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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01686
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 30, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01686
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text






000016 120511 ***- 3 [:G!T
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11700-
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 3261i -194-3


ty


Reporter


Sunday, October 30, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 237 $ $ 1.00


Bonding




with



Stephen N
him at sch
at 7 p.m.


Raising steer for county fair project has helped
Stephen Newsome, a local teen with Asperger's .
syndrome, interact more easily with others.


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
Stephen Newsome hops over a
wooden fence and speaks gen-
tly to Bailey, a black steer. The
Columbia High School senior
offers a carrot, which the ani-
mal gladly accepts with his long black.
tongue. Bailey nuzzles Stephen's chest
The two look calm and comfortable with


each other.
Many would consider hand-r
a 16-month-old steer to be a so
pride. However, raising Bailey
more to Stephen. Helping a cal
a 1,265 pound steer has given
self-esteem boost and allowed
to through his shell.
When Stephen was in fourth
he was diagnosed with high-fu
Asperger's syndrome, ai autism


raising
urce of
means
lf become
Stephen a
hirri breal
grade
nctioning
m snec-


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
lewsome offers'Baileyf carrot while tending to
iool. He will show his 1,265-pound steer Monday
at the Columbia County Fair.


trum disorder that makes social interac-
tion tough.
With animals, there's no judgment,
said Mary Newsome, Stephen's mother.
Bailey needs him and Stephen knows
that, she said.
Since he began working with animals
last year at the Columbia High School
land lab, Stephen's teachers have said
they see a difference in him, Newsome
said. He is more interactive in class.
Working with animals has also helped
k him connect with peers.
During the homecoming pep rally,
Stephen participated when the seniors
BAILEY continued on 3A


Pr,,:,l:,- bt JASON MATTHEW WALKERIL.ae Ciry Rep,.ner
TOP: Bailey, often bathed with Pantene shampoo,
gets a gentle rinse in the warm afternoon sun.
ABOVE: Stephen and CHS ag teacher Patricia
Starnes. RIGHT: With his mother, Mary, and a plaque
and third-place ribbon he won in 2010 at the Columbia
County Fair for a pig he raised.


'Breakfast with the Chief' details LCPD plans


By GORDON JACKSON
giackson@lakecityreporter. corn
Nearly 40 people attended a quar-
terly meeting at the Lake City Police
Department Saturday for the opportunity
to discuss concerns and to learn more
about how the criminal justice system
works after an arrest.
"Breakfast with the chief is our report
card with you," said Argatha Gilmore,


Lake City police chief. "We cannot do
policing by ourselves."
Gilmore compared crime statistics from
2010 and so far this year to show trends
that concern law enforcement officials.
Her department received 36,422 calls
from January through September. The
majority of calls were for traffic accidents,
alarms at homes and businesses, domestic
disputes, thefts and shoplifting.
Burglaries have more than doubled this


year, with 72 reported last year and 152
this year. Thefts are up nearly 65 percent
in the city, she said.
One way police are trying to lower
crime rates is by creating a program called
Volunteers in Police Service. The program
is described as a partnership between
police and citizen volunteers. To qualify,
citizens must be at least 18 years old,
LCPD continued on 3A


Local


vet can


go home


again


Non-profit group
provides him with
a place of his own.

By GQRDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Teddy Milford thought he'd be stay-
ing at a local motel for another week
while he gathered his belongings to
move into a new home in Lake City.
He was mistaken.
Saturday morning, Milford expected
he would tour the new home built with
volunteer labor and'donated materials.
The construction project was coordi-
nated through Vets Helping Vets, a
local organization to help veterans.
Instead of touring an empty house,
however, 'Milford walked into a fully
furnished two-bedroom house that.
includes new living room furniture,
bookshelves, bedroom-sets, new appli-
ances, a full refrigerator and a new
wardrobe in the closet
"There are no words to' say how
much I appreciate it," Milford said.
Mike Arthur, a Vets Helping Vets
member, said the project started in
April with the demolition of a small,
20-foot by 20-foot one-room building
Milford lived in.
Arthur convinced local merchants,
contractors and other businesses to
donate materials and services to build
the home which will house veterans for
VET continued on 5A


Property

tax bills

coming

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
Its that time of year again. Columbia
County property owners should receive
their annual tax bills in the mail some-
time next week.
CountyTax Collector Ronnie Brannon
said the bills will be mailed Monday.
The majority of bills will be compara-
ble to last year, unless
property owners have
made improvements
that would add value to
their property, Brannon
said.
County residents
were sent notifications
in the summer from the Brannon
property appraiser's
office letting them know the assessed
value of their property.
Bills are due by March 31 and no
extensions are allowed. But residents
have an incentive to pay their bills
earlier.
The county is offering a 4 percent
discount to all bills paid in November,
TAX continued on 5A


Trick-or-treating
set for Monday
From staff reports
Lake City officials have fielded a
number of calls asking when Halloween
will be held here. They recommend
Monday, Halloween itself, as the day
trick or treaters should go door to
door.
T O=trt.'wsf- ""


!U84264 00021 8U


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


72
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 8A


Opinion ........... .
Business ....... ......
Obituaries ....... .....
Advice ...............
Puzzles..............


TODAY IN
BUSINESS
Joining
forces.


COMING
TUESDAY
Cit Council
coverage.


--


'ALA F-









LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


f, *. AhY'LJ' '`4. Ai ^FLORIDA
ezrnatch. ',

Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
6-9-18-25 MB 19 1-7-18-22-28 Afternoon: N/A Afternoon: N/A N/A N/A
Evening: N/A Evening: N/A


AROUND FLORIDA


Biden blames GOP for country's woes


By BRENDAN FARRINGTON
AP Political Reporter
LAKE BUENA VISTA
Vice President Joe
Biden on Friday blamed
the nation's problems
on President George W.
Bush's eight years in office
and accused congressional
Republicans of obstructing
President Barack Obama's
efforts to improve the
economy and help the
middle class.
In addition to blam-
ing Bush and Republican
policies for the deficit,
the poor economy, the
collapse of the housing
market and more, he
touted successes ranging
from stabilizing job losses,
passing a health care over-
haul, killing Osama bin
Laden and helping Libyan
rebels remove Moammar,
Gadhafi without losing any
American troops.
"Folks, we've set
America on a different
path, a new journey.
One that our friends on
the other team are try-
ing to obstruct," he said
in a speech to Florida
Democrats.
The speech laid out the
arguments the Obama
campaign will make over
the next year in a state
Biden said he'll visit often
because it's crucial to
winning a second term.
Obama carried Florida
in 2008, but his poll num-
bers have dropped and
Republicans dominated
the 2010 elections here.
SFlorida is also the largest
Battleground state with 29
electoral votes.


Biden said the United
States was isolated in the
world when they took
office. He said allies didn't
respect the nation and
enemies no longer feared
it. He listed the problems
Obama inherited, includ-
ing two wars and a pro-
jected deficit of $8 trillion
over the next 10 years and
a banking industry that
nearly collapsed.
"I find it absolutely
bizarre --Republicans
moralizing about deficits.
That's a little like an arson-
ists moralizing about fire
safety," Biden said.
He gave the Obama
administration credit for
stabilizing Wall Street and
the banking industry and
defended the bailout of the
auto industry, singling out
Republican presidential
candidate Mitt Romney.

2 get prison
time in airline
fraud scheme

FORT LAUDERDALE
Two men have been
sentenced to prison as
part of a federal inves-
tigation into fraud and
anticompetitive conduct
in the airline charter ser-
vices industry.
Prosecutors say each,
man pleaded guilty in
August in Fort Lauderdale
to participating in sepa-
rate schemes to defraud
Rockford, ll.-based Ryan
International Airlines.
Prosecutors say the
schemes involved kick-
back payments to a Ryan


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the Florida Democratic Party State Convention Friday in Lake Buena Vista. Biden said
he and President Barack Obama have made progress on fixing the problems they inherited from Republicans, but the GOP
is using obstructionist tactics to keep the administration from doing more for the economy and middle class.


executive in exchange for
business.
In a statement Friday,
the U.S. Department of
Justice said a former
owner and operator of
a Florida aviation fuel
supply company was sen-
tenced to 23 months in
prison.
A former owner and
operator of an Indiana
flight management servic-
es company was sentenced
to 16 months in prison.


Ryan provides air pas-
senger and cargo services
for corporations, private
individuals; professional
sports teams and the U.S.
government

Bus tour
takes leaders
to the poor

HAVANA Community
organizers in the Florida


Panhandle have organized
a poverty'bus tour.
Tallahassee's: WTXL
reports that former Mayor
Dorothy Inman Johnson
and the Capital Area
Community Action Agency
are hosting a'tour that will
take local leaders through
distressed neighborhoods
in Leon and Gadsden coun-
ties.
The aim of the tour is
to show much needs to be
done.


Johnson says she also
wants to show how much
has been accomplished
with the weatherization
program.
Funded by stimulus
moriey, the program has
helped :seniors, the dis-
abled and low income fam-
ilies upgrade their homes
and prevent high utility
bills.

N Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



Sugarland: 'We are all changed'


By RICK CALLAHAN
Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS A packed
house watched country duo
Sugarland deliver an emotionally-
charged free concert mnant to "cel-
ebrate" healing, life and music while
serving as a tribute to the victims of
a deadly stage collapse last August at
the Indiana State Fair.
Singer Jennifer Nettles told Friday
night's crowd including some of
those injured during the collapse
that the tragedy had changed
them all.
Nettles opened 22-hour show
at a packed Conesco Fieldhouse
in Indianapolis by telling audience
members they were in store for an
emotional night that would also be
part celebration. She also told.fans
that Sugarland had visited the fair-
grounds, where high winds toppled
scaffolding and stage rigging on
Aug. 13 into a crowd awaiting a per-
formance by the country duo. Seven
people were killed.
"Obviously we are here in October
'- we were supposed to do this show
in August. Obviously, the stage is
different, you are different and we
are different. We are all changed
by what happened then," she said.
"But we are going to try to give you
the best show that we can and to
celebrate healing with you and to
celebrate life and music with you
here tonight."
Sugarland's free concert came
10 weeks' after the stage collapsed
as a storm neared the fairgrounds'
Grandstand a few miles north of
Friday night's venue. Attendees were
asked to donate to a victim relief
'fund that already has raised nearly
$1 million.
Indianapolis resident Sue
Humphrey, whose 17-year-old son,
Brad, was left partially paralyzed
when he was struck by falling stage
rigging that night, attended Friday's
concert with her son, who only
decided Friday afternoon that he
wanted to go.
Humphrey said Brad was unsure if
the concert would be too emotional


Country music duo Sugarland featuring vocalist Jennifer Nettles, right, and guitar-
ist Kristian Bush perform a benefit concert in Indianapolis, Friday. Seven people
were killed and dozens more were injured in the Aug. 13 stage collapse at the
Indiana State fairground venue-where high winds ahead of an approaching storm
toppled scaffolding and stage rigging minutes before Sugarland was to perform.


for him, but she said it was herself,
and not her son, who got choked up
at one point during the show as her
mind cast back to August's tragedy.
She said Brad, -a high school
senior who attended the concert
after finishing his first week back at
school since he was injured, held up
fine. Humphrey and her son, who
is now in a wheelchair, sat in the
venue's handicapped section.
Humphrey said she was touched
when Nettles held up a flag near the
end of the concert with the word
"Heal" painted on it and then walked
through the audience holding it aloft.
"She usually has 'Love' on that
flag, but this time she spray-painted
'Heal' on it and I thought that was a
very, very good touch to the show,"
she said.
Rick Stevens, who served as
an Army medic in Vietnam, said
Sugarland "hit a home run" with
Friday's concert by balancing a
remembrance of August's stage col-
lapse with several vibrant and power-
ful renditions of their songs, includ-
ing "The Incredible Machine," the
name of their current album.


"Fve seen them play five times and
this is their most emotional, most
heartfelt concerts I've seen. They
.just played their hearts out," he said.
"It was a slam dunk."
The 57-year-old Terre Haute,
Ind., resident was among those
who rushed into the tangled metal
rigging to help people crushed in
August's collapse. He said he saw
people at Friday's concert whom he ,
had rescued.
Indiana-based musician Corey Cox
and actress Rita Wilson performed
before Sugarland took the stage.
Cox performed a few weeks ago at
a benefit concert for a woman from
his hometown of Pendleton, Ind. -
30-year-old Andrea Vellinga who
suffered severe head injuries in the
stage collapse and still is struggling
to recover. Vellinga's family and
friends attended the show.
He dedicated one of his songs,
"That'll Take You Back" to his
hometown "and every other small
town across this country who came
together the week after Aug. 13 and
prayed and supported" the victims of
the collapse.


Celebrity Birthdays


* Actor Dick Gautier is 74.
* Singer Grace Slick is 72.
* Actor Henry Winkler is 66.
Bassist Timothy B. Schmit of
The Eagles (and Poco) is 64.
* Actor Harry Hamlin is 60.
* Actor Charles Martin Smith
is 58.
* Country singer T. Graham


Brown is 57.
* Actor Kevin Pollak is 54.
* Actor Michael Beach ("Soul
Food," 'Third Watch") is 48.
* Singer-guitarist Gavin
Rossdale of Bush is 44.
* Actor Jack Plotnick ("Reno
911!") is 43.
* Actress Nia Long is 41.


Daily Scripture


"Therefore, I urge you, broth-
ers and sisters, in view of God's
mercy, to offer your bodies as a
living sacrifice, holy and pleas-
ing to God-this is your true
and proper worship."
Romans 12:1 NIV.


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Lake City Reporter
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CORRECTION

SThe Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


--














Broadway's Norm Lewis returning to FGC


From staff reports

Broadway star Norm Lewis will return
to Lake City on Nov. 18 when he performs
as part of FGC Entertainment's inaugural
season.
The Lake City Community College grad-
uate and star of "Les Miserables" and the
upcoming Broadway show "Porgy and
Bess" will take the stage at the college's
Levy Performing Arts Center for a night of


musical stylings. Lewis' setlist will include
some of Broadway's most recognizable
songs along with an eclectic mix of mod-
ern hits.
Lewis is best known for his perfor-
mance as Javert in the Broadway musical
"Les Miserables," a role he reprised for
the show's 25th anniversary concert in
London. Lewis also originated the role
of King Triton in "The Little Mermaid"
musical, and has appeared in "Chicago,".


"Sweeney Todd," and "Side
Show." He will be play-
ing the lead in the upcom-
ing revival of "Porgy and
Bess," which will return
to Broadway in January
2012.
Lwis Tickets for the show are
wis available for $15 for gen-
eral admission and $10 for FGC students,
faculty and staff. Season tickets for the


inaugural season of FGC Entertainment
are also available at a reduced rate $150
for VIP seating, $75 for general admis-
sion and $45 for FGC students, staff and
faculty arid can be purchased by calling
(386) 754-4340. More information about
the series can be found at www.fgcenter-
tainment.com.
For more information, contact Troy
Roberts at Troy.Roberts@fgc.edu or by
calling (386) 754-4247.


BAILEY: Fair project

Continued From Page 1A


got together in a huddle,
a huge accomplishment.
as people with Asperger's
can be uncomfortable with
close spaces.
Newsome said she first
saw Stephen's connec-
tion to animals in Chester
Nordmeyer's 6th grade
science class at Lake City
Middle School where he
fell in love with a class
gecko., Newsome said
taking care'of the gecko,
named Steve McQueen,
gave Stephen something to
look forward to.
Nordmeyer said Stephen
was always attentive to the'
gecko's needs. Later when
Nordmeyer moved to CHS
to teabh art, he gave Steve
McQueen to Stephen,
who still has the gecko six
years later.
Most kids have selective
focus and would rather be
playing video games, but
Stephen's selective focus
is taking care of animals,
Nordmeyer said. When the
class studied the animal
kingdom, Nordmeyer said,
he could tell Stephen was
more engaged and better
able to remember things. -
"Throughout the years
I've noticed him socially
open up to people," he
said. Now Stephen will
offer a firm handshake
and look Nordmeyer in the
eyes, a'social norm people
with Asperger's often have
trouble with.
"He actually started -
to blossom when Mr.
Nordmeyer worked with
him," Newsome said. "He '
came out of his shell."
Newsome said he was
inspired by the life story
of Temple Grandin, a
Colorado State University
professor who was diag-
nosed with Asperger's in
the 1950s. Although she
did not speak until she
was three and a half years
old, Grandin was able to
develop her talents into a
successful career. As a live
stock-handling equipment
designer, Grandin has
developed cattle corrals
that improve the animals'
quality of life by reducing
stress. Her life was made
into an.Emmy award win-
ning movie starring Claire
Danes. Grandin is also the
author of several books
about-autism.
Newsome said Gandin's
mother never gave up on
her and that's what made a
difference in her life. '
In 2010, Stephen raised
a pig that won a blue rib-


bon for its appearance and
came in third for weight at
the fair. It was the first ani-
mal he raised in his three
- years in the Columbia
High School FFA. A Publix
supermarket bought the
pig.
"When he showed the
pig last year, it was amaz-
ing," Newsome said. He
was nervous going out
into the ring, with crowds
looking on. But he did it.
Normally he would not
want to be in that situation,
she said.
After that, Stephen told
his mother he wanted to
raise a steer.
Stephen feeds, cleans
and cares for Bailey for at
least two hours each day.
Scheduling helps Stephen,
Newsome said. Often people
with Asperger's like rott-
tines. Animals like routine
too, she said. Bailey, a cross
between Brahman, Angus
and Limousin, eats 50
pounds of feed each day.
The FFA is a family
affair for the Newsome's.
Stephen's brother Phillip,
13, is active in the LCMS
FFA and sister'Ariel, 15, is
a sophomore at CHS and
will show the junior chap-
ter heifer at the fair..
Stephen will show .,
Bailey in the youth steer
show Monday at 7 p.m.
at the Columbia County
Fairgrounds. Bailey's shiny
coat will be'freshly washed
in Pantene shampoo.
Stephen said he will use a
lead rope and a show stick
to walk Bailey around the
arena. So the judges can
see muscle tone, Stephen
said he will scratch Bailey's
belly which makes the steer
straighten his back.
Despite their bond,
Bailey will be sold Nov. 3
and the money will be put
into the FFA chapter.
"I'm very worried about
him," Newsome said of
Stephen. "He loves this
Steerr" But he understands
What will happen and he
knows Bailey is tq be sold,
she said.
"It's gonna be pretty
hard when I do sell him,"
Stephen said. "I'know this
boy fell into my hands for a
reason."
After graduation,
Stephen told his mom he
would like to work with
zoo animals and learn to
drive. Working with ani-
mals has "boosted his self
esteem so much, it's made
him want to learn," she
said.


LCPD: Police Explorers program in the works

Continued From Page 1A


have a valid driver's license, pass
a criminal background check and
complete orientation and training.
The department is also creat-
ing a citizen's advisory council to
address quality of life issues and
starting a Police Explorers pro-
gram for youths.
Crime Prevention Officer Staci
Brownfield explained the benefits
of neighborhood watch programs
as a way to lower crime.
"We want all the help we-can
get" Brownfield said.
Gilmore said. police take arrests
seriously because of the impact
they have on the accused.
"When you see us coming, nine
times out of 10, someone has asked
us to be there," she said.
She explained how officers often
depend on probable cause to ques-
tion people about a possible crime.
When charges are dropped against
someone who has been arrested,
it's not an indication a mistake was
made, she said.
"Just because -charges are
dropped'does not mean we didn't
make a legal arrest" she said. "We
go on probable cause."
State Attorney Skip Jarvis said his
office often reviews investigation
reports with police to determine if
an arrest warrant should be issued.
Sometimes his office declines to
issue a warrant, he said.
"We try to work very carefully
with law enforcement," he said.
"We've got specific elements in
each crime we prosecute."
Jarvis said some citizens' have'
an inaccurate perception of the
criminal justice system from TV
shows that don't accurately depict
the reality of prosecuting a case.
For example, DNA tests take hours

BELK.COM.







4 hours only!
6-10am
Saturday, Nov. 5


to complete on TV, but in reality
the tests often take months to com-
plete.
Chief Circuit Judge Vernon
Douglas said the many checks and
balances in the legal justice system
are designed to protect the rights of
the accused.
He determines if an arrest is
proper and reviews all arrests within
24 hours. He sets bonds and some-
times lowers them at the request of,
defense lawyers. And he makes the
decision about whether a case goes
forward or is dismissed.
"This is the ultimate practice of
the law," he said. "Our system is
designed in favor of the defense."
The goal is to ensure innocent
people are not convicted.
"We all have a critical role in the
process," he said. 'The bottom line,
obey police on the scene."
Blair Payne, the circuit court divi-
sion chief, said the role of. defense
attorneys and public defenders is to
ensure police have performed their
jobs properly.
Payne praised the department
for many improvements in recent
years, saying officers are making
"cleaner" arrests.
"The police department in Lake
City is light years ahead of where it
was five years ago," he said: "We're
not having the complaints we've
had in the past".
Douglas said state lawmakers will
consider banning the death penalty
in Florida during the upcoming leg-
islative session that will begin in
January. He said a life sentence
without parole is still a harsh pun-
ishment.
During a question and answer
session near the end of the 90-
minute meeting, audience mem-


storewide, -including special savings on
RARELY DISCOUNTED BRANDS
Not valid by phone or on Belk.com. Excludes Everyday Values.


bers were given a. chance to vent,
express concerns and report spe-
cific problems in their neighbor-
hoods.
One woman asked how she
should handle reporting problems
with a loud neighbor. Another asked
if she should have reported a truck
that spilled branches on a highway,
creating a traffic hazard. A man in
the audience expressed concern
about motorists driving too fast,
crossing the double yellow line on
a highway, running stop signs and
endangering other motorists on a
road in the city.
In each instance, Gilmore asked
to meet with the people to get more
information. She promised each of
their concerns would be resolved.
After the meeting, Gilmore said
she was pleased with the turnout
and response by the audience.
'This is everything I hoped it to
be," she said.
Future meetings are planned to
'listen to concerns and educate the
public about law enforcement's role
in protecting citizens.

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LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


3 D .
..-le. S...,,-rmiel.: CNM












OPINION


Sunday, October 30, 201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


Now


and


forever

It's a debt we owe them as
long as they live, our obli-
gation to those who've
served our nation, wheth-
er in peacetime or war.
Vets Helping Vets, a local
group, takes that obligation
seriously.
Saturday morning we saw
just how seriously, when mem-
bers presented Navy retiree
Teddy Milford with the keys to
a brand new home, where hell
stay as long as he likes at mini-
mal cost
Our appreciation goes out to
Vets Helping Vets as well as the
40-plus businesses that funded
the project
We would like to comment
on one point, however.
Some found it surprising that
most of those who helped had
no military background.
We don't find that surprising
at all.
The obligation belongs to all
of us.
It's good to see that local
folks agree.

HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY
Today is Sunday, Oct 30, the
303rd day of 2011. There are
62 days left in the year.
On this date:
In 1938, the radio play 'The
War of the Worlds," star-
ring Orson Welles, aired on
CBS. (The live drama, which
employed fake breaking news
reports, panicked some listen-
.ers who thought the portrayal
of a Martian invasion was real.)
In 1885, poet Ezra Pound
was born in Hailey, Idaho.
In 1945, the U.S. govern-
ment announced the end of
shoe rationing, effective at
midnight.
In 1974, Muhammad Ali
knocked out George Foreman
in the eighth round of a 15-
round bout in Kinshasa, Zaire,
known as the "Rumble in the
Jungle" to regain his world
heavyweight title.
* Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


www.lakecityreporter.com


Thanks, Netanyahu, for


surge of hardened terrorists


sraeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu,
previously counted
among the toughest lead-
ers in the civilized world,
has become softer than the
secretary general of the United
Nations.
Netanyahu recently ran-
somed a kidnapped Israeli
soldier whom Hlamas had held
hostage since 2006. The price
for Sgt. Gilad Shalit's freedom?
Israel will free 1,027 Palestinian
prisoners. Many are hardened
terrorists with Israeli and even
American blood on their hands.
This colossal breach of jus-
tice for these victims injects
this toxic population back into
society. Some of them almost
certainly will express their
gratitude with machine guns
and dynamite.
The first wave of 477 prisons
ers swapped for Shalit include
at least three terrorists who
Shave slaughtered Americans.
Ahlam Tamimi conspired
to attack a Sbarro restaurant on
August 9, 2001. This Jerusalem
suicide bombing murdered 15 -
including Passaic, New Jersey's
Shoshana Greenbaum, 31, -
and wounded 130 more.
Now carefree in Jordan,
despite 16 life sentences,
Tamimi has no regrets.
"It was a calculated act,
performed with conviction
and faith in Allah," 'she told a
Hamas website. "Why should I
repent?"
Abd al-Hadi Rafa Ghanim
of Islamic Jihad grabbed the
wheel of a Jerusalem-bound
bus and steered into a ravine
in 1989, killing 11 (including
Philadelphia's Rita Susan Levin,
39) and injuring 27. Ghanim


Deroy Murdock
deroy.murdock@gmoil.com
was serving 16 life sentences.
Ibrahim Muhammad Yunus
Dar Musa received 17 years
for, among other things, help-
ing to murder Detroit native
David Applebaum, 51, and his
daughter, Nava, 20, on her
wedding eve. Five others were
killed and at least 50 wounded
in a September 9, 2003 suicide
bombing at Jerusalem's CafE
Hillel.
Abd al-Aziz Yussuf Mustafa
Salehi famously waved his
bloody hands from the window
of a Ramallah police station, in
which he and other members
of a mob fatally flogged and
killed Israeli reservists Vadim
SNorzhich and YosefAvrahami.
These October 2000 murders
earned Salehi a life sentence.
Ignoring 469 other prisoners
released on October .18, Israel
soon will free another 550 dan-
gerous characters all to res-
cue one Israeli soldier.
With all due respect and
mercy for Shalit, this was a stu-
pid, disproportionate, and likely
deadly decision.
As Nadav Shragai wrote
in Jerusalem Viewpoints, an
estimated 50 percent of terror-
ists in previous Israeli prisoner
swaps and "goodwill gestures"
subsequently'executed, plotted,
or supported terror assaults. In
fact, Israel previously freed par-


ticipants in the aforementioned
Passover massacre and CafE
Hillel bombing. Israeli officials
twice discharged Ramez Sali
Abu Salmim. He eventually
blew himself up in CafE Hillel.
In October 2010, the U.S.-
Israeli Almagor Terror Victims
Association counted at least
30 attacks involving Islamic
extremists liberated by Israel's
government. Almagor reports
that 177 people have been
murdered, and many others
injured, in attacks that Israel
could have prevented simply by
keeping these savages caged.
While Israel now has com-
plicated its own anti-terrorist
vigilance, America cannot rest,
either. Some of these freed kill-
ers will remain in Israel, the
West Bank, and Gaza, from
which they can attack Israelis.
That would be bad enough.
Some of the more adventur-
ous terrorists, however, might
use their new and undeserved
freedom to target Americans.
As Israel's chief benefactor and
staunchest ally, why not teach
the Yanks a lesson by, say,
blasting a U.S. bank branch
elsewhere in the Middle East?
Why not bomb Americans in
Long Island or Los Angeles?
Rather than meaningless "life
sentences," Israel immediately
needs to enact and implement
the death penalty. Terrorists
neither can be demanded, nor
exchanged, nor kill again while
dead.
a New York commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


Fat cats be wary: Americans


now say you're greedy


The secret about
Americans is that
we have always
admired the
extremely wealthy.
Not just envied but respected
them as smarter and deserving
of their money. That is chang-
ing.
The revelation by the non-
partisan Congressional Budget
Office that incomes of the top 1
percent tripled in the last three
decades while incomes of the
bottom 99 percentrall but stag-
nated is spreading like a gaso-
line fire.
But even as the tax cuts
helped wealthy Americans mak-
ing $500,000 or more a year, the
rate of job creation plummeted
and unemployment rose to 9.1
percent.
That proves what economists
have said for years: Tax cuts
for the wealthiest do not lead to
more jobs.
The other canard bandied


Ann McFeatters
amcfeatters@nationalpress.com
about is that if government reg-
ulations were eased or ended,
such as those to curb Wall
Street excesses, jobs would pop
up like mushrooms. But while
employers yearn for stable,
overall economic growth, the
evidence indicates regulations
shift jobs around but do not
result in overall job loss.
What is happening is that skill
levels of the unemployed do not
match skills needed by employ-
ers. There is little demand for
journalists, secretaries or office
managers. There is a huge,
unmet demand for workers


with math, science and techni-
cal skills such as engineering.
Employers complain they can't
find the skilled workers they
need because our education sys-
tem is declining and good teach-
ers are being laid off.
Also, we don't make things
anymore.
And who is the GOP estab-
lishment's candidate to fix our
problems? Mitt Romney, who
made millions as a financier,
thinks corporations are people,
took over companies, and fired
hundreds but said this year he's
"unemployed too," and bought
a $12 million beach house in
California he could tear down to
build a mansion four times its
size.
His solution for America?
Lower taxes on the rich and kill
regulations.
* Scripps Howard columnist
Ann McFeatters has covered
the White House and national
politics since 1986.


4A


Todd Wilson
twilson@lakecityreportercom


Are you


smarter


than ..?

This I know for
sure, f could not
pass fourth grade
now in the public
school system. I'll
admit it. I use fourth grade as
an example because that's my
daughter's level in schoQl.
Yes, mainly I'm talking about
math. .
Honestly, I couldn't pass
third grade last year.' How I
got promoted to this next level
as a homework cheerleader,
I'll never understand. It was
one of those bless-your-heart-
you're-completely-inept-but-
you're-a-nice-guy-wink-and-pat-
on-the-back moments: 'Todd,
you're a big boy. It's time for
you to go on to fourth grade."
And under their breath, the
"promoters" whisper, "Thank
goodness his daughter is
smart Shell be fine if hell just
keep quiet and stay out of the
way."
When I was a third-grade
parent, I could sed the storm
clouds on the horizon. Third-
grade was challenging in the
way that whittling a stick is a
realistic warmup for cutting
down a tree. I wasn't sure
where things were going to
fall, but I was pretty sure I
wasn't prepared for the heavy
lifting in my near future.
So, I was shoved into the corn
maze of another new-method
math curriculum. I'm never
admittedly lost (yet), but I am
bewildered most of the time.
I've had this discussion with
many parents who share my
anguish. Of course, we're glad
that our children will be better
prepared to face the real world
with these bionic math skills
they are building. And, kids are
tougher than adults. They are
resilient where we are weak
Math homework at my
house usually involves my
being asked to help with one
or two problems. The ones at
the bottom of the page. The
word problems. The ones that
should be outlawed.
Math should stick to its own
cardinal numerals and formu-
las and let the words speak for
themselves. Mixing the two
should be illegal.
While I ponder the chal-
lenge, my fourth-grader gets
impatient "Do you know how
to work it or not?"
"Of course I do, I'm just
reading all the directions here
and making sure I'm not over-
looking anything ... By the
way, where's your math book?
I need to double-check some-
thing there, too. (Yes, I'm look-
ing for example solutions and
silently praying.) And ask your
Mom to come in here, too."
I'm totally convinced that
elementary teachers sit around
the lounge with their feet up,
enjoying a limitless supply of
Diet Coke and Oreos, and have
a grand time sharing torture
stories about parents like me.
It's a mean scene.
They bait us with homework
passes, just to see if we're silly
enough to skip one night's les-
son and be that much farther
behind tomorrow. The Pity
Party Parents Association is
on to that scheme. Well whine
about it, but we will put the pen-
cil on the paper every night.
Teachers, I applaud your
effort and I do not envy your
job. Just have mercy on those
of us who still count on our
fingers.

Todd Wilson is publisher of the
Lake City Reporter.










LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


1-75 ramps

at Newberry
to be closed

The Interstate 75
entrance and exit ramps
at Newberry Road are
scheduled to close over-
night for resurfacing
beginning tonight and
traffic will be detoured
to either Archer Road or
Northwest 39th Avenue.
The tentative schedule
for each ramp is:
1-75 southbound
entrance ramp closed
Sunday and Monday
nights (Oct. 30 and 31).
1-75 southbound exit
ramp closed Tuesday and
Wednesday nights (Nov.
1 and 2).
1-75 northbound
entrance ramp closed
Thursday and Sunday
nights (Nov. 3 and 6).


Jane Morris
Ms. Jane C. Morris, 58, of
Lake City, died late Thurs-
day evening in the Mofton
Plant Hospital in Clearwater,
Florida following an extended
illness. A lifelong resident of
Lake City, Ms. Morris was
the daughter of the late Carl
and Myrtice Stroud Morris.
She was a proud graduate of
the Columbia High School
Class of 1972. Ms. Morris was
disabled and never worked
outside the home. Ms. Morris
loved listening to music espe-
cially from the 1950's and the
1960's and was a member of
the Pine Grove Baptist Church.
Ms. Morris was preceded in
death by her parents and a sis-
ter, Virginia Morris Berryman.
Ms. Morris is survived by her
guardian, Albert Woods of
Lake City; a nephew, Jimmy
Greene Jr. (Judy) of Lake City;
three nieces, Connie Kirby
(Marvin) Lake City; Lisa
Justice, Lake City; and Melody
Berryman of Haysi, Virginia.
Two great-nephews and five
great nieces also survive.
Funeral services for Ms. Mor-
ris will be conducted at 2:00
P.M. on Tuesday, November
1, 2011 in the Chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Fuieral
Home with Rev. Jim Steele of-
ficiating. Interment will follow



BELKCOM


TAX: Bills coming soon

Continued From Page 1A


3 percent for bills paid in
December, 2 percent for
bills paid in January and
1 percent for bills paid in
February.
Partial payments will
also be accepted but the
entire bill must be paid
by the March 31 due date.
Those making partial pay-
ments do not qualify for
early payment discounts.
All unpaid property
taxes will be considered
delinquent on April 1 and
a statutory 3 percent pen-
alty will be applied on real
estate taxes. A 1.5 percent
penalty will be applied each
month on unpaid tangible
personal property.
A list of all unpaid
2011 property taxes will
be advertised in May. A


tax sale certificate will be
issued for all unpaid 2011
property taxes by May 31.
People who receive bills
they believe are inaccurate
and want to contest should
contact the appraiser's
office, not the tax collec-
tor's office.
If a mistake on a prop-
erty value has been made,
the appraiser's office will
send a certificate of cor-
rection to the tax collec-
tor's office and a new bill
will be sent.
The millage rate is
slightly lower this year
and is expected to gen-
erate about $53,3 million.
Last year, county property
owners paid about $56.4
million in county property
taxes.


in Memorial Cemetery. The'
family will receive friends for
one hour prior to the funeral
service. In lieu of flowers the
family requests that memorial
donations be made to account
# 7112 at any Peoples State
Bank location. Arrangements
are under the direction'of
the DEES-PARRISH FAM-
ILY FUNERAL HOME, 458
South Marion Ave., Lake City,
FL 32025. (386)752-1234
please sign our online family
guestbook at parrishfamilyfu-
neralhome.com
Norman Lee Underhill
Mr. Norman Lee Underiill,
62, of Live Oak, passed away
peacefully on Friday, October
28, 2011, in the V.A. Medical
Center in Lake City, Florida,
following a brief illness. A
native of Arcadia, Florida, Mr.
Underhill had been a resident
of Live Oak since 1995 having
moved there from Sarasota,
Florida. Mr. Underhill had
worked most of his life as a
"real'life cowboy". He had
been a ranch hand for sev- -
eral cattle ranches in South-
ern Florida and was a great
auto mechanic as well. Mr.
Underhill was an avid hunter
arid he loved to fish. He was a
Christian. Mr. Underhill, was
preceded in death by his father,


William L. Underhill.
Mr. Underhill is survived by
his wife of forty years, Beth
Underhill of Live Oak; his
mother, Thelma Underhill
of Venice, Florida; his three
sons, Bill Underhill (Heather)
of Live Oak, Florida; Bob
Underhill of Live Oak, Florida;
and Carl Underhill (Sharon) of
Madison, Florida; three broth-
ers, Earl Underhill, Edward
Underhill and Dennis Under-
hill all of Sarasota, Florida and
a sister, Christine Williford of
Venice, Florida. Five grand-
children also survive.
Graveside funeral services for
Mr. Underhill will be con-
ducted at 1:00 P.M. on Tuesday
November 1, 2011 in the New
Hope Cemetery (located off
129 North on 52nd Terrace)
in Live Oak with Rev. James
Countryman officiating. Inter-
ment will immediately follow.
There will be no visitation.
SArrangements are under the
direction of the DEES-PAR-
RISH FAMILY FUNERAL
HOME, 458 South Marion
-Ave., Lake City, FL 32025.
(386)752-1234 please sign our
online family guestbook at par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome.com

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the
Lake City Reporter's classified
department at 752-1293.


GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
John Mclntosh (left), owner of John Mclntosh Construction, Teddy Milford, a disabled veteran
(center) and Mike Arthur stand at the entrance of a new home built by the local non-profit
organization Vets Helping Vets.

VET: Local man can go home again


Continued From Page 1A

as long as the structure
stands.
"I spent days going door
to door," he said. "Ifs vets
helping vets."
The surprise, Arthur
said, is about 80 percent of
those who donated materi-
als or labor had no military
background.
The house is owned
by Vets Helping Vets but
Milford will live there as
long as he wants, Arthur
said.
When Milford moves out
or dies, another veteran
will move into the home,
Arthur said. Milford must
pay for home insurance,
utilities and $50 a month
that will be put into an
escrow account for upkeep
and replacing appliances.
Arthur said volunteers
worked weekends and
evenings .on the project.
Once work began, he said
businesses were eager
to help. More tharl 40


businesses participated
the project. Three busi-
nesses,- O'Neal Roofing,
Standard Plumbing
and John McIntosh
Construction, played
major roles, Arthur said.
"Without 'those three,
this wouldn't have hap-
pened this fast," he said.
John McIntosh, owner
of a construction business,
said he never hesitated
when he was asked to help
with the project.
*"It's a good project," he
said. "We need to help our
own people."
The challenge was keep-
ing Milford in the dark
about moving into a fully
furnished home.
"They did a real good
job keeping this away from
me," Milford said. "I deeply
appreciate and love every-
one who had a hand in
this."
Arthur said his organiza-
tion plans to build a second


home for veterans some-
time next year. McIntosh
said his business will be
there to support the proj-
ect
"If Mike goes in there,
I'll be there," he said. "It's a
good investment"

E I-lakecityreporter.com

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2011 AWARDS
Legislator of the Year
- Florida Association
of Homes & Services
for the Aging

Legislator of the Year
- Florida Farm Bureau

Florida Library
Association


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Laura Jersey
Legislative Assistant


LEONARD L. BEMBRY
District 10

Dear Neighbors,
Florida's budget was the greatest challenge the legislature faced this past
session; we dealt with many critical financial issues. Unlike the Federal
Government, the State of Florida, by constitutional requirement, must
have a balanced budget every year before the legislature can end session.
This forces our state to be fiscally responsible, and to deal with our prob-
lems rather than delay finding solutions. It also allows us to plan more
deliberately going forward and to protect the future 'of all Floridians. We
must run our state budget based on how the changes we make will affect
Floridians and their future opportunities.
The $69.7 billion adopted budget cut spending in many areas that will
touch all of our lives. Many of us did not vote for the budget because
we could not agree on the necessity for some of the cuts. There were
too many cuts to: education, state employee benefits, rural health depart-
ments, nursing homes, Medicaid reimbursement, rural hospitals, the state
court system, and privatization of our prison systems. Items may be
excellent public policy, but may not be the thing to do, due to current
economic conditions. The budget is a difficult and contentious process;
no different from cutting our own personal budget.
Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to serve you!


State Representative, House District 10
I was proud to sponsor successful legislation that:
Waives state park fees for immediate family members of fallen
veterans, police officers, and firefighters.
Clarifies the environmental permitting exemptions farmers have for
bona fide agricultural activities.
Authorizes continuing care retirement communities to offer continuing
care at-home contracts to residents living at home or in the facility.
Assists, promotes, and enhances economic opportunities in the state's
rural communities, with advisory council membership including
rural communities.
Representative Benmbni's Initiatives:
Protect small business and our agricultural interest from unnecessary
permitting and development intrusion
Remain diligent for the interests of small and rural counties, provide
them tax relief and protection from unfunded state mandates
Continue to fight for our state workers in the budget process
Revisit the septic tank inspection issue for our rural counties
Continue to urge Congress to provide for a balanced federal budget

WHAT MATTERS To You?
Help me represent you more effectively by contacting my office:
Representative Leonard Bembry
304 NW Crane Avenue, Bldg. 36
Madison, FL 32340
Email: Leonard.Bembry@myfloridahouse.gov
Facebook: www.facebook.com/LeonardBembry
For a detailed summary of the 2011 Legislative Session and to read the
full State budget, log on to: www. myfloridahouse.gov.


OBITUARIES


i


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


:


s~









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


Obama cites income gap to push jobs bill


By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press
WASHINGTON President Barack
Obama is banking on a new report detail-
ing the income disparity in the country as
further evidence of the need for his $447
billion jobs bill.
A report this past week by the
Congressional Budget Office found that
average after-tax income for the top 1 per-
cent of U.S. households had increased by
275 percent over the past three decades.
Middle-income households saw just a 40
percent rise. For those at the bottom of the
economic scale, the jump was 18 percent
Obama said in his weekly radio and
Internet address Saturday that he would
pay for his jobs plan with an added tax
on people who make at least $1 million a
year.
Senate Republicans have blocked action


on the bill, which mixes tax breaks for
businesses and public works spending,
because they oppose much of the increased
spending and the tax on millionaires.
'These are the same folks who have
seen their incomes go up so much, and I
believe this is a contribution they're will-
ing to make," Obama said. "Unfortunately,
Republicans in Congress aren't ,paying
attention, They're not getting the mes-
sage."
Obama is now trying to get Congress
to pass the individual components of the
bill. But Senate Republicans also stalled
progress on the first of those measures,
$35 billion to help local governments keep
teachers on the job and pay the salaries
of police officers, firefighters and other
emergency services workers.
Saying the country cannot wait for
Congress, Obama has begun bypassing
Congress and taking steps on his own that


he says will encourage economic growth.
On Friday, Obama directed government
agencies to shorten the time it takes for
federal research to turn into commercial
products in the marketplace. The goal is
to help startup companies and small busi-
nesses create jobs and expand their opera-
tions more quickly.
The president also called for creating
a centralized online site for companies to
easily find information about federal ser-
vices. He previously had announced help
for people who owe more on their mort-
gages than their homes are worth and for
the repayment of student loans. The White
House also challenged community health
centers to hire veterans.
"We can no longer wait for Congress
to do its job," Obama said. "So where
Congress won't act, I will."
The congressional report, based on
Internal Revenue Service and Census


Bureau data, was released as the Occupy
Wall Street movement spreading across
the country protests bailouts for corpora-
tions and the income gap.
In the weekly GOP message, Illinois
Rep. Bobby Schilling urged Obama to sup-
port bills that Republicans say would help
create jobs by blocking various energy and
environmental regulations and streamlin-
ing administrative procedures. The bills,
passed by the Republican-controlled
House, await action in the Democratic-run
Senate.
Shilling said the bills give the White
House and Congress an opportunity to build
on the common ground created by the pas-
sage of recent free-trade agreements, and a
measure to void a law requiring federal, state
and many local governments to withhold
3 percent of their payments to contractors
until their taxes are paid. Obama included
repealing that tax in his jobs plan.


Cain momentum continues; South may be key


By SHANNON McCAFFREY
Associated Press
HOMEWOOD, Ala. Herman Cain's
rise in the polls appears to be no fluke.
Unlike some other Republican presi-
dential contenders who have flamed out
fast after auditioning as the conservative
antidote to Mitt Romney, Cain is still rid-
ing high atop public opinion surveys.
'They said I was the flavor of the week,"
the Georgia businessman said at an
appearance Friday on a campaign swing


through Alabama. "But four weeks later
the Cain campaign still tastes good!"
Cain lacks the money and organization
of his top-tier GOP competitors. But, so
far, he's survived several high-profile
campaign blunders and an onslaught of
attacks on his signature 9-9-9 tax over-
haul plan.
And despite the sudden rise to the top
tier of the GOP, Cain is still doing things
his own way.
He's carving out an unorthodox and
some say impossible path to the White


House, largely eschewing early voting
states to focus heavily on the South -
where tea party groups, social conserva-
tives and evangelical voters that make up
the backbone of his support hold sway.
It's been weeks since Cain has set foot
in Iowa or New Hampshire. Instead, he's
barnstormed through Tennessee and
Alabama, states that don't hold primaries
until March.
"The South looks very, very good
for us," Mark Block, Cain's campaign
manager, said in an interview with The


Associated Press. "Do the early states
matter? Of course. But they are not
everything."
Block argues that- next year's com-
pressed primary calendar means more
states will play larger roles. So instead of
tromping around New Hampshire trying
to win over skeptics, the campaign team
is revving up support in states where
Cain's small government, anti-tax mes:
sage and church revival-style delivery
resonate with voters.


Romney does himself few favors when

he goes off-the-cuff on campaign trail


By PHIUP ELLIOTT
Associated Press

WASHINGTON Mitt
Romney may need a cen-
sor. For himself.
In the last few weeks in
Nevada, the man who owns
several homes told the state
hit tough by the housing
crisis: "Don't try and stop
the foreclosure process.
Let it run its course and hit
the bottom."
At one point in Iowa, ear-
lier this year, the former
venture capitalist uttered,
"Corporations are people,"
with the country in the
midst of a debate over Wall
Street vs. Main Street At
an event in economically.
suffering Florida, the retir-
ee who is a multimil-
lionaire many times over
- to'd out-of-work voters,
"I'm also unemployed."
Over the past year, the
Republican presidential
candidate has amassed a
collection of off-the-cuff
comments that expose his
vulnerabilities and, taken
together, cast him as out-of-
touch with Americans who
face staggering unemploy-
ment, widespread foreclo-
sures and a dire outlook on
the economy.
So far, the foot-in-mouth
remarks haven't seemed to
affect his standing, in the
nomination race.
Romney has run a far
more cautious and disci-
plined campaign than his
l sing bid of four years
.go. He's kept the focus on
his core message: He's the
strongest candidate able
to beat President Barack
Obama on the biggest
issue of the campaign, the
economy. He still enjoys
leading positions in pub-
lic opinion polls in early
primary states and across
the nation. Few, if any, of
the other Republicans in
the race have turned his
remarks against him.
Texas Gov. Rick Perry,
Romney's chief rival with
the money to prove it, is
all but certain to try. Perry
has already started sug-
gesting that Romney lives
a life of privilege while he
comes from humble roots.
In an interview Friday with
CNN, another GOP candi-
date, former Utah Gov. Jon
Huntsman, painted Romney
as "a perfectly lubricated
weather vane on the impor-
tant issues of the day."
And Romney's eyebrow-
raising comments are tai-


lor-made for critical TV
ads.
Look no further than
the Democratic Party and
Obama's advisers for proof
of that
Each time Romney says
something that makes even
his closest aides grimace,
Democrats quickly put
together a Web video high-
lighting the remark a
preview of certain lines of
attack come the general
election should the former
Massachusetts governor
win the nomination.
"Mitt Romney's message
to Arizona? You're on your
own," says a new ad by
the Democratic National
Committee that jumps
on Romney's foreclosure
remarks.
Romney's team publicly
dismisses their boss's occa-
sional loose lips, dismissing
them as inconsequential to
voters focused on an unem-
ployment rate hovering
around 9 percent.
"It's a long campaign and
at the end of the day peo-
Sple are going to judge Gov.
Romney and his ability to
take on President Obama
over jobs and the economy.
And certainly there will be a


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lot of back and forth as the
campaign progresses," said
Russ Schriefer, a Romney
strategist
"This election will .be
decided on big issues
because the issues are
so big and so important,"
Schriefer said. "And not
on a gaffe or a mistake
or a moment, any particu-


larly moment. It's more
about the big moments
and who voters see and
being able to turn the
economy around."
* It usually takes more
than one gaffe or one mis-
take to undo a campaign.
And other candidates have
made their own potentially
problematic comments.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


Early storm pelts East Coast with snow


By GENARO C. ARMAS
Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, P;
A classic nor'easter wa
chugging along up th
East Coast and expected
to dump anywhere from
dusting of snow to about
10 inches throughout th
region starting Saturday,
decidedly unseasonal dat
for a type of storm mor
associated with midwinter,
Communities inland i
mid-Atlantic states wer
getting hit hardest. Cherr
Grove, W.Va., on th
edge of the Monongahel
National Forest, already
got 4 inches of snow over
night, according to th
National Weather Service
Heavy snow was falling i
western Maryland, an
the Frostburg area could
receive 8 or 9 inches. Alonl
the Blue Ridge Mountain
between Hagerstown an(
Frederick, significant snow
fall was also expected.
Farther north in central
Pennsylvania, a steady mid
day heavy snow pelted th(
field at Beaver Stadium ii
State College, where Nc
21 Penn State was to hos
Illinois. Mother Natur
cooperated with calls for
"whiteout," in which fan.
wear all white to the game
in an occasional tradi
tion for big games at the
school. A few hours before
the midafternoon kickoff
about 3 inches had already.
fallen.
SThe heaviest snow
though, was forecast fo.
later in the day into Sunda)
in the MassachusettE
Berkshires, the Litchfieli
Hills in northwestern
Connecticut, southwest
ern New Hampshire
and the southern Greel
Mountains.
"It's going to be wet
sticky and gloppy," sai(
NWS spokesman Chris
Yaccaro. "Ifs not going t(
be a dry, fluffy snow."
The storm comes on a
busy weekend for manm
along the Eastern Seaboard
with trick-or-treaters going
door-to-door in search o
Halloween booty, hunting
season opening in some
states and a full slate of col
lege and pro football sched
uled. Officials warned tha
the heavy, wet snow com
bined with fully leafed trees
could lead to downed tree
branches and power lines
resulting in power outage
and blocked roads.
Snow toppled trees anc
a few power lines in east
ern Pennsylvania and lec
to minor traffic accidents
according to dispatchers
Allentown, expected to see
4 to 8 inches, is likely to
break the city's October
record of 2.2 inches or
Halloween in 1925.
Philadelphia was see
ing mostly rain, but wha
snow fell coated downtown
roofs in white. The city
was expected to get 1 to 3
inches, its first measurable
October snow since 1979
with a bit more in some
suburbs, meteorologist
Mitchell Gaines said.
'"This is very, very unusu
al," said John LaCorte, a
National Weather Service
meteorologist in State
College. The last majoi
widespread snowstorm tc
hit Pennsylvania this earls
was in 1972, he said.
"It's going to be verq
dangerous," he added.
The storm also led tc
delays at several airports


D1'\I L Vim



Grace Hrbor N nitre



-A C 9 IC


Saturday morning. Flights
were delayed at Newark,
N.J., and flights headed
a. to New York's Kennedy
is and LaGuardia airports
e or Philadelphia's airport
d weren't allowed to depart
a until early afternoon.
it Southern New Jersey
e was soaked with heavy
a rains and winds that ranged
te from 20 to 35 mph Saturday
e morning, while northern
communities awaited the
n arrival of 5 to 10 inches of
e snow.
y Snow began to fall in
e bursts in New York City by
a late morning. It was driving
y at times, but mixed with
r- periods of rain that pre-
e vented any accumulation
e. on the warm pavement. It
n was accumulating on roof-
d tops and cars by early after-
d noon.
g October snowfall is rare
s in New York; there have
d been just three October
r- days with measurable snow-
fall in Central Park in the
l last 135 years when record-
I- keeping began, according
e to the National Weather
n Service. The largest on
. record was in 1925 when
t eight-tenths of an inch fell
e in Central Park.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Les Lewis uses a clipboard to scrape the snow off of the back of his car window Saturday in Philadelphia, Pa. A classic
nor'easter was chugging along up-the East Coast and expected to dump anywhere from a dusting of snow to about 10 inches
throughout the region starting Saturday, a decidedly unseasonal date for a type of storm more associated with midwinter.


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


" c











LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


THE WEATHER


. ISOLATED
Jlp OWERS



l 75 Lom


I~MOSTLI MSLIIPOTY


MOSTLY MOSTLY MOSTLY
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY



HI 76 L51 l 79 L 54 HI177L50


Monday
79.,67,,sh
78/61/sh
83/70/t
83/65/sh
76/51/pc
73/54/sh
83/74/sh
75/50/pc
85/70/t
84/67/sh
77/54/pc
80/62/pc
69/53/s
71/51/s
73/48/s
81/61/pc
71/47/pc
82/71/t


Tuesday
77,'66,'s
77/64/s
82/71/pc
82/62/s
76/52/s
72/55/s
83/72/pc
76/51/s
83/72/pc
83/66/pc
77/55/s
78/60/s
71/51/s
.70/53/s
74/48/s
79/59/s
72/49/s
82/73/pc
i


Sif-. l hiLgh/.Sunday n t r l Trow -


4i City
... -. Cape Canaveral
TdDasse L~ a 69/55 Daytona Beach
70/45 72/47 Ft. Lauderdale
'eIetsaai N ieslC M Da,7ei5 73 d Fort Myers
67/50 lai \72/50 63 Galnesvllle
65/47 Ocda Jacksonville
'-73/54 6 ,
73/54 v Key West
WOando Ca|KCanaveral
76/64 74/68 Lake City
7664 Miami
7T i* Naples '
<8/ 2 West Pdil Iah Ocala
79/72 Orlando
\*F; Ft L da. Panama City
FR. Us 80/73 4 Pensacola
80/65 ga[ i Tallahassee
183/69 MaiTampa
8V72 Valdosta
K W s* ('I W. Palm Beach
- -- -- -- -- -82/75


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


73.
66
78
55
89 in 2009
32 in 2008


.0.37"
2.50"
31.04"
2.36"
43.49"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom..
Sunset tom.


7:43 a.m.
6:45 p.m.
7:44 am.
6:44 p.m.


MOON ultra-violet The Weather
Moonrise today 11:49 a.m. radiation risk
for the area on
Moonsettoday 10:25p.m. fortheareaon
a scale from O
Moonrise tom. 12:41 p.m. to .rom
-p Eto 1o+.
Moonsettom. 11:27 p.m.



Nov. NOV. NOV. Nov. 4 Forecasts, data and
2 10 .8 25 graphics 02011 Weather
First Full Last New V Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
tlrY www.weatherpublisher.com


NATIONAL FORECAST: As a strong low pressure system continues moving away from the
Northeast, some early rain and snowfall along with windy conditions will be likely for the far
Northeast. Meanwhile, a low pressure system near the Midwest could bring some scattered
showers to the region.



NTOAFP pm .t


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today'


CITY
AlbanyiNY
Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta,
Baltimore
Billings
Birmingham
Bismarck
Bolse
Boston
Buffalo
Charleston SC
Charleston WV
Charlotte
Cheyenne
Chicago
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Columbia SC
Dallas
Daytona Beach
Denver


I


HI/Lo/Pcp
38.30 0
57,,36 0
30 29 0
59/43/.01
41/36/.93
56/47/0
61/37/0
50/26/0
59/44/0
49/39/.05
42/34/0
63/49/.01
49/37/.13
57/40/.37
48/32/0
50/37/0
55 30'0
51, 30, 0
59/46/.10,
64/39/0
77/68/0
62/30/0


. HI/Lo/W CITY
47/26/pc Des MI
67/38/s Detrol
35'24 sr El Pas
6. 39. 5 Falrba
46/37/s Green
59/42/s Hartfo
65/39/pc Honoll
49/29/pc Houst
64/41/s Indian
47/31/sh Jacks
49/39/pc Jacks
64/46/s Kansa
55/38/pc Las Va
61/33/s Little
49/34/s Los A
55/41/sh Memp
54/41/pc Miami
50/41/pc Minne
63/38/s Mobil
73/46/s New O
73/63/pc NewY
60/35/pc Oklah


lolnes
It

inks
sboro
ird
ulu
on
polls
on MS
onvllle
s City
egas
Rock
ngeles
ihls

eapolls
e
rdeans
York
oma City


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
59/31/0 56/34/c
50/35/0 51/43/pc.
62/43/0 75 48. s
11/3/0 17/1/sn
52/37/.48 58/31/s
41/34/.14 43/24/pc
78/f72/,01 85/70/s
65/44/0 75/51/s
57/34/0 58/41/pc
63/35/0 66/41/s
69/64/.45 69/55/s
66/30/0 60/35/pc
71/51/0 78/55/s
66/37/0 67/43/pc
74/53/0 75/57/s
62/36/0 66/45/pc
87/76/.07 81/72/t
51/31/0 48/35/sh
64/44/0 67/43/s
65/51/0 67/52/s
45/33/.78 46/34/pc
63/35/0 65/41/s


CITY
Omaha
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Portland ME
Portland OR
Raleigh
Rapid City
Reno
Richmond
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Antonio
San Diego
San Francisco
Seattle
Spokane
Tampa
Tucson
Washington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
57/30/0
77/69/.33
44/33/1.24
82/61/0
39/33/.31
42/27/.01
52/48/0
52/39/.87
63/25/0
57/32/0
45/39/1.32
66/43/0
61/37/0
49/31/0
64/40/0
71/54/0 .
64/49/0
51/44/0
46/32/0
79/70/.01
79/55/0
43/36/1.02


HI/Lo/W
57/32/pc
76/64/pc
45/33/s
92/59/s
51/34/pc
46/28/sn
58/45/sh
58/31/s
53/39/s
71/37/s
56/36/s
76/49/s
67/38/c
62/43/s
76/51/k
77/55/s
69/52/s
56/46/sh
53/35/sh
78/62/pc
86/55/s
47/37/s


I


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Alres
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


Saturday Today
Hi/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
88 7 70 87/76/s
61..50,0 58/53/sh
60/55/0 65,54',c
70/57/0 69/58/pc
61/39/0 65/44/s
61/37/0 58/46/sh
S73/59/0 73/50/s
77, 63.0 77/62/s
61/46/0 64/46/s
84/75/0 82/72/t
50/43/0 49/46/c
81/72/0 82/75/s
90/81/0 86/77/t


CITY
La Paz
Uma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W
57/34/0 58/38/sh
72/64/0 69/62/pc
61/54/0 63/57/c
68/45/0 71/44/pc
70/45/0 72/44/s
41/27/0 45/39/pc
39/34/0 42/37/c
72/59/0 81/63/sh
91/79/0 86/76/t
84/59/0 88/65/s
43/30/0 49/36/sh
81/75/0 84/75/t
63/55/0, 64/49/pc


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


KEY TO CONDITIONS: cloudy irli,:lefir,1g-fog,'i;hazy,'i-icec-ai dr~l cloudy, r-fair.
sh-showers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


Saturday Today
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W.
84/68/0 81/69/t
72/54/0 74/52/s
.87/78/0 87/79/t
88/74/.53 86/77/t
77/46/0 83/49/s
59/50/0 67/47/s
,90/77/0 86/76/t
82/64/0 70/60/sh
77/61/0 74/61/s
68/55/0 70/60/pc
48/41/0 50/39/s
52/46/0 57/40/s
54/36/0 56/35/s
;uair, -


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SprghilsCom on 920 \', 3 )1h k Oala)'9/ ,;fb,,ic d. as Ocla244 E SiverSping Bvd.Wet M rin 1115SW93r C~rtRd Sunm rfild 790 U Hy. 41 ComngSoo! Aacua 479 N. 17thLn


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


12 THUSu


FLAKE CITY ALMANAC


UnVINDEX










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-042.1
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, October 30, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

RUNNING
Community run
at regionals
The FHSAA Region
1 cross country meet
for Classes 1A, 2A and
3A will be at Alligator
Lake Park on Nov. 12.
A free community run
will be offered following
the FHSAA competition.
The community run will
begin at 10:30 a.m.
For details, e-mail
Dusty Smith at dusty@
halfiniletiming.com.
FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club will
meet Tuesday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting has been
changed for Halloween
to 7 p.m. Tuesday in the
teacher's lounge at the
high school.
For details, call
club president Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.
CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meets Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.
CHS SOFTBALL
Players, parents
meet Thursday
A meeting for all
interested Columbia
High softball players
and parents to discuss
tryouts and conditioning
is 6 p.m. Thursday in the
CHS cafeteria.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.
FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Team at Walmart
for donations
Fort White High's
baseball team will be
accepting donations
in front of Walmart in
Lake City on Saturday. A
Moe's Night fundraiser is
planned for Nov. 10..
For details, call Jeanne
Howell at 288-5337.
N From staff reports

GAMES

Monday
Fort White High girls
soccer vs. Williston High,
6 p.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High
bowling in District 2
tournament at AMF East
in Ocala, 8 a.m.
Thursday
Columbia High
swimming in Region
1-2A meet at Cecil
Aquatic Complex in
Jacksonville, 9 a.m.
Fort White High
cross country in District
2-3A meet at Starke Golf
& Country Club, 5 p.m.-
girls; 5:40 p.m.-boys
Friday
Columbia High
football at Leon High,
7 p.m.
Fort White High
football at Trinity Catholic
High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Columbia High
cross country in District
4-2A meet at Apalachee
Regional Park, 8 a.m.-
girls; 8:30 a.m.-boys
Fort White High
boys soccer at Keystone


(Heights) Classic, TBA


Roll continues

for Fort White


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
The referee watches as Rickards High's Darius Hester (79) kicks Fort White High's
Jonathan Dupree (51) in the head following a play Friday. Hester was ejected from the game.


Richt-er


Bulldogs' victory
saves season, and
maybe a job.:
By MARK LONG
Associated Press,
JACKSONVILLE -
Georgia coach Mark Richt
may have saved his job with
two gutsy, fourth-down
calls.
Aaron Murray threw
two touchdown passes on
fourth down, and the 22nd-
ranked Bulldogs overcame
several mistakes to beat
Southeastern Conference
rival Florida 24-20 Saturday
and keep pace with South
Carolina in the Eastern
Division.
It was Georgia's fourth
victory in the last 22 games
against Florida and could
be a big one for Richt. He
had been' under pressure
since losing his first two
games this season.
Now, the Bulldogs
(6-2, 5-1 SEC) have won six
straight
The Gators have lost four
in a row for the first time
since 1988, a streak that
certainly will taint coach
Will Muschamp's first
season in Gainesville.
The latest loss came
against Muschamp's .alma
mater and eliminated
Florida (4-4, 2-4) in the
division race.
Like so manytimes before
in this series, Georgia found


Indians post third
straight win by
double digits.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE After
scoring 65 points on
Oct 21, Fort White High's
football team was on a
similar pace in Friday's
31-7 homecoming win over
Rickards High.
The Indians rolled up 266
yards on their first five pos-
sessions of the first half and
scored on four of them.
Fort White's defense lim-
ited the Raiders to 23 yards
during the onslaught and
,set up a short touchdown
with a fumble recovery by


scale


AJ. Legree.
Midway through the sec-
ond quarter, Rickards had
more players ejected (2)
than first downs (0).
The Raiders did add 64
yards in two late drives and
scored on a 14-yard pass
from Amion Carridine to
Ventavius Jerger as the
clock ran out for.the half.
Soron Williams easily
polished off his second con-
secutive 100-yard rushing
game.
He had 98 yards in the
first quarter that included'a
24-yard touchdown run. He
finished with 134 yards on
18 carries.
Williams leads the Indians
with 13 touchdowns and 80
INDIANS continued on 2B


10


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's De'Ante Saunders (26) attempts to snatch the ball away from Georgia's Michael Bennett (82) on his touchdown
catch in the second quarter at EverBank Field in Jacksonville on Saturday.


ways to try to give the game
away. The Bulldogs allowed
a touchdown on a fourth-
and-19 play in the first quar-
ter, gave up a 99-yard kick-
off return, missed two field


goals and had a ball bounce
off a running back's helmet
for an interception.
The Gators had their
chances, too.
John Brantley, playing for


the first time since badly
spraining his right ankle
four weeks ago, threw for
226 yards in the first half
but was mediocre at best
after the break. The Gators


managed 32 yards in the
second half, another paltry
performance that showed
how far the team has fall-
en since winning the 2008
national championship.


Success promise

coming to pass


Columbia High
stays in control of
making playoffs.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinely'lakecityreporter.com
ORANGE PARK First-
year Columbia High coach
Brian Allen has been prom-
ising success since arriving
in March.
After a 20-3 win against
.Orange Park, the Tigers
are starting to see that
success.
Columbia (5-3,3-1 District
4-6A) now has control of its
own ticket to the playoffs.
with a road matchup against
Leon High on Friday.
Ridgeview and Leon
high schools also have
3-1 district records following


the Lions' 30-28 win against
Ridgeview on Friday.
The Tigers are not
mathematically eliminated
from the district champ-
ionship, but winning puts
Columbia in either way.
St Augustine looks to be
the likely district runner-
up's opponent in the first
round. The Tigers would
need a win from Middleburg
over Ridgeview to win the
district.
Allen's team got one win
closer to the playoffs with a
win over former Columbia
coach Danny Green, who
coached Allen as a senior.
"There were a lot of
emotions," Allen said.
More importantly, Allen
didn't let the emotion get in
CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Trey Marshall (21) looks for an open hole to run through during a game
against Middleburg High on Oct. 21.











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
1:30 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Tums
Fast Relief 500, at MartinsvllleVa.
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Big 0 Tires
Nationals, at Las Vegas (same-day tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC European PGATourAndalucia
Masters, final round, at Sotogrande, Spain
2:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour
Championship, final round, at Charleston,
S.C.
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regiorial coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
FOX Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
CBS Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Dallas at Philadelphia
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, World Finals, final
round, at Las Vegas (same-day tape)
SOCCER
3 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Conference Semifinals
Game I, Los Angeles at NewYork
5 p.m.
ESPN MLS, Conference Semifinals
Game I, Houston at Philadelphia
TENNIS
I p.m.
ESPN2 WTA Championships,
championship match, at Istanbul (same-
day tape)

Monday
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN San Diego at Kansas City
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
VERSUS San Jose at N.Y. Rangers

BASEBALL

World Series

St. Louis 4,Texas 3
St. Louis 3,Texas,2
Texas 2,St Louis I
St Louis 16,Texas 7
Texas 4, St. Louis 0
Texas 4, St. Louis 2
St Louis I 0,Texas 9, I Innings
Friday
St. Louis 6,Texas 2

Game 7
Texas 200000000- 2 6 0
St Louis 20102010x- 6 7 1
M.Harrison, Feldman (:5. C-,Wlon.
(5), M.Adams (7), M.Gonzalez (7), Ogando
(8) and Napoli; C.Carpenter, Rhodes (7),
Dotel (7), Lynn (8), Motte (9) andY.Molina.
W-C.Carpenter 2-0. L-M.Harrison
0-2. HRs-St. Louis, Craig (3).

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East :
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 5 I 0.833185 135
Buffalo 4 2 0.667188 147
N.Y. Jets 4 3 0.571172 152
Miami 0 6 0.000 90 146
South


Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland


San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
Denver


W L T.Pct PF PA
4 3 0.571182 131
3 3 0.500112 135
2 5 0.286 84 139
0 7 0.000III 225
North
W L T Pct PF PA
5 2 0.714151 122
4 2 0.667137111
4 2 0.667155 83
3 3 0.500 97 120
West
W L T Pct PF PA
4 2 0.667141 136
4 3 0.57116Q 178
3 3 0.500105 150
2 4 0.333123 155


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants.
Dallas
Washington
Philadelphia


New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Carolina


Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis


East
W L T Pct PF PA
4 2 0.667154 147
3 3 0.500149 128
3 3 0.500116 116
2 4 0.333145 145
South
W L T Pct PF PA
5 2 0.714239 158
4 3 0.571l 1 169
.4 3 0.571158 163
2 5 0.286166 183
North
W L T Pct PF PA
7 0 01.000230141
5 2 0.714194 137
4 3 0.571170 150
I .6 0. 143148 178
West
W L T Pct PF PA
S I 0.833167 97
2 4 '0.333 97.128
I 5 0.167116 153
0 6 0.000 56 171


Today's Games
Indianapolis at Tennessee, I p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, I p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona 'at Baltimore, I p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto,
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay,
N.Y. Jets, Oakland,Tampa Bay
Sunday, Nov. 6
Seattle at Dallas, I p.m.
Miami at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.
Cleveland at Houston, I p.m.
San Francisco at Washington, I p.m.


N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, I p.m.
Atlanta at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Tennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Green Bay at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis atArizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, &20 p.m.
Monday,'Nov. 1
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Detroit, Jacksonville,
Minnesota

College scores

Saturday
Penn St. 10, Illinois 7
West Virginia 41, Rutgers 31
Arkansas 31,Vanderbllt 28
Boston College 28, Maryland 17
Louisville 27, Syracuse 10
Marshall 59. UAB 14
North Carolina 49, Wake Forest 24
UCF 41, Memphis 0
Virginia Tech 14, Duke 10
Michigan 36, Purdue 14
Minnesota 22, Iowa 21
Nebraska 24, Michigan St 3
Northwestern 59, Indiana 38
Notre Dame 56, Navy 14
Oklahoma 58, Kansas St. 17
Missouri 38, Texas A&M 31,OT
Oklahoma St. 59, Baylor 24
Air Force 42, New Mexico 0
Oregon 43,Washington St. 28

BASKETBALL-

SEC predictions

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. A list of
preseason media predictions for
Southeastern Conference men's
basketball with first-place votes in
parenthesis and total points.
Kentucky (18) 282
Vanderbilt (4) 265
Florida (I) 235
Alabama 219
Mississippi State 191
Arkansas 154
Ole Miss 119
Georgia 108
LSU 91
Auburn 80
Tennessee 71
South Carolina 57

AII-SEC preseason team

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Preseason
All-Southeastern Conference men's
basketball teams as chosen by SEC and
national medli.
FirstTeam
JaMychal Green, f, Alabama
Terrence Jones, f, Kentucky
Dee Bost, g Mississippi State
John JenklnsgVanderbilt
Jeffery Taylor, gI/fVanderbilt
Second Team
Anthony Davis, f, Kentucky
Doron Lamb, g, Kentucky

Kenny Boynton, g, Florida
Erving Walker, g, Florida
Festud Ezeli. cVanderbikt '

SEC Player'of the Year:Terrence Jones,
Kentucky .

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPLINT CUP
TUMS FAST RELIEF 500
Site: Martinsville.Va.
Schedule:Today, race, 1:30 p.m. (ESPN,
1-5:30 p.m.).
Trackl Martinsville Speedway (oval,
0.526 miles).
Race distance: 263 miles, 500 laps.
FORMULA ONE
GRAND PRIX OF INDIA
Site: Nolda, India.
Schedule:Today, race, 5:30a.m. (Speed,
5-7:30 a.m., 3-5:30 p.m.),
Track- Buddh International Circuit
(road course, 3.192 miles).
Race distance: 191.52 miles, 60 laps.
NHRA FULL THROTTLE
BIG 0 TIRES NHRA NATIONALS
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 7-I0 p.m.).
Trackl The Strip at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway.

Tums Fast Relief lineup

At Martinsville (Va.) Speedway
Saturday qualifying canceled due to
rain, all positions based on owner
points; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
(99) Carl Edwards, Ford.
2.(17) Matt Kenseth, Ford.
3. (2) Brad Keselowskl, Dodge.
4. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet.
5. (29) Kevin Harvick. Chevrolet.
6.(18) Kyle Busch,Toyota.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

PGYPU |


02011 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved.

KCIQU I
-- -- -- ^ ^ r^

__ _:^Z ^^^ I'


NCISTH




SMUAPC
__ ^-^ -^!i>^ __ _


7. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet.
8. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge.
9. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet.
10. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet.
I (I I) Denny Hamlin,Toyota.
12. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet
13. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet.
14. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota,
15. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford.
16. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford.
17. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford.
18.(6) David Ragan, Ford.
19. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet.
20. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya,
Chevrolet.
21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet.
22. (20) Joey Logano,Toyota.
23. (31 I) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet
24. (56) Martin Truex Jr.,Toyota.
25. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota.
26. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet.
27. (I) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet
28. (00) David Reutimann,Toyota.
29. (47) Bobby Labonte,Toyota.
30. (5 I) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet.
31. (34) David Gilliland, Ford.
32. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet
33. (13) Casey Mears.Toyota.
34. (32) Ken Schrader, Ford.
35. (38) Travis Kvapll, Ford.
36. (71) Hermle Sadler, Ford.
37. (7) Reed Sorenson, Dodge.
38. (37) Mike Skinner, Ford.
3,9. (46) Scott Speed, Ford.
40. (66) Michael McDowell,To ota.
41. (87) Joe Nemechek.Toyota.
42. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet.
43. (55) J.J.Yeiey, Ford.
Failed to Qualify
44.(92) Dennis Setzer, Chevrolet.
45. (75) Derrike Cope, Dodge.

Grand-Am schedule

2011 winners
Jan. 29-30 Rolex 24 at Daytona,
Daytona Beach (Joey Hand, Scott Pruett,
Graham Rahal, Memo Rojas)
March 5 Grand Prix of Miami,
Homestead (Scott Pruett, Memo Rojas)
April 9 Porsche 250, Birmingham,
Ala. (Scott Pruett, Memo Rojas)
May 14 Bosch Engineering 250,
Alton,Va. Goao Barbosa,Terry Borcheller,
JC France)
May 30 Memorial Day Classic,
Lakeville, Conn. (Max Angelelli, Ricky
Taylor)
June 4 Six Hours at the Glen,
Watkins Glen, N.Y. (Max Angelelli, Ricky
Taylor)
# June 25 Road America, Elkhart
Lake,Wls. (Scott Pruett, Memo Rojas)
July 9 Continental Tire Sports Car
Festival, Salinas, Calif. (Jon Fogarty, Alex
Gumey)
July 24 American Red Cross 250,
Millville, N.J. (Scott Pruett, Memo Rojas)
Aug. 13 -Watkins Glen 200,Watklns
Glen, N.Y. (Max Angelelli,' Ricky Taylor)
Aug. 20 Montreal 200 (jon Fogarty,
Alex Gurney)
Sept. 17 EMCO Gears Classic,
Lexington, Ohio.
:..p. pna !rototrpe
driver final 'sandin'gs
.1. Memo Rojas, 385
(tie) Scott Pruett, 385
*3. Max Angelelli, 353
(tie) Rlcky Taylor, 353
5.Darren Law, 318
(tie)DavldDonohue, 318
7.Alex Gurney, 315
(tie) Jon Fogarty, 315'
9.JC France, 314
(tie) Joao Barbosa, 314'
I 1. John Pew, 299
(tie) Oswaldo Negri Jr., 299
13.Antoriio Garcia, 263
(tie) Paul Edwards, 263
(tie) Brian Frisselle, 263
16. Burt Frisselle,.242
17. Henri Richard, 241
18. Ryan Dalziel,240
19.Terry Borcheller, 237
20. Enzo Potolicchio, 206,
(tie) Alex.Popow, 206

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Saturday's Games
Ottawa 5, N.Y. Rangers 4, SO
Florida at Buffalo (n)
Pittsburgh at Toronto (n)
Boston at Montreal (n)
San Jose at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Carolina at Philadelphia (n)
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay (n)
Anaheim at Nashville (n)
Detroit at Minnesota (n)
New Jersey at Dallas (n)
Columbus at Chicago (n)
Los Angeles at Phoenix (n)
Washington atVancouver (n)
Today's Games
Anaheim at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.
Tdronto at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Colorado, 8 p.m.
St. Louis at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
San Jose at N.Y. Rangers, 7-p.m.
Winnipeg at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek



Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


A: AU111M >,1 ,]
(Answers tomorrow)
Saturday's Jumbles: RHYME ELDER MOOLAH URGING
Answer: The sale at the nursery turned the customer
into a HEDGE HOG


CHS bowlers look



to return to state


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High's bowling
team wrapped up the regu-
lar season with a match at
Thunder Alley in Live Oak
on Wednesday.,
The Lady Tigers will
compete in the District 2
tournament at AMF East
in Ocala on Tuesday. The
tournament begins at
8 am.
Fort White High and
Suwannee High also are in
District 2.
The other high schools
are from Marion County
- Belleview, Forest,,
Lake Weir, North Marion,
Trinity Catholic, Vanguard
and West Port.
The top two teams at
district qualify for the state
tournament and Columbia
was district runner-up last
year.


"I had a chance to speak
with the Vanguard coach
and she told me Forest is
leading everything down
theie," CHS head coach
Brian Saunders said.
'Trinity Catholic is not bad,
but we should be able to
compete for the top two
spots."
Columbia, Fort White
and Suwannee have played
each other five times this
season with the Lady Tigers
winning each match.
OnWednesday, Columbia
bowled 724-741. in the
regular games and posted a
season-high 188 in the
Baker scoring game.
Suwannee bowled 572-619
and 95. Fort White bowled
495-485 in the regular
games.
Linden Barney led
the Lady Tigers in game
one with a 177. Courtney
Schmitt bowled 142, fol-


lowed by Lauren Snipes at
138, Tori Wise at 134 and
Christine Peters at 133..
In the second game,
it was Schmitt with 183,
Peters with 160, Chelsea
Williams and Barney with
135 each, and Wise with
128.
The six bowled, the
Baker game with Wise and
Williams splitting frames
three and eight
Schmitt, Wise, Barney
and Peters were on the
state qualifying team last
year that tied for ninth.
Snipes and Williams
round out the district team
for Tuesday. Shea Spears
was on the state team last
year and is on the district
roster. She is injured and
waiting medical clearance.
"We hope to make state
as a team, but any of our
girls should compete for
individual," Saunders said.


INDIANS: Prelude to a showdown

Continued From Page 1B


points scored.
With 13-of-18 comple-
tions, Andrew Baker had
his best percentage game
with double digit attempts.
Baker threw two touch-
downs passes to Legree to
give him seven TD passes
in the last three games.
Legree has caught four
'of those touchdowns and
has seven for the season.
Baker also used tight
end Wesley Pitts to get out
of trouble. Pitts 'caught two
passes for 30 yards,, one
from the Indians 10 and
the second one to convert
a third-and-11.
George Fulton scored
his first touchdown of the
season, while Colton Jones
was perfect on four PATs
and scored the only points
in the second half with a
28-yard field goal.
It was the longest of
Jones' three field goals this
season and he has scored
28 points.


Coach Demetric Jackson
was not concerned that
the Indians cooled off after
intermission.
"I knew (Rickards) had
a good defense," Jackson
said. "They were crowding
the line and coming at us.
We were off target a little
bit You have got to realize,'
they-are a 5A school and
have some big boys."
The Indians' defense held
Rickards to 84 yards rush-
ing,. and stopped a first-and-
goal in the second quarter
and two fourth-down tries
in the second half.
Jonathan Dupree had a
couple of sacks and Kellen
Snider added a sack.
Melton Sanders had an
interception to go with
Legree's fumble recovery."
Fort White's long-
*awaited district showdown
with Trinity Catholic High
is this Friday in Ocala.
'This is the one you work
for all year," Jackson said.


S W$N U07a c S0


ACROSS
1 Yikes! (hyph.)
5 Hot spring
8 Mac rivals
11 Counterfeit
12 Kind of salad
14 Go team!
15 Shelf
coverings
17 Vocalist -
Sumac
18 NBA hoopster
19 Repeated
21 Cement
component
23 Space lead-in
24 Ploys
27 Milan money,
once
29 Just scrape
by
30 Relativity
name
34 Gulls
37 Climber's
challenge
38 Advantage
39 Ballot caster
41 Stir around


43 Legal
document
45 Fabled
lumberjack
47 Marsh grass
50 Pacino and
Unser
51 Some bikes
(hyph.)
54 AAA
suggestion
55 This, to a
senora
56 Irritated state
57 Morse code
signal
58 Not sociable
59 Pigskin
props

DOWN
1 Roswell
crasher
2 Crop hazard
3 Kan. neighbor
4 Cartoon
magpie
5 Violent
weather


Rickards 0 7 0 0 7
.FortWhite 14 14 0 3 31
First Quarter
FW-Legree 9 pass from Baker
(Jones kick), 9:11
FW-S.Williams 24 run (Jones kick),
:57
Second Quarter
FW-Legree 10 pass from Baker
(Jones kick), 8:44
FW-Fulton 5 run (Jones kick), 6:45
Fourth Quarter
FW--jones 28 FG, 6:00

Fort White Rickards
First downs '16 7
Rushes-yards 37-181 30-84
Passing 136 90
Comp-Att-Int 13-18-0 7-18-1
Punts-Avg. 3-37 4-43
Fumbles-Lost 2-0 1-1 '
Penalties-Yards 5-43 9-66
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, S. Williams
18-134, Cormier 5-22, Phillips 2-18, Baker
7-10, Fulton I-5,Chatman I-2,T.Williams
1-0, Sanders 2-(-10). Rickards, Odom 5-
57, Darling 10-27, Butler 4-8,Ashby 1-2,
Kelly I-(-l), Carridine 9-(-9).
PASSING-Fort White, Baker
13-18-136-0. Rickards, Carridine 7-17-
90-1,Ashby 0-1-0-0.
RECEIVING-Fort White, Legree
7-93, Phillips 3-4, Pitts 2-30, S. Williams
1-9. Rickards, Jerger 4-55, Kelly 2-27,
Rodriguez 1-8.


Got Connectd mw kevotreport




Answer to Previous Puzzle


S IIGIN FL ASIH
GAVEIN PLENTY
ORACLE RUTTED
PIN K PHI EWE
OCTAGON
ELM OUD RUBS
TAlPAN ANNALS
ENDURE NACHOS
K ISS POT SGT
HEATHER
AHA TAO ALSO


ALDRIN YAPPED
ROC KS THEY


6 Reassure
Rover
7 Dull pain
8 He played the
Wiz
9 Antique
brooch


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10-31


10 Food fish
13 Movie awards
16 Aloha tokens
20 Kind of wave
22 Dropped
syllables
24 -
Montgomery
of jazz
25 1950s prez
26 Meadow
28 Good
connections
30 Joule fraction
31 Wolf, say
32 Dot in the
Seine
33 PBS kin
35 .Throng
36 Form a
thought
39 DC biggie
40 Most strange
41 Vitamin
lead-in
42 First sign
44 Montaigne
piece
45 Minstrel
46 Gangbuster
Eliot -
48 Trait carrier
49 Adams or
Brickell
52 Ultimate.
degree
53 Ave. crossers


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
'Fort White High defender Virginia Vasquez (4) fights with Santa Fe High's Jordan Register (8)
for possession of the ball in a game last year.


Strong returning class


for Lady Indians soccer


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High's girls soccer
district has doubled in the
FHSAA realignment for
2011-12.
In addition to the
Lady Indians, District
5-2A includes Bradford,
Interlachen, Keystone
Heights, Newberry, Santa
Fe and Williston high
schools, and P.K. Yonge
School.
'Fort White "played a,
pair of preseason matches
at Taylor County High on
Saturday and opens the
regular season at home
Monday against Williston.
Kickoff is 6 p.m.
' Fort White dealt with
Santa Fe, Newberry and
Williston last year, when'
the Lady Indians were 7-8-3
overall and 2-5-1 in district
play.
.Santa Fe won the dis-
trict title over runner-
up Suwannee High. The
Raiders made their fifth trip
to the state playoffs.
Keystone Heights and
P.K. Yonge were district
runners-uip last year and
both have made the state


playoffs 10 times all since
2000 for Keystone Heights
and starting in 1996 for the
Blue Wave.
Fort White had a string
of three straight playoff
appearances snapped last
year.
Interlachenand Newberry
both made the playoffs in
2006 for the only time, while
Bradford and Williston have
never qualified.
"I am excited about the
year," Fort White head
coach Perry Sauls said.
"The team is working well
,together and once we get all
the parts in place we will be
OK. If our returning play-
ers progress enough, we
should be able to compete
with anybody we'play."
Fort White has 11 play-
ers returning and all will be
called on to start. There are
some injuries and illness to
overcome and a few players
are still participating in fall
sports and activities.,
Ali Wrench is back as one
of the team captains. Caitlin
Congi and Virginia Vasquez,
one of those injured, are the
other captains..
Other returnees are
Lync6 Stalnaker, Ayla
Gonzalez, Rebecca Onorati,


Kasey Blanchard, Ashley
Beckman, Danielle Wooley,
Amy Matthews and Alexa
Hatcher.
Beth Morgan, who Will
take over in goal as a fresh-
man, leads the list' of new
players that includes Taylor
Wooten, Kimmie Congi,
Alyssa Wilcoxsor, Ashley
Jones, Ashley Welder,
Cassie Douglas, Cheyenne
Patterson, Deanna Hart and'
Carolee Marrow.
Sauls said he plans to
return' to a 4-4-2 line-up
with a diamond defense in
the back. Caitlin Congi will
be the stopper and Wrench
the sweeper. Gonzalez and
Matthews are the other
defenders.
Stalnaker, Beckman,
Blanchard and Wooley are
the midfielders with Hatcher
and Onorati up front. Sauls
said the six could change
positions, depending on the,
opponent Senior Onorati
has led the Lady Indians in
goals in five seasons.'
Cassie Sparks is the.'
assistant coach this year
and former Santa Fe.player
Lyndsay Davis is a volun-
teer assistant.
Fort White has no junior
varsity team. .


CHS: Atones for 'embarrassing' loss
Continued From Page 1B ",


the way of the big picture.
"There ,,were' district
implications,', Allen said.
"We went in and did the
things that i'we wanted' to
do." -
Defensively, the Tigers
have allowed three points
in the last eight quarters
since a. game that Allen
called "embarrassing" for
Columbia a 34-26 loss to
Ridgeview.
"The last time we came
to Jacksonville, we got
embarrassed," Allen' said
after the game.
.Columbia didn't allow an
Orange Park first down in
the first quarter.
The Tigers first
offensive drive went for a
touchdown.
Following two runs for
four yards by Rakeem
Battle, quarterback Jayce
Barber didn't see a receiver
open on third-and-6. The
junior pulled down the
ball and scrambled for 29
yards.
Nigel Atkinson, Braxton
Stockton and Ronald
Timmons had consecutive
runs of five, four and four
yards to put the Tigers on
the Raiders' 6-yard line.
Timmons had two runs
for two yards before Barber
rushed it three yards to the,
goal line.
Stockton wrapped up the


drive;.with a one-yard run.
The Raiders got things
rolling in the second quar-
ter, but 'were short on a
37-yaid field goal.
Columbia's following.
"drive was killed by a hold-
ing penalty.
It was -one of 27 flags
thrown in the game, but
the Tigers' defense forced
a three-and-out.
After Barber was sacked,
on third down, Hayden
Lunde punted the ball to the
36-yard line of the Raiders.
Orange Park had a
19-yard run from
RaeKivon Fuller to set up a
42-yard field goal, but it was
blocked.
A sideline warning, which.
is normally a dead-ball
foul, gave Lofton a second
chance from 37 yards. This
time he nailed it for Orange
Park's only points.
Lunde had a 34-yard field
goal that was set up by
a Barber pass of 37 yards
to Nate Ayers blocked
on Columbia's first drive
of. the second half with
8:43 remaining in the third
quarter.
Dequan Ivory, who
blocked the earlier field-
goal attempt, picked up a
fumble'on the Raiders' first
drive of the second half.
After receiving the ball
off the turnover at the 36-


yard line, Stockton needed
only one play to score on a
inside run to give Columbia
a 13-3 lead.
Orange Park maintained
possession for the next 10
plays after a punt bounced
off a Columbia player and a
Raider recovered.
Trey Marshall helped
back the Raiders up with
a sack, but Jacob Mezera
hit Taran Schofield for 13
yards on fourth and 10 to
keep the drive alive for
three more plays.
Darius Williams inter-
cepted Mezera's pass in the
end zone to give Columbia
the ball back with 10:42
remaining.
Columbia used 12 plays
to burn the clock down
to 5:44 before a holding
penalty forced the Tigers
to punt.
A Tyrone Sands sack and
a 15-yard loss on a bad snap
forced the Raiders to punt
with 3:20 remaining.
Columbia made the
Raiders regret the decision
with a 42-yard pass from
Barber to Ayers. It posi-
tioned Barber for a sneak
into the end zone with 1:56
remaining.
Orange Park didn't give
up, but Devontae Levy's
interception ended the
Raiders chances in the
game and for the playoffs.


Seminoles


smac


By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE EJ
Manuel threw for 321
yards and two touchdowns
Saturday to lead Florida
State to a 34-0 win over
North Carolina State.
Florida State (5-3, 3-2
ACC) led 24-0 at halftime
and intercepted N.C. State
quarterback Mike Glennon
twice en route to its first
shutout of the season.
Manuel completed 25 of
34 passes and connected on
scoring plays of 20 yards to
Kenny Shaw and 26 yards
to Greg Dent.


Lonnie Pryor and
Devonta Freeman scored
on short runs and Dustin
Hopkins chipped in ,with
two field goals for the
Seminoles, who have
bounced back from an
early-season, three-game
losing streak with three
straight wins.
N.C. State (4-4, 1-3) man-
aged only 166 yards on
offense, while suffering its
first shutout since the 2008
season opener.
The Seminoles, who
rolled up 444 yards and 23
first downs in the game,
dominated from the open-
ing kickoff. .


Florida State's offense
produced 249 yards before
halftime while its defense
limited NC State to 106
yards as quarterback
Mike Glennon managed
only 71 passing yards and
suffered one of his two
interceptions.
Manuel sizzled in, the
first half, completing 17 of
22 for 212 yards and the
touchdown throw to Shaw
that gave Florida State its
24-0 halftime lead. His lone
interception came when
Rodney Smith bobbled
the ball and had it swiped
away by NC State's Terrell
Manning.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan (8) sacks N.C. State quarterback Tyler
Brosius (12) in the fourth quarter at Doak,,Campbell Stadium'infTallahassee.on Saturday.



Oklahoma St. persists


in making its BCS case


Associated Press

STILLWATER, Okla,-
Joseph Randle set career-
highs by running for 152
yards and four touch-
downs, Justin Blackmon
matched his career best
with 13 catches for 172,
yards and two scores and
No. 3 Oklahoma State beat
Baylor 59-24 on Saturday.
The Cowboys (8-0, 5-0
Big 12) started a season
with eight straight wins for
only the second time in
school history.

No. 7 Oregon 43,
Washington State 28
EUGENE, Ore. -
Oregon true freshman
De'Anthony Thomas
sparked the No. 7 Ducks
with two second-half touch-
downs in a victory over
Washington State.
Darron Thomas
returned to start against
the Cougars but threw two
interceptions in the first
half and was replaced by
backup Bryan Bennett.
.Washington State (3-5,
1-4 Pac-12) lost its fourth
straight.
Lavasier Tuihei caught
two touchdown passes for
Oregon (7-1, 5-0).

No. 13 Nebraska 24,
No. 9 Michigan St. 3
LINCOLN, Neb. Rex
Burkhead scored three
touchdowns and ran for 130
yards on 35 carries, and
No. 13 Nebraska defeated
ninth-ranked Michigan
State to take control of its
division in the Big Ten.
Burkhead, who went
over 100 yards for the fifth
time in six games, scored
at the end of 80- and 89-
yard drives in the third
quarter.
Taylor Martinez com-
pleted 6 of 7 passes for 80


yards'in the third quarter
after going 1. for 6 in the
firsthalf. ,
Michigan State (6-2,
$-1) managed just 187
yards against Nebraska's
defense.

No. 17 Michigan 36,
Purdue 14
ANN ARBOR, Mich.
- Fitzgerald Toussaint
ran for a career-high 170
yards and tied a career
high with.two touchdowns,
leading No. 17 Michigan,
over Purdue (4-4, 2-2 Big
Ten).
The Wolverines (7-1,
3-1) gave up: aTD on the
opening drive of the game,
then scored 36 straight
points.

No. 8 Arkansas 31,
Vanderbilt 28 -
NASHVILLE, Tenn.
- Zach Hocker kicked a
42-yard field goal with 6:53
left, and eighth-ranked
Arkansas rallied to beat
Vanderbilt.
This was the third time
this season the Razorbacks
(7-1, 3-1 SEC) trailed by
double digits.
The Commodores (4-
4, 1-4) also had the ball
at the Arkansas 5 in the
fourth quarter leading 28-
20 when Zac Stacy fum-
bled, and Jerry Franklin
picked it up and ran
it 94 yards for a touch-
down. Tyler Wilson hit
Jarius Wright for the'tying
2-point conversion.
Vanderbilt missed a
chance to force overtime
when Carey Spear's 27-
yard field goal went wide
right with 8 seconds left.


for 148 yards and No. 15
Virginia Tech overcame
a sloppy performance to
beat Duke for its Atlantic
Coast Cbnference-record
11th straight road victory.
Logan Thomas was 17
of 28 for 190 yards with
two interceptions and a
2-yard touchdown pass to
Eric Martin: Josh Oglesby
added a 1-yard scoring run
for the Coastal Division-
leading Hokies (8-1, 4-1).
Sean Renfree was 17 of
35 for 204 yards but was
intercepted three times for
the Blue Devils (3-5, 1-3).

,No. 11 Oklahoma 58,
No. 10 Kansas St. 17
MANHATTAN, Kan.
- Landry Jones and
Ryan Broyles helped
No. 11 Oklahoma get back
on track- and spoil 10th-
ranked Kansas State's
dream season.
Jones threw for a school-
record 505 yards and
five touchdowns, his All-
American wide receiver
caught 14 passes for 171
yards and a-score, and the
Sooners .bounced back
from a stunning defeat to
beat the previously unbeat-
en Wildcats.
Kehny Stills added four
catches for 101 yards, Roy
Finch finished with 73
yards rushing and another
69 through the air, and the
Sooneirs' attack .managed
690 yards of total offense
against the league's top-
ranked defense.

No. 25 W. Virginia 41,
Rutgers 31
PISCATAWAY, N.J.
- Geno Smith threw two


second-half touchdowns
No. 15 Virginia Tech 14, and scored a go-ahead TD
Duke 10 on a fourth-down, 1-yard
run with 6:18 to play as
DURHAM, N.C. No. 25 West Virginia
- David Wilson rushed rallied for a victory.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


A hall of fame life I I


By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
He splits
his time
in Florida,
Illinois and
his home
state of Alabama, but it
is Mississippi that best
remembered Jay Boland's
feats on the basketball
floor.
Boland was.inducted
into the East Mississippi
Community College
Athletic Excellence Hall of
Fame on Oct. 21.
Boland stays with his
sister, Karen J. Cox, while
in Lake City. His nephews,
Michael Cox and Don
Cox also live in Lake City.
Boland's wife of 46 years,
. Sue, lives with their
daughter, Bethany, in
Chicago. The Bolands have
two sons, Jason and Brad,
and four grandchildren.
Boland played under
coach Creigh Purnell at
Kinston High in Alabama.
A district MVP, he played
in the Alabama High
School All-Star Game as a
senior and drew interest
from East Mississippi.
"Coach Purnell took
me to East Mississippi
(Scooba, Miss.) and
dropped me off," Boland
said. "I couldn't do
anything, so I practiced
basketball."
It paid off.
Boland was all-state
as both a freshman and
sophomore the only
freshman on the all-state
team in 1959-60. As a
sophomore, he played in
the All-American game in
Lawton, Okla.
"East Mississippi is
the top dog in athletics
among the junior colleges
in Mississippi," Boland
said. "When I went to East
Mississippi I talked the
coach (Keyes Currie) into
running the same offense I
had in high school.",
Boland visited East
Mississippi in 2009 and


TIM KIRBY/Lake City Reporter
Jay Boland shares memorabilia and shows the plaque for
his induction into the East Mississippi Community College
Athletic Excellence'Hall of Fame on Oct. 21.


was nominated to the hall
of fame by a teammate. He
was elected to the 2011
class.
Boland moved on to
Delta State University in
Cleveland, Miss., where
he was team MVP and
received the
sportsmanship award.
"We were 19-4 and had a
chance to go to theNAIA
Division II tournament,
but they wouldn't let us go
and play against blacks,"
Boland said. "Arkansas
State went in our place and
won two ball games in the
tournament We beat them
by 29 during the season."
Boland learned his jump
shot in the 10th grade and
said he, averaged better
than 55 percent shooting
in high school and college.
He was money at the free
throw line, once making 96
out of 100 to beat "world
free throw champion"
Wayne Purvis.
After college, Boland
coached at Drew High
and R.H. Watkins High.,
One of his players at Drew
was Archie Manning. At
Watkins, Boland took the
basketball team to state
and coached two state
championships in tennis.
"We made the state
tournament in Jackson and


I took the boys up to spend
the night," Boland said.
"That was a big mistake.
We made 26 turnovers the
next day and lost by four
points."
Boland credited Charlie
Free and fellow Alabama
players for his
basketball prowess.
"Coach Free was my
coach from the third to the
ninth grade," Boland said.
"He used to pick me up
and take me to games. My
teammates who helped me
along the way were
amazing. We had two big
players and they made sure
nobody hurt this Alabama
guy."
Boland has been
successful in real estate
and brokerage, and as a
sales manager. He
owns Boland'Brokerage
and Consulting Firm.
He is a faithful church
member and served as
Lions Club president in
two cities. :
"It has been my faith
in Jesus Christ," Boland
said. "In 46 years, Ihave
never said a curse word
ajd never tasted alcohol
or smoked. I have always
supported church and my
community. I say,
'Here I am, what can it do
to help?'"


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Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreportercom


BUSINESS


Sunday, October 30, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Joining



financial forces


Agreement
strengthens two
local institutions

By GORDON JACKSON
glackson@lakecityreporter.com
Alliances between non-
profit credit unions and for-
profit financial service busi-
nesses are uncommon.
But the recent "strategic
alliance" between Lake City-
based businesses GulfCoast
Financial Services and
SunState Financial Credit
Union makes perfect sense,
according to Melanie
Cosentino, GulfCoast's
marketing, and business
development director.
'They are very custom-
er service oriented, as we
are," she said. "We have a
small-town local approach."'
S. Brent Kuykendall,
GulfCoast vice president,
said both businesses have
a conservative approach
to managing customers'
money that. helped them
successfully weather the
financial problems that
have plagued many larger


companies.
"It didn't seem to be a
stumbling block for our
folks," he said of the agree-
ment
Kuykendall said his com-
pany's approach is to invest
in mutual funds, rather
than individual stocks, to
protect customers from
volatile swings in the stock
market
Kuykendall monitors the
stock market throughout
the day on computers and
a TV in his office, prepared
to quickly make decisions
in the best interest of his
customers.
"We want to be ready to
move into something else
at any time," he said. "We
feel that's a little cushion
for our clients."
The agreement adds
GulfCoast's financial
management, advisory,
retirement planning and
insurance services to the
banking and lending ser-
vices SunState offers to the
region.
"As a credit union, our
mission mandate is mem-
bers first and we believe in


strong community involve-
ment," said SunState
President/CEO Jim
Woodward.
SunState operates nine
branches, with five in the
Suwannee Valley region,
including Lake City.
"With GulfCoast, we
have found a partner that
shares this commitment
to client and community,"
Woodward said. "We share
the same organizational
values, strategic vision and
dedication to excellence.
This is an exciting oppor-
tunity."
GulfCoast Financial
Services 'serves clients in
Florida, Geoigia, Illinois,
Kentucky, Ohio, Texas and
Virginia with life, health
and long-term-care insur-
ance, as well as annuities
and securities.
"GulfCoast Financial is
different from the chain-
store or bank-division
insurance or investment
management firms, too,"
said John Kuykendall, the
company's president. "It's
just another.way we fit with
SunState."


GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
Mia Parrish (left), teller supervisor.at SunState Financial Credit Union, and Tiffany Gay serve
customers at the drive-in window at the business. SunState and GulfCoast Financial Services
recently entered an agreement that will improve customer service at both businesses.


HP says it won't


spin off PC unit


GORDON JACKSONIL ,Ire -Py Reponer
S. Brent Kuykendall, vice president of GulfCoast Financial Services, monitors stock market
fluctuations on computers in his Lake City office. His company-recently entered into a formal
business agreement with SunState Financial Credit Union to combine the strengths of both
businesses.


By RACHEL METZ
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO Hewlett-Packard
Co. has decided against spinning off
or selling its PC division a, plan first
brought to light in August by the technol-
ogy conglomerate's now former CEO Leo
Apotheker.
SHP said on Thursday that it reached
its decision after evaluating the strategic,
financial and operational impact of spin-
ning off the business unit, which is the
world's biggest manufacturer of desktop
and notebook computers for consumers
and businesses.
The unit supplies a third of HP's rev-
enue, and PCs are an area where the
company is a market leader. But it is HP's
least profitable division, and its disposal
was meant to be part of Apotheker's plan
to transform the Silicon Valley stalwart
into a twin of East Coast rival IBM Corp.:,
A company focused on businesses, rather
than both businesses and consumers.
Hewlett-Packard's new CEO Meg
Whitman said that keeping the unit within
the company is right for HP, its customers,
shareholders and business partners.
Deciding what to do with the unit has
been one of the biggest challenges for
Whitman, a former head of online mar-


ketplace operator eBay Inc. who joined
Palo Alto-based HP in September after
Apotheker was fired.
A month before her appointment as chief
executive, Apotheker said the PC business
would go up for sale in a badly blundered
announcement that hastened his demise.
At that time, HP also said it would exit
the tablet computer and smartphone busi-
ness and buy business software maker
Autonomy Corp. for about $10 billion.
Carving out the business would have
been a tricky kind of surgery, given its
enormity. Steve Diamond; an associate
professor at Santa Clara University School
of Law, said "tearing apart a business unit
of that size is like taking out organs."
"It's very painful. It's like dividing
Siamese twins. It's very, very difficult to
do and you don't know how it's going to
come out," he said.,
HP appears to have reached a similar
conclusion.
The company said that its evaluation of
the business unit revealed a deep integra-
tion across key operations, such as its
supply chain and procurement Ultimately,
the review found that the cost to recreate
these operations in a standalone company
outweighed any benefits of selling the PC
unit.
HP continued on 2C


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APric
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SThe Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


Think Twice, Goldbugs


:r time in the prices It's easy to be tempted by gold,
consumers (87 per- as it has soared in recent years,
. population) for a approaching $1,900 per ounce
of consumer goods before dropping back near $1,600.
(It was around $300 a decade ago.)
Includes items Given the volatility of stocks and
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cigarettes, college gold is a smarter investment.
atio6ind haircuts..
ts t haircuts.y If you want to buy gold, you have
ems for $100 in several options. Youniight invest in
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.htm., the point when you're investing in
*** -. gold; diversification is. ... A small
:amount of gold alongside your
ldn't I borrow stocks can be a stabilizer."
y credit card and But not all glitters in the world of
oc market? gold. In his seminal book "Stocks
, Iowa for the Long Run" (McGraw-
Vill Robinson! The Hill, $35), finance professor Jer-
Smarket' as, over ....
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r in returns. But \ lP/ I


that's an average that may not
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see Write to Us


emy Siegel reveals what a dollar
invested in various things would
have grown to, from 1802 to 2006
(yes, 204 years!): stocks, $755,163;
bonds, $1,083; T-bills, $301; and
gold, $1.95. (Amounts have been
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In Fortune magazine, David
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in the dollar boosted gold 76 percent
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an extended rally. Instead, the price
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Name That Company


o o
*e
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S Born in 1946, and based in
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0 glass and crockery. My products didn't
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02011 THE MONY FodDsr. B


A Sure-Fire Loss
I recently invested with a com-
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I lost more than 80 percent on a
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- C.B., Peterborough, Ontario
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FedEx: Still the
Whole Package?
Shares of FedEx (NYSE: FDX)
recently dropped to a nearly two-
year low after the company slightly
lowered its full-year earnings outlook
because of the global slowdown.
The market may have overreacted,
though. FedEx posted revenue of
$10.5.billion for the quarter, up 11
percent from a year ago. Earnings
per share (EPS) rose 22 percent.
The sluggish global economy has
been hurting FedEx and rival United
Parcel Service. Even airlines are
facing lower cargo shipments. As a
result, FedEx has reduced its full-
year EPS outlook.
FedEx is suffering from declining
demand and volume in the U:S. and
Asia. Operating expenses grew by 11
percent over the last year, largely due
to a 40 percent increase in fuel costs.
So far, FedEx has managed to offset
these problems by raising prices.
However, customers are shift-
ing to slower, and cheaper, ship-
ping options. Thus, daily average
package volume fell 3 percent for
FedEx Express, while rising 5 per-
Scent for FedEx Ground.
Though the slow-moving econ-
omy is not favorable to FedEx, it
still has the potential to grow. This
dividend-paying company is trad-
Sing at a low price because of global
economic uncertainty and is poised
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recovers. (The Motley Fool owns
shares of FedEx and United Parcel
Service, and its newsletter services
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LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
You probably don't know my name, but you should. I trace my his-
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Padrinos, EatSmart, Archway, O-Ke-Doke, and Stella D'oro. Two major
snack companies merged in 2010 to form me. One of them is especially
- active in making snacks for private labels and third parties. I was the first
to sell potato chips in foil bags. I rake in more than a billion dollars annu-
ally. Who am I? (Answer: Snyder's-Lance)


Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Smartest) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia-entries
to Fooliafool:com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can't provide individualfinancial advice.
UNIVERSAL UCUCK (FOR RELEASE 10/27/2011)


6 tips for getting in the group gift-giving spirit


By SARAH SKIDMORE willing to pitch in and leave 'ended. If someone isn't
AP Business Repbrter. plenty .of .time to iron out.. able to contribute the same
details, s&t the terms and amount of money, perhaps
SPORTLAND, Ore.-The alert people before they they can offer time -wrap-
holiday season- can mean start their own shopping. ping the gift, picking it'up
lots of work and spending, Robyn Spizman, a gift- or doing another chore .
but new ways to share the giving expert and author "It is very politically
cost of giving gifts may of several books; including correct,.in the gift world,"
bring a smile to everyone's "The Giftionary," recom- Spizman said. "You make
face. mends choosing a leader everyone look like a hero
Splitting a gift for any to streamline the process. in the holiday gift world."
occasion from a wedding BE 'CLEAR: It's help- SELECT'WITH CARE:
to Christmas can save time ful.to suggest the gift and The perk of group giving
and money, and it can mean estimate the cost per per- is pooling your resources
bigger and better presents son up front so people have to give something you
for recipients. enough information to wouldn't otherwise be to,
Here are six tips on navi- decide whether they want but that doesn't mean this
gating etiquette, fairness, to baticipate. On the other 'works only- for big-ticket
gift choice and other issues hand, if you know someone items like a laptop or a
the joint giving brings up. might not be able to con- trip.
START EARLY: Do a tribute as much as others, Group gifts can be heavy
quick assessment of who you may want to leave the on effort and light on cost.
might be interested and contribution amount open- 'Consider a homemade


book with words of wisdom
from each family member
or recipes with notes and
remembrances from each
contributor. A group effort
creates opportunities to
personalize a gift too, like
loading an iPad or Kindle
with photos and video of
the grandchildren and
favorite music or books. -
Justine Angelli, the CEO
and founder of shareagift.
com, said her website has
helped people collect funds
for everything from birth-
day gifts to plastic surgery.
"It really helps people
avoid unwanted gifts,"
Angelli said.
COLLECTWITHTACT:
Make sure you know ahead
of time how you plan to col-


lect the promised contribu-
tions, because it's no fun to
chase down your friends.
and family for money.
Several websites, like
shareagiftcom, will help
you collect funds online.
Retailers including as Best
Buy and eBay also let shop-
pers contribute to a group
gift. And money can be
collected-and used to buy
one of the selected items
offered still other websites
such as frumus.com and
fromeveryone.com. (
KEEP A RECORD:
You should know along the
way, by keeping a close
record, who contributed,
how much and when they
gave so you can avoid hurt
feelings or conflict.


If someone does fail to
contribute, Spizman sug-
gests avoiding shaming
them. Instead try framing
it as a positive statement,
such as 'We've got all but
two payments to go. My
job is almost done! It would
help me greatly if you could
get your contribution to me
by Friday."
REMEMBER THE
DETAILS: You still should
include a gift-receipt, when
applicable, in case your
choice isn't the hit you'd
anticipated. And make sure
every gift-giver is noted on
the card or acknowledged
in another way.


HP: Won't spin off PC unit
SContinued&Froni c Page

Some analysts cheered HP's decision as With Palm, HP got the int
,the right move, adding they were happy that .:ware, which ran on- several
Whitman made the announcement so rapidly. July, HP released a tablet ca
She had previously said the company would that also ran WebOS. But
make a determination about the business by the caught on with consumers
end of the year. were more enticed by Apple
"The fact that Meg pushed this decision very iPad and smartphones rum
- quickly is absolutely cleaning up the mistakes of Android software. HP still i
Sthe past" said Gartner analyst Mark Fabbi. plans to do with WebOS.
Forrester Research analyst Frank Gillett said Shares of Palo Alto, Calif.-
SHP never should have considered removing its cents to $27.16 in after-hours
SPC unit, and the more to keep it "seems like trading on Thursday, the sto
. the right decision for the business given market 4.8 percent, to close at $26.99
2 conditions."
"Hopefully its the beginning of showing
they've got the process and people in place to
* work these things through," he said. "But it Econom y gi
is puzzling that it was hard for them to figure *
out"2.5 pct. in
Gillett thinks HP may now be able to thin out
- its PC family similar to what Steve Jobs did, .
at Apple in order to resuscitate the company in By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
the '90s And focus on just a few devices with AP Economics Writer
attractive features.
Analysts said they don't see any long-term WASHINGTON A sumi
Consequences for HP now that it has made its nomic growth is helping dis
decision. But there's still a big question mark: that another recession migh
SHow will HP compete in the rapidly growing the strength can be sustain
mobile device market? from clear.
As part of its PC business spinoff announce- Buoyed by a resurgent co
ment, HP also said it would stop making tablet business investment, the
computers and smartphones by October ed at an annual rate of 2
effectively killing flailing smartphone pioneer' July-September quarter, the
Palm Inc., which HP bought in 2010 for $1.8 Thursday.
billion.


uitive WebOS soft-
I smartphones. In
lled the TouchPad
the devices never
, many of whom
e Inc.'s iPhone and
ning Google Inc.'s
wasn't said what it

-based HP rose 17
trading. In regular
ck added $1.24, or
l.


rew

!3


mer of modest eco-
spel lingering fears
t be near. Whether
led, though, is far

nsumer and strong
economy expand-
2.5 percent in the
Government said


Obama takes more steps

on own to help businesses


By BEN FELLER
AP White House Correspondent

WASHINGTON Pushing a
campaign to act without Congress,
President Barack Obama moved
unilaterally Friday to boost private
business.
He signed executive order aimed
at spurring economic growth, cap-
ping a week in which Obama sought
to employ the power of his office as
he struggles to make headway on
his jobs bill on Capitol Hill.
Obama's orders direct govern-
ment agencies to shorten the time
it takes for federal research to turn
into commercial products in the
marketplace. The goal is to help
startup companies and small busi-
nesses create jobs and expand their
operations more quickly.
On the other front, Obama called
for creation of a centralized online
site, to be known as BusinessUSA,
for companies to easily find informa-
tion on federal services. The site, a
recommendation of the president's
jobs council, is to be up and running
within 90 days and will be designed
with input from U.S. businesses.
Obama announced both steps in
presidential memos released Friday
morning.
'Today, I am directing my admin-


istration to take two important steps
to help American businesses create
new products, compete in a global
economy, and create jobs here at
home," Obama said. The White
House had no estimate for how
many jobs would be created.
On a larger scale, the president
himself announced two other execu-
tive actions this week, one offering
help for homeowners seeking to
refinance at lower mortgage rates
and the other allowing college stu-
dents to simplify and lower their
student loan payments. The White
House also issued a challenge to
community health centers in a bid
to help get veterans jobs.
White House aides expect more
such actions in coming days.
Obama, up for re-election, is wag-
ing a public campaign to show vot-
ers he is acting on jobs more than
Republicans are.
The Republicans who control the
House counter that their econom-
ic bills have not been considered
in the Senate. And they question
Obama's latest tactic.
"This idea that you're just going to
go around the Congress is just, it's
almost laughable," House Speaker
John Boehner told radio talk show
host Laura Ingraham on Thursday.


I Asktheo


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427












LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 3C


THE WEEK IN REVIEW *THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


s Wiky Stock Expigelighlightsi s OF.OCAL IITEREST .BeKkly DowJo


SNYSE A mex Nasdaq
,803.94 +372.84 2,337.53 +118.36 2,737.15 +99.69


Gainers $2 or more) Gainers ($2or more) Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
ChinaMM 2.34 +1.34+134.0 ChenlereEn11.93 +5.90 +97.8 AdolorCp 4.49 +2.57 +133.9
MediaGen 3.08 +1.39 +82.2 Quepasa 4.41 +1.45 +49.0 Elbitlmg 4.73 +2.05 +76.5
Suntech 3.08 +1.01 +48.8 StreamGSv 3.07 +.98 +46.9 VascoDta 8.95 +3.12 +53.5
iPLEEmM 89.00+28.44 +47.0 HaltwdGp 12.94 +4.05 +45.8 SMTC 204 +.66 +47.8
LDK Solar 4.33+1.33 +44.3 MinesMgt 2.47 +.73 +41.7 TwinDisc 39.49+11.90 +43.1
Unisys 27.28 t8.17 +42.8 GoldRsvg 2.75 +.73 +36.1 FstFHId 7.75 +2.31 +42.5
Jaguarg' 5.72 +1.65 +40.5 Bactern 3.27 +.79 +31.9 Porterp 2.86 +.83 +40.9
Mantowoc 11.96 +3.45 +40.5 QuestRMg 3.55 +.80 +29.1 CrescntF 4.20 +1.20 +40.0
ECDangn 7.56 +2.16 +40.0 Argan 13.84 +3.10 +28.9 InttGold 18.04 +5.10 +39.4
E-House 8.94 +2.55 +39.9 WstC&Ggs 2.64 '+.59 +28.8 Synutra 6.99 +1.97 +39.2

Losers ($2 oor more Losers ($2 or more Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg % Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg
CSVS2xVxS37.25-19.40 -34.2 TellnstEl 6.95 -1.04 -13.0 Healhwys 6.95 -3.69 -84.7
PrUtVJxST 14.29 -7.41 -34.1 Engex 2.07 -.25 -10.8 rrstownF 9.06 -3.97 -30.5
C-TrCVOL 29.74-15.13 -33.7 ElecNmed 3.90 -.41 -9.5 CmprbPr 51.01-20.80 -29.0
CSVS3x[nSlv36.70-16.76 -31:4 Bamwell 3.32 -.28 -7.8 Netlix 84.14-32.90 -28.1
DrxRsaBea30.81-13.22 -30.0 LGLGrp 7.95 -.63 -7.3 Intphse 4.40 -1.22 -21.7
DirLatBear 14.61 -5.88 -28.7 HKN 2.14 -.16 -7.0 TriQuint 5.53 -1.34 -19.5
CSVS2xVxM56.67-22.69-28.6 Aemcntb y 5.95 -.39 -8.1 HumGen 10.97 -2.40 -18.0
DilChiBear 14.85 -5.64 -27.5 OrchldsPP 11.70 -.74 -5.9 CentEuro 5.90 -1.29 -17.9
DirEMBear 16.93 -.02 -26.2 AmBiltr 5.40 -.30 -5.3 NIHldg 24.97 -541 -178
PrUltSCh2528.32 -8.78 -23.7 RFexSolu 2.76 -.15 -5.2 SXCHith 46.54 -988 -175

Most Active (81 or morel Most Active ($1 or more Most Active $1o or more)
Name Vo1(00) Last Chg Name Vol(00) Last Chg Name 'Vol (00) Last Chg
BkofAm 12667578 7.35 +.89 CheniereEn650661 11.93+5.90 Intel 3782798 24.98 +95
S&P50ETF11925030128.60+4.6 Rentedh 328614 1.54 +.32 PwShsQQQ356596058 94.164
SPDRFnd7098442 14.05 +.92 NwGoldg 251671 12.78+1.61 Microsoft 30093C7 26.98 -18
FordM 4856141 12.00 -.26 GoldStrg 249866 2.05 -.01 Cisco 2746514 1856.118
iShEMkts 4215218 42.40+3.55 GrtBasGg 203821 1.49 -.08 SiriusXM 2344118 184 .07
GenElec 3785852 17.25 +.94 NovaGldg 138672 9.44+1.90 MicronT 1854345 5.88 +.42
iShR2K 3780932 76.03+4.90 VantageDi 137184 1.44 +.14 Oracle 1514749 33.69+1.57
DrxFnBul 3693510 16.33+2.66 GtPanSilvg 94443 12.68 +.57 Comcast 1302650 23.85 -.48
SprntNex 3609102 2.72 -.05 NAPallg 89913 3.45 +.55 NewsCpA 1262410 17.80 +.60
MFGlobal3503746 1.20-2.48 DenisnMg 86021 1.63 +.25 Dellinc 1183861 16.31+1.07

Diary Diary Diary
Advanced 2,713 Advanced 378 Advanced 2,140
Declined 459 Dedined 133 Declined 585
NewHighs 225 NewHighs 13 NewHighs 150
NewLows 39 NewLows 11 NewLbws 95
Total issues 3,202 Totalissues 530 Totalissues 2,777
Unchanged 30 Unchanged 19 Unchanged 52
Volume 24,159,749,552 Volume 528,062,014 Volume 10,637,278,298


- .. .. ... .... .-. ..: .: . 7 .
..'. ...; .' "...: .. "' "W ."o.: i
. .. ... .. . , . .A


wmy wiy nlu
Name Ex Div Last Ch%Chg %Chg
AT&Tlnc NY 1.72 29.74 +.61 +2.1 +1.2
AMD NY ... 5.94 +1.22 +25.8 -27.4
Alcoa NY .12 11.57 +1.34 +13.1 -24.8
AutoZone NY ... 327.82 +.32 +0.1 +20.3
BkofAm NY .04 7.35 +.89 +13.8 -44.9
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 34.07 +2.34 +7.4 +3.4
CNBFnPANasd .66 14.52 +.60 +4.3 -2.0
CSXs NY .48 23.11 +1.25 +5.7 +7.3
Chevron NY 3.12 109.4+4.11 +3.9 +20.2
Cisco Nasd .24 18.56 +1.18 +6.8 -8.3
Ciigrprs NY .04 34.16+3.86 +12.7 -27.8
CocaCola NY 1.88 68.93 +.74 +1.1 +4.8
Coming NY .30 15.31 +1.57 +11.4 -20.8
Delhaize NY 2.45 67.80 +2.29 +3.5 -8.0
DrSCBr rs NY ... 28;32 -7.49 -20.9 -39.5
DrxFnBuH NY ... 16.33 + +2. 19.5 -41.4
FamlyDIr NY .72 58.02 -1.08 -1.8 +16.7
FordM NY ... 12.00 -.26 -2.1 -28.5
FMCG s NY 1.00 42.80 +6.22+17.0 -28.7
GenEec NY .60 17.25 +.94 +5.8 -5.7
HomeDp NY 1.00 36.12 -.74 -2.0 +3.0
iShChina25NY .85 37.79 +4.33 +12.9 -12.3
iShEMkts NY .84 42;40 +3.55 +9.1 -11.0
iShR2K NY 1.02 76.03 +4.90 +6.9 -2.8
Intel Nasd .84 24.98 +.95 '+4.0 +18.8
JPMorgChNY 1.00 36.69 +3.27 +9.8 -13.5
Lowes NY .56 2137 -.76 -3.4 -14.8
MF Global NY ... 1.20 -2.48-67.4 -85.6


wNMy wEty u t
Name Ex DIv Last Chg %Chg %Chg


McDnlds NY 2.80
MicronT Nasd ..
Microsoft Nasd .80
MorgStan NY .20
NY Tunes NY
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobttyH If Nasd
NoldaCp NY .55
OciPet NY 1.84
Orade Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY- .28
PwShsQQQNasd .41
PrUShS&PNY ...
RegionsFnNY .04
Ryder NY 1.16
500ETFNY 2.46
SearsHldgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd ..
SouthnCo NY 1.89
rintNex NY
SPDRFndNY .20
TimeWam NY .94
VangEmg NY .82
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48


93.29 +.97 +1.1 +21.5
5.88 +.42 +7.7 -26.7
26.98 -.18 -0.7 -3.3
19.31 +2.34 +13.8 -29.0
7.83 +.62 +8.6 -20.1
57.04 +1.17 +2.1 +9.7
6.75 +1.55 +29.8 -16.8
7.18 +.57 +8.6 -30.4
97.77+11.03+12.7 -.3
33.69 +1.57 +4.9 +7.6
33.08 +.19 +0.6 +2.4
63.20 +.92 +1.5 -3.3
19.82 +.76 +4.0 +13.2
49.97 +.71 +1.4 -3.2
58.94 +1.64 +2.9 8.2
19.30 -1.61 -7.7 -18.8
4.27 +.49 +13.0 -39.0
51.80 +4.71 +10.0 -1.6
128.60 +4.63 +3.7 +2.3
78.69 +3.74 +5.0 .67
1.84 +.07 +3.7 .129
43.31 -.63 -1.4 +13.3
2.72 -.05 -1.8 -35.7
14.05 +.92 +7.0 -11.9
35.47 +.70 +2.0+10.3
43.23 +3.63 +9.2 -10.2
57.15 +.23 +0.4 +6.0
27.08 +.77 +2.9 -12.6


Stock Footnotes: 9g DMdends and earnings In Canadan dollars h = Does nol meal comlnued-fl ng standards
I Late lnng withSEC n Newm pas 52 weeks p l Preferred re Stock haunarlogone a reveru lock spl
ol t last 5percentlt ln I petyesr. R gin tlobuy secaty at a tpeliedprle = Stock hu splt Dy at
lSest 20 percent wclhn th year un t Units. vI= beninucy or receiver *a = When dtiltuled 1la
When iLsue. Al = Wanira
Mutual Fund Foonotes: b = Fee coveing a nkel costs pld from lund essel d = Defterd sales cerge. Mo
redempton tee I. front losd (aeschgem) m Mulple ees arechaige NA notaevaime pipreviouseaya
net sme vasue s = fund sil esa during mne wee f x lufnd paid & dlstrl n urnng Ine mekOanews end
ILosm us be oirth at IleBt$2 to be lised in tbiM t le Most Actives must e worth al least 1. Volume In
hundreds ol shares. Sourl Te AMsocasted Prase Sales fgurs are unolfcl

7O-- v


Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.01 0.02
6-month 0.06 0.05
5-year 1.13 1.07


In-vear


2.32 2.21


Last Pvs Day
Australia .9333 .9323
Britain 1.6119 1.6121
Canada .9934 .9907
Euro .7065 .7034
Japan 75.75 75.94
Mexico 13.0377 13.1313


Dow Jones Industrials 104.83 -207.00 162.42 339.51 22.56
Close:12,231.11 '
1-week change: 422.32 (3.6%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000 ...... ...................... ......


1 2 ,0 00 - ..... ....".....



11,000



10,000... ..... ...... ...
10,000 .......................... .................................................... ......
M J J A S O


. t/ .IIM Iw'A "' '

Total Asset Total RturnlRank Pct MnInInt
Name Obj ($Wins) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt


PIMCOTotRetls Cl
Vanguard TotSUdx LB
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Rdelity Contra LG
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American Funds GrthAmA m LG
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard SOAdmi LB
vanguard TotSIAam LB
Amencar. Funds CpWdGrIA m WS
Amencan Funds InvCoAnA m LB
Douge CoxImlSi FV
Amencan Funds WAMuflnvA m LV
Doage & CoxSlocb 'LV
FrariTemp-Frankln tncomeA m CA
Vanguard InsiPus LB
PIMCO TotRetAdm b CI
Vanguard TotBdAdml CI
American Funds EurPacGrA m FB
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard TotinI d. FB
American Funds FnlnvA m LB
Vanguard WelltnAdm MA
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCOTotRetA m Cl
Vanguard5001nv LB
FranTemp-Templton GIBondAdv IB


143,222
54,584
52,811
52,421
52,251
51,434
48,664
46,205
43,815
43,482
39,741
35,768
34,692
34,245
32,845
32,673
31,525
'30,034
.29,151
28,742
28,698
27,768
26,965
26,896
26,312
25,318
25.305


10.83 +0.6
32.09 +12.3
50.15 +6.7
70.25 +9.7
117.71 +11.8
30.21 +10.6
16.87 +7.5
118.50 +11.8
32.10 +12.4
34.20 +11.8
27.89 +11.5
33.27 +14.7
28.60 +10.5
105.40 +12.6
2.15 +7.6
117.72 +11.8
10.83 +0.5
,10.94 -0.2
39.09 +13.1
18.57 +8.2
14.86 +13.7
36.58 +12.3
54.88 +8.2
28.22 +11.4
10.83 +0.5
118.48 +11.8
13.28 +4.9


+0.8/E
+10.7/A
+4.6/B
+9.3/C
+10.8/A
+5.1/E
+7.4/B
+10.8/A
+10.8/A
-0.5/D
+5.3/E
-3.9/E
+12.6/A
+5.4/D
47.1/A
+10.8/A
40.6/E
+4.5/B
-3.2/D
.+9.2/A
-2.4/D
+7.0/D
+8.3/A
+3.1/C
+0.4/E
+10.6/B
+3.4/C


+7.9/A
+1.3/B
+2.0/D
+4.0/8
+0.8/8
+0.8/D
+2.4/C
+0.8/B
+1.4/B
+1.3/8
+0.1/C
0.0/A
+0.7/B
-2.8/-
+3.7/C
+0.8/B
+7.6/A
+6.4/B
+1.5/A
+3.2/B
-0.2/B
+1.7/A
+4.3/A
+3.0/A
+7.4/A
+0.7/B
+10.9/A


NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500
NL 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
4.25 1,000
NL 200,000,000
NL 1,000,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL -3,000
5.75 250
NL 50,000
5.75 250
3.75 1,000
NL 3,000
NL 50,000


Switzerlnd .8621 .8593 CACmserv~ithcAlocmon,O -r TeainW Bon ES uop S FB-Fo Lagse i FG FoGn FV-o
Lame Vdnd e U dol aB. lllooca ilBl.laBsbed, .LG nGtthLV.e i,MA4r M iM Cpn,-
British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth- lWCVle,SH spedayea.. WS -WO Stk TFR : CNg i h eds rinhvest ed Raerkl bd: peifoned
ers show dollar In foreign currency. o wftha sau tecdo:Ais ntp2a EI bon m20%,. Mi kAwtM mnm $nedID kwtinWA San: Mtnt.


Wkly YTD Wly
Name Div Yd PE Chg %Chg Last


14 +.46 -4.4 11.65
10 +4.02 -17.2 48.74
... +1.12 -44;0 9.17
... +.02 -85.2 2.71
15 +.61 +1.2 29.74
19 +.36 +13.2 5422
18 +3.68 +27.4 61.76
4 +1.22 -27.4 5.94
8 +2.51 +33.2 40.63
15 +5.62 -1.3 40.89
... +.18 4.1 2.84
12 +1.34 -24.8 11.57
26 +.26 -14.8 27.16
65 +4.83 -55.8 26.56
17 +.11 +11.9 27.56
12 +2.55 -7.8 28.42
10 +.29 +9.6 39.42
13 +3.64 +21.4 52.10
... +2.33 -45.4 26:34
11 +5.28 -15.3 48.74
50 +4.70 +10.0 83.74
S6 +.97 -5.2 16.98
17 -1.19 +4.3 47.99
11 +3.16 -41.9 22.14
14 +3.64 -42.3 20.22.
10 +1.75 +.9 30.34
16 +1.27 +11.8 .34.89
11 -4.57 -35.1 .18.87
15 +.86 -9.1 23.91
... +8.08 -10.5 83.15
19 +6.40 +6.5 60.89
... +1.90 -6.8 18.91
... +.67-15.4 9.01
... +1.05 -29.7 9.56
... +.89 -44.9 7.35
10 +1.84 -25.8 22.41
... +1.44 -20.6 13.12
...-7.53 -3.6 36.26
12 +6.26 -4.4 50.85
15 +.36 +9.0 55.17
16 +2.51 -.2 79.96
9 +.42 -22.7 26.50
... +1.03 +6.4 15.06
13 +3.58 +4.5 68.17
16 +.42 -23.2 5.81
16 -.47 +21.2 32.09
23 +3.69 -7.3 18.98
16 +.89 +35.4 25.80
8 +1.93 +27.2 46.63
14 +.14 +13.5 21.11
14 +1.25 +7.3 23.11
15 +1.29 +6.0 36.84
11 -2.43 -36.0 15.14
21 +2.03 +2.1 51.78
... +3.42 -17.1 36.82
59 +6.21 -.4 64.57
6 +3.61 +10.2 48.90
34 -.09 -9.3 '6.44
15 +1.04 -21.7 36.12
15 +9.48 +3.4 96.85
... +.91 -57.0 4.43
18 +.06 +35.4 21.29
13 +.77 -22.1 35.96
10 +1.93 +14.8 29.74
10 +4.11 +20.2 109.64
5 +.15 -26.0 3.04
9 +3.86 -27.8 34.16
7+12.78' -6.7. 72.811
22 +5.82 +20.0 66.36
13 +.74 +4.8 68.93
13 +:99 +6.1 26.56
12 +1.54 -38.6 25.92
14 -.01 +11.9 25.27
10 -.09 +5.3 71.74
17 +5.29 -4.1 46.75
16 -1.72 +17.1 58.04
19 +1.19 +29.9 39.80
7 +1.57 -20.8 15.31
13 +2.92 +5.7 48.25


Name Dv YId
CSVS2xVxS... .
CSVellVSts...
Cummins 1.60 1.6
DRHorton .15 1.3
DTE 2.35 4.5
Danaher .10 .2
Deere 1.64 2.1
DelaAir ...
DenburyR ... .
DeutschBk 1.07 2.3
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBrrs ...
DrxEMBull 1.10 .1
DrxEnBear ... .
DrxFnBull ... ...
DirxSCBull .. ...
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 1,1
DomRescs 1.97 3.8
DowChm 1.00 3.4
DukeEngy 1.00 4.9
DukeRlty .68 5.4
EMC Cp ...
Eatons .1.36 2.9
EPasoCp...04 .2
EldorGldg .12 ...
EmersonE 1.38 .8-
EnCanag .80 .3.6
E(coRes .16 1.2
Exelon 2.10 4.7
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.3
FMCTchs ... ...
FstHorizon .04 .5
RrstEngy 2.20 4.8
FordM
ForestOils ...
FMCGs 1.00 2.3
FrontierCm .75 11.9
Gannett .32 2.6
Gap .45 2.3
GenGQPrh .40 2.7
GenMills 1.22 3.1
GenMon ...
GeiOn En ...
Genworh ...
Gerdau .25 2.6
Goldcrpg .41 .8
GoldmanS 1.40 1.2
Goodyear ...
HCP Inc 1.92 4.8
Hallibrtn .36 .9
HartfdFn .40 2.0
HItMgmt ...
HfthSprg
HeclaM,
Hess ..40 ,6
HewlettP .48 1.7
HollyFrts .35 1.1
HomeDp 1.00 2.8
Honwillntl 1.49 2.8
HostHots .16 1.1
Huntsmn .40 3.1
ING
iShGold
ISAstla 1.06 4.3
IShBraz 3.42 5.3
IShGer .67 3.0
IShHK .42 2.5
iShJapn .17 1.7
iSTaiwn .29 ...
IShSilver ...
iShChina25 .85 2.2
ISSP500 2.45 1.9
IShEMkis. .84 2.0
iShB20T 3.94 3.5
iSEafe 1.68 3.0
IShlBxHYB7.23 8.0
IShR2K 1.02 1.3
iShREst 2.18 3.8


Wky YTD Wkly
PE Chg %Chg Last
...-19.40 -42.4 37.25
... +1.06 -38.7 7.33
12 +8.53 -6.6 102.75
97 +.78 -2.7 11.61
13 +.41 +15.4 52.30
19 +3.95 +7.8 50.86
13 +6.44 -5.3 78.67
12 -.15 -32.5 8.51
25 +.94 -11.7 16.85
... +8.08 -10.1 46.80
... -7.49 -39.5 28.32
... -9.07 -23.4 36.18
... +4.82 -46.7 22.02
... -2.39 -49.2 11.45
... +2.66 -41.4 16.33
.. +8.84 -28.6 51.69
7 +1.33 +32.1 24.48
15 +1.05 -3.5 36.21
17 -.70 +20.2 51.37.
12 +2.01 -14.3 29.25
14 -.09 414.9 20.46
... +1.30 +1.0 12.58
25 +1.00 +9.3 25.03
13 +4.72 -7.5 46.97
34 -+.45 +84.9-.-25.44-
47 +2.66 +5.9 19.66
-16, +2.19 *.4 491,-
40 +1.54 -22.9 2245
..'+1.50 -30.68 13:48
12 +1.26 +7.0 44.57
10 +1.35 +11.4 81.48
30 +2.99 +6.0 47.12
30 +.37 -38.1 7.29
19 -.45 +22.7 45.41
6 -.26 -28.5 12.00
11 +.72 -53.9 12.59
7 +6.22 -28.7 42.80
39 +.15 -35.5 6.28
6 +1.01 -19.4 12.17
11 +.62 -12.3 19.33
... +1.28 -4.7 14.76
15 -.66 +9.9 39.13
7 +2.10 -28.2 26.45
... +.29 -17.8 3.13
... +.85 -47.9 6.85
... +1.68 -32.3 9.47
20 +5.43 +8.S 50.06
18+13.77 -31.1 115.86
... +1.87 +25.2 .14.84
34 +2.22 +9.2 40.19
14 +5.63 -4.2 39.13
5 +1.07 -23.5 20.26
12 +.36 -6.8 8.89
13+14.02+104.2 54.18
24 +1.00 -42.0 6.53
12 +5.86 -14.2 65.66
7 +2.56 -33.6 27.94
16 -1.67 +56.3 31.86
16 -.74 +3.0 36.12
14 +2.60 +1.4 53.88
... +1.14 -18.4 14.59
10 +2.63 -17.1 12.94
+.83 -2.0 9.59
... +1.02 +22.4 17.01
... +1.85 -2.2 24.87
... +6.96 -16.7 64.51
... +1.75 -5.5 22.62
.. +1.15 -10.9 16.86
... +.39 -8.5 9.98
... +.72 -14.9 13.29
... +3.79 +13.6 34.27
...,+4.33 -12.3 37.79
...+4.72 +2.2 129.05
.. +3.55 -11.0 42.40
.. -1.67 +18.4 111.46
...+3.17 -5.1 55.25
... +2.20 -.2 90.12
... +4.90 -2.8 76.03
... +3.64 +3.6 58.00


:.. ...^^ to frt c ..:-;. ..e:.. .;iK
- -" : ' " .' " -" : -'-" ":- :- .- % ...'. .. ..'. .' '.-..' ",. . '..'...". .: .;.,. ,


You've Spent a Lifetime

Preparing for Retirement.



4 Now What?

If you'rerecently retired or planning to retire, you're probably
concerned about making the right financial decisions.
Together, we Can find the answers.
We'll sit down, face to face, to develop a strategy designed to
help your finances meet your needs over the long haul.
............ --- --------------- ----- ----------- -- ----- ------ ---- ------ ----
To develop a retirement income strategy that works for you,
call or visit today.


Steve ones,CFMP.. -
Financial Advisor

2929 West U S-.lighway 90
Suite 114
Lake City, FL 32055
386-752-3847




www.edwarnones.com Member SIPC
------------


Wly YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last
ITW 1.44 2.9 12 1.77 -8.0 49.13
IngerRd .48 1.5 ... +4.40 -31.3 32.34
IBM 3.00 1.6 15 +5.82 +27.7 187.45
IntlGame .24 1.4 .21 +1.47 +.2 17.72
IntPap 1.05 3.6 10 +2.88 +5.8 28.81
Interpublic .24 2.4 19 +1.49 -6.6 9.92
Invesco .49 2.3 11 +2.16 -13.1 20.90
ItauUnibH .84. 4.3 ... +1.59 -17.4 19.75
JPMorgCh 1.00 2.7 8 +3.27 -13.5 36.69
Jabil .32. 1.5 12 +1.40" +6.1 21'32
JanusCap .20 2.8 7 +.68 -44.3 7.22
Jefferies .30 2.0 10 +1.96 -44.7 14.72
JohnJn 2.28 3.5 16 +1.82 +6.1 65.60
JohnsnCtl .64 1.9 14 +.93 -12.0 33.62
JnprNtwk ... ... 26 +3.69 -32.8 24.81
KBHome .25 3.3 ... '-.06 -44.6 7.471
KeyEngy ... ... 12 +2.44 +3.2 13.39
Keycorp .12 1.6 7 +.38 -17.2 7.33,
KimbClk 2.80 4.0 17 -2.63 +11.6 70.37
Kimco .72 4.0 99 +1.58 -.8 17.90
KindMorn 1.20 4.1 ... +.18 -6.3 29.10
Kinrossg .12 .8 21 +1.01 -22.4 14.71
KodiakOg ...... ....+.93 +9.8 7.25
Kohls 1.00 1.9 13 -1.12 -2.3 53.07
Kraft 1.16 3.3 20 +.20 +12.3 35.40
LDK Solar ... ... 2 +1.33 -57.2 4.33
LSICorp ... ... 12 +.43 +5.0 6.29
LVSands ... ... 28 +6.84 +4.7 48.13.
LennarA .16 .9 36 +.32 -9.1 17.05
UllyEli 1.96 5.1 9 +.21 +9.2 38.28
UncNat .20 .9 6 +2.37 -23.0 21.40
LzClaib- ... ...... +.56 +18.3 8.47


y:. No, :asdaq Most-Active


WkMy YT WdMy
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASMLHId .58 1.3 ... +3.05 +13.6
AcmePkt ... ... 52 +6.46 -30.7
ActivsBliz .17 1.2 24 -.03 +8.2
AdobeSy ... ... 16 +1.72 -5.7
AdolorCp :. ... ...+2.57+271.1
AkamaT .. ... 28 +4.44 -39.9
AlteraCpIf .32 .8 15 +2.89 +12.3
Amazon ... ... ...-17.46 +20.7
ACapAgy 5.6020.2 4 +.01 -3.6
AmCapLtd ... ... 3 +1.01 +6.2
Amgen 1.12 2.0 14 -1.35 +4.3
AmkorTIf ... ... 7 +.06 -35.6
Apollolnv 1.12 13.1 6 +.72 -22.8
Apple Inc ... ... 15+12.08 +25.5
ApldMat .32 2.5 9 +.93 -10.2
AriadP ... ...... +.93+133.3
ArmHId .15 .5 ... +2.26 +40.4
Arris ... ... 21 -.07 -.9
ArubaNet ... ... 42+1.90 +19.6
Atmel ... ... 9 +.63 -9.5
Autodesk ... ... 33 +4.05 -6.2
AutoData 1.44 2.7 20 +.35 +13.7
AvagoTch .44 1.3 15 -.25 +18.2
AvisBudg ... ... 13 +2.40 -6.0
BMCSft ... ... 14 -3.34 -25.3
Baidu ... ... 67+22.48 +49.8
Biogenldc ... ... 27 +9.88,+77.1
BrigExp ... ... 51 -.05 +34.0
Broadcom .36 1.0 22 -.58 -15.9
BrcdeCm ... ... 19 +.23 -14.7
CAInc .20 .9 13 +.25 -9.1
Cadence ... ... 26 +.94 +34.4
Celgene ... ... 28 -.74 +11.9
CentAl ... ... 13 +2.51 -21.9
Cemers ... ... 42 -1.73 +37:4
CienaCorp .. ...... +1.15 -34.3
Cirrus ... ... 7 +2.95 +9.4
Cisco .24 1.3 16 +1.18 -8.3


28.29
39.94
217.32
27.71
8.03
57.24
4.77
8.55
404.95
12.62
11.90
29.14
11.12
24.98
11.15
35.83
52.60
33.59
14.62
35.21
144.62
118.72
36.49
36.64
4.51
22.21
11.10
66.19
12.13
65.10
13.82
17.49
18.56


Name Dlv
Ctriys ...
Clearwire .
Coinstar ...
Comcast .45
Comcspcl .45
Costco .96
Cree Inc
Crocs
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc ..
Dndreon
DrecTVA ...
DishNetwk ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips .12
E-lrade ...
eBay
ElectArts ...
EricsnTel .37
Exelixds
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
F5Netwks ...
Fastenals .56
FfthThird .32
Fnlsar
FstNIagara .64
FstSolar ...
Flextn
Fortinets ..
FultonFnd .20
GTAdvTc .
GileadSci ...
Google .
GreenMtC .
HercOffsh.
HudsCity .32
HumGen


WMy YTD WMy
YId PE Chg %Chg Last
... 41 +8.93 +7.3 73.37
... ... +.45 -61.2 2.00
... 19 -1.88 -12.8 49.22
1.9 17 -.48 +9.1 23.85
1.9 16 -.61 +12.7 23.33
1.1 26 -.37 +17.6 84.93
.31 +3.17 -57.7 27.84
.15 +1.99 +.7 17.24
1.8 23 +1.15 +6.2 19.73
9 +1.07 +20.4 16.31
... ... +.93 -67.7 11.29
... 15 -.89 +14.0 45.53
9 -1.47 +24.3 24.44
6.3 17 +.74 -5.4 16.53
... 15 +.30 -47.2 2.90
... 48 +1.62 -27.3 11.63
... 24 +1.13 +19.5 33.25
..... +.52 +47.1 24.10
3.4 ... +.84 -5.3 10.92
... ... +1.61 -7.4 7.60
1.0 16 -.54 +8.7 27.28
... 18 +7.56 -13.6 46.70
... 37+18.71 -17.3 107.63
1.5 34 +3.25 +28.9 38.62
2.6 10 +.65 -16.1 12.31
... 24 +4.28 -28.0 21.38
6.8 13 +.49-32.8 9.39
... 9 +.22 -58.5 53.99
9 +.09 -14.9 6.68
... 58 +5.42 +42:6 23.06
2.1 14 -.01 -5.7 9.75
... 6 +1.91 -1.9 8.95
... 12 +1.32 +18.1 42.79
.19 +9.65 +1.0 600.14
... 69 +3.14+116.0 70.99
... .. +.50 +17.8 4.10
5.1 ... +.11 -50.6 6.29
... ... -2.40 -54.1 10.97


Name


W.y YTD Wkly
Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last


Illumina
Intel .84
JA Solar .
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
JoyGlbl .70
KLATnc 1.40
LamResrch ...
ibtlntAh ...
LifeTech
LinearTch .96
luluemngs ...
MarvelT ..
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .88
MelcoCrwn ...
MicronT
Microsoft .80
NIl Hldg
NasdOMX ...
NetApp
Netflix
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
NuanceCm ..
Nvidia
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
PMC Sra
Paccar .72
PacEthrsh ...
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.28
PeopUtdF .63
Polycoms ...
Popular
Power-One..


41 +4.84 -49.2
11 +.95 +18.8
2 +.27 -65.2
41 +2.12 -12.7
20 +.23 -31.2
17 +9.37 +5.1
10 +4.05 +22.5
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14 +1.41 +5.6
23 +3.36 -22.5
14 +2.38 -4.2
55 +7.84 +69.4
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68 +1.96 +89.3
39 +.42 -26.7
10 -.18 -3.3
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25 +3.49 -24.3
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28 +1.45 +47.0
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12 +1.25 -20.9
19 +1.57 +7.6
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18 +3.43 -22.9
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12 +2.60 +1.0
20 +.90 -5.0
24 +.94 -7.1
28 +.85 -10.9
.. +.10 -39.5
4 -.14 -51.9


AESCorp ... .
AFLAC 1.32 2.8
AK Steel .20 2.2
AMR
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.8
AbtLab 1.92 3.5
Accenture 1.35 2.2
AMD ...
Aetna .60 1.5
Agilent ...
AlcatelLuc '
.Alcoa .12 1.0
Allstate .84 3.1
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.64 6.0
AMovllLs .28 1.1
AEP 1.88 4.8'
AmExp .72 1.4
AmintlGrp ...
Ameriprise .92 1.9
Anadarko .36 .4
Annaly 2.51 14!8
Aon Corp .60 1.3
ArcelorMit .75 3.4
ArchCoal .44 2.2
ArchDan .64 2.1
ATMOS 1.36 3.9
Avon .92 4.9
BB&TC .64 2.7
BHPBillLt 2.02 2.4
BakrHu .60 1.0
BcoBrades .80 4.2
BcoSantSA .84 9.3
BcoSBrasil 1.65 17.3
BkofAm .04 .5
BkNYMel .52 2.3
Barclay .36 2.7
BariPVixrs ...
BarrickG .60 1.2
Baxter 1.24 2.2
BerkH B ...
BestBuy .64 2.4
Blackstone .40 2.7
Boeing 1.68 2.5
BostonSci ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.1
CBREGrp... .
CBSB .40 1.6
CIGNA .04 .1
CMSEng .84 4.0
CSXs .48 2.1
CVS Care .50 1.4
CblvsNYs .60 4.0
Cameron
CdnNRsgs .36
CPRwyg 1.20
CapOne. .20 .4
CapifSrce .04 .6
Carnival 1.00 2.8
Caterpillar 1.84 1.9
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 3.7
Cntryink 2.90 8.1
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Chevron 3.12 2.8
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CliffsNRs 1.12 1.5
Coach .90 1.4
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ConAgra .96 3.8
ConocPhil 2.64 3.7
ConsolEngy.40 .9
ConEd 2.40 4.1
ConstellEn .96 2.4
Coming .30 2.0
Covidien .90 1.9


YId


WMy 'TD WMC y
PE Cha %Cha Last


2.3 ... +3.48 +.3 34.50
21 +.84 -41.0 6.64
...-2.48 -85.6 1.20
14.3 7 +.53 -14.5 6.98
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1'.3 13 +1.62 +24.3 31.46
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1.8 ... +4.77 -27.4 45.59
... +1.06 -20.0 13.74
2.1 6 +2.16 +24.4 27.97
2.7 ... -.03 -4.3 37.32
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2.8 18 +.59 +13.2 30.95
3.0 ... +.88 -22.0 9.88
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... +2.67 -50.7 14.40
.. 16 +7.41 -9.4 55.50
2.7 12 +1.19 -4.3 35.48
4.3 13 +1.76 -2.6 35.11
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1.6 26 +1.60 +9.8 76.43
... 43 +1.13 -58.3 9.86
1.6 14 +4.51 +35.2 35.89
1.0 11 +2.34 -29.0 19.31
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... 13 +1.44 +29.3 19.87
... 19 +3.83 -18.8 19.05
... ... -.02 -64.9 .59



Wly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last


... +1.64
6 -.05
19 +1.68
... -1.82
23 +1.21
26 +.36
4 -1.47
59 +7.14
83 +4.52
11 +3.62
15 +.97
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39 +1.71
21 +.25
32+17.63
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20 +.44
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Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg
NatGrid 2.92 5.8 ... -.81
NOilVarco .44 .6 17+10.01.
NYCmtyB 1.00 7.4 12 +1.08
NewellRub .32 2.1 13 +1.92
NewfldExp ... ... 9 +5.27
NewmtM 1.40 2.0 15 +5.86
Nexen g .20 ... ... +.40
NextEraEn2.20 3.9 14 +1.17
NiSource .92 4.1 20, -.15
NobleCorp .53 1.4 28 +2.80
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NorflkSo 1.72 2.3 15 +4.08
Nucor -1.45 3.7 20 +2.51
OcciPet 1.84 1.9 14+11.03
OfficeDpt ... ...... +.27
OIISvHT 1.58 .8 ...+14.21
PG&EGp 1.82 4.2 16 -.06
PNC 1.40 2.5 9 +1.01
PPLCorp 1.40 4.7 12 +.28
PatriotCoal ... ......+3.40
PeabdyE .34 .7 14 +7.95
Penney .80 2.4 19 +.19
PepsiCo 2.06 3.3 16 +.92
PetrbrsA 1.34 5.2 ... +3.73
Petrobras 1.26- 4.6--.. -&70-
Pfizer .80 4.0 13 +.76
PhilipMor 3.08-"4.3 .-15 .1
PlainsEx ... ... 2
Potashs .28 .6 1 +.71
PSUSDBull... ...... -.38
PrinFnd .70 2.6 9 +1.02
ProLogis 1.12 3.7 ... +2.33
ProShtS&P... ... ... -165
PrUShS&P ... ... ...-1.61
ProUQQQ .... ...... +4.84
PrUShQQQrs... ..... -2.67
ProUltSP .31 .6 ... +3.41
ProUShL20... ...... +.53
ProUSSP500... ... ... -1.74
ProUSSIvrs... ... ...-3.19
ProUShEuro... ...... -.68
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.1 12 +.88
ProUSR2Krs... ... ... -6.40
Prudent 1.15 2.0 8 +4.07
PulteGrp ... ...... +.60
RadianGrp .01 .4 ... +.09
RadioShk .50 4.1 8 -1.07
Raytheon 1.72 4.0 8 -.43
RegionsFn /.04 .9 25 +.49
Renrenn ... ... ...+1.28
RioTinto 1.17 2.0 ... +7.74
RiteAid ... ... ... +.10
RylCarb .40 1.3 12 +2.95
SLMCp .40 2.9 14 .-.34
SpdrDJIA 3.23 2.6 ... +4.19
SpdrGold .........+10.10
SPMid 1.64 '1.0 ... +8.92
S&P500ETF2.46 1.9 ... +4.63
SpdrHome .31 1.9 ... +.56
SpdrS&PBk .26 1.3 ... +1.04
SpdrLehHY4.28 10.2 ... +.80
SpdrLel-3bll...
SpdrS&PRB.40 1.7 .. +1.27
SpdrRetl .49 .9 ... +1.49
SpdrOGEx .50 .9 ....+4.09
SpdrMetM .42 .7 ... +8.06
Safeway .58 2.9 12 +.90
StJude .84 2.1 14 +.05
Saks ... ... 22 +.74
SandRdge ... ... 34 +1.04
SaraLee .46 2.5 9 +.40
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.3 22 +8i58
Schwab .24 f. 9 9 +.60
SemlHTr .64 2.0 ... +1.93
SiderurNac .81 8.2 ... +1.82
SllvWhtng .12 .3 27 +6.17
SlIvrcpM g .08 .. 22 +1.77
SouthnCo 1.89 4.4 18 -.63
SwstAirl .02 .2 40 -.09


YTD Wkly Wkly YTD Wy
%Ch Las I Name Div YId PE Ch %Cha Last


+13.0 50.13
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-28.4. 13.49
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-41.8 42.00
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-.3 97.77
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-9.3 55.07
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-24.3 25.87
-27.0 -27.64-
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-6.8 21.16
-17.1 26.98
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-8.3 40.19
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-71.9 11.05
-15.6 17.15
-2.0 19.47
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-2.4 57.30
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-68.5 2.54
-33.7 12.25
-5.3 43.54'
-39.0 4.27
-61.0 7.02
-18.8 58.18
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-35.3 30.40
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+22.3 169.62
+.4 165.41
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-4.7 16.58
-21.3 20.40
-1.3 39.20
... 45.84
-8.6 24.18
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-14.4 58.88
-12.2 19.75
-6.2 40.08
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-9.0 75.96
-24.8 12.86
.. 32.54
-40.7 9.89
-7.9 35.97
-22.9 9.89
+13.3 43.31
-32.4 8.78


SwstnEngy ...
SpectraEn 1.12 3.8
SprntNex ...
SPMatlls .82 2.3
SP HthC .64 1.9
SPCnSt .85 2.7
SP Consum.61 1.5
P Engy 1.08 1.5
PDRFndcl .20 1.4
SP Inds .69 2.0
SPTech .36 1.4
SPUtII 1:36 3.9
StdPac
StarwdHI .30 .6
StateStr .72 1.7
StllwtrM ... ...
Suncorgs .44 ...
Suntech
SunTrst .20 1.0
Supvalu .35 4.2
Synovus .04 2.6
Sysco 1.04 3.7
TaiwSemi .52 4.1
TalismEg .27 ...
Target .120 2.2,
TeckResg .60.;...
relffEsp 92.14 *9.6"
TenetHth ...
Teradyn
Terex
Tesoro
Texlnst .68 2.2
Textron .08 .4
ThermoFis ..
3M Co 2.20 2.7
TWCable 1.92 3.1
TimeWam .94 2.7
Total SA 2.38 4.4
Transocn .79 1.3-
Travelers 1.64 2.8
TrinaSolar ...
Tyson .16 .8
UBSAG .. ...
USAirwy '.. ...
UnlonPac 1.90 1.9
UtdCont ...
UtdMicro .19 8.3
UPSB 2.08 2.9
USBancrp .50 1.9
US NGsrs ... .
USOUFd
USSteel .20 .7
UtdhlthGp .65' 1.3
UnumGrp .42 1.7
Vale SA. 1.14 4.3
ValeSApf 1.14 4.6
ValeroE .20 .7
VangEmg .82 1.9
VerizonCm2.00 5.3
Visa .88 .9
Walgm .90 2.7
WsteMInc 1.36 4.0
Weathflnt .
WellsFargo .48 1.8
WendysCo .08 1.6
WDogtal .
WstnReinr ...
WstnUnlon .32 1.8
Weyerh .60 3.3
WmsCos 1.00 3.2
XLGrp .44 2.0
Xerox .17 2.0
Yamanag .18 1.2
YingliGm ...


25 +3.96 +18.1 44.21
17 +.91 +16.7 29.17
... -.05 -35.7 2.72
... +262 -6.3 35.99
... +1.10 +8.6 34.21
+.04 +7.5 31.51
.. +.31 +5.9 39.63
... +4.49 +7.0 73.04
+.92 -11.9 14.05
... +1.59 -1.7 34.26
... +.95 +5.1 26.48
... +.13 +11.7 35.01
-.05 -31.7 3.14
16 +3.75 -14.5 51.98
13 +3.23 -9.3 42.01
13 +3.26 -41.7 12.45
15 +3.23 -13.0 33.31
3 +1.01 -61.5 3.08
20 +2.06 -30.1 20.63
69 +.30 -13.9 8.29
... +.25 -40.9 1.56
14 +.98 -5.0 27.93
... +.56 +1.6 12.74
... +1.11 -32.4 14.99
13," ,00 -8.'1-55.24
..-'+7.22 -32.4 41.81
..!+1i.6 -2.1 22.34
2 +.20 -24.2 5.07
11 +1.46 +7.0 15.02
... +3.92 -42.5 17.86
9 +.70 +46.2 27.10
13 +1.21 -3.1 31.50
19 +1.23 -14.1 20.30
15 -1.86 -7.2 51.40
14 +.52 -6.1 81.00
14-8.39 -5.4 62.48
14 +.70 +10.3 35.47
.. +1.90 +1.9 54.49
... +5.56 -13.7 59.99
16 +2.13 +6.8 59.48
2 +2.13 -60.4 9.28
9 +.78 +13.7 19.58
... +1.39 -16.0 13.84
11 +.07 -40.7 5.94
16'+5.06 +10.1 102.02
13 -1.03 -18.6 19.40
7 +.20 -27.8 2.28
17 +1.43 -1.5 71.49
12 +.64 -3.5 26.03
... +.19 -24.8 9.01
... +2.18 -7.6 36.03
... +4.49 -52.3 27.86-
11 +.93 +35.3 48.85
8 .. +.1 24.24
... 43.81 -23.0 26.62
... +3.49 -17.7 24.86
22 +3.02 +15.5 26.70
... +3.63 -10.2 43.23
15 +.21 +5.2 37.63
19 +1.67 +35.1 95.10
12 -.33 -13.2 33.81
16 -.19 -8.5 33.72
63 +1.26 -28.6 16.29
10 +.77 -12.6 27.08
... +.44 +10.2 5.09
8 +1.33 -19.5 27.30
16 +.03 +60.4 16.97
12 +.82 -3.0 18.01
5 +1.21 -3.3 18.30
22 +1.09 +26.4 31.25
30 +1.02 +3.4 22.56
14 +.70 -26.0 8.53
18 +1.20 +21.5 15.55
3 +1.20 -51.6 4.78


AM .sP~t;iss
.. ,, -;'.7 ;' .. -
. .o .: -. C\ .,.. ~ ,. .,


Wk YTD WMy
Dlv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx ...
AlexcoRg ...
AlldNev ...
AntaresP ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalRaren ...
Banrog
BarcGSOH ..
Brigus grs ...
BrtATob 3.86
CAMAC En ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci
CFCdag .01
CentGoldg ...
ChenilreEn...
ChenlereE 1.70
ChinNEPet...
ChinaShen ...
DejourE g ...
DenisnMg ...
ExeterRgs ...
ExtorreGg ...
FrkStPrp .76
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy ...
GenMoly ...
GoldenMin ...
GoldStrg .
GranTrrag ..
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSlvg ...
ImpOilgs .44
InovioPhm..
IntTowerg ...
LadThalFn ...
MadCatz ...


+.07 +5.3
+.07 -56.7
+1.03 -1.5
+4.29 +50.4
+.07 +34.7
+.54 -19.7
+.41 -43.8
+.67 +12.9
+1.51 -7.6
+.25 -33.8
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+.41 -38.2
-.04 -2.0
+.11 -53.1
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+.81 +23.6
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+.39 -53.1
+.30 -76.5
+.00 +10.6
+.25 -52.3
+.26 -39.5
+.11 +19.2
+.80 -8.6
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+.02 -38.3
+.71 -40.7
-.07 -71.7
-.01 -55.3
+.33 -19.8
-.08 -49.7
+.57 -4.6
+2.19 +5.8
+.08 -42.2
+.59 -47.2
+.12 +57.3
+.13 -20.6


Name Div
Metalico ...
MetroHlth ...
MdwGoldg ...
Minend g ...
NeoStem ...
Neoprobe ...
Nevsun g .06
NwGoldg ...
NAPallg ...
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NovaGldg ...
Oilsandsg ...
ParaG&S
PhmAth ...
PionDrill ...
Quaterrag ...
Quepasa ..
QuestRMg ...
Raree g ...
Rentech
RexahnPh
Richmntg
Rubicon g
SamsO&G ...
TanzRyg
Taseko ...
TmsatlPet ...
TrValley ...
TriangPet ...
Ur-Energy....
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDrl ...
VimetX
VistaGold ...
YM Bio ...


Wkly YTD Wldy
Yld PE Chg %Chg Last
... 10 +.38 -20.4 4.68
... 10 +1.00 +49.9 6.70
...... +.33+181.0 2.36
... ... +1.46 +34.1 14.80
... ... +.05 -50.4 .70
25 +.12 +43.7 2.96
1.1 27 +.75 -28.0 5.42
... ... +1.61 +30.9 12.78
...... +.55 -50.3 3.45
...... +1.44 -39.3 8.68
...... +2.64 -9.5 24.63
... 1.90 -33.8 9.44
+.03 -39.0 .26
14 +.45 -28.6 2.85
... ... +.10 -57.7 1.79
... ... +2.09 +25.2 11.03
...... +.08 -55.6 .88
... ... +1.45 -62.3 4.41
S...+.80 -37.1 3.55
.. ... +1.36 -57.8 6.78
+.32 +26.2 1.54
-.09 -4.5 1.07
... +2.32+145.6 12.55
+.61 -26.3 4.21
-.02 +85.6 2.45
+.32 -45.8 3.96
... ... +.56 -27.4 3.81
... 4 +.09 -75.7 .81
... ... -.00 -67.2 .19
... ... +1.04 -7.1 6.04
... ... +.16 -55.9 1.32
... ... +.28 -42.9 2.28
... ... +.33 -43.0 3.44
... ... +.14 -29.1 1.44
... ...+3.98 +31.9 19.58
7 +.66 +59.4 3.81
... ... +.03 -26.2 1.72


Name Dlv
LyonBasA .80
MEMC
MF Global
MFAFnd 1.00
MGIC
MGM Rsts ...
Macys .40
Manitowoc .08
ManpwrGp .80
Manulifeg .52
MarathnOs .60
MarathPn 1.00
MktVGold .40
MktVRus .18
MarlntA .40
MarshM .88
Masco .30
McDrmlnt ...
Mechel
MedcoHlth ...
Medtmic .97
Merck 1.52
MetLife .74
MetroPCS ...
Monsanto 1.20
MonstrWw ...
Moodys .56
MorgStan .20
Mosaic .20
NCR Corp ...
Nabors
NBkGreece .29




Name DIv
PwShsQQQ.41
Powrwav ...
PriceTR 1.24
PrUPShQQQ...
Qualcom .86
RF MicD
RschMotn
RightNow
Riverbeds ...
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
Sequenom ...
Slcnware .28
Sina
SiriusXM ...
SkywksSpl...
Sonus
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TDAmeritr .24
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .87
TriQuint
UrbanOut
VertxPh ..
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone 1.45
WamerCh ...
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
YRCrsh ...
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


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FI-
FiTJFI-


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011

Lake City Reporter





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One Item per ad lu i
4 lines 6 days Eachadditional
Ra applies to private individuals selling
personal merchandise totalling $1,000 or Iless
Each item must include a price.
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One Item per ad $23 7
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persona merchandise totallg 2 00or les.
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One Item per ad
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One Item per ad 83YT
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Rue applies to private Individuals sllang
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Each item muat Include a price.
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Limited to service type advertis-:
ing only.
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$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment Our office is located at 180
East.Duval Street.
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Adisto Appr Callby: Fax/Emal by:
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




Ad Errors- Please read your ad
on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only
the first incorrect Insertion, and
only the charge for the ad space
in error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments.
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation..
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
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Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
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In Print and Online
www.lalkecityreportcr.com


020 Lost & Found
FOUND BASSET Hound
on Buford Road.
Found on 10/27/11.
386-754-6105 Call to identify.

100 Job
Opportunities

05528704
Executive Assistant
Seeking an exec assistant who is
ready to jump in & take
initiative on a variety of admin
projects including light HR.
Must be a detail oriented and
self sufficient individual. Will
work directly for owner of
multiple businesses in & out of
FL. Some travel required. Word,
excel & power point a must.
Quicken, Quickbooks, payroll a
plus. Please submit resume &
salary requirements to
jenn@qkproduce.com. EOE.

05528733
Now hiring
Dairy Queen Manager
We currently have opportunities
fqr a Dairy Queen Manager,
in Jasper, Florida. The Manager
position requires single unit
restaurant management
experience. Dairy Queen
restaurant experience is strongly
preferred, Qualified candidates
must have excellent customer
service and employee relations
skills. The successful candidate.
will be capable of operating in a
fast paced environment. Must
have a flexible schedule, be self
S motivated, able to train,
motivate and prepareemployees
for greater responsibilities and
have effective communication
skills. Benefits include:
Competitive pay
Bonus program
Performance-based pay
increases
Paid vacations, holidays &
* 401K
Fax Resume to: 352-333-1161
Call: 352-494-7552 or Email:
aoberle(@fasttrackstores.com

05528737
Fast paced physical, therapy
center recruiting front office
person w/great presence, great
voice, & enjoys being face-to-
face w/people.' Receptionist or
administrative asst. w/strong
fast-paced customer service
exp. is preferred. You will be
the authority at the front desk,
so confidence is a must. We
have a great staff that is both
professional & fun loving. Must
love a strong challenge, be
PROFESSIONAL, & extremely
organized. Must be able to think
quickly on your feet! Reply to:
pta714@hotmail.com or
fax (386)755-3165

05528782
OPS Gift Shop Attendant
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park
White Springs, Florida
$7.50/hr Approx.
28 hours per week
Operate cash register, answer
visitor inquiries in a courteous
and tactful manner in person and
over the phone, sells and stocks
merchandise, provides cleaning
and maintenance of the Gift
Shop. Outstanding customer
service is a must as well as
knowledge of basic arithmetic,
computers and sales. Must be
able to work rotating shifts
including weekends, some
nights and holidays.
Mail or Fax State of Florida Em-
ployment Application by Friday,
November 4th to:
Attn: Kelli Pipkins, Gift
Shop/Craft Square Manager
Stephen Foster State Park
P.O. Box G
White Springs, FL 32096
Fax (386) 397-4262
Applications are avail online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com.
Resumes are not accepted unless
accompanied with a State of FL
Employment Application.
DEP only hires US Citizens or
authorized aliens and is an
EEO / ADA / VP employer.
Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits
the employment of any male
required to register with
Selective Service System
under the US Military
Selective Service Act.

05528798
Administrative Assistant
White Springs, Florida
Verifiable job history. Strong
computer skills. Able to be
trained in our specialty.
Able to perform without
constant supervision. Must be
flexible and team player. Great
communication skills. Must
want to work for a stable
company. Company has grown
significantly in last three years.
POSITION NEEDS TO BE
FILLED IMMEDIATELY
Please email resume to
hr@speced.org


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


100 Job
SOpportunities

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

Cloth Cutter: Person to cut cloth
from patterns in small sewing
company. Sewing exp. helpful.
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
Company. Full training provided -
Potential of $60K+ annually.
401(k), BCBS Insurance &
Pension for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.
05528767
FT Project Manager position
available with First Federal ,
Bank of FL. Candidate must
have 5+ years of project mgmt.,
coordinating and supporting IT
business processes. Background
in technology a must. Responsi-
ble for coordinating deployment
of new projects and updates to
methodologies. Deliver effective
project mgmt, including estimat-
ing, developing, and monitoring
project plans often spanning
multiple application and dept.
'areas. Applications may be
obtained from any First Federal
Branch and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City, FL 32056 or emailed to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply. EEO
Customer Service Representative
for call center. Must be fast friend-
ly & efficient. Please send resume
to: 197 SW Waterford Ct. Lake
City, Fl 32025 .Att: Joey Kitaif.
Please send resume for call center
position only. There are no other
positions at this time.

Securitas Security Services
is hiring FT/PT security officers.
in Lake City. Class D Security Lic.
req'd. Good computer skills.
www.securitasjobs.com or call
(352)378-5788 Lic# BB2300010
EOE M/F/D/V
Wanted, Banquet Cook, experi-
enced in high end cuisine. Apply
in person at Cerveny Conf Center,
11057 Camp Weed PI., Live Oak.

120 Medical
120 Employment

05528667
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD.
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

05528686
SGainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
EXP.-MAMMOGRAPHY
TECH wanted full time or part
time, for private Radiology of-,
fice. AART & Mammography
certification req. Fax resume to:
Tracy: (352)331-2044

05528793
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org.
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online:
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health Service
Corps
For its Student Loan
Forgiveness program. Licensed
Clinicians who serve in our
approved locations may qualify
for up to $60k in Student Loan
forgiveness for F/T
2yr commitment.
Therapists:
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst Preferred
Bachelor's-Level in Counselor
Support
Case Management (adult &
child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Master's Therapist in
Screening
Medical Services
RN full-time Lake City CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist '
(Direct Care )
To see our current openings in
Mental.Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

05528800
RN Part-time position.
Must be able to work flexable
hours and shifts.
Please apply Baya Pointe
Nursing & Rehab Center,
587 SE Ermine Ave.,
Lake City, Fl 32025 or
fax resume to 386-752-7337.
EOE/DFWP
Qualified caregivers needed to
provide personal care to individu-
als w/disabilities 352-692-4930
specialfriendsinc@vahoo.com
I k* ]


240\ Schools &
240 Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/07/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies
Black, female, lab-mix.
Approx. 10 months old.
Good with kids. Very friendly.
Free to Good Home call 386-
755-6319 or 386-984-8190
Golden Retriever puppies. Pure-
bred! Champion Line. Available
Nov. 1. Wellborn/Lake City area.
$225. ea. (719)429-6232
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they -
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

330 Livestock &
Supplies
Cattle For Sale.
Bulls, Brood Cows,
Bred Heifers & Yearlings.
All gentle. 386-365-1352


407 Computers

HP Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


419 TVRadio &
Recording
20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$65.00
386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Haidwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
.Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


450 Good Things
45 to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinremount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Joey 965-0288
Sif no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.

630 Mobile Homes
630 forRent
16X80 Almost new. 10 mi S of
Lake City, off Branford Hwy. 3/2,
fenced yd, Dish Washer private.
$650. mo + sec. No Pets. 984-7478
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA on 1/2 ac Branford area
Nice yard. Must see!
Call for info.
386-623-6523 or 386-752-7814
Country Living
2&3bdrm, $500-$550.
Very clean, NO PETS!
Ref's & dep req'd. 386-758-2280


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area; 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent '+dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482

64 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Just Reduced! Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
1995 MH. 66'X14'
. Newly remodeled. All new carpet.
You Move! $9,600. obo.
386-754-8885
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with loti of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1,77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"
cond. Split floor plan, Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Factory Direct Sale
15K 25K Off Models
800-622-2832 ext 210
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or Doubles. Must have
clear title. Call North Point Homes
(352)872-5566

0 Mobile Home
650 &Land

Outside of Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473


Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
camper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
S867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City.
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany,
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

S Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
S Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website: -
www.springhillvillage.net


710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

S05528852
Nice, Ig 2 br Apt. Close to town
$500 ino + $500 dep. 344-2972

2/1 CH/A Duplex Apt.
$450. mo No pets.
Near Beachville.
Call Margie 386-935-3447
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 brApts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmvflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ Iba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint, Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH cloge to town. Incl water,
'386-755-2423 riesbyrentals.com
'Redwine Apartments. Move in'
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com


X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2 v For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
SHome For Rent
2BR/1.5 ON 1/2 acre; fenced.
Off.Turmer Rd.
$650. mo. plus deposit.
352-335-8330 or 352-258-9598
2BR/1BA DUPLEX, Carport
Off Branford Hwy
$595. mo. $595. dep. Very clean.
Contact 386-752-7578
3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, comer of Putnarm &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
3BR/1BA HOME off McFarlane.
CH/A, Ig yard, No pets.
$600. mo $600. dep.
Call (850)421-3617 for info.
3br/2ba Brick home w/Pool
Great location. Hwy 47 & 1-75
$900. mo. 1st, last & security.
(386)365-5008
3BR/2BA HOME. Private
wooded lot. Rent $695. mo + sec.
dep. $450. Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
4BR/3.51BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1100. mo.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235.'


North Florida


HulLt l icrmma


Lake City Reporter












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER30, 2011


730 Unfurnished
J730 Home For Rent
Ft. White 2br/lba. CH/A. Washer
/Dryer, dishwasher, Ig. deck,
screen porch. carpet, ceiling fans..
Very quite & nice. $650. mo. 1st,
last & $300. dep. 386-497-2296
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.

750 Business &
Office Rentals

05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
WeStfield Realty Group,


780 Condos for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900'

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
* 78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver- ..
tised in this newspaper are availa7
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call *
HUD toll free at 1L800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath iv/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
4 br/2ba on aprox. 1 ac. near 1-75
,& Hwy 47. Jane S.
Usher, Lic. Real Estate Broker.
386-755-3500/365-1352


810 Home for Sale
CUTE.3BR/l.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced; tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC.'755-5110 #78278
Own a pieceof history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
.S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful.
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
-$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. .Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area;
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com


Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Island kit. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi ppod,
green house& &more MLS# 76-2.55
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900


Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story-
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
S 3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances,
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900


810 Home for Sale
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5.acres.
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411,'$79,900,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, Fl room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
3/2 w/1 car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -,
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
SClose to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group-
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint'&
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 FI room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millar4 Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group


Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept 3/2 DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Ginger Parker.
. 365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen.
Wired 24x36 workshop, steel roof,
pole bani. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake'area on comer Jot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC: 386-755-5110







oepln, Ies .


$*0/mnh


810 Home for Sale
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on corer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110 ,
WELL-CARED.FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110

820 Farms&
Acreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
SCall 352-215-1018
wvw.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, gross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-10)6 .
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755,6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
-Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
.386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
830 Property
3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181

Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900..
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498'Westfield Realty Group

85. Waterfront
0 Property-
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock.
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821


870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

920 Auto Parts
2 & Supplies
Like new 20 inch Goolyear
radial tires.Set of four.
$300-obo-Call Greg at
386-623-5219

950 Cars for Sale


1973 FORD Galaxy.
Clean, runs good, spotless interior.
4 -door. $2,300!
386-754-8885


.'.to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call'
S ':755-5445 ':



Lake Ctv Reprtcr:


SEELS WATERCRAF.


2000 Olds Intrigue
Mint condition, garage
kept, 4dr sedan, due to
illness have to sell.
Only 50,000 miles.
$7,000
Call
386-752-6956
(cell) 386-984-2627


2005 Ford F-350
Lariat
50,000 miles, many
extras, excellent.cond.

$18,500
Call
386-755-0139


=Contact us

:at the paper.

'I /- C ~


CLASSIFED ADS
386-755-5440


SUBSCRIPTION
386-755-5445


ALL OTHER DEPARTMENTS
386-752-1293


Bring the picture in or
wewilI take it for you!
* Ad orns 10 consecutive days
with adescriptioh and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
*Ad runs 1 consecutivedays as a
classified line ad online.'
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250

S3/4 ton, metal work
sheltes/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If yqu don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only'$15.0oo
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011 Classified Department: 755-5440


I I


PEN New Patient

Exam and Necessary X-rays
DOI150 DO330
First-time
patient
Reg. 136 SAVINGS OFS107
Expires October 31, 2011
IPEN DENTAL GRO UP

S .. www.apenlakeclty.com


VISIT OUR BOOTH AT THE FAIR.|
DECORATE YOUR TREE
with Custom Design
Christmas Ornaments
No 2 the same

TimEraEss mIlmomesS
FuRmrru Ei ATIriQUiS COLLKCetLBIa J
386-466-1888
1034 SW Main Blvd., (next to the Money Man)ake City, FL 32055
~ w. ..I. '


Large Selection of Soap Fragrances
(fisk for \'our favorite ceiit)
We do favors for:
Weddings. Baby Showers
and any octasioni-
SSoaps
0 Dog Mechanpic
s Coffee & Monogrammied


..275 N. Marion Avenue
Holiday (8,) 243-89ao
Silk arrangements 1,,.,, I-n ,,(I y- III uar
lib>lllil ., Il l tll l ll. l r


FLU SHOTS*


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*BAYA EAST LOCATION ONLY.

CBere y Mioio & Mny Iuanc. Walk-ln or by Appointment 75111177


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LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


Classified Department: 755-5440


mV-










Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com

Sunday, October


LIFE


30,2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


GARDEN TALK


Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu


Native

grasses

a natural

choice

gardeners are
discovering
the pleasures
and benefits of
landscaping with
ornamental grasses. Once
established, most of these
plants are maintenance
and pest free. Generally,
grasses perform well in
sandy soil and variable pH
ranges. Many will tolerate
everything from extreme
drought to occasional flood-
ing. Native grasses have
had eons to become adapted
to our fickle Floridian fluc-
tuations.
Ornamental grasses are
very diverse in growth habits.
Some are spreading ground
covers less than six inches
tall, and others become eight
foot upright clumps of stiff
leaves. Some are evergreen,
and others die back in the
winter. The foliage color of a
plant may be different in the
summer than in the fall, and
the flower color can be quite
spectacular,
The two main types are
clumping and spreading.
The clumping type will
simply increase the diam-
eter of the clump each year
and you can divide them
down in three or four years.
Spreading types will grow
out in any direction from the
original plant which makes
them valuable as ground and
bank covers.
You can imagine how
many different uses that
grasses could have in the
landscape when you consider
all their possible character-
istics. Stiff, upright grasses
make a bold statement and
contrast well with rounded,
fine textured plants. Masses
of soft and wispy grasses will
flow gracefully in the breeze
and bring movement to large,
open areas. Single plants
with vibrant fall color will
certainly add some warmth
to a lifeless fall and winter
landscape.
As their popularity grows,
more diverse species are
becoming available com-
mercially in garden centers.
Great grass selections, many
of which are native to north-
ern Florida, can be found in
mail order and online cata-
logues.
One locally available
ornamental grass, purple
Muhly grass, is one that you
may want to start growing
today. This tough, clumping
native grass grows upright to
three foot and has wire-thin
leaves. Muhly grass tolerates
drought and extended flood-
ing, acidic arid alkaline soil,
and it grows well in sand and
sun. Dark pink blooms seem
to float above the foliage in
the fall. For such a tough
plant this grass adds a bit of
gentle charm to any setting.
To learn more about native
ornamental grasses, talk to
the UF Master Gardeners
at the fair, or visit http://
wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/Subsites/
OrnamentalGrasses.
* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


Anew


way to





TONY BRTT/Lake City Reporter
Amanda Priest (left); Five Points Elementary School special
t needs teacher, follows along as Cheryl Becker gives a demon-
stration of sign language. Becker, who is hearing impaired, is
the sign language interpreterat Five Points Elementary.School.



Sign language interpreter bridges the gap

between special needs students and teachers


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
T he phrase "hard
of hearing" has
been used for
decades, but
it doesn't ade-
quately describe Cheryl
Becker.
Although Becker is
hearing impaired, she's
overcome the challenges
associated with not beiig
able to hear perfectly, and
in a manner she hopes
inspires the people she
works with special
needs students.
Becker is a sign lan-
guage interpreter at
Five Points Elementary
School. She has worked
as a Columbia School
District sign language
interpreter for close to four
years and has worked at
Eastside, Melrose Park
and Pinemount elemen-
tary schools along with
Five Points. She said she's
one of four sign language
interpreters the school
employs.
As a sign language
interpreter, Becker teaches
sign language to students,'
which allows them to
communicate with teach-
ers and other students.
She currently works with
Josiah Lee, a Five Points
Elementary School second
grader unable to speak due
to a rare disease.
Amanda Priest, a sec-
ond grade special needs
teacher at Five Points, said
Becker is an important
link in the learning pro-
cess.
"Mrs. Becker helps me


IT
Five Points Elementary School sign language interpreter Cheryl Beck
Lee learn sign language.


and the students by inter-
preting what Josiah has to say because he is
completely nonverbal," Priest said. "She also
teaches me and the other students how to
communicate with Josiah in sign language so
that we can learn what he's saying."
Becker, 47, has been teaching sign lan-
guage since 1995. She's taught in public


schools, for home schooled children and at
church. She taught sign language as a volun-
teer for 13 years before going to work for the
local school district.
She learned sign language when she was
13, and as a school district sign language
interpreter she works with any student who
has a hearing or speech problem, interpret-


because my stepdad was in
the Air Force. There was a
lady that came to class and
she wanted to help me out
after school. I was kind of
stubborn back then and she
realized that I needed help.
About two months later she
disappeared. I thought I
caused the problem, but a
year later I went to middle
school and when I saw her
.in the door she was wait-
ing for me. When I stepped
in the door she gave me a
'hug and said, 'Thank you
so much, you taught me
sign language. My heart's
desire was I wanted to be
a teacher for deaf children
and their needs. I wanted to
be a teacher for the deaf.' I
want my heart to go out to
the deaf children wheae
NY BRILake C Rporter I came from. I want them to
r helps Josiah have an education. It's noth-
ing to be ashamed to be
deaf or hard of hearing."
Becker, who wears a
hearing aid has suffered
hearing loss since birth.
"My right ear hearing is much better than
my left one," she said, noting she has been
wearing hearing aids since before she was
8. "With my left ear I can't hear very well.
Without the hearing aids I can hear loud
noises and vibrations. I'm very sensitive to
SIGNING continued on 2D .


Dog missing for 3 months turns up in Mich.


By COREY WILLIAMS
Associated Press
DETROIT Jim. Arrighi last
saw Petey, his 4-year-old Jack
Russell terrier, in the backyard of
his home in Erin, Tenn.
That was in July, and the 73-year-
old retired electrician had nearly
given up on seeing his pet again
when he learned the dog turned
up safe about 500 miles away in
suburban Detroit.
A Michigan Humane Society
volunteer was expected to return
Petey to Arrighi on Thursday
morning.
'This is just a little town and
everybody is buzzing about it,"
said Arrighi's daughter, Tyanne
Morrison.
Most of Erin's roughly 7,000
residents know one another, and
many of them would recognize


Petey, which is why Arrighi,
.Morrison and their friends sus-
pect he was pooch-napped by an
out-of-towner.
Morrison believes Petey left his
yard "and somebody picked him
up."
"We searched. We knew some-
one had gotten him," she told
The Associated Press by phone on
Wednesday. "We got on 4-wheel-
ers and went all over the area.
There had been some more dogs
over the last few months that were
missing.'1
While struggling with the loss
of his dog, Arrighi also lost his
wife, Juanita, who suffered from
pulmonary disease and died Oct.
12.
"Since my mother passed away,
even I told him 'why don't we go
to the pound to give a home to a
puppy that don't have a home,'"


Morrison said. ,
Last week, a homeowner in
Rochester Hills, about 20 miles
north of Detroit, saw Petey in
his backyard and took him to a
Humane Society animal care cen-
ter.
As it does with every recov-
ered dog and cat, the Michigan
Humane Society scanned Petey
for an implanted microchip, which
led the organization to its owner,
spokesman Kevin Hatman said.
Arrighi, who has been staying
at Morrison's home since his wife
died, was thrilled to receive the
call, she said.
"He thinks my mother, who is in
heaven, sent the dog back to him,"
Morrison said.
She said their local veterinarian
likely recommended Petey get a
microchip.
MISSING DOG continued on 2D


In this photo provided by Michigan
Humane Society, Petey, a Jack Fussell
terrier, is photographed at the Michigan
Humane Society's Rochester Hills
Center for Animal Care in Rochester
Hills, Mich. on Tuesday.










2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011



Halloween? No, German Expressionism


By Dr. Frederick Smith
Professor of Humanities
Florida Gateway College
Insatiable terror, creepy
music, eerie moonlight,
murderous monsters,
blood-thirsty vampires, and
sheer madness. The stuff
of Halloween? Certainly.
But it's also the stuff of
the German Expressionist
movement of the early
twentieth century.
Born out of the social
and political conditions ,
in Germany both before
and after World War I, as
well as the philosophies
of Friedrich Nietzsche,
Expressionism sought to
evoke intense, subjective,
and often troubling emo-
tions through the arts,
It basically probed the
depths of the human mind
and pulled forth the scary
stuff, the thoughts and
ideas that most of us would
just as soon forget The
result was some of the most
interesting and disturbing
paintings, music, literature,
theatre, and film of the cen-


tury.
If you've seen the
Norwegian artist Edvard
Munch's iconic 1893 paint-
ing "qhe Scream," with its
tormented alien-looking fig-
ure contorting and scream-
ing on a bridge over a twist-
ed black river set against
a morose dark orange sky,
then you have a pretty good
idea about the subject mat-
ter of the Expressionist
movement
In fact, the paintings
of both Munch and his
contemporary Vincent van
Gogh not only provided
inspiration for such later
German Expressionist
painters as Ernst Ludwig
Kirchner and Franz Marc,
but also the vocabulary of
harsh colors and jarring
brushstrokes that would
come to define the style.
The manifestation
of Expressionism in music,
meanwhile, involved the
use of severe dissonance
and atonality, which even-
tually led to the infamous
twelve-tone system of music
composition. When such


Dr. Frederick Smith


music would be unlisten-
able, you wouldn't be alone
in your opinion. Though
technically impressive, the
works of Schoenberg and
other such Expressionist
composers as Anton
Webern and Alban Berg
have never really enjoyed
wide audience appeal.
The same cannot be said,
however, for several of the
notable literary and theatri-
cal works of the movement
specifically those of Franz
Kafka and Bertolt Brecht,
in which the central char-
acters find themselves
alienated, disoriented, and
threatened by the nightmar-
ish reality in which


they are trapped.
Kafka's 1915 novel-
la "The Metamorphosis,"
in which a man awakens
transformed into a mon-
strous insect, is still taught
in many high school
and college literature
courses and has inspired
the term "Kafkaesque."
While Brecht's 1928 "The
Threepenny Opera," a musi-
cal written in collaboration
with composer Kurt Weill
and featuring the murder
ballad "Mack the Knife,"
remains popular today.-
At the heart of the
German Expressionist
movement, however, are
the many superb silent
films of the era, quite a
few of which are currently
available in various digital
formats. Featuring such
macabre motifs as mon-
sters, vampires, insanity,
and murder, Expressionist
cinema was a precursor
to the modern horror film
genre.
Though there are many
worth noting, a few German
Expressionist films are mas-


terpieces, as well as my per-
sonal favorites, and make
for superb viewing this
time of year. Even without
spoken dialogue, their
haunting imagery and plots
can still send the occasional
chill down your spine.
Paul Wegener's 1920
'The Golem: How He
Came into the World,"
the only surviving film
of a trilogy, is just such a
work. Concerned with the
legendary creation and
supernatural animation
of a deadly creature from
Jewish folklore, the film
and its portrayal of the
monster were major influ-
ences on Hollywood's later
Frankenstein films.'
Similarly, E W. Murnau's
1922 "Nosferatu" was one
of the earliest vampire films
and maintains a strong
cult following. Starring
Max Schreck as the creepy
Count Orlok, this unauthor-
ized adaptation of Bram
Stoker's "Dracula" novel
features castles, coffins,
fangs, and plenty of vampire
victims.


But if monsters and
vampires don't appeal to
you, never fear, or at least
save your fear for Robert
Wiene's 1920 'The Cabinet
of Dr. Caligari." Probably
the most famous and influ-
ential work in German
Expressionist cinema, due
in part to its bizarre sets,
the film's plot centers on a
carnival hypnotist who com-
mits a series of murders
through his subjects. It is
the pioneering inclusion
of a twist ending, however,
involving insanity, that
really makes "The Cabinet
of Dr. Caligari" worth
watching.
So, if you're in the mood
for something strange and
disturbing, whether it be
in the visual arts, music,
literature, theatre, or film,
the German Expressionist
movement may be just your
thing. In addition, a taste
of Expressionism might be
the perfect complement to
your Halloween.

* Dr. Smith can be reached
at (386) 754-4380


Mobility falls to record low as Americans stay put


By HOPE YEN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Yet
another symptom of the eco-
nomic downturn: Americans
aren't moving.
Young adults are stay-
ing put, often with their
parents. Older people aren't
able to retire to beachfront
or lakeside homes.
U.S. mobility is at its low-
est point since World War II.
New information from the
Census Bureau highlights
the continuing impact of the
housing bust and unemploy-
ment on U.S. migration, after
earlier signs that mobility
was back on the upswing.'
It's a shift from America's
long-standing cultural image
of ever-changing frontiers,
dating to the westward
migration of the 1800s and
more recently in the spread-
ing out of whites, blacks and
Hispanics in the Sun Belt's
housing bodm.
Rather than housing mag-
nets such as Arizona, Florida
and Nevada, it is now more
traditional, densely popu-
lated states California,
Illinois, Massachusetts,
New York and New Jersey
- that are showing some
of the biggest population
gains in the recent economic
slump, according to the data
released Thursday.


Residents have been large-
ly locked in place. Families
are stuck in devalued homes
and young adults are living
with parents or staying put in
the towns where they went
to college. -
"The. fact that mobility is
crashing is something that
I think is quite
devastating," said
Richard .Florida, 'Th
an American urban
theorist and profes- ar
soratthe University r
of Toronto's real
Rotian School
of Management
He described
America't~i' esiden- Rich
tial movement as .To
an important ele-
ment of its econom-
ic resilience and
history, from development
of the nation's farmland in
the Midwest to- its coastal
ports and homesteading in
the West
"The latest decline shows
we are in a long-run econom-
ic reset and that we never
really recovered' --we've
just been stagnating along,"
Florida said.
About 11.6 percent of the
nation's population, or 35.1
million, moved to a new
home in the past year, down
from 12.5 percent in the pre-
vious year. The current level
of low mobility tomes after,


the recession technically Longer-distance moves,
ended in mid-2009, beating a typically for those seeking
previous low of 11.9 percent new careers in other regions
in 2008. of the country, remained
It is the lowest in the largely flat at 3.4 percent
60-plus years that the Census The." biggest drop-off
Bureau has tracked infor- occurred in local moves,
nation on moves, dating to down to 15.4 percent from
1948. 17.7 percent in 2010. It's a
sign that
young adults
e latest. decline shoWs we in the pro-
longed slump
e in a long-run economic weren't even
eset and that we never willing to ven-
ly recovered we've just ture outside
theircounties,
been stagnating along.' continuing
instead to live
ard Florida, professor at the University of with relatives
ronto's Rotman School of Management or on college
campuses.
SPeople
most often
The share of people mov- cite a desire to live in a new
ing has been declining for home as the main reason for
decades, due in part to moving, as well as reasons
increases in two-income fam- of family or economy such
ilies that are more tied down as marriage or a new job.
by jobs and to an aging popu- But analysts say with many
lation that is less mobile. The young adults delaying mar-
peak for U.S. mobility came riage while struggling to find
in 1951, when it hit 21.2 per- employment and aging baby
cent The rate had.leveled off boomers expressingfinancial
at around 13 percent before worries about retirement,
falling off notably in 2008 the current mobility freeze
during the recession, could continue for several
Among young adults 25 more years.
to 29, the most mobile age An Associated Press-
group, moves fell to 24.1 per- LifeGoesStrong.com poll this
cent from 25.9 percent in the month found that more than
previous year. half of baby boomers born


between 1946 and 1964 say
they are unlikely to move
somewhere new in retire-
ment about 4 in 10 say they
are very likely to stay in their
current home throughout all
of their retirement
The annual growth of
retirement-destination
counties, typically in Sun
Belt states such as Florida,
Arizona and New Mexico,
has fallen sharply since the
recession that began in late
2007. It's down nearly half
compared with the period
2000-2007, according to
recent census data.
In all, the mid-decade
housing boom and subse-
quent bust took a toll on
virtually all age, and race
groups.
Homeownership declined
in 47 states and the District
of Columbia while the nation-
al ownership rate fell by its
largest amount since the
1930s. Hispanics who moved
and purchased homes in new
destinations in the Southeast
were hit especially hard,
with bigger drops in average
income and increases in pov-
erty after lowiwage construc-
ti6n jobs dried up in states
such as South Carolina,
North Carolina, Alabama,
Kentucky and Tennessee.
In contrast middle-class
blacks from the North who
migrated to Southern states


such as Georgia, Florida
and Texas fared better,
maintaining higher incomes
than African-Americans
who remained in declining
industrial' centers such as
Michigan and Ohio.
Other bright spots in
the housing bust included
urban, high-tech college
meccas that are proving to
be a draw for young, college-
educated adults of all races
and ethnicities.
The data covering 2008-
2010 show that Raleigh, N.C.;
the Texas cities of Austin,
San Antonio and Houston;
Denver; Pittsburgh; and
Baltimore and Washington,
D.C., had some of the big-
gest gains in residents. All
of them tend to promise spe-
cialized tech jobs and hip
lifestyles.
William H. Frey, a
Brookings Institution
demographer who reviewed
the education and race data,
said many of these cities
will continue to attract new
residents after the econo-
my fully recovers. He said
other cities must seek ways
to diversify their industries,
draw new investment and
build partnerships with local
universities to attract young
talent much like Pittsburgh
has been striving to do
after the collapse of its steel
industry.


MISSING DOG: Turns up in Michigan


Continued From Page 1D
"It was only about $70
total," Morrison said. "Now,
a lot of people are inquiring
about it"
In September, an implant-
ed microchip helped an ani-
mal control agency in New
York City locate the owners
of Willow, a calico cat who
turned up on a Manhattan
street after going missing
five years ago in Colorado.
The Michigan Humane
Society recommends that all
pet dogs and cats get micro-
chips implanted, in addition


to making sure they have col-
lars and identification tags.
"It's wonderful ,when we
see microchip .reunions,
including those that seem like
miracles," said Marcelena
Mace, shelter manager at the
Rochester Hills Center for
Animal Care. "It really proves
that no matter how far your
pet may travel, a microchip
can help him find his way
home."
Microchips, which also
are implanted in pet cats,
are about the size of a grain


of rice and typically injected
near the animal's shoulder
blade, said Adam Goldfarb,
director of pet care issues
with the Washington, D.C.-
based Humane Society of the
United States.
The chips do not have
their own power sources and
only can be found and read
with a scanner.
"In the last few years
there has been a real jump in
microchip usage, especially
in animal shelters," Goldfarb
said.


SIGNING: Interpreters bridge the gap

Continued From Page 1D


vibrations and sounds. With
hearing aids I can hear
clearly."
Becker said she is able to
encourage the students she
works with so well because
she's overcome many of the
same challenges.
"It's easy to encourage
them," she said. "They like
to be excited, not to be
bored."
Becker teaches American
Sign Language and English
Sign Language.
Becker often sits beside
the student, making ges-


tures, speaking softly and
giving them a reassuring
smile as they attempt to
communicate with their
hands.
Priest said the students
like the lessons because
they get to use their hands
and learn a new form of
communication.
"The students think it's
neat," she said. "You have
to use your hands so we're
all getting to where we talk
with our hands and they are
learning a lot of the signs so
they are enjoying it"


Priest said having a sign
language interpreter gives
her another avenue of
communication with the
students.
"It gives them a kin-
esthetic way of learning
where they can move
while they're learning
- which a lot of special
needs children need," she
said. "It also give Josiah
a way to voice his opin-
ion on things. As of right
now he does not have a
voice, so Mrs. Becker is
his voice."


I
I

I
!


!











LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Hairstylist has dishonorable


designs on unwilling client


DEAR ABBY: I relocated
to a new area a year ago and,
after several hair color disas-
ters, finally found a great styl-
ist/colorist, "Raphael." The
problem is, he constantly hits
op me even though he's mar-
ried. He emails and calls me
frequently. I told him I'd be -
willing to see him after hours
only if his wife, the salon
receptionist, is aware of it. He
said, "No, don't tell her."
Raphael tries to lure me
into the salon after closing
by promising free services,
which I decline. There's no
question that this is more
than the simple flattery most
male stylists give their clients.
That he's trying to cheat on
his wife makes me extremely
uncomfortable. The salon is
across from my apartment, so
when he sees me come out
he always asks me to have
dinner. I have taken to walk-
ing a different route.
I don't want to look for a
new stylist after all the mess
I had to go through to find
Raphael. How can I com-
municate clearly that I love
the way he does my hair, but
I'm not interested otherwise?
I don't want to make things
awkward, but I have tried
everything and he won't take
the hint DISTRESSED IN
BETHESDA, MD.
*DEAR DISTRESSED:
There's a reason Raphael's.
wife is his receptionist
Raphael may think he is irre-
sistible because he has done
this successfully with other


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

customers.
The next time he makes
a move on you, tell him
PLAINLY you're not inter-
ested and that his actions
are embarrassing. You
will probably have to find
another hairdresser afterward
because Raphael appears to
have a giant ego and may not
take rejection well. An excel-
.lent way to find one is to ask
women whose hairstyles and
color you like. In fact, I'm
advising you to start doing
that right away before your
roots start showing.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: I have been
dating "Cameron" for five
years. We're in graduate
school, have a wonderful
relationship and are discuss-
ing marriage. I get along well
with his parents, but some
things have just come out
about his father and I don't
know how to. deal with it
Two years ago we discov-
ered that Cameron's father had
been having an affair. He prom-
ised to stop seeing the woman,
get a restraining order so she'd
leave him alone and work on


his marriage. It seems he lied.
We have ound out (again) that
he has continued-to see her.
Cameron was mortified both
times and sad his father would
treat his mother this way.
His mother said she'd try
counseling with'him, and if
he didn't live up to his prom-
ise, she'd divorce him. It has
been months and they're still
in counseling. His dad isn't
allowed to live at home with
her.
I'm furious with
Cameron's father for being
such an idiot. I don't want to
see him (one of Cameron's
sisters has cut him out
of her life completely),.
but Cameron thinks his
father will hurt himself if
we all leave him. Please
tell me how to handle this
because although I never
want to see the man again,
I may have to. WALKING
ON EGGSHELLS IN
DELAWARE
DEAR WALKING ON
EGGSHELLS: Cameron's
parents' marriage has hit
a "rough patch." However,
they're both trying to repair
it While you may be disgust-
ed with Cameron's father, you
have no reason to be "furious"
with him his wife does. So
for everyone's sake, cool off
and think rationally.


* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
RP.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL
19): Be careful about what you
say and how you treat people.
Insensitivity will come back to
bite you. Take better care of
yourself and avoid criticizing
how others live. Make today
about you and be the best you
can be. **r
TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
Observation can be a great,
teacher. Watch, and you will
discover the best way to han-
dle people and situations you
face. Stubbornness and anger
will never bring good results.
Don't make changes without
the consent of the people your
decision will affect *.****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't leave anything
to chance. Self-deception is
apparent, especially where''
money is concerned. Set up
a new budget or consult with "
someone who may be able
to help you consolidate your
debt. A part-time job will help
subsidize your income. -***
CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Network with people who may
have alternative options for you
regarding work and money.
Sharing ideas will lead to a
solution for a problem you face.
Love is highlighted, and joining


THE LAST WORD

Eugenia Word

forces with someone you love
will lead to greater flexibility..

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Discipline will be required
if you plan to get everything
done. Problems with a lover,
child or friend will entail
deception. Look for the obvi-
ous and ask direct questions.
Don't jeopardize your position
or status for someone who is
using you. ***
SVIRGO (Aug. 23Sept 22).:
Have little fun. Attend an event
or family function that allows
S'you to share your thoughts and
network with people with com-
:modi interests. Love is on the
rse,d axa little time spentwith
. someone special will enhance
your relationship. ** .
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct 22):
There is too much at stake
to sit idle. Consider what you
need to do in order to take
advantage of an opportunity
that can change your financial
course for the better. A favor
will be granted from someone
you run into at an event or
meeting. ****


CELEBRITY CIPHER
by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms areeted from quotations by fmoua people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher tlands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: V equals U
"CAD ADDN ACG T JFTUXiDW GC
XD FTVAGDN ... / GFD XWTPA FTO
JCWWPNCWO OVWKTOOPAR / UTGDWPTI
KITJD." DUPIH NPJSPAOCA

Previous Solution: "'m not going to sit on the porch of the old anchorman's
home with a drool cup." Tom Brokaw
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal LJElick 10-31


SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't get angry, get mov-
ing. It's what you accomplish
that counts. Complaining or
arguing will hold you back.
Focus on what's important
and don't stop until you reach
your destination. Opt to make
gains rather than please oth-
ers. ***
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Secrets and
deception will lead to trouble.
Avoid discussing personal
matters until you are ready
to offer honest answers. A
change is overdue in your per-
sonal and domestic life. Face
facts and fess up.***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): What you offer others
will help you in turn. Getting
involved in a cause or help-
ing others find solutions will
enhance your reputation and
put you in a good position. Set
aside time to relax and enjoy
the company of someone you
love. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Deception is apparent. Be
careful dealing with someone
who.sends mixed messages.
Don't let your heart rule
your head. Be precise about
what you. want and what you
are willing to give in return.
Heated discussions will be
emotionally costly. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You have more opportuni-
ties than you realize. Look at
your current position and you'
will discover a way to use the
law to your advantage. A settle-
ment, contract or debt owed to
'you can be collected if you use
practical and shrewd tactics.
-*-**- ,'


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


TAKE IT FROM THE TOP By Joe DiPietro / Edited by Will Shortz 11 12 3 14 ES 15 6 M 819 1 11 131415 1617


Across
1 Onetime
propaganda
source
5 Portmanteau
8 Obstruct
13 Brings in
18 Funny Johnson
19 See 6-Down /
20 Queen City of the
Rockies
,'21 Prefix with light
or sound
22 Holiday
purchase,.
informally
24 Tone setters for
conductors
26 Item in a certain
e-mail folder
'28 A couple of
SSpaniards?
29 E-mail
alternatives
30 Source of the
Amazon
31 South Carolina's
state bird
32'Neurotic Martin
Short character
35 Not discounted
36 Give up
38 Start of a 1957
hit song
40 Press and fold,
Essay
41 Pecking order.?
42 Oxidized
43 Agree (with)
44 Cousin who's
"altogether
ooky"
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone: 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


45 Vague early
afternoon time'
47 Like certain
investments
49 Soaked
53.To the,point, to
'lawyers
55 Times
57 Succeed
59 Bridge expert
Culbertson
60 Go back and
forth
62 Some are
cohesive
64 Territory
65 1985 film based'
on "King Lear"
66 How some games
finish
67 How some cars
screech
69 Plant known as
"seer's sage"
because of its
hallucinatory
effect
71 Loser
72 Skinny
74 Screenwriter
Ephron
75 Somme place
76 Prefix with
magnetic
77 Old fishing tool
79 An instant
81 Blowup, of a sort
82 "... but possibly
untrue"
84 Peeper protector
86 Wield
.88 Uncorking noise
90 His debut album
was "Rhyme
Pays"
91 Grating
92 W. Hemisphere
grp.


95 Queen's land
97 Like average
-folks, in Britain
98 Enthralled
99 _,_ Park, classic
Coney Island
amusement
locale
.100 V formation?
102 Shop chopper
104 Bounce (off)
105 Mil. officers
106 Avg. level
107 Change quickly
.110:Iniredibly nice
115 Matter in
statistical
mechanics
116 Bulldog
117 Dispatch boats
118 Neighbor of
Oman: Abbr.
119 "Pride and
Prejudice"
actress Jennifer
120 9-Down holder
121 Pickup line?
122 One of the
Chaplins
123 Underworld
route

Down
1 Transference of
property to pay
assessments
2 Asian republic
3 Gets up for the
debate?
4 Certain poetic
output
5 Reveal
6 With -19-Across,
S far back
, 7 Beats it and won-'t
explain why? .


8 Proof that a
"Jersey Shore"
character has an
incontinence
problem?
9 Heady stuff
10 Entire "Reservoir
Dogs" cast, e.g.
11 Athlete's attire,
informally
12 Pampers maker,
informally
13 Arrests an entire
crime syndicate?
.14 Inits. in '70s and
'80s rock
15 Slayer of his
brother Bleda
16 Like some majors
17 Impudent
20 Longtime ESPN
football' analyst
Merril __
23 Protected
images, for short
25 Russian novelist
Maxim
27 Fancified, say
32 Singer Gorme
33 Eschews Mensa
material when
going to parties?
34 "Drag ___ Hell"
(2009 movie)
36 "Star Wars"
character ___-
Gon Jinn
37 SALT party
39 Dashboard choice
42 Contents of
Lenin's Tomb.,
e.g.?
46 Settle in
47 Aquatic nymph
48 The Wildcats of
the N.C.A.A.
50 Merits at least a
20% tip?
51 "Airplaie!"
woman


52 King or queen
53 Hard Italian
cheese
54 Slower to pick up
56 Phone button trio
58 Minor
61 Break down
63 A bar may offer
it
68 One-dimensional:
Abbr.
70 Flat flooring
73 Minute


78 Scout's missiori '::.94 Untiaditional,as .'* 104 Major.org.
80 Assertive. some marriige.s :: rprepsen'ting
comeback :95 Charges. e '-. zitertainers and
83 118-Across is in 96 Give a hard time. athletes
it -- -ll08 Anitt f iaz.


85 Super Bowl IV
M.V.P. Dawson
87 Scoring stat for
N.B.A.'ers
89 Wallop
91 Motorola phone
line
93 Departure from
the norm


99 Soup kitchen
implements
100 They're shown
by X's, O's and
arrows
101 Luggage
attachment
103 Some annual
bills


109 Desideratum
111 Fit
112 Brooklyn's
Flatbush, e.g.:
Abbr.
113 Go unused
114 Symbol for
electric flux


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
TR|ACIE PICKOFF PACMAN
HURLS TRUEFACT ACHEBE
UNCUT ARTIFICIAL HEART
BETTER EL AMIE LIBS
ICEE POWER LRON ETD
ARCH CIVIL AAAS NEIGH
RE C TOMAS IL K PALMER
MDI AR'ULE GUESSER EDS

DOCILE AIR RUE A.LB
ARLO RIFFS MIATA POOL



IPROPEI ASS ENERO R E



WL ERE AIL KNOWNASE
_D AIMONDNECKLACE D OGGY
ELNINO GAMEOVER ARLES
LEAST TENS ION SKEET


5 2 9 8


9 '_ 1


4 7 2


2 3 6


6 4 3


5 7 9 1
----- ----

1 786


8 3 4


2 4 6 7 1


L L C897 V 6 E


6 L7 9 EL 6 9 L.-8


Z 918 L 6 9. L 17





E61 9VZE8 9 L


8 9 9 L L 1.6

---i_- --~i
9 LZ 6 S L 789


9 7V L 9 8 6 L


L 8617 9 L C


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415










4D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2011



Squirmy toddler? There's an app for that


By RASHA MADKOUR
Associated Press
MIAMI There's a new
routine these days when-
ever Amber Mullaney goes
out to eat at a restaurant.
While waiting to be seat-
ed, she asks her husband
to get the phone ready to
hand over to their 2-year-old
daughter, Tatum.
The phone with its
ability to stream episodes
of Dora the Explorer is a
godsend, Mullaney says.
Attempts at going out
without whipping out the
gadget have been disas-
trous, the mom says. Her
curious, independent tod-
dler gets into everything.
Salt shakers are fiddled
with, drinks are spilled.
"She'll color for a little
bit or talk with us for a lit-
tle bit, but it's short-lived,"
Mullaney says. "It's miser- Denise Thevenot and her son
able because all she wants home in Metairie, La. About 40
to.do is get out" than that) have used a smartpl
With the iPhone, howev- nonprofit group Common Sens
er, Tatum sits quietly in the
booth while her parents get
to enjoy a meal. body parts; for example, or
Mullaney, a marketing sing nursery rhymes. It
manager for a technology has become commonplace
,has become comonplace
company, sq times wish- to see little ones flicking
es they could without the through photos on their par-
phone because she doesn't ents' phones during church
want people to think they're or playing games on a tablet
using technology to shut during a bus, train or plane
their child up, but she also ride. Parents of newborns
doesn't wantt to give up rave about an app that plays
going out. white noise, a womb-like
"Sometimes you gotta whoosh that lulls scream-
do what you gotta do," she ing babies to sleep.
says. In fact, toymaker Fisher
Mullaney is in good com- Price has just released
pany. About 40 percent of a new hard case for the
2- to 4-year-olds (and 10 per- iPhone and'iPod touch,
cent of kids younger than framed by a colorful rattle,
that) have used. a smart- which allows babies to play
phone, tablet or video iPod, while promising protection
according to a new study from "dribbles, drool .and
by the nonprofit group unwanted call-making."
Common Sense Media. Denise Thevenot
Roughly 1 in 5 parents sur- acknowledges that some
veyed said they give their people would look askance
children these devices to at the idea of giving a child
keep them occupied while a$600 device to play with -
running errands, she had the same concerns
There are thousands of initial shen she discov-
apps targeted specifically ered the sheer potential.
to babies and toddlers "The iPad is mov-
interactive games that name


Frankie Thevenot, 3, play with an iPad in his bedroom at their
I percent of 2- to 4-year-olds (and 10 percent of kids younger
hone, tablet or video iPod, according to a new study by the
se Media.
o


ies, books and games all
wrapped in one nice pack-
age," says Thevenot, who
works in the New Orleans
tourism industry. The iPad,
she says, keeps her 3-year-
old son Frankie busy for
hours. And, when needed,
taking it away "is the great-
est punishment ... He loves
it that much."
Kaamna Bhojwani-
Dhawan is an unapologetic
proponent of the trend.
"If you're raising chil-
dren, you've got to raise
them with the times," says
Bhojwani-Dhawan, who
lives in Silicon Valley and
founded the family travel
website Momaboard.com.
"If adults are going all digi-
tal, how'can we expect chil-
dren to be left behind?"
Her21/2-year-old, Karam,
loves the GoodieWords app,
which explains complex
concepts like "shadow" and
"electricity." Other favor-
ites are a memory match-
ing game with farm animals


and a drawing program.
Bhojwani-Dhawan points
out that Karam also has
books, crayons and Legos.
"It's not replacing any of
these things; its one more
thing he's getting exposed
to," she says.
Experts say balance is
key.
"It's really important
that children have a vari-
ety of tools to learn from.
Technology gadgets can be
one of those tools, but they
shouldn't dominate, espe-
cially when we're talking
about very young children,"
says Cheryl Rode, a clini-
cal psychologist at the San
Diego Center for Children,
a nonprofit that. provides
mental health services.,
"If kids are isolating
themselves or if it's narrow-
ing their range of interest in
things everything else is
boring those are big red
flags," Rode says. "You want


them to have the ability to
find lots of different ways to
engage themselves."
For public relations con-
sultant Stacey Stark, one
red flag was seeing her 1
1/2-year-old cry if she wasn't
allowed to hold, Stark's
iPhone. Little Amalia has
dropped the phone, leaving
it with a small crack on the
back. She has also called
a colleague of Stark's and
almost shot off an email to
a client
For all those reasons,
Stark and her husband have
started to cut back on how
much they let Amalia and
4-year-old Cecelia use their
phones and tablets.
"It became an issue. We're
trying to make it go away,"
she says. "It was easy'for it
to become a crutch."
Since scaling back,
Stark says,- she has seen
her daughters engage in
more imaginative play. Still,
there*is a positive side to
the technology, Stark says.
She thinks Montessori
reading and spelling apps
have accelerated her older
daughter's learning in those
areas, "But," she adds, "it's
such a delicate balance."
Wake Forest University
psychology professor
Deborah Best, who spe-
cializes in early childhood,
agrees that children can
benefit from programs that
are age-appropriate and
designed for learning.
But "interacting with
devices certainly does not,
replace one-on-one, face-
to-face interaction between
children and parents, or
children and peers," Best
says. Those interactions,
she says, help children
learn such skills as reading
emotions from facial expres-
sions and taking turns in
conversations.
Joan McCoy,. a bookstore
owner and grandmother of
five in Seattle, worries that
this new generation will
lack some of those social


skills.
When her son and daugh,
ter-in-law get together with
other parents and their
kids, they give the children
mobile phones to play with,
or the children bring along
toy computers. "There; is
absolutely no conversation
among them or with their
parents. They are glued to
the machine," McCoy says.:
It's a different story
when the youngsters, ages
2 through 7, are out with
their grandmother. McCpi
brings along books, some:
times ones with only pic-
tures, and asks the kids
what they think is going on
and what they would do in a
similar situation.
"They just talk and
they're excited and they're
engaged," McCoy says,
"They never ask for my cell
phone, which is amazing
because when we go with
the parents, that's the first
thing they ask for."
McCoy acknowledges she
has the luxury of being a
grandparent and having the
time to do these things. "It's
harder. It takes more dis-
cipline, it takes more time,
and it requires interacting
with the child as opposed.tp
the child being entertained
on their own," she says.
Eileen Wolter, a writer'in
New Jersey, readily admits
to taking the easier path
with her 3- and 6-year-old
sons: "I'm buying my kids'
silence with an expensive
toy."
When her in-laws get
together for a family meal,
iPhones get passed to five
children. The adults talk
while the kids play, their
contribution to the dis-
cussion typically limited
to announcing they have
cleared another level on
a game. When that hapr
pens, Wolter starts to think,
"Eek!"
But then she says to her-
self, "Yeah, but we had a
nice dinner."


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