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The Lake City reporter
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01688
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: November 2, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01688
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





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\ HISTORY


Reporter


Wednesday, November 2, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Vol. 137, No. 239 M 75 cents


Shooting ruled self-


defense


Jarvis: Gunman justified
in use of deadly force under
Stand Your Groind law

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter. corn
Criminal charges will not be filed
against a northern Columbia County
man in a Sept. 29 shooting that left
a nearby resident and his daughter
wounded.
The Third Circuit State Attorney's


office filed paperwork Tuesday formally
declining prosecution in the shooting
of Mark McGlashan and his daughter,
Amber McGlashan, by Douglas Paul
Driscoll, citing Florida's "Stand Your
Ground" doctrine.
Mark McGlashan, who is still wear-
ing bandages over some of his wounds,
was angry about the decision.
"A man shoots me in my front yard
and gets away with it, that ain't flying,"
he said.
However, State Attorney Skip Jarvis
said the law was clear in this case.


"With the passage of the Stand Your
Ground statute authorizing a citizen to
resort to self-defense where necessary,
we have determined that the defendant
in this case did not act improperly,"
Jarvis said. "His actions were well with-
in the statute."
According to police records, around
5:45 p.m. occupants of two vehicles
became involved in an argument on
Suwannee Valley Road in northern
Columbia County, a few miles south of

SHOOTING continued on 3A


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Mark McGlashan is loaded into an ambulance after a
Sept. 29 shooting at his home.


ROLE REVERSAL


OUInuuIN JUSr\ouiNLaNKe e y Keponer
Art Butler holds the photos of actor Clayton Moore, who played the Lone
Ranger on TV, and singer Tiny Tim. Moore and Tim were early supporters
of Butler's work to start a community theater group featuring actors with
physical and mental handicaps in 1990. Butler plans to start a similar the-
ater group in Columbia County.


Handicapped actors
should be first choice
to portray the disabled,
says Fort White
resident Art Butler,
who's starting a theater
group to make it
happen.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
The idea of creating a theater
group featuring people with phys-
ical and mental disabilities isn't
new to Arthur Butler.
In 1990, he created the
Performing Arts Theater for the
Handicapped in Fort Pierce. The
group consisted entirely of actors
and stage hands with disabilities.
Butler, 62, of Fort White, has
had polio since his childhood.


He got the idea to start a theater
group in Fort Pierce after watch-
ing TV and movies that featured
able-bodied actors playing people
with handicaps.
"It always bothered me," he
said. "Why are people in the
entertainment business so afraid
of us? Hollywood and TV have so
much hypocrisy."
Now, Butler is planning to start
a theater group for the handi-
capped in Columbia County,
where he has lived since 2004.
The theater group's live per-
formances in Fort Pierce were
life-changing events for the actors
and audience, Butler said.
He taught actors to role play
in different fictitious scenarios.
Eventually, he taught actors line
by line until they were comfort-
able with their roles.
'Through acting and charac-
ter building, it opens doors," he


said. "Even their body language is
different. It does something you
can't buy. Your self-esteem and
confidence comes from knowing
the material."
The theater group also used
handicapped individuals to oper-
ate lighting, curtains and set up
for performances. Audiences
were very surprised at the acting
ability and quality of the perfor-
mances, he said.
'They don't know what to
expect when they come to a per-
formance," he said. "Many in the
audience don't know the actors
have disabilities."
Butler said he has high expec-
tations for his actors because of
his experience with polio.
"One of the hardest things
dealing with a disability is being
babied too much," he said.
ROLE continued on 3A


Pay your fine


in food under


library program


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
SHave an overdue library book
riding around in your vehicle,
just begging tor be returned? Is
that borrowed DVD still in the
player, days after it was due?
From Nov. 14-20 you can settle
up with the Columbia County
Public Library and make a differ-
ence in your community with the
Food for Fines Project.
During that week, the library
will forgive $1 in overdue fines
for every food item donated.
Food must sealed, non-perish-
able and not expired. There is no
limit to the number of items that
can be donated. Ten items will
forgive $10 in fines and so on.
The food collected will be deliv-
ered to the Christian Service
Center in-Lake City for local dis-
tribution. Food collected at the


Fort White library branch will
be delivered to the Fort White
Thrift Shop.
"In these difficult economic
times, I think it's nice to help fill
the shelves of local food banks
and pay off library fines," said
Debbie Paulson, director of the
Columbia County Public Library.
"It's an added bonus."
This is the fourth year the
library has accepted food for
fines. In 2008 the library collect-
ed 2,469 food items over a three
week period. Over 21 days 5,303
items were collected in 2009. In
seven days 4,277 items were col-
lected in 2010.
*Overdue fines collected by the
library usually go to the county's
general fund. Paulson said she
received special permission from
county commissioners to accept
FINES continued on 3A


Training the trainers


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Todd Hoffman (from left), with a private training company, instructs Trenton
volunteer firefighters Billy Brideson and David Peaton on the best way to
cut through a car Tuesday at the LKQ facility on U.S. 90. Local trainers
learned the newest extraction techniques for newer vehicles.


, . F 'r I i: .r I


Another nighttime-extravaganza


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Emily Gonzalez (from left), 5, her brother Adam, 4, and mother, Jessica, cheer as floats pass by along Marion
Avenue during the Christmas parade last year.



Parade plans march ahead


By Laura Hampson
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
After the sugar rush of
Halloween, it's time to start prep-
ping for the Lake City Christmas
Parade. Applications to walk or
ride in the parade are due on Nov.
29, just days after Thanksgiving.
The parade, sponsored by the
Rotary Club of Lake City, will
be Saturday, Dec. 10. It starts
at the intersection of North
Marion Avenue and Northeast
Washington Street at 6 p.m. The
floats, boats and marching bands
will then travel south on Marion
Avenue. The parade will disband
at Farmers Furniture, 1445 S.W.
Main Blvd. All parade entries
must be at the staging area,
Memorial Stadium, by 5 p.m.


Opinion ................ 4A
People.................. 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics.......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


This year's theme, "Christmas
on the Ichetucknee," was chosen
because the Rotary is dedicated
to preserving water quality not
just locally but internationally,
said Bruce Drawdy, Rotary direc-
tor for community service.
Tom Brown, a Lake City native
who has made significant con-
tributions to the community,
will serve as the parade mar-
shal. Brown graduated from the
University of Florida College of
Law in 1965 and has worked
at Brannon, Brown, Haley and
Bullock for more than 45 years.
In 2007 h6 was awarded the
President's Call to Service
Award by the President's Council
for more than 4,000 volunteer
service hours. Brown was a
co-founder of the Lake City -


Columbia County United Way in
1968 and is currently on the plan-
ning committee. He also serves
on the executive board of the
Boy Scouts of America North
Florida Council and is a member
of the Rotary Club.
Brown was nominated by
several members of the Rotary,
Drawdy said.
Drawdy expects to have about
120 float entries but space is lim-
ited. Returning applications early
is better than waiting, Drawdy
said.
The entry fee for the parade
is $10 for classic cars, $15 for
schools, $15 for cheerleading
and dance units, $20 for non-
profit organizations and $35 for
PARADE continued on 3A


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
Jackson doc
won't testify


COMING
THURSDAY
Local news
roundup


CALL US:
(386) 72-1293 75
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER: T-Storm Chance
Voice: 755-5445 AATHER, A
Fax: 752-9400WEATHER, 2A









2A LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011


Saturday:
3-8-12-28-34-48
x3


H 3)E Tuesday:
Y^ Afternoon: 8-1-9
Evening: N/A


Tuesday:
. Afternoon: 8-3-1-9
Evening: N/A


wez atch.
s\1


Monday:
6-23-28-30-34


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Jackson's doctor doesn't testify


LOS ANGELES


Michael Jackson's
doctor told a judge
Tuesday that he
would not testify in
his own defense,
as testimony came to a close in the
involuntary manslaughter trial.
Closing arguments in the six-week
case will begin Thursday one of
the final steps before jurors begin
deliberations.
Dr. Conrad Murray held his hands
over his mouth as if he was pray-
ing in the moments before Superior
Court Judge Michael Pastor asked
the cardiologist whether he intended
to take the stand.
The judge also asked if he under-
stood the decision was his alone
to make. "Have you made up your
mind," Pastor asked.
Murray paused, looked at all his
lawyers, seemed to sigh and said,
"My decision is I will not testify in
this matter."
Defense attorneys rested their
case after calling 16 witnesses. A
total of 49 witnesses testified over 22
days of trial.
Prosecutors contend Murray gave
Jackson a fatal dose of the anes-
thetic propofol in the bedroom of the
singer's mansion. Defense attorneys
claim Jackson self-administered the
dose when Murray left the room.

Iraq War veteran named
Rose grand marshal
PASADENA, Calif --The grand mar-
shal for Pasadena's 123rd Tournament
of Roses is a certain crowd pleaser.
Leading the Jan. 2 procession of floats
will be J.R Martinez, the "Dancing With
the Stars" contestant, "All My Children"
daytime soap opera star and Iraq War
veteran seriously burned when his
Humvee hit a land mine,


Dr. Conrad Murray, surrounded by his defense attorneys, looks on after the
defense rested their case in his involuntary manslaughter trial in the death of
singer Michael Jackson at the Los Angeles Superior Court on Tuesday.


He will also toss the coin before
kickoff of the 98th Rose Bowl Game in
honor of all wounded military personnel.
The Tournament of Roses
Association announcement
Tuesday says Martinez is a perfect
fit for the "Just Imagine ..." parade
theme.
Martinez says he's grateful for
the opportunity to share his mes-
sage of hope'and possibility.


is announcing that Seinfeld will join
continuing co-host Kelly Ripa for three
days, airing Nov. 21-23.
The show said Tuesday that guests
scheduled to join Ripa and Seinfeld are
actor Jason Segal, actress Kim eattrall,
comedian-host Howie Mandel, "Naked
Chef' Jamie Oliver and that fabulous
Muppet, Miss Piggy.

Nielosn' tnnn-rated


Jerry Seinfeld first guest programs for Oct. 24-30


host to follow Philbin
NEW YORK- Departing morning
TV hosts Regis Philbin's chair on "'ive!"
won't have time to cool off before Jerry
Seinfeld arrives as the first guest host of
the post-Regis era.
The popular weekday talk show


1. World Series Game 7: Texas at St
Louis, Fox, 25.4 million.
2. Sunday Night Football: Dallas at
Philadelphia, NBC, 22.99 million.
3. World Series Game 6: Texas at St.
Louis, Fox, 21.07 million.
4. "NCIS," CBS, 19.43 million.
5. "60 Minutes," CBS, 18.56 million.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Political commentator
Patrick Buchanan is 73.
* Singer-songwriter k.d.
lang is 50.
* Rock musician Bobby Dall


(Poison) is 48.
* Actor David Schwimmer is
45. Rapper Nelly is 37.
* Prodigy (Mobb Deep) is


Daily Scripture
"I pray that the eyes of your
heart may be enlightened in
order that you may know the
hope to which he has called
you, the riches of his glorious
inheritance in his holy people,"
Ephesians 1:18

Thought for Today
"If I have any beliefs about
immortality, it is that certain dogs
I have known will go to heaven,
and very, very few persons."
James Thurber (1894-1961)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
Circulation ..............755-5445 (sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com CIRCULATION
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
The Associated Press. problems with your delivery service.
All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
City Reporter. Reproducti6 in whole or call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
in part is forbidden without the permis- vice error for same day re-delivery. After
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service 10:30 am., next day re-deliery or ser
No. 310-880. 10:30 a.m., next day re-deliery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes In all other counties where home delivery
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709, is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
Lake City, Fla. 32056. vice related credits will be issued.
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(twilson@lakecityreporter.com) Circulation ...............755-5445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news items.
If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please call the
executive editor. Corrections and.clarifications will run in this
space. And thanks for reading.


Scott defends
policies to black
legislators
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida Gov. Rick Scott is
telling black state legisla-
tors he won't appoint judg-
es who think differently
from him in the name of
diversity.
Scott on Tuesday met
with more than 20 black
members
of the .
Florida ,
Legislature ,L ,
where
they asked
him about
judicial
appoint-
ments, help Scott
for black
businesses,
and restoration of civil
rights for former felons.
Scott asked for more
information and said he
was open to hearing more
about the fallout of a deci-
sion made back in March
to restrict the restoration
of civil rights and voting
for criminals who finished
their prison sentences.
But Scott said he won't
appoint activist judges just
to increase diversity in the
courts.
The governor has
appointed 2 blacks out of
36 appointments he made
to the bench since January.

Student arrested
after gun found
PALM BEACH
GARDENS, Fla. Palm
Beach County school
officials say a 16-year-old
student at Dwyer High
School has been arrested
after another student
tipped them off about a
gun on campus.
The Palm Beach Post
reports the teen volun-
tarily handed over the
Sgun when approached
by administrators at the
Palm Beach Gardens


school on Tuesday.
Officials say the 11th
grade boy also had three
rounds of ammunition
and marijuana.
The student has been
charged with possession.
of an unloaded handgun
and possession of mari-
juana. He was taken to
the Juvenile Assessment
Center.
School officials say
classes were not disrupted
and there were no threats
involving the school.

Religious groups
against casinos
TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
- A coalition of religious
and faith-related groups
is calling on lawmakers
to reject plans for three
South Florida casinos.
The Florida Catholic
Conference, the Florida
Baptist Convention and
Florida Family Action
on Tuesday strongly
denounced a recently-
filed bill that would bring
resort casinos to Broward
and Miami-Dade counties.
Critics of the new leg-
islation which will be
voted on early next year
- called it an expansion of
gambling that would prey
on the poor.
One of the.groups,
Florida Family Action,
said it would keep track
of all gambling-related
votes during the upcom-
ing session. The head of
the group also said law-
makers would be asked
to sign a no gambling
pledge.
Backers df the casino
proposal contend it would
help attract visitors from
out of state and other
countries.

Girl arrested after
fit of rage on bus
FORT MYERS Le
County Sheriff's deputies
say a 9-year-old girl faces
multiple felony charges


after a fit of rage that
began on the school bus.
Officials say the girl
jumped off the school bus
Monday afternoon after
spitting at staff members.
A sheriff's report says
a deputy saw the girl toss
large pieces of asphalt at
the bus, hitting the wind-
shield next to the driver.
Authorities say the
girl walked away when
she saw the deputy. She
picked up a metal chair in
a nearby yard and threw
it at the deputy. When
he said she was under
arrest, the girl resisted
by kicking and attempting
to push him.
No one was injured.
She is charged with
battery on a school
employee and a law
enforcement office among
other charges.

Grassroots effort
saves post office
MELBOURNE BEACH
- A post office that's
been a big part of a cen-
tral Florida community
since 1984 won't be clos-
ing after all.
The Ocean Avenue post
office was on the list of
facilities slated for pos-
sible closure by the U. S.
Postal Service. But town
leaders and residents
started a petition drive
and letter-writing cam-
paign. On Monday, they
found out their efforts
were successful.
Town Manager Bill
Hoskovec says he
received the good news
from U.S. Rep. Bill
Posey, a Republican from
Rockledge.
Florida Today reports
that Hoskovec spread the
good news to the town's
commissioners and
administrators, saying
this proves that grass-
roots efforts work.
The Melbourne Beach
post office serves the
32951 Zip code.


THE WEATHER
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MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY, MOSTLY PARTLY
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. .. .


72/5esa
72/58


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74/52
Tallahassee Lake City
74/50 5/54
Gainesville
Parlama City 75/55
70/55 Ocala
77/56


Tampa *
81/61


Ft Myers
83/63 '


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72 58 Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Daytona Beach Fort Myers
76/60 Galnesvllle
i Jacksonville
Key West
riando Cape Canaveral Lake Cty
0/59 77/61 MIamI
Naples
West Palm Beach Ocala
80/67 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
82/71<* Pensacola
Naples Tallahassee
82/64 Miami Tampa


S, 82/69 Valdosta
ey W est W. Palm Beach
81/73


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TEMPERATURES
Higr Tuesday
LO, Tuesd.i,
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


7-
'52
78
55
90 in 1914
'32 in 1993


0.00"
0.00"
31.27"
0.07"
43.70"


'7a lp 7p la 63
i Wednesday Thursday


SUN
Sunnse tckr a
_,,n- l- .I t ]3,
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.

MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today
Moonrise torm.
Moonset tom.


7:45 a m.
(. 4 p n,
7.46 a.m.
6:42 p.m.


2:04 p.m.
12:27 a.m.
2:39 p.m.
'1,25 a.m.


Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov.
2 10 18 25
First Full Last New


1-1 c _rz 3re,7- in
4, r 1r o ng
':,'4 a lr.:.ng
storm brought mea-
Ssurable snow to the
Plains of southeast-
Sern New Mexico.
Snowfall totals
of 4 to 6 inches
Were reported near
STatum, N.M.


6
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30nmiestobm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
s. .ai- rr,-.- 1)
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Thursday
,i 63 i.:

82/67/s
83/62/s
77/54/pc
76/58/s
81/72/pc
77/54/pc
81/67/s
80/62/s
78/56/pc
82/59/s
71/57/pc
76/52/pc
76/55/s
80/63/s
77/56/pc
81/64/s


. .. s..


Friday
;9 c0l :nr
19 61 -ir,

82/69/pc
82/64/pc
78/55/pc
76/58/pc
81/72/pc
78/54/pc
82/68/s
80/63/pc
79/56/pc
82/61/sh
72/58/pc
68/50/s
75/50/pc
79/63/pc
76/53/pc
81/65/s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com
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Forecasts, data and
Graphics 2011 Weather
S V Central, LP, Madison, Wls.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011 3A


Prison privatization decision appealed


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE At the
request of legislative lead-
ers, Attorney General Pam
Bond on Monday overruled
a decision by Gov. Rick Scott
and appealed a court ruling
that struck down a Florida
prison privatization plan.
Scott's office earlier in
the day had announced he'd
decided against an appeal.
Hours later, though, Bondi
filed one anyway, barely beat-
ing the 30-day deadline.
The Republican-controlled
Legislature passed the plan
to privatize nearly 30 South
Florida prisons as a cost-cut-
ting measure.
"Not only is the privati-
zation of our state's prisons
good policy, but it ensures
that our state can dedicate
more money to education,
health care or economic
development programs that
would otherwise be spent on
prisons," Senate President
Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt


Island, said in a statement
Last month, a judge in
Tallahassee ruled lawmak-
ers violated the Florida
Constitution by putting the
provision in the $69.1 billion
state budget instead of pass-
ing it as a separate bill.
'The case is a pure ques-
tion of legislative power,
which makes the Legislature
and the attorney general best
suited to litigate this case,"
said Scott spokeswoman
Jackie Schutz.
The attorney general has
the authority to act on her
own to defend a state law
even if that's against the wish-
es of her client, which in this
case is Scott's Department
of Corrections, said Bondi
spokeswoman Jenn Meale.
The challenge from
the Police Benevolent
Association, which repre-
sents prison guards, now will
go to the 1st District Court of
Appeal. PBA spokesman Ken
Kopczynski said the union
is prepared to fight the case
all the way to the Florida


Supreme Court
Circuit Judge Jackie
Fulford's ruling was a setback
for private prison companies
such as the Geo Group Inc.
and Corrections Corporation
of America.
"It definitely sounds to me
that the Geos of the world
got to somebody late in
the game," said Sen. Mike
Fasano, a New Port Richey
Republican who opposes
prison privatization.
Haridopolos also said he
believes putting the priva-
tization plan in the budget
instead of passing a stand-
alone law is a valid exercise
of legislative authority.
In her ruling, though,
Fulford wrote that the privati-
zation plan violated constitu-
tional provisions limiting all
laws to a single subject and
the state budget to appro-
priating money for current
expenses. She cited two prior
Supreme Court decisions in
similar cases to back up her
ruling.
"We're not breaking any


PARADE: Already working on floats

Continued From Page 1A.


commercial businesses. Marching bands,
veteran's organizations, fire departments
and police departments are free. The fee
helps cover advertising costs.
All parade floats must be decorated with
at least 500 lights and portray a holiday,
children's or whimsical theme. Businesses
can advertise as long as their float incorpo-
rates the theme, Drawdy said.
Last year the parade was held on a
Saturday for the first time. In the past it
started later on a Monday evening which
kept children out late on a school night,
Drawdy said.


People are already working on their
floats, he said. "It's going to be very excit-
ing."
The parade will round out a day of festivi-
ties on Dec. 10, with the Dashing to the Snow
.5K Reindeer Run/Walk at 8 am. and Snow
Day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Columbia
County Courthouse annex parking lot
Applications are available at the Lake City
Columbia County Chamber of Commerce,
162 S. Marion Ave, and Drawdy Insurance
Services, 738 S.W. Main Blvd. For more
information contact the Chamber at (386)
752-3690.


SHOOTING: Gunman justified in action

Continued From Page 1A


White Springs.
The McGlashans and two
other individuals were in one
vehicle, Driscoll in the other.
What happened next isn't
entirely clear, but minutes
later the McGlashans were
shot -Mark McGlashan
eight times, Amber three
times in the front yard of
their 1065 NW Parnell Ave.
home. Both are recovering
from their wounds.
Prosecutors say an inde-
pendent eyewitness told
them Driscoll was alone in
his vehicle, parked on a pub-
lic road, engaged in an argu-
ment with four occupants
of another vehicle. The
argument escalated 'when,
according to the eyewitness,
Mark McGlashan "opened
his truck door displaying a
shotgun and pointing it at
the other truck that was still
in the roadway."
The order of dismissal
elaborated: 'The four alleged
victims ... all had identical
stories, with one exception
by Mr. McGlashan, who stat-
ed .that there was a shotgun
in the back of the vehicle. All
of the victims denied that a
firearm was ever pointed at
the defendant and all with
the exception of McGlashan,
claim that there was no
other gun in their vehicle
except (a) handgun, which
was secured in the cen-
ter console; An additional
vehicle occupant ... stated
that McGlashan exited the


Tahoe with a long gun prior
to the defendant shooting."
According to the order of
dismissal, "the shots fired
by the suspect were, then...
a response to an aggravated
assault with a deadly weap-
on. The shots fired were a
reasonable response under
the law."
Under the "Stand Your
Ground" doctrine, "a person
who is not engaged in an
unlawful activity and who is
attacked in any other place
where he has a right to be
has no duty to retreat and
has the right to stand his
ground and meet force with
force, including deadly force
if he reasonably believes it
is necessary to do so to pre-
vent death or great bodily
harm to himself or to pre-
vent the commission of a
forcible felony."


However, even without
the Stand Your Ground
rule, the shooting would
have been considered
self-defense, the order of
dismissal said, especially
since Driscoll had report-
edly been threatened with' a
gun by another occupant of
the McGlashan vehicle on a
prior occasion.
That Amber McGlashan
was also injured "is tragic but
not unlawful" the order read.
"It was ... a consequence of a
lawful self-defense."
Driscoll was facing
charges of aggravated bat-
tery, aggravated assault and
shooting into an occupied
dwelling. All charges have
been dismissed.
Messages seeking com-
ment were left with a third
party for Driscoll, who did
not respond by press time.


new ground here," said PBA
lawyer Hal Johnson.
Nearly 4,000 of the union's
members would stand to lose
their jobs if the privatization
provision is upheld.
A privatization contract
would be contingent on cut-
ting costs by 7 percent at 29
prisons in 18 South Florida
counties. Legislative leaders
estimated an annual savings
of $22 million.
The PBA had disputed the
accuracy of that estimate.
The current-year savings
would have been less. That's
because the contract would
not have begun until the
middle of the budget year,
which began July 1. The
budget year could be over
by the time the court case
is resolved, particularly if it
goes to the Supreme Court.


PSC sets fuel charges


TALLAHASSEE Fuel
and other cost recovery
fees are going up for one
Florida electric utility but
down for another in 2012.
The Public Service
Commission on Tuesday
set annual recovery fees for
fuel and purchased power,
-conservation, capacity and


environmental costs.
Florida Power & Light
Co. customers using 1,000
kilowatt hours a month will
see their bills increase by
$2.50 a month to $99.04.
For a Gulf Power Co.
customer the reduction
would be $1.37 for a
monthly bill of $125.79.


FINES: Food for a cause

Continued From Page 1A


food items instead of money.
Overdue books and maga-
zines -are fined 10 cents a
day. Overdue movies and
Music cost $1 a day.
Some library patrons


brought the food but asked
that it not count towards
their fines because it was for
a good cause, Paulson said.
For more information,
call (386) 758-2101.


ROLE: Lots of good handicapped actors

Continued From Page 1A


"People have a tendency
of underestimating the dis-
abled.".
He has the unwavering
support of his wife, Anne
Butler, who believes a the-
ater group for the disabled in
Columbia County would be
an asset to the community.
She agrees that
Hollywood has done a poor
job portraying the handi-
capped. It's as offensive to
see an able-bodied actor
playing the role of someone
with a handicap as a white
actor in blackface playing
an African-American, she
said.
"He is trying his best
to start it again," she said.
'There are plenty of good
handicapped actors to play
a part."
Butler, who hosted a
'radio show called 'The Art
Gallery" from 1999 to 2003
in Fort Pierce, said he has
met many actors who sup-
port his quest to see more
disabled actors in TV and
movies. Some of his sup-


porters included actress
Jane Russell, actor Clayton
Moore and singer Tiny
Tim.
Butler said his dream is
to live long enough to see
actors with real handicaps
earn paying roles for mov-
ies and TV.
"That's really what I pray
for," he said. "It Would be
like living a dream come
true. I'm not giving up on
my dream."
Butler said he wants to
inspire other communi-
ties to start similar theater
groups. But they need the
support of civic groups, edu-
cators and everyone else in
the community.
He is building a website,
PATH to Help, that will be
online in about a month to
publicize his theater group.
He also plans to speak to
civic organizations and
schools about his plans.
Butlef said he is 'seek-
ing a venue where actors
can rehearse and perform.
He also needs lighting and


sound equipment, micro-
phones, money and food to
feed actors during rehears-
als.
"I don't want this to be a
hardship for families," he
said. "I want to help pay for
gas, food and other expens-
es."
He is selling advertising
for a calendar that will be
sold for $5, with the pro-
ceeds going toward his the-
ater group.
"I really appreciate all the
community support," he
said.
Butler said his goal is to
have the first performance
within a year and possibly
tour the region with his
troupe of actors and stage
hands.
"I believe God has inter-
vened in my life," he said.
"I'm here for a reason to
help other people. I want
this to catch fire."
Call Art Butler at (386)
497-1908 for information or
to make a donation to the
non-profit organization.


N. .
.6,.,&Satu. .ay;No'm e




Friday, Novembei r4 ....
h- customers receive
The';
.
,




io


Columbia County's Most Wanted
Richard Vernon William Scott
Sexton Warner
OB: 9/15/73' DOB: 12/3/65
Height: 5' 11" Height 5'8"
SH~eih t:5 13 DOe: 12/3/65
Weight: 250 Ibs. Weight 170 Ibs.
Hair: Brown Hair: Brown
W t Eyes: Blue Eyes: Brown
Wanted For: VOP Possession of i. Wanted For: FTA Pre-Trial
d Controlled Substance with Intent to
Sell or Deliver Conference for Grand Theft III
WANTED AS OF 10/31/2011
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at fhe time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
B e SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
fICOLIUMBIA COUNTY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


4' "

w.
-... ...




4 :0 .2'1U ^-. :
. r ,.


a JCLi


NOTICE OF

FINAL

CERTIFICATION

OF TAX ROLL
Pursuant to Section 193.122, Florida Statutes,
J. Doyle Crews, ,Property Appraiser of
Columbia County, hereby gives notice that
the 2011 Tax Roll for Columbia County was
certified to the TaxCollector on the 27th day of
October for the collection of taxes.
J. DOYLE CREWS
PROPERTY APPRAISER













OPINION


Wednesday. November 2, 201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Bad


move,


Bondi

.Y yesterday in this
space we commend-
ed Gov. Rick Scott
for his desicion not
to appeal a court rul-
ing that struck down a budget
measure privatizing nearly 30
South Florida prisons.
The issue wasn't privatiza-
tion itself a mixed blessing,
depending on the setting but
the way in which it was attempt-
ed.
Last year the legislature sim-
ply plopped the privatization
measure down into the middle
of the $69 billion state budget -
a take-it-or-leave-it proposition.
However, the state constitu-
tion prohibits attempts such
as this to skirt the lawmaking
process of committees, sub-
committees, alterations arid
amendments.
As we noted yesterday, the
state budget is for allocating
fuids, pure and simple, not for
policy choices masquerading as
something else. That's the law.
All well :and good, except that
Attorney General Pam Bondi, at
the reqfiest of legislative lead-
ers, went ahead and filed the
appeal anyway.
Bad move, as we see it.
'Privatization may be the right.
approach in this case, despite
the potential loss of 4,000 jobs.
But something as important as
this ought not be dealt with in
back-door fashion.
If the governor wants to
privatize state prisons, let his
supporters introduce a bill to
that effect in the legislature. Let
the system work the way it's
supposed to.

HI: -G HL'I G H TS
-I N HISTO RY
Today is Wednesday, Nov. 2,
. the 306th day of'2011. There
are 59 days left in the year.
Today's Hihlilight in History:
On Nov. 2, 1783, Gen.
George Washington issued his
Farewell Orders to the Armies
of the United States near
Princetor, N.J.
In 1948, President Harry S.
Truman surprised the experts
by winning a narrow upset over
Republican challenger Thomas'
E/.Dewey.
Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporteris pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers.
get things done!"
'Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oridented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.-
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman


LET
PO


TERS
LICY


Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400.words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32066; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


f you'd asked me 20 years
ago what I'd be doing
today, I might have said
cruising the Caribbean
or greeting at Walmart or
getting my knees replaced.
I would not have said,
"Working on my website."
Twenty years ago, when
I left my job as a reporter to
write a column for syndication,
the world was a different place
From the one we've come to
know.
Back then, I wrote on a
clunky laptop and emailed my'
work to Scripps Howard News
Service to be distributed to
papers around the country -
pretty much the same as I do
now.
But managing a website an
electronic world where I post
-thoughts and observations and
invite comments from readers?
I never saw that coming.
Besides, I have enough trouble
keeping up with the real world,
staying in touch with family
and friends and remembering
to brush my teeth. My world is
big enough. Why would I want
to expand it? ,'
-Not that I don't like hearing
from.nreaders. I do. In fact, that
is possibly the part of the job
that I love best; the thing that's
kept me at it all these years.
Well, that and a paycheck.
I never wanted to write a per-
sonal column. An editor made
me do it I blame him.
He told me I could write
about Little League games and
kids' birthday parties and hid-
ing the TV remote from my
husband.
He never mentioned writing


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANO
VI


Sharon Randall
wwwsharohrandal.com
about cancer. Or watching my
husband fight for his life. Or
waking up one day, a widow
with grown children in a big
empty house, to realize, like
it or'not, it ias time to begin
again.
I.didn't plan to write about
Sany of that. But that's what
came my way life in all its
fullness, all its pain and glory. I
took it as it came, wrote it as I
lived it
And soon I began hearing
from readers who said they
were praying for my husband
Sand their children were praying
for my children and the life I
was writing about was not just
my own; it was their life, too.
Hearing from readers has
taught me several things: Never
to be cynical; never stoop to self-
'pity; and never forget that people
are good and we are all more
alike than we are different
It has allowed me to be part
of a far-reaching community
and share a kinship with people
I've never met though I do
get to meet them on occasion.
Whenever I'm invited to
speak in areas that have long
carried my column, people
ask about my children and my
family. They want to hear. the
story of how my former editor


is now my husband and what
life is like in Las Vegas, of all
places. Instead of handshakes,
I get hugs. It's like a big family
reunion, except nobody asks to
borrow money or tells me I've
gained weight
I like readers a lot That's
why I'm working on my website
(www.sharonrandall.com) to
make it more "reader friendly."
Actually, my daughter-in-law is
doing all the work. She insisted
on doing it. She gave me my
first grandchild. I do what she
wants.
When she asked for my
ideas, I said I'd like it to be
more "homey" less like a
website and more like a kitchen
table, a place where we can sit
down over coffee, you and I,
and talk about whatever comes
to mind. (Sorry, you'll have '
to bring your own coffee. We
haven't figured out how to do
e-coffee yet, but we're working
on it.)
Now I have this new website
where I'm supposed to check
in regularly, post interesting
thoughts and observations (or
at least a few recipes) and reply
to comments posted by readers.
My world just got a lot big-
ger.
It brings to mind my moth-
er's words when I said I was
going to Califorhia: "Have you
lost what little brains you had
left?"
It also begs a larger question:
What in the world will we be
doing 20 years from now?

Sharon Randall writes this col-
umn for Scripps Howard News
Service.


U.S. troops leaving Iraq


but not the Mideast


W e may be leav-
ing Iraq as
planned at the
end of the year,
but apparently
we're not going very far.
Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton said the U.S. would have
"a continuing robust presence in
the region." Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta indicated that
robust means around 40,000
troops, slightly more that we still
have in Iraq, with 23,000 of them
based in Kuwait
The U.S. already has a substan-
tial presence in Kuwait, but they
are generally logistics personnel
in support of the Iraq mission.
This would not be a precedent
for Kuwait Between the two
SIraq wars, we had a full combat
brigade and massive stockpiles of
military supplies stationed there.
The continuing military pres-
ence will certainly irritate Obama
administration critics who believe
we should be out of the region


Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
altogether. It will also irritate
the presidents Republican crit-
ics who believe we should have
tried more strenuously to keep a
residual force in Iraq.
Maintaining a substantial
U.S. presence in the region
only seems a reasonable insur-
ance policy against a general
collapse in Iraq or threats from
Iran. As part of our staying on,
the Pentagon plans to develop
close ties with the six-nation Gulf
Cooperation Council Saudi
Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman,
Qatar and the United Arab
Emirates.


None of this pleases Iran. On a
visit to Iraq, Iranian foreign minis-
ter Ali Akbar Salehi, whose coun-
try has been notably meddlesome
in Iraqi politics, said, "Iraq does
not need anyone to meddle in its
internal affairs." That's for Iraq's
officials to say, not Iran's.
And Salehi said, "Iraqis know
better than anyone else how to
govern their country." That rather
glibly overlooks the 23-year rule
of Saddam Hussein and the eight-
year war he launched against Iran.
Salehi had a verdict on the
U.S. keeping troops in the region:
"The Americans always have a
deficit unfortunately, in rationality
and prudence."
From time to time, that's been
true, but it's for us to say, not the
top envoy of a corrupt theocracy.
And Iran talking big, as if we've
already left the region, is rea-
son enough to stay on.

* Dale McFeatters is a columnist
for Scripps Howard News Service.


4A


THEIR
EW


The U.N.

suicide vest,.

courtesy of

Palestinians

T r he Palestinian
Authority's bid for '
U.N. recognition
has substantial
downsides, includ-
ing wrecking the peace process:
and increasing regional instabil-
ity. The upside is that it could
drive the United States out of
the United Nations.
On Monday, the United
Nations Educational, Scientific"'
and Cultural Organization
(UNESCO) voted overwhelm- '
ingly to admit the Palestinian
Authority to full membership.
This step triggered an imme-
diate cutoff of U.S. funds to
the organization, which total
around $70 million annually.
The UNESCO defunding was
based on legislation from 1990
and 1994. Section 414 of the
Foreign Relations Authorization
Act, fiscal 1990 and 1991,
states, "No funds authorized
to be appropriated by this act
or any other act shall be avail-
able for the United Nations or
Sany specialized agency thereof t,
which accords the Palestine
Liberation Organization the
same standing as member
states."
The State Department
had warned UNESCO of the
automatic defunding provi-
sions and' said it could find no
way around the law despite
the best efforts of its legal
team. This mitigates any
credit the Obama administra-
tion can claim for standing
up for Israel on this issue
because presumably if State :
Department lawyers were
more clever, the UNESCO
funds would keep flowing.
Holding back funds from
UNESCO could lead to the
United States exiting the
organization, but this has hap-'
pened before. The Reagan
administration pulled America
out of the organization in 1984 n
because, according to the
State Department at the time,'
"UNESCO has extraneously
politicized virtually every sub-
ject it deals with, has exhibited '
hostility toward the basic
institutions of a free society,
especially a free market and
a free press, and has demon-
strated unrestrained budget-
ary expansion." President
George W. Bush announced
the United States would return'
to UNESCO in 2002, claiming
much of this had changed. (It
hadn't.) The real reason was
to be on the scene to counter
the use 'of the organization as a
vehicle for spreading hard-line:
Islamist propaganda.
The defunding laws have
implications for the U.N. as
a whole. In September, the
Palestinian Authority formally ,
began its bid to seek full rec- i,
ognition from the world body. ^
Such a vote would trigger the
same defunding mechanism
for the U.N. generally and
could cascade to affiliated '
organizations such as the
World Health Organization, i
the World Trade Organization '
and the World Bank. ."
It would be ironic if the
Palestinian Authority's move
for U.N. recognition became ;?
the vehicle for a total cutoff of :
U.S. funds to the organization
and potential pullout. A State
Department official quoted
in Foreign Policy magazine
employed some particu-
larly undiplomatic language
to describe the situation. "'We
have a suicide vest padlocked :
around our torso, and the
Palestinians have the remote ,
control," the official said. "They:
get to decide whether they '
blow us up or not. It's 100 per- .,,
cent up to them." Given their
history, it's pretty obvious how ;
this scene will end.


* The Washington Times


My world just got


a lot bigger










LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011 5A


Cain says he's not

changing his story


US school kids showing

slight improvement in math


By Kasle Hut
Associated Press
WASHINGTON
Republican presidential can-
didate Herman Cain denied
on Tuesday that he's chang-
ing his story as he struggles
to contain the fallout from
sexual harassment allega-
tions that could threaten his
recently surging campaign.
He also suggested his race
could a factor in the contro-
Sversy.
The White House con-
tender's contradictory
explanations over two days
have raised questions about
details of the allegations
from back in the 1990s
and about his current abil-
ity to manage a crisis in
the national spotlight The
accusations, relating to his
time as head of the National
Restaurant Association,
have surfaced just as he's
risen in national polls in the
GOP nomination fight two
months before the leadoff
Iowa caucuses.
He said Tuesday night on
Fox News that he believes


there are some Democrats
who want him defeated
because he's an unconven-
tional candidate "achieving
some unexpected, uncon-
ventional results," and there
could be some on the right
"who do not want to see me
because I am not the estab-
lishment candidate."
Cain, who is black, said
he believes race is also
involved "but we don't have
any evidence to support it"
He added, "Relative to the
left, I believe thatrace is a
bigger driving factor. I don't
think itfs a driving factor on
the right"
A lawyer for one woman
who complained about
Cain's behavior told The
WashingtonPostonTuesday
she wants to talk publicly
about it According to that
report, Joel P. Bennett, a
Washington lawyer who
specializes in employ-
ment cases, said he asked
the National Restaurant
Association to waive his
client's confidentiality so
she can respond to Cain's
claims that the complaints


Herman Cain


were "totally baseless and
totally false."
Bennett did not imme-
diately return messages
seeking comment from The
Associated Press.
In Sunday night's original
report by Politico, at least
two women who had com-
plained about Cain were
said to have agreed to settle-
ments that included stipula-
tions that they not repeat
their allegations in public.
Cain's evolving answers
to questions in a host of
media interviews this week
led at least one rival cam-
paign to suggest he's not
being upfront about the
accusations.


By Kimberly Hefling
AP Education Writer
WASHINGTON -
Some progress. Still needs
improvement.
The nation's report card
on math and reading shows
fourth- and eighth-graders
scoring their best ever in
math and eighth graders
making some progress in
reading. But the results
released Tuesday are a stark
reminder of just how far the
Nation's school kids are from
achieving the No Child Left
Behind law's goal that every
child in America be profi-
cient in math and reading
by 2014.
Just a little more than one-
third of the students were
proficient or higher in read-
ing. In math, 40 percent of
the fourth-graders and 35
percent of the eighth-grad-
ers had reached that level.
The figures were from
the National Assessment of
Educational Progress.
'The modest increases
in NAEP scores are reason
for concern as much as


optimism," said Education
Secretary Arne Duncan. "Ifs
clear that achievement is not
accelerating fast enough for
our nation's children to com-
pete in the knowledge econ-
omy of the 21st century."
There were few notice-
able changes in the achieve-
ment gap between white and
black students from 2009.
While the gap is smaller
than.in the early 1990s, the
new test results reflect a
25-point difference between
white and black fourth- and
eighth-graders in reading
and fourth-graders in math.
However, Hispanic stu-
dents in eighth grade made
some small strides to narrow
the gap with white students
in both math and reading.
In reading, the gap was 22
points in 2011 compared to
26 in 1992 and 24 in 2009.
The reading test asked
students to read passages
and recall details or inter-
pret them. In math, students
were asked to answer ques-
tions about topics such as
geometry, algebra and num-
ber properties and measure-


OBITUARIES


Walter P. Atkinson


Dr. Walter P. Atkinson, died
at a Chattanooga hospital sur-
rounded by his fapiily on Tues-
day, Novem-
ber 1, 2011.
He was 77.
Dr. Atkinson
is survived
by: beloved
wife, Oleda
Atkinson, of
Ooltewah, TN; 3 Daughters: Re-
ita Ball (husband Steve), of Chat-
tanooga, TN; Renea A. Medlin
(husband Don), ofMemphis, TN;
Rhonda Parris (husband Ran-
dall), of Cleveland, TN; 5 Grand-
children: Brittni Ball, of Chatta-
nooga, TN; Taylor and Victoria
Medlin, of Memphis, TN; Clay
and Alysse Parris, of Cleveland,
TN. Sisters: Jerri Disbrow, of
Lake City, FL; Arlene Jones
(husband Gail Richard, Spe-
cial Brother in-law, and Friend,)
Several nieces and nephews,
Special Aunt and Friend, Alice
Thomas (E.C. Thomas, former
General Overseer of the Church
of God,) of Cleveland, TN.
He was born in Lake City, Flori-
da and graduated from Columbia
County High School. He attend-


ed Lee University from 1953-
1957 and also earned a Master's
Degree at the Pentecostal Theo-
logical Seminary. He received
an honorary Doctor of Divinity
degree from Lee University. His
pastorates included Columbia,
MS, Smithville, TN, Anderson,
SC, and North Cleveland Church
of God, in TN. Dr. Atkinson
Iaso served as State Youth and
CE Director in AL and SC.
Dr. Atkinson was elected to serve
,on the Church of God Internation-
al Executive Committee as Gen-
eral Secretary-Treasurer from;
1994-199q6. Atkinson served as
State Administiative Bishop in:
MS, KY, AL, W. NC, and TN.
He also served as Director of
Media Ministries and National
Evangelist. Recently, he was
very involved in the ministries of
Metropolitan Tabernacle church.
Walter Atkinson will be remem-
bered as a true "statesman,"
world-class leader, and gifted
Bible scholar. His love for
God, his family, the Church, his
friends and "ordinary people"
ran very deeply and was easily
observed in his everyday life. He
and his wife of 54 years, Oleda,
were truly a "team" in all of their
ministry and life experiences.


Visitation will occur on Friday,
November 4, from 4:30-6:30
p.m., followed by the Celebra-
tion of Life and Legacy service of
Dr. Walter Atkinson at 7:00 p.m.
at the Metropolitan Tabernacle
Church, 2101 West Shepherd
Road, Chattanooga, TN 37421:
A .private family interment
will occur Saturday morning.
Because of his love for training
spiritual sons and daughters, in
Slieu of flowers, friends are en-
couraged to make donations to
"Destiny Ministries" to continue
the legacy of Dr. Waltei Atkin-
son @ www.walteratkinson.org.
Visit www.heritagefh.com
to share words of comfort to
the family. Arrangements by
HERITAGE FUNERAL
HOME, 7454 E. Brainerd
Road, Chattanooga, TN 37421.


Essie Laura Eason

Essie Laura Eason, 85, a resi-
dent of Lake City, Florida
passed away November 1, 2011
at the Shands of Lake Shore
Hospital, Lake City, Florida.
Mrs. Eason was born in Sales
City, Georgia and is the daughter


of the late William Thomas and
Genivie Cannie Holton Cook.
Mrs. Eason has lived'in Lake
City for the past twenty-five
years and is of the Baptist faith.
She is preceded in death by two
husbands, Grady O.D. Browder
and Lloyd C. Eason, and three
daughters, Carolyn Browder,
Linda Withers and Eileen Eason.
Survivors include three daugh-
ters: Paula A. Kuelbs and Pa-
tricia Avallone both of Lake
City, Florida and Elairie M.
Eason, Gainesville, Fl. Two
Sons: Lloyd Eason, Gillette,
Wyoming and Timothy Eason,
DeBary, Florida. Twelve Grand-
children twelve great grand-
children and one great great
grandchild and Special Nieces
and Nephews also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Eason


will be conducted Thursday;No-
vember 3, 2011 at 11:00 A.M.
in the Chapel of Guerry Funeral
Home with the Rev. Jerry Tyre,
officiating.. The family will re-
ceive friends Thursday Novem-
ber 3, 2011 from 10:00-11:00
just prior to the service. Grave-
side funeral services will follow
in the Forest Lawn Cemetery,
Pompano Beach, Florida Friday,
November 4, 2011 at 1:00 P.M.
in the Cemetery. GUERRY
FUNERAL HOME 2659 SW.
Main Blvd. Lake City is in
charge of arrangements. 386-
752-2414. Please sigh the guest-
bookatguerryfuneralhome. com.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


ment
The Education
Department's National
Center for Education
Statistics administers the
test On a 500-point scale,
both fourth- and eighth-
graders scored on average
one point higher in math
in 2011 than in 2009 and
more than 20 points higher
than in 1990, when students
were first tested in math. In
reading, the score for fourth-
graders was unchanged
from two years ago and
four points higher than in
1992, when that test was
first administered. Eighth-
graders in reading scored
on average one point higher
in 2011 than in 2009 and five
points higher than in 1992.


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6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATION WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011


Plan B

for picking

president

By Nancy Benac
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Lots of
people complain about the
shortcomings of the coun-
try's two-party system for
picking a president Now a
nonpartisan group is gather-
ing millions of petition sig-
natures and dollars to
offer people a Plan B.
Americans Elect, which
grew out of a failed 2008
effort to provide an alterna-
tive in the presidential race,
aims to secure a slot on the
November ballot in all 50
states for a to-be-determined
candidate who would be
nominated in the nation's
first online convention next
summer.
The group,.whose back-
ers include both Republicans
and Democrats anxious to
open up the political pro-
cess, has raised $22 mil-
lion so far and secured bal-
lot slots in Florida, Alaska,
Nevada, Kansas, Arizona
and Michigan. It has-submit-
ted signatures for certifica-
tion in California, Utah and
Hawaii.



Jax man

pleads not

guilty in

celebrity

hacking
By Greg Risling
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES A
Florida man has pleaded
not guilty in a Los Angeles
court to hacking into the
email accounts of Christina
Aguilera and Scarlett
Johansson.
Christopher Chaney
of Jacksonville has been
indicted in California on 26
counts, including wiretap-
ping, and faces up to 121
years in prison if convicted.
Federal prosecutors say
Chaney hacked into e-mail
accounts belonging to
Aguilera, Johansson and
Mila Kunis. Some nude
photos taken by Johansson
of herself were posted on
the Internet.
Authorities say they
35-year-old offered some
material to celebrity blog
sites but there isn't any evi-
dence that he profited from
his scheme.
Chaney, who is free on
$10,000 bond, has apolo-
gized for his actions.
A trial has been set for
Dec.'27.


Hillary

Clinton's

mom dies

Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
Dorothy Rodham, moth-
er of Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton
and former President Bill
Clinton's mother-in-law,
died Tuesday at age 92
after an illness.
The family said Rodham
died shortly after midnight,
surrounded by her family
at a Washington hospital.
The secretary of state had
cancelled a planned trip to
London and. Istanbul to be
at her mother's side.
In a statement, the Clinton
family hailed Rodham as
a woman who "overcame


abandonment and hardship
as a young girl to become
the remarkable woman she
was a warm, generous
and strong woman; an intel-
lectual; a woman who- told
a great joke and always got
the joke; an extraordinary
friend and, most of all, a
loving wife, mother and
grandmother."
President Barack Obama
praised Rodham as a
"remarkable person" who
also was "strong, deter-
mined and gifted."


House OKs freeze

in new cell taxes


In this Nov. 4, 2008 file photo, a lone voter casts her ballot at the' Su Nueva Launderia on the
southwest side of Chicago.


Americans Elect, whose
slogan is "pick a president,
not a party," appears to be on
track to secure ballot access
across the country, with
1.9 million signatures col-
lected so far. But how it will
effect the 2012 race depends
on what kind of candidate
its delegates select in next
June's online convention,
which will be open to any
registered voter.
"It's a fascinating experi-
ment in trying to empower
the disenfranchised center
in American politics," says


Will Marshall, one of the
group's leaders and the
president of the Progressive
Policy Institute, a centrist
Democratic think tank.
"It uses the power of the
Internet and social media
to provide a new means for
political participation."
Even Marshall admits,
though, that he approaches
the effort with some trepida-
tion.
"I'd hate to see a scenar-
io in which a vibrant third
choice in some way threw
the 2012 election to a right-


winger like a Rick Perry or
a Michele Bachmann," he
says.
Americans Elect rejects
the notion its candidate
could turn out to be a spoiler
and says that putting the
choice in 'the hands or
clicks of millions of regis-
tered voters will ensure the
selection of a qualified nomi-
.nee. Leading candidates for
the group's nomination will
be required to choose a run-
ning mate who is not from
their own party to ensure
political balance, it says.


By Jim Abrams
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
House on Tuesday approved
a five-year freeze on any new
state and local taxes imposed
on cellphones and other
wireless services, including
wireless broadband access.
The voice vote reflected
a consensus that new taxes
on wireless mobile services
have far outpaced average
sales taxes on other items
and have become a deter-
rent to the spread of wire-
less broadband technology.
"We need to encourage
the development and adop-
tion of wireless broadband,
not tax it out of existence,"
said Rep. Zoe Lofgren,
D-Calif., the sponsor of the
legislation.
She said that in many
places, the taxation of wire-
less approaches or even
exceeds the rates of sin
taxes on goods like alcohol
and tobacco.
Her office said wireless
customers now pay 16.3
percent in taxes and fees,
more than double the aver-
age rate of 7.4 percent on
other goods and services. It


said taxes on wireless ser-
vices hits 26.8 percent in
Baltimore, 20.4 percent in
New York City and 19.9 per-
cent in Omaha, Neb.
"The exorbitant discrimi-
natory taxes on wireless
customers are not only
unfair, they are counterintui-
tive, adding another costly
impediment to the success
of so many American busi-
nesses who are struggling
in the midst of a prolonged
recession," said Rep. Trent
Franks, R-Ariz., co-sponsor
of the bill with Lofgren.
The bill prohibits state
and local governments from
imposing new discriminato-
ry taxes on mobile services,
providers or property -
cellphones for five years.
Discriminatory taxes are
defined as those not gener-
ally imposed on other types
of services and providers or
imposed at a lower rate.
The only lawmaker to
speak out against the bill
was Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif.,
who said it was a special
interest measure for the
wireless industry that was
opposed by state govern-
ment associations and orga-
nized labor.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirbyd@lokecity, eortoer:comn


SPORTS


Wednesday, November 2, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS SOFTBALL
Players, parent
meet Thursday
A meeting for
Columbia High softball
players and parents
to discuss tryouts and
conditioning is 6 p.m.
Thursday in the CHS
cafeteria.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.
RUNNING
Community run
at regionals
The FHSAA Region
1 cross country meet
for Classes 1A, 2A and
3A will be at Alligator
Lake Park on Nov. 12.
A free community run
will be offered following
the FHSAA competition.
The community run will
begin at 10:30 a.m.
For details, e-mail
Dusty Smith at dustv@
halfmiletiming.com.

Veterans Day Run,
Walk, Roll 5K
Gainesville Fisher
House Foundation has a
Veterans Day 5K event
planned on a course at
the University of Florida.
The event begins at
8 a.m., preceded by
registration at 6:30 a.m.
Registration is $25 and
day-of registration is $30.
For details, go to www.
GainesvilleFisherHouse.
org.
CHS BOWUNG
Gas card raffle
for fundraiser
Columbia High's
bowling team is selling
raffle tickets for a $250'
gas card as a fundraiser.
Tickets are $5 for one,
$10 for three, and $20
for 10.
For details, call Brian
Saunders at 755-8080.
YOUTH BASEBALL
Georgia Batmen
fielding teams
Georgia Batmen is
fielding 8-under, 9-under,
10-under and 11-under
travel baseball teams
in 2012. Spots are cur-
rently available on next
year's 8-under, 9-under
and 10-under teams and
additional teams may
be formed in each age
group (age cutoff date is
May 1).
For details, call
Jim Bennett at
(229) 630-3736.
E From staff reports

GAMES

Thursday
Columbia High
swimming in Region
1-2A meet at Cecil
Aquatic Complex in
Jacksonville, 9 a.m.
Fort White High
cross country in District
2-3A meet at Starke Golf
& Country Club, 5 p.m.-
girls; 5:40 p.m.-boys
Friday
Columbia High
football at Leon High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Trinity Catholic
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
cross country in District
4-2A meet at Apalachee
Regional Park, 8 a.m.-
girls; 8:30 a.m.-boys
Fort White High


boys soccer at Keystone
(Heights) Classic, TBA


Falcons knock off

Baker County, 19-8


Lake City to
play for Star
Conference title.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Lake City Middle School
will play its third game in
eight days on Friday after
beating Baker County, 19-8,
for a chance to win the Star
Conference Championship.
Lake City improved to 5-
2 for the season with its
19-8 win on Tuesday. The
Falcons will travel to Wakulla
at 7 p.m. on Friday for the
championship game.
Roger Cray started the
Falcons off with a 38-yard
run in the first quarter for
a 6-0 lead.
Baker County took the
lead with 2:22 left in the first


At

Columbia hitting
peak as it heads
into Tallahassee.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
Columbia High h<
coach Brian Allen's favot
comparison of the TigE
football team is to that
a weightlifter heading
state.
Allen didn't want
Tigers lifting at their n
to begin the season.
wanted the Tigers max
out when it matters mos
The time has come
Columbia (5-3, 3-1 distr
travels to Leon High at 7 p
in Tallahassee on Friday.
Allen's teams have gi'
up a combined three poi
in its last two games
wins over Middleburg a
Orange Park. It's that k
of defense he had ei
sioned in the preseat
when he first mention
wanting the Tigers to pE
toward the end of the ye
"The team stepped ul
the challenge last wee
Allen said. "We cal
them out with a purp,
and they responded. I
a phone call on Morn
that I'll probably never
again and that was the h<
CHS continued on


half off a Tymez Givens'
run and the Bobcats added
a two-point conversion to
go up 8-6.
Derontae Jordan followed
up the Bobcats' score by
running the kickoff back
to the Baker County three.
Devante Sercey then car-
ried it in for a 12-6 lead.
Dallon Washington recov-
ered a fumble with 55 sec-
onds left in the first half to
set up a Cray run from 61-
yards away. Jake Thomas
snuck it in for the 19-8 lead
following an extra point by
Hunter Houston.
"The defense stepped it
up in the second half for
a shutout, but the offense
still isn't quite where we
want it to be," Lake City
head coach Billy Jennings
said. "We hope it all clicks
Friday."


the


BRANDON FINLEY/Lake City Reporter
Lake City Middle School's Hunter Sweet makes a tackle on Baker County Middle School's
Tymez Givens during the Falcons' 19-8 win on Tuesday.


right


time


Vf.-~, ."- 4 .
?'e ~ .-`
~P~1~4~~rb~.I..a.. i~
k .


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Tyrone Sands (32) and Austin Reiter (52) look to tackle Middleburg's Rick Lassiter (12) on Oct. 21. The
Tigers travel to Tallahassee on Friday to take on Leon High in a District 4-6A battle that will decide if Columbia makes the
playoffs.


District on line


4 against.Trinity


.. Catholic High


.
,: 4,


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White's Tavaris Williams (2) trips up a Rickards High runner during the homecoming
game victory on Friday.


Fort White has
chance to host
first playoff game.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Not too
long ago, Fort White High
football spent four years in
the district with Madison
County High, one of the
acknowledged powerhouse
programs in the state.
In 2011 and 2012, the
Indians are grouped with
Trinity Catholic High, which
has established itself with a
string of playoff appearanc-
es that has reached eight
straight.
The teams are in District


3-3A for football and, as the
only two schools in the dis-
trict, both are assured of a
trip to the FHSAA playoffs.
The winner will host a play-
off game, something that
has never happened at Fort
White.
The district deciding
game is 7:30 p.m. in Ocala.
Trinity Catholic was
established in 2000, the
same year Fort White High
opened.
The Celtics hit their
playoff stride in 2003 and
have been each year since.
The head coaching spot
has so far been reserved
for former Gators. Kerwin
Bell was at the reins in
INDIANS continued on 2B


I_ _


F~-~~ ;;C~jSt


---- n. ;










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN -Temple at Ohio
GOLF
II p.m.
TGC PGA Tour-WGC, HSBC
Champions, first round, at Shanghai
NHL
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Philadelphia at Buffalo
SOCCER
3:30 p.m.
FSN Champions League, Real
Madrid at Lyon
8 p.m.
FStN Champions League, Otelul at
Manchester United (same-day tape)

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


Buffalo
New England
N.Y. Jets
Miami


Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland


Kansas City
San Diego
Oakland
Denver


East
W L
5 2
5 2
4 3
0 7
South
W L
5 3
4 3
2 6
0 8
North
W L
6 2
.5 2
5 2
3 4
.West
W L
4 3
4 3
4 3
2 5


TPct PF PA
0.714 211147
0.714 202160
0 .571 172152
0.000 107166

TPct PF PA
0.625 206145
0:571 139145
0.250 98 163
0.000 121252

TPct PF PA
0.750 176139
0.714 171123
0.714 185110
0.429 107140

TPqt PF PA
0.571 128170
0.571 161159
0.571 160178
0 .286'133200


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L TPct PF PA


N.Y. Giants
Philadelphia
'Dallas
Washington


New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Carolina


Green Bay -
Detroit
Chicago -
Minnesota

San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Arizona


5 2
3 4
3 4
3 4
South
W L
5 3
4 3
4 3
2 6
North
W L
7 0
6 2
4 3
2 6
West
W L
6 1
2 5
1 6
1 6


0.714 174164
0.429 179152
0.429 156162
0.429 116139

TPct PF PA
0.625 260189
0 571 131169
0.571 158163
0 .250 187207

TPct PF PA
01.000230141
0.750 239147
0.571 170150
0.250 172199

TPct PF PA
0.857 187107
0.286 109162
0.143 87 192
0.143 143183


Sunday's Games
Tennessee 27, Indianapolis 10
St. Louis 31, New Orleans 21
Houston 24,Jacksonville 14
N.Y. Giants 20, Miami 17
Minnesota 24, Carolina 21
Baltimore 30,Arizona 27
Detroit 45, Denver 10
Buffalo 23,Washington 0
San Francisco 20, Cleveland 10
Cincinnati 34, Seattle 12
Pittsburgh 25, New England 17
Philadelphia 34, Dallas 7
Monday's Game
Kansas City 23, San Diego 20, OT
Sunday, Nov. 6
Seattle at Dallas, I p.m.
Miami at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans. I p.m.
Cleveland at Houston, I p.m.
San Francisco atWashington, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Buffalo, I p.m.
Atlanta at IndianapoJis, I p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati atTennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Green Bay at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
St Louis at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants aS New England, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 7
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.


Open: Carolina, Detroit, Jacksonville,
Minnesota

College schedule

Today
Temple (5-3) at Ohio (5-3), 8 p.m.
Thursday
Florida St.(5-3) at Boston College
(2-6), 8 p.m.

Top'25 schedule

Friday
No. 21 Southern Cal at Colorado,
9 p.m.
Saturday
No. I LSU at No.2 Alabama, 8 p.m.
No. 3 Oklahoma State vs. No. 17
Kansas State, 8 p.m.
No. 4 Stanford at Oregon State,
3:30 p.m.
No. 5 Boise State at UNLV, 10:30 p.m.
No. 6 Oregon at Washington,
10:30 p.m.
No. 7 Oklahoma vs. Texas A&M,
3:30 p.m.
No. 8 Arkansas vs. No. 12 South
Carolina, 7:15 p.m.
No. 9 -Nebraska vs. Northwestern,
3:30 p.m.
No. 13 Michigan at Iowa, Noon
No. 14 Houston at UAB, 7 p.m.
No. 15 Michigan State vs. Minnesota,
Noon
No. 18 Georgia vs. New Mexico State,
12:30 p.m.
No. 19 Wisconsin vs. Purdue,
3:30 p.m.
No. 20 Arizona State at UCLA,
7:30 p.m.
No. 23 Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
No. 24 West. Virginia vs. Louisville,
Noon

BASEBALL

All-time manager's wins

I. Connie Mack 3,731
2.John'McGraw 2,763
3.Tony La Russa 2,728
4. Bobby Cox 2,504
S.JoeTorre 2,326
6. Sparky Anderson 2,194
7. Bucky Harris 2,158
8. Joe McCarthy 2,125
9.Walter Alston 2,040
I0.Leo Durocher 2,008

GOLF

Golf week

WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS
HSBC CHAMPIONS
Site: Shanghai.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Sheshan International Golf
Club (7,140 yards, par 72).
Purse: $7 million.Winner's share: $1.2
million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday,
midnight-4 a.m., 8 a.m.-noon; Friday, mid-
night-4 a.m., 8 a.m.-noon,-II p.m.-4 a.m.;
Saturday, 7 a.m.-noon, II p.m.-4 a.m.;
Sunday, 7 a.m.-noon).
Online: http://www.worldgolfchampion
ships.com
PGA Tour site: http://www.pgotour.com
European Tour site: http://www.
europeantour.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR
CHARLES SCHWAB CUP
-CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: San Francisco.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: TPC Harding Park (6,743
yards, par 72).
Purse: $2.5 million. Winner's share:
$440,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 4:30-7 p.m.).'
LPGATOUR/JAPAN LPGATOUR
MIZUNO CLASSIC
Site: Shima, Japan.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Kintetsu Kashikojima Country
Club (6,506 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.2 million. Winner's share:
$180,000.
Television: None.
Online: http://www.lpga.com; Japan
LPGA Tour site: http://www.lpgo.or.jp
OTHERTOURNAMENTS
MEN
PGA OF AMERICA: Callaway Golf


PGA Assistant Championship, Thursday-
Sunday, PGA Golf Club, Port St. Lucie.
Online: http://www.pgo.com

AUTO RACING

Sprint Cup leaders

Points
I,Carl Edwards, 2,273.2,Tony Stewart,
2,265. 3, Kevin Harvick, 2,252. 4, Brad
Keselowski, 2,246. 5, Matt Kenseth,
2,237. 6, Jimmie Johnson, 2,230. 7, Kyle
Busch, 2,216. 8, Kurt Busch, 2,215. 9,
Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,200. 10, Jeff Gordon,
2,197.
II, Denny Hamlin, 2,193. 12, Ryan
Newman, 2,184. 13, Clint Bowyer, 940.
14, Greg Biffle, 916. 15, Kasey Kahne, 915.
16, A J Allmendinger, 912. 17, Juan Pablo
Montoya, 863. 18, Marcos Ambrose, 862.
19, David Ragan, 857. 20, Mark Martin,
857.
Money
I, Carl Edwards, $7,617,866. 2, Kyle
Busch, $5,932,241. 3, Jimmie Johnson,
$5,902,376. 4, Kevin Harvick, $5,798,786.
5, Matt Kenseth, $5,673,401.6, Kurt Busch,
$5,577,701. 7, Tony Stewart, $5,515,797.
8, Jeff Gordon, $5,456,851. 9, Clint
Bowyer, $5,200,827. 10, Denny Hamlin,
$5,012,868.
II, Ryan Newman, $4,896,448.
12, Brad Keselowski, $4,773,745. 13,
Juan Pablo Montoya, $4,668,027. 14,
Jamie McMurray, $4,450,625. 15, A J
Allmendinger, $4,420,906. 16. Marcos
Ambrose, $4,403,016. 17, Regan Smith,
$4,266,173. 18, Kasey Kahne, $4,222,582.
19, Bobby Labonte, $4,190,818. 20, David.
Reutimann, $4,035,842.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Winnipeg 4, Florida 3, SO
N.Y. Rangers 5, San Jose 2
Chicago 5, Nashville 4, OT
Tuesday's Games
Ottawa at Boston (n)
Tampa Bay at Carolina (n)
Anaheim at Washington (n)
Minnesota at Detroit (n)
Vancouver at Calgary (n)
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Winnipeg at N.Y. Islanders. 7 p.m.
Anaheim at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Calgary at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Nashville at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Edmonton at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

SOCCER

MLS playoffs

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Semifinals
Sporting Kansas City vs. Colorado
Sporting Kansas City 2, Colorado 0
Today
Colorado at Sporting Kansas City,
7 p.m.
Houston vs. Philadelphia
Houston 2, Philadelphia I
Thursday
Philadelphia at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Championship
Sunday
Semifinal winners
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Semifinals
Los Angeles vs. NewYork
Los Angeles I, New York 0
Thursday
NewYork at Los Angeles, I I p.m.
Seattle vs. Real Salt Lake
Seattle 0, Real Salt Lake 3
Today
Real Salt Lake at Seattle, 10 p.m.
Championship
Sunday
Semifinal winners
MLS CUP
Sunday, Nov. 20
At Carson, Calif.
Conference champions, 9 p.m.


INDIANS: Travel to Trinity Catholic


Continued From Page 11

200306 and gave way to Ricky
Nattiel for one year. John
Brantley took over in 2008.
Trinity Catholic won the
Class 2B state championship
last year. The Celtics swept
through Yulee High, Bolles
School, Pensacola Catholic
High (which beat Fort
White in the first round) and
University School of Nova
Southeastern 'University.
It was the second state
title for the Celtics. Bell's
2005 team also went 4-
0 in the playoffs and beat
Pahokee High in the final.
Trinity Catholic was twice
state runner-up to Pahokee
- 2006 and 2008. Only in
its first playoff year was
Trinity Catholic eliminated
in the opening round.
The Celtics are 4-3 this
year. They had an open date
last week and an earlier
game at Monsignor Pace
High was postponed by the
weather and later canceled.
Brantley has loaded
up his schedule. Trinity
Catholic's losses have
come to Class 6A schools
Gainesville High (29-6) and
Vanguard High (21-0) and


to 5A North Marion (23-
20). All have been ranked
in the top 10 in the Florida
Sports Writers Association
poll during the season.
Monsignor Pace was a
'top five team in 4A, as was



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.


2A Glades Day High which
Trinity Catholic whipped
46-0 two weeks ago.
Trinity Catholic's otherwins
have come over Eastside High
(480), Forest High (24-7) and
East Lake High (38-19).

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


(Answers tomorrow)


Yesterday Jumbles: CROOK BLEND SMOGGY GAMING
IAnswer: Even they weren't related, Pierce Brosnan and
Daniel Craig had one A COMMON BOND


GOLF REPORTS



Rivers/Warren top LGA field


The LGA format com-
bined a front-nine better
ball score and a back-nine
scramble score for two-
person teams.
Sally Rivers and Faye
Warren went to the score-
cards for a regression win
over Natalie Bryant and
Dottie Rogers after both
twosomes finished regula-
tion play with 61.
Katrina Counts and
Nancy Edgar were a stroke
behind the winners.
Steve Patterson (+6)
topped a list of six players
in the hunt for first place in
Wednesday's blitz. Rocky
Ryals (+5) picked up sec-
ond place, followed by Don
Combs (+4) in third.
The payoff for skins was
seriously diluted when
nine winners were posted.
Chad Hunter had two win-
ners including an eagle on
No. 2. Mike Gough, Hank
Rone, Donald Roberts,
Lynn Smith, Patterson,
Ryals and Combs each had
one. Both pot holes carried


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff


over again.
A big field was split into
two flights for the Saturday
blitz.
Bruce Gibson overcame
a barrage of five birdies
by Steve Smithy with four
of his own to take the "A"
division win.
Al Alvarado and Andy
Peterson had matching
scores of +3 to split top
money in the "B" division.
Dennis Crawford, David
Pope and Smithy shared
a nice payoff in the skins
game.
Both teams broke into
double digits in match one
of Good Old Boys play.
Derrick Tuell, Joe
Persons and Jim Bell
finally emerged as the win-
ning team over Marc Risk,
Dave Cannon and Bobby
Simmons in the 14-10
shootout.


The three teams involved
in match two appeared to be
heading for a tie until Stan
Woolbert, Eli Witt, Carl
Wilson and Bill Wheeler
managed a late team point
to finish with 5 points for
the win. Ed Snow, Paul
Davis, Jim McGriff and
Dan Stephens matched
Monty Montgomery, Tom
Elmore, Bill Rogers and
Mike Spencer with 4 team
points in the tie for second
place.
Derrick Tuell outpaced
the usual medalist con-
tenders with a blistering
4-under-par 32 on the home-
ward nine to post a two
under par round of 70.
Risk was two strokes
back with a 36-36-72.
Montgomery (74), Snow
(76), Woolbert (78)
Simmons (79), and Witt
(79) rounded out the crowd
of top scorers.
In nine-hole play, Bell and
McGriff locked up at 39 on
the front side. Elmore and
Persons split the back side,


CHS: Can make playoffs with win


Continued From Page 1B

official apologizing to me
for a blown call. You take
that call away and you're
talking about back-to-back
shutouts. I've played on
some good defenses here,
in college and in the pros,
but I don't think I've ever
been a part of back-to-back
shutouts."
I Allen likes the way his
team is doing it with a
group of guys as well.
"We're a bunch of blue-
collar guys," he said. 'We're
not a bunch of superstars.
We're taking our lunch
bucket to work and play-
ing as a team and unit. The
guys are putting their trust
into the guys lining up in
front of them, to the side or
behind them. They're play-
ing within the scheme and
they're believing in it."
Allen was also pleased
with the way his team
responded when Orange
Park came out throwing
more than he expected.
"Coach (Danny) Green's
philosophy is that only
three things can happen
when you pass the ball and


ACROSS
1 Boards
'5 Fast on one's
feet
10 Skirted the
basket
12 Malt-shop
delight
13 Beethoven's
Third -
14 Overly diluted
15 Many August
people
16 52, to Livy
18 Mantra chants
19 Is sparing or
frugal
22 Soprano -
Callas
25 Greeted the
cat
29 Hunter
constellation
30 Poe's night
visitor
32 Indications
33 Kick out of
the country
34 Fall upon


two of them are bad," Allen
said. "We didn't expect to
see that. Even still, we did a
great job of attacking their
strong point and limiting
their ability to get outside
with the run."
Allen's defense has been
helped with the addition
of Dequan Ivory back in
the lineup after serving a
suspension for violation of
team rules. Allen said the
time away from the game
has helped Ivory play with
a chip on his shoulder.
"Last week, he had the
best game of his career,"
Allen said. "He earned our
defensive player of the
game."
Ivory ended the game
with 10 tackles, two tackles
for loss, a sack and a fum-
ble. He also had a blocked
kick that was negated by
penalty.
"He also did a good job
of reading screens," Allen
said. "He played to his
assignments. Missing time,
you can tell that he missed
the game."
The Tigers have adjust-


37 Had theflu
38 Unisex wear
40 Remove, as
branches
43 Unlucky
gambler's
note
44 Capture
48 Pina -
50 Glossy paint
52 Stayed a
while
53 Says it isn't
so
54 Elk cousin
55 Idyllic spot

DOWN
1 Down to
the -
2 Melville opus
3 Some errata
4 Holiday mo.
5 Sine non
6 A law itself
7 Footnote
word
8 Tauruses and
Impalas


ed some things with their
defensive line over the last
couple of weeks a move
that Allen said has paid off.
'We're mixing up our
stunts," he said. 'We're
working on where we start,
our stance. We're not just
coming straight ahead.
We're starting to see the
fruits of our labor."
For the Tigers, those
fruits. can be obtained in
the form of a playoff-clinch-
ing performance on Friday.
Columbia will guarantee
itself a runner-up position
in District 4-6A with a win
against Leon, but could
also still win the district if
Ridgeview stumbles against
Middleburg.
The Tigers are currently
in a three-way tie for the
district lead, but Ridgeview
holds the tie-breakers if
both teams should win on
Friday.
"We've mentioned
it," Allen said of winning
the district. "But right
ndw, we're focused on
taking care of business
Friday."


Answer to Previous Puzzle


MARS HIDI LAST
ATEN EP A .AR C H
CABARETS BEAU
COD HERALD

USE HACK ED

SPE W S E OBOE
ESSE TIE READ
ICICLE TRI
FIRE BLAST


AIDE LO NGERS
RI L S IP IDNE
NEATMEIEIK COIN I


Enter data
Family mem.
Surrealist
painter
Slide a credit
card through
a reader


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


17 Troublemaking
toddler
20 Sunflower
state
21 Lightning
flash
22 Jan. and Feb.
23 Libretto
feature
24 Supplies with
gear
26 Hotel amenity
(2 wds.)
27 Very, very bad
28 Edit out
31 Beatty of
films
35 Achilles' story
36 Thai neighbor
39 Prompted
40 Gray timber
wolf
41 Mishmash
42 Water lily
leaves
45 Pierre's
girlfriend
46 Lament loudly
47 Loop trains
48 Engine part
49 Sandra or
Ruby
51 Born as


11-2 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


NSIFIH




A:Kmmm


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011


PREP ROUNDUP


RECREATION ROUNDUP


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Micheala Polhamus dives off the block during a meet against Suwannee
High on Oct. 13. Polhamus is a member of the Lady Tigers' 200 medley and 400 freestyle
relay teams that qualified for region.


Lady Indians shut out


Williston in opener


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High's girl soccer
team opened the regular
season with a 2-0 home
win over Williston High on
Monday.
It was a District 5-2A
game and the opening
game of the season for both
teams.
The Lady Indians domi-
nated the first half, but
could not get a ball in the
net. The second half start-
ed the same way with two
missed chances in the goal
mouth. A whiff on a kick
cost the first one and a div-
ing save by the keeper, who
ended up half in and half
out of the goal, saved the
second.
Finally, in the 63rd min-
ute, Lynce Stalnaker turned
on a ball from 30 yards out
and blasted it over the keep-
er and into'the goal.
With 7:12 left in the
match, Caitlin Congi took
a shot from midfield and
Alexa Hatcher redirected it
by the keeper and into the
left side of the goal.
"We had a lot of opportu-
nities," Indians head coach
Perry Sauls said. "Our
offense has got to learn to
finish."
One finish will be enough
if Fort White's defense
keeps playing the way it is.
The Lady Indians recorded


shutouts in both preseason
games on Saturday. Fort
White won the two games
by a combined 7-0.
"Our defense snuffed
them out tonight, the same
way it was in our two games
over the weekend," Sauls
said.
Fort White hosts
Newberry High at 5 p.m.
this Monday in the open-
ing game of a girls/boys
doubleheader.

Columbia swimming
In winning her events
in the District 2-2A meet,
Hannah Burns set two
Columbia High school
records and earned the No.
1 seed for both at region.
Burns clocked 2:06.44 in
the 200 IM and 1:06.96 in
the 100 breast to break the
CHS records.
Heather Burns placed
third in the 200 free and is
seeded sixth at region. She
placed fourth, in the 500
free and is seeded seventh.
Lindsay Lee was third in
the 50 free and is seeded
eighth at region. Lee was
eighth in the 100 free and is
seeded 21st.
The Lady Tigers second-
place 400 free relay teams
seeded seventh at region,
while, the fifth-place 200
medley relay team is seed-
ed 15th.
David Morse placed fifth
in both the 100 breast and


100 fly, and is seeded 18th
and 21st, respectively, at
region.
Columbia swimmers
who placed in the top 16 at
district were reported on
Tuesday. Both CHS boys
freestyle relay teams were
disqualified.
Others swimmers not
in the top 16 in individu-
al events at district are:
Meghan Collins (29th-200
free); Stephanie Silva (17th-
200 IM, 20th-100 fly); Aleena
Fields (26th-200 IM, 23rd-
100 breast); Sara Woodfield
(22nd-50 free); Cheyenne
Brown (32nd-50 free, 28th-
100 free); Nichole Baptista
(45th-50 free); Brianna Pope
(29th-100 fly, 28th-500 free);
Joana Mata (23rd-100 free,
26th-100 back); Madeline
Ault (41st-100 free); Kaicie
Chasteen (25th-500 free,
20th-100 breast); Courtney
Britt (25th-100 back);
Jacob Finley (19th-200
free); Randal Soltis (23rd-
200 free, 22nd-500 free);
Joshua O'Connell 23rd-
500 free, 200 free); Cale
Shaw (19th-200 IM, 18th-
100 back); Jackson Nettles
(26th-50 free, 19th-100 free);
Andrew Fortier (42nd-50
free, 44th-100 free); Marlon
Polintan (45th-50 free, 28th-
100 back); Cody Smith
(31st-100 breast).
The Region 1-2A meet
is 9 a.m. Thursday at
Cecil Aquatic Complex in
Jacksonville.


Resurgent Seminoles

dominant in 3 straight wins


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida State is starting to
play like many expected at
the beginning of the sea-
son.
The Seminoles (5-3, 3-2
Atlantic Coast Conference)
have won three straight
games in which they've
outscored opponents by a
combined 116-32. They've
scored 30 points or more in
seven of eight games this
season and 10 of their last
12 dating back to last year.
And their defense ranks
among the nation's best
as they head north for
Thursday night's nationally
televised game at Boston
College (2-6, 1-4), a team
Florida State coach Jimbo
Fisher believes is better
than its record.
'"They've had a couple of
tough games," Fisher said
Monday. "They've just had
a couple of bad breaks. The
film doesn't relate to the
record."
But for the record, BC
lost close games to Duke
and Northwestern, but was
ripped by Central Florida,
Clemson and Virginia Tech.
The Eagles' only wins are
over Massachusetts and


Maryland last Saturday.
The Seminoles' resur-
gence has coincided with
improvement on a reshuf-
fled offensive line, a strong
cadre of young receivers
and a healthy EJ Manuel,
who didn't play in the 35-30
loss at Clemson and didn't
enter the Wake Forest
defeat until the Seminoles
fell behind 16-7 in the sec-
ond quarter. -
Manuel has been hot
after returning fulltime,
completing 52 of 74 passes
(70 percent) for 824 yards in
wins over Duke, Maryland
and North Carolina State
despite not having his most
dangerous target, freshman
Rashad Greene, who has
missed those games with a
sprained ankle.
Manuel has also added
some option runs to the
Florida State attack, which
has rolled up 1,407 yards in
the last three games while
limiting opponents to 786.
"He's been the differ-
ence in their team," North
Carolina State coach Tom
O'Brien said after his team's
34-0 loss in Tallahassee on
Saturday. "When he went
down they had problems.
The problems seemed to
disappear when the 6-5, 240-
pound Manuel came back
full-time three weeks after


he suffered a separated left
(non-throwing) shoulder in
a 23-13 loss to Oklahoma.
Florida State lost twice in
September, once in October
and is hoping for a per-
fect finish in hopes of an
attractive bowl bid. A win
Thursday would make the
Seminoles' eligible for a
nation-leading 30th consec-
utive bowl appearance.
"We can still have a suc-
cessful season," Manuel
said Monday. "We'll try to
control what we can con-
trol right now, take care of
BC and then get ready for
Miami."
The Seminoles begin a
challenging November
schedule with Thursday's
game at Boston College
before returning home
to host longtime nemesis
Miami on Nov. 12. Florida
State finishes the season
with a home date against
Virginia on Nov. 19 and a
visit to archrival Florida on
Nov. 26.
A November sweep
would leave Florida State
with a 9-3 record.
"It didn't work out the way
we wanted it to," Manuel
said. "You can't go into a
hole. "You've got to focus
and play football."
And Manuel, for one, has
been laser-focused.


i *"w




I u r n .


!



..'












COURTESY PHO
COURTESY PHOrO,


NAPA No Pop
NAPA No Pop won the 2011 Lake City Recreation Department's Open Summer Softball
League. Team members are (front row, from left) Lee Crews, Chad Gaskins, Josh Wehinger
and Brian Crews. Back row (from left) are Clayton Thomas, Jerry Yates, Robbie Crews,
Trevor Cazin and Ronnie Preston.


COURTESY PHOTO

K & H Timber
K & H Timber was runner-up in the 2011 Lake City Recreation Department's Open Summer
Softball League. Team members are (front row, from left) Brent Raymer, Mickey Kirkman,
Richard Petty, Dale King and Blake King. Back row (from left) are Tophei Jones,
Brad Tomlinson, Don Lee, Jody Scott, Jeremy Yates and Kraig Kennington.
Kevin Kennington also is on the team.


COURTESY PHOTO

MCS/Bandits
MCS/Bandits was third place in the 2011 Lake City Recreation Department's Open Summer
Softball League. Team members are (front row, from left) Dustin Davis, Shawn Pace,
Willie Moates and Corey Thomas. Back row (from left) are Charlie Culp, Moe Allbritton,
Ricky Cothran, Joe Parrish, David Rhoades and Jay Hannah. Jeremy Thompson,
Harry Paul Lee and Neal Afford also are on the team.


Winfield Wildcats
Windield Wildcats was runner-up in the 2011 Lake City Recreation Department's Co-ed
Summer Softball League. Team members are Pat Davis (front left) and Ronnie Preston.
Second row (from left) are Teresa Perry, Debra Perry, Cassandra Smith and Mike Grissom.
Back row (from left) are Clayton Thomas, Tyron Bones and Mike Felton.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


4B


LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011


DILBERT


BLONDIE
NEW THIS FALL HOGWOOO BRIMSTO UH-OH! THEIR LITTLE NEIGHBOR
IS IN HOT WATER WITH HIS EMO HAS DROPPED BY FOR SOME.
FIRE-BREATHING BOSS, MR. DuTwE,;5 "-, LP-/hLt-ilG iJiNKS""
WHO 44, l E5I "'7Nol-I




1,O.i-
rui5 STU FF'- ', ,Ou CE Fi= s)"'< IDlCULOuS, .EMAIO!','


,.;o- o,._- 0o .


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


WILL THE BEAUTIFUL MRS. BRIMSTOD
SBE ABLE TO PUT UP WITH ALL
"- THE HOOPL -.-
"REALITY i '--, ,
STV" 1IS A.. L G S I', -.
GETTIN6 .- .. . l -wi -.E E..'O .
LESS 4C'^ LET'S 'QDEi? '
EVEr-.,-


'--- .9- ;- .-. ^' ,,. .


DEAR ABBY


Life of toil and thrift is

teen's tough row to hoe


DEAR ABBY: I'm a
15-year-old girl who has
never been in trouble,
but my mom treats me
like I'm a criminal. She
makes me go to church
every Sunday. She makes
me go to Catholic school,
and I have to wear an ugly
uniform. She won't help
with my homework. She
says, "I already did 10th
grade." I can't wear halter
tops, short shorts, a bikini
or much makeup. If I tell
her it's the style, she says,
"Modesty is always in
style."
When I go out with my
friends, she wants to know
where I'm going, who
I'll be with, what we'll be
doing, when we'll be back
and their phone numbers.
If I have a date with a new
boy, she makes him come
into the house and tell her
what school he goes to.
Then she makes him show
her his driver's license and
car registration.
I can't keep my com-
puter in my room. When
I'm using it in the den, she
looks over my shoulder
and won't let me go to chat
rooms. I have to set the
table even if we don't have
company and sit down
and have dinner with her
EVERY night.
If I can't afford some-
thing, she tells me to save
up or budget better. She
won't let me drive until
I can pay for my own
insurance. It's not like


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorobby.com
my mom's poor. We go to
Hawaii and Lake Tahoe,
and we've been to Europe
and on cruises. But she
won't even pay for cable
TV. She says it's an idiot
box and I should read a
book instead.
She also makes me do
my own laundry and keep
my room and bathroom
clean. She makes me do
unfair chores like clean
the guest bathroom even
though I never ever use it.
She wants to teach me to
sew and cook, but I have
no interest in those things.
She told me as long as I
live under her roof, I have
to abide by her rules even
if I'm over 18. And I have
to go to college, and if I
don't, I'll have to get a job
and support myself.
I could go on and on.
Have you ever heard of a
mother so unreasonable?
I'm afraid to run away, but
I don't know how much
more of this I. can take. -
EMOTIONALLY ABUSED
IN CALIFORNIA
DEAR EMOTIONALLY
ABUSED: Wow! Your letter
should be posted on every
refrigerator in the country.


Rarely do I hear about a
parent who tries as hard as
your mother does to do a
diligent job. One day you
will look back and thank
her.
P.S. And if by chance
this letter was written by
your mother congratula-
tions for a job well-done. I
would like to nominate you
for Mother of the Year.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I would
like. to know who gives
singers the right to change
the melody of "The Star-
Spangled Banner" and
"America the Beautiful"?
Some of them who are fea-
tured on national TV don't
even get the lyrics right.
Francis Scott Key's ver-
sion in its original format.
Am I alone on this issue?
- NOT TONE-DEAF IN
WASHINGTON STATE
DEAR NOT TONE-
DEAF: You're far from
alone in feeling as you
do. Our national anthem
is notoriously difficult to
sing, and the lyrics difficult
to remember. However,
performers are, to a
greater or lesser extent,
artists. And some artists
can't resist the temptation
to add their personal inter-
pretation to the classic,
which has proved embar-
rassing for the singer and
the listeners.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Excitement will
unfold and good wishes
and greater prosper-
ity are apparent through
winnings, settlements,
contracts or gifts. Do what
you can to help others and
the rewards will be high
and emotionally touching.
Change will bring love and
success. ****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't let uncertainty
win when it comes to your
status or position. Keep
things in perspective and
don't overanalyze the situ-
ation you are in or you will
overreact, causing more
harm than good. Sit tight
and go with the flow. **
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Take pride in your
home, family, friends
and life. Take a creative
approach to making the
most of what you've got
and you will outshine
anyone who tries to com-
pete with you. A change
of heart will benefit you.

CANCER (June 21-July
22): Change can make the
difference in the outcome
of something you are
working towards. Your will-
ingness to try new things
will show your adaptability
and eagerness to fit into
the plans of those with
whom, or for whom, you
work. Versatility will help
you professionally. ***


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Keep your plans simple.
You can have fun and
impress someone you
are interested in by being
imaginative and frugal.
Overdoing, overreacting
and being emotionally
indulgent will work against
you. A change of scenery
will do you good and lead
to new friendships. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Keep your emotions
out of the equation when
dealing with friends, rela-
tives and neighbors. Too
much of anything will turn
sour. Keep an open mind,
but at the same time main-
tain a practical perspective
about what's going on
around you. ***
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
22): Emphasize home, fam-
ily and creativity. A change
in the way you do things
or live your life will bring
about professional altera-
tions that better suit you.
Don't let the past or the
demands of others stand
in the way of your plans.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Communication may
be a problem for you if you
aren't mindful of what you
say. Someone is likely to
end up with hurt feelings.
Concentrate on protecting
partnerships and you will


avoid a multitude of mis-
haps, disagreements and a
loss of reputation. **
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Don't let the
past haunt you. Deal with
any emotional connections
that are pulling you back-
ward so you can get on
with your life. A move, or
even adjusting the way you
think or deal with such
matters, will help. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Consistency will
play a role in how things
turn out Don't make an
impulsive move. A deal
may entice you, but without
all the facts and figures in
place, it will be best if you
take a pass. Work on a sure
thing, not a gamble. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Emotions will
be difficult to contain and
arguments will be hard to
avoid. Focus on what you
can learn from the situa-
tion or experience. Love
is in the stars, but uncer-
tainty will prevail. Don't
make promises you can't
keep. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Your best efforts will
pay off. Avoid emotional
manipulation that will take
your mind off what needs to
be done. Separate your per-
sonal and business affairs.
Involvement in groups that
put stipulations on your
beliefs must be avoided.
***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: M equals W
"ECJEFUP JDU JH RHZUVDJG WJDZ CS
J HB L J H J V U D'P Z U J L, P W U E R J G G B
RS ZFUB JDU VCCK WRHCEFGU


W G J B U D P.


- U J D G M U J T U D


Previous Solution: "Writers aren't exactly people ... they're a whole lot of
people trying to be one person." F. Scott Fitzgerald
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 11-2


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


CLASSIC PEANUTS














o umbia

Your marketplace source for Lake City and Columbia County


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


Chefs auction will aid March of Dimes


From staff reports
rea residents
will have the
opportunity to
help the March
of Dimes dur-
ing a fundraiser designed
to aid babies born prema-
jurely or with other medi-
pal problems.
The March of Dimes
Signature Chefs Auction
will take place from 5:30
4 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.
j at the Rountree Moore
Toyota Showroom, 1232
West U.S. Highway 90.
Maureen and Vern Lloyd
are serving as co-chairs.
'The event is for
the March of Dimes,"
Maureen Lloyd said. "All
the money goes to the
March of Dimes."
SThe Chefs Auction
.has served as a March
of Dimes local signature
fundraiser for seven years.
This year's event has the
theme: "Holiday Magic."
"We have 24 chefs
multiple chefs from
the different restaurants,"
Lloyd said. "Some of
them are caterers. We're
going to have all kinds of
foods."
The event will feature
chef specialty foods, compli-
mentary wine tasting, live
music by "Harry, Sally &
Billy" and will also feature a
festival of trees and wreaths.
Lloyd said Ferne Mann
worked to help get the
chefs coordinated for the
event George Ward is
serving as the event's hon-
orary chairman.
i addition to the chefs.
there ifl-also-beianctions at=--


the event which will serve
as additional fundraisers.
'Well have live and
silent auctions going on
and some really nice jew-
elry that will be in our live
auction," Lloyd said.
She said there will also
be a premier auction,
which she described as
being a step above the
silent auction. There will
be at least 15 live auction
items for bids.
'The premier auction
has really nice stuff, too,"
Lloyd said. "It's stuff that's
probably $450 and above."
Lloyd said event organiz-
ers hope to raise at least
$45,000 for the March of
Dimes.
She said event organiz-
ers had a good sponsor-
ship call for this year's
event and they were able
to raise close to $33,000 for
this'year's fundraiser. Last
year sponsorships were
listed at approximately
$24,000.
'This is basically a sig-
nature event and we do it
every year," Lloyd said.
In addition there will be
a "fund the mission" pre-
sentation in which some-
one who has had a serious
problem with their baby
gives a testimony about
March of Dimes, services
and.the importance of the
NIC (Neonatal Intensive
Care) unit
'We're hoping it's going.
to be a very good Chefs
Auction this year," Lloyd
said. "We've been working
really hard at it."
Tickets are $50 each and
are.available..at manani~ ea
businesses.


File
.Regina S.h.ep.rdAjefta..eches for items to bid on during a silent auction last year at the Holiday.Magic:Signature Chef's
Auction.


O f t" I........ 5. ..

Iisbi? Sl31 '-- ? a, ,a
K3& -^ ,,"' ^^^^ ^* '^**'S
"*"' *w*^*w~wT-t- f^.< *ufc~~


Ask About Our Cabin Rentals
or Stay the Night In Our Famous Tree House!


. 1-ji








Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


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4 lines 6 days,






One ilem i per ad
4 lines 6 d ays .. .. .










One item per ad .
4 lines 6 days ,. :: ,".


4 lines 5 0
3 days' 7
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ing only.
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$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad is to Appear: Call by: Fax/Email by:
Tuesday Men,10:00a.m. Mon., 9:00a.m.
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Friday Thurs, 10:00a.m. Thurs., 9:00 a.m.
Saturday Fn.. 10:00 an Fri.,9:00a.m.
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These deadlines are subiecl to change without notice.

.,-.- .- t., -


Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect insertion, and,
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
*public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

r: I .1l Online
WWW.bi, '! i i, L l',taill


ADvantage


Legal

NOTICE TO ROAD CONTRAC-
TORS COLUMBIA COUNTY
PROJECT NO. 2011-5 SR-247 AND
SW BASCOM NORRIS DRIVE
Notice is hereby given that sealed
bids will be received in the Columbia
County Manager's office until 11:00
A.M. on November 16, 2011 for Co-
lumbia County Road Project 2011-5.
This office is located on.the second
floor of the,Codrthouse Annex at 135
NE Hemando Avenue Room 203
Lake City, Florida 32055.
This project consists of constructing
a right-hand turn lane improving the
intersection of SR-247 and Bascom
Norris Drive. Scope of work includes
clearing and grubbing, grading,
storm pipes, storm inlets, asphaltic
concrete (base, structural and sur-
face), sodding paint stripping, traffic
signal improvements and incidental
items.
The Bid Forms and Construction
Specifications may be .downloaded
at:
http://www.columbiacountyfla.com/
PurchasingBids.asp
The successful bidder will be re-
quired to furnish the County Manag-
er with a performance bond and lia-
bility insurance prior to commencing
work.
The Columbia County Commission
reserves the right to reject any or all
bits and to add to the contract or de-
lete from the contract to stay within
their funding capabilities.
Signed,
Jody Dupree, Chairman
Board of County Commissioners
Columbia County, Florida
05528858
November 2, 9, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND BASSET Hound
on.BufordRoad.
Found on 10/27/11.
OWNERFOUND!!

Lost: ladies perscription/purple
glasses w/hot pink case. Missing

arund Oct. 20th. On Birley Rd. at
the Kol HaMaschiach-364-4494

t oo Job
S Opportunities

05528665 '
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for County
Engineer. Highly responsible
administrative, technical, and
professional work in directing
the playing and engineering
activities of the Conimty.
Minimum Experience:
Graduation from an accredited
college or university with a
degree in Civil Engineering
and/or 10 years of progressively
responsible work in Public
Works and engineering, 4 of
which should have been in
supervisory capacity, or an
equivalent combination of
training, education, and
experience. Must be registered
as a professional engineer in the
State of Florida with extensive
experience in roadway design,
construction, maintenance &
drainage. Columbia County
residency required within six
months of date of employment.
Salary is negotiable depending
upon experience and qualifica-
tions. Excellent benefits pack-
age. Successful applicant must
pass pre-employment physical,
criminal history & drug screen-
ing. Applications may be
obtained at the Human
Resources Office, Board of
County Commissioners, 135 NE
Hemando, Suite 203, Lake City,
FL 32055, or online at
www.columbiacountyfla.com .
(386)719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139. Review of
applications will begin on
11/14/11 & continue until
position is filled.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

05528733
Now hiring
Dairy Queen Manager
We currently have opportunities
for a Dairy Queen Manager,
in Jasper, Florida. The Manager
position requires single unit
restaurant management
experience. Dairy Queen
restaurant experience is strongly
preferred. Qualified candidates
must have excellent customer
service and employee relations
skills. The successful candidate
will be capable of operating in a
fast paced environment. Must
have a flexible schedule, be self
motivated, able to train,
motivate and prepare employees
for greater responsibilities and
have effective communication
skills. Benefits include:
Competitive pay
Bonus program
Performance-based pay
increases
Paid vacations, holidays &
401K
Fax Resume to: 352-333-1161
Call: 352-494-7552 or Email:
aoberle( fasttrackstores.com





)@.ff)


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


100 Jb0
1 Opportunities

05528737
Fast paced physical therapy
center recruiting front office
person w/great presence, great
voice, & enjoys being face-to-
face w/people. Receptionist or
administrative asst. w/strong
fast-paced customer service
exp. is preferred. You will be
the authority at the front desk,
so confidence is a must. We
have a great staff that is both
professional & fun loving. Must
love a strong challenge, be
PROFESSIONAL, & extremely
organized. Must be able to think
quickly on your feet! Reply to:
pta714(a hotmail.com or
fax (386)755-3165

05528865
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a Librarian II.
This is full-time professional
library work coordinating and
conducting services and
activities in the Reference area.
Strong computer,& website
skills desirable. Minimum.
training: MLS or equivalent
from an American Library
Association accredited
University plus two years of
library experience. A compara-
ble amount of training,
education or experience may be
substituted for the above
minimum qualifications. Valid
FL Drivers License required.
Salary is negotiable within
$14.05- $16.48 hourly range
plus benefits. Successful
applicants must pass pre-
employment physical, drug
screening, and criminal history
background. Applications may
be obtained at the Human Re-
sources Office,,Board of County
Commissioners, 135 NE
Hemrnando Ave., LakeCity, Fl
32055, or onlineat
www.columbiacountyfla.com,
(386) 719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139. Application'
deadline: 11/18/2011.
Columbia County is an
AA/EEO/ADA/VP employer.

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Cloth Cutter: Person to cut cloth
from patterns in small sewing
company. Sewing exp. helpful.
Call Hafners 3867755-6481

Commercial Driver Class A for
OTR employment with local
company. Volvo 780 with reefer
trailer. Exp'd req'd. Absolutely
clean record. Call for interview,
Trava Bros LLC (386) 438-3256.

FT/PT Line Cook w/comm'l cook-
ing exp needed at Milton's Coun-
try Store. Will be taking orders
cooking & serving. Kitchen
opened to public view. Apps avail
Milton's 8 mi N, of 1-10 hwy 441

Customer Service Representative
for, call center. Must be fast friend-
ly & efficient. Please send resume
to: 197 SW Waterford Ct. Lake
City, F1 32025 .Att: Joey Kitaif.
Please send resume for call center
position only. There are no other
positions at this time.

Securitas Security Services
is hiring FT/PT security officers.
in Lake City. Class D Security Lic.
req'd. Good computer skills.
www.securitasjobs.com or call
'(352)378-5788 Lic# BB2300010
EOE M/F/D/V



r r
FLORIDA




EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NURSING AND
HEALTH SCIENCES
Position #: A9.9962
(Re-advertised)
This is a professional classification
responsible for the development and
supervision of innovative and forward-
thinking programs. The primary
responsibilities are to implement and
maintain the Bachelor of Science degree
in Nursing, continue to expand all program
areas and resources, provide effective
leadership for administration, faculty, and
students, manage multiple budgets, 'and
an understanding of strong personnel
management. The Executive Director
will have the responsibility of developing
and maintaining a premier institute that
will support Florida Gateway College as
it moves into the baccalaureate degree
program level. The individual applying
for this position must hold a minimum of
a master's degree and be eligible for or
hold a Flodida Nursing license or closely
related field, have at least five years of
progressive administrative experience, a
strong background in program design and
accreditation, and a vahid Florida driver's
license. Desirable Qualifications:
Doctorate degree in Nursing or health
related field preferred. Record of teaching
at tenured professor level; experience
in business in conjunction with health
background. Experience in the community
college teaching/working environment.
Salary: Based on Degree and Experience.
Application Deadline: Open Until Filled
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and photocopies
of transcrnpts- All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at"
wwwfacleu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007


120 Medical
120 dEmployment

05528667
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05528686
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY
TECH wanted full time or part
time, for private Radiology of-
fice. AART & Mammography
certification req. Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

240 Schools &
2 Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/07/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11

Continuing education
i
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees: Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


310 Pets & Supplies

Black, female, lab-mix.
Approx. 10 months old.
Good with kids. Very friendly.
Free to Good Home call 386-
755-6319 or 386-984-8190
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Flgrida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old anrd have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
S Supplies
WANTED: I Buy and Sell used
Horse Tack in good/fair condition
Saddles, bridles, pads, reins, etc.
Will pay cash. Call 386-935-1522


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans'
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


SAT. 11/5, 8-2, 576 SW Koonville
Ave., approx. 6 1/2 miles past 1-75
on US Hwy 90 W., turn left on
Koonville, 1/2 mile on right.


450 Good Things
Sto Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420


460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.


520 Boats for Sale

07 SeaFox 17 ft. Center console.
Aprox. 40 hrs. Mecury 90HP. New
551b trolling motor. Alum trailer.
Pay off $13,000. 386-758-7766

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent

1bedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.


630 fMobile Homes
630 for Rent

2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/2ba DWMH
on 1 ac.
$700. mo. $500 security.
386-719-4957
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482

6/40 Mobile Homes
64 for Sale
Just Reduced! Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900 '
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"
cond. Split floor plan, Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Direct Sale
15K 25K Off Models
800-622-2832 ext 210
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or Doubles. Must have
clear title. Call North Point Homes
(352)872-5566

650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
Outside of Fanning Sprjngs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in .
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
- pole, water & septic. W/nice
camper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3.473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

710 Unfurnished Apt.
./v For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net


710 2Unfurnished Apt.
710f For Rent







05528852
Nice, Ig 2 br Apt. Close to town
$500 mo + $500 dep. 344-2972
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1', 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com

Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ lba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
,Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup, patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ See, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
SFor Rent

Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Colurhbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent

2BR/1BA DUPLEX, Carport
Off Branford Hwy
$595. mo. $595. dep. Very clean.
Contact 386-752-7578
3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, comer of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
3br/2ba Brick home w/Pool
Great location. Hwy 47 & 1-75
$900. mo. 1st, last & security.
(386)365-5008
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
3br/2ba on acreage $695 mo.
3br/2ba nice home fine
neighborhood. $875.mo. 3br/2ba
bonus room. Fine home, newer
neighborhood. $995. mo. Security
deposit and application req'd.
Call 386-935-1482
4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to
town, great schools. Well water &
septic Clay electric $81100. Co.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
Ft. White 2br/lba. CH/A, Washer
/Dryer, dishwasher, Ig. deck,
screen porch, carpet, ceiling fans,.
Very quite & nice. $650. mo. 1st,
last & $300. dep. 386-497-2296
Prime location 2br/Iba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235


Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(ofoc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education and Employment


Set your sights
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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales. Inc.
TOWNHOUSE 2br plus
bonus room. w/1.5 bath.
Quail Heights CC. $750. mo plus
$250 damage dep. 386-752-8553

750 Business &
750 Office Rentals

OSS2Ms
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mtli
900 sq S600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' 5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group

770 Condos For Rent
2BR/2BA, all appliances,
water/sewer, basic cable,
pool & tennis cts.
$1150/mo, call 386-344-0433

780 Condos for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis coprt &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065

Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2BR/IBA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
F--


810 Home for Sale
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156.900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated: 1.455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba I car garage Priced.
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233'
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba. 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br-'s & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896


Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.,
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 27Q6sf. Island kit. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp .
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900


810 Home for Sale
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances,
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269.000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928. $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres.
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410,
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, FI room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group


3/2 w/l car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.o frida-property-search.comi
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
.365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 F1 room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept 3/2 DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen .
Wired 24x36 workshop, steel roof,
pole barn. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
Must sell fast!
Handyman Special.
Near downtown Lake City.
$8,400 386-623-0906
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110


810 Home for Sale
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on comer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110

82 Farms &
27 Acreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
O8 v Property
3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group

850 Waterfront
O Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821

87O Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


920 Auto Parts
92 & Supplies
Like new 20 inch Goodyear
radial tires.Set of four.
$300-obo-Call Greg at
386-623-5219

950 Cars for Sale
1973 FORD Galaxy.
Clean, runs good, spotless interior.
4 -door. $2,300!
386-754-8885


















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180 East Duval St.
Lake City, FLorida 32055


IUNw WHEELS& WATERCRAFT


2005 Ford F-350
Lariat
50,000 miles, many
extras, excellent cond.

$18,500
Call
386-755-0139


UwU Seai-ox
17 ft. center.console,
approx. 40 hrs. Mercury
90hp. New 551b trolling
motor. Alum. trailer.
Pay off
$12,600
Call
386-758-7766


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Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
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newspaper and online E-edition.
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2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
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CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011


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We do favors f>':
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(386) 243-8298
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