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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01692
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 6, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01692
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


:y


Reporter


Sunday, November 6, 2011 www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 243 E $1.00




BROADBAND'S




BACK ON TRACK


LAUKA L HiAMP'UIiNLake City Reportuer
Dana Huggins, homeless education liaison for the Columbia
County Schbol District, with donated clothes, shoes and
backpacks for homeless children in her office at the Columbia
County School Board Administrative Complex.



Homeless


kids get help


at schools

Backpack program
ensures they'll eat
over the weekend.

By LAULIA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter.com .
You may not see them on the street corner or sleeping in
a park, but 300 school-aged children in Columbia County do
not have a home.
SBy the end of the school year, it's estimated there will be
425 homeless students, said DanaHuggins; homelesseduca-
tion liaison for the Columbia County School District
Huggins' job isto remove barriers homeless students
might face enrolling, attending and. succeeding iri school.
Homeless students are eligible for free breakfast and lunch
at school, free school supplies and tutoring. Students are
allowed to enroll in school, even without required documents
and immunizations. If a family moves, children do not have to
change schools. The district provides transportation to and
from-the school a child attended before becoming homeless
The district homeless education program can pay for edu-
cational field trips, graduation cap and gowns, and activity
fees for sports, band and chorus. Through.donations from
the community the program can supply children in need with
coats, shoes, socks and underwear.
Tuition is free at a state community college if a high school
senior is identified as homeless, said Huggins, who trained as
a social worker and has worked for the county for 20 years.
Huggins is also a resourcecoordinator with assistant Joyce
Spradley for SED/NET, which provides help for students with
emotional and behavioral issues.
She often puts homeless students in contact with commu-
nity resources to help with other needs like housing. -.
"IThere are limits and it's very frustrating that there are
no homeless shelters for families in Columbia County," she
said.
* A 1987 federal act considers a student homeless if his or
her family lacks a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime resi-
dence. This includes students living in shelters, cars, woods,
campers and substandard housing. Students awaiting foster
care, abandoned in hospitals or living temporarily in motels
are also considered homeless.
Students are most often identified as homeless when their
families double up with another family due to foreclosure,
eviction, hurricane, tornado or fire.
Although living with others is not normally defined as
homeless, these families move an average of two to three
times a year. Huggins said it takes about three months for
children to catch up. with their new class every time they
move. Socially it's difficult for them too, she said.
Growing numbers of families are living week by week in
various motels in Columbia County, Huggins said.
Most students are identified as homeless in the beginning
of the school year with a residency form sent to parents,
Huggins said.
While parents often seek out services, Huggins said teach-
ers, school staff and, bus drivers are trained to recognize
when a student is homeless.
"My focus is on education and removing the barriers"
homeless students face, Huggins said.
Homeless children are provided breakfast and lunch dur-
ing the week, but are often hungry over the weekend.
HOMELESS continued on 3A

Homeless Students
District I 10 f 2009-10 {208-09 2007-0 2006-07
Columbia 403 380 423 89 61
-------------
Alachua 594 446 707 616 554 I
Baker j 249 191 153 72 46
Hamilton ,326 342 251 236 258
Suwannee 315 322. 387 257 166
Union 148 121 i51 52 15
Source: Florida Department of Education


J OJP NUNl M I IncHw WAL.lC/L '.ly RepuIr'r
A customer walks-by a display promoting the North Florida Broadband Authority at the Columbia County Courthouse Annex.

Funding finally restored to problem-plagued
'Middle Mile' project after delays, allegations.


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com


A
service to


after months of ,delays,
work is set to resume on
a .$30 million, problem-
plagued project to pro-;
vide broadband :Internet
a 14-county. region in


North Florida.
Funding was put on hold in July by
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration Grants Office amid
allegations of poor supervision, fraud
and waste.
Before funding was restored, mem-
bers of the North Florida Broadband
Authority were required to present a
revised management plan to assure
federal authorities that the project
could be completed with no further
problems. -
The revised management plan
included replacing key contractors
such as the engineering company,
.Rapid Systems, and Government


Andy

Rooney

dies

at 92

Famed '60 Minutes'
essayist made final.
show last month.
By DAVID BAUDER
AP Television Writer
' NEW YORK Andy
Rooney so dreaded the day
he had to end his signature
."60 Minutes"' commentar-
ies about life's large and
small absurdities that he
kept going until he was 92
years old.
Even then, he said he
wasn't retiring. Writers
never retire. Buthis life after
the end of "A Few Minutes
With Andy Rooney" was
short Ife died Friday night,
according to CBS, only a


Services Group, the company awarded
the low bid to oversee the project. A .
lawyer involved with the project was.
also replaced.
Todd M manning, information technol-
ogy director for Columbia County and
a North Florida Broadband Authority
member, expressed confidence that the
project can be finished by the summer
of 2013, the original completion date.
"The funding has been restored,"
Manning said. "Now, all future invoices
will be paidt"
Each of the 14 counties in the
authority's boundaries appointed one
member to.the board overseeing the
project
The 14 counties are Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy,
Madison,,Putnam, Suwannee, Taylor,
and Union.
The project was funded with a
grant under the federal government's
.Broadband Technology Opportunities


Rooney in 2009.
month after delivering his
1,097th and final televised
commentary. .
Rooney had gone to the
hospital for an undisclosed
surgery, but major compli-
cations developed and he
never recovered.
, "Andy always said he
wanted to work until the
day he died, and he man-
aged to do it, save the last
few weeks in the hospital,"
said his "60 Minutes" col-
league, correspondent
Steve Kroft.
ROONEY continued on 3A


Program to stimulate growth and busi-
ness by providing North.Florida with
Internet at the same high speeds as in
large cities.
Regional broadband authority mem-
bers were given the task of overseeing
the Middle Mile Project, a high-speed
Internet network that individual com-
panies tap into to provide service-to .
customers. Wireless broadband-was ,
determined to be the fastest, most
cost-effective way to deliver the needed
broadband capacity across the 9,137
square-nmile area.
The region was considered for \
stimulus funds because of factors such
as high unemployment and-under
employment, low per capital income,
high percentages of families living
below the poverty level and lower
housing values.
"The weakness of the local econo-
my is exacerbated by the inability to
BROADBAND continued on 3A


ATV crash Ills 1


FortWhite man
dies when 4-wheeler
strikes oak tree.
From staff reports
A Fort White man was
killed in an ATV crash early
Saturday, according to the
Florida Highway Patrol.
Timothy Allen Parrish,
23, died when his 2000
Honda struck a tree some-
time between 3 and 6 a.m.,
FHP said.
Parrish was traveling east
on SW Hilliard Lane near SW


Lime Way when he failed to
negotiate a slight left curve,
reports show. The ATV par-
tially left the roadway and
struck an oak tree. Parrish,
who was wearing a helmet,
was then propelled into the
tree, which he struck with
his upper body, according
to FHP.
Parrish was pronounced
dead at the scene by
Columbia County E.M.S.
This is the 26th motor
vehicle fatality of 2011 in
Columbia County, matching
the total for all of last year.


Reminder: Fall back hour


With that autumn chill
in the air, nature reminds
us its time to set the clock
back.
Officially, the change to
standard time occurs at 2
a.m. Sunday. If you're like
most folks, you already set


your clock back Saturday
night
Remember, it's. fall back
an hour. Otherwise, you'll
be an hour early on Sunday
for church, golf or what-
ever.
Associated Press


CALL US:I 1 VOpinion ...... .... ... 4A
(386) 752-1293 2 5 Business .... ... .. IC
SUBSCRIBE TO Obituaries 5A
THE REPORTER: Partly Cloudy Ad 33D
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IN PEOPLE
irrn-i, Buffent
hangi.,r out ,*. rth
'Parrc:t Heads'


COMING
TUESDAY
Complete ct,
council oI .erage


I








2A LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

A 'flA- -' ( Ak.$H -I~A'\ FLORIDA


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
3-10-16-26 13 9-16-26-32-33 Afternoon: 9-9-0 Afternoon: 8-1-7-0 N/A N/A
Evening: 0-9-1 Evening: 6-5-8-6



AROUND FLORIDA




Scott plays 'workday DJ' on Carnival Cruise ship


MIAMI Gov. Rick Scott
donned a hard hat and .then a
DJ's headphones Friday during a
"workday" at the Port of Miami,
where a $1 billion tunnel project
was held up by last-minute legal
challenges. .
The start of drilling for the tun-
nels that will connect the port with
Miami's .expressways had been
scheduled next Monday. That's
been temporarily postponed and
it's unclear when a final drilling
permit would 'be issued so the,
project could resume.,
Late last week a Key-Biscayne
councilman filed an objection, to
the drilling, but he later apolo-
gized and.the'objection was'with-
drawn. However, the Department
of Environmental Protection's
general counsel must revie- con-
cerns filed early this week by the
Biscayne Bay Waterkeeper before
a permit can be issued, said age'n-
cy spokeswoman Jennifer Diaz.:
Scott called the tunnel delay dis-'
appointing, but he said it wouldn't
derail a dredging project that will
allow newer, larger cargo ships to-
enter the port -
The dredging project will bring
30,000 permanent jobs to Miami,
Scott said, adding that the port is
an economic driver for the entire
state. In March; Scott reallocated
state transportation funds to pay
the' full cost of the $77 million
dredging proje.' .
"If you look at the dredging of
the port, that's :going to be 30,000
jobs, on top of the construction
jobs. Look at the trade that's going
to come here," Scott said. "When
we made sure they had the dredge
money, it made everybody in the
world know that Florida is going
to be, a shipping capital, and we
shoidd be a shipping capital."-


Florida Gov. Rick Scott, center, gets down with D.J. Ro Parrish during his "workday" as a D.J. aboard the..
Carnival Cruise Lines' ship "Carnival imagination" on Friday., *.


Shortly after the sun rose Friday
over stacked'cargo containers and
giant cranes at the port, Scott
joined a Seaboard Marine employ-
ee to inspect heavy construction
equipment, including forklifts,
bulldozers and diggers, bound for'
Costa Rica and Panama
In the afternoon, Scott
greeted passengers boarding
. Carnival Cruise Lines' Carnival
Imagination; which was set to
depart for a three-day cruise to
the Bahamas.
He boarded the ship for a quick
lesson on the turntables from the
ship's DJ. Putting a large pair of
headphones over his ears, Scott


asked the small crowd around the and a Tampa doughnut shop.
bar what they. wanted to hear. To,. Scott used the port stop to tout
the delight of a group of women. trademissions to Panama, Brazil
standing (on the. stairs above "'and Canada to generate more
him, Scott's first pick was Gloria business in the state.
Gaynor's I Will Survive." Nine hundred thousand peo-
;.:Since August, Scott; a ple in Florida are unemployed,
Republican, has been making sim- but the. rate of unemployment
ilar stops across the state to work has dropped-to 10.6 percent and
jobs with regular Floridians: He 110,300 private sector jobs have
borrowed the idea from former been created, Scott said.
Gov. and U.S. Sen. Bdb Graham, a "So what we've got to do is keep
Democrat, and renamed the plan this going," he said.
to coincide with his campaign slo- Some state legislators also are
gan: "Let's Get to Work." hoping to create more jobs and
So far, his "workdays" have lure more international business
included an Orlando school, a to South Florida with three mega-
Panama City Beach restaurant casinos proposed in Broward and


Miami-Dade counties. Legislation
that Would allow for, large resort
casinos has been filed in the
Florida Legislature, but Scott said
there needed to be a discussion
about how those casinos 'would
affect other gambling operations
irithe state.
"As you know,, I'm very cautious
about our budget. I don't want
our budget-to be significantly tied
to gaming, but I'll look at the
bill when it gets to me," Scott
said, adding, "I'm not going to go
gamble. I don't want to lose any
money. And I want to make sure
we have a discussion about the
social impact of all this."

RNC wants low hotel
rates for convention
TAMPA Organizers of the
Republican National Convention
want hotel operators in Tampa to
lower their rates for the event
Hotel operators said the rates
they plan to charge and the book-
ing fee were specified in contracts
they signed with the Tampa Bay
Host Committee for the August
2012 event But the Republican
Party has since replaced its con-
vention planning' staff, which
now wants the"hotels to cut their
prices.
Thathasn'tgone down well with
the hoteliers, who met this week
to air their complaints. They say
none of the hotels asked for their
peak rates and aren't inclined to
lower them now. f
A spokesman for the GOP's
Committee on Arrangements
said he is confident the disagree-
ment can be worked out

ASSOCIATED PRESS


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Native American group slams Jenner


ANativeAmericangroup ip denounc-
ing a comment Kim Kardashian's
mother made on national television as
being "wrong and hurtful."'
The comment from Kardashian's
mom, Kris Jenner, came 'on "Good
Morning: America" Thursday, when
Jenner was :asked if her daughter
should return Kris Humphries' $2
million engagement ring after their
72-day marriage ended.
Jenner responded with a laugh, say-
ing: "Well, I hate an Indian giver. Don't
you? It's a gift. Keep your gift. "
The National Congress of American
SIndians wasn't amused.
"The phrase 'Indian giving' is wrong
and hurtful," Jacqueline Johnson Pata,
executive director of the tribal advo-
cacy group, said in a statement
'- "The cultural values of Native
Americans are based on giving uncon-
ditionally and .empowering those
around them. Instead this cultural
value is forgotten when negative ste-
reotyping of Native people occurs."
Pata noted that November is Native
American Heritage Month and invit-
ed the Jenner and Kardashian family
to "join with the country in learning
more" about American Indian cul-
ture.
An email message to Jenner's repre-
sentative wasn't immediately returned
Friday.
The E! reality star's comment also
drew attention online, with several
bloggers discussing the origin and
derogatory nature of the term "Indian'
giver."
"What it boils down to is misun-
derstandings" that date back more
than 200 years, Indian Country Today
Media Network reported on its web-
site.
Back then, Native. Americans con-
ducted trade using a barter system
and considered gift-giving an exten-
sion of that system. "Europeans, upon
encountering this practice, misun-
derstood it, considering it uncouth
and impolite," said the report, citing
WordOrigins.org.
Earlier this year, the National
Congress of American Indians criti-
cized the use of the code name
"Geronimo" for the operation that


ASSOCIATED PRESS
'Kris Jenner attends a book sigriing for
her memoir, "Kris Jenner . and All
Things Kardashian", at Barnes & Noble
in New York, Friday

killed .Osama bin Laden.
Geronimo was an Apache leader
revered by 'many in the Southwest
NCAI President Jefferson Keel said
at the time that the use of a Native
American term "undermines the mili-
tary service of Native people."

Buffett celebrates
'Parrot Heads' in Keys
KEY WEST About 3,500 fans of
Jimmy Buffett are celebrating the
singer's music and laid-back island
attitude in Key West, Fla.
Attendees at the 20th Parrot Heads
Convention were surprised Friday
afternoon when Buffett made a rare
appearance with his Coral Reefer
Band. He played for more than an
hour. Many of his 15 songs featured
lyrics recalling people and places he
knew while living in Key West during
the 1970s and 80s.
The convention of "Parrot Head"
fans, named for their offbeat tropical
headgear, continues through Sunday.
It will feature more performances


and a charity auction.
Organizers ,say that since 2002,
members of about 200 chapters have
contributed over $20 million and
nearly 3 million volunteer hours to
local and national causes.

Broadway's 'Godspell' is
heaven-sent for cast
NEW YORK One was waiting
tables at a Times Square seafood res-
taurant. Another was in Disney films
and on tour with the Jonas Brothers.
A third had performed at Carnegie
Hall;, but wondered when she'd land
theater's biggest prize.
All three George Salazar, Anna
Maria Perez de Tagle and Celisse
Henderson are overjoyed to be mak-
ing their Broadway debuts this month
in a revival of Stephen Schwartz's
"Godspell."
"For me, it's a dream come true,"
says Perez de Tagle while the others
nod.
The trio is part of a 10-person cast
that stars Hunter Parish, whose cred-
its include Showtime's "Weeds" and
Broadway's "Spring Awakening," as
-Jesus but also has plenty of young
performers making their first foray
onto a Broadway stage. The hip musi-
cal retelling of the New Testament's
Gospel of Matthew opens Monday at
the Circle in the Square Theatre.
The Tony-nominated score fea-
tures the songs "Day by Day," 'Turn
Back, 0 Man," "Prepare Ye the Way"
and "Light of the World" and the
story updated with modern jokes,
including references to Kanye West
and Occupy Wall Street hits an
infectious, hopeful tone.
"Godspell," which was an off-Broad-
way and Broadway smash in the 1970s
and was made into a film in 1973, has
been a mainstay of church groups,
high schools and colleges ever since.
Performers such as Jeremy Irons,
Zach Braff, Gilda Radner, Madonna,
Queen Latifah, Alice Ripley and Jon
Hamm were in productions as young
people.

ASSOCIATED PRESS


Celebrity Birthdays


'* Nov. 6: Director
Mike Nichols is 80.
Country singer Stonewall
Jackson is 79. Singer
Eugene Pitt of the Jive
Five is 74. Singer PJ.'
Proby is 73. Country
singer Guy Clark is 70.
Actress Sally Field is
65. Singer Glenn Frey is
63. Actress Lori Singer
("Fame," "Footloose') is
54. Actor Lance Kerwin is
51. Bassist Paul Brindley of


The Sundays is 48. Singer
Corey Glover of Living
Colour is 47. Actor Peter
DeLuise ("seaQuest DSV,"
"21 Jump Street") is 45. '
Actor Ethan Hawke is 41.
Actress Thandie Newton is
39. Model-actress Rebecca
Romijn is 39. Actress Nicole
Dubuc ("Major Dad'") is 33.
Actress Taryn Manning is
33. Actress Emma Stone
("Zombieland," "Superbad')
is 23.


Daily Scripture

"This is also why you pay taxes,
for the authorities are God's
servants, who give their full
time to governing."
Romans 13:6 NIV


Lake City
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number..............752-9400
Circulation ............755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, RFla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press. ,
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher .. .754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
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Reporter

BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
Jf you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.








LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 3A



Operation Christmas Child up for big season


More than 16,000
gift boxes were
distribution last year
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.comrn
Around 30 people from
around the region gathered
in western Columbia County
Saturday morning and dedi-
cated more than three hours
of volunteer sweat to chil-
dren from other countries
so they can have the kind of
Christmas many American
children take for granted.
An Operation Christmas
Child "packing party" took
place from 9 a.m. noon
Saturday at the Power
Country radio station, where
volunteers made and pre-
pared shoeboxes that will
be shipped to impoverished


children in other countries.
"People had the oppor-
tunity this week to drop off
items for the shoeboxes,"
said Colleen Ruehl, an
Operation Christmas Child
volunteer serving as the
Suwannee Valley region and
North Central Florida .area
coordinator. "We had scouts,
homeschoolers, youths and
volunteers packing shoe-
boxes."
The volunteers were from
Lake City, McAlpin, Live
Oak, Bronson, Lake City and
several other local areas..
Operation Christmas
Child collections have been
held in this region since
1999. Last year approximate-
ly 16,500 shoeboxes were
collected from the 10-county
area Ruehl serves.
"We can do this because


TUNY l DIM ILaIW Ulc y repotiiei
Operation Christmas'Child volunteers pack shoeboxes with
candy, school supplies and other materials Saturday morning
in preparation for shipping to children abroad.


people from this area under-
stand what its like not to
have," she said. "We under-
stand how important it is
to reach out to our neigh-
bors." ,


Operation Christmas
Child is one of many
Samaritan's Purse projects
run by Franklin Graham,
the Rev. Billy Graham's son.
'"We fill the shoeboxes and


collect them during national
collection week," Ruehl said,
noting this year national col-
lection week will take place
Nov. 14- Nov. 21.
There are 16 collection
sites in the area, a collection
center and 15 relay centers.
All the relay centers send
their shoeboxes to the col-
lection center in Live Oak.
Once in Live Oak the
boxes are checked, pack-
aged in Samaritan cartoons
and taken by transfer truck
to Atlanta, the processing
center for Alabama, Georgia,
Florida and Mississippi.
From there the shoeboxes
are sent to the children.
"The shoeboxes go to
children around the world,"
Ruehl said. "Many of them
are in war-torn situations or
in poverty. The only chil-


dren that get the boxes
more than one time are in
the four Samaritan's Purse
orphanages."
This year the shoebox-
es will be sent to Panama,
Ukraine, Macedonia,
Bahamas, Uganda, Lebanon,
Kenya, Tanzania, Namibia,
Seychelles, Togo, Benin,
Belize, Ecuador, Madagascar
and one undisclosed coun-
try.
"Last year 8.2 million
Operation Christmas Child
shoeboxes that were dis-
tributed around the world,"
Ruehl said.
'That's a new crop of
young children to reach
and show them the love of
America and the love of fel-
low Christians. We have a
40 percent salvation rate in
these countries."


'Holiday Magic' lends helping hand


From staff reports
Want to help premature
babies and their families?
You'll have the chance
at the March of Dimes
Signature Chefs Auction, set
for 5:30 9:30 p.m. Tuesday
at the Rountree Moore
Toyota Showroom, 1232
West U.S. 90.
Sample great food and
wine, hear live music, bid on
a variety of donated items,
many worth hundreds of dol-
lars, and do some good. The


theme is Holiday Magic.
Beyond that, for a $25
donation you can win a shot
at one of three pieces of jew-
elry worth $1,300 and up.
Tickets for the event are
$50 each and are available
at many area' businesses,
including Ward's Jewelers,
First Street Music, Mike's
Cafe & Grille, Suwannee
Democrat, Moe's Southwest
Grill, TD Bank (all locations),
American Pawn Brokers and
Rountree Moore Toyota.


i. '^ ,
k ^ ^ .-""


Courtesy Photos
,A $25 donation can win one of the above pieces of jewelry.


BROADBAND: Funds restored to problematic project

Continued From Page 1A


attract new businesses to
the region frequently
as a result of the lack of
cost-effective broadband
Internet .access," according
to a study touting the need
for high-speed Internet in
the region.
.Existing institutions such


as schools, libraries, hos-
pitals, clinics and public
safety will also benefit from
high-speed Internet.
"It's an immediate impact,
once we have. Lake City
online," Manning said.
Despite recent funding
problems, Manning said


HOMELESS: Kids get help

Continued From Page 1A


When you have a child
. that doesn't eat all week-
end it takes him or her
until Wednesday to feel full
again and be able to focus on
school, she said.
Five schools in the county
have a backpack program
Where students .are given
nonperishable foods in a
nondescript backpack on
Friday so the students
are not hungry over the
weekend. They return the
backpack on Monday to be
refilled again the following
Friday.
First United Methodist'
Church in Lake City donates
food to children to Summers
Elementary and Columbia
City Elementary schools.'
First Presbyterian Church
in Lake City provides food
to Melrose Park Elementary
School students. Altrusa
members fill weekend
backpacks at Fort White
Elementary.
"They have no idea how
much these families need
this," Huggins said of the
backpack program.
Huggins said elementary
students are easier to iden-
tify as homeless. Parents are
more open about needing
assistance for young chil-
dren, she said. However,
homeless students in middle
and high school are harder
to identify. Huggins said
they often live on their own
and couch surf, sleeping on
sofas of friends and neigh-
bors. Older children might
leave their home because of
abuse, a bad home environ-


ment or were kicked out,
she said.
In 2009, Florida ranked
43rd out of 50 states on
child homelessness, accord-
ing to a report by The
National Center on Family
Homelessness.
Children who are home-
less suffer from high rates
of acute and chronic illness-
es, according to the Florida
Coalition for the Homeless.
They go hungry twice as
often and have three times
the rate of emotional and
behavioral problems as chil-
dren who are not-homeless.
Fewer than 25 percent of
homeless students graduate
from high school according
to the coalition.
Huggins' budget is very
small, she said. The program
receives $45,000 a year in
federal money from the state,
based on the number of
homeless children, she said.
"Donations allow me to
stretch the budget and help
more students," she said.
This year nonprofit Feed
The Children donated back-
packs and school supplies to
the program, she said,.
The biggest need this
time of year are jackets,
shoes and socks, she said.
The program is always look-'
ing for more groups to run
backpack programs in other
schools.
"My biggest thing is mak-
ing these kids more success-
ful. Ift's their way out," she
said.
For more information call
(386)758-4954.


CAMO0
SAdult & Children
Jackets, coveralls,
shirts, overalls, hats,
wildlife cameras,
binoculars


work will quickly resume
because some of the mate-
rials and electronic equip--
ment was purchased prior
to funding being cut off.
"We have a warehouse
full of equipment," he said.
'"We do have towers already.
We just haven't turned the
switch on, yet."
Columbia County
Manager Dale Williams


said the project will help
rural counties compete
with larger municipalities
for new employers. It will
also reduce the time spent
retrieving and sharing data.
"I think it's extremely
important," Williams said.
"From the county's per-
spective, the ability to com-
municate with the world is
extremely important"


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ROONEY: Dies at 92

Continued From Page 1A


Rooney talked on "60
Minutes" about what was in
the news, and his opinions
occasionally got him in trou-
ble. But he was just as likely
to discuss the old clothes
in his closet, why air travel
had become unpleasant and
why banks needed to have
important-sounding names.
Rooney won one of his
four Emmy. Awards for
a piece on whether there
was a real Mrs. Smith who
made Mrs. Smith's Pies. As
it turned out, there was no
Mrs. Smith.


"I obviously have a knack
for getting on paper what a
lot of people have thought
and didn't realize they
thought," Rooney once said.
"And they say, 'Hey, yeah!'
And they like that"
Looking for something
new to punctuate its week-
ly broadcast, "60 Minutes"
aired its first Rooney com-
mentary on July 2, 1978.
He complained about
people who keep track of
how many people die in
car accidents on holiday
weekends.


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NOTICE OF MEETING
UTILITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
CITY OF LAKE CITY

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Utility Advisory Committee for the City
of Lake City, Florida will hold a meeting on Wednesday, November 9, 2011 at 6:00 P.M.,
in the Council Chambers located on the second floor of City Hall at 205 North Marion Avenue,
Lake City, Florida.

THE PURPOSE OF THE MEETING IS AS FOLLOWS:
Kickligher Wastewater Treatment Plant (update)
Meter Exchanges & AMI Upgrade (presentation)
Abandonment of Elevated Tank #1
Bullard Property

All interested persons are invited to attend.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: If you require special aid or services as addressed in the
American Disabilities Act, please contact the City Manager's Office at (386) 719-5768.

AUDREY E SIKES
City Clerk


Indvdual results may vary.













OPINION


Sunday, November 6,201 I


OUR
OPINION



More


good


works

he good folks
at Operation
Christmas Child.
were at it again this
morning.
SThirty, or more, all volun-
teers, gathered for a "packing
party" to prepare shoeboxes of
toys and other items for ship-
Sment to impoverished-children
around the globe.
Last year the group collected
more than 16,000 such pack-
ages from a 10-county region
including Columbia. This year
Sthe total may go even higher.
SIts truly a heartfelt gesture,
*. especially considering the pov-
*,erty we face here at home.
'We can do this because peo-.
ple from this area understand
what it's like notto have," area
organizerr Colleen Ruehi said
:"We understand how important'
-. it is to reach out t, our'neigh-
-bors." "
Well said.
Good job, all.

H I G H LIG H TS
I IN HISTO RY

S Today is Sunday, Nov. 6, the
S310th day of 2011. There are 55
days left in the year.
On this date:
In 1860, former Illinois con-
gressman Abraham Lincoln
*; defeated three other candi-
dates for the presidency: John
,Breckinridge,John Bell and
Stephen Douglas.
In 1861, Confederate
-President Jefferson Davis was
elected to a six-year term of
office.
In 1888, Benjamin Harrison"
Swon the presidential ejec-
tion. defeating incumbent
Grover Cleveland with enough
electoral votes, even though
Cleveland led in the popular
vote.
,In 1893, composer Peter
'Ilyih Tchaikovsky died in St
Petersburg, Russia, at age 53.
In 1900, Presid&ntWilliam
McKinley was re-elected, beat-
ing Democrat William Jennings
Bryan.
Associated Press.

Lake City Reporter'
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished witpride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
.strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
S Our primary goal is to
*publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
.dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
S Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president-
Tom Wood, chairman

: LETTERS
S POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
Spaced. Letters should not exceed
. 400 words and will be edited for
Length and libel. Letters must be
Assigned and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
Verification: Writers can have two
Letters per month published. Letters
Sand guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
Sthe Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
:180 E.'Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


righ

R ick Santorum has
announced his
"Faith, Family and
Freedom" tour in
Iowa.
Santorum may be drag-
ging the rear in the line-up of
Republican presidential candi-
dates, but I am grateful to him
for being the only candidate
who insists that the so-called
"social issues" remain an inte-
gral, explicit part of his agenda.
That's not to say that the
other conservative candidates
disagree with Santorum's take
on these issues traditional
values; abortion, marriage but
Santorum has been. the only
one to insist that you cannot
consider the economy indepen-
dent of the way the-individual
human beings'who makeup the
'economy behave.
Polk County Republican,
Chairman Kevin McLaughlin,
in Iowa takes issue with
S'ntorum's insistence on push-
ing, the social agenda.
McLaughlin says, and he's
far from alone on this, that can-
didates at this time should just
be talking about the "stuff that
is putting money in people's.
pockets."
.Santorum insists that there'
is a "moral component" to eco-
nomic problems and that claims
that one can be discussed mean-
ingfully without the other are
bogus.
,Consider for a moment the
morass in which Herman Cain
has found himself in recent '
days. . .
Let's look beyond what Cain.
may or.may not have done.
Lets just look at the platform
from which he is being attacked
and which, at least for the


on the issues
on 1ss


Star Parker
parker@urbancure.org
moment, is giving indigestion to
his explosively successful presi-
dential run.
Sexiial harassment and sexual
discrimination law is part of the
Civil Rights Act of 1964.
The definition of sexual
harassment has expanded and
become increasingly vague over
the years, and increasing power
has been granted to complain-
ants to sue for damages.
What has happened is, like
the whole agenda associated
with race, that a profoundly
serious moral issue has become
politicized and, rather than the
law being the focal point for
dealing with a bona fide moral
problem, it has become just
another entitlement platform.
" We how live in an entitle-
ment culture where at minimal
personal:costs to the claimant,
people can frivolously sue for
what they claim is their due.
A journalist writing about the
Cain case noted that in his own
office, he avoids all personal"
statements about appearance
with female employees, like
commenting about a new hair-
style.
In an interview segment,
CNN's Erin Burnett asked Newt
Gingrich if it is fair game to be
checking "morality in a presi-
dential candidate."
But is this really-about moral-


ity?
No. Ifs about a society,that
on the one hand wants to claim
there is no place for traditional
values in the public space but at
. the same time wants a society
that is fair and just
* If religion and traditional .
values are not the standard and
if personal responsibility is not
the means, how do you get from
point A to point B?
The answer is politicians and
bureaucrats write laws and reg-
ulations that allegedly achieve
these just ends.
The result is we get a society
that spends almost $1 trillion
a year on lawsuits, $1.5 trillion
a year complying with regula-
tions, and less and less on moral
quality.
We get a society that tolerates
a million abortions a year but
will bear hundreds of billions
of dollars of costs in frivolous
lawsuits, motivated by alleged
fairness and justice.
We live under the costly illu-
sion that we can write rules and
laws that will displace traditional
truths and personal responsibility.
Oilman J. Paul Getty once,
said thathe didn't believe in
contracts because if he was
dealing with an honest man he
didn't need one and if he was
dealing with a crook, it didn't
matter.
I think it is a sign of our
deeply troubled and lost society
that so many don't grasp the
validity of Santorum's claim that
morality and economy cannot
be separated.
Star Parker is president of
CURE, Coalition on Urban,
Renewal and Education
(www.urbancure.org) and author of
three books.


War of the Worlds,' the


sequel

worried about
triggering
w another "War
of the Worlds,"
the Federal
Emergency Management
Agency at the last minute has
scaled back its plan for the first
simultaneous nationwide test of
the Emergency Alert System.
The test still scheduled for
2 p.m. EST Wednesday, was
planned to halt all programming
for 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. That
was the guidance FEMA sent
last month to 3.5 million partici-
pants, including radio and TV
broadcast stations, wireless and
cable TV systems, and satellite
radio and TV providers.
Only problem: Not all cable
systems have the equipment
needed to run a text message at
the bottom of the screen describ-
ing the alert as only a test.
That means those who are
hearing impaired or other-
wise miss the audible "test"
announcement before and after
programming stops might think
the nation was under an actual
threat of an imminent nuclear
attack, massive asteroid strike
or another cataclysm the system
is intended to signal.


*0O


Tomb trouble


Lisa Hoffman
lisahoffman@shns.com


No doubt mindful of
panic spawned by the 1938
radio broadcast of a fictional
attack by Martians on New
York,'the National Cable
and Telecommunications
Association on Nov. 3 called on
the government to postpone
the test to forestall any panic.
Anxiety also surfaced from
assorted local police and gov-
ernment officials wary.of a fear-
ful citizenry.
So FEMA, in concert with
the Federal Communications
Commission, has decided to
shorten the test to 30 seconds.
Even so, it acknowledges glitch-
es and public fear may result.
In fact according to blog posts,
some T-Mobile subscribers got
an early and inadvertent taste of
the test when their smartphones'
ominously emitted a siren-like


sound Friday, then vibrated and
displayed a message that said
"Presidential Alert" and, in small-
er letters, 'Test"
* *
Four days before the 10th
anniversary of the 9/11 terror
attacks in which civil servants
died in New York City and at
the Pentagon the American
Legion blasted a House bill to
honor with a U.S. flag those
civilian federal workers who are
killed in the line of duty.
The Legion objected that
the measure would effectively
diminish a similar honor given
to fallen troops, causing law-
makers skittish about insulting
the military to back off.
This past week, the House
passed the bill, which specifies
that the only civilian feds merit-
ing a flag would be those who
were on the job when they were
killed in a natural disaster, by
criminal or terrorist act or oth-
erwise deemed by the president
to be worthy of the token. And
absolutely no military-style buri-
al honors would be allowed.
Next up: the Senate, where
no vote has been scheduled.
* Scripps Howard News Service


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


To all

who've

served,

thanks

F riday is Veterans
Day, a day when
everyone should
pause and reflect
on what we have
because of the commitment of
those who have worn the uni-
'forn of this country. '
We have freedom and the
Strongest framework of democ-
racy the world has ever known.
Our system works because
when challenged throughout
history, there have always
been men and women willing
to stop what they were doing
and answer their country's .
call.
Military service has played
a key role in shaping this
country during peacetime,.
as well. Wearing the uniform
and answering the call has
built character in individuals
in strong ways not obtained
through any other experience.
According to the U.S. ,
Census Bureau's 2010 sta-
tistics, there are 21.8 million
veterans in the country today.
These include veterans who
have served from World War II
to the present
Here are some interesting
numbers offering a more spe-
cific look at our veterans.
There are 1.6 million
female veterans in the U.S.
9 million U.S. veterans .
are age 65 or older.
1.7 million are under the
age of 35.
There are 2.1 million
World War II veterans in
the U.S. These are men and
women who answered the call
specifically from 1941-1945.
2.6 million men and
women served in'the Korean
War between 1950-1953.
:- There are 7.6 million
Vietnam-era veterans. The
Vietnam era is defined as
service between the years of
1964-1975. '
4.8 million veterans
served during the Gulf War,.
which represents service
between Aug. 2, 1990 to the
present
There, are 5.5 million vet-
erans who served during other
time periods in history that are
Classified as peacetime only.
SAnother interesting fact is
there are 54,000 living veterans
who served during World War,
II, the Korean and Vietnam
wars.
In Florida, we have 1.6 mil-
lion residents who are veter-
ans, a number second in the
country to California's 2 mil-
lion veterans. Texas also has
1.6 million veteran residents.
We all know veterans and
their medical services play
a very important role in the
daily lives of many residents
and visitors in Lake City.
The Veterans Administration
Domiciliary provides much-
needed housing facilities for
our treasured veterans in need
of care.
The VA Medical Center is
not only a major employer
locally, but it also serves as the
hub of medical care for qualify-
ing veterans in North Florida
and South Georgia. It serves
a need and allows a grateful
nation to offer medical atten-
tion to those who served.
Anywhere we live in this
country, we're linked to veter-
ans and their dedication. More
than the statistics about veter-


ans, we need to focus on one
word directed toward these
men and women: Thanks.
* Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Rick Santorum is









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 5A


Business

owners to

pay more

to jobless

By GARY FINEOUT
Associated Press
TALIAHASSEE Flor-
ida's businesses that are
already grappling with the
toll of the recession and
a high unemployment rate
could get hit with a massive
tax hike next year.
In a move that some
fear could hamper a fragile
recovery now under way,
nearly 460,000 businesses
across the state will have to
pay higher unemployment
taxes. The news comes as
Gov. Rick Scott continues
to push creating jobs in the
state by lowering costs for
businesses.
For two years, state law-
makers have pushed back
significant hikes in the
state's unemployment com-
pensation taxes. But, pre-
liminary figures released
Thursday show the mini-
mum tax rate for employ-
ers is expected to jump
from $72.10 per employee
to more than $170 per
employee. The maximum
rate is also expected to
rise from $378 to $459 per
employee.
This is a big deal," said
David Hart, executive vice,
president of the Florida
Chamber of Commerce,
"The last thing we ought to
be doing is putting addition-
al burdens on employers."
The tax hike is not totally
unexpected since it was
state legislators who have
delayed previous- increas-
es.
Out-of-work Floridians
collect unemployment com-
pensation benefits. But the
problem is that the. trust
fund used to pay those ben-
efits has been drained as
nearly a million Floridians
have remained out of work.
Florida's unemployment
rate is now 10.6 percent.
Since 2009, the state
has been forced to borrow /
$2.4 billion from the fed-.
eral government to keep
the trust fund solvent


Bear Creek to bring bands, artists to Live Oak


LIVE OAK The-Bear Creek
Music and Art Festival is one of
the largest, most talked about
and unique music festivals in
America. Held at the Spirit of
the Suwannee Music Park in
Live Oak on the banks of the
famed Suwannee River, this fes-
tival is set for Nov. 10-13
With more than 97 bands on
multiple stages, the 5th Annual
Bear Creek Music and Art
Festival will offer everything
from rock, funk, jam, jazz and
hip-hop to world fusion.
Artists this year include
Trey Anastasio (lead singer for
Phish) Band, Medeski, Scofield,
Martin & Wood, Galactic, The
Funky Meters, Medeski Martin.
& Wood, Karl Denson's Tiny
Universe (two shows), John
Scofield & Piety Street, Ivan
Neville's Dumpstaphunk (two
shows), George Porter Jr. &


The Runnin Pardners, Beats
Antique (two shows), Russell
Batiste Band, Lettuce (two
shows), Big Gigantic, Garage A
Trois, Russell Batiste Band, Jon
Cleary: Piano, Bass & Drums;
Soulive, The New Mastersounds
(two shows),
Anders Osborne
Trio, The Coup
featuring Boots.
Riley (two shows),
The Trio (Porter,
Vidacovich,
Hartswic k) ,
Jacob Fred Jazz
Anastasio Odyssey, Skerik,
Fred Wesley, Dr.
Lonnie Smith (two
shows), Marco Benevento Trio
(two shows), The Lee6 Boys,
Zach Deputy (two shows), Pimps
of Joytime (two shows), Hairy
Apes BMX, Chali 2'na Band,
Break Science, Breakestia (two,


FBI investigation of

dead child switches

focus to Indiana


Associated Press
PORT CANAVERAL
- -The FBI's investiga-
tion into the death, of a
newborn found aboard a
Carnival cruise ship has
been moved from Tampa
to Indiana.
An FBI spokesman
told the Orlando Sentinel
Friday that the' case has
been moved -to the north-
west part of Indiana where
the 20-year-old mother
lives. Supervisory Special
Agent Robert Ramsey says


the law allows for'the move
since the baby was born in
international waters.
An employee of the
Carnival Dream ship found
the dead' newborn in a
guest cabin on Oct. 12. The'
ship had been docked in St.
Maarten at the time. It later
returned to Port Canaveral
in central Florida for the
investigation.
. The cause and manner
of death have not yet been
determined. The mother
has not been identified.


shows), Eric Krasno & Chapter
2,The London Souls (two
shows), Spam All-Stars, Honey
Island Swamp Band, Corporal.
Boil, Yo Mama's Big Fat Booty
Band, Orgone, Papadosio (two
shows), Jennifer Hartswick
Band, Snarky Puppy, Nigel Hall,
Honey Island Swamp Band,
Shane Pruitt Band (two shows),
Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad
(two shows), Rubblebucket,
Juno What?!, Sister Sparrow and
the Dirty, Birds (two shows),
Van Ghost, Gramatik, Zoogma,
Underground System (two
shows), Sub Swara, Shak Nasti,
3rd Stone, Turkuaz (two shows),
Catfish Alliance, Greenhouse
Lounge, Dopapod, Flight Risk,
Zongo Junction (Two Shows),
Strange Arrangement (Two
Shows), The Last- Straw, Trial
By Stone, Jazz Chronic, Green
Sunshine, DJ Craig, Heneveld,


Monozygotik,, Scott Campbell
Band, Earphunk, Cypress, Klob,
Saint Francis, Gaslight Street,
Corporal Boil, Betsy Franck
& the Bare Knuckle Band and
Artists at Large Will Bernard,
Topaz, Freekbass, Roosevelt
Collier, Scott Messersmith,
Jamie McLean, Nikki Glaspie,
Michelle Sarah, Shady Horns
with Sam Kininger and Ryan
Zoidis.
.Music will. begin Wednesday
night, Nov. 9, with 7 bands play-
ing in the Music Hall. Thursday,
Nov..10, the event will increase
to 4 stages and 16 bands. Many
of the bands playing twice at
Bear Creek will be scheduled
Thursday night. Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 11 & 12, perfor-
mances will be from 6 stages and
a Silent Disco/DJ tent. Sunday,
Nov. 13, the event winds down
with a 4-stage format.


lfor 5un, yr Ulm V II

First Presbyterian Church WORSHIP
.697 SW Baya Dr. Lake City, Florida Contemporary Worship 9:00am
'752-0670 fpclc@bellsouth.net Traditional Worship 11:00 am
www.fpclc.org Sunday School 10:00am


OBITUARIES
GenevieveS summers Buie i
Nelson

Mrs. Genevieve Summers Buie
Nelson, 94, of Lake City died
Saturday, November 05, 2011 at
her residence following a brief
illness. Born, on December 22,
1916 to the late Mattie "Patsy"
and Samuel D. Summers, Mrs.
Nelson had been a resident of
Lake City for her entire life. She
graduated from Columbia High
School Class of 1934, and at-
tended Florida State College for
Women where she was a member
of Kappa Delta Sorority. Mrs.
.Nelson was an active member of
First United Methodist Church,
United Methodist Women, Past-
President of Lake City Woman's
Club, and was a Director of Co'-
lumbia Bank for more than 30
years. She was preceded in death
by her brother, Powell Summers,
and husbands, G.A. 'Buie, Jr.,
Clifton Howell, and Curt Nelson.
Mrs. Nelson is survived by her
daughter, Betty 'Pat (Tommy)
Witt, Lake City; son, Archie
(Carolyn) Buie, Lakeland; three
granddaughters, Gigi (Troy)
Register, and. Patti (Darin)
Summerlin, both of Lake City,
and Maribeth Buie of Orlando;
grandson, Ben (Karen) Buie
of Lakeland; five great-grand-
children, Witt Register, Calla-
han Register, Buie Summerlin,
Wittleigh Summerlin, and Rema
Summerlin, all of Lake City;
special caregivers, Louise Perry,
Tracey Young, -Patty Moore,
Sereta Butler, Jennifer Pierce,
Florine Shonk, Angela Hutson.
Funeral services for Mrs. Nelson
will be conducted on Tuesday,
November, 8, 2011-at 11:00 A.M.
in the First United Methodist
Church with the Reverend Jeff
Tate, Pastor officiating. Inter-
ment will follow at Forest Lawn
Memorial Gardens Cemetery.
Visitation with the family will be
held from 5:00-7:00 P.M. Mon-
day, evening at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests donations be made to First
United Methodist Church, 973
South Marion Avenue, Lake City,
FL 32025. Arrangements are un-
der the direction of GATEWAY-
FOREST LAWN FUNERAL
HOME, 3596 South Highway
441, Lake City. (386) 752-1954.
Please sign the guest book at
*www.gatewayforestlawn.com
Obituaries. are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6,2011

Honoring the educators


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Rep
Former teacher Florence Pierce thanks students for honoring the retired Niblack Elementar
School educators.


City Councilman Jake Hill
watches as Lake City Police
Chief Argatha Gilmore
expresses her regret over
'not being able to thank her
porter elementary school teachers
y. and how touched she was
when students honored their
former teachers.
I at a;*' *' A ".,.i


Top left, Pastor Willie J. Cooper, of Freewill Church of God in
Christ, shakes hands with retired educator Will Brown Oct. 28'
at the Pioneers of Education event held at Minnie J. Niblack
Elementary School. Active Richardson High School/Columbia
High, School Class of 1975 members honored their elemen-
tary school teachers for all that they did for their students.
Class president Conrad Wallace echoed the sentiment, and
thanked all who made the day possible.
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Keynote speaker Pastor Norman Wilson
Sr., of Freedom Hall Church of the Living
God in Orlando, gestures as he delivers
anfimpassioned speech to former educa-
tors.


P '" ^

JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff Mark Hunter jokes while making a speech at the, Pioneers of
Education event.


Courtesy Photo
A 1960 photograph of educators, some ov/oim were present to be honored at the Pioneers
of Education event.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS FOR THE
ENACTMENT OF CITY COUNCIL RESOLUTION
NO. 2011-095 BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE
CITY OF LAKE CITY, FLORIDA TO DESIGNATE
A BROWNFIELD AREA PURSUANT TO-THE
PROVISIONS OF SECTION 376.80,
FLORIDA STATUTES.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Section 166.041, Florida.Statutes, that
the proposed Resolution, the title of which appears below, will be considered on
first reading for adoption on the 7th day of November, 2011, at the City Council
meeting commencing at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers o.n the second.
floor of the City Hall, 205 North Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055, and
will be considered on second and final reading for adoption on the 21st day of
November, 2011, at the City Council meeting commencing at 7:00 p.m. in the
City Council Chambers on'thq second floor of the City Hall, 205 North Marion
Avenue, Lake City, Florida 32055: A copy of said Resolution. may be inspected-
'by any member of the public at the office of the City Clerk on the first floor of the
'City Hall. At the aforementioned meeting, all interested parties may appear and
be heard with respect to this proposed Resolution.

CITY COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 2011-095

A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA, AUTHORIZING THE CITY TO PARTICIPATE IN THE .FLORIDA
BROWNFIELDS REDEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROVIDED FOR IN AND
AUTHORIZED BY THE "BROWNFIELDS REDEVELOPMENT ACT" (THE
"ACT") CREATED UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF SECTIONS 376.77- 376.85
FLORIDA STATUTES, AS AMENDED; DESIGNATING' CERTAIN' LANDS
WITHIN THE CITY LOCATED AT 3072 WEST U. S. HIGHWAY 90, LAKE CITY,
FLORIDA, AND IDENTIFIED AS PROPERTY APPRAISER'S PARCEL NUM-
BER 35-3S-16-02582-001, AS A BROWNFIELD AREA FOR THE PURPOSE
OF ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION, REHABILITATION AND ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE ACT; PROVIDING FOR NOTI-
FICATION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION OF
THE CITY'S DECISION TO DESIGNATE A BROWNFIELD AREA FOR REHA-
BILITATION; PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

Any interested party shall be advised that the date, time and. place of any con-
tinuation of the'public hearing shall be announced during the public hearing and
that no further notice concerning the matter will be published.

All persons are advised that, if they decide to appeal any decision made at the
public hearing, they will need a record of the proceedings and, for such purpose,
they may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if any ac-
commodations are needed for persons with disabilities,- please contact Joyce
Bruner, Office of City Manager, 1-386-719-5768.

AUDREY E. SIKES
City Clerk


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For more information call FABULOUS COACH LINES at
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Florida Tax Payers
Please research this information.
With our taxes, Florida School Districts will be testing Biology 1 public,
school students in the spring of 2012 concerning the blasphemous fallacy
of The-Scientific Theory of'Evolution, which is contrary to the Word of God.
It teaches hdminid evolution which flies in the face of the ancestry of
The Virgin Mary and Joseph, who were descendants of King David...
son of Jacob, son of Isaac, son of Abraham...son of Adam, son of God.
,(Compare Matthew 1:1-25 & Luke 3:21-38 versus Florida Biology,1 End-of-
Course Assessment Test, Items Specifications, page 32 SC.7.L15.1; page
52 SC9121.15.10 .
S.http://fcat.fldoe.ora/eoc/pdf/BiologyFL11Sp.pdf)
I challenge the Florida Columbia County School District and all of its teachers
to a public-debate between The Scientific Theory of Evolution and the Holy
Bible. Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339, kbmerriken@hotmail.com
In The Year of our Lord 2011
'. Paid for by Kenny Merriken


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 7A


Cain'

still able

in early

states
By THOMAS BEAUMONT
Associated Press
DES MOINES, Iowa -
Republicans in Iowa and
other earlyvoting states seem
to be giving presidential can-
didate Herman. Cain the ben-
efit of the doubt for now..But
they say they need to know
more about accusations that
he sexually harassed women
who 'worked for him in the,
.1990s.
"It's concerning, but. it's
not a big deal," said Cindy
Baddeloo of suburban Des
Moines. "Nobody's perfect"
She was one of. more Repu
than two dozen undecided he Wa
Republican voters who Amer
were interviewed in Iowa,
'New Hampshire and South. dacy.
Carolina since the allegations Ca
surfaced last weekend. Cain by h
has denied them.. propo
LaDonna Ryggs, 'chair- I'sV
woman of Spartahburg were,
County ,GOP in South altgyt
Carolina, said,. "You givenme endui
some substance to the ques ". tiorn
tions, and then well talk." in an
The: Georgia businessman., w, a
topped a. national poll taken; wit
this past week. But. even before
before the allegations envel- Cain
oped his" campaign, doubts seek
had arisen about his caridi-- with


ASSOCIATED PRESS
blican presidential candidate Herman: Cain gestures as .
alks toward the podium to speak at the Defending the
ican Dream Summit on Friday.


in was sharply critiqued
is rivals over his tax
)sal during a debate in
Vegas last month. There
questions about his loy-
o the GOP base's most
ring litmus test, opposi-
o abortion, after he said
.interview the decision
nmiatter of choice..
th just two .months
-e the Iowa caucuses,
presWumably should be
ng to .close the deal
undecided activists in


the state.
But he's not scheduled
to return to Ilowa for two.
more weeks, and, if he fol-
lows through, he willhave
made just one trip, to the
leadoff, caucus state over.
the course of three minonths.'
Former 'Massachusetts
Gov. Mitt Romney is step-
ping it up in Iowa, Texas
Gov. Rick Perry is gung-
ho on advertising and for-
mer Pennsylvania Sen. Rick
Santorum ,is hitting his
stride.


GM recalls Pontiac G8 models,
Associated #ress. said.
DETROIT- GeneralVotors Co.is recall-1 But the company found that in case of a
'ing 38,400 Pontiac G8 models to reprogram crash, the air-bag sensor could be delayed
te front-passenger air-bag. module. and put some passengers at increased
The Nationallihw Traffic Safety nsk for a head injury GM said crash tests
Administration said Saturday that the air found thht the risk was limited but slightly
1bag modules foi the 2008 and 2009 models higher for small woien sitting in the front
might not comply with federal standards passenger seat..
for head injury protection, GM' dealers will reprogram the sensing
N6 complaints, crashes or injuries have and diagnostic.module at no charge.
been reported related to the issue, GM The G8 'was manufactured in Australia
and imported to the United States.


Second Iraq war veteran

hurt at Occupy Oakland


Associated Press
OAKlAND, Calif. The second Iraq war
veteran hospitalized after' a confrontation
at an Occupy Oakland protest wasn't par-
ticipating in the demonstration when he was
injured and arrested, a friend and colleague
said Saturday.
Kayvan Sabeghi, 32, had joined in a march
the day before but was only trying to get
home when he was beaten by police early
Thursday, said Esther Goodstal, who co-
owns a brewery with Sabeghi in nearby El
Cerrito.
"I saw he had bruises all over his body, and
that'snotright," Goodstal told The Associated
Press in a phone interview. "No one should
treat another human being like this."'
An Oakland police, spokesman didn't


immediately return a call seeking comment
A. Highland Hospital spokesman, said
Sabeghi was. in fair condition Saturday but
released no. further details. Goodstal said
Sabeghi was in the intensive care unit and had
to undergo surgery for a lacerated spleen.
She said he was mostly in good spirits.
Goodstal said Sabeghi took: part in an
Occupy Oakland march to the city's port
Wednesday but left-when it was over.
"After that, he went out with his friend and
had dinner," she said.
When dinner was over, Sabeghi decided
to call it a night because he had to work
Thursday. He was walking home in west
Oakland sofmetimelate Wednesday or early
Thursday when he encountered a line of
police at the protest who wouldn't let him
through, Goodstal sqid.


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8A LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6,2011


THE WEATHER


PARTLY
I r CLOUDY



HI72 L0


A I NPA tLC


ISOLATED PARTLY CHANCE
SHOWERS CLOUDY OWNERS



HI 78 LO 56 HI79LO54 1173LO446


. I 4 U.,. ,


Talahasseed
74/52 ,
Pensacola 0
73/59 Panm CRY
70/54


* Vdsta
72/53
Lake Cty
72/54


*Jacksonvle
71/56


Ganvile Daytoa Beach
74/55 78J63
Ocala*
,77/55
Oland0 Cape Canaeral
S 80/61 79/67


City Monday
Cape Canaveral 80/67 pc


Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Key West
Lake City
Miami
Naples


o/o3/ West Palm Beach Ocala
81/69 Orlando
Ft.Lauderdale Panama City
F. lyerm; 83/72 Pensacola
83/61 Naples Tallahassee
84/64 Mimi Tampa
S 83/70 Valdosta
KeyWest i' -W. Palm Beach
80/73


I aE TY A aLMANAC,


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday 65
Low Saturday 51.
Normal high 77
Normal low 54
Record high, 90 in 1935
Record low 35 in 1945

PRECIPITATION
Saturday ,0.00"
Month total 0.03"
Year total 31.30"
Normal month-to-date 0.35"
Normal year-to-date 43.98"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


6:48 a.m.
5:40 p.m.
6:49 a.m.
5:39 p.m.


80/65/pc
82/71/pc
84/63/s
78/55/pc
75/57/pc
81/72/s
75/55/pc
82/70/pc
83/64/pc
79/57/pc
81/63/pc
72/60/pc
76/60/pc
76/56/pc
83/66/pc
75/54/pc-
81/69/pc


Tuesday
79, 66,'pc
81/65/pi
82/71/pc
84/64/pc
79/57/pc
78/57/pc
81/72/s
78/56/pc
83/70/pc
83/65/pc
81/57/pc
82/63/pc
77/61/pc
77/60/pc
79/55/pc
84/65/pc
77/55/pc
83/69/pc


MOON ultraviolet Ie eaUier
Moonrise today 3:i p.m. radiation isk 0 Channel.
Moonset today 3:07 a.m. for thearea onm 0
ta scale from 0 --
Moonnse tom. 3:42 p.m.n t fo m 0_
Moonset tom. 4:00 a.m.



Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec. Forecasts, data and
10 IS 25 2 >'graphics 02011 Weather
Full Last New First Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
we tWeo, www.weatherpubllsher.com


I-M-4 -I S S-3ED-BB


INATIONAL FORECAST: A cold air mass will remain situated over the West today with scat-
tered rain and snow showers throughout much of the region. Meanwhile, a low pressure
system over southern Canada will spread a few rain and snow showers over northern North -
Dakota and northern Minnesota. High pressure will remain the dominant weather feature over
the East, leading to another dry day.


NAIONL IORCATMA,3p Itoa


Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


10 Ilftl
cK ''1


Saturday Today


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY 4;7,26,0,
Albuquerque 56/41/.08
Anchorage 30 21, )
Atlanta 60.43.0
Baltimore i51/38, 0
Billings 34 28 17
Birmingham 66, 40,'0
Bismarck 47 32,0
Bole 37 27/0
Boston 49/36/0
BufalD 52-.29/0
Charleston SC 61/45/0
Charleston WV 61/29/0
Charlotte 55/37/0
Cheyenne 48/27/0
Chicago 56/34/0
Cincinnati 59/28/0
Cleveland. 55/29/0
Columbia SC 59/45/0
Dallas 67/43/0
Daytona Beach 70/54/0
Denver 60/37/0


HI/Lo/W CITY
55,'35,'s Des Molnes
49/34/pc Detroit
27/13/sn El Paso
62/43/pc Fairbanks
57. 39, Greensboro
39/20/pc* Hartford
69/47,'pc, Honolulu
38;23.p.: Houston
44/2541r Indianapolis
56.41 s Jackson MS
67/44/s Jacksonville
66,.53. p Kansas City
65/39/s Las Vegas
58/40/pc Uttle Rock
37/20/pc Los Angeles
66/52/c Memphis
63/44/s Miami
62/46/s Minneapolis
63/45/pc Mobile -
73/64/t New Orleans
78/63/pc New York '
44/24/s Oklahomi(Clty


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
53/41/0 59/35/pc Omaha*
53/36/0 60/47/s Orlando
67/59/0 67/45/s Philadelphia
18/3/.01 14/1/st Phoenix
51/38/0 57/39/pc Pittsburgh
49/27/0 55/35/s Portland ME
80/76/0 84/71/s Portland OR
71/39/0 89/67/pc Raleigh
56'33. 0 63/47/pc Rapid City
68/40/0 72/54/pc Reno
59/50/0 71/56/pc Richmond
57/43/0 67/47/sh Sacramento
53/40/0 57/42/sh St. Louis
63/51/0 67/54/c Salt Lake City
59/46/0 61/49/sh San Antonio
65/43/0 71/55/pc San Diego
78/60/0 83/70/sh San Francisco
57/40/0 54/35/s Seattle
70/45/0 72/55/pc Spokane
69/50/0 76/63/sh Tampa
48/36/0 57/45/s Tucson
60/40/0 70/59/t Washington


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
58/42/0 57/32/s
70/55/0 80/61/pc
53/36/0 57/43/s,
63/51/.22 68/52/pc"
52'30 0 60/40/s
50/32/0. 54/34/s
45/41/.1,4 49/37/sh
54/38/0 61/42/pc
50/33/0 43/22/pc'
35/20/0 42/24/rs:
54 37 0 5943 D o
52/35/0 57/36/sh
57/37/0 67/53/sh
34/30/.25 38/26/sn
75/41/0 80/67/c'
62/51/.08 62/48/sh
.56/49/0 59/47/sh
48/37/0 .49/39/pc
34,24 0 41/25/pc
73/55/0 82/63/pc
64 43. 18 66/45/pc
53/38/0 58/43/s


* a a
Saturday Today Saturday Today I


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Being
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
-Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
88/75/0 87/76/pc
64/50/0 58/50/pc
62/50/0 68/54/s
61/52/0 65/59/pc
55/48/0 57/40/s
52/39/0 .57/42/s
82/63/0 81/57/s
73/55/0 77/59/s
57/48/0 / 58/51/sh
73/68/0 82/70/pc
46/45/0 49/42/c
88/77/0 83/77/pc
90/79/0 89/77/t


CITY
La Paz
Lima
London
Madrid
Mexico City
MonIreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
63/36/0
72/63/0
59/48/0
54/48/0
72/48/0
45/28/0
34/21/0
79/61/0
84/73/0
86/64/0
46/43/0
88/81/0
63/55/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
63/38/sh
71/62/pc
57/51/sh
58/40/s
75/52/s
55/39/s
26/21/c
79/63/t
05/73/c
87/66/s
43/36/sh
86/75/t
59/49/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thorn
San Juan
Santiago
Sedul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel AvIv
Tokyo
Toronto.
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
81, 61 '0
56k 61,C 0
Is VI 86/77/0
PR 86/77/0
86/50/0
77/59/0
88/77/0
77/63/0
72/57/0
73/61/0
45/32/0
61/48/0
57/36/0.


HI/Lo/W,
73/61/sh
68/54/t'
86/7t/t;
87/76/t"
88/52/s'
61/50/r,
88/77/t,
79/66/pc
72/58/s
71/61/r
.66/45/s
57/44/pc
53/36/s;


KEY TO CONDIONS: c-cloudy, dr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-hazy, i=ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s=sunny,
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts=thunderstorms, w-windy.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lakecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday. November 6. 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS
CHS BOWLING
Team at Food ULion
for donations
Columbia High's
bowling team will be
at Food Lion on U.S.
Highway 90 west in Lake
City from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. today accepting
donations for the trip to
the state tournament
.The team also is
selling raffle tickets for a
$250 gas card as a
fundraiser. Tickets are
$5 for one, $10 for three,
and $20 for 10. The
drawing is Nov. 14.
For details and
tickets, call coach Brian
Saunders at
755-8080, Ext. 148.
CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back.Club
meets Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly nieeting is 7 p.m.
Monday in the teacher's
lounge at the high.
school.
For details, call
club president Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
YOUTH GOLF
Free clinic
offered for girls
A free golf clinic for
girls ages 9-17 will be
offered from 10 a.m. to
noon Saturday at Quail
Heights Country Club.
The instructors are
looking for future
Lady Tiger golfers for
Columbia High.
For details, call coach
Todd Carter or Chet
Carter at 365-7097.
* From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort' White High
soccervs. Newberry High,
7 p.m. (girls-5 p.m.)-
Tuesday
Columbia High
bowling in FHSAA Finals
at Boardwalk Bowl in*
Orlando, TBA
Columbia High
boys soccer at Hamilton
County High, 7 p.m.
Fort White High girls
basketball in Branford
preseason classic, TBA
Wednesday
Columbia High
bowling in FHSAA Finals
at Boardwalk Bowl in
Orlando, TBA
Thursday
Fort White High
soccer vs. Santa Fe High,
7 p.m. (girls-5 p.m.) (may
be rescheduled)
Friday
Columbia High
football at Suwannee
High, 7:30 p.m..
Fort White High
football vs. Santa Fe
High, 7:30 p.m. (may be
moved to Thursday)
Saturday
Fort White High
girls cross country in
Region 1A meet at
Alligator Lake Park in
Lake City, 8:55 a.m.
Columbia High
swimming in FHSAA
Finals at Central Florida
YMCA Aquatic Center in


Orlando, TBA


Gators

escape

Florida beats
Vanderbilt, 26-21,
on homecoming.
By MARK LONG
Associated Press
GAINESVILLE Jeff
Demps took the pitch,
juked a defender and went
untouched for a 52-yard
touchdown in the closing.
minutes.
It provided a sigh of relief
throughout Florida Field.
Demps ran for a career-
high 158 yards and two
touchdowns, including a
long scoring run with 2:13
remaining, and Florida
edged Vanderbilt 26-21 on,
Saturday.
The Gators ended a four-
GATORS continued on 3B


FROM THE SIDELINE



2.11


Brandon Finley
,Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinleyj@lakecityreportercom

SMuch-

needed

victory

be much
~here will

bigger wins
in the history
of Florida
football, but don't
underestimate how
JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter important the Gators'
Florida quarterback Jacoby Brissett (1.7) stretches over Vanderbilt defenders fo score a 26-21 victory over
touchdown Saturday during Florida's homecoming game. Florida beat Vanderbilt 26-21 in order
to break their four-game losing steak. FLORIDA continued on 3B


ay


Tigers beat


Leon, 38-3


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
If success can be mea-
sured by making the play-
offs,. coach Brian Allen's.
promise to the Columbia
High football team has
come true. With a 38-3 win
at Leon High on Friday,
the Tigers qualified for the
playoffs as the District 4-6A
runner-up.
Columbia (6-3, 4-1 dis-
trict) finished in a tie with
Ridgeview High, but the
Panthers 'own the head-to-
head tie-breaker. The Tigers
will travel to St Augustine
for the first round of the
playoffs. Ridgeview will
host Bartram Trail.
Getting to the playoffs
is not Allen's only goal. He
wants the Tigers to make
noise once arriving.
If Friday's win was a pre-
view, the Tigers could do
just that. '
Columbia has allowed
six points in three games
- wins over Middleburg,
Orange Park and Leon. A
penalty that the head ref-


eree later called and apolo-
gized to coach Allen about
after the game resulted in
Orange Park's only points.
A fumble deep in Tiger ter-
ritory allowed Leon to score
it's only points, on the lions'
opening drive.
Columbia's defense
owned Leon from that
point.
The Tigers' offense also
had one of its most produc-
tive games of the season.
A three-headed monster
at running back produced
263 combined yards by an
offensive line that is com-
ing into its own after a slow
start to the season.
Braxton Stockton led all
rushers with 18 carries for
95 yards, but Rakeem Battle
and Ronald Timmons didn't
lack far behind.
Battle carried, the ball
only 10 times but averaged
7.7 yards per carry for 77
yards total. Timmons ran
for 91 yards on 14 carries.
Quarterback Jayce
Barber also had one of his
CHS continued on 2B


JEN CHASTEEN/Special to the Reporter
Columbia High's Braxton Stockton looks for an opening during the Tigers' 38-3 win against
Leon High in Tallahassee on Friday.


Fort White

no match for

Trinity Catholic


Five fumbles
doom Indians
in district loss.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
OCALA- The only thing
worse than being scheduled
as a homecoming opponent
is to play like one.
Fort White High served
up a 49-14 celebration for
Trinity Catholic High in
Ocala on Friday.
The Indians lost five fum-
bles, with the first one com-


ing on the second play of
the game. Trinity Catholic
quickly turned it into an
11-yard touchdown run by
Andre Johnson and a 7-0
lead one minute into the
District 3-3A showdown.
After a punt, Austin
McClellan broke a 40:yard
scoring run. The Indians
fumbled away the kickoff
and the ball was returned
30 yards to the 1. Demonta
Blunt scored the second
touchdown in 25 seconds
for the Celtics.
INDIANS continued on 2B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Soron Williams (21) struggles to stay on his feet as Rickards High's Malik Slater
(45) drags him down during the Indians' Homecoming game on Oct. 28.


-- /I I I





----










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
3 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Texas
500, at Fort Worth,Texas
GOLF
4:30 p.m.
TGC Champions Tour, Charles
Schwab Cup,Championship, final round,
at San Francisco
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED MotoGP World
Championship, at Valencia, Spain
6 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP Moto2, at Valencia,
Spain (same-day tape)
NFL FOOTBALL
SR p.rn.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Baltimore at Pittsburgh
'RUNNING
2 p.m.
NBC New York City Marathon
(same-day tape)


SOCCER
9p.m.
ESPN MLS, pTayoffs, conference
final, Real Salt Lake at Los Angeles
WOMEN'S COLLEGE SOCCER
4:30 p.m.
FSN -- Big 12 Conference,
championship match, at San Antonio

Monday
NFL FOOTBALL
8&30 p.m.
ESPN Chicago at Philadelphia
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS N.Y. Islanders at Boston

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


Buffalo
New England
N.Y.Jets
Miami .

Houston
Tennessee
lacksonville
Indianapolis

Pittsbuigh '
Cincinrnti
BiiL.more
Cleveland


Kanras City
San Diego
Oaklarnd
Denver


East
W L.
5 2
5 2
4 3
0. 7
South
W L
5 3
4 3
2 6.
' Nort6
'W "
"6 2
5 2
52
3 4
West
W L
4 3.
4 .3
4 3
2 5


TPct PF. PA
0.714 211147
0.714 202160
0,571 172152
0.000 107166

T Pct PF PA
0 .625 206145
0:571"(39145 .
0. 250 98 163
0 000 121252

TPct PF PA
0 750 176139:
(0 714 171123
0 714 185110,
0 429 107140

TPct PF PA
0 571 128170
0 571 161159
0.571 160178
0 286 133200


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
S W L. TPct, PFPA
N.Y. Giants .5 2' 0.714 1741664
Philadelphia" '3 4 00.429 179f52
Dallas. 3 4 0.429 156162
Washington -3 4 0"429"116139
South
W L TPctP'F PA
New Qrleans 5 3 0'.625 260189
.Tampa Bay 4. 3 0.571 131169
Atlanta 4 3 0:571 158163
Carolina .2 6t 0 .250 187207
North -
S W L TPct .PF PA
Green Bay 7 0 01.000 230141
Detrqit 6 2 0,.750 239147


Chicago 4 3
Minnesota 2 6
West
W L
San Francisco 6 I
Seattle 2 5
St. Louis I 6
Arizona I 6


0.571 170150
0.250 172199

TPct PF PA
0.857 187107
0.286 109162
0.143 87 192
0.143 143183


Today's Games
Seattle at Dallas, I p.m.
Miami at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tampa. Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Cleveland at Houston, I p.m.
San Francisco atWashington, I p.m.
N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, I p:m.' -
Atlanta at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Denver at Oakland,,4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Green Bay at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
St Louis atArizdna,4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New EnglInd, 4:15 p.m,
SBaltimore at Pittsborgh, 8:20 p.m.
S Monday's Game .
qChlago at Philadelphia, 8:30,p.m: -
Open. Caroilina, Detroit. Jacksonville,
innesota '
Thursday's Game
Oakland at San Dlogo, 8:20 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 13
Buffalo at Dallas, I p.m.
Denver at Kansas City, I p.m. m.
Washington at Miami I p.m..
St. Louis at Cleveland, I p,..
Arizona at Philadelphla. I 'p.m.
Tennessee at Carolina, I pm. .
Pitsburgh at Cinqinnati, I p.m.
Hoidston'a2tTampa Bay, I p.m.
New Orleans at Atlanta, I p.m.
Jacksonville at IndIanapolis, I p.m.
Baltimore at Seattle, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 415 p m.
New England at N YJets. 820 p m -.
Monday, Nov. 14
Minnesota at Green Bay, 8-30 p m

-College scores '

Friday
Kent St 24, Cent. Michigan 21
Southern Cal 42, Colorado 17

AUTO RACING


Race week

NASCAR SPRINT CUP
AAATEXAS 500
Site: Fort Worth,Texas.
Schedule: Today, race, 3 p.m. (ESPN,:
2-7 p.m.).
I Track: Texas Motor Speedway (oval,
1.5 miles).
SRace distance: 501 miles, 334 laps.

AAA Texas 500 lineup
SAc Texas Motor Speedway
Fort Worth.Texas '"
Friday, qualifying race today
(Car number Irn parentheses) "
I (16) Greg Biffle. Ford, 193.736.
2.(6) David Ragan, Ford, 193.729.
3 l7) Mi Kenseth. Ford. 193 659
4 .27), Paul Menard. Chevrolet.
193.437. .
5. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevroleta
193.257.: 1,
6.. (00) David, Reutimann. Toyota,
193.181. ".
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 193071.
S8. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge.
193023
9 (41 Kasey Kahne,Toyota. 192.947.,
'0. '(78)' Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
192.892, '. *" : **
II. (48) Jimmie Johnson. Chevrolet,
12.871. ,.
'-12. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,
192.8161 '
3, 3(21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 192.599.
14.(22)kurt Busch, Dodge, 192.472.
15.3(42) Juan Pablo MontoyaqChevrolet,
192.362. :
16. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
S192.13.
17, (18) Kyle BuschToyota, 192.123;
18. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet.


192.123.
19. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota,
191.986.
20. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 191.918.
21. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet,
191.646.
22. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
191.571.
23. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
191.564.
24. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
191.421.
25. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota, 191.299.
26. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford,
191.252.
27.(55) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 191.069.
28. (I I) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
190.995.
29., (51) lndon Cassill, Chevrolet,
190.638. ..
30. (5) Mark' Martin,;" Chevrolet,
190:436, :' '
31. (1)' Jeff Burtron. Chevrolet,
190.389.
32. (47) Bobby Labonce. 'Toyotu.
190.221. ,
33. (13) Casey Mears,Toyota, 190.221.
34.-(34) David Gilliland, Ford, 190.02.
35. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
189.74. ,
36. (35) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,
189.64. . '
S37. (32).Mike Bliss, Ford, 188.904.
..38. (37) MikeSfklnner. Ford, 188.904.
39 (46) Scott Speed. Ford, 188.679.;
40. (87) Joe Nemechek. Toyota, 188.6.
41 (38) Travis Kvapil. Ford, Owner
Points.-. :,,, .
42 (36) Geoffrey Bodine. Chevrolet,
Owner Points
43. (7 1) Andy Lally. Ford. 188.528.
Failed to Qualify
44 (30) David Stremrpe. Chevrolet.
'188357. ,
45 (95) David Starr. Ford. 188 344
46 (7) Reed Sorenson. Dodge.
S18: .182. .

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Friday's Games
Washington 5, Carolina I
Buffalo 2, Calgary I
Montreal 2, Ottawa I
Tampa Bay 5, Chicago 4, OT
St. Louis 3,Vancouver 2
SDallas 7, Colorado 6; OT
Saturday Games
Boston at Todronto (n)
Buffalo at Ottawa (n)
SWinnipeg at New Jersey (n)
Washington at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Montreal at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Columbus at Philadelphia (n)
Anaheim at Detroit (n)
SL Louis at Minnesota in)
Edmonton at Phoenix (n ,
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles (n) .::
N"shville at San Jose (rn) -
Today's Games
Dallas at Carolina. 1-30 p.m ." '
Tampa Bay at Florida. 5 pm
Winnipeg at N.Y. Rangers, 7pm p
Vancouver a ,Chlcagi. 7 p m.
Calgar/ at Colorado. 8pm '
Monday's Games
N Y Islanders at Boston. 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose. 10:30 pm.

SOCCER .

MLS playoffs

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Championship
S-rToday
Sporting Kansas City. vs. Houstdn,
5:30 p.m. ..
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Championship
Today
Real Salt Lake at Log Angeles. 9 p.m.
MLS CUP
Sunday, Nov. 20
At Carson. Calif : .
Conference champions, 9 pm


CHS: Tigers qualify fo payoffs
Continued From Page 1B


best, games completing
10-of-17 passes fori 167
yards and two touchdowns.
His favorite" target ,on the
night was Nigel Atkinson,,
whoQ finished with' five,
catches for 97 yards. It was
his biggest receiving "day
as a Tiger.
Aweek'after being penal-
ized 17 times, the Tigers cut
that number down to seven.
Columbia also; forced turn-
overs on defense including
a 95-yard' return by Trey
Marshall.
"The important thing is,
we've been successful, but
we're still seeing things
that we can do to get bet-
ter," Allen said. "We're still
young."
And Allen's defense is a
big part of that success.
"I told them that if we can
just get 17 points, that'd be
'enough to win," Allen said.
"The 'defense has contin-
ued to get better and now
we've had back-to-back-to-
back great defensive per-
formances. I'm extremely
proud of this bunch.".
Allen wants to keep the'
momentum going as the
Tigers head to Live Oak
to take on the Suwannee
Bulldogs in the Annual
Battle for .the Oaken
Bucket It's a game that
Allen 'has had circled
since the beginning of the


.season
"I've had 'A Country Boy.
Can Survive' as my ring'
tone since I signed on the
dotted llne in March," Allen
said. ."That's their 'niotto'
in ,ive Oak. This game
is one that it doesn't mat-
ter what the record is. It's
like Florida/Florida State.
We know the kids' from
Suwannee are going to be
motivated. They want to




:' Unscramble these four'Jumbles,
.one, letter to .each square,4 -
to form four ordinary words.

I GTRIE I


ATIGNP,



A:
^ I Jumbles^ STAND
'^^,. Jumbles: STAND


get the bucketback so
should coiime in. insj
,We're looking for a bi,
'tory to get us ready fo
playoffs."
And in the end, tha
that matters -: Colu
returns to the playoffs
a one-year absence.
Depending on.how
cess is defined, this g
of Tigers may have air
found it


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD
by David L. Hoyt and Jell


INDIANS: End regular season Friday


Continued From Page 11


Fort White put together
a 14-play drive that stalled
at the Trinity Catholic 23.
The Indians forced a quick
punt and bobbled the catch,
but did not lose this one.
However, Lprenzo
Washington intercepted
a pass and .returned it 74
yards for a touchdown and
a 28-0 lead with 6:30 left in
the second quarter. .
Fort White lost, another
fumble in Trinity Catholic,
territory, then Terry,
Calloway got the ball, back
on an. interception and'
42-yard return. Melton
Sanders hit A.J; Legree 'in
the. back of the end zone
from six yards, out with, 1.5
seconds left in the half.
SFbrt. White played bet-
ter than even with Trinity
Catholic for the next quar-
ter and a half. Legree broke
,.a 72-yard run on an end
around to cut the deficit
in half, 28-14, one play into
the fourth quarter.
Two interceptions, both
returned -for touchdowns'
though 1One was called back'
by a penalty, and. another
lost fumble allowed the
Celtics to score 21 points
in. about the same amount
of time as they scored their
first three TDs.
Reid Carlton threw a 15-
yard touchdown pass to
Anthony Crisera. McClellan
added a 47-yard touchdown.
run and Washington ran


back his second intercep-
tion for a score, this one
from 51 yards.
"Look at the score and
they, only had one .drive
over 50 yards," Fort White
head coach Demetric
Jackson said.
Jonathan Dupree
smelled out a couple of
screen passes from his
*defensive line spot. He
had one interception and
almost another. Dupree
also lined up in the back-
field when Fort White was
trying to get the running
game going. He had his
first carry of the season.
Fort White played with-
out quarterback Andrew
Baker, who suffered a sep-
arated shoulder in the last
game and ,was diagnosed
over the weekend. Jackson
said Baker is expected to
be out 3-4 weeks.
Thatmightbejustenough
time for the re-match with
Trinity Catholic, if both 3-
3A teams win their open-
ing playoff games. Fort
White will, travel to The
First Academy in Orlando
for the first round.,
If Baker is not back,
Sanders will have time to.
settle in at quarterback '
after being forced into
starting for the biggest
game of the season.
'"The season is still a go,"
Jackson said. "We are in
the playoffs right now."


Fort White and Santa
Fe High are trying to
move their Friday game
to Thursday. Jackson said
they should know if all par-
ties agree by Monday.
Tr. Catholic 21 7 0 21 49
FortWhite 0 7 0 7 14
First Quarter
TC-Johnson II run (Lincoln kick),
1 1:00
TC-McClellan 40 run (Lincoln kick),
6:30
TC-Blunt I run (Lincoln kick), 6:05
Second Quarter
TC-Washington 74 interception
return (Lincoln kick), 6:30
FW-Legree 6 pass from Sanders
(|ones kick),:01,
Fourth Quarter
FW-Legree 72 runr (Jones kick),
11:46
TC--Crisera '15 pass from 'Carlton
(Lincoln kick), 6:55
TC-McClellan 47 run (Denicola kick),
5:54
TC-Washington 51 interception
return (Denicola kick), 4:41

Fort White Tr. Catholic
First downs 10 9
Rushes-yards 43-161 37-229
Passing 28 38
Comp-Att-Int 4-13-3 3-12-1
Punts-Avg. 2-25 2-24
Fumbles-Lost 7-5 0-0
Penalties-Yards 5-55 12-111
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, Legree 1-72,
S. Williams 28-48, Cormier 6-19, Sanders
5-11, T. Williams 2-9,. Dupree I-2. Trinity
Catholic, McClellan 12-148, Blunt 11-51,
Johnson 3-20, Brown 3-12, Reed 1-4,
Carlton 5-(-2), Washington I-(-2), Stanley
S-(-2).
PASSING-Fort White, Sanders 4-13-
28-3. Trinity Catholic, Carlton 3-10-38-2,
'McClellan 0-2-0-0.
RECEIVING-Fort White, Legree 2-6,
Phillips 1-I1, Pitts 1-F1. Trinity Catholic,
Crisera l-15, Blunt I-13, Lincoln 1-10.


Duke falls into quick



hole, loses to Miami


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI A month ago,
Duke was flying high after
playing in Miami, on a
three-game winning streak
that suggested the Blue
Devils were,poised to end a
16-year bowl drought.
This time around, the
mood was decidedly dif-
ferent
Duke yielded touch-
downs on Miami's first
five possessions, quickly
falling into a 21-point hole
and eventually losing to
the Hurricanes 49-14 on


ACROSS
1 Did the
butterfly
5 Toy on a
string
9 Bear's


TOOt
12 Duplicate
13 Artifact
14 Miscellany
15 Elec. units
16 Injurious
18 Soda fountain
treat
20 Nanny
*thOey 21 Diamond or
pired. Simon
g vic- 22 Boombox
>r the "platters"
23 Autumn
r's all beverage
ts 26 So
Jmbia 30 Not delay
after 33 Overhang-
34 Epic
suc- 35 Hairdo
group 37 Turner and
ready Koppel
.39 Question
starter


GAME
I Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers Monday)
GUMBO TWITCH OUTING


........ I Answer: The football coach was nervous about flying, so
he was looking forward to this TOUCHDOWN


11-5 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Saturday, the Blue., Devils'
fourth straight loss and one
that badly damaged those
bowl hopes. Duke (3-6, 1-4
Atlantic Coast Conference)
has three games left, and
needs to win them all for a
postseason shot.
"If you are a competi-
tor it is a good situation
to be in," said Duke quar-
terback Sean Renfree, .who
completed 19 of 25 passes
for 181 yards, throwing for
one score and running for
another. "It is nose to the
grindstone. Anybody that
wants to compete and is
looking forward for pres-


40 St. -'s fire
41 Wed on the
run
43 Lipstick color
45 Bus. letter
acronym
48 Antitoxin
51 Bakery goody
53 Made a list
56 Yucky
57 Spiral
molecule
58 Went really
fast
59 One-time
Mets' stadium
60 Flair for
music I
61 Increase
sharply
62 Opry's st.

DOWN
1 Crooked
scheme
2 John Lennon
hit
3 Orchard
product


sure situations, something
is on the line.evefy game.
I know all the guys I'm
playing with are up for the
situation."
Starting with the 1996
season, 100 different
schools have won at least
one bowl game..
Duke hasn't even played.
in one during that span.
The Blue Devils' last post-
season gamewas the 1995
Hall of Fame Bowl, where
they lost to Wisconsin.
"It's tough," wide receiv-
'er Donovan Varner said.
"But we have to move on
and win these last three."


Answer to Previous Puzzle


VEA BUS P EG
___'3
HEIST ESO ORO
FROTH GONDOLA
IRKS AAHED
ATRIA ORR
AGO FRAU YMCA
EW TAFT LULU
NEW OR-CA LIE


LYE MIGHT
.SNAFU FETA
CATERER ALLOT
UNO TOE SLABS
DOM SSE ODIE


4 Sufi or St.
Francis
5 Notorious
pirate
6 Spud st.
7 Cat or
turkey


8 Large
antelope
9 Card combo
10 Miller and
Blyth
11 Worker's
compensation
17. Blows hard
19 Newsman -
Abel
22 Tenet
24 Went steady
25 Mr. Knievel
27 Left, to a mule
28 Gross!
29 Paulo
30 King beater
31 Blimp title
32 Bob Cratchit's
son
36 Discussion
panel
38 Blueprint,
briefly
42 Join up
44 Throws off
heat
46 Secret store
47 Compare
48 Half a beef
49 Long-active
volcano
50 Caboose's
place
51 German river
52 Meg or Nolan
54 Busy place,
slangily
55 Victorian, e.g.


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


-


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


,










Page EdItor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420 LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter,
Florida's Jaylen Watkins (14) swats down a pass intended for Vanderbilt's Wesley Tate (24)
during a game Saturday.

GATORS: Pull out 26-21 win Saturday
Continued From Page 1B


game skid and extended
their winning streak over
the Commodores to 21
games.
Demps and penalties
were the difference in the
latest one.
Demps, who carried
more of the load because
of injuries to running back
Chris Rainey and quarter-
back John Brantley, scored
on a 5-yard run in the sec-
orid quarter and saved his
best play for last. He, made
safety Keenny Ladler miss
in the open field on a third-
ind-1 play and went the
distance for the winning
score,
* "Jeff's an .outstanding
player,", Gators: coach Will
Muschainp said. "He's,
been a guy that every time
hle's been healthy this year
for us he's been very pro-
ductive.".
'His run pretty much
ended Vanderbilt's come-.
back.


. Florida. (5-4, 3-4
Southeastern Conference)
led' 17-0 at halftime
and could have been up
more had it. not been for
a missed field goal and a
fumble at the goal line. But
the Commodores -(4-5, 1-
5) scored on consecutive
drives in the second half,
cutting the lead to 20-14,
and had a chance to moire
ahead.
It didn't happen. Florida.
took advantage of two pen-
alties to keep the winning/
drive alive. ', ,
Florida, the most penal--
ized team in the nation,
was flagged three times for
17 yards. Vahderbilt was


flagged 12 times for 106 got a bunch," Muschamp
yards. 'The last two were said. "But I know one
crucial. thing: We're going to have
The Gators lined up to a tough group as we. move
go for it on a fourth-and- forward with this and some
1 play from their own 15- guys are going to be tight
yard line. Trey Burton got together in what they do
under center, barked out and we will benefit from
.cadences and induced Rob the tough times we're trav-
Lohr to jump off sides. eling through. People bet-
"Their noise was a little ter enjoy it while they got
bit of a factor and it really it."
showed up on a fourth- Rodgers, the young-
down play," Vanderbilt er brother of Green Bay
coach James Franklin said. Packers quarterback
-Thre, plays later, back- Aaron Rodgers, carved up
up quarterback :Jacoby Florida's sedondary. Many
Brissett rolled right and of them went to Jordan
threw a pass up for grabs "Matthews, who caught
near. the sideline. ,Safety nine passes for 170 yards
Sean Richardson was and a touchdown.
;flagged for interference on ,.Nonetheless, the,
the play, moving the chains Commodotes lost their
and keeping the drive alive. ,third'. straight '. iail-bit-
Demps did the rest '. fer., They also. lost close
"When you have w6rld- ones to Georgia and
class speed, it makes.it dif- Arkansas.
ficult to stop the guy when ,, "We -want to, win and
you're by yourself," Ladler that's why it hurts so much
said. because we' know how
Jordan Rodgers' touch- much we put in," Matthews
down, pass to Chris Boyd said. "We've just got to find
with 1:16 remaining made it a way to get the wins."
26-21, but Florida's Jordan Florida needs to get
Reed recovered an onside healthy.
kick to seal the victory. ..The Gators, played with-
"It's frustrating," said out Rainey, the team's lead-
Rodgers, who completed' iig rusher and receiver.
19 of 28 passes for. 297 He injured his right ankle
yards and two touchdoWns. last week against Georgia
"We've just got to learn and was held out for pre-
how to finish." ... cautionary reasons. And
Florida won for the first' Brantley, who missed two
time Sept 24. It wis the and a half games because
'program's longest los- of an ankle injury, injured,
ing streak, since' 1988 his right arm in the fourth'
and certainly dampened ,quarter aid couldn't finish
Muschamp's first season in the game.
Gainesville. "It's.a bunch of things,"
"We're building our bat- Brantley said. "Just took a
tie scars right now; we've good'shot" :


FLORIDA: Positioned for a bowl


Continued From Page 1B
Vanderbilt was Saturday. t
Florida might not be
playing for a national title
this'season. The Gators
won't even contend for t
the SEC East Still, the b
win over Vanderbilt is
important to the future of S
the program. t
Will Muschamp's team t
still has work to do to '
qualify for a bowl this
season, but getting a win a
over Vanderbilt was a
must. (
With South Carolina, f
Furman and Florida State
left on the schedule, it's
very feasible that the (
Gators are looking at a
6-6 record. Florida could I
put a lot of faith back in c
.the program beginning I
with a win against the 1
Gamecocks on Saturday,
but odds are the Gators 1
will only pick up one win i
in their final three games. e
That win should come I
against Furnlan, while i
Florida State and South b
Carolina should both beat b
the Gators. (
That's what makes t
the win over Vandy so i:
important. It's not just
making the bowl. Florida c
has been to much bigger i
games than the bowls that t
it will potentially play in. c
.What's important about -
being in the bowl game is
the extra month of practice p
the football team will get I


to go along with it
And trust me, this team
ieeds the practice.
Florida has had a tough
ime with Vanderbilt
beforee in its 21-game
win streak against the'
SEC East foe. In 1996,'
he Gators closest win of
he season came against
Vandy.
- Jay Cutler came within
in eyelash of helping
Vanderbilt knock off the
Gators in Urban Meyer's
first season.
What's important
about these two wins? .
Championships followed.
I'm not saying that
Florida will win a
championshipp next season,
)ut to get back to that
evel it needs the work.
The secondary is young.
The defensive front is
experienced. Heck,
everywhere you look on
Florida's roster there's
experience except in the
)ackfield with running
backs Jeff Demps and
Chris Rainey. ... and
they've been fighting
injuries.
Muschamp's teams will
certainlyy get better, but
t's going to take more
han the final three weeks
of the season to get them
where they want to be.
With the change of
personnell this season,
Florida was expected to


take its bumps.
After the month of
October, the Gators had.
.endured more than even "
the biggest of pesimist
probably expected.
But the season's
hardest slate of games is
over. Florida is talented'
enough to beat each team
remaining on its schedule.
However, the problem
hasn't been talent.
The Gators lack
execution. Florida came
into the Vanderbilt
game as the nation's
most penalized team.
That shows a lack of
poise.
Florida was only
penalized three times on
Saturday, but there were
still things that the Gators
did to drive the calmest of
coaches crazy. And let's
face it, Muschamp is one
temper tantrum short of a
stroke.
The Gators must learn
to do the things that it"
takes to win. Too many
times on Saturday they did
the things to allow Vandy
to stay in the game. If it
wasn't for Jordan Reed
recovering an onside kick,
Florida was on its way to
blowing a 17-0 halftime
lead.
As it turned out, the
Gators didn't do enough
to win. They just didn't do
enough to lose.


TONY BRrr/Lake City Reporter
Oni Allen (standing, center) serves Columbia High football players fried deer tips during the '
annual Columbia High Tiger Feed at the Double 00 Buck Hunt C lb. -


Food for football


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.co

If an army travels
stomach, then the a
the Columbia High
team ha* been fuE
travel a few miles do
high school football
path. -
On Wednesday.
Double 00 Buck I
Club members treat
team to dinner at th
camp near the no
Columbia County bo
;."This event is sor
we've .been doing
1989 and we used
it 7Tiger Feeding', b
Coach Brian Allen s
a tradition mor
just a-feed," said W
Allen, Columbia


Quarterback Club member venison, vegetables, stew
m and member of the Double' and rice.
00 Buck Hunting Club. 'V "When I joined- the
on its Allen has been a member of Quarterback Club in. 1988
irmy of the Quarterback Club since and I saw what they were
football 1988 and is on the organiza- doing, I brought back the
eled to tion's board of directors, suggestion to the hunting
>wn the Organizers estimate that club.-- let's feed the Tigers
playoff more than 250 people ate because J wanted them to
during the evening event,. taste our deer stew," Allen
night, where Columbia Highfoot- said. .It went over well and
huntingg 'ball players, coaches :and, ever since we've, been hold-
ted the 'their families wre treated ing this event. Everybody
ie hunt ,to dinner by the hunting: isin agreement with dqing
>rthern club. this and it's just .some-
irder. "Our goal was to feed the thing we do to give back
nething football team and the coach- to the community anti the
since es, but the event gets big- Columbia County football
to call ger and bigger each year," team." I
)ut now Allen said. The Double 00 :Buck
lays it's For two decades the local Hunting Club has approxi-
e than hunting club has provided a mately 25 'members and
Millie B. meal to the football players club members annually
County and others which includes budget'the feeding event.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420













LSU wins overtime thriller against Alabama


Associated Press


TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -
No. I LSU gained the inside
track to the BCS title game,
beating No. 2 Alabama 9-
6 on Drew Alleman's 25-
yard field goal in overtime
after a fierce defensive
struggle in which neither
team reached the end zone


Saturday night
The Crimson Tide missed
four field goals, includ-
ing Cade Foster's 52-yard
attempt after Alabama got
the ball first in the extra
period. LSU appeared to win
the game on Michael Ford's
run around left end after tak-
ing a pitch, but he stepped
out of bounds at the 7.


After two plays gained
nothing, LSU (9-0, 6-0
Southeastern Conference)
sent oA Alleman to attempt
his third field goal of the
game on third down.
Alabama (8-1, 5-1) tried to
freeze him by calling time-
out, but he calmly knocked
it through to set off a wild
celebration by the visiting,


team.
No. 4 Stanford 38,
Oregon State 13
CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP)
- Andrew Luck shook
off the rain and the chill
to throw for '206 yards
and three touchdowns
as Stanford extended the


nation's longest winning
streak to 17 games.
The Cardinal (9-0, 7-0.
Pac-12) are off to their best
start since 1952.
No. 7 Oklahoma 41,
Texas A&M 25
NORMAN, Okla. -
Landry Jones threw two


touchdown passes during
Oklahoma's 28-point third-
quarter surge, but the
Sooners lost All-America
receiver Ryan Broyles for
the year with a knee injury.
Bjroyles came out in
the third quarter and the
school announced after the
game -the senior had torn
a ligament in his left knee.


; :ASSOCIATED PRESS
Alabama running back Trent Richardson (3) rushes as LSU safety Eric Reid (1) and,
linebacker Ryan Baker (22) defend Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala.


The Lake City Reporter
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with Partnership for Strong Families
on their November 1, 2011 ribbon'cutting ceremony for
their new location at 1211 S. W Bascom Norris Drive


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4B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420


I


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' *" 1 * 7 "








SUN DAY, NOVEM R 6, W2011


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz


il/s


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N"Al -r -.7Ig I


05 1) @ 00


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Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


Sunday, November 6, 201 1


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Firms gear up for shopping season


'Think Lake City First
is theme of campaign
for the holidays.

By GORDON JACKSON
glackson@lakecityreporter.com

The.Halloween rush has ended for Lake
City merchants. Now their challenge is
to prepare for the busiest time of year -
Christmas shopping season.
Employees .at the Hallmark store at
Lake City Mall were busy Wednesday
clearing Halloween merchandise from the
shelves to make room for Christmas items
not already on display. Gary Frampton,
the store's manager, said preparing for
holiday shoppers is both a blessing and a
challenge.
The holiday season can determine the,
future of many businesses that struggle to'
break even most of'the year, so planning is
important
One major challenge for business own-
ers and managers is to organize holiday
merchandise in storage rooms so employ-
ees can quickly retrieve items and. place
them on store shelves.
"Ifs a logistical nightmare," Frampton
said.
.The Hallmark store's storage room
is filled with boxes strategically stacked
with the heaviest ones on the bottom so
the more fragile items are not damaged.
Frampton also considers where to store
boxes of merchandise based on how fast
they sell in the showroom.
"I'm a stacking genius," Frampton said.
"Everything has a location."
What makes. it more challenging for
Frampton is he must keep empty boxes
for figurines and other delicate items until
they're sold.
"When you're talking collectibles, the box
is almost as important as the figurines," he
said.
The past week was especially busy for
Frampton because, all Hallmark retailers
hold an open house this weekend to show-
case new merchandise for the holidays..
An item that may be difficult to find later
in the shopping season is the Peanuts Band
musicians, a group of battery operated figu-
rines based on the popular Peanuts comic
strip. The characters each play different
instruments that can be synchronized to
perform the same song together. I
Another hot item returning from last year
is Jingle, an interactive stuffed animal with
accompanying children's books. When the
books are read aloud, Jingle will, respond
when -key phrases from the books are spo-
ken.
At Rue 21, a junior retail store in the mall,
store manager Emily Peterson said her staff
is also busy preparing for the holidays.
Peterson said her staff began preparing
in October. Extra part-time employees
have been-hired and will complete training
by Nov. 12. The good news for some of
the temporary workers is their part-time
jobs could result in a full-time position,
Peterson said..
"We usually hire, two or three workers
- after the holidays," she said.


Photos by GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
Barbara Frampton, manager of the Hallmark store at Lake City Mall, arranges boxes of merchandise in the storage room at her business in
-preparation for the Christmas shopping season. The challenge is determining where to place boxes of merchandise so they can be retrieved
easily by employees.,


Peterson said she expects boots, winter
. coats and denim products to be the hot sell-
ers this year especially if the region expe-
riences cold weather before Christmas.
Frampton said he expects to hire four
part-time workers to help with the Christmas
rush at the Hallmark store.
Peterson said she plans to open at 3 a.m.
the day after Thanksgiving. Other stores in
the mall, such as Belk, will also open at 3
a.m. All stores will have extended hours set
by the mall for the holidays.
Frampton said he has no plans to open,
early on Black Friday but he expects lots of
business.
As for a prediction for how busy he will be'
during the holidays, Frampton said Hallmark
corporate representatives expect this to be a
strong holiday shopping season.,
"They're optimistic," he said.
A new local campaign, "Think Lake City
First," may also give local merchants a
reason to be optimistic. The program is
a marketing initiative by the Lake City/
Columbia County Chamber of Commerce
to support local merchants during the
holiday season and through 2012, said
Dennille Folsom, the chamber director.
Think Lake City First reminds residents
that local merchants are capable, of pro-
viding thp same quality merchandise and
services available in larger cities and a
comparable prices.
Holiday shoppers avoid the larger crowds
and save gasoline. And, they receive the
small-town customer service you can't find
in a large city.
"Every time you buy here you help the
entire community,"' Folsom said. "Why
wouldn't you do business here?".


Barbara Frampton arranges Christmas displays at the Hallmark store at Lake.City Mall.
Employees are busy preparing for the holiday shopping season; which is expected to be busy.


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"You've gotta see this place!" (I
lived in Pennsylvania, and Wal-
Mart hadn't expanded there yet.)
We went to Wal-Mart on a Thurs-
day evening, and it was packed
with shoppers. I said to myself,
"As soon as I get home, I'm buy-
ing stock in this company." Guess
what? That's right I
let the opportunity slip
through my fingers. If I'd.
bought 100 shares then,"
they would be more than 50,000
shares today, and I would really be
"retired." O.N., online
The Fool Responds: Ouch!
In mid-1975, shares of Wal-
Mart traded at price of $0.03 per
share. (The price then was really
$24.50, but adjusting for stock
splits makes that $0.03.) With a
stock price recently near $55 per
share, your 51,200 shares would
be wofth $2.8 million, all from an
investment of less than $3,000.
Your story hurts, but it's a great
reminder of how.we can profit
in stocks. Much less spectacular
stocks can serve us well, too, as
can simple index funds.
^ Do you have an embarrassing
lesson learned the hard way?
Boil it down' to 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My
Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
print yours, you'll win'a Fool's cap!


PepsiCo Is
Looking Sweet
PepsiCo (NYSE: PEP) recently
reported its third-quarter earnings,
with revenue up 13 percent over
last year to $17.6 billion and core
earnings up 7 percent. Investors
are watching to see how effective
price hikes will be in combating the
inflation that's been boosting supply
costs and threatening profit margins.
So far, so good, partly due to, the
company's strong brand power.
Emerging markets continue to drive
growth for PepsiCo, with snacks
volume up 31 percent in China and
26 percent in India, and beverage vol-
ume up 19 percent in India and up by
double-digits in many other regions.
What's less good is the company's
continued struggle with its core car-
bonated soft drinks, particularly in
developed markets,
Current PepsiCo investors have
' plenty of reasons to stick around.
There are challenges to be met, but
the company has many very strong
brands, and its push into more nutri-
tional offerings is a promising sign of
forward thinking from management.
Investors on the sidelines may
want to look into PepsiCo. The
stock has fallen in the past few
months and sports a dividend yield
above 3 percent. The stock may
not be a screaming bargain, but it's
a fair price for a great company.
(The Motley Fool owns shares of
PepsiCo, and its newsletter services
have recommended shares of the
company and options on it.)


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Born in 1946, and based in Orlando, Fla., I pushed plastic over glass
and crockery. My products didn't sell well initially, because consum- *
ers needed demonstrations to really appreciate them. I quickly left *
retail outlets and shifted to direct sales. Over the years I've innovated
with kitchen tools and products for microwaves and ethnic cuisines.
In recent years I've added some new names to my flagship namesake
brand: Armand Dupree, Avroy Shlain, BeautiControl, Fuller, NaturCare,
Nutrimetics, Nuvo and Swissgarde. My sales force tops 2.5 million glob-
ally and likes to party and burp. My annual sales top $2 billion. Who am
I? (Answer: Tupperware Brands)
Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest'(or Smart-.
esto Investments (up to, 100 words), and your Trivia entries to
Fool(vfool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Mode) fool. Sorry, we can providee individual financial advice.
0 .0 0 60_00 o. 0 0 a0 0 0 0 0 0 *0 0 &00 0 '0 0 0b 0 0


IIVERSML UCLICK (IOR R LLAS I 1/20 11)


Banks scramble


to make up lost


debit-card fees


By PAIAVI GOGOI
-, Associated Press
NEW YORK After
'an intense public back-
lash, Bank of America and
other banks have, backed
I off charging monthly .debit
card fees.
It's a victory for angry cus-
tomers and consumer advo-
cates. But the move will be
costly for banks. They are
scrambling for ideas on how.
to make up for lost revenue
at a time when interest rates
are atrock bottom and there's
little demand for loans, the
traditional source of making
profits for banks.
Banks are likely to avoid
jacking up existing fees or
introducing other new ones
for fear of stoking more pub-.
lic anger. Most large banks
have already gotten rid of
free checking this year and
increased monthly fees by an
average of $10 for checking
accounts. They also charge
$2 and $3 for services like
printed statements and can-
celed.checks.
The $5 monthly debit
card fee Bank of America
Corp. announced on Sept
29 became a flashpoint .of
anger for "Occupy" protest-
ers nationwide. There is
also a growing movement
among consumers to trans-
fer accounts from big banks
to credit unions and smaller
community banks.
Customers moved at least
$4.5 billiofi to credit unions in
the last four weeks. At least
650,000 customers joined
credit unions since Sept
29, when Bank of America
announced its fee, accord-
ing to Credit Union National
Association, an advocacy
group for 7,400 credit
unions.


After seeing the public,
reaction, JP Morgan Chlase
& Co., Wells Fargo. & Co.,
SunTrust Banks Inc., and
Regions Financial Corp. all
backed down from plans
to charge monthly fees for
debit card purchases. Bank
of America was the last major
bank to backtrack on its plans
when it scrapped its fees on
Tuesday.
"Consumers have the
power to make the big banks
back down from unfair
practices if they faise their
voices and vote with their
feet and their dollars," said
Norma Garcia, manager of
Consumers Union's financial
services program.
For the banks, it will be an
expensive decision.
The debit card fee was trig-
gered by a new federal law
championed by Senator Dick
Durbin of Illinois, which goes
into effect on Oct L The law
caps the amount banks can
charge merchants for debit
card usage at about 24 cents
per transaction, down from
an average of 44 cents. It will
whittle down revenue dra-
matically for banrks.
Banks have given esti-
mates of how much they
would lose in the last three
months of this year alone:
Bank of America said
it will lead to a reduction in
revenue of $475 million
JPMorgan warned it
would lose $300 million
Wells Fargo said it
would lose' $250 million
PNC Financial Services
Corp. will take a $75 million
hit
SunTrust's will decline
by $45 to $50 million
Moshe Orenbuch, bank
analyst at Credit Suisse, says
the Durbin regulation will
cost about $5 billion over-


A protester sits in front of an ATM machine as a customer gets money at a Bank of America
branch in Oakland, Calif., recently.


all for the banking industry.
Other analysts have pegged
the losses as high as $10
billion. Orenbuch says he
expects banks to be able to
recoup only a modest portion
of lost revenues in 2012.
Most banks say they
expect to make up for the
lost revenue by next year,
but none of them have given
specific plans. Revenue and
income at banks have already


shrunk dramatically this year
because interest rates are so
low and demand for loans is
anemic.
"There is no silver bullet,"
says Sherief Meleis, a partner
at bank consultant Novantas.
Meleis says any bank that
raises prices will not just
see public pressure, but will
face intense competition. He
points to the credit unions
and community banks that


stepped up their advertising
and marketing after Bank of
America announced its $5
monthly debit card fee.
Meleis says banks will have
to rely on an incremental, but
multi-pronged strategy like
cutting costs by reducing the
number of branches and also
slashing staff at branches.
Another strategy would be to
generate more business per
customer.


China to

phase out

inefficient

light bulbs


BEING (AP) China
announced Friday it will
phase out incandescent light
bulbs within five years in an
attempt to make the world's
most polluting nation more
energy efficient
China will barn imports
and sales of 100-watt and
higher incandescent bulbs
from Oct. 1, 2012, the coun-
try's main planning agency
said.
It will extend the ban to
60-watt and higher bulbs on
Oct. 1, 2014, and to 15-watt
and higher bulbs on Oct.
1, 2016. The time frame for
the last step may be adjust-
ed according to an evalua-
tion in September 2016, the
National. Development and
Reform Commission said.
State-run Xinhua News
Agency quoted Xie Ji, dep-
uty director of the commis-
sion's environmental protec-
tion department, as saying
China is the world's largest
producer of both energy-
saving and incandescent
bulbs.
Last year, China produced
3.85 billion incandescent
light bulbs, and 1.07 billion
were sold domestically, the
agency said. Lighting is esti-
mated to account for about
12 percent of China's total
electricity use, it said. Xie
said the potential for ener-
gy savings and reduction of
greenhouse gas emissions
is huge.
The planning agency said
China will save 48 billion
kilowatt hours of power per
year and reduce emissions
of carbon dioxide by 48 mil-
lion tons annually once the
bulbs are phased out.
Several countries plan to
phase out traditional light
bulbs. The United States
is set to put standards in
effect that require a higher
level of efficiency.


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


;2C


NP, ERS [. UCLICK (lOg Ri LI'ASI 111312011)












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


NYSE
552.23 -251.71


Gainers (2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
BkAlArs 5.11 +2.47 +93.6
Orbitz 2.98 +1.06 +55.2
ITTCps 20.10 +6.20 +44.6
CSVS2xVx"52.00+14.75 +39.6
PrUltVixST 19.77 +5.48 +38.3
AlonUSA 11.44 +3.16 +38.2
C-TrCVOL 39.07 +9.33 +31.4
ForestOils 15.74 +3:15 +25.0
NamTai 5.98 +1.19 +24.8
ETLglmVlxll1.30+20.76 +22.9

Losers $2 or more)
Name Lat Chg %Chg
ExamWks 6.88 -4.78 -41.0
Endvrlnlrs 7.44 -2.64 -262
NeoPhoton 4.05 -1.40 -25.7
MarineMx 6.15 -2.09 -25.4
Renren n 5.28 -1.74 -24.8
AberFdc 58.21-18.60 -242
DiceHldg &40 -2.60 -23.6
Ying8Gm 3.69 -1.09 -22.8
RosettaStin 7.72 -2.22 -22.3
GMX Rs pfB15.00 -4.25 -22.1

Most Active ( 1or more)
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 13088336 6.49 -.88.
S&PooEi11685524125.48-3.12,
SPDR Fnd5910723 1329 -.77
DrxFnBul 3359509 13.97 -2.36
lShR2K 3296718 74.60-1.43
iShEMkts 3226051 41.19-1.21
Cifigiprs, 3021639 30.34-3.81
FordM 2995160 11.27 -.73
GenBec 2815234 16.39 -.86
Pfizer 2618676 19.66 -.16

Diar
Advanced 1033
Delned 2,099
New Highs 107
NewLows 58
Total issues 3,183
U ~nc0anged 51
Volume 22,248,901,923


SAmex
2,298.72 -38.81


Gainers $2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
OrienlPap 3.46 +.95 +37.8
MinPDiag 4.68 +.77 +19.7
Grahar 24.08 +354 +172
UVQMne 2.15 +.26 +13.8
VinetX 22.15 +2.57 +13.1
EVOHMu 1429 +1.49 +11.6
WhteRiv 20.85 +2.17 +11.6
GoldenMin 8.39 +.84 +11.1
Aerosonic 2.52 +.24 +10.5
Suprmnlind 2.15 +.20 +10.3

Losers ($2 or more'
Name Last Chg %Chg
Melaeco 3.79 -.89 -19.0
Gastargrs 3.31 -.65 -16.4
SOCTBcp 2.00 -.38 -16.0
11.78 -2.06 -14.9
= so 20.15 -3.35 -14.3
ProloBio 4.09 -.66 -13.9
Bacteria 2.88 -.39 -11.9
De= Api 16.94 -2.12 -11.1
GnMoly 3.44 -.40 -10.4
OrlonEngy 2.80 -.31 -10.0

Most Active l1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Rentech 356427 1.64 +.10
CheniereEn290314 11.45 -.48
NwGoldg 198768 12.21 -.57
GrtBasG g 169914 1.35 -.14
GoldStrg 149675 2.19 +.14
Nov%?ldg 128847 9.74 +.30
VantageDd 107392 1.32 -.12
VinetX 86768 22.15+2.57
NA Pall g 77756 3.50 +.05
DenisnMg 67769 1.52 -.11

Diar
Advanced 248
Declined 267
NewHighs 13
NewLows 10
Total Issues 529
Uncha nged 14
Volume 422,980,350


*Nasdaq
2,686.15 -51.00


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Medvation 41.60+23.98+136.1
Inhtiilex 8.54 +4.68 +121.2
BBCpfll 22.01+10.91 +98.3
SinoGlobal 2.69 +1.01 +60.1
DragonWg 5.09 +1.69 +49.7
Sonesta 30.6 +88.43 +37.9
CorinlhC 2.55 +.68 +36.4
CharlsColv 2.68 +.68 +34.0
SuperMda 2.53 +.64 +33.9
PowerSec 5.92 +1.48 +33.3

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
CareerEd 7.98 -9.17 -53.5
CarverB rs 4.V0 -3.62 -45.7
CentEuro 3.21 -2.69 -45.6
Exeloos 4.26 -3.34 -43.9
VaVisA 2.05 -1.55 -43.1
Dndreon 6.69 -4.60 -40.7
HansenMed 2.09 -127 -37.8
KSwiss 3.11 -1.52 -32.8
TecumsehA 461 -224 -32.7
Amyns 1405 -677 -325

Most Active (si or morel
Name Vol (00) Last Chg
SmnusXM 3424884 168 -16
PwSnsQOQ3153008M57 80-1.14
Intel 2697768 2374-103
MIcrosoft 2619004 2625 -73
CiSCO 2350307 1803 -53
Yanoo 1534644 1524-132
mewsCpA 1412590 1680-100
Queloom 1357617 56.50+3.27
Oracle 135008 32.55-1.14
MIcronT 1275518 5.89 +.01


DIary
Advanced 953
Declined 1,725
New Hitghs 87
New Lows 137
Tol issues 2,753
Unchanged 75
Volume 10,031,542,496


T l niC. O LOCAL INTEREST


Name Ex Div


WLty WDy YT D
Last ChaICtChg Name Ex Div


AT&Tlnc NY 1.72 29.16 -.58 -2.0 -.7.
AlcatalLicNY ... 2.30 -.54-19.0 -22.3
Alcoa NY .12 10.93 -.61 -5.3 -29.0
AutoZone NY ... 325.00 -2.82 -0.9 +19.2
BkofAm NY .04 6.49 -:86 -11.7 -51.3
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 33.29 -.78 -2.3 +1.0
CNBFnPA Nasd .66 14.69 +.17 +1.2 -.8
CSXs NY .48 .21.76 -1.35 -5.8 +1.0
Chevron NY 3.12 106.43 -3.21. -2.9 +16.6
Cisco Nasd .24 18.03 -.53 -2.9 -10.9
Ciligipris NY .04 30.34 -3.81 -11.2 -35.9
CocaCola NY 1.88 67.78 -1.15 -1.7 +3.1
Delhaize NY 2.45 63.59 -4.21 -6.2 -13.7
DrSCBrrs NY ... 29.3 +1.06 4.8 -37.3
DirFhBrrs NY ... 40.53 +4.35 +12.0 -14.2
DrxFnBull NY ... 13.97 -2.36 -14.5 -49.8
DirxSCBuHNY ... 48.12 -3.57 -6.9 -33.6
FamilyDIr NY .72 58.97 +.95 +1.6'+18.6
FordM NY ... 11.27 -.73 -6.1 -32.9
GenElec NY .60 16.39 -.86 -5.0 -10.4
HomeDp NY 1.00 36.39 +.27 +0.7 +3.8
iShClina25NY .85 37.72 -.07 -0.2 -12.5
iShEMkts NY .84 41.19 -1.21 -2.9 -13.5
iShR2K NY 1.02 74.60 -1.43 -1.9 -4.7
Intel Nasd .84 23.74 -1.03 -4.2 +12.9
JPMOrgChNY 1.00 33.97 -2.72 -7.4 -19.9
Lowes NY .56 21.54 +.17 -+0.8 -14.1
McDnlds NY 2.80 93.81 +.52 +0.6 +22.2


Microsoft Nasd .80
MorgStan NY .20
NY Times NY
NewsCpA Nasd .19
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobltyHIf Nasd. ...
NokiaCp NY .55
OcdPet NY 1.84
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potashs NY .28
PwShs QQQNasd .41
PrUShS&PNY ...
RegionsFnNY .04
R der NY 1.16
S500ETFNY 2.46
SearsHldgsNasd ..
SiriusXM Nasd .
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDRFndNY .20
TineWam NY .94
VangEmg NY .82
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargoNY .48
YRCrsh Nasd
Yahoo Nasd


IL:. -


Last Chg%Chg%Cig
26.25 -.73 -2.7 -5.9
16.72 -2.59 -13.4 -38.6
7.46 -.37 -4.7 -23.9.
16.80 -1.00 -5.6 +15.4
56.44 -.60 -1,1 +0.6
5.77 -.98 -14.5 -28.9
,6.67 -.51 -7.1 -35.4
97.64 -.13 -0.1 -.5
33.69 +.61 +1.8 +4.3
'61.99 -1.21 -1.9 -5.1
19.66 -.16 -0.8 +12.3
48.05 -1.92 -3.8 -6.9
57.80 -1.14 -1.9 +6.1
20.17 +.87 +4.5 -15.1
4.02 -.25 -5.9 -42.6
51.52 -.28 -0.5 -2.1
125.4& -3.12 -2.4 -.2
78.15 -.54 -0.7 4.0
1.68 -.16 --8.7 4+3.1
43.20 +.37 +0.9 -10O
2.87 +.15 +5.5 -322
13.29 -.77 -5.4 -J7
34.44 -1.03. -2.9 +7.1
41.98 -1.25 -2.9 -12.8
57.50 +.35 +0.6 .+6.6
25.40 -1.56 -5.8 -18.0
.05 -.01 -10.7 -8.7
15.24 -1.32 -8.0 -8.4


Stock Foonotes: g DMddenos and earnings In Canadian dolars h= Doesnotmeal e ontinued-lingl andards
r q Late ltng wth SEC. p = NOw In palt 52 weeks pl. PrefeIed. r = Sock has undergone reverse stock
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rwq.npllontle.= m.lroin loaa laa es) m= Mopile l s are cnaged NA-oil vaflabla preIDloUsdayt'
neit amsel value sa luna sptI shares during the weAIL x = lund pai a d(atlRakon during the wdek.Gtine and
Loarsmuslbeworthatast2elS2tpbe ldin ladies altleft. Most*AlcvS Mbelbwonh aluleas1.VoUrten
hundreds oI shares Source: The Associaled Press Sales tgurs re unoffical


Last Pvs Week
325 3.25


e nrirP Rate


Ill-p 11 I


Federal Funds Rate .00-.25 .00-.25
TreasuriesE
3-month 0.005 0.01
6-month 0.03 0.06-
5-year 0.88 1.13
10-year 2.04 2.32
30-vear 3.09 3.38


Weekly Dow J 4ne. I


Dow Jones Industrials -276.10 -297.05 178.08 208.43 -61.23
Close: 11,983.24
1-week change -247.87 (-2.0%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI











10,000-...... ....J... .
MS O



Total Asset Total Return/Rank Pct lin Init
Name Ob| ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PlMCOTotRetls Cl 144,140
Fidelt Contra LG 56,898
Vanguard TotSIldx LB 54,584
American Funds CaplncBuAm IH 52,811
Vanguard Instldxil LB 52,251
Annencan Funds GrthAmnA m .LG 51,434
Amnencan Funds IncAmerA m MA 48,664
Vanguard 50OAdmI LB 46,205
Vanguard ToStlAom LB 43,815
Amencan Funds CpWIaGrtA m WS' 43,482
American Funds InvCoAmA m LB 39,741
Dodge & Co inlStk FV 35,768
FraroTump-Frankin Income A mn.CA 3555 .
Amencan Funds WAMutnA m LV 34,692
Dodge & Cox Slock LV 34,245
Vanuar InslPlus LB 32,673
PiMCOnTolRetAdm n Cl 31,685
Vanguard ToliBdAdmI Cl 30,034
Ameriencan Funds EurPacGrA m FB 29,151
American Funds BalA m MA 28,742
Vanguard TolnI d FB 28,698
Anenican Funds FnlnvA m LB 27,768
Vanguard WeltnAdm MA 26,965
American Funds NewPerspA m WS ;26,896
FrankTenmp-TelnpletonGIBondAdvlB 26,811
PIMCOTotRetA m 'Cl 26,758
Harbor InlnstI d FB '25,555


10.93 +2.0
69.39 +12.5
31.37 +12.5
49.24 +5.8
1,14.83 +11.7
29.60 +12.0
16.60 +7.2
115.60 +11.7
31.38 +12.5
32.95 +9.9
27.18 +10.6
31.38 +11.0
2.10 +10.0
28.01 +10.3
101.85 +11.4
114.84 +11.7
10.93 +2.0
11.04 +0.4
'37.47 +11.2
18.27 +86.1
14.14 +12.1
35.75 +12.7
53.88 +7.5
27.32 +11.0
13.13 +52
10.93 +1.9
55.73 +13.0


+0.8/E
+4.5/C
+4.7/A
+0.2/B
+4.7/A
-0.3/E
+3.5/B
+4.7/A
+4.8/A
-7.5/D
-0.1/D
-12.9/D,
+3.21B
+7.4/A
-1.0vfl
+4.7/A
+0.5/E
+4.7/A
-10.6/Ci
4.0/A
-11.0/C
+1.2/D
+3.8/A
-3.3/C
+0.6/C
+0.4/E
-9.019


+8.1/A
+3.8/B
+1.0/B
+1.7/C
+0.5/B
40.5/D.
+2.2/C
+0.5/B
+1.1/B
+0.5/C
-0.3/C
-1.1/A
+3.41C
+0.4/B
ASE
,-3.3/B
40.5/B
+7.9/A
+6.6m.
+0.7/A'
+3.01/
-1.21B
+1.3/A
+4.01A
+2.4/A
+10.6/A
+7.7/A
+1.7/A.


NL 1,000,000
NL 2,500
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 5,000,000
5.75. 250
5.75 .250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
4.25 1,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 200,000,000
NL .10,000,;
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 '250
NL 50,000
5.75 250
NL 50,000
3.75 1,000
NL 50,000


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Name Div YId PE g%Chg Last
ABBUd .64 '3.4 ... -1.17-'-16.3 .18.78
AESCorp ... ,.. 14 +.26 -22 11.91
AFIAC 1.32 2,9 10 -1.45 -19.7' 45.29
AKSteel .20 2.2 ... -.12 -44.7 9.05
AMR .... .. ... -.26 -68.5 2.45
AT&TInc 1.72 5.9" 15 -.58 -.7 29.16
Abitab 1.92 3.6 18 -.89 +11.3 53.33
AberFl'o. .70 1.2 23-18.60 +1.0 58.21:'
AMD ... .:.' 4 -.27 -30.7 5.67
.Aeropos1' .:.0* ... 10 +312 -29.3 17.42
Aetna .60 1.5 8 -.98+30.0 39.65
Agilent ... ... 14 -3.98 -10.9 36.91
AlcatelLuc ... ......-.54 -22.3 2.30
Alcoa .12 1.1 'I11 -.61 -29.0 '10.93
SAllstate .84 3.2 38 -1.26 -18.8 25.90
AiphaNRs .." .... 65 +1.53 -53.2 28.09'
Alria 1.64 6.0 17 -.19, 411.2 27.37
AMovllLs .28 1.1 11 -.91 -11.0 25.51'
AEagleOut .,44 3.1 17 +.45. -4.2 14.02
AEP 1.8& 4.7 11t +.28 +10.3 39.70
AmExp .72 .1.4 .13 -.92 +19.2 51.18
AmlntlGrp ... .. 2 -2.43 -50.5 23.91
AmTower ... ... 84 +1.60 +12.2 57.92'
Anadarko .36 .4 ... -1.28 +68.3 82.46
Annaly 2.51 15,3 8 -.62 -.7 '16.86
AonCorp ".60 1.3 17 -.58 +3.0 47.41
Aptlnv. .48 2.1 ... -2.24 -11.8 22.79
ArcelorMit .75 3.7' 10 -1.83 -46,7 20.31
ArchCoal .44 2.4 16 -2.10 -48.3 18.12
ArchDan .70 2.4 9 -1.29 -3.4 29.05
ATMOS 1.36 3.9 16 +.21 +12.5 35.10.
Avon :.92 5.0 11 -.35 -36.3 18.52
BB&TCp .64 2.y7 15 -.54 -11.1 23.37.
BHPBlIUt 2.02 2.6 ... -4.15 -15.0 79.00
BalorHu .60 1.1 .15 -4.59, -1.8 56.15
BcoBrades,.80 4.5 .:.'-1.03 -11.9 17.87
BcoSantSA .84.10.5 .. -.99 -24.7 8.02
BcoSBrasil 1.65 19.0 ... -.87 -36.1 ,.8.69
BkofAm. .04 ..6 ... -.86 -51.3, 6.49
BkNYMeI .52 2.5 10 -1.42 -30.5 20.99
Barclay ; .36 3.0 ... -1.23 128.0 11.89
BarlPVix rs.... ..: ...+6.99 +15.0 43.25
BarrickG .60 1.2.12 +.57 -3.3 51.42
Baxter 1.24 2.3 14 -1.48. +6.1' 53.69
BerkHB ... .:. 16 -2.72 -3.6 77.24
BestBuy .64 2.3 9 +.81 -20.4 27.31
Blackstone .40 2.8 ... -.89 +.1 14.17
Boeing 1.68 2.6- 13 -2.37 +.8 65.80
BostonSdc'... ... 16 -.04 -23.8 5.77
BrMySq 1.32 4.2 16 -.75 +18.4 31.34
CBREGrp .. ... 20-2.31 -18.6 16:67
CBSB .40 1.6 14 -.62 +32.2 25.18
CIGNA .04 #.1 9 -3.U4 +17.3 42.99
CSXs .48 2.2 13 -1.35 +1.0 21.76
CVS Care .50 1.3 15 +1.18 .+9.3 38.02
CblvsNYs .00 4.0 12 -.27 -37.2 14.87
CdnNRs gs .3 .... .... +.24-16.6 37.06
CapOne .20 .4 6 -.74 -+8.5 46.16
Carnival 1.Ab 2.9 14 -2.04 -26.1 34.08
Caterpilar 1.84 1.9 15 -1.11 +2.2. 95.74
Comex .. ... ... +.25 -54.6 4.68
CenterPnt .79 3.9 16 4-.98 +29.2 20.31
CntryULink 2.90 8.0 17 +.27 -21.5 36.23
ChesEng .35 1.3 8 -2.67 +4.5 27.07
Chevron 3.12 2.9 8 -3.21 +16.6 106.43
Chimdra .57 19.9 5 -.17 -30.2 2.87
Citigrprs .04 '.1 8 -3.81 -35,9 30.341
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.6 .6 -1.36 -8.4 71.45
Coach .90 14 22 -1.29 +17.6 65.07
CocaCola 1.88 2.8 12 -115 +3.1 67.78
CocaCE .52 2.0 13, -.40 +4.5 26.16
Comerica .40 1.6 12 -.24 -39,2 25.68
ConAgra .96 3.8' 15 +.12 +12.4 25.39
CohocPhil 2.64 3.7.. 9 -1.03' +3.8 70.71
ConsolEngy.40 .9 16 -1.91 -8.0 44.84
ConEd 2.40 4,1 16 +.52 +18.1 58.56
ConstellEn .96 2.4 17 -.59 +28.0 39.21
Coming .30 2.1- 7 -.77 -24.7 14.54
Covidien .90 2.0 12 -2.64 -.1 45.61



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Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASMLHId .58 1.4
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.2
AdobeSy ... ...
AkamaiT ...
AlscriptH ... ..
AlteraCplf .32 .8
Amarin.
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 20.1
AmCapLtd ...
'Amgen 1.12 2.0
Apollolnv 1.12 13.8
Apple Inc ...
ApidMatI .32 2.6
AriadP ... ...
ArmHId .15 .5
Atmel ... ...
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44 2.8
AvisBudg ...
BMC Sft ......
Baidu ... ...
vjBeacnP ...
BrigExp ... ..
Broadcom .36 1.0
BrcdeCm ...
CAInc' .20 .9
Cadence ...
CareerEd ...
Celgene ...
CentEuro ...
CienaCorp ....
Cisco .24 1.3
CitrixSys ... ...
Clearwire ... ..
CognizTech...
Comcast .45 2.0


... -1.19 +10.5 42.36
56 +2,82 -25.4 39.65
25 +.10 ,+9.0 13.56
16 .+.77 -3.2 29.79
30 +1.53 -36.6 29.82
... +1.42 +7.9 20.79
15 -.89 +9.8 39.05
... -2.63 -10.7 7.32
... -.84 +20.3 216.48
4 +.18 -3.0. 27.89.
3 -.45 .+.3 7.58
14 -2.07 +.5 55.17
... -.43 -26.6 8.12
15 -4.71 +24.1 400.24
9 -.20 -11.6 12.42
... +.11 +135.5 12.01
... +2.07 +50.4 31.21
10 -.60 -14.4 10.55
32 -.81 -8.3 35.02
20 -.97 +11.6 51.63
9 -.91 -11.9 13.71
15 +.76 -23.7 35.97
66 -1.44 +48.3 143.18
... -.34 -94.8 .11
51 -.11 +33.6 36.38
22 -.63 -17.3 36.01
19 +.10 -12.9 4.61
13 -.53 -11.3 '21.68
26 -.01 +34.3 11.09
4 -9.17 -61.5 7.98
27 -2.46 +7.8 63.73
,. -2.69 -86.0 3.21
-.14 -35.0 13.68
15 -.53 -10.9 18.03
41 +.86 +8.5 74.23
... -.11 -63.3 1.89
26 -4.83 -3.3 70.84
16 -1.10 +4.0 22.75


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Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
CSVS2xV SS... ...+14.75 -19.7 52.00
CSVeIIlVSts... ....-1.40 -50.4, S'.93
DCTIndl .28 5.5 ... +.10 -4.7 5.06
DDRCoip '24 1.9 .. -.76 -11.1 12.52-
DR Horton .15 1.3 96 -.06 -3.2 11.55
DTE' 2.35 4.5 13 -.18 +15.0 52.12
DanaHIdg ... ... 32 -.91 -17.7 14.17
Danaher .10 .2 18 -2.11 +3.3 .48.75
Oeere 1.64 2:2 12 -3.28 -9.2' 7:39
etaAir ... ... 11 ,-.16 -33,7 8.35
DenburyR .:. ...13 +53 -9.0 17.38
Deutchpk 1.07 2.7 ... -7.86 -25.2 38.9j,
DevonE .68 1.0, 6 -2.77 -16.7. 65.38
DrSCBrrs ... ......+1.06 -37.3 29.38
DirFnBr r ... .... .. +4.35 -14.2 40.53.
DrxEnBea ... ......+.54 -46.8 11.99
DrxFnBull ... ...... -2.36 -49,8' 13.97
DirxSCBull... .....-3.57 -33.6 48012
Discover .24 1.0 7 +.02 +2.2 24.50
Disney :.40 '1.2 15 -1.45 -7.3 34.76
DomRescs.1.97 3.8 18 +.19 +20.7 51.56
DowChm 1.00 3.5 12 -1.07 -17:5 28.18
DukeEngy 1.00 4.8 16 +.18 +15.9 20.64
DukeRIty .68 5.6 ... -.41. -2.3 12.17
EMCCp ... .. 24 -.36 +7.7 24.67
EOGRes .64 .6 25 +6.50 +11.2 101.68
Eatons 1.36 3.0 12 -.69 -9.5 45.94
EIPasoCp .04 .2 ... -.48 +81.4 24.96
EldorGIdg .12 -..-'36 -.71 +2.0 18.95
EmersonE1.60 3.1 16 +1.65 -10.3 51.26
EnCanag .80 3.8 .38-1.22 -27.1 21.23
ExcoRes .16. 1.2 .:. -.29 .-32.1 13.19
Exelisn :.10 ... :.. +.63 +:.4 11.55.
Exelon 2.10 4.8' 12 -.55 +5.7 44.02
ExxonMbl 1;88 2.4 9 -2.96 +7.4 78.52
FstHorlzon .04 .6 300 -19 -39:7 7.10.
FirstEngy 2.20 4.8 14 +.65 +22.9. 45.51
FootLockr .66- 3.0. 1 -.25 +13,5' 22.27
FordM ... ..: 6 -.73. -32.9 11.27
Foresils ;.. 15 +3.15 -42.4 15.74
FMCGS 1.00 2.5 7 -2.48 '-32.9 40.32
FrontierCi)t.75.13.3 388 -.62 -41.8 .5.66
Gannett'- ,.32 28' 5 -.85 -25.0 11.32
Gap" '.45 2.3 11 +.32 -10.8 19.65
GenGrf.rn,.40 2.7 ... -.21 -6.0 14.55
GenMills 1.22 3.2 15 -.46 +.7 38.67
GenMotn .... ... 7 -2.84 -35.9 23.61
GenOn En .......... 27 -24.9 2.86

Gerdau .25 2.8 .. -.39 -35.1 9.08
GlaxoSKIn2.12 4.8 .. -.04+13.3 44.43
Goldcrpg .41A .8 21 +1.64 +12.4 51.70
GoldlianS 1.40' 1.3 17-10.82 -37.5 105.04
Goodyear. .'. .. 32 -.54 +20.7 14.30
HCA Hkdn ... ...... '+.73 -24.2 23.51
HCPJnc .1.92 5.1 25 -1.70 +3.3 38.01
HaMlibr. ;.36 1 3--1.97 -9.0 37.16
HartfdFn ,40 2.2. 7, -2.43 -32.7 17.83
HItCrREIT 2.96 5.9 50 -2.82 +5.0 50.00
HeclaM ... ... 24, ... -42.0 6.53
,Hertz ... ...14. -23 -17.7 11.93
Hess .40 .6 11 -2.22 -17,1 63.44
HewlettP .48 A1.8 6 -.97 -35.9 26.97
HomeDp 1.00 2.7 16 +.27 +3.8 36.39'
Honwlnti 1.49 2.8 14 +.07 .+1.5 53.95
HostHots .16 1.1 ... -.05 -18.6 14.54
Huntsmn .40 3.2 9 -.43 -19.9 12.51
ING. ... ... ...-1.25 -14.8 8.34
iShGold ... ... ... +.13 +23.3 17.14
iSAstla 1.06 4.5 .... -1.36 -7.6 23.51
iShBraz 3.42 5.5 ... -2.48 -19.9 62.03
iShGer .67 3.2 ... -1.84 -13.2 20.78
iSh HK .42 2.5 ... -.38 -12.9 16.48
iShJapn .17 1.8 ... -.62 -14.2 9.36
iSTaiWn .29 -.14 -15.9 13.14
iShSilver .... .. .-1.07 +10.0 33.20
iShChina25 .85 2.3 ... -.07 -12.5 37.72
iSSP500 2.45 1.9 ... -3.17 -.3 125.88
iShEMkis.. .84 2.0 ... -1.21 -13.5 41.19

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Name DIv
Comc spcl .45
CodnthC ...
Cree Inc
Crocs ..
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk ...
DonlleyRR I..04
DryShips .12
E-Trade
eBay
BectArts
EricenTel .37
Exelixis .10
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
Fastenals .56
FifthThird .32
Finisar
FstNilagara .64
FstSolar ...
Flextm ...
Fortinet s ...
FosterWhl ...
GT AdvTc...
GileadSd ...
Globlind ...
GreenMtC ...
Groupon n ...
HercOffth ...
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
Inhibitex ...
Intel .84
InterClick ...
JA Solar ...


YId PE Ch l %Chg Last
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... +.68 -51.1' 2.55
... 34 +2.73 -53.6 30.57
... 16 +.57 +4.0 17.81
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...... -4.60 -80.8 6.69
... 16 +1.13 +16.9 46.66
... 8 -.96 +19.4 23.48
6.3 11 +.11 -4.8 16.64
... 14 -.14 -49.7 2.76
... 44 -1.06 -33.9 10.57
... 24 -.54 +17.5 32.71
S...... +1.10 +53.8 25.20
3.5 ... -.31 -8.0 10.61
...... -3.34 -48.1 4.26
1.0 17 +1.09 +13.1 28.37
... 18 -1.49 -16.4 45.21
1.4 35 +1.65 +34.4 40.27
2.7 10 -.30 -18.2 12.01
.. 24 -.24 -28.8 21.14
7.2 13 -.37 -36.6 8.86
... 8 -4.40 -61.9 49.59
9 ... -14.9 6.68
.. 62 +1.63 +52.6 24.69
... 14 -2.48 -42.5 19.84
... 6 -.12 -3.2 8.83
... 12 -2.07 +12.4 40.72
... ... +.01 +14.9 7.97
... 69 -.32+115.1 70.67
... ... ... ... 26.11
... ... -.39 +6.6 3.71
5.6 ... -.46 -54.9 5.75
...... -1.28 -59.4 9.69
...... +4.68 +228.5 8.54
3.5 10 -1.03 +12.9 23.74
... 47 +1.51 +67.2 8.98
... 2 -.31 -69.7 2.10


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Name DIv ,Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
iShB20T 3.92 3.j4 ,.. 5.32 +23.8 116.48
iSEafe. 1.68 3.2 .. -3.45.-11.0 51.80
IShR2K- 1.02 1.4' ... -1.43 -4.7 74.60
iShREst 2.18 3.8 .... -1:36 +1.2 56.64
ItTCps ... '", ,.-+6.20 +16.3 20.10
ITW 1.44 2.9 12 +.10 -7.8 49.2P
IngerRd .48 1.5 ... +.12 ,,-31.1 32.46
IBM 3.00 1.6' 15 -1.07 +27.0 '186.38
IntlGame .24 '1.4' 21, -.04 -.1 17.68
IntPap' 1.05 3.6 10 .. +5.8 '28.81
Inlerpublic' 24' 2.5 11. -.24 -8.9 9.68
Invlsoo' .49 -2.4- 1.1 -..87 -16.7 20.03
ItauUnibH .84, 4.5 '... -1.06 -21.8 18.69
JPMorgCh 1.00' 2.9 7 -2.72 -19.9 33.97
Jabil .32 1.6 ,12 -.73 .+2.5 20.59
JanusCap .20 3.0 "71 -.60 -49.0 6.62
Jefferids .30 2.5 8"'-2.65 -54.7 12.07
JohnJn 2.28 3.6 16 -1.48 +3.7 64.12
JohnsnCtl .64 2.0 14 -1.07 -14.8, 32.55
'JnprNtwk ..; ... 25 -.83 -35.0 23.98-
KB Home 25 3.5 ... -.33 -47.6 7.07
Kellogg 1.72 3.4 15 -4.87 -2.3 49.91
Keycoip .12 1.6 7 ... -17.2 7.33
Kimco .76 4.4 79 -.58 -4.0 17.32
Kinropsg .12 .8 19 -.38 -24.4 14.33
KodiakOg .... ... 34 -.15 +7.6 7.10
Kohis 1.00 1.8 14 +3.01 +3.2 56.08
Kraft 1,16 3.3 '19 -.22 +11.6 35.18
LSICorp ... ... 12 -.01 +4.8 6.28
LVSands ... ... 28 -.09 +4.5 48.04
LennarA .16 .9 36 +.12 -8.4 17.17
LilEyBi 1.96 5.2 9 -.34 +8.3 37.94


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Name DIv YId PE


JDS Uniph .. .
JetBlue ... ...
KLATnc 1.40 2.9
LeapWirlss ...
UbtlntA,h ... ...
UnearTch .96 2.9
lululemn gs ..9 ...
MarvellT ... ...
Mattel .92 3.2
Medivation ...
MelcoCrwn ... ...
Microchp 1.39 3.8
MicronT ...
Microsoft .80 3.0
NIl HIdg ... ...
NPS Phm ...
NXP Semi ...
NasdOMX ... ...
NetApp ... ...
Netflix
NewsCpA .19 1.1
NewsCpB .19 1.1
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OnSmcnd ...
OpenTable.
Oracle .24 .7
PMC Sra ... ...
Paccar .72 1.7
PacEth rsh ...
PattUTl .20 .9
Paychex 1.28 4.4
PeopUtdF .63 5.1
PharmPdt .60 1.8
Polycoms ...
Popular
Power-One...
PwShs QQQ.41 .7


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Limited .80
UncNat .20
UzClaib ...
UoydBkg
LyonBasA .80
MEMC
MFAFnd 1.00
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40
MagHRes ...
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .80
Manulifeg .52
MarathnOs .69
MarathP n 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MarlntA ..40
MarshM .88
Masco .30
,McDrmlnt ...
Medtmic .97
'Merck 1.52
MetUfe' .74
MetroPCS ...
Monsanto 1.20
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
NCR Corp ...
Nabors ...
NBkGreece ...


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19 -.16 -33.6
10 +.13 +22.9
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14 -.04 -4.4
54 -1.96 +63.6
11 +.15 -23.2
14 +.01 +13.3
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66 -.30 +84.6
18 +.55 +8.2
39 +.01 -26.6
10 -.73 -5.9
13 -1.14 -46.6
... -2.15 -29.0
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26 +1.04 -22.4
20 +5.88 -48.8
15 -1.00 +15.4
15 -.64 +6.2
27 -.42 +44.7
16 -.78 -3.8
22 +.14 -19.4
52 -4.80 -40.6
18 -1.14 +4.0
22 +.04 -26.0
18 -.63 -24.0
... +.27 -86.3
11 -.53 -1.4
20 +.05 -4.9
23 -.62 -11.5
23 +.07 +21.8
26 +.21 -9.9
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Qualcom .86
RFMlcD :..
RschMotn ..
Rivebeds ...
SanDisk ...
SeagateT .72
SeattGen ..
Sequenom ...
SifyTech ...
Sicnware .28
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSol ....
Staples .40
Starbucks .68
StlDynam .40
Symantec ..
TD Arneritr .24
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .90
TriQuint
UrbanOut ...
Veecolnst ...
VertxPh ...
VirgnMda h .16
Vodafone 1.45
WetSeal ...
WholeFd .40
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
YRC rsh ...
Yahoo
ZionBco .04


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2.3 ... +.51 +1.8 35.1
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2.6 ... +1.30 -1.0 38.1
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1.3 62 -1.17 -23.9 '31.I
2.9 18 -.37 +11.9 30.,
3.2 ... -.49 -25.8 9.1
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2.8 12 -1.10 -7.3 34.:
4.5 12 -1.09 .-5.6 34.1
2.1 9 -2.05 -21.8 34.7
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1.2 10 -2.59 -38.6 16.
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10 -2.07 +2.9
17 42.13 +22.0
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17 -.18 -15.1
... -5.30 +20.7
42 '-.16 +3.1
18 +1.54 -23.8
11 +.03 -34.7
27 +1.69 +37.5
12 -.12 -26.3
20 -1.01 +1.4
15 -.27 -10.8
... +.08 -36.1
13 -1.41 -21.5
10 -.26 -54.9
18 -1.38 -25.4
3 +1.07 -32.0
... -4.95 +4.6
... -.52 -11.0
... -.27 +5.6
17 -.85 -7.8
40 -4.98 +35.7
20 -.42 -15.0
31 -5.88 +26.8
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Name p DIv Yid P Ch %Chg Last
NatGrid 2.92 5.8' .. +.02 +13.0 50.15
NOilVearc .44 .6 16 -4.65 +5,7 71.08
NYCmtyB 1.00 7.9 11 -.62 -33.1 12.62
.NewqllRub .32 2.0 .36 +,55 -125 15.91
NewnmlM 1,40 2.0 '16 +.89 +12.9 69.38
.Nexeng .20 ... +.42 -24.4 17.31
NextEraEn2.20 3.9' 14 -.60 '+8.6 56.44
NiSource .92 4.1 20 -.29 +26.2 22.23.
NobleCorp ,55 1.5 28 .+.40 +5.0 37.79
NoklaCp .55 '8.2 ... -.51 -35.4 6.67
NorflkSo 1.72 23 15-1.01 +17.1 73.54
Nucor 1.45 3.7 20 -.30 -11.0 39.01
OcciPet 1.84 1.9 14 -.13 -.5 97.64
OfftceDpt .. .... -.22 -57.0, 2.32
OilSvHT '1.58 .8 ... -.12 -8.5 128:60
PG&ECp 1.82 4.5' 16 -2.08 -14.6 40.86
PNC 1.40 2.7 8 -2.40' -13.3 52.67
PPLCorp 1.40 4.7 12 -.03 +12.7 29.67
PatriotCoal .. ..... -1.22 -37.3 12.14
PeabdyE -.34 .8 13 -3.18 -31.9 43.57
Penney .860 2.4 20 +.61 +4.3 33.69
PepsiCo 2.06 3.3 16 -1.21 -5.1 61.99
PetrbrsA 1,34 5.2 ... -:12 -24.6 25.75
Petrobras 1.26 4.6 ... -.11 -27.2 27.53
Pfizer. -80 4.1 12 -.16 +12.3 19.66
PhilipMor 3.08 4.4 15 -1.91 +20.0 70.21
PitnyBw 1.48 7.4 8 -.74 -17.5 19.96
PlainsEx .. ., 27 +3.98 +13.4 .36.46
Potash s 28 .6 15 -1.92 -6.9 48.05
PS USDBull... ...... +.55 -4.4 21.71
PrinFncl .70 2.8 8 -1.99-23.2 24.99
ProLogis 1.12 3.8 ... -.66 -7.7 29.27
ProShtS&P... ...... +.95 -6.2 41.14
PrUShS&P ... ... ... +.87 -15.1 20:17
ProUItQQQ ........ -3.62 '+7.7 87.66.
PrUSoQQQrs... .. .:+1.45 -24.9 43.69
ProUltSP .31 .7 ... -2,47 -3.8 46.21
ProUShL20 ... .., ... -2.15 -45.4 20.21
PrUlt2K ..... ... -1.63 -15.8 35.94:
ProUSSP500... ... +.86 -26.7 14.22
PrUltSP500s.03l ...... -5.24 -11:1 60.69
ProUSSIvrs.. ... .57 --70.4, 11.62
ProUShEuro... ... ... +.95 -10.9 18.10
ProgsvCp,1.40 2.2 '11 -.94 -6.7 18.53
ProUSR2Krs... ... +1.08 -19. 40.39
Prudent. 1.15 2.2 8 -5.11 -11.1 52.19
PuteGrp .. .. -.02 -27.1 5.48
QksilvRes ... ... 4 +.14 -42:8 8.43
RadianGop .01' .4 ... +.30 -64.8 2.84,
Raytheon 1.72 3.9 8 +.84 -3.9 44.18
RegionsFn,,04 1.0 24 -.25 -42.6 4.02
Renrenn ...... -1.74 -70.7 5.28
RioTinto 1.17 2.1 ... -2.14 -21.8 56.04
RifteAid ... .......-.09 +24.6- 1.10
Rowan ... ... 29 -.96 +2.1 35.63
SLMCp .40 2.8 15 +.51 +12.5 14.16
SpdrDJIA 3.23 2.7 ... -2.44 +3.4 119.60
SpdrGod ... ......+1.23 + 23.2 170.85
SPMid 1.64 1.0 ... -1.85 -.7 163.56
S&500ETF2.46 2.0 .,. -3.12' -.2 125.48.
SpdrHomne .31 1.9 ... -.41 -4.0 16.17
SpdrS&PBk.26 1.3, ... -.83 -24.5 19.57
SpdrLehHY4.23 10.1 ... -.16 -2.3 38.80
SpdrRetl .49 ..9 ... -.58 +9.7 53.07
SpdrOGEx .50 .9 ... -.02 +7.8 56:87
SpdrMetM .42 .7 ... .1.95 -17.2 56.93
Safeway .58'3.0 11 -.43 -14.1 19.32
StJude .84 2.2 13 -1.49 -9.7 38.59
SandRdge ... ... 12 -.33. ,+7.4 7.86
,Sanofl 1.82 5.3 ... -3.12 +5.9 34.12
SaraLee .46 2.5 13 +.35 +5.8 18.52
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.3 22 -.99 -10.2 74.97
Schwab .24 1.9 19 -.20 -26.0 12.66
SealAIr .52 2.9 13 -.65 -30.5 17.70
SemiHTr .64 2.0 ... -.55 -1.9 31.92
SiderurNac .81 8.6 ... -.44 -43.3 9.45
SilvWhtng .12 .3 28 +.12 -7.6 36.09
SouthnCo 1.89 4,4 18 +.37 +13.0 43.20
SwstAlrl .02 .2 39 -25 -34.3 8.53



Wy YTD Widy
Name Div Yid PE Chg %Chg Last
AbdAsPac .42 6.0 ... -.15 +3.1 6.96
Adventrx ... ...... -.09 -60.2 1.04
AlexcoRg ... ..... -.21 -4.0 7.86
iAIvdeIHA -1 17 .46.00 .4n


AmApparel ... ...
AntaresP ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalRaren ...
Banrog ...
BarcGSOl ...
Brigus grs ...
BritATob 3.86 4.1
CAMAC En ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSd ci ...
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
CheniereE 1.70 10.3
DenisnMg ....
EV LUdDur 1.25 8.4
ExeterR gs ...
ExtorreGg ...
FrkStPrp .76 6.4
GabGIdNR 1.68 10.3
GascoEngy...
Gastargrs ...
GenMoly ... ...
GoldenMin ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrra g ..
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSilv g ...
ImpOilgs .44 ...
IndiaGC ... ....
IntTower g ...
LongweiPI ...
MadCatzg ...
Metalico ...


-,01 -46.4
+.01 +35.3
+.24 -16.4
-.28 -48.2
-.32 +5.0
+.28 -6.5
-.08 -37.6
-1.18 +20.8
-.05 -40.7
-.01 -5.6
-.01 -54.9
-.23 +10.7
-.48 +107.4
-1.30 -22.8
-.11 -55.6
-.39 -7.1
+.28 -34.9
+.30 +23.7
-1.15 -16.6
-.13 -15.7
-.01 -42.6
-.65 -23.0
-.40 -46.9
+.84 -68.6
+.14 -52.3
-.30 -23.5
-.14 -54.4
+.02 -3.9
-1.47 +2.2
+.04 -40.0
+.02 -47.0
+.37 -40.9
+.01 -19.6
-.89 -35.5


I e D F %l" YD WLat


Name Div Yid-PE ig %Chg ast.
SwstnEngy,... ... 24 -1.55 414.0 42.68
SpectraEn 1.12 3.8 16' +.16 17.4 29.33
SpintNex ... ... ... +.15 -3222 ;2.87
SPMalls .82 2.3 ... -1.01 ,-8.9 34.98
SPHIthC .64' 1.9 .. -1.02 +5.4' 33.19
SPCnSt :.85 2:7 ... -.52' +5.7 30.99
SP Consum.61 1.6 ... -.71 +4.0 38.92
SPEngy 1.08 1.5 ... -1.78 +4.4 71.26
SPDR Fnc .20 1.5. -.77 -16.7 '13.29
SP Inds .69 2.1 ... -.66 -3.6 33.60
SPTech .36 1.4 ... -.43 +3.4 26.05
SPUtil 1.36 3.9 ... -.03 +11.6 34.98
SteawdHtl .50 1.0 16 -1.35 -16.7 50.63
StateStr .72 1.8 13 -2.02 -13.7 39.99
SllwtrM ..'' ... 9 -.52 -44.1 11.93
Suncogs ,44 ... ,11 -.87 -15.3 32.44
S(intedi ... .. 3 -.34 -65.8 2.74
SunTrst .20 .1.0 19 -1.14 -34.0 19.49
Supvalu .35 4.5 64 -.57 -19.8 7.72
Synovus .04 2.8 ... -.12 -45.5 '1.44
Sysco 1.04 3.7 14 -.13 -5.4 27.80
TE Connect .72 2.1 13 -1.23 -.8 35.11
TaiwSeml .52 4.0 .:. +.24 +3.5 '12.98
Talisxmg .27 ......-.71 -35.6 .14.28
Target 1.20 2.3 12 -3.07 -13.2 52.17
TeckRes g .80 ....... -2.97 -37.2 38.84
TelefEsps 2.14 10.9 ... -1.57 -13.6 19.71
Tenaris .68 1.9 +.72 -20.1 35.23
TenetHith ... ... 12 -.21 -27.4 4.86
Teradyn .... .. .10 -.44 +3.8. 14.58
Terex .... ... ....91 -45.4 16.95.
Tesoro ... ... .6 +1.70 +55.3 28.80
TexInst ,.68 2.1 13 +.29 -2.2 31.79
Textron .08 .4 17 -1.69 -21.3 18.61
ThemoFs ... ... 14, -2.54 -11.7 48.86
3MCo 2.20 2.8 13 -1.70 -8.1 79.30
TWCabte 1.92 3.1 14 -1.19 -7.2 61.29
TimeWam .94 2.7 13 -1.03 +7.1 34.44
TollBros .... ... 38 -.69 -8.6 17.36
Total SA 2.38 4.6 .. -3.21 -4.1 51.28
Transocn .79 1.6 ... -9.87 -27.9 50.12
Travelers 1.64 2.8 16 -1.34 +4.4 58.14
TrinaSolar ... ... 2 -1.20 -65.5 8.08
UBSAG ... ... -1.39 -24.4 12.45
USAirwy ... ... 10 -.44 -45.1 5.50
UPSB 2.08 3.0 17 -1.5Q -3.6 69.99
USBancfp .50 2.0 11 -.50 -5.3 25.53
USNGsrs ... '...' ... -.30 -27.3 8.71
USOilFd ......... +.43 -6.5 36.46
USSteel :20 .7 ... +.06 -52.2 27.92
UtdhlthGp .65 1.4 10 -3.27 +26.2 45.58
UnumGrp .42 1.9 8 -2.38 -9.7 21.86
ValeSA 1.14 4.4 ... -.50 -24.4 26.12
Vale SAp! 1.14. 4.7 ... -.63 -19.8 24.23
ValeroE .60 2.3 9 -.90 +11.6 25.80
VangEmg .82 2.0 ... -1.25 -12.8 41.98
VerizonCm2.00 5.4 15 -.46 +3.9' 37.17
ViacomB 1.00 2.4 12 -3.70 +4.0 41.19
Visa .88 .9 19 .-2.46 +31.6 92.64
Walgm *' 90 2.7 11 -.64 -14.9 33.17
WsteMInc 1.36 4.3 15 -2.22 -14.6 31.50
WeathflntI ... ... 62 -.11 -29.0 16.18
WellsFargo .48 1.9 9 -1.56 -18.0 25.40
WendysCo .08 1.5 ... +.41 +19.0 5.50
WDigital ... ... 9 +.65 -17.6 .27.95
WstnUnion .32 1.8 11 -.65 -6.5 17.36
Weyerh .60 3.5 20 -.99 -8.6 17.31
WhftingPts .. !'11 -3.37 -19.8 47.02
WmsCos 1.00 32 20 +.02 +26.5 31.27
XLGrp .44 2.1 28 -1.25 '-2.3 21.31
Xerox .17 2.0 14 -.07 -26.6 8.46
Xylemn .10 .,....-.63 +3.9 25.19
Yamanag .20 1.2 17 +.71 +27.0 16.26
YingliGm ... ...2 -1.09 -42.7 3.69



Widy YTD Wkdy
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
I r o ... -. 05- .4 8


MetroHIth
MdwGold g
Minefnd g
MinesMgt
NeoStem
Neoprobe
Nevsun g
NwGold g
NA Pall g
NDynMn g
NthnO&G
NovaGld g
Oilsands g
ParaG&S
PhrmAlh
PionDrill
Quepasa
RareBe 9g
Rentech
RexahnPh
Richmnt g
Rubicon g
SamsO&G
SeabGldg
TanzRy g
Taseko
TmsatlPet
TriValley
TriangPet
US Geoth
Ur-Energy
Uranerz
UranlumEn
VantageDrl
VimetX
VlstaGold
YM Bio Q


-.05 +48.8
-.20 +157.1
+.90 +42.2
+.09 -38.8
-.04 -53.4
-.24 +32.0
+.50 -21.4
-.57 +25.1
+.05 -49.6
-.45 -42.4
+2.05 -1.9
+.30 -31.7
-.01 -40.5
+.07 -26.8
-.18 -61.9
-.97 +14.2
+.12 -61.3
-.24 -59.3
+.10 +34.4
-.39 -39.3
-.18+142.1
-.18 -29.4
-.10 +78.0
-.03 -20.1
-.28 -49.6
-.16 -30.5
+.25 -68.2
-.02 -70.2
-.25 -10.9
+.05 -59.0
-.17 -61.5
-.17 -47.1
-.23 -46.9
-.12 -35.0
+2.57 +49.2
+.05 +61.5
+.12 -21.0


'Last PvsDay
Australia .9619 .9603
Britain 1.6040 1.6041
Canada 1.0173 1.0079
Euro .7258 .7228
Jaoan 78.16 78.09
Mexico .13.4591 13.3985
Swtzerind .8859 .8784
Bptish pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar In foreignn currency.





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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


I ADvantage


[Persona MerhnI


$250

4 ach Ines mst6 daysde a p dile.
Rate appliesto private Individuals selling
personal merchandise ttalling $00 or less.



S Each Item must Include a p.ce.
One Item per ad IQ 0
4 lines 6 days li ac addional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $50 or less.



S Each Item must Include a price.
This Isa non-refundable rte.



One Item per ad $2370
4 lines 6 days additional
Rate applies to private Individuals selling



Personal merchandise totalling $1200 or less.
Each item must Include a price.
This I a non-refundabd e rate.



One Rem per ad 23UF \
4 n; 6 days sEach additional
4 ,lines d v line $1.645
Rate apes to private Individualsellln
personal Pmerchadlie totlling $2,00 or leS.



S Each Item must Include a prIce
lThis s non dabla ra e




One tem per adtial
4 lines 6 days ta eflonall
Rate applies to private individuals ailing
'personal merchandise totalling $4,00 or leas.
Each Iem must ieelade a price
rThis Is a n'l-,rsndah rate.




41ine Ha per dav Each additional
lines ays line $1.65
Rate applies to private Individualse wiling
Iff, This Is a nohretndhindbe Prate. !-


Limited to service type advertise
ing only
.1 lines one month....'92.00
$10 80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.

- ass s


You can call us at .755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some'
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifjeds@lakecityre-
porter.com


Daln

-mSr t al al


Ad Is to Appear. Call by: Faxi/nallby:
Tuesday Mon.,1H.00a.m. Mon., 9:00 am.
Wednesday Mon.,10:00 am. Moi.,9:00a.m.
Thursday Wed.,lt00la.m. Wed., t00 am.
Friday Thurs.,10:00am. Thm s.,9:00 am.
Saturday Fri., 10:00 am. .A, .00 a.m.
Sunday F, 10:00am. Fri., 9:00 a.m.
These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication..
We accept responsibility for only
the first Incorrect Insertion, and.
only the charge for the ad space
In error. .Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-'
tion and billing adjustments..
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information .be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising -copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
.abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.:

In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.com


Legal


Public Auction'
2003 CHEV
VIN#2G1WF52E439317748
1993 FORD
VIN# 1FTDFl5Y6PNA10551
To be held 11/15/2011, 8:00am at
Bryant's Tire and Towing
1165 East Duval St. Lake City FL
32055
05528946
November 6, 2011
PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF PROPOSED BOARD
ACTION TO CONSIDER
ORDER APPROVING PROVI-
SIONAL FRANCHISE AND WA-
TER RATE ADJUSTMENTS FOR
ESPENSHIP INVESTMENT
GROUP, LLC.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County.Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on November 17,
2011, in the Columbia County
School Board Administration Build-
ing, 372 West Duval. Street, Lake
City, Florida at 7:00 p.m. hold a pub-
lic hearing to consider a Proposed
Board Action entitled:
PROPOSED BOARD ACTION BY
THE BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF"
COLUMBIA COUNTY
FLORIDA
ORDER APPROVING PROVI-
SIONAL FRANCHISE AND WA-
TER RATE ADJUSTMENTS FOR,
ESPENSHIP INVESTMENT
GROUP, LLC;.
The substance 6f the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies.of the proposed ordinance are
available for inspection at tha office
of the County Manager located in the
SCounty: Administration Complex,
135 NE Hemrnando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.,
In the event .any person decides to
appeal any decision of the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above
references public hearing a record
of the proceedings may be needed
and in such event, such person may,
Need to ensure that.a verbatim record
of'the'public hearing is made, which
,record includes the testimony, and
' 'evidence on which the appeal is to be
'based.
In< accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person need-'
ing special accommodations or-an in-
terpreter to participate in this. pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts '
386/752-1006 or T.D. Services
386/758-2139. at least seven k7) days
prior to the dale of the hearing.
-DATED this Isi day of November,
-2011
R DEWITTCASON
Clerk of Court';
05528894
November 6, 2011

020 Lost & Found

Know where he is?
Please call
386-249-0164
facebook.com/chewylostL


Lost: ladies perscription/purple
'glasses w/hot pink case. Missing
around Oct. 20th. On Birley Rd. at'
the Kol HaMaschiach 364-4494

100 Job
U Opportunities


05528938
NOW HIRING:
COMPANY DRIVERS
Enjoy the open road with
Our Line Haul division! '
Now Hiring Driver Trainers!
CDL-A & 3 mos OTR exp
S req'd.




Our tradition of stability gives
you a future of strength!
www.amoldtrans.com
S800-299-4744

05528943
Substitute Teachers-Infant/
Toddler/PreK (Lake City)
HS Dip/GED; FCCPC/CDA,
DCF 40 hrs., 5 hr literacy and
1stAidlCPR preferred;
classroom experience preferred;
Bilingual (Spanish/English)
preferred. Must pass physical
/DCF background screening.
Apply in person at 236 SW
Columbia Ave or e-mail resume
(386)754-2222

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CDL Class A Driver needed.
Must have clean driving record.
Target Dedicated.
Call Lee at (772)293-5878
Commercial Driver Class A for
OTR employment with local
company. Volvo 780 with reefer
trailer. Exp'd req'd. Absolutely
clean record. Call for interview,
Trava Bros LLC (386) 438-3256.
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full training provided
Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
Experienced Roofers
Needed.
Please call
(850) 271-4199
Production Technician'needed.
Must be over 21/clean driving
record. On call wkwnds/after hrs.
Call for appt. 386-754-0261


100 Job
1 Opportunities
FT/PT Line Cook w/comm'1 cook-
ing exp needed at Milton's Coun-
try Store. Will be taking orders
cooking & serving. Kitchen open
to view. Apps avail Milton's 8 mi
N, of 1-10 hwy 441 (386)365-7262
STYLIST NEEDED at
Southern Exposure.
386-752-4614
Call for info.



FLORIDA
c GAT E AY
qM COLLEGE

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
MATHEMATICS
(to-commence Spring Term 2012)
Teach college-level and preparatory
mathematics; work with colleagues for
,the advancement of departmental goals.
Position Is a spring term appointment with
possible continuance based on enrollment
needs. Requires a Master's degree in
mathematics; or master's degree with
minimum of 18 graduate credit hours In
course work centered on mathematics.
Ability to use technology in Instruction.
Ability to teach on-line and distance..
learning courses. Ability to work well with
others. Ability to learn from colleagues
and to share knowledge. Ability to utilize
various Instructional strategies to reach
students. Ability to present Information in
a coherent manner and the ability to fairly
evaluate student retention of that
Information. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience. Ability to
teach college level and preparatory
mathematics. Salary: Based on degree
and experience. Application Deadline:
Open Until filled.
Persons interested should provide Col-
lege application, vita, and photocopies,
of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
b6 submitted with official translation and
evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at:'
www.fac.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax(386)'754-4814
E-Mail: humannfffac.edu
FGOC-is accredited'bythe Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of
'Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education and Employment


4


* -- '


An *meaW opportunity empioyerr'pogram. Axltkary aide and
serWvlcs are avalae upon request to persons with disabilies.
Persons needing ccommodatlons please contact Jeannie Carr at
(386) 7656026 X 3150 one day prior to job fair. TTY (386) 762-2622


100 Job
100 'Opportunities
Customer Service Representative
for call center. Must be fast friend-
ly & efficient. Please send resume
to: 197 SW Waterford Ct. Lake
City, Fl 32025 .Att: Joey Kitaif.
Please send resume for call center
position only. There are no other
positions at this time.
Wanted, Banquet Cook, experi-
enced in high end cuisine. Apply
in person at Cerveny Conf Center,
11057 Camp Weed PI., Live Oak.
Wee Care of Columbia City
is hiring CDA Teachers
Experience required.
Apply in person.

120 Medical
12 Employment

05528667
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local 'Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05528913
'Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY
TECH wanted full time or part.
Time, for private Radiology of-
fice. AART & Mammography
certification req. Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

05528941
Fast-paced physical therapy
center hiring a licensed Physicil
-Therapist's Assistant orRehab
Aide. Hands-on training w/some
exp. preferred. Personal training
or fitness background a plus.
Basic knowledge of anatomy
and exercises are a MUST.
Candidate must be confident,
have good people skills, a great
attitude and be willing to learn.
Extreme motivation promotes
pta7l14(lhotmail.com
or fax to 386-755-3165.

Orthopedic Surgeon seeks
Medical Transcriptionist.
.Experienced candidates need'only
to apply. Please fax resume to:
386-758-6995.


Medical office seeking Cert.
.Respiratory Therapist Tech .
part-time. Fax resume to
(386) 754-1712.
REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


10 Medical
20 'Employment

05528934
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare.Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities
and to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
For its. Student Loan
Forgiveness program. Licensed
Clinicians who serve in our
approved locations may qualify
for up to $60k in Student Loan
forgiveness for F/T
2yr commitment.
Therapists:.
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred
* Bachelor's-Level in Counselor
Support
* Case Management (adult &
child)
* Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
* Master'sTherapist in
Screening
Medical Services
* RN full-time Lake City CSU
* PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
* Recovery Specialist'
(.Direct Care )


05528912
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners &c exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-i 1/28/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
*Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees, Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com

To place your
classified ad call


CC'-,- 0[N V


Selling from
Hilton Garden Inn, 4075 SW 33rd Place, Gainesville, FL

For More nformatifoh 800-323-8388

Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.
A TIONS 10% Buyer's Premium AU 479, AB 296
Roe. ,to s~o


Where: Lake City Mall

2469 W US Highway 90; Suite 190

Lake City, FL 32055

* Professional dress required

As a global business process outsourcing

(BPO) provider, Sitel offers a range of call cen-

ter career opportunities in 135+ locations. We '

are currently looking for motivated individuals to

join our team. FIT, P/T and temporary positions

available. No collections, no telemarketing-

just GREAT opportunities.


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and' cats being sold to be at4east 8
weeks old and have a'health :
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
J3j3 Supplies
WANTED: I Buy and Sell used
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay cash. Call 386-935-1522

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
'Call 386-961-1961.
Wntlin s.., (r Tuin, Vnn.


Must be Pre-Paid.


450 Good Things
450 to Eat ;
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
S Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville


460 Fire ood
Firewood for Sale.$65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288 .
if no answer pIs leave message
we will call you back.

520 Boats for Sale
07 SeaFox 17 ft. Center console.
Aprox. 40 hrs. Mecury 90iP. New
551b trolling motor. Alum'trailer.
Pay off $13,000. 386-758-7766

I3 Mobile Homes
630U for Rent
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2bedrm/2bth $500 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
.441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2BR/2BA in Country. Large shady
yard, No pets! $550 dep.
$550 rent: Water, sewer &
garbage.fumished. 386-867-0941
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/2ba DWMH
on 1 ac:
$700. ino. $500 security.
386-719-4957
3BR/2BA on 1/2 ac Branford area
Nice yard. Must see!
Call for info..
386-623-6523.or 386-752-7814.
CLEAN furnished or unfurnished
3br/lba, In quiet, private park.
Large lot Call: 386-752-6269
lv message if no answer.
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
'Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Mobile Hohies for rent in
White Springs, & Ft. White.
Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482

(640 Mobile Homes
S640for Sale
3/2 MH on 1 acre in nice sub.
paved rd. metal roof. completely
remodeled. new everything! Only
$39,500 386-249-1640
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes Has 3 .
Modular Homes Available
at HUGH Savings
Over 40K Off 800-622-2832
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or Doubles. Must have
clear title. Call North Point Homes
(352)872-5566


To see our current openings in $275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
SMental Healt h and to apply $27.5 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
Mental Health and to apply NO title needed !386-878-9260
online, please go to: After 5pm 386- 752-3648.
www.mbhci.ore
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify 4
430 Garage Sales
240 Schools & PUBLISHER'S NOTE
240 Education .All Yard Sale Ads


FLORIDA
G GATEWAY'
f COLLEGE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. NURSING AND
HEALTH SCIENCES
Position #: A99962
(Re-advertised)
This Is a professional classification
responsible for the development and
supervision of Innovative and forward-
thinking programs. The primary
responsibilities are to Implement and
maintain the Bachelor of Science degree
in Nursing, continue to expand all program
areas and resources, provide effective
leadershipfor administration, faculty, and
students, manage multiple budgets, and
an understanding of strong personnel
management. The Executive Director,
will have.the responsibility of developing
and maintaining a premier institute that
will support Florida Gateway College as
it moves Into the baccalaureate degree
program level. The Individual applying
for this position must hold a minimum of
a master's degree and be eligible for or-
hold a Florida Nursing license or closely
related field, have at least five years of
progressive administrative'experience, a
strong background in program design and
accreditation, and a valid Florida driver's
license. Desirable Qualifications:
Doctorate degree in Nursing or health.
related field preferred. Record of teaching
at tenured professor level; experience
In business in conjunction with health
background. Experience'in the community
college teaching/working environment.
Salary: Based on Degree and Experience.
Application Deadline: Open Until Filled.
Persons Interested should provide
College application, vita, and photocopies
of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation. Position details and
applications.avallable on web at:
www.fac.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E.'College Place "
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: htimanrafgf.edu
FGC Is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of.
Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO
College In Education and Employment'


200+ Job Opportunities


_What: Applications and Pre-screening


Date: Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Time: 9am-4pm


I-









5C


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED


710 Unfurnished Apt. 730 Unfurnished
For Rent I Home For Rent


05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








Nice, g 2 br Apt. Close to town

2BR/1BA. Close to town.


2BR/2BA w/grage
5 minutes from VA hospital and
Timco. Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 &3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Inci water.
386-755-2423 riesbyrentals.com
The Lakes Apts'Studios & lBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable, incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
States avail Call 386-752-2741
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
'$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181


3br/2ba on acreage $695 mo.
3br/2ba nice home fine
neighborhood. $875.mo. 3br/2ba
bonus room. Fine home, newer
neighborhood. $995. mo. Security
deposit and application req'd.
Call 386-935-1482
4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close-to.
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1100. mo.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
For lease-beautiful Callaway sub.
home brick, 3bd/2bath/2car w/LG
fenced yard, built 2007. $1275.
p/m+last+security 386-365-0083'
For lease-Lakewood sub. LG
brick, 2600 sq. ft. 4bd/2.5 ba/2car
Lg lot by Lake Jeffrey. $1275.m
+last+sec. Bruce 386-365-3865
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private 6bn 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
TOWNHOUSE2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553
7 0 Business &
750 Office Rentals

05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI.
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space.,Convenient to
Court house.
Call 3867155-3456.
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
S1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
S0622 or weekends 386-497-4762


72r Furnished Apts. Con
7 For Rent 770 Condos For Rent


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished, Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly.
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly ,
: 386-752-5808

73 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, comer of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
3BR/1BA HOME off McFarlane.
SCH/A,'lg yard, No pets.
$600. mo $600. dep.
850-42'1-3617 or 850-294-4778
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.,,. -
$750. mo + full security. '
386-9657534 or 386-365,1243....-

Hos orRn'


-mradlIe
03B/ bahwthdn
gaae 2,00s. t
$ 13 0 pr mnt
Cal 386752865


2BR/2BA, all appliances,
water/sewer, basic cable,
-pool & tennis cts.
$1150/mo, calt,386-344-0433

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair.
housing act which makes it illegal
to-advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familiar status orr.gtiko.-_.
al on;gin";' or any intention to mike-
such preference, limitation or .
discrimination Familal status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
. people securing custody of chil-
dreri under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept anyadvertising.for real es-
tate which is in violation of the

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakeoityreporter.com


3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181

870 Real Estate,
$ 7 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

950 Cars for Sale
1974 FORD Galaxy.
Clean, runs fair, spotless interior.
4-door. $2,300!
386-754-8885
1986 Chevy Monte Carlo SS. Ma-
roon on maroon. I owner, non
smoker. $84K original mi. Never
wrecked. $10Kobo 904-718-6747
Cold A/C, great gas, mileage,
4 new tires, low mile engine.
Looks and runs great.
$3500 obo. Call 386-965-1600


Private Estate
Withi e the city limits. Beautiful
older home with mature land-
scapirig and lake views, 6 Br., 3.5
baths, 3 fireplaces, private paved
drive. 39.7 acres of property in-
cluded vith home. $994,000 or
$2,500 per -no: for rent or home
plus 2 acres only $495,000. Call
for additional iNfo and showings.

Listing Agent Mary Brown Whitehurst

(386) 965-0887
0 .or co-owner (386)397-5131


S & WATERCRAFT


2005 Ford F-350
Lariat.
50,000 miles, many
extras, excellent cond.

$18,500
Call
386-755-0139


2007 SeaFox
17 ft. center console,
approx. 40 hrs. Mercury
90hp. New 551b trolling
motor. Alum. trailer.
Pay off
$12,600
Call
386-758-7766


2001 Pontiac
Grand Am
Cold A/C, great gas
mileage, 4 new tires,
low mile engine. Looks
and runs great.
$3,500 OBO
Call
386-965-1600


1986 Chevy
Monte Carlo SS
Maroon on maroon,
one owner, non-smoker,
84,000 orig. mi., never
wrecked, solid body.
$10,000 OBO
Call
386-718-6747


Lake City Reporter


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.




2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond,
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
STerms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To Get You


805 Lots for Sale
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call'
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft!, double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.
Must sell fast!
Handyman Special.
Near downtown Lake City.
$8,400 386-623-0906

820 Farms&
20 Acreage
$10,000 reduction onfour 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.'
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landqfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
: Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7.stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close,in $500. mo.
386-961-1086

830 Commercial
O Property


Tell 'em L.C. Reporter sent ya.



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Sign up today for EasyPay*, and receive,
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i c ecadd 5386.755.5445


--.j


Classified Department: 755-5440


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


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Home Furnishings


Decor


386-466-1888

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Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks

TOYOTA 1"%
Please present Rountree
Moore Toyota Bucks at "
time of purchase No cash
value No reproductions : .'y
of the Rountree Moore
Toyota Bucks is allowed. *iflb
Not valid with any other S EI E
coupon. One coupon per M
customer Fees, tax. Expires 11-30-11
& shop supplies not -3
included Not Legal Tender



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B &UniqueGfls Gi
L"' Cordially invites you to our First Annual... .. pl! '

"'GIKLS (J] GHTqOUqT
CHRISTMAS SHOPPING EXTRAVAGANZA
,, ~November 18th, 2011 _.
1^^ 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. d .i
275 N. Marion St Lake Citl FL 32055
(rrefshmeiaL and ru ill be pn.id3di -
.. o f ,r ..,r. i.',l...,.rt_.,...r, 4. l 38 .2ii3 h^9S


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Classified Department: 755-5440


CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


II


!


GOWed by Medicare & Many nWan Ptens











Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





LIFE


Sunday, November 6, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Once a

week is

plenty

n my morning
drive to work, I.
pass a number
of home lawns
that are being
watered every day or every
other day. Why are some
people using our most pre-
cious natural resource like
this? So far, the answer to
this question has eluded
me.
It is possible that some
residents do not understand
the water source of nearly
100 percent of our drink-
ing water, the Floridan
Aquifer., This aquifer is
a system of underground
limestone rocks and caves
that hold water. It lies
beneath all of Florida and
much of the southern parts
of Alabama, Georgia, and
South Carolina. Water in
the underground limestone
aquifer slowly flows to the
south ...
Most people are familiar
with surface water such as.
lakes, rivers and oceans.
We cant ee above ground
water,; but it is harder to
imagine the underground
water supply. Wells are
drilled into the under-
ground water supply,
bringing up millions of
gallons of pure drinking
water. Wells also extract
water from the aquifer that
is used to irrigate those
lawns, every day.
We.have our rainy spells
and our dry spells, but
Florida has the good for-
tune-of an annual precipita-
tion average of around 53
inches per year. In the
past, the supply of drinking
water has been replenished
as the rains filter into the
ground water, or recharge
the aquifer.
But several things are.
happening to threaten the
quantity of this very impor-
tant natural resource. The
population is increasing
which means there will
be more and more people
using this resource. At the
same time, development is
covering Aatural areas with
paved lots, buildings, roads
and other surfaces that will
not let rain water naturally
, soak into the ground.
Several years of drought
have taken a toll on the
local water tables. During
times of drought, streams,
lakes, and wells can dry
up as the water level in the
aquifer goes down. Right
now, the Suwannee River
is showing those effects .
of low levels. Are there
ponds, lakes or streams
near you showing signs of
low water levels?
We all share that price-
less natural resource -.
water. Water restrictions
now allow for watering
your lawn once per week
for a reason, and that rea-
son benefits you, me, our
children and grandchil-
dren.
D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Fair Finale


Lilith St. John, 3, of Lake City, enjoys the Dragon ride Thursday while attending the Columbia County Fair. .


From staff reports


after nine days of fun
,k and fried food, the
AColumbia County Fair
came to a close Saturday.
ousands of visitors
laced through the fairgrounds taking
in the livestock exhibits, vendors and
educational booths. Young and old alike
buckled in for wild rides on the midway.
This year's theme, "A Smokey Bear A
Fair," honored fallen firefighters Joshua
Burch, 31, of Lake City and Brett Fulton.
52, of the Springville community, as well
as all wildfire firefighters. The tremen-
dous effort from fair employees and
volunteers made it a successful, family
event. Columbia County will be anxious-
ly awaiting the 58th year of the fair.
See more fair coverage Page 4D


Christine Mullen performs with Nicka, a 4-year-old female cou-
gar, at the Columbip County Fair.


In the photo above, hundreds
.of people are seen enjoying the
Columbia County Fair in this aerial
photograph of the midway taken
from the top of the Ferris Wheel
on Thursday.

In the photo at left, Adrienne
Foreman, 7, of Lake City, tries to
make a basket at a booth at the
Columbia County Fair.

Photos by Matthew Jason Walker
Lake City Reporter


TASTE BUDDIES


uenie norman ana
Mary Kay
Hollrngsworth
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com


Give

Hannah's

Seafood

andGrill

atry

Having started out with
humble beginnings in a
mobile kitchen, Hannah's
Seafood and Grill has moved
t4p to a 30-seat restaurant
The eclectic, vintage fishing
d6cor with faux weathered
wood flooring give you ,the,
feel of being down in the
Conch Republic.
On a recent Saturday
evening, the place was jam-
packed with locals enjoying;
the casual yet tasty fare.
Hannah's doesn't have a
liquor license, so if you. want/
to enjoy a libation, BYOB.
They'll even supply a bucket
of ice to cool down your bot-
tled beverage of choice at
no charge.
Our table of six really
inixed it up with' the appetiz-
ers. The ribeye -15
lighftlybattered and fried,,
were so tender and juicy
without a hint of the dreaded
gristle that often is found at
chain restaurant choicest A
kid-approved favorite was
the fried cheese grits! With
a slight hint of garlic, these
tasty little squares had just
enough coating to keep their
shape and were filled with
the creamiest grits around.
True to the Key West flavor
of the ambience, we couldn't
resist trying out the conch
fritters. Similar to hush pup-
;:es, these perfectly fried
morsels were light and airy
with great flavor. Hannah's
Special Sauce, a jazzed up -
mayo and ketchup concoc-
tion, added just the right
amount of spice as a dipping
sauce.
Each of us were craving
something different as our
main course, and the menu
offered up something for
everyone. Our "I don't like
seafood" girl chose the /
pound hand pattied burger,
"hold the onions and pickles,
please." Coolked just the way
she liked it, our land lover
declared it the yummiest
hamburger around. Being
a bit more adventurous, our
other two teenagers dove into
crispy fried shrimp and fried
gator tail. Full disclosure; we,
are die-hard Seminole fans,
so the gator tail was a natural
choice!
Finding good fried oysters
around here can be tough,
but Hannah's has come to the
rescue. Nicely breaded, the
dozen were perfectly fried
and tender in the middle with
just the right amount of natu-
ral salt you get from fresh
oysters. The Trio Sandwich
featured a super soft bun
which was lightly pan-toasted
and chock full of lightly fried
shrimp, scallops and oysters.
tASTE BUDDIES continued on 2D

Genie Norman and Mary Kay
Hollingsworth are Columbia
County residents who love
good food and fun, at home
and out. Their column on area
restaurants appears twice
monthly. You can contact them
at TasteBuddiesLakeCity@
gmail.com.


I


'









2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011



On the road to tolerance


By LIZ COBB
Associate-Professor of English
Florida Gateway.College
' / ....it really goes to show
it's not who you are
(Tammy, Shameka, Kayla,
Jessie), what you are
(black, white, Hispanic), or
what you do (the good, the bad).
It's how other people accept you
and how far you are willing to go
to be accepted." This philosophy,
provided by one of my Project
Excel students in reaction to an
essay we read in my Principles of
Writing class, helps define what
practicing tolerance and accept-
ing yourself for who you.are
really means. For most incoming
college students, one striking
feature of a college campus is
the feeling that academia accepts
people from all walks of life.
Certainly, here at FGC, we serve
students from.five rural counties,
students just out of high school,
students returning to college seek-
ing new careers, students with dis-


abilities, and the list goes on.
In their discussion board
reactions to Judith Ortiz Cofer's
essay, "Don't Call me a Hot
Tamale," students were very
candid in sharing experiences
they had had with stereotyping,
which made for very fruitful and
rewarding conversations. For
many of them the most memora-
ble experiences occurred in high
school.' One student commented,
"For instance... in my first couple
years of high school I did band
and was constantly under ridicule
for it I was even tormented by
my family because I didn't play
football because of my size and
potential to be a good football
player and get a scholarship
for college." This was a painful
memory but the student went on
to explain how he grew from this
experience.
Another student shared her
experience of being stereotyped
as a cheerleader with no intel-
ligence. She asserted, "But I


Liz Cobb

took a stand to make sure that I
proved I wasn't just any ordinary
dumb blonde I guess you could
say. When graduation came
around, guess who was sitting
pretty with high honors and a
smile on her face?"
In the same way, one student
told her classmates:
"I was often called an 'airhead'
and to this day, I hate that word.
It brings back painful memories
for me. It hurt really badly,
but as time went on, I felt like I
always had to prove myself that
I was both attractive, and smart.'
Today I am a mother of two, and
a Me-Maw- great titles-very


rewarding! I feel like I am still
trying to prove something. But
at this stage of my life, it's prov-
ing things I can do myself, and
not trying to prove to everyone
else."
It's one thing to experience ste-
reotyping as an adult who can fend
for him/herself. When our own
children are experiencing some-
thing so negative it seems almost
insurmountable. It is a part of life,
however. One student shared an
experience his son had from which
we could all learn:
"The first time I experienced
it in my own home was when my
eight-year-old came to me and
told me a story. He told me that
his friend had called him a 'fatso'
and a 'lard butt.',His response to
his friend was to call him a 'black
idiot' I was instantly furious with
my son. After careful thought
I asked him this, 'Is there any-
thing that you can do to change
what this boy is making fun of?'
My son answered reluctantly,


'Yes.' I asked him only one more
question. 'Is there anything that
he can do to change what you
were making fun of?' He didn't
even have to answer me to let
me know that he understood. .
My son did answer me and went
back to school to apologize, not
for making fun of his classmate,
but for the content which he
used. These two boys are friends
today, eight years later."
From a teacher's per-
spective, I was rewarded ten-fold
when I read these thoughtful
and provocative posts. As one
student pointed out, ".. .so the
stereotyping continues, good or
bad." But I contend that by open-
ly sharing our experiences with
our words anid connecting with
each other on this level, we move
one step closer to achieving toler-
ance as a culture.

Liz Cobb can be reached at
elizabeth.cobb@6fgc.edu
386-754-4359 (office)


0


Nation's 101 ighest-prioity



conservation projects listed


By MATT VOLZ-
Associated Press
HELENA, Mont.-An Interior Department report-
released Thursday identifies 101 high-priority
conservation projects across the nation as part"of
President Barack Obama's initiative to protect pub-
lic lands, but it says.most will have to find funding
somewhere besides the U.S. government.
The report outlines two projects in each state and
one in the District of Columbia in various stages of
development, ranging from the creation of an all-
season trail system in Alaska's Denali State Park to
the completion of a 32-mile trail through urban areas
in central Florida.
Representatives from all 50 states who \were asked
to identify specific projects in which, the federal
government could form partnerships as part of the
America's Great Outdoors Initiative.
Some could be completed within in a few years,
while -othe-s& would take sevgal decades, Interior -
Secretary Ken Salazar said.
Salazar said he didn't know the total cost, arid the
report says the federal agency won't be able to fund
most of them, "given the fiscal constraints facing the
federal government."
"We could do more, if we had more funding,",
Salazar said. "I'm hopeful that as Congress consid-
ers appropriations for the future, they will recognize
conservation is important for very important rea-
sons, such as jobs."
Many of the projectshave already launched, and,
the Interior Department will be able to help the.
state and local groups leading them by reallocating
existing revenue within the agency and by providing
technical assistance, he said.
The agency could also help the groups by acquir-
ing conservation easements and grants,-according to
the report.
The report is part of the Obamha administration's
.conservation initiative meant to protect public land,
encourage more people to .enjoy the outdoors and
bolster employment in tourism and recreation.
When-Obama announced the initiative earlier in
February, it aimed to double federal spending on land
and water conservation to $900 milliontto buy private
land for public use and provide grants to states.
The Obama administration came under fire last year
for an internal memo that identified several areas ini
the West as potential national monuments. Critics had
pointed, to that as a sign the administration aimed to



TASTE BUDDIES:

Tasty yet casual seafood

and grill fare

Continued From Page 1D


Topped with shredded
lettuce, chopped tomato
and some more of that
awesome Hannah's Special
Sauce, this sandwich is
definitely worth a try. You
can get any of the seafood
offerings grilled, garlic,
buffalo style, blackened or
with lemon, pepper. The
garlic shrimp were plenti-
ful and cooked to perfec-
tion. You get your choice
to two sides with your
entr6e, and we have to
say our favorites were the
creamy cheese grits, fresh
sauteed spinach, dirty rice
and homemade coarsely
chopped slaw.
With no room to spare,
we didn't try the home-
made desserts but well
save some space next time.
Before we headed out
the door, we were dying
to find out "just who is


Hannah?" Is'she Travis'
wife, mom or grandma?.
Not a chance she's
Travis' English Bulldog
and couldn't possibly have
passed down these great
recipes to share with his
customers!
Only open for three
weeks and a steady stream
of customers, our bet is
that Travis, owner and
cook, will get the planned
outdoor deck under con-
struction pretty quickly.
Come early or go late to
make sure you get a table
at Lake City's newest sea-
food restaurant that rivals
the long remembered and
not forgotten Steven's
Corner.

Hannah's Seafood and Grill
4196 US Highway 90 West
386-752-5255


unilaterally lock up land from development.
Bob Ekey, spokesman for the Wilderness Society,
said the new report shows the Interior Department.
has decided upon a more collaborative approach.
The agency is focused.on community-based conser-
vation, which makes the projects slower to develop
.but means more people are involved, he said.
."It's gone more slowly than a lot of us would like
to see, but it has great promise in helping people
connect to the land and to nature," Ekey said.
Salazar, conscious of the concerns raised by the
national monument memo, said it's important to
protect rural landscapes but in a way that maintains
private ownership.
"The reality is, all these projects have very strong
local, county and state support," Salazar said; "The
days of the federal government buying up large
stretches of land :.. are over. We aren't going to do
that anymore."
U.S. Rep Denny Rehberg, the Montana Republican
=-who has been vocal following the national monuments
memo in his criticism of the department's conserva-
tion.plans, said in a statement Thursday that he hopes
the administration has turned a corner.
"After two years of leaked secret memos and
top-down wilderness plans, I'm hopeful the Obama
administration is finally beginning to realize the
importance.of public input. It's critical that land ini-
tiatives be based on consensus and not just collabo-
ration" Rehberg said.


A great blue heron wanders at the Bear River Migratog Bird
. Refuge, southwest of Brigham' City, Utah. A new Intenor
Department report identifies the refuge as one of the 101
high-priority conservation projects.


NYC photo lawsuit seeks to recreate wedding


ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK A New
York City man has filed a
lawsuit seeking $48,,000
to recreate his 2003
wedding, even though
the marriage ended in
divorce.
The New York Times
reports that Todd
Remis sued H & H


ds-s
China, Crystal,'
Flahvtware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Renee Bates
Kyle Head -
November 5, 2011.

Ashley Owens
Kenneth Gamble
December 3, 2011

Jazan Nabinger
Blaiyze Neeley
January 21, 2012
We know exactly what they
want in a wedding or shower
gift. We update their list as gifts
are purchased, and gift wrap,

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470


Photographers claiming
that the photographers
missed the last dance
and the bouquet toss.
Remis wants to be
repaid the $4,100 cost
of the photography. He
also wants $48,000 to


recreate the entire wed-
ding and fly the -prin-
cipals to New York so
the celebration can be
re-shot by another pho-
tographer.
The studio says that,
might be difficult. since


the bride has returned
to her native Latvia.
An owner of the studio
called the case "an abuse
of the legal system."
A hearing in the case is
scheduled for Thursday in
Manhattan.


4~&~ S~f~?
4~~CompIimen'tary
Engagel


A4#klw.











Page EdItor: Emogene Graham 754-0415 LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


DEAR ABBY



Wear and tear take a toll


on family holiday hostess


DEAR ABBY: Over the
past five years, family gather-
ings have become increas-
ingly stressful. When they
come here, my nieces don't
control their young children.
Last year after everyone left, I
sat down and cried! The mess
was horrific, and the damage
to my house and yard was
dumbfounding. What's worse
is they didn't seem to care.
I'm dreading, this holiday
season. I have refused to host
anymore and my husband
supports my decision. But I
feel bad for my parents. They
are in their 70s and have
always had pride in their fam-
ily.
As our family has
branched out, respect has
gone completely out the
window. Last Thanksgiving
we were all on our own. We
always invite my parents,
but they decline because
they don't want to hurt any
feelings. We have told them
it doesn't matter who they're
with, as long as they cel-
elirate with one of us.
. I feel like rm being;pun-
ished for not having the .
w)ole family at my house. If
it weren't f9r ny daughter,
we would leave during the
holidays to avoid the dissen-
sion. How do I dealwithimy
feelings and live with myself?
I don't understand the disre-
spect in the'young genera-
tion. If you say anything about
a child's behavior, you are
verbally abused and made
an outcast. GIVING UP IN


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

TEXAS
DEAR GIVING UP: I'm
glad you wrote, because
you're blaming the wrong
people. The disrespect you
have described is a direct
result of children not having
been taught how to behave
by their ineffective parents,
and because there have been
no consequences for bad
behavior.
If you are asked why there
will be no celebrations at your
house this year, tell the ques-
tioner it's because you can no
longer handle the mess and
the damage. It's the truth.
And PLEASE don't feel guilty
for doing so.
As to your parents, please
understand that staying home
is THEIR'choice, They may
prefer to celebrate or not
'- by themselves. It has no _
reflectionon you.

DEAR ABBY: I'm a 43-year-
old single mom of 16-month-
old twins and in'the midst
of a career change. I will be
entering the legal profession.
Some people have told me
that courts and lawyers tend


to be "conservative" and may
frown on single mothers.
My question is, should I
wear a ring on my left hand
without saying anything
about my marital status? Of
course, if asked directly, I
will say I am not married.
But would simply wearing a
ring on the third finger of my
left hand (perhaps my boys'
birthstone?) be considered
disingenuous or dishonest?
PUT A RING ON IT? IN
NEBRASKA
DEAR PUT A RING ON
- IT?: Because of advances in
the,fieldof reproductive medi-
cine, women both married
and single have been able to
safely have children at later
ages.
However, one of the inter- .
testing things about mother-
hood is that no one can tell by
looking who is or isn't one.
Unless you walk into
court and announce that
you are a single mother,
, your personal life should not
be a distraction to anyone,
Whether the person is con-
. servative or liberall. There is
no disgrace in being a single
'parent if yoti can afford to
,,:feed and educate the chil-
dren yoi have, 0so stop wor-
rying you'll e labeled with a
Scarlet letter.
t P.S. I see no reason
to "pdt a ring.on it" ifit's a lie.

Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April 19):
Revise your spending habits,
look over your personal papers
and consider your options
regarding your current over-
head. A solid plan will help
you get the aide you require. A
lover can play an integral role
in your future. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Take on a challenge. Be
a participant. Make personal
changes that will improve
your life and empower you to
give up bad habits. Establish
a routine that will enable you
to improve your image and
your self-confidence. Don't
wait until someone complains.
Make changes now. "**
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Get involved in groups that
share your concerns. Make
reforms and you will enhance
your reputation and intrigue
someone who can contribute
to your personal or profes-
sional life. Love is highlighted,
and an intimate encounter will
bring positive results. ****
CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Impulsive moves based on
emotions will lead to trouble.
Bide your time and consider the
consequences of your actions..
Keep an open mind and avoid


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

making accusations that may or
may not be true. A partnership
opportunity looks promising, if
handled properly. **
LEO Guly 23-Aug. 22):
Travel to a new location
or attend an event that will
ensure that you meet people
from different backgrounds.
Your reputation will be
enhanced by the contributions
you make. Love is on the rise,
and sharing your feelings will
bring good results. *****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
Not everyone will agree with
the way you handle your
personal life and expenses.
You'll be better off not bring-
ing attention to what you plan
to do. Concentrate.on help-
ing others and you will avoid
someone meddling in your
affairs. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct 22):
Prepare to make alterations
to your current situation with
friends, relatives or neighbors.
You can manipulate the out-
cpme if you are diplomatic in
the way you handle others.
A trip that allows you to mix


CELEBRITY CIPHER
eeyy Luis Campose .4


"DZG GAGRDTMS TCS'L D HHGOK
a wo MBB FZGS W RWSITII W DG RWS
0 GRMPST J G KME WROMCC D Z A
CDOGGD.'- XTS. ZEVVWOI

Previous Solution: "Juan Trlpp was a friend. Good name for an airline man,
huh? Juan Tripp after another?" Fay Wray
@2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-7


business with pleasure will pay
off. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):
Good fortune can be yours if
you open up about the way you
feel and what your plans are
for the future. A sudden realiza-
tion regarding what you can do
socially to help yourself profes-
sionally will lead to an interest-
ing turn of events. *****
SAGHITARIUS (Nov. 22-.
Dec. 21): Avoid emotional dis-
cussions that might lead to a
problem with a friend, relative
or lover. Consider what you
can do .to please the ones you
love and to make your domes-
tic scene more conducive to
comfort and happiness. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Commit to something
you care about Your actions
will affect the outcome of a
concern you have. Opening
your home to friends and fam-
ily or for an important meeting
will pay off. Expect gifts or
generous offers to be made.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Sort through what's hap-
pened in the past so that you
can avid making the same
mistakes. You can stabilize
your financial situation if you
are prepared to take on an
additional job or change your
current position. Get your
resume ready. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):
Communication can help you
set the stage for future gains.
You will gather the interest of
potential partners by planting
a seed now. Don't let ulterior
motives get in the way of your
plans. Promise only what you
can deliver. ***


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


y HOLLYWOOD FROM RIGHT TO LEFT E1 2 1 T1 st1 y1 i7illo [110 3114 l s 116 17 [14 19
By AndrcimCarla. Michaels & Patrick Biindauer / Edited by Will Shortz ,-----t-171 .: '2 2
20 21


Across
1 "Right back at
Scha!"
9 Unclear
i5 Sandcaslle
engineering
t equipment
20 Took one step tot
many, maybe
21 She was
beheaded by
Perseus
22 "Dallas" Miss
23 One of St.
Peter's heavenly
duties?
25 "The
Untouchables"
villain
26 "How's it ?"
27 Ship part
28 Roast slightly
29 Mujeres con
esposos
31 Place for un
Sbret
33 Conquer
36 Kitty, in Segovia
37 Singer Cassidy
40 One side of a
quad, maybe
42 "Snakes on a
Plane," e.g.?
46 Brand of tea
48 Term on a tide
table
50 Subject, of a
Magritte
painting
51i Doc workers'
: org.?
52 What a lazy
mover prefers to
carry?
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


, 56 Projections on
some-globes:)
Abbr.
57 Your, in Tours
58 Blues instrument
59 Harsh cry
60 Cheap and
o flimsy, as metal
62 Big bump
63 Poet Mark
64 "___ Fan Tutte"
65 Bob, for one
67 Workout class o
a pleasure
cruise?
74 William Morris
workers .
75 Cousin of an
ampule
76 Things.rings.lac
77 Egg foo _._
78 Makeshift
Frisbee'
81 Film special.
effects, briefly
82 Rangers' venue,
for short
85 Ax
86 Number of X's i
I this puzzle's
answer
88 Unbelievable
court infraction
9.1 Game with 108
cards
92 Mouselike anim
94 Fictional Jane .
95 Biblical dancer
96 Cabby's nonstop
patter?
100 Key with four
sharps: Abbr.
102 Curt
103 "Family Guy"
wife
S104 Melodic
passages
106 Provide a gun
for, maybe


108 "Shakespeare i
Love" star
111 Anthem.
contraction
t 112 Crystal on the
dinner table?
114 Bloke .
118 Dickens's
Drood
119'Guests at a
Hatfield/McCo)
marriage
ceremony?
n 123 Appropriate
124 Playground
'retort
125 Classic
Freudian
diagnosis
,126 Stinger
k 127 Stonewallers?
128.Looks down on

Down
1 Single partygoer
2 Classical Italian
I 'typeface
3 Christmas party
n 4 Occurring.
someday
5 Daughter' of Loki
,6 Horror film
? locale: Abbr.
7 Garnered,
8 "The Simpsons"
al teacher
Krabappel.
9 Letters of t'
surprise, in text
messages
10 Classmates, e.g.
11 Lets in
12 City that'was th
site of three
battles in the
Seven Years'
War
13 Org. with a sub
division
14 Has a beef?


n 15 Mark Twain and
George Sand,
: e.g.
16 1960s-'70s San
Francisco mayor
17 Opera whose
second act is
called "The
Gypsy"
18 Singer Ford
y 19 Cinco follower
24 Limb perch
30 "Raiders of the
Lost Ark" locale
32 College in
B3everly, Mass.
34 Fine fiddle
35 Rat-a-tat
37 Orly birds, once
38 "You're so
funny,"
sarcastically
39 "Family Ties"
son
41 It's west of 12-
Down: Abbr.
43 "You put the ___
in the coconut

44 Marcos of the
Philippines
45 "Morning Train"
singer, 1981
47 Anci.e.nt May
birthstones
49 Thing tliat may
S break people up
,53 Rtes.
t 54 Polar hazard
55 Moneyirelated:
Abbr.
61 Automaker since
e 1974
62 Triangular sails
63 "Shoot!"
65 1997 winner of
Wimbledon and
the U.S. Open
66 Step down, in a
way


67 Union concession 73 Geori. figure


68 Creature whose
tail makes up
half its body's.:
length
69 World
heavyweight
champion who
was once an
Olympic boxing
gold medalist
70 Egg: Prefix
71 Feudal estate
72 "Et voilh!"


78__ sci
79 Peeper problems
80 Doing injury, to
82 Othello, for one
83 Basic arithmetic
84 Lottery winner's
feeling
816 Easy eats
87 Poorer
89 Word with level
or devil'


90 Arrow maker
93 Mendes of
"Hitch"
97 Charge, in a way
98 Chips away at
99 Given false facts
101 Co-star of Kate
, and Farrah, in
1970s TV
105 Belted one
107 Ho-hum
108. Celebration
109 Theory,


110 Did laps
11"3 Cries in ,
Cologne
115 O'ne of a pair of
towel markings
116 17-Down piece
117 Challenge for
jrs.
120 ballpark fig.
121 Turndowns
122 Jeanne d'Arc,
for one: Abbr.


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
TASS BAG DAMUP REAPS
ARTE AGO HELENA ULTRA
XMA'STREE OPENINGNOTES
SENTMESSAGE DOS I MS
NDES WREN EDGRIMLEY
LIST QUIT DAYO KNEAD

ONEISH NOR ISK HOSED
ADREM ROMAN ENSUE ELY
SE ISAI NITST TU F RAN
I NAT I TOAHALT SALV I'A.
ASS N E S E L IA A M ENS
GEO SPEAR SANKA INSET
O RNOT EYELID EMPLOY
POP ICET RASPY OAS
SHEBA NONU AGOG LUNA
PEACE IGN ADZE CAROM
LTS STD TURNONADIME
ASSWEETASP IE IDEALGAS
YALIE A V I S U A E H L E
SiTEIN GET 1N_ SY STY X


9 7 2


43 6 8 9 1


4


9 2 3


5 8 7


5 27 3 4


1 3 8


6 4 5


5 2 6


LIV-9 LS]6 9 8


9 L 6 L I 78 9.


8 8 919 61 LL VL


V 8 C9 6 LEL 9


E 6 L 8 L 9 917 9


9 9 L El V17 8 6 L


6 9 7 9 8 L 8 L


LL 9 6 8 9 E7


E 8 7 L 1 9 6


LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415











FAIR FINALE






































Photos by Mathew Jason Walker I Lake Cty Reporter
In the photo above, patrons hold on to
safety bars as they turn upside down while
riding the Rok n Roll Thursday.
In the photo at left, Geno Cummings
(left),. of Frederic, Wis., loses his foot-
ing as Dave Weatherhead, of Hayward,
Wis., manages to stay-on a slippery log
Thursday at the Columbia County Fair.
'Log rolling is the hardest thing to do,'
Weatherhead said. 'What is physically
demanding is when the speed keeps
climbing. It takes years of practice to get
good at it.' In the photo at right, teens
scream as they are jolted back and forth
and swirled around while enjoying the
Freak Out ride Thursday.'




Successful Surgery depads Won

being in the Right Hands.


Our surgeons
specialie in
Breast
Colon and rectal
Cytoscopk
Endoscopic
Gallbladder
lGeneralsurgery

Hyst~ecto*my
Laparmscopict
Thyroid and parathyroid

S Ilez M.D., FACS


Hands hold the skill to create and renew. They hold the
power to heal, which is why you want to be in the right hands
should the need for surgery arise. At Shands Lake Shore
Regional Medical Center, our surgeons are trained in the latest
techniques and procedures to provide more treatment options
and reduce recovery times. We offer some of the most advanced
technology and expertise with all the convenience of staying
close to home. If you need the experience of a gifted surgeon
like Dr. Jerzy Polmerski or Dr. Edwin Gonzalez, call Shands
Lake Shore Surgical SPecialists, where you're in the right hands.

For an appointment, call 386-755-7788


Shands keShore
S.Regional Medical Center




Shands Lake Shore Surgical Specialists
755 SW State Road 47 Lake City, FL 32025
m2~ I FMG _. i AShandsLakeShore.corn


LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011


4D


D.h B unt
^ .*^ ^ ^^ ^- L I -*LIndustri' ~ re