 9 Louisville vs. Lamar, 4 p.m.
No, 10 Pittsburgh vs. Rider, 6 p.m.
No. 12 Baylor vs. Jackson State, 7 p.m.
No. 16 Arizona vs. Ball State, 6 p.m.
No. 20 Texas A&M vs. Southern U.,
4 p.m.
No. 21 Cincinnati vs. Alabama State,
7 p.m.
No. 24 California vs. George
Washington, 9:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Sprint Cup leaders

Points ,
I,Carl Edwards, 2,316.2,Tony Stewart,
2,313. 3, Kevin Harvick, 2,283. 4, Matt
Kenseth, 2,278.5, Brad Keselowski, 2,267.
6,Jimmie Johnson, 2,261.7, Dale Earnhardt
Jr., 2,237. 8, Jeff Gordon, 2,235. 9, Kurt
Busch, 2,229. 10. Denny Hamlin, 2,217.
II, Kyle Busch, 2,216. 1.2, Ryan



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

THAPC 1


Newman, 2,213. 13, Clint Bowyer, 975.
14, Kasey Kahne, 957. IS, Greg Biffle,
956. 16,A J AIIlmendinger, 946. 17, Marcos
Ambrose, 895. 18, David Ragan, 889. 19,
Juan Pablo Montoya, 889.20, Paul Menard,
884.
Money
I, Carl Edwards, $7,979,432. 2, Jimmie
Johnson, $6,053,387. 3, Tony Stewart,
$6,000,580. 4, Kevin Harvick, $5,949,297.
5, Kyle Busch, $5,932,241.6, Matt Kenseth,
$5,900,862. 7, Kurt Busch, $5,715,041.
8, Jeff Gordon, $5,647,512. 9, Clint
Bowyer, $5,365,260. 10, Denny Hamlin,
$5,155,943.
II, Ryan Newman, $5,036,548.
1i2, Brad 'Keselowski, $4,895,378. 13,
Juan 'Pablo Montoya, $4,803,560. 14,
Jamie McMurray, $4,579,739. 15, A J
Allmendinger, $4,578,642. 16, Marcos
Ambrose, $4,543,382. 17, Kasey Kahne,
$4,454,465. 18, Regan Smith, $4,388,993.
19, Bobby Labonte, $4,311,838.20, David
Reutlmann, $4,160,525.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOUR OF AUSTRALIA
AUSTRALIAN OPEN
Site: Sydney.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: The Lakes Golf Club (6,879
yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.55 million. Winner's share:
$278,475.
Television: Golf Channel (Wednesday,
8 p.m.-I a.m.; Thursday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-
noon, 8 p.m.- I a.m.; Sunday,9 a.m.-noon).
S Online: http:l//www.australianopengolf
com.au
PGA Tour of Australia site: http://
pgatour.com.au
EUROPEAN TOURIASIAN TOUR
SINGAPORE OPEN
Site: Singapore.'
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Sentosa Golf Club, Serapong
Course (7,357 yards, par .71) and Tanjong
Course (6,625 yards, par 71).
SPurse:' $6 million. Winner's share:
$.990,520.
* Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 1-5 a.m., noon-3 p.m.; Saturday,
I-5 a.m., noon-2:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-5 a.m.,
*nqon-3:30 p.m.).
European Tour site: http://www.
europeantour.com
Asian Tour site: httpJ//www.asiantour.
com
.LPGAT9UR
LORENA OCHOA INVITATIONAL
Site: Guadalajara, Mexico.
Schedule Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Guadalajara Country Club
(6,626 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1 million. Winner's share:
$200,000.
Television. Thursday-Saturday,
4-6 p.m.,6:30-8 p.m.; Sunday,4-6 p.m., 6:30-
8:30 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgao.com

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Boston 6, N.Y. Islanders 2
Sari Jose 4, Los Angeles 2
Tuesday's Games
Winnipeg at Buffalo (n)
Florida at Toronto (n)'
Dallas atWashington (n)
Carolina at New Jersey (n)
Edmonton at Montreal (n)
Colorado at Detroit (n)
Chicago at St. Louis (n)
Minnesota at Caliary (n)
Nashville at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Games
N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
SNashville atAnahelm, 10p.m.
Thursday's Games
Edmonton at Boston, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Toronto at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Florida at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Colorado, 9 p.m.
MIontreal at Phoenix, 9 pnm.
Vancouver at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Minnesota at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS Cup

At Carson, Calif.,
Sunday
Houston vs. Los Angeles, 9 p.m.

U.S. Soccer schedule

(Won 5, Lost 7,Tied 3)
Friday
U.S. vs. France at Saint-Denis, France,
3 p.m.
Tuesday
U.S. vs. Slovenia at Ljubljana, Slovenia,
noon
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


GOLF REPORTS



Chad Hunter takes pot hole


Chad Hunter harvested
a lucrative pot hole prize
this week with a little skill
and a lot of luck.
Skill came with his birdie
on the designated pot hole.
Luck came when the only
other person to birdie the
hole had opted out of the
pot hole game.
Donald Roberts went into
double digits at +13 to over-
come Dennis Crawford's
round of 68 and +8 points
in the Wednesday blitz.
Chad Hunter, Roger
Mitzel and Keith Shaw tied
for third place with +5.
Roberts also picked
up a nice payoff with two
skins. Charlie Timmons,
Tony Garcia, Hunter and
Crawford split the rest of
the skins.
Competition was close in
the "A" flight of Saturday's
blitz.
Steve Thomas (+3) edged
Terry Hunter and George
Burnham by a stroke for
first place.
Jim Cannedy (+7) had


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


one of his better rounds of
late to take the "B" flight
win by two points over
Rafidy Sommers. David
Pope finished at +2 for the
third spot
The skins game high-
light was provided by Julius
Davenport, whose winner
came on an eagle on the
par 4 first hole. Other skins
went to Jimmy Rogers,
Hunter and Thomas.
Match .one of Good Old
Boys play went into the
books as an 8-5 win for Stan
Woolbert, Jim McGriff,
Bill Rogers and Bobby
Simmons over the three-
man team of Marc Risk, Eli
Witt and Dave Cannon.
In the three-team second
match, Jerry West, Tony
Branch, Dennis Hendershot
and Mike Spencer piled up
9 team points to overcome
Ed Snow, Jim Stevens, Joe


Persons and Dan Stephens
by three.
Monty Montgomery,
Tom Elmore, Howard
Whitaker and Nick
Whitehurst were two shots
farther back.
Risk regained 'the
medalist title with a round
of '37-37-74. Woolbert's
37-38-75 left him a stroke
behind. West (40-36-76)
and Snow (38-39-77) were
hot on the winner's trail.
Spencer picked up a nine
hole win with 39 on the
front side. Hendershot's 39
was best on the back nine.
The ladies played a modi-
fied Stableford format with
full handicaps in the LGA
event
Ladies club champion
Cathy Steen played to form.
for a 40 points and first
place. AnitaWest (36) broke
free of Caroline. Stevens
(35) .for second place.
Roberta Whitaker had
two chip-ins for a nice
payoff. Steen recorded one
winner from off the green.


Madison Midgets in Memorial Bowl final


From staff reports

Three of the Midget
League semifinals for the
Memorial Bowl were from
Madison, and two of those
teams made the final.


The Madison Lions beat
the Lake City Wolves, 42-0,
and the Madison Steelers
beat the Madison Falcons,
20-0, on Monday.
The Lions and Steelers
will play each other at


7:15 p.m. Tuesday in the
championship game.
The Junior Midget semis
on Tuesday had all Lake
City teams-- the Panthers
vs. the Cowboys, and the
Bears vs. the Gators.


COURTESY PHOTO

Champs in River City'

The Columbia Crushers were the 14-under winners in the River City Softball Association's
Spooktacular Tournament in Jacksonville. Team members are (front row, from left)
Katie Zipperer, Morgan Cushman, Lacey King and Dee Washington. Back row (from left)
are coach Jamie Story, Summer McCray, Breland Phelps, Jessica Storey, Madison Kennon,
Kalyn Ingram, Allie Wilkerson, Katelyn Belong and head coach Chad Padgett.


ACROSS 38 S
1 Flivver starter. I
6 More tedious 39 '
12 Check to P
make sure 4 40
14 On deck 41
15 Stir up. 42
16 Predicaments 43 E
17 Command to 44
a mule 46,
18 Mate's 48
comeback 51
19 Yech! 51
21 PSAT takers 55
23 Traipse about
26 Santa 56 E
winds I
27 Perfume label 57 N
word '.
28 Quacks 58 H
30 Japanese
currency
31 Recolor 1
32 Deceitful 2 i
33 King-sized i
spoon 3 I
35 Opposite of 14
friend 5
37 Cal Tech rival
Want
Check out the "Just I
-at Qull


IjZ -Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: AU L1 l
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's I Jumbles: MUSIC AWARD DENOTE BETTOR
I Answer: His prize-winning sourdough was the -
TOAST OF THE TOWN


Scared-
ooking
Put to a
purpose
Univ. degrees
- and yang
Jungfrau
Earth's star
Telephone trio
Jay-Z's music
genre
Admonition
Way out
Overdo the
diet
Baking
needs
More on the
edge
Heavily built

DOWN


Dernier -
Cartoon
Chihuahua
Bow shape
Whinny
Petruchio's


Answer to Previous Puzzle


FOXCOT T~EA
UTA APES EX PO
ETC RASP RIBS

LETHAL SORT
ROOF WARD
REACTS AID
01F


VOUS BRR AMOR
CONE BAA OPRY
RHO YAMMER
SPAM ITCH
EGADD ITALIC
RUNE ROSH EPA
OMEN ABLE RPM
TADA TIER KNOP
JA TKP


6 Sand mandala
builders
7 Knuckle
under
8 Small bouquet
9 Vapor
10 Afore
s?,
d Puzzles" books
om
8 9 110 i 1


11 Hwys.
13 Platter
spinner
19 Lacking
reassurance
20 Ben Kingsley
film
22 Really sorry
24 With hands
on hips
25 Turndown
26 Jean Auel
heroine

27 Paradise
28 Escape
29 Certain NCOs
34 Loan sharks
36 Seabird
42 In the wake of
43 No-fat Jack
45 Roof
overhang
47 Dries out, as
wood
48 St. Louis time
49 Dined on
50 Furniture
mover
52 Paul Anka's
"- Beso"
53 Three
before V
54 Former JFK
arrival


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421











Page EdItor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


DILBERT


SNUFFY SMITH


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


DEAR ABBY


Noise from bedroom

leaves hosts speechless


J DEAR ABBY: My son
invited two friends to our
home for the weekend.
We had never met them
before, but they seemed
nice'.
At bedtime, the young'
man was on the couch and
the girl was in our spare
bedroom. In the middle of
the night, I was awakened
to loud lovemaking noises.
My husband and I were
mortified. Finally, I banged
k on the wall and it stopped.
They left before break-
fast, so we didn't have to.
face them in the morning.
What was proper here?
Would it have been appro-
priate to knock on the bed-
room door and ask them
to leave?
I told my son about
it the next day. He was
embarrassed and apolo-
gized for his friends. What
should we do if this ever
happens again? RED-
FACED IN MICHIGAN
To DEAR RED-FACED:
Unless you first required
your son's friends to sign
an abstinence pledge
before bedding down at
your place, you were right
not to have evicted them
before morning. Next
time, keep this from hap-
- opening by having your son
tip them off at bedtime
that you're light sleep-
9 ers and prefer not to be
awakened by "nocturnal,
whoopee."

DEAR ABBY: When fm


ionship at the time he's
reaching out- If finishing
a chapter is so important
that you can't take a few
minutes and talk with him,
then suggest that in 15 to
20 minutes you can give
Abigail Van Buren 'him the rest of the evening
Abigal to talk. If my husband is.
www.dearabby.com involved in a project, or I
reading a Tbook, my hus- am, that's what we do, and
band choosevs.that moment it works for us.
to begin a conversation. If
I don't immediately put it DEARABBY: How do
down and give him my full you handle a relative who
attention, he gets upset seems to think your house
and says I'm being rude to is her own personal garage
continue reading and not sale site? She rifles through
talk to him. ngmy closets, brings out cloth-
I think its rude of HIM ing, and then asks, "What
to interrupt me when can I pay you for this?"
I'm reading. These aren't She also looks around our
important conversations or garage for items that are
even questions he needs being stored and asks the
immediate answers to. same question.
They are conversations She would never act this
we could easily share over way at a friend's home,
dinner, or later when I'm but somehow it's different
not reading. with me. By.the way, she's
I.love to read, but as a my sister. NO SALE IN ,
'busy mom I rarely have AUSTIN
the time. Being inter- DEAR NO SALE:
erupted during those rare Because it's your sister
moments drives me crazy and not some nervy
and makes me feel even acquaintance, be light-
crazier'when I'maccused handed in your response.
of being rude if I don't.- Smile and say, "I'm not
want to chat right then. ready to let it go, but when
Who's right-and who's I'am, you'll be the first to
rude? TRYING TO know." Then get her out
FINISH MY BOOK of.your closet or garage
DEAR TRYING TO and direct the conversation
FINISH: Frankly, I think elsewhere.
your husband is right He M Write Dear Abby at
may not need the answer vwwwDearAbbycorn or
to his.question as much RO. Box 69440, Los
as he needs your compan- Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SARIES (March 21-April
19): Ask questions and talk
about what's expected of
you. Preparation will be
a key component to your
success. Your mood will be
dependent on how things
go. Romance is in the
stats, and a celebration will
ease ybur stress. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Keep busy. Learn all
you can about something
you are trying to master.
Participation will make the.
difference. Networking
and being receptive to dif-
ferent ways of doing things
will help you advance. .
Emphasis should be
placed on health and well-
being. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
.20): Your home is your
castle. Spend time fixing
things up jo better suit
your needs. Take a look
at an investment It is
probably time to make a
change. Keep your assets
accessible so you'can take,
advantage of a good deal.
***
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Participate in a cause
you believe in. Reach out
to people you feel can
help as well as to those
who need assistance.,
Collaborating will put you
in a good position and help-
to build strong alliances
with people who can be of
benefit to you personally.
A** A*


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23Aug. 22):
Don't push your luck when'
dealing with supeti6ts.
If you overreact, you will
end up losing. Practical
application will pay off.
Concentrate on what you
can do to make yourself
the best that you can be
mentally, physically and
Emotionally. **
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Interact with people
who have something to
offer. The more knowledge
'rou can pick up, the bet-
ter. equipped you will be
to handle whatever comes
your way. Expanding your
interests or friendships will
.lead to a change of heart
and opinion. ***
.LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct,
22): A change can' do you
good. Visiting someone
you don't see often will
lead to an, opportunity.
. You can make a personal
change that will bring com-
pliments your way. You
don't need t9 go overboard
to get a reaction. ***
SCORPIO (Oct .23-Nov.
21): You'll be pulled in two
different directions when
it comes to emotional mat-
ters. Step back and reas-
sess your situation before
taking action. Ask ques-
tions if you are unclear
about where you stand or


what's expected of you.
*** .
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Mix business
with pleasure.. Offer sug-'
gestions based on experi-
,ence to those interested in
taking part in your work.
Communication, along
with mixing the old with
the new, will bring splen-
did results. ***
CAPRICORN/(Dec.
22-Jan. 19): A chance to
improve your home and
your personal relation-
,ships looks promising. Go
above and beyond the call
of duty and you will get
twice as much in return.
You must take advantage
of an investment opportu-
nity. Filter through your
options.*****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): As long as you
stay 'calm and stick to
basics, you will have ample
time to accomplish your
goals. An unusual turn of
events will lead to a profit-
able ending. Love is in
the stars, and celebrating
should be your plan. **
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Rely on experience
to see your way through
a trying situation. Avoid
reunions with people who
have never been an asset.
Be honest with yourself
about the way you feel,
and you will make the
right decision. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and.present.
Each letter In the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: K equals D
"P LZFN VG YFMWN BXF GWJFZBH
MPRF. P BXPRS PB DTKF DF
ABZWRLFZ TA + GFZAWR; PB YVPMB
DH EXTZTEBFZ." CVABPR YPFYFZ


Previous Solution: "A politician looks forward only to the next election. A
statesman looks forward to the next generation." Thomas Jefferson.
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-9
CLASSIC PEANUTS


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011











4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011, Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


SOCCER: New district for Columbia
Continued From Page 1B


Tigers.
Chiles, Leon, Lincoln and
Panama City Mosely will
make up the rest of the new
district.
"Our district is really
strong," Brown said. "Our
goal is to go. in and try
to compete with them.
Obviously, everyone's goal
is to win the district"
The boys team looks to
be solid after a 1-0-1 show-
ing during preseason games
against Bartram Trail and
Providence.
Following a 1-1 tie with
Bartram Trail, the Tigers
picked up a victory against
Providence, 2-1.
Jimmy Blakely helped
the Tigers account for two
goals after falling down 1-0
and keeper Shane Hartopp
blocked the second of
Providence's two penalty
kicks to preserve the 2-1
win.
"They showed that they
can play hard with lots of
effort," Tyler said. "There
are still things to work on.
We have to do better at
clearing the ball and with
our defensive pressure. The
midfield pressed good, it's
just a. matter of them figur-
ing out their positions."
After Blakely helped
the Tigers account for two
"goals, he didn't shy away
from his expectations for
the, season.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High captain Michaela Burton (28) fights with
Suwannee High's Teylor Alley (19) for possession of the ball
Thursday at the CYSA soccer fields.


"My goal is to go out
every game and expect to
win," Blakely said. "I hope'
to score a goal every game
and I want the other team to
remember me afterwards."
As far as the Tigers sea-
son goes, he belie-ves that
Columbia can continue to
play at the level it has under


Tyler.
"State is;' always our
goal," he said. "It'll take a
lot of work to get there,
but I believe coach Tyler
has what it takes to get us
there. We just have to work
on things in practice and do
our job in the classroom.
That's where it all starts."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Columbia High defenders (from left) Tyrone Sands, Austin Reiter and Quaysean Monismith
bring down Leon Lions quarterback.

CHS


PREP ROUNDUP


COURTESY PHOTO COURTESY PHOTO'
Fort White High's Ashley Jones led the Lady CHSregion qualifier Hayley Lewis (right)
Indians at district with a third-place finish, shows her ribbon to coach Kristin Hart.

Alligator Lake Park is site of

3 region cross country meets


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
Alligator Lake Park
in Lake City will host
the Florida High School
Athletic Association's
Region 1 cross country
meets for Classes 1A, 2A
and 3A.
Fort White High's girls,
team qualified for the meet
as a team by placing sec-
ond in the District 4-2A
meet on Thursday.
Columbia High's Hayley
Lewis qualified as an indi-
vidual runner by finishing
12th in the District 2-3A
meet on Saturday.
Entry fee for all specta-


tors is $6. Parking is avail-
able for $5 per vehicle.
The gates at Alligator
Lake Park will open at
6 a.m. with the coaches
meeting at 6:30 a.m. '.
Start times for the class-
es are: 3A girls, 7:30 a.m.;
1A girls, 8 a.m.; 3A boys,
8:30 a.m.; 2A girls, '8:55
a.m.; 1A boys, 9:25 a,m.; 2A
boys, 9:50 a.m.
The awards ceremony is
10:20 a.m.

Fort White soccer
Fort White soccer lost a.
doubleheader to Newberry
High at home on Monday.
The Lady Indians


trailed 2-0 at intermission.
Rebecca Onorati scored a
goal early in the second
half, but Fort White could
not get closer.
"They dominated the
first half and we dominated
the second half," coach
Perry Sauls said. "We just
could not get any goals. It
was disappointing."
Fort White's girls are
1-1, overall and in district.
Fort White's boys
opened their season with
a 3-0 district loss to the
Panthers.
Fort White hosts Santa
'Fe High on Thursday. The
girls play at 5 p.m., followed
by the boys at 7 p.m.


INDIANS: Opponents going strong
Continued From Page 1B


week.
Wakulla High (7-2,
3-0) beat host Godby High,.
24-21, in the District 2-
5A showdown last week.
The district champion
War Eagles wrap up the
regular season at Escambia
High.
Taylor County High
(6-3, 2-1) nipped visiting
Marianna High, 22-21, to
take the runner-up spot in
District i-4A.
The Bulldogs host'
Florida High in this
week's regular-season
finale.


Rickards High (1-8, 1-2)
got its first victory with.
a 20-18 District 2-5A win
at Suwannee High on,
Friday.
Leon High hosts
Rickards in a matchup of
Tallahassee schools this
week.
Hamilton County High's
District 5-1A chances
ended with a 42-20 loss to
Jefferson County High on
Friday.
The Trojans (2-7, 1-1)
'play at Yulee High this
week.
Fernandina Beach High


(3-6, 0-2) lost its District
2-4A runner-up deciding
game at West Nassau High,
28-21. The Pirates end the
.season by hosting Oakleaf
High.
Newberry finished
the season 2-8 and 1-3 in
District 7-1A'vith its loss at
Union County.
Independent Williston
High fell to 4-5 with a 28-24
home loss to Dixie County
High.
The Red Devils will have
a tough task reaching .500,
as Dunnellon High visits
this week.


From Page 1B

the road against Hamilton
County High.
The Bulldogs used' 306
yards passing from Josh
Wright and four touch-
downs to pull off the 51-26
win.
After the win, the fire went
out on the Bulldogs season.'
A 1-1 record has gone into
a. tailspin with Suwannee
coming out at 1-8.
For .the most part, the
games since Hamilton
County haven't been close.
Santa Fe, Rutherford
and Godby high schools
each gave the Bulldogs a
beating.
Suwannee came close to
righting the ship in a 31-22
loss against Bay, but fell
back to earth with a 42-0
loss against Wakulla the fol-
lowing week.
Suwannee has been close
in its last two games before
entering the battle for the
bucket. The Bulldogs fell 34-
21 at home against another
set of Bulldogs the group
from Taylor County.
Last week, the Bulldogs
traveled to Tallahassee, but
came back with heartbreak
after a 20-18 loss to Rickards
High. *
Still, Columbia coach
Brian Allen knows what it
means to play in rivalry like
this and won't let the Tigers
look ahead to a playoff game
with St Augustine High.
"We know their record
but they want to get back
the Oaken Bucket," Allen
said. "You can throw out the
records in a game like this.
Suwannee will be motivated
and will try to come out
at their place and give us
a great game. They'll play
inspired."


, Having a Yard Sale? Call Us and Reserve a booth "Free of Charge" with
L HWY 90 Frontage! Bring.your Toys, Clothing, Furniture, Book, Antiques,
- r Exercise Equipment, Lawn Equipment, Animals and WHATEVER!


YGUR SP!ACE!


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f-f,4f,(r, .4'CJE


LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


4B















olumbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


Think


locally,


shop


locally


LAKE CITY REPORTER


From staff reports
T he Lake City
-Columbia
County
Chamber of
Commerce has
launched a new marketing
campaign designed to get
residents to think of Lake
City and its businesses
and service providers as
the first option for all their
needs.
The "'Think Lake City
First" marketing campaign
continues to gain popu-
larity and support-as the
,phrase arid concept gains
visibility.
Think Lake City First
is a marketing campaign,
the Chamber will publicize
over the next year," said
Dennille Folsom, Lake
City Columbia County
Chamber of Commerce
executive director. "It will
run in its full entirety in
2012. We wanted to go
ahead and get some infor-
mation out this year, in the
fourth quarter, because as
far as retailers go, this is
their busiest time of the
year.P"
Folsom said 'Think
Lake City First" is much
miorethaniTiis aah-paifflgn
designed to get people to


shop in Lake City; its a
"think local" campaign for
people who'need other
services.
"If you need a plumber,
attorney, doctor, CPA or
any service -- think Lake
City first," she said, noting
the campaign promotes
local businesses and ,
services provided locally.
"For the majority of things
that we need, you cani
Think Lake City First,;'
and shop with your friends
and neighbors and keep
the money in our local
economy"
Although there are indi-
cators that the economy'
is improving, Folsom
said it remains challeng-
ing and it's important to
have a concept such as.
"Think Lake City First" to
promote hometown busi-
nesses.aiid services.
The "Think Lake City
First" marketing campaign
will include Chamber
members displaying 18
x 24 inch yard signs and
well as smaller window
decals. The signs can be
purchased from the cham-
ber office at $15 each. The
window displays are $5
each. .:. ..
The Chamber is ask-
ing that all its members


JASON MATTHEW WALKER,L.-le ,.ty repori-r
Dennille Folsom, executive director of the Lake City/Columbia County Chamber of Commerce, is helping to promote the Think
Lake City First campaign, which will run through all of next year. Folsom said the campaign will encourage consumers to shop
in the Lake City area for not only retail, but also for services provided by lawyers, contractors, etc. 'Every dollar spent locally
will be reinvested back into the community,' she said. 'The way to build the economy is to start locally and move outward.'


display one of the signs on.
their property,
"We also encourage all
businesses, if they have a'
marquee to put the "Think
Lake City First" mantra up
on their business signs,"
Folsom said. "We're going
around town looking for
businesses that have'
"Think Lake City First"
and we're taking pictures
of them and putting them.
on our Facebook page. So,
it helps give them a little
bit of extra publicity, too."
Folsom said a ":Think
Lake City First" media
.blitz has-bee plauied.
to get the message out. '
Businesses who are not


Chamber members are
asked to join the Chamber
and become a part of the
positive "Think Lake City'
First" business network.
Todd Wilson, Lake City
Reporter publisher, is the
incoming president of
the Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of
Commerce and Folsom
said the "Think Lake City
First" concept was his idea
and the Chamber's board
of directors embraced the
idea.
"I proposed this Think
Lake City First' concept
after mitehesacrsh
wilh'mediak gaerbs d
Chambers from'iacross


the country, but more slated to take place in
importantly, I talked with January.
many local business own- "Since we've unveiled
ers in Columbia County Think Lake City First, .
and I listened," Wilson we've gotten a lot of
said. "Local businesses positive feedback from our
want the Chamber to be members and we've got-
their advocate and this ten a lot of telephone calls
marketing campaign is from people we haven't
anotherstep toward pro- heard from in a long time,"
moting our members., Folsom said. "I think this
More businesses need to is something everybody
"join the Chamber and join wants to get behind. There
this powerful network. is no reason not to want
Working together, we all to support your local com-
become stronger." munity and keep your local
The full plan behind the neighbor in business. I
campaign will be revealed, think this is going to be a
in detail.- t the ,2l12--,- -- roal positive thing for Lake
Chamber-of Commerce City."
annual dinner which is


/ .


- ut --- ,_ k." 0 --re
SE^^ ^ ^^.fSS 9Sb ~~~~~FR'^*"''* '!.1''>"" ^ -"1'"'^ ,.
BJ^lI^^Jlh~robmH **fOl'a dute -AS~ t*i ^0,^


and Columbia County











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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Advertising copy is subject to
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advertiser on the first day of pub-
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for that portion of the advertisement
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Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
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ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
Vwwvw.lakecityreporter.com


Legal


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON ENACTMENT OF ORDI-
NANCE BY THE CITY COUNCIL
OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Ordinance No. 2011-2018, which ti-
tle hereinafter appears, will be con-
sidered for enactment on second and
final reading by the City Council of
the City of Lake City, Florida, at
public hearing on Monday, Novem-
ber 21, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matters can be heard
in the City Council Meeting Room,
City Hall located'at 205 North Mari-
on Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055. Copy of said ordinance may
be inspected by any member of the
public at the Office of the City Clerk,
City Hall, located at 205 North Mari-
on Avenue, Lake City, Florida
32055, during regular business
hours. Op. the date, time and place
first above mentioned, all interested
persons may appear and be heard
with respect to the ordinance.
CITY COUNCIL ORDINANCE
NO. 2011-2018
'AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
AMENDING CHAPTER 102, AR-
TICLE II OF THE CITY CODE RE-
LATING TO WATER AND SEW-
ER UTILITY CHARGES BY ADD-
ING A NEWiSECTION TO CHAP-
TER 102, ARTICLE II TO 'BE
NUMBERED SECTION 102-40, TO
PROVIDE 'THAT WATER AND
SEWER IMPACT FEES RE-,
QUIRED TO BE PAID BY SEC-
TION 102-36 WILL BE WAIVED
AND SUSPENDED FOR A PERI-
OD OF ONE CALENDAR YEAR
BEGINNING JANUARY 1, 2012,
THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 20'12
(THE "DEVELOPMENT PERI-
OD"), AS AN INDUCEMENT FOR
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
(HEREIN THE "DEVELOPMENT
INCENTIVE"); REQUIRING ANY
APPLICANT SEEKING TO TAKE
ADVANTAGE OF THE DEVEL-
OPMENT INCENTIVE TO APPLY
FOR AND ACQUIRE A BUILD-
ING PERMIT AND COMMENCE
CONSTRUCTION OF THE DE-
VELOPMENT PRIOR TO THE EX-
PIRATION OF THE DEVELOP-
MENT PERIOD; PROVIDING FOR
THE REPEAL OF ORDINANCES
IN CONFLICT WITH ANY OF
THE PROVISIONS OF THIS OR-
DINANCE; PROVIDING FOR A
SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; PRO-
VIDING FOR THE INCLUSION
OF THIS ORDINANCE IN THE
CITY CODE; AND. PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
Thepublic hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any in-
terested party shall be advised that
the date, time and pi,. of any con-
tinuation of the public
hearing, shall be announced during
the public hearing and that no further
notice concerning the matter, will be
published.
All persons are advised that. if they
.decide to appeal an\ decision made.
at the public hearing. the\ wilf need
a record of the proceedings and,; for'
such purpose, they may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of' the
proceeding is made, which record inm-
cludes' the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, if any accom-
modations are needed for persons
with disabilities, please contact
Joyce Bruner, Office of City Manag-
er, 1-386-719-5768.
AUDREY E. SIKES
City Clerk .
05528958
November 9, 2011 .


NOTICE TO ROAD CONTRAC-
TORS COLUMBIA COUNTY
PROJECT NO .'011-5 SR-247 AND
SW BASCOM .NORRIS DRIVE
Notice is hereby given that sealed
bids will be received in the Columbia
County Manager's office until 11:00
A.M. on November 16, 2011 for Co-.
lumbia County Road Project 2011-5.
This office is located on the second
floor of the Courthouye'Annex at 135
NE Hemando Avenue Room 203
Lake City, Florida 32055.. .
This project consists of constructing
a right-hand turn lane improving the
intersection of SR-247 and Bascom
Norris Drive. Scope of work includes
,clearing and grubbing, grading,
storm pipes, storm, inlets;, asphaltic
concrete (base, structural and sur-
face), sodding paint stripping, traffic
signal improvement and& incidental,
items. ,
The Bid Forms and Construction.-
Specifications may be .downloaded
at:
http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/
PurchasingBids.asp
The successful bidder will be re-
quired to furnish the County Manag-
er with a performance bond and lia-
bility insurance prior to commencing
work.
The Columbia County Commission
reserves the right to reject any or all
bids and to add to the contract or de-
lete frbm the contract to stay within
their funding capabilities.
Signed,
Jody Dupree, Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Columbia County, Florida
05528858
November 2, 9, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Best friend Lost
SKnow where he is?
Please call
386-249-0164
facebook.com/chewylost

SIam am a 4-H student that had a pure
bred Netherland Dwarf Rabbit in
the Col Co. Fair. She won a Rib-
bon, but most importantly, she is
my pet. She was taken for her pen
at the fair Saturday night: I'm hop-
ing by mistake. I just want my pet
back. If you know anything about
"Cloverleaf' Call 386-752-6094


I


020 Lost & Found

LOST DOG In Eastwood Boston
Terrier, Black and White named
Harley. Likely blue collar. Very
friendly. Roughly 35 lb $50 Re-
ward. Call Brian 386-365-6171


100 Job
Opportunities

05528865
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a Librarian II.
This is full-time professional
library work coordinating and.
conducting services and
activities in the Reference area.
Strong computer & website
skills desirable. Minilium
training: MLS or equivalent
from an American Library
Association accredited
University plus two years of'
library experience. A compara-
ble amount of training,
education or experience may be
substituted for the above
minimum qualifications. Valid
FL Drivers License required.
SSalary is negotiable within
$14.05- $16.48 hourly range
plus benefits. Successful.
applicants must pass pre-
employment physical, drug
screening, and criminal history
background. Applications may
be obtained at the Human Re-
sources Office, Board of 'County
Commissioners, 135 NE
Hernando Ave., Lake City, Fl
32055, or online at
www.columbiacountyfla.com,
(386) 719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139. Application
deadline: 11/18/2011.
Columbia County is an
AA/EEO/ADA/VP employer.

05528943
Substitute Teachers Infant/
Toddler/PreK (Lake City)
HS Dip/GED; FCCPC /CDA,
DCF 40 hrs., 5 hr literacy and
1st Aid/CPR preferred;
classroom experience preferred;
Bilingual (Spanish/English)
preferred. Must pass physical
/DCF background screening.
Apply in'person at 236 SW
Cdlumbia Ave or email resume
to: employment(alsv4cs.org
(386)754-.2222
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
WRIT ER r eded'1
Must have experience.
$100(0 wk 38675847157'

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN-
needed. $1.500 eek
Music ha\ e experience an8 tools.'
386-758-4757


FLORIDA


** *

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
MATHEMATICS
(to commence Spring Term 2012)
STeach college-level and preparatory
.'mathematics; work with colleagues for
1the advancement of departmental'goals.
*Position is a spring term appointment with
possible continuance bated on enrollment
needs. 'Requires a Master's degree in
Mathematics; or master's degree with
minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in
bourse workcentered on mathematics.
Ability to use technology in instruction.
ri'.rvh To ,a6.3-.h r..Ihe a.a,, a iance
,,ir.inilcc.jru e ." /b'il, 1I. %,vrl n.'1 p lr,
,l1 5- AOIrr, lo ea I ,n I O...cJa
and ic I rrE br.,o cjcoo A 4,I 1'5 utblZe.
various instructional strategies to reach
students. Ability to present Information in
a coherent manner and the ability to fairly
evaluate student retention of that
information. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience. Ability to
teach college level and preparatory
.mathematics. Salary: Bated on degree
and experience. Application Deadline;
Oc. o .r Li'nid Filea
Persons interested should provide Colh
lege application, vita, and photocopies
of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
.'evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at:
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E, College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrafac.edu
FGC is acaredtited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Educationsand Employment


100 Job
100 OOpportunities
AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $.up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL Class A Driver needed.
Must have clean driving record.
Target Dedicated.
Call Lee at (772)293-5878
Construction Engineering &
Inspection. Seeking Inspectors,
Contract Support and Compliance
Staff. CTQP Qualified.
email resumes,to:
SuzannaM()via-cs.com
Experienced Roofers
Needed.
Please call
(850) 271-4199
Customer Service Representative
for call center. Must be fast friend-
ly & efficient. Please send resume
to: 197 SW Waterford Ct. Lake
City, Fl 32025 .Att: Joey Kitaif.
Please send resume for call center
position only. There are no other
positions at this time.
Director of Allied Health
Programs (RN) wanted at North
Florida Community College.
See www.nfcc.edu for details.
Production Technician needed.
Must be bver 21/clean driving
,record. On call wkwnds/after hrs.
Call for appt. 386-754-0261
STYLIST NEEDED at
Southern Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info.
Wee Care of Columbia City
Sis hiring CDA Teachers
Experience required.
Apply in person.

a120 Medical
1 Employment

05528667 ,
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05528913
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY
TECH wanted full time or part
time, for private Radiology of-
fice. AART & Mammography
certification req. Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

05528941 '
Fast-paced physical therapy
center hiring a licensed Physical
Therapist's Assistant or Rehab
Aide. Hands-on training w/some
exp. preferred. Personal training
or fitness background plus.
Basic knowledge of anatomy
and exercises are a MUST. o
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills, a great
attitude and be willing to learn.
Extreme motivation promotes
rapid growth. Send resume to:
pta714-@h6tmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

05529016
Medical lqilling
Must.have experience in all.
aspects of coding, billing,
d and collections.
Sendresume in confidence to:
mafaisalmd@gmail.com or
Fax*# 386-758-5987

Medical office seeking Cert.
Respiratory Therapist Tech
part-time,'Fax resume to
(386) 754-1712.
SOrthopedic Surgeon Seeks
Medical Transcriptionist.
' Experienced candidates need only
Sto apply. Please fax resume to:
S 386-758-6995.


240 Schools &
240 Education,

05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/28/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainineservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
FREE to Good Home
Orange & white Kittens
Litter box trained.
(386)288-2504 or 288-4481.
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health '
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites; Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
SSupplies
WANTED: I Buy and Sell used
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Wil, pay cash. Call 386-935-1522


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

410Lawn & Garden
410. Equipment

JOHN DEERE 2009 42'
Mower With 2 Bag bagger
$750.00
386-755-1002 Leave Message

419 TV-Radio &
.41 Recording
20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$50.00
386-984-7510


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
WVe Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales ,
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

USED SET (3) Danton tires.
185/60/15
$65.00
386-984-7510

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line

www.Ilakecityreporter.com


confused?



Call Lake City Reporter Classifieds!


WE CAN HELP 386-755-5440


I


BUY IT1
k~ilhir


SELfL I r


c


450 Good Things
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420
The Pecan House in Ellisville
We buy, sell & crack Pecans.
Several good Varieties.
386-752-6896


460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pls leave message.
we will call you back.

630 MobileHomes
Sfor Rent

16X80 Almost new. 10 mi S of
Lake City, off Branford Hwy. 3/2,
fenced yd, Dish Washer private.
$650. mo + sec. No Pets. 984-7478.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650: mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422 -
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2bedrm/2bth $500. mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2BR/2BA in Country. Large shady
yard, No pets! $550 dep.
$550 rent. Water, sewer &
garbage furnished. 386-867-0941
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833

Country Living.
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or'386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br.
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
2006 Fleetwood Anniversary Ser-
ies. 3br/2ba plus bonus rm adjoins
master. Garden tub. South side of
Lake City. Ez commute to:G'ville
MLS # 78411 $164,900 623-6896
3/2 MH on 1 acre in nice sub.
* paved rd: metal roof. completely.
remodeled. new everything! Only,
$39,500-386-249-1640
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
4br/2ba, Long carport,
Front & back porches.
Reduced to $37,000.
SCall 386-752-4258
NEW.2012 Town Homes
" 28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80 3
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include'
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
Steps, No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes Has 3
Modular-Homes Available
at HUGH Savings
Over40K Off 800-622-2832
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or Doubles. Must have
clear title.,Call North'Point Homes
(352)872-5566
A -










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent








SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website: "
www.springhillvillage.net
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1, ,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
NICE Apt Downtown. Remodeled
1 bedroom. Kitchen, dining, living
room. $450. mo plus sec.
386-362-8075 or 386-754-2951
Nice, Ig 2 br Apt
Close to tow n
$485 mo +,$485 dep..
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have home for you-;
386-754-1800. \~wW mtflapis.comi
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk ,Util.,& cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates a%.ail Call 386-752-2741
yWayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
,2/I, washer/dr3er. Behind Kens off-
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.nvflapts.com:
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. NlMo em'
2/I. 2/1.5, 2/2 Pet Fnend.. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/drver hkup
386-754-1800. u~ m nflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 f SECOND,
storn 2/2. deck, quier pnvate
acre 8 mi nu of VA No dogs.
S$600 mio dep 386.96A-918l-

720 Furnished Apts.: .
2 For Rent
Rooms for Rent H-llcrest. Sands.
Columbia All furnished. Electric.
cable, fridge, microdwae. Weekly]
or monthly rates I person $135.
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808
7 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/I BA.ne%%ly renovated,
CH & A, comer of Pumam &
Mairsh, large yard. first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872
4BR/3.5BA Exec ume Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok
Old bnck & heart pine floors.
jet tub, DSL Beautiful'
..For right person $ 1650/mo
negotiable 386-209-4610
; TOWNHOUSEE 2br plus
bonus room i/1.5 bath
QuailHeights CC. $750 mo plus
$250 damage dep 386-752-5553


r"


Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent

05528950


SMUATER. BOIDER. FASTR.
The Darby Rogers Company
* 315 Piedmont St.
4/2 in Live Oak $790./mo
775SW EL Prado.
Lake City 3/1 w/screened
porch and large fenced back
yard $775./ni6.
222 SW 3rd St.
3/2 totally remodeled in
downtown Jasper $800.mino
1320 NW Labonte.,
3/2 located in Gwen Lake
area of Lake City $800:/nfmo
847 SW Applewood Glen.
.Ft White 3/3 DWMH in the
country $800./m6
6 199 SW Brandy Way.
family friendly 4/2 in
Springfield Estates
Lake City $950.00
16652 Spring St.
Historic 3/2 two story home
totally remodeled in down
town White Springs
$1000./mo
Kayla Carbono 386-623-9650 or
BJ Federico 386-365-5884


3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534. or 386-365-1243
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1100. mo.
'$1000 Dep. 18501346-8318 Chris
For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.
home brick, 3bd/2bathl2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083
For lease-Lakewood sub.. LG
brick; 2600 sq. ft.,4bd/2.5 bal2car
Lg lot by Lake Jeffrey. $1275.m
+last+sec. Bruce 386-365-3865,
Rent % %ih opuon to purchase.
3/2 Bnck Home. Pn\ ate on I 5 ac
386-752-5035x.3112
7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.

75O Business &
75 Office Rentals

OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq $450/mirLh
S 900 sq' $600/mth
'" 3568 sq $2973/mth
', -8300sq $5533/mith
.'''. also Bank Budilding .
Excellent Locations'
Tom Eagle. GRI
386; 961-1086 DCA Realtor


FOR LEASE: bDon16own office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave Tuo -
1000 sqfL office space 'units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


770 Condos Fodr'ent
2BR/2BA. all appliances,
water/sewer. basic cable,
pool & tennis cis.
$1150/mo. call 386-344-0433


805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City. 100% owner financing,
no qualifymg,'$395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065

FOR SALE: 2 valuable lots locat-
ed nett to Lake Shore hospital in
Lake Ciry $20,00). senous inm-
quires Orily please. 910-874-1565
To place your
classified ad call
-yi-- I


805 Lots for Sale
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or'
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This.
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real'es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free.,
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale


PRICE SLASHED TO $95,0001!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on corner lot,
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000-
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/livingrm &
familyrm.$39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL,
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-155-5110 #78971
W'N-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/bardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79.500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233,
2BR/1 BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
avadable $44,900 DANIEL .
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
BANK OWNED 3/2 home with
screened in pool, fireplace,
#79039 $129,000 Call Paula
Lawrence 386-623-1973
Hallmark Real Estate


COUNTRY CLOSE 3/2 brick, 3
acres, pole bam,.workshop, fruit
trees. $129,900 478096
, Call Ginger Parker 386- 365-2135
Hallmark Real Estate


" ,HUD HOME'fenced 4.77 Ac, 3/2
sold'"as is" $95,500 Case 091-
434983 Robin Williams 386-365-
""5146'wv'a hudhomestore cbnm
Hallmark Real Estate

Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba. 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.
LAKEFRONT Brick 3/2, large
oaks, wood floors, fireplace.
$139,000 #78385 Call Janet Creel
386-719-0382 Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes tnple-
wide M--. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Really"
MLS i 71594 $149,900 623-6896
PRICE REDUCED!! 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25.
fenced ac: Freshly painted. Split.
plan. Large rear deck MIS 78103
$169,900 386-623-6896


I- WB Short Sale! 3/2,w/wood. floors,
garage/game room. Make offer!
Subject to bank approval. #79355
Ginger Parker 386-365-2135
----- mim


820 Farms &
SAcreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
"w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900; $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.cori
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.,
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086

830 Commercial
Property,
MOBILE HOME PARK with 1g.
brick owner residence. 12 units, 14
spaces, 11.84 Acres in town.
#77920 Call Jay Sears 386-
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate

807 Real Estate
O 0 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price.
386-269:0605


950 Cars for Sale
1974 FORD Galaxy,,
Clean, runs fair, spotless interior.
4-door. $2,3001
386-754-8885
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS. Ma-
roon on maroon. 1 owner, non
smoker $84K original mi. Never
uTecked. $ I0K obo 904-718-6747
2000 Lincoln LS $3200;
1999 Pontiac Minivan $1995,
*-? 1999 Ford Mustang $3900;
1999 Chr\sler 300M $2695.
352-538-0292/514-2950
Cold A/C, great gas mileage,
4 new tires. low mile engine
Looks and runs great.
$3500 obo. Call 386-965-1600


S..to nevef miss a day's
worth of all the"
*. ,,. -Lake City Reporter
S has to offer:,
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
S755-5445 .


ADVERTISE YOUR
Job Opportunities in the
Lake City Reporter
Classifieds.
Enhance Your Ad with
Your Individual Logo
For just pennies a day.
Call today,
755-5440.


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the',
newspaper and online E-edi ion.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online
* You niust include vehicle price
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3. j '3on, meal work -
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, excl cond.
$10,500
'Call .
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run,the same'vehicle ad
.for 10 additional days for
only-$15,0Q
Terms and conditions remain the.
same for the additional run.


V e C. S
M *Bi


Lake City Reporer


-


SZuu0 apF-ox
1'17 ft. center console,
approx. 40 hrs- Mercury
.90hp. New 5plbltrolling;
'fmotor. Aun.-.trailer.
Payoff
$12,600
p- Call ;
"386-758-7766 ,'


386-758-7766~


01ui rontac
Grand Ami
Cold A/C, great gas
mileage, 4 new tires.
low mile engine. Looks
.and runs great.
$3,500 OBO
Call
386-965-1600


1986 Chevy
Monte Carlo SS
Maroon on maroon,
one owner, non-smoker,
84,000 orig. ml., never
wrecked, solid body.
$10,000 OBO
Call
386-718-6747


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Classified Department: 755-5440


HCaJ^U^

E OK ^^^*^^^^^^


I iB vRplorel


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CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011


Soaps by D&ea e
S& Unmque Gifjf
Cordially invites you to our First Annual...
"GIRLS NIGHTITOUP'
CHRISTMAS SHOPPING EXTRAVAGANZA
November 18th, 2011
":00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
2"5 N Manon M. Lake City, FL 32055
Srcfr. lrnm-nt arid music will be provided)
F. r m,rt ,rilri.nn tion: Call 386.243.8298


m Emo R IES "
JUST ARRIVED!
New Dinette Sets
starting at just
1. .00 .


xtf 386-466- 888
ext to the Money Man)Lake City, FL 32055 f]|


M c{*ply g~RAT, rotle] R agey'srp.gaae
Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks

@ TOYOTA Oflk / a.e. J_ d


Please present Rountree
Moore Toyota Bucks at
time of purchase No cash
value No reproductions
of the Rountree Moore
Toyota Bucks is allowed
Not valid witn any other
coupon One coupon per
customer. Fees tax.
& shop supplies not
included


Not Legal Tender
Al"


'n WMSI


GOES NW
jj~lI' ~PRICES COME D WN!


WWW.morrells coll


DC TIS CLOSEOUT
ON 01: AKINS -OVESTOK3 *CAC' &DNS


LOOK FOR THE YELLOW
TAGS INSIDE THE STORE FOR
SPECIAL DEALS ON LIVING
.ROOMS, BEDROOMS, DINING
ROOMS & MATTRESSES!


LakCiySIDavsane38.752.3910or800-597.3


Connected


www.lakecityreporter.com


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L.,.1


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Classified Department: 755-5440





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