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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01684
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 28, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01684
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




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Reporter


Vol. 137, No. 235 N 75 cents


'He would have




shot all of us'


Woman feared
the worst during
Monday robbery.
By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
A restaurant worker who had a
gun put to her head during a rob-
bery earlier this week recounted
her ordeal Thursday.


Anne Castaneda's account of
Monday night's armed robbery of
the Subway at 683 NW Duval St.
differs from police reports, which
said two customers entered the
store during the holdup and that
one was forced to the ground by
the gunman.
'There was no customer that
came in and even gave eye contact
with the robber," she said.
Both Castaneda and police agree


that another customer entered but
left on seeing an empty store.
In any case, her focus Thursday
was on the fear she felt as her
life hung in the balance for a few
tense moments.
Castaneda said her co-worker
had already gone to the back of
the store when the robber entered
the business looking for cash just
ROBBERY continued on 3A


It's fair time


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILjVe Cily Reproner
Sean McKee, of Redding, Pa., climbs about 30 feet in the air n the Galleon ride Thursday while making prepara- .
tions for the Columbia County Fair, which opens today at 4 p.m. See full coverage in Friday's Lake City Reporter.



New airport terminal awaits

just a few finishing touches


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
After nearly 10 months of work,
the new 6,000 square-foot Lake
City Airport terminal is 'nearly
complete.
Work crews were busy Thursday


putting final touches on the build-
ing's interior in preparation for the
delivery of furniture early next
week.
Nick Harwell, the airport's proj-
ects manager, said the transition
from the old 3,000 square-foot
terminal to the new one should


be unnoticed by those using the
airport.
On. Nov. 7, communications
technology will be transferred
from the old terminal to the new.
facility next door. Harwell said
AIRPORT continued on 3A


GORDON JACKSONILake City Reporter
Nick Harwell, projects manager at the Lake City Airport, stands next to a new airport terminal that is nearly com-
pleted. The $2.9 million project was funded mostly through the Federal Aviation Administration. A ribbon cutting cer-
emony to commemorate the grand opening will be held sometime in late November or early December.


Florida Highway Patrol troopers and emergency workers at the
scene of a crash Wednesday that left a Gainesville man hospital-
ized in extremely critical condition.


Crash victim


clings to life


Was struck bylog truck
while doing lawn work
at local restaurant.
From staff reports
A Gainesville man struck
by a log truck in down-
town Lake City Wednesday
remains in extremely critical
condition at Shands at the
University of Florida, accord-
ing to authorities.
Hugh Suggs, 52, was doing
lawn work at the Burger King
at the southeast corner of


Main Boulevard and Duval
Street when a 2001 Peterbilt
tractor trailer~ drove onto the
sidewalk while making a right
turn onto Duval. Suggs was
struck by the trailer, which
was loaded with logs.
The fruck ws driven by
Frederick Gilhousen, 47, of
Fargo, Ga.
Police have not decided
whether to file charges in the
case, according to Capt. John
Blanchard of the Lake City
Police Department


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Members ofthe Fort White High School cheerleading squad'flip a
fellow cheerleader Thursday during the Fort White Indian Uprising.
The community pep rally is, a prelude to the homecoming game
against Rickards High School Friday. See more photos, Page 6A.


Charter will get

complete review


By GORDON JACKSON
giackson@lakecityreporter.com
Members of the Columbia
County Charter Review
Commission agreedThursday
to a line-by-line review of
the entire county charter at
future meetings.
Commission member
Ozelle Graham said he
thought a thorough review
of the existing document was
important to ensure every-
one on the 16-member com-
mittee interprets the charter
the same way before possible
changes are recommended.
"If there are no concerns,
we just move on," he said. "I


think we know the changes
we might have."
Fellow commission mem-
ber Walt Graham said he
has already read the 18-page
document and didn't believe
a line-by-line review was nec-
essary.
Bettye Lane, the commis-
sion's vice chair, said she
agreed with Ozelle Graham's
proposal.
Koby Adams, commission
chairman, said it won't be
difficult to review the entire
charter in one or two upcom-
ing meetings.
"I would like to not rush
CHARTER continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


82
T-Storm


crIp


Chance


WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
People................... 2A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN
PEOPLE
'Broads' to
chat sports.


COMING
SATURDAY
Local news
roundup.


~iS~''J~


Friday, October 28, 201 I


1 tII4 Ii 0 2 1












Celebrity Birthdays


$H E3 Thursday:
$ Afternoon: 6-5-6
Evening: 8-0-9


..ay, 4 Thursday:
Afternoon: 9-2-0-7
Evening: 1-9-1-8


v Wednesday:
3-5-10-17-31


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

'Broads' to chat sports, Vegas at ex-mayor's joint


I


LAS VEGAS

Oscar Goodman was
known to swill gin and
bring showgirls every-
where while he was in
office. Now, the booze and girls are
back as he opens his new steak-
house Dec. 15.
Sin City's colorful ex-mayor tells
The Associated Press that his Beef,
Booze and Broads steakhouse .at the
Plaza Hotel and Casino downtown
will feature good-looking hostesses
hired to chat with diners about top-
ics like sports, Vegas and politics.
They will also drink and dine with
customers.
"Its all going to be first class," he
said.
"I want everyone to feel very com-
fortable," Goodman said. Goodman
left office earlier this year as term
limits ended his run as the self-
proclaimed "happiest mayor of the
greatest city in the world" after 12
years. Goodman, a former lawyer,
said the restaurant's name comes
from one of his cases in the 1970s
that involved wiretapped conversa-
tions where the executives could be
heard talking about dalliances with
womet around town who weren't
their wives.
'The defendants are in the court-
room, I'm by their side, the wives
are in the audience to support their
husbands, and the judge says, 'Oh,
this is the booze and broads case,"'
he said. "Ever since that time, I
figured if I was ever going to.have
a speakeasy as I dreamt about,
it would be called the Booze and
Broads speakeasy."

Bret Michaels creates
hospital music room
PHOENIX Rocker Bret
, Michaels is set to rock a Phoenix
hospital with a'donation that will
benefit its patients and their families.
The Poison frontman is set to


announce plans Thursday to give
new TVs and sound systems for
a hospitality and
music room at the
St. Joseph's Barrow
Neurological
Institute. It's the
facility where he was
treated in April-2010
Michaels for a brain hemor-
rhage.
Michaels was treated at the hospi-
tal earlier this year for a procedure
to fix a hole in his heart. Doctors
found the hole when they treated
him for the brain hemorrhage.

Big Sean takes plea in
NY concert assault case
EEWISTON, N.Y.- Rapper Big
Sean has pleaded guilty to a misde-


AROUND FLORIDA


Michelle Obama
visits Jacksonville


JACKSONVILLE-
First lady Michelle Obama
was in Jacksonville to meet
with culinary students and
members of a local GirP
Scoitsgroup.
She spoke at a
Democratic National
SCommittee luncheon
'. Thursday.
S Obama's first stop was
with students from Frank
SH. Peterson Academies of
STechnology High School.
The students won a.
national healthy cooking
contest hosted by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.
The first lady, who
Serves as the honorary
national president of the
Girl Scouts, also met with
Sa local Girls Scouts group.
SShe also made an
appearance Thursday.at
other Democratic party
functions in Tampa and
Fort Lauderdale.

Rubio: History
issue overblown
ORLANDO U.S. Sen.
Marco Rubio said those
involved in politics have a
tendency to exaggerate.
And despite minor incon-
sistencies, his family's
history is essentially the
same as he has always
described it.
Rubio spoke Thursday
about the evolving story
of his parents' arrival
from Cuba and their
early years in the U.S. at
the University of Central
Florida in Orlando. The
event was the first of
three stops he planned in
Central Florida to discuss
job creation.
A spokesman later clari-
fied Rubio was referring
to the tendency of those
in politics and particularly
the media to inflate minor
issues.
Questions about the
family history of the self-
described son of Cuban


meanor charge of unlawful imprison-
ment stemming from a backstage
incident at an upstate New York con-
cert over the summer.
The Detroit rapper, whose real
name is Sean Anderson, entered the
plea Wednesday as part of an agree-
ment with Niagara County prosecu-
tors. He was charged in August with
forcible touching; unlawful imprison-
ment and sex abuse
after a 17-year-old
told police she was
sexually assaulted
during a concert.
Prosecutors said the
victim agreed to the
Big Sean plea deals. His law-
yer, Scott Leemon,
said denies there was any sexual
misconduct.
* Associated Press


* Olympic gold medalist
Bruce Jenner is 62.
* Microsoft co-founder Bill
Gates is 56.
* Country singer Ron Hemby
is 53.


* Actor Chris Bauer is 45.
* Actor-comedian Andy
Richter is 45.
* Actress Julia Roberts is 44.
* Country singer Brad
Paisley is 39.


, .


THE WEATHER


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, -STORMS CLOUDY CLOUDY i SUNNY L SUNNY


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ASSOuIAI Eu "K1:R
First Lady' Michelle Obama is escorted by Ana Bautista,
17, a Girl Scout Board of Directors member, after Obama's
plane landed at Jacksonville Naval Air Station Thursday in
Jacksonville.


exiles emerged last week.
Media organizations
reported Rubio's parents
emigrated for economic
reasons more than two
years before the Cuban
Revolution.

Police search for
DCF impersonators
TALLAHASSEE -
Authorities are searching
for at least three people
who pretended to be child
welfare investigators in.
northwest Florida.
The Bay County and
Santa Rosa County
Sheriff's Offices are inves-
tigating two separate dates
reported of people imper-
sonating investigators
with the Department of
Children and Families.
State officials released a
statement Wednesday say-
ing the children involved
in both cases are safe.
Parents are reminded that
child welfare investigators
always carry proper identi-
fication while investigating


cases of child abuse and
neglect.
Both families later called
DCF and were told there
was no open case on either
family.

Cubans found after
11 days at sea
BOYNTON BEACH -
U.S. Border Patrol authori-
ties have taken nine peo-
ple, reportedly from Cuba,
into custody after they
came ashore on a beach in
South Florida.
Agent John Modlin said
the group spent 11 days
at sea on a raft and were
found in Boynton Beach
early Wednesday morning.
The group included eight
men and one woman. All
were taken the hospital for
dehydration and other non-
life threatening injuries
and later detained.
Under the U.S. Cuban
Adjustment Act, most
Cubans who reach U.S.
soil are allowed to stay.


.' .. .. ,;. ;

Tallahassee *
82/56
Pensacola
77/53 ,Panana Cit
77/54


Jaisonie Cape Canaveral
Lake City 81/63 Daytona Beach
82/57Ft. .auderdale
\Ga esvike DatoaBeach Fort Myers
81/61 8W67 Gainesvllle
0'iala Jacksonville
80/61 Key West
S Or ando Cap Canaveral ake City
S81/67 7969 Miami
Taua \ a*Nagles
82/08/ West Palmn B Ocala
,"\ 85/70 Orlando.
S Ft L Panama City
Ft 85/70 K Pensacola
84/69 Naples Tallahassee
85/73 Miani Tampa
Ke t 85/ 72 Valdosta
Key WestW. Palm Beach
84/75


LAK CITY A


TEMPERATURES
High Thursday
Low Thursday
Normal high
Normal'low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Thursday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


84
62
79
56
92 in 2010.
34 in 1962

0.00"
2.13"
30.67"
e "2.22"
43.35"


SUN
Sunrise today 7:41 a.m.
Sunset today 6:47 p.m.
Sunrise tom. ,. 7:42 a.m.
Sunset tom. 6:46 p.m.
MOON
Moohrise today 9:45 a.m.
Moonset today 8:23 p.m.
Moonrise.tom. 10:51a.m.
Moonset tom. 9:23 p.m.


Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov.
2 10 18 25
First Full Last New


, A B H


Ip 7p la 6a On this date in
Friday Saturday 1991, a strong
cold front drop
out of Canada and
brought 2.4 inches
of snow to Yakima,
Washington, equal-
ing a record October
snowfall amount set
in 1973.


Saturday
79,67'sh
78/62/pc
82/73/sh
84/65/sh
74/47/pc
71/52/pc
82/74/t
72/44/pc
82/73/sh
86/68/sh
77/51/pc
80/62/sh
69/47/s
71/48/s
69/42/s
83/58/sh
69/42/pc
82/73/sh


Sunday
77,,68',p
75/61/pc
83/73/sh
82/66/pc
75/51/pc
72/56/pc
83/74/sh
75/49/pc
83/73/t
83/70/pc
76/53/pc
77/62/pc
S68/50/s
70/48/s
71/44/s
80/61/pc
71/46/s
82/76/1


An exclusive
serice

ILt our readers
30m11i blaoini
Today's by
ultraviolet TheWeather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 1

wethercom

4Yg g Forecasts, data and
0 graphics 2011 Weather
wIeh Certral, LP, Madison, Ws.
weather J www.weattierpublilsher.com


gel
E-edition Online Access
Absolutely

FREE

Call for login information.


[2 RDA


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12 f lI


1-2 1 MO


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


" 2A


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LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


Daily Scripture
"For the word of God is alive
and active. Sharper than any
double-edged sword, it pen-
etrates even to dividing soul
and spirit, joints and marrow;
it judges the thoughts and atti-
tudes of the heart."
Hebrews 4:12
Thought for Today
"If liberty means anything at all,
it means the right to tell people
what they do not want to hear."
George Orwell (Eric Blair),
English author (1903-1950).

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ..............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
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Online... www.lakecityreporter.com CIRCULATON
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc, is pub- Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180 should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
E. Duval St., Lake City, Ra. 32055. Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, a. a.m. on Sunday.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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CORRECTION

lan Davis, 5, was incorrectly identified in a photo in
Thursday's Lake City Reporter.
/


MOOUhtI-I ou rInca
Las Vegas mayor, Oscar Goodman, walks though the lobby of a hotel accompa-
Snied by two Las Vegas showgirls in Anaheim, Calif. in 2004. The former Las Vegas.
mayor Goodman was known to swill gin and bring showgirls everywhere while he :
was in office. Now, the booze and girls will stay as he opens his newsteakhouse.









NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


Summer growth calms recession fears


By MARTIN CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON A
summer of modest eco-
nomic growth is helping
dispel lingering fears that
another recession might be
near.
Whether the strength
can be sustained is less
certain.
The economy grew at
an annual rate of 2.5 per-
cent in the July-September
quarter, the Commerce
Department said
Thursday. But the growth
was fueled by Americans
who spent more while
earning less and by busi-
nesses that invested in
machines and computers,
not workers.
The expansion, the best
quarterly growth in a year,


came as a relief after ane-
mic growth in the first half
of the year, weeks of wild
stock market shifts and the
weakest consumer confi-
dence since the height of
the Great Recession.
The economy would
have to grow at nearly
double the third-quarter
pace to make a dent in the
unemployment rate, which
has stayed near 9 percent
since the recession offi-
cially ended more than two
Years ago.
For the more than 14
million Americans who are
out of work and want a job,
that's discouraging news.
And for President Barack
Obama and incumbent
members of Congress, it
means they'll be facing vot-
ers with unemployment
near 9 percent


"It is still a very weak
economy out there," said
David Wyss, former chief
economist at Standard &
Poor's.
For now, the report on
U.S. gross domestic prod-
uct, or GDP, sketched a
more optimistic picture for
an economy that only two
months ago seemed at risk
of another recession.
And it came on the same
day that European leaders
announced a deal in which
banks would take 50 per-
cent losses on Greek debt
and raise new capital to
protect against defaults on
sovereign debt
Stocks surged on the
European deal and main-
tained their gains after the
report on U.S. growth was
released. The Dow Jones
rose 340 points to close


ROBBERY: Gunman'still at large


Continued From Page 1A
minutes before closing.
"She heard what was going on, she
heard the tone in my voice and she stayed
out back," Castaneda said.
The gunman then jumped over the coun-
ter and ordered Castaneda to open the
register.
Castaneda said the robber stood behind
her as she collected the cash from the
open register and placed it on the floor.
"About that time he put the gun to the
back of my head and said, 'What's the com-
bination to the safe?'" she said.
Castaneda didn't know the combination,
and told the robber so. He backed her
away from the money, led her to the rear of
the store and forced her to the ground.
A customer entered the store at just that
moment.
"When the customer came in he put the
gun to .the back of my head and told me not
to say a word," Castaneda said.
Castaneda's feet could be seen protrud-
ing from behind the counter. The robber
pulled them back.
"He pulled my feet in and straddled me,
put the gun to my head and told me if I said
anything he would kill me," she said, add-
ing she believed he would have. "He was
real enough for me."
The customer, seeing money piled on
the floor and unable to find any employees,


left the store and called for help..When the
customer returned, "the money that was
on the floor was gone and the back door
was wide open," Castaneda said.
Castaneda said she didn't realize tow
fast things had happened until she saw
video footage of the incident.
She said the store has been robbed in
the past, but never has an assailant jumped
over the counter to get to the register.
"He came in like a bat out of hell," she
said. "He came in so fast, cocked his gun
and all I saw was his mask and his gun and
I immediately threw my hands up."
Castaneda said she would have gladly
complied with the robber's demand for the
combination to the safe, had she been able.
. "I would have been more than happy
to open that safe if I would have had that
code," Castaneda said. "'hen he put that
gun to my head and asked me and the
way he asked me for the code for that
safe I just knew that if I didn't give him
that code he was going to, shoot me."
Castaneda said there was no telling what
the robber would have done had the cus-
tomer looked behind the counter.
"We were praying for the customer to
not come around the corner," she said.
"He would have shot him, he would have
shot us he would have shot all of us,
probably."


at 12,209. The Dow hadn't lead consumers to feel
closed above 12,000 since more confident about their
Aug. 1. The Standard & wealth, they may spend
Poor's 500 index is close to more. That could help sus-
having its best month since tain economic growth.
1974. The GDP report mea-
If higher stock prices sures the country's total


through this," he said.
Adams said the last charter review
commission that was formed five years
ago also reviewed the entire document
during public meetings.
"It didn't take that long to do," he said.
"We went through it thoroughly. This is
the governing document of Columbia
County."
The goal is to. complete the char-
ter review early enough to give the
Columbia County Commission- time to
review proposed changes, if any are
suggested. If the commission does not
choose to propose changes, the char-


output of goods and ser-
vices. It covers everything
from bicycles to battle-
ships, as well as services
such as haircuts and doc-
tor's visits.


ter will remain the same until another
review is held.
Though no formal vote was taken, no
commission members disagreed when
Adams asked if everyone wanted a thor-
ough review of the charter at upcoming
meetings.
If changes are recommended, com-
missioners must review the suggestions
and send them to the supervisor of elec-
tions in time to have them put on a ballot
for voter approval.
The next meeting is at 6 p.m. on Nov.
10 at the school board administrative
complex in Lake City.


AIRPORT: Finishing touches remain

Continued From Page 1A


it will take less than 24 hours to make
the transition. People trying to contact
the airport that day will have their calls
forwarded to Lake City City Hall or to the
cell phones of airport managers.
Once the remaining operations are
moved to the new building, Harwell said
the goal is to find a new tenant to lease
the old terminal.
The $2.9 million project, which also
includes additional parking spaces and a
second entrance, is funded mostlythrough
the Federal Aviation A~ministration, with
approximately $500,000 of city money to
qualify for matching funds from a Florida
Department of Transportation grant.
The new terminal will include internal
and external security cameras, weather
monitors on flat screen TVs, a public con-
ference room, a security room and WiFi
access throughout the building. Motion
sensors throughout the building will turn
on and off-room lights to save energy.
A pilot's lounge will be open 24 hours a
day. Pilots will be given a code to unlock
the electronic security so they can enter
the building after normal business hours,
which are from 7 am. to 6 p.m. every


day except Thanksgiving and Christmas.
Other facilities for pilots including a
shower, recliners in the lounge to catch
a few hours of sleep, a computer with an
Internet connection and a flight planning
room.
"Well hopefully attract other aviation
type businesses to enhance the business
side of the airport," Harwell said. "It's
wide open."
Harwell said a flight school or sky div-
ing business would be good additions to
the airport.
"I think it's one of the more modern
buildings in Lake City," Harwell said.
."With the construction of this new facil-
ity, we will entertain new operations."
Grayson Cason, the airport manager
and assistant city manager, said the air-
port is important to those who house
aircraft in hangers at the airport and
corporations that conduct business in
the region.
"I think it certainly provides a first
impression second to none," he said.
"It's a quality place to conduct flight
operations. It's a great addition to the
community."


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CHARTER: Complete review coming

Continued From Page 1A


LAKE CITY REPORTER












OPINION


Friday, October 28,201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


The


right


way to


start

W e don't
know where
the delib-
erations of
the Columbia
County Charter Review
Commission will eventually
lead, but we were pleased to
learn members will review
the county's governing docu-
ment in deliberate, methodical
detail before considering any
changes.
Thursday's meeting may
have been the shortest on
record. Members addressed
a few housekeeping issues
then agreed without dissent to
undertake a careful line-by-line
review ofthe document that
sets forth the basic structure
of county government Twenty
minutes, tops.
That's fine, since the real
work won't start for at least a
couple of weeks, when the com-
mission begins its run-through
of the 18-page document in
order to see whether members
at least interpret its various
provisions in roughly the same
fashion.
We know folks are in a hurry
to get to the heart of the mat-
ter, but careful preparation can
only make the commission's
later work and final recom-
mendations more credible.

HI G H LI G H T"S
IN HISTORY
Today is Friday, Oct 28.
On this date:

In 1636, the General Court
of Massachusetts passed a
legislative act establishing
Harvard College.

In 1918, the Republic of
Czechoslovakia proclaimed its
independence.

In 1919, Congress enacted
the Volstead Act, which pro-
vided for enforcement of
Prohibition, over President
Woodrow Wilson's veto.

* Associated Press

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get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman .

LETTERS
POLICY
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T he federal student
loan program has
been a whammy, the
academic version of
selling people mort-
gages they can't-afford, generat-
ing $1'.1 trillion in debt while
fueling tuition hikes. That's.
more money than Americans
owe on credit cards, huge num-
bers are defaulting, and here
comes President Barack Obama
with a solution. Only itfs not It's
a farce.
In full campaign mode while
once more neglecting the duties
of office, Obama showed up at
a Denver high school to outline
more of his executive orders
that will do absolutely nothing
for 29 million of the 36 million
paying off these loans, and
something on the order of a
smidgen for most of the others.
One move affecting roughly
6 million of the. debtors, for
instance, is to allow consolida-
tion of private and public loans
so as to reduce interest pay-
ments by half a percentage
point, or less than $10 a month,
according to a calculation by
Atlantic magazine.'But hold the
chuckles. There's more.
The president also intends to
reduce the mandatory amount
due on some loans in 2012 from
15 percent of income a year
to 10 percent, while allowing
full forgiveness after 20 years
instead of 25. The thing is, this
change was due to go into effect
in 2014 anyway, no more than
1.6 million will be eligible for
it, and many of those probably
won't sign up because, when
you deal with Uncle Sam, it's
not red, white and blue you are
dealing with. It is only red. Red
tape.
"We can't wait for Congress,"


Soften say "It Takes a
Parent" to raise a child.
Ironically, that was the
title of the book I was
writing when I unexpect-
edly became that single par-
ent. The title then took on new
meaning. Over the subsequent
years, I've realized more than
ever that while parenting can
sometimes be done by one
person successfully, it's a job
designed for two.
Sometimes, it takes a small,
well-trained army a village
- to raise a little one. Not in
the sense of more federal fund-
ing for all sorts of expensive
programs, but in the sense of
caring adults involved in the
lives of each other and each
other's kids. Giving and receiv-
ing grace, or "unmerited favor."
Something we all need.
I was reminded of this again
one recent weekend. Three of


W.-:. i -
Jay Ambrose
Speaktojay@ool.com
Obama said while in the swing
state of Colorado that could
be absolutely crucial in next
year's presidential election. The
question is how -much longer
we can wait for Obama to get
serious about the economy (not
to mention the Constitution he
is ignoring). Here he is trying
to replicate Harry Truman's
unexpected victory in 1948 by
running against a "do-nothing
Congress" when he ought to
be seeking common ground on
measures he has been hiding
from for three years now.
You remember, of course,
how he backed a do-nothing
stimulus bill that worsened a
debt that absolutely has to be
restructured for the economy to
* purr. His real attention most of
his first year in office was to a
health care measure that raises
deficits, raises costs, denies
liberties and fixes virtually noth-
ing that could not have been
more cheaply accomplished.
Advocates trotted out horror
stories that could be trotted
out under any system as if the
bill would cure them. A favorite
was how so many of the elderly
could not afford long-term care.
Of course, the section of
a mostly unread, 2,000-page
bill that dealt with that issue
was flimflam, as even Obama
finally recognized in announc-
ing it would go poof. Not too


Betsy Hart
betsysblog.com
my four children were at my
sister's house, in my absence.
One behaved badly, very badly,
in front of other extended family
and guests. My sister needed to
step in and admonish the child,
then make sure an apology to
the assemblage took place. The
offending party wasn't as con-
trite as one would have liked in
that instance. But it was a start.
I see the challenges they
present as God's grace to me,
too.
In any case, it's a wonderful
thing to have a member of "the


long before that, however, he.
had figured out a way to make
his "reform" more expensive
by making sure even the rich
he wants to tax more will soon
have to make no insurance
co-payments on birth control
purchases. The worst of the act
is that it adds more to the debt
and is scaring businesses out of
expansion because of the costs
and complications for them.
Time and again, govern-
ment does that kind of thing.
As too many have failed to
notice, Congress prompted the
fiscal crisis by conniving with
Fannie Mae and Wall Street
on means of getting mortgage
loans t6 the unqualified. Among
those later lying bloody on the
ground were those awarded
the unaffordable mortgages.
Preoccupied with his health
measure, Obama had some
weak-kneed ideas to help them
and lately came up with more
weak-kneed ideas to bring down
interest rates for those strug-
gling the least
The student loan program
has been more of the same.
While tuition charges have gone
up beyond the ability of many
families to pay, the government
has made it easier for them to
find the money in the short
run, meaning tuition charges
go up even more. The politi-
cally advantageous move is to
pretend the guaranteed loans
are rescue instead of culprit, but
culprit'they are.


* Jay Ambrose, formerly
Washington director of editorial
policy for Scripps Howard news-
papers and the editor of dailies in
El Paso, Texas, and Denver, is a
columnist living in Colorado.


village" confidently step in and
say to a child, "I love you too
much to let you do that here,"
instead of being so worried
about my ego that it might
only be whispered to me later,
if at all. Possibly with condem-
nation of me in the process,
and most important with the
difficulty in the child's heart
going unanswered in the
moment.
I think as a mom of sev-
eral children herself, my sister
"gets" it. That's how the village
is supposed to work. That's
grace.
Other friends and family have
stepped in to help me over the
years. In the process, I'm often
reminded that where there is
grace there is little room for
defensiveness.
* Betsy Hart hosts the "It Takes a
Parent" radio show on WYLL-AM
1160 in Chicago.


4A


ANO
VI


THEIR.
EW


Obama


housing


plan is

no cure


recognized the
obvious steps that.
had to be taken
after 2008's hious-
ing disaster no more loans
to.unqualified buyers, no more
creative financing, no more
packaging for resale of secu-
ritized mortgages not worth
their face value.
Apparently, President
Barack Obama already has
forgotten. He proposes a hous-
ing fix with more problematic
government intrusions like
those that contributed to the
crisis. His housing rescue
plan, at best, will be ineffec-
tive. At worst, it may mean
another round of financial
moral hazards, more pain from
main street to Wall Street and,
of course, ultimately, mbre
demand on taxpayers.
Three years ago the presi-
dent proposed a fix, the Home
Affordable Refinance Program.
* He hoped to help 5 million '
people refinance mortgages.
Only 822,000 took advantage.
Only one-tenth of those owed
significantly more than their
homes were worth. Today,
about 10 million American
homeowners are underwater
on their mortgages.
A significant problem was
the inability of the government
to force banks to refinance and.
risk losing money. The plan's
disincentives included limiting .'
aid to borrowers who owed 25
percent more than their prop-
erties are worth, costly upfront.
fees and banks worried they
would be liable if borrowers
defaulted on refinanced loans.
Now, the president wants to
expand what has largely failed, -
adding greater financial risks
to prod banks and underwater
borrowers into refinancing.
Mr. Obama's new program
places no limit on how much
borrowers can owe, reduces
fees and largely relieves banks
of liability in defaults.
The president wants to help
homeowners in the hope they
will spend what money is left
over to stimulate the economy.
His plan is more likely to merely
delay some defaults while expos-
ing lenders to losses that, if his-
tory is any judge, are likely to be
left for taxpayers to pay..
It's understandable to want to
save a person's home. But the
government shouldn't force oth-
ers' assets, investments and pen-
sion funds to be placed at risk to
accomplish the goal.
An added irony is that Mr.
Obama's plan generally would
serve the least-suffering hom-
eowners, including many living
in homes valued at $700,000
or more. Borrowers must not
have missed any payments
in the past year. Their loans
must be owned or guaranteed
by Fannie Mae and Freddie
Mac, the two quasigovern-
ment agencies on life-support,
already bailed out with $169
billion in taxpayer money and
without assets enough to cover
all the missed payments they ;.
have guaranteed. :
As painful as it is to hear,
Republican presidential candi- :
date Mitt Romney was correct
when he said recently that
the government should leave
mortgages alone and let the -
housing market bottom out
The government should allow
private banks and lenders to
voluntarily work out financially :
sound refinancing agreements.
without government's coer-
cion or perverse incentives.
Otherwise, the pain will last
longer and the ultimate costs
will increase.


* The Orange County Register


www.lakecityreporter.com


Obama games on


student loans


Extra hands support


children and parents













Blackbeard's cannon salvaged from shipwreck off NC


BEAUFORT, N.C. A
2,000-pound cannon pulled
from the waters near
Beaufort Wednesday will
give archeologists and his-
torians more. ammunition
for separating fact from leg-
end surrounding the infa-
mous pirate Blackbeard.
The Queen Anne's
Revenge Project brought
the massive gun ashore
and displayed it to the
public before taking to a
laboratory at East Carolina
University. Onlookers
cheered as the 8-foot-long'
gun was raised above the
water's surface.
"The last people who
saw this were pirates,"
QAR project director Mark
Wilde-Ramsing told more'
than 100 spectators who.
later gathered in front
of Beaufort's Maritime
Museum for a closer look
at the 18th century weap-
on.
Dozens of local residents
turned out, while some
Blackbeard enthusiasts
drove in from other parts
of the state.
"We read about it last
night, and I asked the kids:
are we going to skip school
tomorrow, and go see this?"
said Joy Herndon, who
made the roughly 230-mile
trek from Greensboro with
her children, Lucy and
Kevin.
Separating the
Blackbeard legend from
historical facts is one of
the goals of the QAR recov-


ery effort, which, has so
far netted some 280,000
artifacts, said Joseph
Schwarzer, director of the
North Carolina Maritime
Museum.
"This is about as close
to that particular point in
American history, and to
piracy, as anybody is ever
going to get," Schwarzer
said.
The .recovery 'effort
involves collaboration
between the state depart-
ments of Cultural Resources
and Environmental 'and
Natural Resources, the
National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Agency, East
Carolina University and
other agencies. ,
The gun recovered
Wednesday was the 13th
cannon raised from the
shipwreck. Other items
have included medical sup-
plies, dishes, gold dust,
prisoner shackles, African
jewelry and small weap-
onry.
Schwarzer said research-
ers believe the ship was
built as La Concorde, a
French' slave-trading ves-
sel, butwas commandeered
by Blackbeard atid his
crew six months prior to its
grounding near Beaufort
Inlet
Historians theorize that
the ship was intentionally
scuttled by Blackbeard,
who then took off in a
smaller boat, because he
could no longer afford the
expense of four ships and a


pirate following estimated
at 400.
Neal Stetson, 58, said he
and his wife drove a half-
hour from Newport.to see
the recovered, cannon.
"After we moved here,
I became fascinated with
Blackbeard, particularly
all the tales and legends
that surround him," said
Stetson, who came to the
area from Maryland six
years ago. "It's amazing
and fortunate that they
found the wreck."
An exhibit of the items
recovered from the ship
opened at the Beaufort
Maritime Museum in June
and has already attracted
more than 100,000 visi-
tors, said N.C. Cultural
Resources Secretary Linda
Carlisle.
Only about half the ship-
wreck has been examined
so far, but Carlisle said'the
state has a goal-pf finish-
ing the recovery effort by
2013.
"We're really concerned
about the site itself," she
said. "We live through each
hurricane season with trep-
idation." -
The project could move
more swiftly if additional
funding was available.
Carlisle said it costs about
$150,000 'annually for the
reporery and lab work, but
state, funding has not kept
up with'the need.-
Tholigh some flakes of
gold dust are: the closest
to pirate's treasure yet dis-


Researchers led by the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources' Underwater Archaeology
Branch recover a 2,000-pound cannon from the wreck of the pirate Blackbeard's ship,.which
has been on the ocean floor off the North Carolina coast for nearly 300 years, Wednesday, in
Beaufort, N.C.


covered, the project, and
museum exhibit has netted
the state a valuable influx of
tourism dollars, as well as
drawn international atten-
tion to the state, Carlisle
added.
The cannon will be pre-
served at the lab at ECU
-while the research staff
studies both the weapon
and the cement-like shell
of sand, salt and barnacles
covering it, a process that


could easily take five years,
said Sarah Watkins-Keeney,
'chief conservator for the
QAR project
Blackbeard was an
Englishman whose
real name may have
been Edward Teach or
Thatch. After captur-
ing La Concorde in the
Caribbean, Blackbeard and
his men blockaded the pbrt
of Charleston for a time.
He was sailing north from


Charleston when his ship
went aground in what was
then known as Old Topsail
SInlet, now Beaufort Inlet.
After being granted a par-
don from North Carolina
Gov. Charles Eden in June
1718, Blackbeard was killed
five months later by mem-
bers of the Royal Navy of
Virginia at Ocracoke Inlet.
Associated Press


Marlboro Man meets moisturizer


By MAE ANDERSON
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK --
Everyone wants flawless
skin, flat abs and a fab
rear. But men don't always
admit it.
So, companies that sell
products promising to help
guys lose weight, conceal
bloat and enhance kinii
have to walk a fine line
between men's vanity and
masculinity. But how do
you market moisturizer to
the Marlboro Man?
Dove plays the theme
song to the 1930s TV west-
ern "The Lone Ranger" and
compares guys' skin with
cowhide in commercials
for its men's shower gel.
Weight Watchers uses TV
spots with trimmed-down
singer Jennifer Hudson to
market to women, but opts
for average Joes talking
about drinking beer and
grilling meat in ads for its
weight loss program for
men. Dr Pepper is more
overt in ads for its diet
soda targeted toward men
with the tagline: "It's not
for women."
The ads come as guys
of all ages are succumb-
ing to growing pressure to
suck in their guts and hide
their blemishes. In one of
the biggest signs that men
are more image-conscious,
the number of chemical
peels, laser hair removal
and other cosmetic proce-
dures on men is up 45 per-
cent since 2000, according
to the American Society of
Plastic Surgeons.
."Back in the day, guys
cared more about work-
ing hard and provid-
ing than having a hairy
chest or a beer belly," said
Brian McCarthy, 32, a
Philadelphian who works
out regularly and uses
hair pomade. "Guys worry


more about their appear-
ance than they used to."
Fashion and pop culture
have a lot to do with the
change. The ultra-slim sil-
houette and skinny jeans
that hit the high-fashion
world several years, ago
have infiltrated men's
departments in main-
stream stores like'Banana
SReublic and OdifNavy.And
because of social media
websites like Face.book
and Twitter, men constant-
ly are confronted with pho-
tos of fit'male celebs like
singer Justin Timberlake
and actor Will Smith.
The U.S. economic,
downturn even plays a
role. With unemployment
around 9 percent, men
looking for a job have to
make sure their look is as
polished as their resume.
'The better you look, the
more you're going to earn,"
said Deborah Mitchell,
executive director for
the Center for Brand and
Product Management at
the University ofWisconsin
School of Business. "Men
are increasingly thinking
'Wow, I need to look good
or look young.'"
That doesn't mean men
want the whole world to
know.
Dove officials had that in
mind when they launched
a line of shower gels for
men. The brand, a unit of
Unilever, had been synon-
ymous with women since
the 1950s. But when Dove
rolled out the Men+Care
line of lighter-scented
shower gels, it used .a
-more "manly" approach to
marketing.
The "Manthem," which
was launched during
the Super Bowl in 2010,
showed a man's journey
through life from concep-
tion to age 30. In another
ad, the theme music for


"The Lone Ranger" plays
as a deep male voice
urges men to use Dove
shower gel to moisturize
their "man hide," which
it says dries out like cow-
hide. Then, the voiceover
implores men. to not be
bashful: "Be comfortable
in your own skin."
Rob Candelino,
Unilever's marketing direc-
tor for personal wash in the
U.S., declined to give sales
for the Men+Care line,
Sbut said the campaign has
exceeded expectations.
Before seeing ads for
the Men+Care-line, James
Harris, 32, wouldn't dare
use his girlfriend's Dove
soap. But since seeing one
of the ads during aYankees
baseball game in April, he
has become a loyal user of
the brand. "If it's for men,
I'll use it" says the student
who lives in Birmingham,
Ala. "If it's for women, I
won't."
Weight Watchers found
that men: respond better
to real men rather than
women or celebs in
ads for its weight loss pro-
gram. In April, it launched
its first national campaign-
targeting men, using ordi-
nary fellas talking about its
online "cheat sheets" that
give tips on thehealthiest
ways to enjoy beer and
grilled meats.


UN: Leaded fuel to be gone by 2013


BY RON DePASQUALE
Assbciated Press

UNITED NATIONS -
Leaded gasoline, once so
widespread it was sold at
U.S. pumps -as "regular"
fuel, is expected to be erad-
icated globally within two
years, the United Nations
Environment Program
announced Thursday.
With the end of leaded
gasoline in sight, public
health and environmental
advocates are claiming vic-
tory in a fight that stretches
all the way back to when it
was first added to gasoline
in the 1920s.
Leaded gasoline is
still used in six nations.
Afghanistan, Algeria, Iraq,
North Korea, Myanmar
and Yemen are expected to
complete the phase-out by
2013, said the U.N., which
is assisting those nations.
The elimination of lead-
ed gasoline has increased
IQ scores, lowered lead-in-
blood levels by up to 90 per-
cent and prevented the pre-
mature deaths of more than
1.2 million people annually,
according to a new study
by Thomas Hatfield, chair-
man of California State
University, Northridge's
department of environmen-
tal and occupational health.
"We live in a time when
politicians and lobbyists
make sport out of -pitting
the economy against public


health," said Peter Lehner,
executive .director of the
Natural Resources Defense
Council. 'This study flies
in the face of those petty
politics."
In 2002, the NRDC and
the U.N. Environmental
Programbegan a final push
to eradicate leaded fuel by
foundingthePartnershipfor
Clean Fuels and Vehicles,
which helps developing
nations with the switch to
unleaded gasoline.
Most of the six nations
still using leaded. gaso-
line, are only using small
amounts, said Jim Sniffen, a
U.N. Environment Program
spokesman. They are work-
ing with the U.N. and part-
ner agencies to conduct
blood testing for lead levels
and develop plans to phase
out leaded fuel, he said.
Lead became the gaso-
line additive of choice in the
1920s, after General Motors,
DuPont and Standard Oil of
New Jersey, the forerun-
ner of Exxon, chose it over
clean-burning ethanol and
other alternatives as a way
to make engines run bet-
ter. It became universal
despite warnings from pub-
lic health advocates and a
scandal over the deaths in
1924 of six refinery work-
ers in Newark, New Jersey,
who were poisoned while
manufacturing it and "were
led away in straitjackets,"
said Bill Kovarik, a journal-


ist and communication pro-
fessor at Radford University
who researched the history.
of leaded gasoline.
"Historically, there are
only a handful of major'
environmentalvict'ories like'
this," Kovarik said. "It-took'
90 years to eradicate what.'
was always a well-known,
poison from a product that
everyone uses. It's a great
achievement, but it- really
says something about how
public health works glob-
ally, that it took so long
... Benjamin Franklin com-
plained about lead poison-
ing in print shops."
The industry falsely
claimed that there were noi.-
alternatives to lead, which-
was more profitable, and':
gained' control over the
government's scientific
study of it, Kovarik said.
Eventually, exposure to."
airborne lead 'was found
to cause brain,'kidney and
cardiovascular damage. In.
children, ,it was found to
lower IQ levels and shorten'
attention spans,
A public health cri-
sis again erupted aroutmd
lead in the 1960s as the
environmental movement
bloomed.









r)0\ \l I I (_I


- _


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427








6A LAKE CITY REPORTER, LOCAL FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


Fort White High School Indian Uprising


Community pep rally
is a prelude to Friday's
homecoming game.


fr'*


1ow featuring:
Latisse
r low ft_
l^^ jtj: "iC
i^^^^^


Photos by JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
TOP LEFT: Fort White receiver AJ Legree (3) amps
up'the audience Thursday during the Fort White Indian
Uprising. TOP RIGHT: Members of the Fort White High
School dance team perform in front of school staff,
students, friends and family. MIDDLE LEFT: Fort White
High School guidance counselor Melinda Carson (from
left), ESE resource teacher Amber Bussey-Parks, and
guidance counselor Stacy Worrell dance to 1950s rock-
and-roll music during a skit Thursday. MIDDLE RIGHT:
Fort White High School students portraying Rocky
Balboa helps up Ozzy
Osbourne after hitting him
in the jaw after Osbourne
doubts Fort White's vic-
tory over Rickards High.
LEFT: Students dressed as
Wayne's World TV show
hosts Wayne Campbell and
Garth Algar during a skit
Thursday.


John S. Poser, M.D., P.A., F.A.C.S.
Diplomat of the American
Board t! ,i , ,


9 P


Dr. Poser is
NOW ACCEPTING
PATIENTS
in Lake City at
at Southwest Family
Dentistry
.Call for appointments


OSER


Answers to

Acid Reflux
If you experience symptoms after eating that make you miserable,
you may have more than a case of simple heartburn.
You might have Acid Reflux Disease.
Join us for Tummy Talk at Lake City Medical Center.
Dr. Miguel Tepedino and Dr. Peter Sarantos will discuss how
Acid Reflux is diagnosed, how it can sometimes be managed
with medicine and the advanced, minimally-invasive procedures
that work when medications do not.

Friday, November 4
12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Lake City Medical Center Classroom
Our program is free and includes lunch.
Please RSVP by November 2. Call 1-800-611-6913.


NORTH FLORIDA
N~L REGIONAL HEALTHCARE


LAKE CITY'
MEDICAL CENTER


12921 SW 1st Road, Suite 219 Tioga, FL 32669
352-372-3672
www.posermd.com
.~~~~~ ~~ .- '.' .


0i










Story ideas?

Contact
STim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@akecityreportercom


Friday, October 28, 201 I


Lake City Reporter


SPORTS


www.lakecityreporter.com


CHEAP SEATS


It3.


Tim Kirby
Phone:(386) 754-0421
tkirby@akecityreportercom


Return

to the

ranks
At an age
when many
coaches are
hanging up
their whistle,
Rudy Hubbard began a
reclamation project
Hubbard, 65, took
over as head coach at
Rickards High in 2008,
after being in the
business world more
than 20 years.
"I was watching
Rickards and they were
having a hard time,"
Hubbard said. 'They
never seemed to get
where they wanted to
get It became a
challenge for me."
Hubbard had plenty of
laurels on which to rest
He was head coach at
Florida'A&M from
1974-85, when the
Rattlers compiled an
83-48-3 record.
The Rattlers won the.
Black College National
Championship in 1977
and won the first NCAA
Division 1-AA National
Championship in 1978.
Florida A&M was
23-1 in the tvycIyears.
The Rattlers fell to 7-4 in
1979, but one' of the wins
was over Miami.
Hubbard was inducted
into the Florida A&M
University Athletics Hall
of Fame in 1990.
Hubbard had already
attained great heights in
football.
An Ohio native, he
earned a scholarship to
Ohio State, and played
under Woody Hayes.
Hubbard starred in
.football, basketball and
track in high school.
After graduation,
Hubbard was given a job
on Hayes' staff the
first black coach at Ohio
State.
"I may have been the
first black coach' in the
Big 10," Hubbard said.
"I don't remember many
going ahead of me."
Hubbard said the
Buckeyes ended his
senior year on a
seven-game win streak.
That set the stage for a
national championship
season in 1968.
Ohio State (9-0) beat
Southern Cal (9-0-1),
27-16, in the Rose Bowl.
'That was O.J.
Simpson's senior year,"
Hubbard said.
During his time at
Ohio State, Hubbard
recruited and coached
Archie Griffin, the
only two-time Heisman
Trophy winner.
In 1974, Florida A&M
lured Hubbard away.
Hubbard has only
praise for the gruff
Hayes.
"He was a great coach
and a great guy to have
on your side," Hubbard
said. "I was fortunate to
stay and coach with him
for six years. It was a
great time in my life and
I am proud of it"
* Tim Kirby is sports editor
of the Lake City Reporter.


CHS ready


for district


showcase


Tigers have
diverse offensive
attack system.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
When Columbia High
tangles with Orange Park
High in a District 4-6A
showcase tonight, it will be
a contrast of styles.
While the Raiders will
come in with primarily a
running attack, the Tigers
will use a variety of ways to
attack Orange Park.


Columbia's passing
game has been led by Jayce
Barber. He's thrown for
seven touchdowns with just
two interceptions this sea-
son and completed 44-of-87
passes for 722 yards.
.Barber has been danger-
ous with his feet as well.
Despite only rushing for 60
yards, Barber has reached
the, end zone six times on
the ground.
The Tigers use a trio of
running backs to attack
defenses with all three
CHS continued on 3B


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Zedrick Woods (25) tackles a Middleburg runner on Oct. 21.


Fantastic


Lake City beats
Richardson,
18-16, to win cup.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com


In the 12th annual meet- -
ing of the Commanders
Bowl, the Lake City Middle
School Falcons retained the
Commanders Cup with an
18-16 win at Tiger Stadium
on Thursday.
Richardson Middle'
School had a chance with
the ball at the one-yard
line with under a minute.
remaining, but Roger Cray
recovered a fumble and the
Falcons sat on the clock to
preserve the win.
After a scoreless first
quarter, Richardson
punched in a five-yard
touchdown with a Gabriel
Williams run. Williams also
had runs of eight and 10
yards on the drive. Lake City Middle School celeb
LaDarius Powell made it are Jacob Thomas (offensive I
8-0 on a two-point conver- Carl Rentz, past commander
sion with 7:45 remaining in
the second quarter.
Lake City answered on Thomas was cut down
its following drive. Faced on the two-point conversion
with a fourth-and-five situ- as he tried to run it in on a
ation, the Falcons pitched keeper.
the ball to Dariaun Dallas, Richardson used a
who ran for six yards. On 42-yard run from Alphonso
the next play, Jacob Thomas Battle to set up the next
hit Dallas on a 60-yard pass score. After reaching the
play to cut the lead to 8-6 seven, Richard stalled until
with 5:02 remaining in the fourth down when Williams
second quarter. took a sweep play into the


finish


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Repocer
rates after winning the Commanders Bowl at Tiger Stadium on Thursday. Pictured (from left)
MVP), Falcons' coach Billy Jennings, Brock Jennings, D.A.V. Chapter 20 first vice-chairman
Willie Merrell, veteran John Mann, coach James Albritton and Roger Cray (defensive MVP).


end zone.
Powell converted on his
second-straight two-point
conversion for a 16-6 lead
with 45 seconds remaining
in the first half.
The Falcons tried to get
a quick score before the
half, but Powell picked
off a Thomas pass to help
the Wolves' walk into the


locker room with a 10-point
advantage.
The second half featured
the Falcons' defense step-
ping up to hold the Wolves
without a point.
Lake City cut the lead to
16-12 on the first drive of the
second half. Four Thomas
passes resulted in 54 com-
bined yards to move the


Falcons to the one. Thomas
snuck into the end zone on
a keeper. A sweep by Roger
Cray was shut down on the
two-point try.
SFollowing offensive
exchanges, Richardson
made a timely mistake to
help the Falcons take over
FALCONS continued on 3B


Indians' get


tune up for


homecoming


Fort White host
Rickards High at
7:30 p.m. today.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE Fort
White High football hosts
Rickards High at 7:30 p.m.
today.
Fort White (5-2) is cel-
ebrating homecoming this
week and facing a winless
opponent.
With the two biggest
games of the regular sea-
son coming up, it would be
easy for the Indians to look


ahead.
The District 3-3A cham-
pionship showdown with
Trinity Catholic High is
Nov. 4 in Ocala, then Fort
White plays host to Santa
Fe High in the Battle for the
Paddle rivalry game.
Fort White is coming
off an impressive offensive
performance at Fernandina
Beach High, where the
Indians scored 65 points
and rolled up 551 yards of
offense.
It was a super spoiler for
the Pirates' homecoming
and Fort White will be on


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Tavaris Williams (2) skirts out of the way of would-be Williston High tacklers


INDIANS continued on 3B in a game on Oct. 14.


Section B












LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


TELEVISION

STV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
practice for Turns Fast Relief 500, at
Martinsville,Va.
2 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR,Truck Series, final
practice for Kroger 200, at Martinsville,
Va.
3:30 p.m.
SPEED NASCAR, Sprint Cup,
"Happy Hour Series," final practice for
Tums Fast Relief 500, at MartinsvilleVa.
4:30 a.m.
SPEED Formula One, qualifying
for Indian Grand Prix, at Greater Nolda,
India
BOXING
II p.m.
SHO Welterweights, Javier Molina
(9-0-0) vs. Artemio Reyes (13-1-0);
middleweights, Brandon Gonzales
(14-0-0) vs. Ossie Duran (26-8-2), at
Atlantic City, N.J.
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN BYU vs. TCU, at Arlington,
Texas


GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGATour,Andalucia
Masters, second round, at Sotograhde,
Spain "
2:30 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour
Championship, second round, at
Charleston, S.C.
I am.
TGC PGA Tour, Asia Pacific
Classic Malaysia, third round, at Selangor,
Malaysia
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 7, Texas
at St. Louis (if necessary)
PAN AMERICAN GAMES
S8 p.m.
ESPN2 Events TBA, at Guadalajara,
Mexico
PREP FOOTBALL
10 p.m.
FSN Saguaro (Ariz.) at Chaparral
(Ariz-)
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR World Finals, third
round, at LasVegas


BASEBALL

World Series

Texas vs. St. Louis
St. Louis 3,Texas 2
Texas 2, St. Louis I
St.Louis 16,Texas 7
Texas 4, St. Louis 0
Texas 4, St. Louis 2
Wednesday
Te.cs at St.Louis, ppd., weather
Thursday
Texas at St. Louis (n)
Today
Texas (Harrison 14-9) at St. Louis
(TBA), 8:05 p.m. (if necessary)


FOOTBALL


NFL standings


Nev
Buff
N.Y
Mian


H2L
Teni
Jack
Indi:


AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
w England 5 I 0.833185 135
alo 4 2 0.667188 147
.Jets 4 3 0.571172 152
mi 0 6-0.000 90146
South
W L T Pct PF PA
iston 4 3 0.571182 131
nessee 3 3 0.500112 135
sonville 2 5 0.286 84 139
anapolis 0 7 0.000111 225
North


Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland


San
Oal
Kan
Der



N.Y
Dal
Wa
Phil


No
Tan
Atl
Car


Gre
Det
Chi
Min


San
Seat
Ariz
St. I


W L
5 2
4 2
4 2
3 3
West


T Pct PF PA
0.714151 122
0.667137 III
0.667155 83
0.500 97 120


W L T Pct PF PA
Diego 4 2 0.667141 136
kland 4 3 0.571160 178
nsasCity 3 3 0.500105 150
never 2 4 0.333123 155
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Giants 4 2 .0.667154 147
las 3 3 0.500149 128
shington 3 3 0.500116 116
adelphia 2 4- 0.333145 145
South
W L T Pct PF PA
w Orleans 5 2 0.714239 158
ipa Bay 4 3 0.571131 169
anta 4 3 0.571158 163
olina 2 5 0.286166 183
North
W .L T Pct PF PA
een Bay 7 0 01.000230141
roit 5 2 0.714194 137
cago 4 3 0.571170 150
nesota I 6 0. 143148 178
West
W L T Pct.PF PA
Francisco 5 I 0.833167 97
ttle 2 4 0.333 97 128
zona I 5 0.167116 153
.ouis 0 6 0.000 56 171


Sunday's Games
Indianapolis atTennessee, I p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, I p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Baltimore, I p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto,
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay,
N.Y.Jets, Oakland,Tampa Bay
Sunday, Nov. 6
Seattle at Dallas, I p.m.
Miami at Kansas City, I p.m.
Tampa Bay at New Orleans, I p.m.


Cleveland at Houston. I p.m.
San Francisco atWashington, I p.m.
N.Y.Jets at Buffalo, I p.m.
Atlanta at Indianapolis, I p.m.
Denver at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati atTennessee, 4:05 p.m.
Green Bay at San Diego, 4:15 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 4:15 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at New England, 4:15 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 7
Chicago at Philadelphia, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Detroit, Jacksonville,
Minnesota

College games

Today
BYU (6-2) vs.TCU (5-2) at Arlington,
Texas, 8 p.m.

College scores

Thursday
Virginia 28, Miami 21

Top 25 schedule


No. 3
3:30 p.m.
No. 4


Saturday
Oklahoma State vs. Baylor,

Stanford at Southern Cal,


No. 6 Clemson at Georgia Tech,
8 p.m.
No. 7 Oregon vs. Washington State,
3 p.m.
No. 8. Arkansas at Vanderbilt,
12:21 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State at No. 13
Nebraska, Noon
No. 10 Kansas State vs. No. II
Oklahoma, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 Wisconsin at Ohio State,
8 p.m.
No. 14 South Carolina at Tennessee,
7:15 p.m.
No. 15 Virginia Tech at Duke,
12:30 p.m.
No. 16 Texas A&M vs. Missouri, Noon
No. 17 Michigan vs. Purdue, Noon
No. 19 Texas Tech vs. Iowa State,
7 p.m.
No. 21 Penn State vs. Illinois,
3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Georgia vs. Florida,
3:30 p.m.
No. 23 Arizona State vs. Colorado,
6:30 p.m.
No. 25 West Virginia at Rutgers,
3:30 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Race week
r i
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
TUMS FAST RELIEF 500
Site: Martinsville, V
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
12:30-2 p.m., 3-5:30 p.m.); Saturday,
qualifying (Speed, noon-1:30 p.m.); Sunday,
race, 1:30 p.m. (ESPN, I-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval,
0.526 miles).
Race distance:263 miles, 500 laps.
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
KROGER 200
Site: Martinsville,a.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
2-3:30 p.m.); Saturday, qualifying
(10:30 a.m.-noon), race, 2 p.m. (Speed,
1:30-4:30 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway.
Race distance: 105.2 miles, 200 laps.
FORMULA ONE
GRAND PRIX OF INDIA
Site: Noida. India.
Schedule: Today, practice (Speed,
4:30-6 a.m.); Saturday, practice,
qualifying (Speed,4:30-6 a.m.);Sunday,race,
5:30 a.m. (Speed, 5-7:30 a.m.,
3-5:30 p.m.).
Tratk Buddh International Circuit
(road course, 3.192 miles).
Race distance: 191.52 miles, 60 laps.
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
BIG TIRES NHRA NATIONALS
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Today, qualifying; Saturday,
qualifying (ESPN2, 10:30 p.m.-
midnight);Sundayfinal eliminations (ESPN2,
7-10 p.m.).
Track: The Strip at Las Vegas Motor
Speedway.

IndyCar schedule

2011 winners
March 27 Honda Grand Prix of
St. Petersburg (Dario Franchitti)
April 10 Honda Indy Grand Prix of
Alabama (Birmingham) (Will Power)
April 17 Grand Prix of Long Beach
(Calif.) (Mike Conway)
May I Sao Paulo Indy 300 (Will
Power)
May 29 Indianapolis 500 (Dan
Wheldon)
June II FirestoneTwin 275 Race I
(Dario Franchitti)
June II RrestdneTwin 275 Race 2



Unsdramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

IRGFOO


(Will Power)
June 19 The Milwaukee 225, West
AllisWls. (Dario Franchitti)
June 25 Iowa Corn Indy 250,
Newton (Marco Andretti)
July 10 Honda Indy Toronto (Dario
Franchitti)
July 24 Edmonton Indy (Will
Power)
Aug. 7 Honda Indy 200, Lexington,
Ohio (Scott Dixon)
Aug. 14 MoveThatBlock.com Indy
225, Loudon, N.H. (Ryan Hunter-Reay)
Aug. 28- Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma
(Calif.) (Will Power)
Sept 4 Baltimore Grand Prix,
Baltimore (Will Power)
Sept. 18 Indy Japan 300, Motegi
(Scott Dixon)
Oct 2 Kentucky Indy 300, Sparta,
Ky. (Ed Carpenter)
Oct. 16 IndyCar World
Championships, LasVegas (canceled)
Driver standings final
I. Dario Franchitti, 573.
2.Will Power, 555.
3. Scott Dixon, 518.
4. Oriol Servia, 425.
5.Tony Kanaan, 366.
6. Ryan Briscoe, 364.
7. Ryan Hunter-Reay, 347.
8. Marco Andretti, 337.
9. Graham Rahal, 320.
10. Danica Patrick, 14.
II. Hello Castroneves, 3123
12.James Hlnchcllffe, 302.
13.Takuma Sato, 29'.
14.J.R.Hildebrand, 296.
(tie) Alex Tagliani, 296.
16.Vitor Meira, 287.
17. Mike Conway, 260.
18 E.J.Viso, 241.
19. Charlie Kimball, 233.
20. Simona de Silvestro, 225.

ALMS schedule

2011 winners
March 19 -Twelve Hours of Sebring
(Nicolas Lapierre, Loic Duval, Olivier
Panis)
April 16 Long Beach (Calif.) Grand
Prix (Lucas Luhr, Klays Graf)
July 9 Northeast Grand Prix,
Lakeville, Conn. (Chris Dyson, Guy
Smith)
July 24 Grand Prix of Mosport,
Bowmanville, Ontario. (Lucas Luhr, Klaus
Graf
Aug. 6 Challenge of Mid-Ohio,
Lexington, Ohio. (Lucas Luhr, Klaus Graf)
Aug. 21 Road Race Showcase,
Elkhart Lake, Wis. (Lucas Luhr, Klaus
Graf)
Sept. 3 Baltimore Grand Prix.
(Humnald AI Masaood, Steven Kane)
Sept. 17 Monterrey (Calif.) Sport
Car Championships. (Adrian Fernandez,
Harlod PrimatStefan Mucke)
Oct. I Petit Le Mans, Braselton,
Ga. (Franck Montagny, Stephane Sarrazin,
AlexanderWurz)
Final standings
I.Guy Smith, 186
(tie) Chris Dyson, 186
3. Klaus Graf, 124
4. Lucas Luhr, 114
5. Chris McMurry, 85
(tie) Tony Burgess, 85
5. Humaid AI Masaood, 64
(tie) Steven Kane, 64
9.Jay Cochran, 60
10.Adrian Femandez,25
(tie) Harold Primat, 25
(tie) Stefan Mucke, 25


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Wednesday's Games
Montreal 5, Philadelphia I
Calgary 4, Colorado 2
St. Louis 3,Vancouver 0
Thursday's Games
Montreal at Boston (n)
Columbus at Buffalo (n)
Toronto at N.Y. Rangers (n)
Winnipeg at Philadelphia (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh (n)
Florida at Ottawa (n)
Tampa Bay at Nashville (n)
Anaheim at Minnesota (n)
Los Angeles at Dallas (n)
Washington at Edmonton (n)
New Jersey at Phoenix (n),
Today's Games
Chicago at Carolina, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Colorado, 9 p.m.
St. Louis at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Saturday's Games
Ottawa at N.Y. Rangers, 3 p.m.
Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Boston at Montreal, 7 p.m.
San Jose at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Anaheim at Nashville,S p.m.
Detroit at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
New Jersey at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Washington at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


I--O LAN I IVUt, I littY L
I II ri v
NAASTV NEED P-
SNow arrange the circled letters
to. form the surprise answer, as
S suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:0L TI I i '^i

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: FILMY HUNCH INDIGO RITUAL
Answer: After being dealt a horrible poker hand, he
knew he was sitting in a FOLDING CHAIR


League reports
Results of league bowling at Lake
City Bowl:
HIT & MISS
Team standings: 1. Oddballs
(27-13); 2. Legal Ladies (26-15);
3. The Sandbaggers (23-17).
High handicap game: 1. Cathy
Pelley 235; 2. Joan Carman 224;
3. (tie) Sandy Black, Karen Clampett
220.
High handicap series: 1. (tie)
Susan Mears, Ruth Helms, Iva "Jean"
Dukes, Joyce Crandall 606.
(results from Oct. 25)
WATERGUARD
High scratch game: 1. (tie) Maggie
Battle, Lori Davis 212; 3. Lorie
Geiger 205; 4. Joyce Hooper 190.
1. Mark Davis 276; 2. Mark Koppa 226;
3. George Waiters 223.
High scratch series: 1. Lorrie
Geiger 558; 2. Lori Davis 539;
3. Maggie Battle 508. 1. Mark Davis
648; 2. Mark Koppa 601; 3. Bill Dolly
593.
High handicap game: 1. Lori Davis
252; 2. Maggie Battle 250; 3. Danni
Fair 236.. 1. Mark Davis 282; 2. Ken
Watson 255; 3. George Walters 243.
High handicap series: 1. Stacl
Greaves 667; 2. Rachel Mclnnaly
660; 3. Pat Fennell 654. 1. Marshall
Campbell 667; 2. Ben Nyssen 665;
3. Jesus Camacho 661.
High average: Mary Lobaugh 188,
Luke Milton 203.
(results from Oct. 25)
SUNDAY NITE MERCHANTS
Team standings: 1. TAZ (25-11);
2. WGASA (24-12); 3. McGhghy's
Navy (23-13).
High scratch game: 1-2. Cheryl
Jacks 172, 172; 3. Angela Pond 169.
1. (tie) Garrett Shay, Mark Moore 255;
3. Mike Rutter 244.
High scratch series: 1. Cheryl
Jacks 509; 2. Angela Pond 457;
3. Chrissy Fancy 444. 1. Mark Moore
683; 2. James McNalr 616; 3. Robert
Pond 611.
High average: 1. Norma Yeingst
171.48; 2. Jennifer Freeman 152.81;
3. Cheryl Jacks 151.15. 1. James
McNair 211.52; 2. A.J. Dariano
198.67; 3. Garrett Shay 190.96.


SCOREBOARD


BOWLING

(results from Oct. 23)
SEXY SENIORS
Team standings: 1. Farmers
(23.5-12.5); 2. Perky Pals (22.5-13.5);
3. Pin Droppers (21-15).
High scratch game: 1. Janie
Posey 182; 2. Roberta Giordano 175;
3. Vy Ritter 172. 1. Earl Hayward 244;
2. (tie) Vernon Black, Dan Ritter 202.
High scratch series: 1. Bea Purdy
479; 2. Louise Atwood 473; 3. Joanne
Denton 468. 1. Dan Ritter 593; 2. Earl
Hayward 572; 3. Vernon Black 504.
High average: 1. Joanne Denton
149.96; 2. Louise- Atwood 149.37;
3. Bea Purdy 142.96. 1. Dan Ritter
177.15; 2. Rick Yates 168.8.6; 3. Earl
Hayward 167.74.
(results from Oct. 18)
GOLDEN ROLLERS
Team standings: 1. 4 S's
(29.5-10.5); 2. Quirky Quad (29-11); 3.
BMW (26-14).,
High handicap game: 1. Joan
Carman 233; 2. Amy Musselwhite
231; 3. Pat Hale 220. 1. Bill Dolly 266;
2. (tie) Dan Ritter, George Walters
243.
High handicap series: 1. (tie) Judy
Sanders, Jane Sommerfeld 634;
3. Diane' Madson 630. 1. David
Duncan 717; 2. Sandy Sanders 687;
3. Jack Stanfleld 676.
High average: 1. De De Young
160.06; 2. Jane Sommerfeld 153.23;
3. Betty Carmichael 152.03. 1. David
Duncan 189.8; 2. Bill Dolly 189.2;
3. George Mulligan 174.63.
(results from Oct. 20)
MONDAY NIGHT MAVERICKS
Team standings: 1. Ronsonet
Buick/GMC (169.5-70.5); 2. Team
12 (145-95); 3. Rountree-Moore.
(1.43-97).
High scratch game: 1. Josh Bisque
287; 2. John Janki 278; 3. Robert
Stone 268.
High scratch series: 1. Josh
Bisque 755; 2. Zech Strohl 752;
3. Robert Stone 729.
High handicap game: 1. Josh
Bisque 301; 2. John Janki 294;
3. Carl McGhghy 291.
High handicap series: 1. Josh
Bisque 797; 2. Zech Strohl 752;
3. John Janki 735.
High average: 1. Zech Strohl


AMERICAN LEGION HOLD 'EM


Week nine winners/
qualifiers in the American
Legion Post 57 Texas
Hold 'em Champions
Tournament:
Oct. 17 Marshall
Garner, 'first; Frank
Capallia, second; Marylan
Kerley, third; Tim Murphy,
fourth;
Oct 20 Art Lowes,
first; Maggie Woods,
second; Joseph May, third;
Ray Benoit, fourth;
0. Oct. 22 Buddy
Witt, first; Frank Capallia,
second; Stacy Fuchs, third;
Tim Murphy, fourth.
Total qualified 48;
Royal Flush Jackpot -
$375.
SNon-members are
welcome to play.


ACROSS
1 Congratulatory
words
6 Plundered
treasure .
11 Exceedingly
clever
13 Hot fudge -
14 Movie ad
15 Straitlaced
ones
16 "You, there"
17 Add- -
(extras)
18 Pfc.'s
superior
21 Stadium
features
23 Natural
elevs.
26 Hit the -
27 "Bus Stop"
author
28 Waikiki
setting
29 Fix flowers
artistically
31 Stonehenge
worshipper


10-28


32 Cake
decoration


Eddied
Splinter group
Bachelor party
Curie
daughter
Loop trains
Not chic
Lair
Debt
memo
Mao -tung
High-fliers
(2 wds.)
Ergraving
expert
Tell about
Sombrero
go-with
Argyles
Hugo
contemporary


Answer to Previous Puzzle


SC1I CRAB UR GE
WAD H ILO P.EER
AVERAGES GI INS
P E STLE COR GI
EELS WANE
T WIST USED
U HS SERA E VEN
TOSS GIMGTG IDA
CLUE ABASH
GYRO DALIr
HEIST MOSEL L
SOAP I NUNDATE
OUST NOSE K0OA
BLTS AGED IN K


A Caokt C*vra


doc
DOWN 5 Springtime
1 Recipe meas. sound
2 Gloating cry 6 "To a Mouse"
3 MGM motto poet
start 7 Heavy burden


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


8 Roulette bet
9 kwon do
10 Survey choice
12 Losing
moisture
13 Mold source
18 One-horse
shay
19 Postal
delivery
20 Words for
songs
22 Spews out
23 Handled
roughly
24 Be a bandit
25 Without
warning.
28 Ex-Bruin
Bobby -
30 Colony
member
31 Absorbed
34 Squanders
36 Brown in
butter
39 Keats and
Byron
41 Ms. Dinesen
43 Linen color
44 Some H.S.
students
45 Want-ad
letters
46 RN forte
48 Grocery buy
49 PCB regulator
50 Home tel.


225.04; 2. Robert Stone 221.21;
3. Curtis Gutzmer 220.17.
(results from Oct. 17)

Youth leagues

MAJORS SCRATCH
Team standings: 1. Balls to the
Wall (76.5-51.5); 2. Ninja Bowling Co.
(74.5-53.5); 3. Angry Birds(: (63-65).
High scratch game: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 210; 2. Courtney Schmitt
194; 3. Linden Barney 193. 1. Dalton
Coar 235; 2. Micheal Burlingame 225;
3. Bobby Hosier 224.
High scratch series: 1. Courtney
Schmitt 586; 2. Linden Barney 516;
3. Lauren Snipes 506. 1. Bobby
Hosier 614; 2. (tie) Cody Howard,
Dalton Coar 612.
MAJORS
Team standings: 1. Bubblegum
(21.5-10.5); 2. Splltz Happen
(20.5-11.5); 3. Split Second (18-14).
High handicap game: 1. Mecenzie
Sellers 264; 2. Alyson Everett 242;
3. Chelsea Williams 233. 1. Shawn
Perry 250; 2. (tie) Jamie Moon, Jacob
Howell, David Senokossoff 247.
High handicap'series: 1. Mecenzie
Sellers 701; 2. Chelsea Williams
653; 3. Alyson Everett 647. 1. Jacob
Howell 676; 2. Anthony Cqors 656;
3. Josh Pettigrew 648.
JUNIORS
Team standings: 1. Crazy Kids
(26.5-5.5); 2. Lane Busters (22-10,
12,675 pins); 3. The Bud Utes (22-10,
11,009 pins).
High ,handicap game: 1. Sarah
Griffin 201; 2. Amanda Schmitt 196;
3. Dakota Stitsinger 191k 1. Ben
Williams 233; 2. Mason Cooper 212;
3. Blake Lyons 205.
High handicap series: 1. Sarah
Grifin 563; 2. Dakota Stitslnger 557;
3. Savannah Barr 554.1. Ben Williams
595; 2. Jarret Moehl 581; 3. Adam
Fralick 578.
BANTAMS
High handicap game: 1. Heaven
Camacho 195; 2. Jadyn, Freeman
174. 1. Carson Lyons 164.
High handicap series: 1. Jadyn
Freeman 474; 2. Heaven Camacho
471. 1. Carson Lyons 424.
(results from Oct. 15)


COURTESY PHOTO
Lake City Shrine Club's seventh Texas Hold'em fundraiser
tournament was Oct. 21. The top four finalist among the 17
players split the prize fund with each receiving $180:
Bob Holt (from left), Robert Lamberson, Vernon Higginbothem
and Ron Lubas.


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


Cards send World Series to Game 7


By BEN WALKER
Associated Press

ST. LOUIS David
Freese homered to lead
off the bottom of the 11th
inning, and the St Louis
Cardinals forced the World
Series to a Game 7 by ral-
lying from two-run deficits
against the Texas Rangers
in the 9th and 10th on
Thursday night
Freese hit a two-run triple
just over a leaping Nelson
Cruz to tie the score 7-7
in the ninth inning against
Neftali Feliz. Then, after
Josh Hamilton put Texas
ahead with a two-run homer
in the 10th off Jason Motte,
Ryan Theriot hit an RBI
groundout in the bottom
half and Lance Berkman
tied it 9-9 with a single.
Freese's shot to center
came off Mark Lowe. Game
7 is Thursday night
Texas had built a 7-4 lead
in the seventh when Adrian
Beltre and Nelson Cruz


hit consecutive home runs
off Lance Lynn, and Ian
Kinsler added an RBI single
off Octavio Dotel.
Allen Craig's second
homer of the Series cut the
gap in the eighth against
perek Holland.
In the ninth, Albert Pujols
doubled with one out off
Feliz and Berkman walked
on four pitches.
Craig took a called
third strike, and Freese
fell behind in the count
1-2. He sliced an oppo-
site-field drive, and when
Cruz jumped, the crowd of
47,315 at Busch Stadium
couldn't tell at first whether
he caught it
Feliz then retired Yadier
Molina on a flyout to right,
sending the game to extra
innings.
With Texas ahead 3-2 in
the Series and one win from
its first title, the Rangers
also wasted 1-0, 3-2 and 4-3
leads. The Cardinals made
three errors in a Series


game for the first time since
1943, and Rangers first base-
man Michael Young made
two, with each team allow-
ing two unearned runs.
Matt Holliday was picked
off in the sixth at third base
by catcher Mike Napoli,
thwarting the Cardinals'
attempt to go ahead, and
he had to leave the game
because of a bruised right
pinkie.
Hamilton's RBI single
had put the Rangers ahead
in the first offJaime Garcia,
Berkman's two-run homer
gave the Cardinals the
lead in the bottom half and
Kinsler's run-scoring dou-
ble tied it 2-all in the third.
Cruz reached when
Holliday dropped a flyball
leading off the fourth and
came home when Napoli
singled for his 10th RBI of
the Series. Berkman then
got to first on a throwing
error by Young starting the
bottom half and scored on
Molina's grounder.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
St. Louis Cardinals' Lance Berkman hits a RBI single off a pitch from Texas Rangers' Scott
Feldman during the tenth inning of Game 6 of baseball's World Series Thursday in St. Louis.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Florida's tight end Jordan Reed (11) jumps as a John Brantley pass is tipped into the
hands of FAU's Marcus Bartles (27) in Gainesville on Sept. 3.

With LSU, Bama on break,

other contenders tussle


By RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

With the game of the
year a week away, and No.
1 LSU and No. 2 Alabama
taking the weekend off,
the other national champi-
onship contenders will be
jostling for position behind
the SEC superpowers on
Saturday.
The picks:
Saturday
Baylor (plus 14) at
No. 3 Oklahoma State
If only RGIII could play
defensive back, too...
OKLAHOMA STATE 62-31
No. 4 Stanford (minus
71b) at No. 26 Southern
California
Cardinal offense is
punishing and precise ...
STANFORD 38-24.
No. 6 Clemson (minus
3'M) at Georgia Tech
Dabo-dacious Tigers
can match speed with any
team, but option is tricky ...
GEORGIA TECH 37-34.
Washington State
(plus 351) at No. 7
Oregon
Ducks have won four
straight vs. Cougars by
average of 40 ... OREGON
54-14.
No. 8 Arkansas (minus


Continued From Page 11
in scoring territory.
Roger Cray jumped in
front of a Richardson pass
at the Falcons 45-yard
line and returned it to the
Wolves' 20 to set up the
game-winning score.
After a series of runs,
including an eight-yard
keeper by Thomas, the
Falcons' faced a third and
goal from the four. Cray
took the ball on a sweep
and found the corner to
give Lake City an 18-16


10) at Vanderbilt
Hogs QB Tyler Wilson
leads SEC in passing by 52
yards ... ARKANSAS 35-21.
No. 9 Michigan State
(plus 4) at No. 13
Nebraska
Ohio State, Michigan,
Wisconsin; next up for
Spartans ... MICHIGAN
STATE 28-27.
No. 11 Oklahoma
(minus 131) at No. 10
Kansas State
Think Bob Stoops has
Sooners attention now? ...
OKLAHOMA 42-17.
No. 12 Wisconsin
(minus 7) at Ohio State
Badgers beat No. 1
Buckeyes last season ...
WISCONSIN 28-14. .
No. 14 South Carolina
(minus 4) at Tennessee
Ball Coach Spurrier
still loves beating UT ...
SOUTH CAROLINA 23-20.
No. 15 Virginia Tech
(minus.151) at Duke
Hokies in the lead
for fifth ACC title game
appearance ... VIRGINIA
TECH 28-14.
Missouri (plus 11) at
No. 16 Texas A&M
S-E-C, S-E-C, S-E-C ...
TEXAS A&M 45-28.
Purdue (plus 13'1) at
No. 17 Michigan


lead.
Battle returned the fol-
lowing kickoff to the 50-
yard line, but the Wolves'
offense stalled.
Ronnie Williamson
returned a punt to the
Falcons' 30-yard line with
1:14 remaining to give
Richardson a chance.
A Williams run of 10
yards and a facemask
followed by a Battle run
of five yards moved the
Wolves' inside the 10-yard


With tough closing
.stretch, Wolverines cannot
lose this one ... MICHIGAN
35-23.
Iowa State (plus 15)
at No. 19 Texas Tech
Air Tubby? Auburn
fans wondering where
this came from ... TEXAS
TECH 45-17.
Illinois (plus 51h) at
No. 21 Penn State
Anybody notice how
well PSU RB Silas Redd
has been playing? ... PENN
STATE 20-17.
No. 22 Georgia
(minus 1) vs. Florida at
Jacksonville
Mark Richt Stay or Go
Bowl ... GEORGIA 26-17.
Colorado (plus 30) at
No. 23 Arizona State
Buffs so banged up,
might have to suit-up
Ralphie ... ARIZONA
STATE 47-10.
No. 25 West Virginia
(minus 51') at Rutgers
Last trip to New Jersey
for the Mountaineers? ...
WEST VIRGINIA 24-14.

Last week's record:
13-6 (straight); 7-12 (vs.
spread).
Season record: 132-
27 (straight); 76-59-1 (vs.
spread).


line.
After picking up a
first down, the Wolves
faced a second and goal
from the four. Cray recov-
,ered a fumble, however,
and the Falcons' offense
ran out the clock on the
Wolves.
"Roger played an all-
around good game," Lake
City coach Billy Jennings
said. "He's a joy to coach
and is one of those once in
a lifetime players."


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High's Lauren Eaker (12) and Ashleigh Bridges (9) signals for one more point
during a game against Fort White on Sept. 14.


Lady Tigers season ends


against St. Augustine


By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com

Columbia High's volley-
ball season came to an end
as St Augustine High's Lady
Yellow Jackets defeated the
Lady Tigers in three sets
in the District 4-6A tourna-
ment on Wednesday.
"They are very good,"
Columbia coach Rebecca
Golden said. ."They're
young as well, but we're just


excited about next year." as the I
Columbia fell 12-25, 22-25 with 59
and 19-25. kills wi
Jessie Bates led the team Courso
with 17 assists, 10 digs and Thre
two aces. aces lee
Annie Milton led the had 45
Lady Tigers with four kills, ished w
Ashleigh Bridges, Jara Cour
Courson and Lauren Eaker with 13
added three kills. Courson blocks
also had nine digs. The
For the season, Bates had the se
593 assists to lead the team record.


Lady Tigers finished
3 kills. Milton led in
ith 129 followed by
n with 126.
e Tigers had over 40
i by Bates 48. Eaker
aces and Milton fin-
ith 41.
son led the team
1 digs. Milton had 42
to lead Columbia.
Lady Tigers finished
ason with a 12-9


averaging over four yards
per carry.
Braxton Stockton has
seen the majority of the
work this season with 70
carries for 289 yards. He's
scored three times.
Ronald Timmons came
on strong last week with
122 yards on only 13 carries.
Timmons has 238 yards for
the year on 44 carries with
one score.
Rakeem Battle has
rushed for 219 yards and
averages 5.6 yards per
attempt after being limited
in early-season action with
an injury.
Columbia is also versatile
in the passing game with
three receivers nearing 200
yards.


Continued From Page 1B

guard today to prevent that
from happening.
"We try to promote stay-
ing focused and not looking
ahead to the next week,"
Fort White head coach
Demetric Jackson said.


Nigel Atkinson had 14
catches for 192 yards, but
played the first two games
at quarterback.
Nate Ayers has 10 catch-
es for 290 yards and four
touchdowns.
Shaq Johnson leads the
team in receptions with 24
for the season. He has 221
receiving yards.
Defensively, the Tigers
also have multiple players
standing out.
Quayshon Monismith
leads the team in tackles
with 55 for the season.
Seven of those were tackles
for losses.
Austin Reiter and
Soloman Bell each have
43 tackles for the season.
Reiter leads the team with


"We have had a good week
of practice and been pretty
focused for the most part"
Jackson said the Indians
are healthy with the excep-
tion of Jomar Gainer, who
suffered a broken leg mid-


10 sacks.
Tyrone Sands is sec-
ond on the team with five
sacks.
Interceptions probably
won't come easy against
the Raiders, which don't
put the ball in the air
often, but Darius Williams
and Devonta6 Levy lead
the team with three each.
Trey Marshall has two
picks.
Still, the focus isn't on
individuals. It's on advanc-
ing to the playoffs.
"We have to take care
of business with district
implications on the line,"
Columbia coach Brian Allen
said. "This is a win that will
put us one step closer to
our ultimate goal."


way through the season.
Fort White had an after-
noon practice on Thursday
and the Indian Uprising
homecoming celebration was
Thursday night "Indians Rock
the Raiders" is the theme.


CHS: Uses trio of backs in attack
Continued From Page 1B


FALCONS: Retain cup in 18-16 win


INDIANS: Ready to rock the Raiders


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY


Uncle's ashes'temporarily'

housed in mom's mausoleum


DEAR ABBY: My 87-year-
old mother recently discov-
ered that the mausoleum
site she had reserved for
herself next to my father's
grave and paid for when
he died was occupied by
my uncle's ashes and head-
stone. Mom had moved
away 20 years ago and had
not visited the cemetery in
all that time.
My cousin's explanation,
when confronted by my
tearful mom, was that it
was a "temporary solution"
as the mausoleum was full
at the time of my uncle's
death. They were planning
to move him. Apparently, it
has taken 14 years for them
to get around to it
Mom had to send a nota-
rized letter to the cemetery
asking that my uncle's
remains be removed. My
cousins, who are wealthy
and successful people,
saved $800 by using my
mother's prepaid site.
Should Mom charge them
rent? BEWILDERED IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR BEWILDERED:
I don't think your mother
should ask your cousins for
"rent," but I do think your
mother should contact the
owners of the cemetery and
ask what they plan to do to
compensate her for her dis-
tress. Frankly, I don't under-
stand how they could have
allowed your uncle's ashes
to be placed in her reserved
site. The ball will then be
in their court and if they


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
are ethical and responsible,
they may offer free opening
and closing costs at the time
of her death.
** ** **
DEARABBY: My daugh-
ter "Joy" is 19. She attended
a small school with about 40
other students in her grade.
She never had a boyfriend -
or even a date until the first
week of college a year ago.
The boy was a high school
classmate of hers. They
became engaged before he
went off to boot camp.
My husband and I are
extremely concerned
because of Joy's age and
inexperience. Her fiance
is OK, but we feel they are
not for each other. We're
positive she could find
someone more compatible,
but who's going to approach
her with that ring on her
finger? How do we make
Joy see that she's too young
and inexperienced to make
such an important decision?
- MAMA KNOWS BETTER
IN OHIO.
. DEAR MAMA KNOWS
BETFER- You can't As
well-meaning and caring a
mother as you are, if you try
to tell your daughter what


you have in mind you will
only make her defensive.
Instead, encourage her to
wait until her fiance returns
home and she either has
her college degree or is
close to it before they tie
the knot It will go a long
way to making her more
employable when she starts
a career of her own.
** ** **
DEAR-ABBY: It's almost
Halloween and parents need
to teach their children that
if a house does not have its
porch light on, it means the
resident will not be handing
out candy or other treats.
There are many reasons
people don't participate.
Some people run out of
treats early, while others
simply can't afford to buy
candy in the first place.
These homes should not
be targeted with "tricks"
or vandalism. Simply skip
the house with the lights
off and move on to the
next one that has its lights
on. LIGHTS ON IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR LGHTS ON: Your '
letter is a timely one, and
I'm glad you brought the
subject up because what
you have written is cor-
rect Some people do not
participate in Halloween for
religious and other reasons,
and their beliefs should be
respected.

* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


*'^


ARIES (Maich 21-April
19): A lack of funds will
motivate you to find new
ways to earn more cash.
Innovation coupled with
your energetic nature and
communicative charm
will lead to an opportunity
to market a service or
product that is in demand.

TAURUS (Apiil 20-May
20): Emotional deception
will leave you wondering
what to do next. Don't let
an incident or a betrayal of
trust cost you financially.
Too much of anything will
lead to mistakes. Protect
your heart and.your
assets. ***
GEMINI (May 21-
June 20): A partnership
issue will challenge you.
Consider both sides of the.
situation before you make
a decision that you will
have to live with. A change
in your professional direc-
tion looks promising, but
don't leave a secure posi-
tion until you have a solid
offer. ***
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): Negativity is the
enemy. Everyone wants to
be around upbeat people
who are vibrant go-getters.
You have plenty of options
available if you become
a participant instead of a
spectator. Love is on the
rise. A partnership can
change your life. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Domestic concerns will
escalate if you don't accept
the inevitable. Get out and
socialize or try something
new that will stimulate
your mind and spark ideas
that can help.your current
situation. Don't let some-
one who is a burden hold
you back. *****.,
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Travel and take in
all the information you
can. Listen to advice and
re-evaluate your options.
Communication is key and
can lead to an opportunity
if you are patient but you
must avoid argumentative
people who offer nothing
but grief. *****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Talking to an old
friend or lover will lead to
an emotional misunder-
standing. Take what you
have learned in the past
and put this information to
work in dealing with your
current situation. *** '
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Don't let anyone push
you into something you
don't want to do. You have
to gauge your time and
choose your friends careful-
ly so that both work toward
positive results. Don't rule
out educational pursuits or
offering to work in an insti-
tutional environment ***


SAGITARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Finish what
you start, or someone will
accuse you of being lazy
or unprofessional. A secret
involvement will not be as
uplifting as you had once
hoped: Short trips will pay
off if you gear them toward
business or financial gains.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Focus on what
you can do to help others
without taking on too great
a burden. An opportunity
to make sensible altera-
tions to your domestic
scene should be carried
out Someone you have
been emotionally con-
nected to in the past will
confuse you. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Now is the time
to make decisions based
on what's best for you.
Question a friendship with .
someone using persuasive
tactics to manipulate a
decision you need to make.
Ulterior motives are likely.
You may be best moving
forward alone. ****
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Expect to encounter
plenty of changes going
on around you. Before you
jump on the bandwagpn,
tie up loose ends. Love and
romance are highlighted
and should bring positive
results. Collect old debts
or invest in something you
have to offer. **


CELEBRITY CIPHER


by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: 0 equals V
"XAD NG, ZEG BADIZ FJDZ AX
FCJVPLM MACX, TV XJD, EJI JCBJVI


TGGL EPZZPLM ZEG TJCC."


- YJOG


T J DDV


Previous Solution: "There are no boundaries or barriers if two people are
destined to be together." Julia Roberts
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-28


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


1. 1 I


J-4-L"l-6
wlGr-


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


Lake City Reporter





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Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11000251CA
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
WACHOVIA BANK, N.A
Plaintiff,
vs.
TERRY WAYNE PARKINSON
A/K/A TERRY W. PARKINSON
A/K/A TERRY PARKINSON
A/K/A TW PARKINSON, ET AL
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s)
AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
TERRY WAYNE PARKINSON
A/K/A TERRY W PARKINSON
A/K/A TERRY PARKINSON
A/K/A TW PARKINSON, IF ANY
157 SE CHANDLER COURT
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32024
(LAST KNOWN ADDRESS)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:
LOT 7, SHADOW WOOD UNIT II,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 24, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
TOGETHER WITH THAT' CER-
TAIN 1995 HORNET MOBILE
HOME VIN#H112660G-TITLE#
69791530
Street Address: 157 SE' Candler
Court, Lake City, Florida 32024
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
Moskowitz, Mandell, Salim & Simo-
witz, PA., Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 800 Corporate
Drive, Suite 500, Fort Lauderdale,
FLORIDA 33334 on or before No-
vember 11, 2011, a date which is
within thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this Notice in the
LAKE CITY REPORTER and file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on Plain-
tiffs attorney -or immediately there-
after, otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
This notice, is provided pursuant to
Administrative Order No. 2.065
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act, If you are a
person with a disability who needs
any accommodation to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, the provisions of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the
Court Administrator at 145 N.E.
Herando Street, Rm 113, Lake City,
Fl 32055. Phone No. (904)758-2163
within 2 working days of your re-
ceipt of this notice or pleading; if
- you are hearing,impaired, call 1-800-
95508771 (TDD); if you are voice
impaired, -call 1-800-955-8770 (v)
(via Florida Relay Services)
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 11 day of October,
2011
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk
05528587
October 21, 28, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.
122011CA000362CAXXXX
ATLANTIC COAST BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSHUA NICKELSON; TREVOR
W. BLANK A/K/A TREVOR W.
BLANK; JAYME L. LANK; DA-
NETTE NICKELSON; COLONIAL
PAIdFIC LEASING CORPORA-
TION; LOTTIE FARMS HOME-
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.;
UNKNOWN PERSONS) IN POS-
SESSION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY;
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
To the following Defendant(s)
JOSHUA NICKELSON
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
DANETTE NICKELSON A/K/A
DANETTE NICKELSON
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action
to Foreclose of Mortgage on the fol-
lowing property:
RIVERS MANOR, UNIT II AN
UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION IN
THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 1, AND
THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 12,
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
LOT 3: A PART OF THE NW 1/4
OF THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 12,
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE NW CORNER OF
SAID NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4
AND RUN RIUN NORTH
89'20'28" E, ALONG THE NORTH
LINE. THEREOF, 662.35 TO THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE
WEST 1/2 OF SAID NORTHWEST
1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4;
THENCE CONTINUE NORTH
89'20'28" EAST, 33.39 FEET TO
THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF DAVIS LANE ( A
60.00 FOOT ROAD) SAID POINT








Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Services


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line

www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

Submitted By;
Kahane & Associates, P.A.
8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000
Plantation, FL 33324
Telephone: (954) 382-3486
Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380
05528689
October 28, 2011
November 4, 2011


Legal

BEING ON THE ARC OF A
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE EAST
HAVING A RADIUS OF 260.00
FEET; AND AN INCLUDED AN-
GLE OF 29"21'41", THENCE
SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC
OF SAID CURVE FOR AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 133.24 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 00"01'07" EAST,
ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
531.53 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
89'17'43" WEST, 662.02 FEET TO
THE WEST LINE OF THE
NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SEC-
TION 12; THENCE N 00'02'51"
WEST, 659.17 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. SUB-
JECT TO EASEMENT OVER AND
ACROSS THE SOUTH 10.00 FEET
AND THE EAST 15.00 FEET FOR
UTILITIES AND DRAINAGE.
TOGETHER WITH A 60 FOOT
ROAD EASEMENT FOR IN-
GRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES
IN THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 1
AND 12 OF TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH.
RANGE 16 EAST, THE CENTER-
LINE OF WHICH IS PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE NORTH-
EAST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 1 AND RUN N
89'16'03" E, ALONG THE NORTH
LINE THEREOF, 529.90 FEET;
THENCE S 00'19'13" E, 40.80
FEET TO THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-
WAY OF LITTLE ROAD AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT OF RIV-
ERS MANOR UNIT #1, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 ,
PAGE 139, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA. SAID POINT AL-
SO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
FOR THE CENTERLINE OF SAID
EASEMENT; THENCE 00"19'13"
W, ALONG SAID CENTERLINE,
698.13 FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVE OF A CURVE TO THE
LEFT HAVING A CENTERLINE
RADIUS OF 230.0 FEET AND AN
INCLUDED ANGLE OF 33'23'54":
THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY
ALONG THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE FOR AN ARC DISTANCE
OF 134.07 FEET TO THE POINT
OF REVERSE CURVE OF A
CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING
A RADIUS OF 230.0 FEET AND
AN 'INCLUDED ANGLE OF
33'23'54"; THENCE SOUTHERLY
ALONG THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE FOR AN ARC DISTANCE
OF 134.07 FEET; TO THE POINT
OF REVERSE CURVE OF A
CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING
A RADIUS OF 230.0 FEET AND
AN INCLUDED ANGLE OF
33'23'54"; THENCE SOUTHERLY
ALONG THE .-ARC OF SAID
CURVE AN ARC DISTANCE OF
-134.07 FEET; THENCE S 00'19'13"
E, 1336.16 FEET TO THE POINT
OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAV-
ING A CENTERLINE RADIUS OF
230.00 FEET AND AN INCLUDED
ANGLE OF 89'39'41"; THENCE
SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE
ARC OF SAID CURVE, AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 359.92 FEET;
THENCE S 89'20'28" W, 119.25
FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE OF
A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING
A RADIUS OF 230.00 FEET, AN
INCLUDED ANGLE OF 89'21'35"
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTHER-
LY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID
CURVE, AN ARC DISTANCE OF
358.71 FEET; THENCE S 00'01'07"
E, 565.48 FEET; THENCE N
89-58'53" E, 20.00 FEET TO THE
RADIUS POINT OF A 50 FOOT
CUL-DE-SAC AND THE END OF
THE CENTERLINE OF SAID. 60
FOOT EASEMENT. SAID EASE-
MENT INCLUDES A CUL-DE-
SAC OF 50 FOOT RADIUS CEN-
TERED QN THE ABOVE DE-
FINED RADIUS POINT WITH
THE RETURN OF A 25 FOOT RA-
DIUS AT THE INTERSECTION
OF THE 50 FOOT ARC AND THE
EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID
EASEMENT.
LESS AND EXCEPT THAT PAR-
CEL OF LAND MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED IN THAT
CERTAIN PARTIAL RELEASE OF
MORTGAGE RECORDED IN ORB
1104, PAGE 588, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
a/k/a 806 SW BLAYLOCK COURT
F/K/A 718 SW BLAYLOCK
COURT, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA
32024
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on Ka-
hane & Associates, P.A., Attorney
for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201
Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation,
FLORIDA 33324 on or before No-
vember 19, 2011, a date which is
thirty (30) days after the first publi-
cation of this notice in THE LAKE
CITY REPORTER and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of This Court
wither before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint.
If you are a person with a disability
who required accommodations in or-
der to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you,
the provision of certain assistance.
Individuals with disability who re-
quire special accommodations in or-
der to participate in a court proceed-
ing should contact the ADA coordi-
nator, 173 NE Hemando Avenue,
Room 408, Lake City, FL 32055,
(386)719-7428, within two (2) busi-
ness days of receipt of notice to ap-
pear. Individuals who are hearing
impaired should call (800)955-8771.
Individuals who are voice impaired
should call (800)955-8770.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 19 day of October,
2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
As Clerk of the Court
By:/s/B. Scippio
As Deputy Clerk


IN THE COURT FOR COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2011-237-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF JESSE RALPH
CUSTER
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of
Jesse Ralph Custer, deceased, whose
date of death was September 23,
2011, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Columbia County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of which
is Post Office Box 2069, Lake City,
Florida 32056. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF
3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
.and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO, (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is October 21, 2011.
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive:
Lisa A. Schlitzkus
Florida Bar Number: 0047134
Anita Patel
Florida Bar Number 0070214
Attorneys for Natalie Custer
THE LAW OFFICE OF LISA A
SCHLITZKUS, PA.
118. Marion Ave.
Lake City, FL 32055
Telephone: (386)438-5544
Fax: (386)438-5860
Personal Representative:
Natalie Custer .
391 Northwest Irma Avenue
Lake City, Florida 32055
05528616
October 21, 28, 2011


020 Lost & Found

FOUND BASSET Hound
on Buford Road.
Found on 10/27/11.
386-754-6105 Call to identify.

Reward! Lost Parrot, 10/20. Near
Deputy Jeff Davis. Severe McCaw
Red edged wings. Hand tamed.
Squawks to "Nasdak" 752-0347

100 Job
0 Opportunities

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies

CLASS A Driver wanted.
Clean records. Exp. whopper,
dump, live floor a plus. Serious
inquires only. 386-755-7700


100 Job
Opportunities


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, THIRD
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 11-171-CA
FIRST FEDERAL BANK OF
FLORIDA, a Banking corporation
organized under the laws of the Unit-
ed States of America, f/k/a FIRST
FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OF
FLORIDA,
Plaintiff,
v.
DONITAA. TANNENBAUM, et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that P.
DEWITT CASON, Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Columbia County, Flor-
ida, will on the 16th day of NO-
VEMBER, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the
Columbia County Courthouse in
Lake City, Florida, offer for sale and
sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash, the follow-
ing described property situated in
Columbia County, Florida, to-wit:
Parcel I.D. No. 16-3S-33-02438-123
LOT 23, OF EMERALD COVE,
PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
)BOOK 8, PAGES 35-36, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF COLUM-
BIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in a case pend-
ing in said Court, the style of which
is as set out above, and the docket
number of which is 11-171-CA. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and the official
seal of said Court, the 12th day of
October, 2011.
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Columbia County, Florida
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05528590
October 21,28, 2011


05528667
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
.Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

Qualified caregivers needed to
provide personal care to individu-
als w/disabilities 352-692-4930
specialfriendsinc@vahoo.com

240 Schools &
240 Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/07/10

* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11

* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainin services.com

To place your
classified, ad call

755-5440


05528704
Executive Assistant
Seeking an exec assistant who is
ready to jump in & take
initiative on a variety of admin
projects including light HR.
Must be a detail oriented'and
self sufficient individual. Will
work directly for owner of
multiple businesses in & out of
FL. Some travel required. Word,
excel & power point a must.
Quicken, Quickbooks, payroll a
plus. Please submit resume &
salary requirements to
jenn@qkproduce.com. EOE.

05528782
OPS Gift Shop Attendant
Stephen Foster Folk Culture
Center State Park
White Springs, Florida
$7.50/hr Approx.
28 hours per week
Operate cash register, answer
visitor inquiries in a courteous
and tactful manner in person and
over the phone, sells and stocks
merchandise, provides cleaning
and maintenance of the Gift
Shop. Outstanding customer
service is a must as well as
knowledge of basic arithmetic,
computers and sales. Must be
able to work rotating shifts
including weekends, some
nights and holidays.
Mail or Fax State of Florida Em-
ployment Application by Friday,
November 4th to:
Attn: Kelli Pipkins, Gift
Shop/Craft Square Manager
Stephen Foster State Park
P.O. Box G
White Springs, FL 32096
Fax (386) 397-4262
Applications are avail online at
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com.
Resumes are hot accepted unless
accompanied with a State of FL
Employment Application.
DEP only hires US Citizens or
authorized aliens and is an
EEO / ADA / VP employer.
Section 110.128, F.S. prohibits
the employment of any male
required to register with
Selective Service System
under the US Military '
Selective Service Act.

FLEET MECHANICS Needed
Tractor / Trailer Mechanics
Needed for late model fleet,
Must have experience and tools
Welsing experience helpful
Good Pay & Benefits
Apply in Person at
PRITCHETT TRUCKING
Lake Butler, FL. Or online at
www.pritchettrucking.com
05528767
FT Project Manager position
available with First Federal
Bank of FL. Candidate must
have 5+ years of project mgmt.,
coordinating and supporting IT
business processes. Background
in technology a must. Responsi-
ble for coordinating deployment
of new projects and updates to
methodologies. Deliver effective
project mgmt. including estimat-
ing, developing, and monitoring
project plans often spanning
multiple application and dept.
areas. Applications may be
obtained from any First Federal
Branch and submitted to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 2029, Lake
City, FL 32056 or emailed to
Turbeville.J@ffsb.com
Bilingual candidates encouraged
to apply. EEO

Customer Service Representative
for call center. Must be fast friend-
ly & efficient. Please send resume
to: 197 SW Waterford Ct. Lake
City, Fl 32025 .Att: Joey Kitaif.
Please send resume for call center
position only. There are no other
positions at this time.
Securitas Security Services
is hiring FT/PT security officers.
in Lake City. Class D Security Lie.
req'd. Good computer skills.
www.securitasjobs.com or call
(352)378-5788 Lic# BB2300010
EOE M/F/D/V

0 Medical
120 Employment


386-984-8448
2BR/BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466


DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


li~Zi~F"


nmnan


rjaasn


Classified Department: 755-5440


310 Pets & Supplies

Black, female, lab-mix.
Approx. 10 months old.
Good with kids. Very friendly.
Free to Good Home call 386-
755-6319 or 386-984-8190
Free Kittens!
7 weeks, Male and Female
Calico and Grey Tabby!
386-365-0042
Golden Retriever puppies. Pure-
bred! Champion Line. Available
Nov. 1. Wellborn/Lake City area.
$225. ea. (719)429-6232
Mixed-short haired terrier.
FREE to good home.
Please call for info.
386-755-9333 or 755-7773
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques

ANTIQUE OAK
Side Board. $100.
386-365-1187



402 Appliances

HEAVY DUTY Whirlpool
dryer, great working condition.
Less than 2 yrs, old. $100.
386-755-9239


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

4i9 TV-Radio &
Recording
20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$65.00
386-984-7510


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

ESTATE SALE Everything must
Go!. Oct 29-30 ONLY Sat 12-6p
Sun 10a-3p 2330 NW Lower
Springs Rd Lake City 32055
Every weekend til sold. 603 SW
Long Leaf. Off 247. Exercise
equipment, antiques, furniture,
collectibles. 386-397-3390
Fri & Sat. 8-?
360 NE Bascom Norris Dr.
North of Lake City.
Clothes, toys, furn., lots of misc.
LARGE SALE. Fri & Sat.
Come look and see. Something for
Everyone. 312 SW Zebra Terr.
Lake City, FL 32024
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.

Thur-Sun. 8-4. S. 47 to Walter
Ave. 1/2 mi. on right. Lots of stuff.
fridge, tires, grill, clothes, baby
stuff & more. Everything must go!

440 Miscellaneous

2 Wheel Utlity trailer.
$100.
386-365-1187


450 Good Things
450 to Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

460 Firewood

Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
'Load. Joey 965-0288
if no answer pls leave message
we will call you back.

630 fMobile Homes"
J30 for Rent

16X80 Almost new. 10 mi S of
Lake City, off Branford Hwy. 3/2,
fenced yd, Dish Washer private.
$650. mo + sec. No Pets. 984-7478
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2011


630 Mobile Homes
6 for Rent
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3BR/2BA on 1/2 ac Branford area
Nice yard. Must see!
Call for info.
386-623-6523 or 386-752-7814
Country living.
3br/2ba Mobile Home
Very clean! 386-497-1116.

Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482

64A0 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Just Reduced! Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
1995 MH. 66'X14'
Newly remodeled. All new carpet.
You Move! $9,600. obo.
386-754-8885
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"
cond. Split floor plan, Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or Doubles. Must have
clear title. Call North Point Homes
(352)872-5566

6 Mobile Home
650 & Land
.Outside of Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473
* Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
camper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532; Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

71. Unfurnished Apt.
S For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net


2/1 CH/A Duplex Apt.
$450. mo No pets.
Near Beachville.
Call Margie 386-935-3447
II 15 ,






-i~lItilm


710 Unfurnished Apt. 730 Unfurnished
/ 'UFor Rent 730 Home For Rent


2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryer hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chlW,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ Iba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
;Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
Nice, large 2 br Apt.
Close to town & shopping
$500. mo. plus $500 dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Freed
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

72 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2BR/1.5 ON 1/2 acre, fenced.
Off Turner Rd.
$650. mo. plus deposit.
352-335-8330 or 352-258-9598
2BR/1BA DUPLEX, Carport
Off Branford Hwy
$595. mo. $595. dep. Very clean.
Contact 386-752-7578
3 BR/1 BA, newly renovated,
CH & A, comer of Putnam &
Marsh, large yard, first & security,
$800 mo., 954-559-0872.
3BR/1BA HOME off McFarlane.
CH/A, Ig yard, No pets.
$600. mo $600. dep.
Call (850)421-3617 for info.
3BR/2BA HOME.'Private
wooded'lot. Rent $695. mo + sec.
dep. $450. Application required.
Call 386-935-1482
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $200
sec.$900. mo. South-of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
4BR/2BA CH/A 2 miles
out on Price Creek Rd.
$700. mo $500 security.
386-752-4597
4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1250. mo.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
Ft. White 2br/lba. CH/A, Washer
/Dryer, dishwasher, Ig. deck,
screen porch, carpet, ceiling fans,.'
Very quite & nice. $650. mo. 1st,
last & $300. dep. 386-497-2296


2UUU aOlS Intrigue
Mint condition, garage
kept, 4dr sedan, due to
illness have to sell.
Only 50,000 miles.
$7,000
Call
386-752-6956
(cell) 386-984-2627


Nice in town 2br/lba CH/A
$700. mo. $700 deposit.
386-758-3922 or
386-344-5065
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days.7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.

750 Business &
75 Office Rentals

05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak; FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group


780 Condos for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale


BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of roomgon 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 ml. NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
4 br/2ba on aprox. 1 ac. near 1-75
& Hwy 47. Jane S.
Usher, Lic. Real Estate'Broker.
386-755-3500/365-1352
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-511.0 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retireinent
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
Lake City. 05 Brick home w/shop,
3br/2ba, 1,700 sqft., double lot
fenced, tiled walk in shower.
$189,900 neg. Call 417-396-2134.


2005 Ford F-350
Lariat
50,000 miles, many
extras, excellent cond.

$18,500
Call
386-755-0139


Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group-
Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfidld Realty Group 4
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres.
Up to date kitchen, lg detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group'
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, Fl room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
3/2 w/1 car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty'Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223


OPEN HOUSE
12:00-4:00 PM Sat., Oct. 29
2:00-4:00 PM Sun., Oct. 30


200 SE Mohawk Way
Lake City
$140,000
MLS 78723


Jo Lytte
Remax Professionals, Inc.
386-365-2821
E-mail: jolytte@remaxnfl.com
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
www.jolytte.com

Best Real
Estate
[il. Office 2011


810 Home for Sale
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS #71594 $155,900 623-6896
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group'
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Island kit. Corian
countertops.,Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp
'Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances,
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com


810 Home for Sale
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Investment Property! 3/2 home.w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept 3/2 DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen.
Wired 24x36 workshop, steel roof,
pole barn. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY,.INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
SFenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on comer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110

820 Farms&
820 Acreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn:
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCresf S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

830 A Commercial
8O3 Property
3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181

Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group

8 0 Waterfront
850 Property
Upscale River Cabinon
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
80A Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

950 Cars for Sale
1973 FORD Galaxy.
Clean, runs good, spotless interior.
4 -door. $2,300!
386-754-8885


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2006 EF250
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3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
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$10,500
Call
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