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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01682
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 26, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01682
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




000016 120511 ****3-DIGIT 32'
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL, 32611-1943


Reporter


Wednesday, October 26, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 233 E 75 cents


LAKE CITY TRIPLE SLAYING



One murder count tossed;



state wll seek to reindict


SDeath ofunborn child
charge thrown out; 3
other counts remain.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
State Attorney Skip Jarvis said he plans
to seek reinstatement of a murder indict-
ment against a man accused in the Feb.
2 shooting deaths of three Lake City resi-
dents, one of whom was pregnant .
The murder suspect, Alan Lucas Strattan,
25, of Lake City, was indicted in February


in the shooting deaths of
Nichole Cervantez, 25,
Monica Hudson, 27, and
Michael Kevin Tucker,
32, as well as Cervantez's
unborn child.
But defense attorneys
successfully challenged
the indictment for death Jarvis
of the unborn child. They
argued the state never presented anyone
with specialized knowledge to prove the
viability of the fetus-as defined by state
law.
The only witnesses who spoke to the
grand jury were law enforcement officials


involved in the investigation, according
to court records. The medical examiner
never addressed the viability of the fetus
Sin the written report .
Defense attorneys argued the evidence
shows the grand jury did not have reliable
evidence to indict Strattan for the unborn
child's death.
But Jarvis disagreed.
S"If their opinion is the baby would've
been viable, it's my intention to go back to
the'grand jury and seek a new indictment
on that count," Jarvis said during a phone
interview on Friday.
Roberta Getzan, an assistant state attor-
ney prosecuting the case, said the motion


I to dismiss the murder
charge does not jeopar-
dize the case against
Strattan.



at 1506 SE Baya Drive
occurred, Strattan drove to the Lake
City Police Department to surrender to
authorities. When police arrived at the
home, they found the gunshot riddled
CASE continued on 3A


Going


high-tech


to save


water

Area farmers using GPS
technology to conserve,
as well as reduce runoff.

By GORDON JACKSON
glackson@lakecitvreoor ter. corn
Local organization composed of educa-
tors, elected officials, community leaders
and environmental 'and regulatory orga-
nizations is finding ways to encourage
Columbia County to protect local rivers
and springs.
At a quarterly public meeting at Lake
SCity City Hall-on Tuesday, representatives,
from The Ichetucknee Partnership said
most residents seem eager to follow the
organization's recommendations.
"We've been making strides in the
right direction," said Joel Foreman, the
SPartnership's chairman.
Water quality and flow levels are impor-
tant because of the total direct impact to
tourism at Ichetueknee Springs alone is
More than $7 million a year, according:
to a Florida State Parks economic impact
'statement
Locally, the Partnership has persuaded
five Columbia County motels to conserve
'water by giving guests the option of reus-
. ing towels and linens. Guests at the motels
: have filled out comment cards indicating
Support for the program. The incentive
for business owners is the program saves
water and reduces housekeeping costs.
, Area farmers are also doing their part
by voluntarily reducing water consump-
tion and fertilizerouse.
The challenge is spreading the word to
Small county farmers explaining how to mini-
mize water consumption and fertilizer use
S without reducing crop yields. The goal is
: to reduce nitrates in local waterways by
35 percent.
"If they don't know, it's hard to do the
right thing," said Terry Hansen, a Florida
SDepartment of Environmental Protection
official.
Hansen said his agency's goal is to con-
vince all local farmers to participate in the
program. .
"There is a presumption of compliance,"
he said of the program. "The plan is not
to point finger at anyone. The goal is to
help them do business and protect water
quality."
Jeff Willis, a local peanut farmer, said a
cost share program that helps pay for new
technology to help farmers reduce water,
and fertilizer use has helped him increase
profits.
"A farmer is not the enemy of water," he
said. "Our job is to protect it."
Jon Dinges, director of the Suwannee
River Water Management District's
WATER continued on 3A


60 YEARS OF FRIENDSHIP


The Lake City Newcomers Club, pictured here, celebrated its 60th anniversary earlier this month. Special guests included Sheriff Mark
Hunter, who addressed the group. Mayor Stephen Witt presented the club with a proclamation in honor of its continued success. The club
was founded in 1951 by Marge-Van Arsdall.



20-year term in shooting death


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Charlotte Lashonda Owens has been
sentenced to-2Q years in prison for her
role in the March 2009 shooting death of
Jesse Devon Johnson.
A Columbia County jury convicted
Owens of manslaughter in August. An
eight-man, four-woman jury deliberated
for about 3 hours pnd 30 minutes before


returning the guilty
verdict to Third Circuit
Judge David W. Fina,
ending i four-day trial.
Fina scheduled a
sentencing hearing for
September, but it was
rescheduled for Monday
Owens in r Columbia County
Courthouse Courtroom 2. The sentenc-
ing hearing started around 2 p.m. and


Lasted for about 90 minutes. In addition
to 20 yeas in prison, Owens will serve 10
years' probation.
Owens was represented by attorneys "
Jimmy Hunt and Lisa Schlitzkus.
Roberta Getzen was lead prosecutor in
the case.
"The manslaughter charge (a felony
of the second degree) usually carries a,
PRISON continued m34


ALL
OUT
Columbia
High School
soccer goalie
Ty Williams,
15, dives'for
a ball dur-
ing practice
Tuesday.


CALL US:
(386)752-1293
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


8256
Mostly sunny
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
People................. 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics......... 4B
Puzzles ....... .......... 2B


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE THURSDAY
The birth Local news
of Gonzo roundup.


La


S III10


--r I I ---- I~-3C----L---C- C -IIL -31~--


____ ~ --_--I---_---1 ------_IC--III---liPI I~C---~-L-~-C-









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


,Iay4)


$H 3 Tuesday:
3.Afternoon: 1-9-7
Evening: N/A


SSaturday:
Afternoon: 1-5-2-9
Evening: N/A


ewlatdz .
Saturday:
11-12-17-31-33


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS



The birth of Gonzo in 'The Rum Diary'


f Batman and the X-Men get
prequels, why not Hunter S.
Thompson?
He was certainly a super-
hero of a kind, just one whose
powers mainly consisted of consum-
ing copious amounts of alcohol while
still, somehow, churning out wildly
colorful, raging dispatches from the
road.
'The Rum Diary" is based on
Thompson's heavily autobiographi-
cal novel by the same name, which
he wrote as a 22-year-old in the early
1960s after a stint as a newspaper
reporter in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
It wasn't published until 1998. Since
then, Thompson's friend Johnny
Depp (who also played Thompson
in 1998's "Fear and Loathing in Las
Vegas") has been trying to adapt
"The Rum Diary" to the screen.
"The Rum Diary" which is
dedicated to Thompson, who died '
in 2005 is essentially a portrait of
the Duke as a young journalist. The
stand-in for Thompson, the young
novelist-reporter Paul Kemp (Depp),
is trying to find his way and his writ-
ing voice: It's the birth of Gonzo. -
You might expect a tribute such
as this to be sycophantic, but direc-
tor Bruce Robinson keeps a realistic
tone. Robinson, who also wrote the
screenplay adaptation, doesn't pres-
ent the cartoonish Thompson we've
come to expect. Its a refreshing,
grounded view of the writer.
Thompson went on to find his
voice, but "The Rum Diary," enter-
taining and well-intended, comes just
shy of discovering its own.

Jason Aldean set for
Grammy nom concert
NEW YORK Lady Gaga and
Jason Aldean possible contenders
for next year's Grammy Awards -
are set to perform during the annual
nominations special.next'month..
LL Cool.J will again.host the show,


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Johnny Depp is shown in a scene from 'The RUm Diary.' Based on the novel of the
same name by the late Hurter S. Thompson, the film will be released in theaters
on Friday.


to air live on CBS on
Nov. 30. A handful
of the 78 categories
will be announced at


the event, to be held
at the Nokia Theatre
in Los Angeles.
Aldean. The Grammys will
be held Feb. 12 in
Los Angeles and will air live on CBS.

Undsay Lohan's father
arrested in Tampa
STAMPA-- The father of actress
Lindsay Lohan was arrested
Tuesday on domestic violence
charges after police said he grabbed
his'on-and-off girlfriend's armh and'
pushed her down multiple times dur-
ing a daylong argument
A Tampa Police Department
report said one cause of the fight
between Michael Lohan, 51, and
Kathryn Major, 28, was a sched- ,'
ruled Tuesday court date in nearbyy


Sarasota County on a previous
domestic violence case.
"She had some redness on her
arms, some minor bruising and it
was determined
that he grabbed
her arm and threw
her to the ground
a couple of.times,"
police spokeswoman
Andrea Davis said.
Lohan After being placed
in custody, Lohan
complained of chest pains and was.
taken to a hospital. Davis said he
apparently tried to check himself,
out and leave unnoticed when he
Thought the officers had departed,
but they"quickly arrested him.
Lohan, who told police he moved
to Tampa to get away from the
publicity surrounding his celeb-
rity daughter, was being held in
Hillsborough County Jail without
bail. ..
Associated Press


Celebrity Birthdays


* U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton is 64.
* Musician Bootsy Collins
is 60.
* Actor James Pickens Jr.
is 59.
* Rock musician Keith
Strickland is 58.
* Actor D.W. Moffett is 57.
* Actress Rita Wilson is 55.
* Actor Dylan McDermott is
50.
* Actor Cary Elwes is 49.


* Country singer Keith Urban
is 44.
* Actor Tom Cavanagh is 43.
* Writer-producer Seth
MacFarlane is 38.
* Actress Lennon Parham
is 36.
* Actor Jon Heder is 34.
* Singer Mark Barry is 33.
* Singer Natalie Merchant
is 48.
* Olympic silver medal figure
skater Sasha Cohen is 27.


Daily Scripture

"Always giving thanks to God
the Father for everything, in the
name of our Lord Jesus Christ."
Ephesians 5:20

Thought for Today
"Without a song, each day "
would be a century."
Mahalia Jackson,
gospel singer (1911-1972)

Lake City Reporter
HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293 BUSINESS
Fax number ............752-9400 Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
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Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
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All material herein is property of the Lake In Columbia County, customers should
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CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks fr reading.


Women helped
inmates flee
VERO BEACH Two
women have been charged
with helping two maxi-
mum security inmates
escape from a Florida jail.
The women were arrest-
ed Monday night after
helping Leviticus Taylor,
25, and Rondell Reed, 51,
escape Monday morn-
ing from the Indian River
County jail.
Taylor was captured
Monday night in Stuart
about 15 hours after
jail officials noticed his
absence.
According to an arrest
affidavit, one of the women
is Taylor's girlfriend. Reed
remained at large Tuesday.

Turtle found by
BP worker released

PENSACOLA BEACH
-Wildlife officials
released a 14-pound sea
turtle named Shrek in the
Gulf of Mexico after an.
eight-month rehab stint in
the Florida Panhandle.
About 150 people gath-
ered on Pensacola Beach
Monday to watch Shrek
make his trek into the
water.
Shrek was never really
friendly to the staff at the
Gulfarium in Fort Walton
Beach. A BP cleanup
worker found the strug-
gling turtle in the surf on
Feb. 28.
Gulfarium's Rachel Cain
oversaw Shrek's rehabilita-
tion. She said staffers tisu-
ally get very attached to
the turtles they are rehab-
bing. But not Shrek. She
said he was never really
comfortable being there.
Shrek had frostbite on
his front flippers and a bac-
terial infection.

Woman's body
found in Disney
LAKE BUENA VISTA -


Boyz and Mouse
Boyz II Men members, (L-R), Wanya Morris, Nathan Morris
and Shawn Stockman join Mickey Mouse on stage at Walt
Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista to commemorate
the release of the R&B vocal group's 20th anniversary album,
entitled "TWENTY." The R&B group performed at the Epcot
International Food & Wine Festival's "Eat to the Beat" concert
series,


Orange County Sheriff's
officials say a woman has
been found dead in a cast
member parking lot at
Walt Disney World.
A security guard called
911 early Tuesday morn-
ing to report finding the
body.
Sheriffs officials said
the death was not a homi-
cide. But no further details
were immediately avail-
able.
Deputies said the park-
ing lot where the body was
found is near a construc-
tion site and several build-
ings.

Bus thief caught
after wild ride
TALLAHASSEE -
Police said a man wearing
a camouflage jacket stole a
city bus in Tallahassee and
drove it about 25 miles to a
neighboring town.
They said James Shaw
Jr.,'25, crashed the bus
twice Monday, hitting a
car in Tallahassee and a
light pole in Quincy. That's
where he was arrested.
Tallahassee police
stopped chasing him for


safety reasons after getting
information the thief was
Sthe only one on the bus.
Shaw was booked into
the Gadsden County Jail in
Quirncy. Charges are pend-
ing. No bond was immedi-
ately set. It's not known if
Shaw has a lawyer.

Man gets 30 years
for child porn
TAMPA A former
guidance counselor at
a high schoorhas been
sentenced to 30 years in
prison for possessing child
pornography.
Prosecutors said Robert
Frederick Murray, 55,
had amassed more than
250,000 images. Murray
pleaded no contest to 181
counts of possession of
child pornography.
Murray was a guidance
counselor at Brandon High
School and other schools
for more than 25 years. He
said his repressed homo-
sexuality had led him to
child porn.
Family members and a
former student pleaded for
mercy at a hearing.
N Associated Press


THEW WEATHER


MOSTLY MOSTLY PARTLY MOSY
SUNNY SUNNY CLOUDY SUNNY


HI 82 L056 HI 84 ) 57 H182L0L541 H174L047


Pensacola
79/61


Tallahassee Lake it
80/52 82/56
80 Canesi
Panama City ,82/5
77/59 \ ",


Ta4/
84/


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Ye *79/57 Daytona Be:a
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58 5 65 Gainesville
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a83/59 *ra Key West.
Orda ndoCap, Cuan Lake City
S 85/64 82/65 Miami
t \ \ Naples
tar West Pan Bech Ocala
83/72 Orlando
S Ft Laudendal Panama City
FtMyers, 84/75 Pensacola
86/68 9 Naples Tallahassee
87/71 Mial Tampa
.. wu-l 84/ 74 Valdosta
nuJ irni


SWe83/77st
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Thursday Friday
ral 81/69ish 81, 66.'sh
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81/60/s
84/76/sh
84/57/pc
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85/73/t
85/61/pc
86/69/pc
81/63/s
80/61/pc
82/57/s
85/70,1
8'i58 pc


W. Palm Beach 84,74.1


SALM. A N, AC/


TEMPERATURES
High Tuesday .'
Low Tuesday
Normal high
Normal low
Reco0r4.high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Tuesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date .


53
47
69
56


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tor.
Sunset tom.


91 in 1911
33 in 1917 MOON
Moonrise today
Moonset today.
0.00':. Monrise tom.
2.13" Moonset tom.


, .30.67"
2.08"
S43.21"


7:40 a.m.
6:49 p.m.
7:41 a.m.
6:48 p.m.

7:24 a.m.-
6:36 p.m.
8:35 a.m.
7:27 p.m.


Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov.
26 2 10 18
New First Full Last


On this date in
2002, a football
game had to be
suspended due to
a flooded field in
Kingston, R.I. After
a halftime down-
pour, the entire
field was covered
in water, and some
areas were knee-
deep.


85/76/sh
86/70/sh
82/57/pc
80/56/pc
84/75/sh
82/54/pc
86/75/t
86/73/sh
83/58/pc
83/69/sh
79/56/pc
76/51/pc
81/54/pc
84. 70, sh
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S5'72,'r


service
6 brought to
MRt our readers
30nmitetolun by
Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on
a scale from 0 '
to 10+
S weather.com

3Y4 Forecasts, data and
S y graphics 02011 Weather
i V Central, LP, Madison, Ws.
weather www.weatherpubllsher.com


et Connected


te^


City


AROUND FLORIDA


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-,- ~-s--.l- -: - i ..., t'-Y' j i'l*-"T1
'


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Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


fys'ss








LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


Battery, false imprisonment alleged


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com

A Lake City man, accused of holding
and accosting a woman in local drug store
parking lot Monday night, was arrested
and faces felony charges stemming from
the incident, police officials said.
Curtis Leonard Fluellen, 49, 11 NW
Oakland Ave., was charged with battery
and false imprisonment. He was booked
into the Columbia County Detention
Facility. His bond was set at $6,000.
According to Lake City Police
Department reports, around 10:50 p.m.


Monday officers were dispatched to the
Walgreens parking lot, 2094 SW U.S. 90,
in reference to a possible battery.
Once there authorities reported speak-
ing to a woman who told them an unidenti-
fied man asked her for some money..
The woman told authorities she gave
the man a $5 bill. According to Capt. John
Blanchard, Lake City Police Department
public information officer, the officer at
the scene believed that the woman gave
he man the money so that he would leave
her alone.
However, woman said told authorities
that Fluellen then put his arms around her


and tried to kiss her as she
was getting into her car.
"She was trying to back
away from him," Blanchard
said. "She didn't say he was
groping her, but that he
just put his arms around
her and tried to kiss her."
Fluellen Reports said the woman
attempted to get away from
Fluellen, but he kept pushing her over in
the seat while she was inside her vehicle.
Blanchard said the woman never allowed
FlueUen to get inside her vehicle.
"As he was trying to kiss her, he was


trying to come in the car with her, which
led to the false imprisonment charge,"
Blanchard said.
The woman then told authorities the
man exited the car doorway and left the
scene, jogging westbound down U.S. 90.
Officer Mike Delcastillo reportedly
located Fluellen. The victim and a witness
identified him as the suspect.
"It was within minutes that he was
found and he was found at the intersection
of U.S. Highway 90 and Bascom Norris
Road," Blanchard said.
.Fluellen was arrested and taken to jail
without incident.


Just in time for holidays, a bad economic mood


By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO and
CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
AP Business Writers

NEW YORK Americans say they feel
worse about the economy than they have
since the depths of the Great Recession.
And it's a bad time for a bad mood because
households are starting to make their holi-
day budgets.
It might not be all doom and gloom,
though. Sometimes what people say about
the economy and how they behave are two
different things.
Consumer confidence fell in October to
the lowest since March 2009, reflecting
the big hit that the stock market took this
summer and frustration with an economic
recovery that doesn't really feel like one.
The Conference Board, a private
research group, said its index of consumer
sentiment came in at 39.8, down about six
points from September and seven shy of
what economists were expecting.
The reading is still well above where
the index stood two and a half years ago,
at 26.9. But it's not even within shouting
distance of 90, what it takes to signal that
the economy is on solid footing.
Economists watch consumer confi-
dence closely because consumer spending
accounts for about 70 percent of U.S. eco-
nomic activity. The index measures how
shoppers feel about business conditions;
the job market and the next six months.
It came exactly two months before
Christmas, with retailers preparing for the
holiday shopping season, their busiest.
Almost twice as many people now expect a
pay cut over the next six months as'expeet
a raise.
"If people think their income is declin-
ing, they're not going to be inclined to
spend," said Jacob Oubina, an economist
at RBC Capital Markets.
Economists point out that consumer con-
fidence is not as simple as a single number,
though. The feelings people express about
the economy do not always track how they
actually spend money.
In September, for example, despite


feeling bad about the economy, people
increased their spending on retail goods
by the most since March. More people
bought new cars, a purchase people typi-
cally make when they are confident in
their finances.
The percentage of Americans who plan
to buy a major appliance in the next six
months, such as a television or washing
machine, rose to 46 percent, up from 41
percent Exactly half plan to take a vaca-
tion in the next six months, up from 47
percent
Marc Rosenberg, CEO of SkyBluePink
Concepts, a toy marketing company, said
he looks for broader trends in the monthly
consumer confidence numbers but doesn't
pay attention to the monthly changes.
"I think it is nice background music,"
he said.
It's still not a very happy tune. Jessica
Jarmon was laid off from her job in social
work in March. For the past three months,
she has worked a temp job in the same
industry, but that ended last week.
She has a job interview Wednesday morn-
ing, but she said it's hard to.tell whether the
economy is getting better or not
"You hear about one company creat-
ing 16,000 jobs, and then you hear about
another company laying off 10,000 jobs.
Maybe, at best, we are just breaking even,"
said Jarmon, who lives in Philadelphia.
Mark Vitner, senior U.S. economist at
Wells Fargo, said he will probably trim his
forecast for holiday revenue in the retail
industry based on Tuesday's figure.
Vitner said the persistent gloomy head-
lines about the economy may lead people
-to say-they-feel-worse about things than
their own situations would suggest They
might have a good job and stable finances,
for example, but still report feeling sour.
But the decline in confidence is "too
significant to get away from it," he said.
"Consumers are losing hope that strong
growth is around the corner."
Higher earners are also starting to
lose confidence, a bad sign because they
account for a disproportionate amount of
spending.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Sept. 29 file photo, a woman and child leave a mall with purchases in Culver City,
Calif. Consumers' confidence in the economy fell in October to the lowest it's been since
2009 when the U.S. was in the middle of a deep recession, according to a report released
Tuesday by a private research group


LCPD chief to host breakfast


From staff reports

A breakfast hosted by Lake City Police
Chief Argatha Gilmore will be held from
10 to 11:30 am. Saturday at the Lake City
Police Department
Gilmore will be joined in the police
department's second-floor meeting room
by Robert "Skip" Jarvis, state attorney for
the Third Judicial Circuit, and E. Vernon
Douglas, chief judge of the Third Judicial


Circuit They will explain what happens
after an arrest is made and the case moves
through the legal justice system.
Police officials will also make an
announcement about a new community
volunteer program designed to generate
more interaction between law enforcement
officials and residents.
The meeting is open to the public. Call
(386) 719-5742 for information.


WATER: High-tech methods

Continued From Page 1A


department of water supply and resource
management, said the cost share program,
funded by TIP, pays up to up to 75 percent
of the expense for new technology up to
$10,000 to help farmers manage water,
animal waste and nutrient use for growing
crops.
Willis said TIP officials should print bro-
chures to distribute to farmers explaining
the benefits of using new technology to
minimize water and fertilizer use.
Willis said he uses GPS technology to
ensure he doesn't overlap areas already
fertilized or watered.
"My generation has no choice," he said.
"We have to fix what has been done."
Willis said even older farmers are will-
ing to change if it protects the environ-
ment and saves money.


The meeting also featured speak-
ers who explained the importance of
monthly monitoring for water qual-
ity and a representative from Florida
Gateway College who discussed the
growing demand for. water resources
training programs.
"It's a good career," said Tim Atkinson,
director of the college's water resources
program. "The demand is great There's a
lot of opportunity."
Foreman suggested holding a public
event sometime next year where anyone
with a stake in water quality issues could
meet to discuss areas of concern.
"We want this to be a model for other
basins," he said. "It's a big idea but it's
a big idea that needs flushed out before
implementation."


CASE: 4th murder count dismissed

Continued From Page 1A


bodies of the victims inside the home.
Strattan currently faces three counts
of first-degree murder while armed.


Prosecutors said they plan to seek the
death penalty. No trial date has been
set.


PRISON: 20-year term

Continued From Page 1A

maximum penalty of just 15 years," Getzen said
by email. "However, based on her prior criminal
record I was able to show that she qualified for
enhanced sentencing under the Habitual Felony
Offender Status."
Getzen said when a defendant had two prior
felony convictions, and was either convicted or
released from prison or probation supervision
within five years of the current .offense, the
court can basically double the sentencing.
"Fina found Owens to be a habitual felony
offender and sentenced her to 20 years in prison
to be followed by 10 years of probation," she
said.
Johnson, 23, was found at Gqorgia Avenue
and Gibson Lane on March 19, 2009 with a gun-
shot wound to his chest.
Officers and EMS personnel responded, and
after stabilizing Johnson transported him to
Shands at Lake Shore Hospital. He was later
transported by helicopter to Shands at the
University of Florida but died soon after arrival.


E wwwlakecityreporter.com

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Columbia County's Most Wanted
Blake Thomas Selph Rodrick Theodore
DOe: 9/17/88
Height: 5'10"- Weight: 144 Ibs.Harris
Hair: Brown- Eyes: Brown DOB: 12/13/68
Birthmark: Stomach/Left Side- Height: 5'9" Weght: 200 Ibs.
Light Area Hair: Black
Scar: Head-From Earto,Ear Eyes: Brown
dHairline Wanted For: VOP Drug Sale,
Tattoo: RightArm-Tribal Manufacturing, Delivering, Resisting
Wanted For: Parole Commission Officer with Violence
Cocaine Possession *History of Violence, Prior Resisting
-e-Arrest-
WANTED AS OF 10/24/2011
ANYONE WITH INFORMATION ON THE WHEREABOUTS OF THESE INDIVIDUALS IS ASKED TO CALL CRIME STOPPERS OF COLUMBIA COUNTY.
WE DO NOT WANT YOUR NAME, JUST YOUR INFORMATION!
The likeness of suspects is supplied by the Columbia County Sheriff's Office Warrants Division and/or other law enforcement agencies.
The cases are active at the time of publication unless otherwise noted. Crime Stoppers of Columbia County, Inc., and their volunteers
are jointly and individually exempt from any and all liability which might arise as a result of the publication of public records.

CALL (386) 754-7099 OR
SUBMIT A WEB TIP AT
S COLUMBIA COUITY www.columbiacrimestoppers.net
Funded by the Crime Stoppers Trust Fund; Administered by the Office of the Attorney General


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Wednesday, October 26, 201 1


'OuR


'OUR
OPINION


Doing

business

on our

own terms


like Jeff Willis, a
local peanut grow-
er who proves
folks in his profes-
sion have a more sophisticated
attitude toward the environ-
ment than some may realize.
"A farmer is not the enemy
of water," Willis told a quarterly
meeting of The Ichetuclmee
Partnership on Tuesday. "Our
job is to protect it" (See story,
Page 1A.)
Yes, farmers use a lot of
water. Crops don't grow too
well without it
But Willis, with the help of
some sophisticated electronic
equipment and the Partnership,
is able to pinpoint just where
water is needed with greater
precision than his forebears
could ever have imagined.
That means just the right
amount neither too much nor
too little.
Better yet, the same technol-
ogy helps prevent overlap of
fertilizer distribution, meaning
less runoff into area lakes and
streams. To top it off, Willis
actually saves money doing
business this way.
A win-win situationif ever
there was one.
And with federal authorities
always at the gate, it seems,
threatening to impose this reg-
ulation or that in place of per-
fectly serviceable state:rules
we can use every win we get.

HIGH:LIGH TS
IN HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, Oct 26,
the 300th day of 2011. There
are 66 days left in the year.
On this date:
In 1774, the First Continental
Congress adjourned in
Philadelphia.
In 1958, Pan American
Airways flew its first Boeing
707 jetliner from New York to
Paris in 8 hours and 41 minutes.
In 1972, national secu-
rity adviser Henry Kissinger
declared, "Peace is at hand" in
Vietnam.
* Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County'
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbid and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.
BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,


Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


B arack Obama is the
Barry Bonds of Big
Government He
offers America lib-
eralism on steroids.
While he earns grand slams for
spending and debt, his pitiful
"results constitute strikeouts.
In an address to the Hoover
Institution in Palo Alto,
Calif., last Monday,.Stanford
University economics profes-
sor Michael Boskin detailed
President Obama's truly historic
profligacy.
Under Obama, federal spend-
ing has risen from 20.7 percent
of gross domestic product to
25.3 percent, Washington's larg-
est slice of apple pie since 1945.
In fiscal year 2011, which ended
SeptenibweraoUnclwSam
spent a record $3.6 trillion, up
an inexcusable 4 percent since
FY 2010. So much for Obama's
demands for "shared sacrifice."
SObama's spend-o-rama
includes federally funded green
jobs that Boskin dismisses as
"the leprechaun economy."
The apotheosis of this blarney
was last month's $1.2 billion
Energy Department loan guar-
antee to Richmond, California's
SunPower Corporation. Its
solar-equipment project prom-
ises 15 permanent positions.
Cost-per-job-created: a stagger-
ing $80 million each.
Even worse, if possible, the
Fox Business Network's Gerri
Willis reports that SunPower
received this federal largesse
even though its share price has
plummeted 93.5 percent from
$133.61 (its December 7, 2007
peak) to $8.09 on September
30, when it won Energy's loan
guarantee.
SunPower's market capital-
ization stood at some $800 mil-
lion, just below its $820 million
debt. SunPower released an
earnings warning after scoring
this federal subsidy. SunPower
also faces a class-action lawsuit
in which investors claim that
it has made false public state-
ments.


www.lakecityreporter.com


ANO
VI


Deroy Murdock
deroy.m'urdock@gmail.com
Such fiscal recklessness
helped swell FY 2011's federal
deficit to $1.298 trillion, just
ahead of FY 2010's $1.294 tril-
lion in red ink and FY 2009's
record $1.416 trillion. Obama
has authorized three consecu-
tive, trillion-dollar deficits. Now
,he demands another $447 bil-
lion for Stimulus, Jr.
. All this, Baskin observes,
has pushed the federal debt to
67 percent of Gross Domestic '
Product, the highest since the
aftermath of World War II. No
wonder Standard & Poor's
downgraded America's sover-
eign debt last August 5 anoth-
er first
Obama's milestone-setting
expenditures would be bad
enough if'they were the spec-
tacularly high price for restor-
ing prosperity. Instead, Obama
has impoverished the Republic,
for nothing.
Only 58.1 percent of the
population is working, the
lowest level since 1983, notes
Boskin, President George H.W.
Bush's chairman of the Council
of Economic Advisors and a
Hoover senior fellow. Among
America's 14 million unem-
ployed citizens, a record 45,.9
percent have been jobless for
more than 27 weeks.
Boskin compared snapshots
of Obama's and President
Ronald Reagan's post-recession
recoveries, 27 months after
each downturn hit bottom. In
September 2011, on Obama's
watch, non-farm payrolls had
grown 0.6 percent, yielding
841,000 jobs since June 2009.
Under the tax-cutting, business-
boosting Reagan, non-agricul-


tural employment swelled 8.7
percent, generating 7.7 million
new jobs.
Team Obama predicted that
his stimulus would limit unem-
ployment to "approximately 7
percent" In fact, unemployment
seems stuck at 9.1 percent,
despite Obama's $840 billion
stimulus. Boskin calculates that
this 2.1 percent gap equals 16
billion foregone work hours.
Even if one believes that Obama
stimulated 3 million jobs, that
equals $280,000 per position -
nearly quintuple the analogous
$58,510 private-sector cost.,
This stagnation now finds
51 percent of Americans too
poor to pay federal income tax
(a modern record) while 47
percent of Americans receive at
. least one form of federal trans-
fer payment (an historical high),
as dependency on the ever-
expanding state expands.
Obama's stack of bills, Boskin
predicts, means higher taxes
soon. To underwrite Obama's
deficits, top California earners,
for instance, could see com-
bined federal and state income
and payroll taxes total 70.8 per-
cent of income by 2016. Those
earning just $60,000 could pay
52,4 percent to Washington and
Sacramento. Non-Californians
also should anticipate higher
taxes.
"A CEO who got it wrong
this many times would be gone
by now," Boskin said. Instead,
Obama barnstorms campaign
events, barks at the rich, and
bellows for further federal out-
lays.
While Americans wallow in
the poor house, Barack Obama
is bound for the Unlimited
Government Hall of Fame.

New "Ark commentator
Deroy Murdock is a columnist
with the Scripps Howard News
Service and a media fellow with
the Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace at Stanford
University.


U.S. to Iraq: 'We're outta here'


The effective end of
the Iraq war, com-
ing up on its ninth
year, was defined
over this past week-
end. "U.S. troops will be home
for the holidays," promised
President Barack Obama.
'And as a practical matter, the
U.S. war machine is already
past the point of no return. We
are down from 505 bases to
18. The U.S. military last week
closed the second of its three
regional military headquarters.
What's left of the headquarters.
staff has been consolidated in
Baghdad.
The U.S. military presence
is down from the 2007 peak of
166,300 to 39,000 this month,
with troops now leaving at the
rate of 520 a day. It would take
a heroic effort by the adminis-
tration, combined with an act


I P: '; ,.
Dale McFeatters
mcfeattersd@shns.com
of international idiocy, like an
Iranian military incursion, to
convince the American people
and the U.S. Congress to send
them back.
The reaction of the
Republican presidential can-
didates to the withdrawal -
Herman Cain's "a dumb thing to
do" was one of the milder criti-
cisms showed a disheartening
combination of political vitriol
and historical amnesia.
Mitt Romney, who should
know better, said the decision


to withdraw was either "naked
political calculation or simply
sheer ineptitude in negotia-
tions with the Iraqi govern-
ment."
If it was a political calculation,
it is unlikely to be of much help
to Obama because the American
public simply doesn't care about
Iraq any more and, for that mat-
ter, is rapidly losing interest in
Afghanistan. The Bush admin-
istration's goalswof making Iraq
a pro-U.S. beacon of democracy
and prosperity in the Mideast
have been worn down over the
years to Obama's more modest
formulation: "The United State
will continue to have an interest
in an Iraq that is stable, secure
and self-reliant"

E Dale McFeatters is editorial
writer for Scripps Howard News
Service.


4A
*!


T.HER
EW


Obama's

pyrrhic

Iraq

victory


announced the
pullout from Iraq -
by the end of the '
year on a note ,
of triumph. Obama adviser '
James Kvaal claimed that was a
"an example of what happens
when a leader sets a plan and 2"
sees it through." West Wing
machismo was on full display, v'
trumpeting, "President Obama '
has ended the war in Iraq." Mr.
Obama said the withdrawal 1
was taking place "as prom-
ised," but the pullout timeline '
evolved as did the president's
responsibility for the after-
math.
During the 2008 campaign, 1I
Mr. Obama proposed a with-
drawal timeline with all troops
out by the summer of 2010.
"As I've said many times, we ;
must be as careful getting out
of Iraq as we were careless
getting in," he wrote in the
New York Times. "We can
safely redeploy our combat
brigades at a pace that would a-
remove them in 16 months.
That would be the summer of 'V
2010 two years from now, and '
more than seven years after ;
the war began." That promised
timeline went by the wayside, i
and the plan Mr. Obama
wound up executing was not
his own but George W. Bush's.'
The end-of-2011 withdrawal
deadline was established in the
Status of Forces Agreement
agreed to by America and Iraq -
in November 2008, before Mr. ,;
Obama took office.
The Obama administration
tried to extend the U.S. com- v
mitment beyond the deadline.
The White House pressed
Baghdad to allow about 6,000
American troops to stay in
the country for training,
intelligence and air-support
missions, but Prime Minister
Notri al-Maliki pushed back
against U.S. negotiators and
demanded that the original
timeline be honored. Mr.
Obama got none of the things
he was negotiating for. It
wasn't a foreign-policy triumph
but a comprehensive diplomat- .
ic failure. "It is a strange way
'to declare victory," a Defense
Department official told The
Washington Times, "after ,)
negotiating for months and
getting nothing." i
Retired Army Gen. John M.
Keane warned that the pullout '
plan is "an absolute disaster" ,
that chiefly benefits Iran. Iran,
however, cannot be blamed '"
for seeking to fill the vacuum
, left by failed U.S. diplomacy. In 2
any case, it is the Iraqis who
lack commitment "It all seems
ignoble," an Iraq combat vet-
eran told The Times. "Really,
we just leave? No advisory I,
role, no friendship? It's like the t
Iraqis said, 'Don't let the door
hit you on the way out,' and ,,
we're letting them do that"
Many members of the military
are concerned that this rush
for the exit will endanger the
progress they sacrificed so
much to achieve.
Mr. Obama's pledge that the
troops would be "home for the '
holidays" was an irresponsible .
throwaway line in his trium-
phalist speech. It may sound
good coming off a teleprompt-
er, but for the White House
to keep this promise, it would
mean highly trained troops ,
newly stationed in Iraq cannot
be shifted to Afghanistan. Nor '
can U.S. forces stay on standby '
in Kuwait to see what develops '
after the pullout. Mr. Obama
promised to be careful get-
ting out of Iraq, but American
troops are being yanked out
before their job is done.


M The Washington Times


The Barry Bonds


of big government


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


COMMUNITY CALENDAR


Today
LEC Activity
A Geriactors performance
is 11-11:45 a.m. Oct. 26 at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-0235.
The center is located at 628
S.E. Allison Court.
Fort White LEC
Senior Home Care is 10-
11 a.m. Oct. 26 at Fort White
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call 386-497-1504. The cen-
ter is located at 18829 Hwy.
47 South.

Thursday, Oct. 27
Landlords Meeting
Thursday Oct. 27 at 6
p.m. at Lake City Medical
Center classroom 101. All
rental managers welcome.
Will discuss up to date insur-
ance needs. For information
call 755-0110.
Livestock
announcements
The mandatory End
Weigh-Ins for Steer, Swine,
Beef Heifer and Meat Goat
is 3-8 p.m. Oct. 27 and.:fhe
Record Book Deadline is
one hour following close of.
scales. The YOUTH- SWINE
& STEER SHOW'is sched-.
uled for 7 p.m. Nov. 3.. Call
752-8822.
LEC Activity.
A Costume Contest is
11:30 a.m. Oct. 27 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235. The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.
Fort White LEC
A Halloween Party and
Senior Home Care is 0 .
a.m.-noon Oct. 27 at Fort:
White LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call 386-497-1504.
The center is located at
18829 Hwy. 47 South.
Info fair
The "Wealth of Information
Fair" is 9 a.m.-noon Oct. 27
at the LifeStyle Enrichment;
Center.. It pprrnotes,a 'e ,qe,
stop shop" where seniors
and soon to'be seniors can
find out how-physical activ-
ity) social cohnectlon, mental
stimulus and good nutrition
can promote "lndepergdent'
living for a lifetime." The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.

Friday, Oct. 28
Trunk or treat
Trunk or treat from 6 to 9
p.m. at Olustee Park. There


will be live entertainment,
carnival games, a costume
contest and movie. If a busi-
ness would like to set up a
station or pass out candy,
contact the Lake City-
Columbia Chamber at (386)
752-3690.
Art reception
The Art of Change: Fall
and Winter, a wine and
cheese art reception on
Oct. 28 from 7 to 9 p.m.
at the Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Care
Center Community Room,
6037 W. US Hwy. 90 in Lake
City. Local artists who have
a connection with haven will
share their inspired work.
This event is free and open
to the public. For more infor-
mation call (386) 752-9191.
LEC Activity
A Free ZUMBA Class is 1
p.m. Oct. 28 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
event is open to the public.
Call (386) 755-0235. The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.
High Springs
Community Theater,
"Moon over Buffalo," a
comedy is playing'at the,
High Springs Community'
- Theater on Friday and.
Saturday nights and Sunday
matinees? Tickets are' $12
online:at highspringscomdr-
munitytheater.com or at The.
SFramery, 754-2780. For infor-
Smation call.752-7994.

Saturday, Oct. 29
BBQ Cookout


Safety Bash is 6-9 p.m. Oct.
29 at Ogburn Ball Field. Free
flashing necklaces, blinking
lights, reflective trick-or-treat
bags and candy. Also food,
games, bounce house, hay
ride and more. Call 386-623-
4758 or 386-292-1720.

Monday, Oct. 31
Train-the-Trainer class
A vehicle rescue "Train-
the-Trainer" class is Oct.
31 at the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office and Nov. 1 at
LQK North Florida. The class
provides the most up-to-date
information available for new
vehicle technologies. The
second day of training is
hands-on. Space is limited.
Register at www.sceneofthe-
accident.com.

Tuesday, Nov. 1
Fall memorial
Haven.Hospice will host a
Fall Love and Remembrance
Memorial service 6 p.m.
Nov.;1 at the Haven Hospice
Suwannee Valley Care
Center Community Room,
6037 W. US Hwy. 90 in Lake
.City. The memorial is open
to anyone in the community
who has lost a loved one.
Attendees are encour-
aged to bring pictures and
..mementos of loved ones that
can 'be placed on the Table
.of Memories. Refreshments
Swill be served and registra-
tion is not required.to attend.
Call (386) 752-9191.

Wednesday, Nov. 2
LEC Activity


The Vineyard, 1832 SW Pat Dolamore performs
Tomaka Terrace, will be hav- at 11 a.m. Nov. 2 at the,
ing a barbecue cookout from LifeStyle Enrichment Center..
.3 to 7 p.m. on Oct. 29 with Call (386) 755-0235. The
music, games and fellow-- center is located at 628 S.E.
ship. Everyone is welcome. Allison Court.
For Information call 365- Oustee meeting
0764 O'stee meeting
Fall fetival. .The Blue Grey Army iS.
meeting 5:30 p.m. Sept. 14
The McAlpin Advent at the Central Building to '*
Christian Church, 17214 .' plan for Olustee 2012. The
89th Road in McAlpin, is building is located at 409.
hosting a Free Fall Festival SW St. Johns St. across from
Oct. 29 from 1 to 4 p m '.: ., Aquatics Center.
"P'There will btheayrides,T;a :'r')rr y, Y:.~r?. ;.
nival games, snacks.likie ;: .Friday, Nov. 4
cotton candy and.popc. n,. :
and a 26-foot-tall inflatable :''EC Activity


slide at:no cost to area .: .:
families. The-fall festival, is in
conjunction with the church's
homecoming ;celebration on
October 30th at 10:45 AM.-
For more information please
contact Pastor Mike Bassett
at (386) 209-1919.
Fall Safety Bash
The second annual White
Springs Fire Department Fall


A healthy skincare tips
class from 11:15 to 11:40
a.m. Nov. 4 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is 'located at 628 S.E. Allison
Court.

Saturday, Nov. 5
Yard sale


Wellborn Community Fall
Yard Sale hosted by the
Community Association will
be from 7:30 a.m to 2 p.m.
Nov. 5 at 1340 8th Avenue,
in Wellborn. Come to buy or
sell. Spaces are only $5.00.
Join us for the monthly blue-
berry pancake breakfast
served from 7:30 to 10 a.m.,
which is $5 for adults and
$3 for children. For more info
call 386-963-1157 or visit
www.wellborncommunityas-
sociation.corr*
Book and bake sale
Thousands of books oh -
a variety of subjects will
be on sale by donation on
Saturday, November 5 from
7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Wellborn Community Library.
In addition to books, video
tapes and art prints will be
available, and the Wellborn
United Methodist Church
Women will host a large
bake sale at the same time.
,Books will not be priced, but
attendees are encouraged
to take as many as possible
and make a donation. The
Wellborn Community Library
is located on the campus
of the Wellborn United,
Methodist Church, 12005
County Road 137, about
a quarter mile north of the
Wellborn Post Office. For
additional information about
Sthe book and bake sale, call
386-365-3418.
Sick and shutin outreach
The 7th Heavenly
Cooking Community in. mem-
ory of Levi Sheppard Sr..,
Swill be Nov. 5. Volunteers
will provide free meals. and .
activities to sickI and shit-in
members of the community
at noon in the Richardson
Community Center, 255 NE
Coach Anders Lane in Lake
City. For information or to
help contact Levi Sheppard,
Jr. at (386) 365-0013.
Crossroads Pregnancy
Center Walk for Lfe
The Crossroads
Pregnancy Center seventh
annual Walk for Life fundrais-
er is Nov. 5 at Deese Square
in Fort White. Registration
starts'9 a.m. at the park
and walking begins 10.
Call'386-497-4978'to get a
sponsor sheet or come by
the Crossroads Pregnancy
Center at 19094 SW State
Rd 47 in Fort White.

Tuesday, Nov. 8
March of Dimes
The March of Dimes, TD
Bank, and Rountree Moore
Auto Group are present-
ing the "Signature Chefs
Auction" at 5:30 p.m. Nov.


8 at Rountree Moore Toyota
showroom, US 90 W. There
will be silent ahd live auC-
tions with pre-decorated
Christmas trees, live enter-
tainment, and a selection of
specialty foods, presented
by over 20 area restaurants
and caterers. Call Kathy
McCallister 623-1505.
LEC Activity
The first of four water-
color painting classes from
12:45 to 2 p.m. Nov. 8 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235 ahead
to register. The center is
located at 628 S.E. Allison
Court.


Humbert will play piano
Sunday Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. at
First Baptist Church of Lake
City, 182 Northeast Justice
St. Admission is free.

Tuesday, Nov. 15
Diabetes workshop
The next Diabetes
Community Education Class
is 9:30 a.m. Nov. 15 at
Lake Shore Authority Board
Building, 259 NE Franklin
St. The topic is Diabetes
Basics led by Dr. Richard
Weizenecker, MD endocri-
nologist. Call Wendy Fisher
at 292-7815. Classes are
free.


Wednesday, Nov. 9 Wednesd Nov. 16


LEC Activity
Richard Graham performs
at 11 a.m. Nov. 9 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235. The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.

Thursday, Nov. 10
LEC Activity
Living with diabetes class
from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m.'
Nov. 10 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is located at 628 S.E. Allison
Court,

Friday, Nov. 11:
Vetans celebration
To hondr and thank
attending veterans, Deb
Grassman, author of Peace
at Last, a book that recounts
stories of hope arid healing.
for veterans and their families;
will speak from 10 to 11 a.rti.
at Suwannee Valley Hospice
Care Center community .
room, 6037 US Highway
90, Lake City. From 11 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. there will be a
barbeQue lunch and pin-
ning ceremony. The event is
free and open to the public.
RSVP at (386) 752-91,91 by
Nov. 4.

Saturday, Nov. 12
-Diabetes Health fair
Local physicians," hospi-
tals and other participants
from the medical community
will offer screenings and
information on both adult
and juniville diabetes at the
Lake City Mall from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m.

Sunday, Nov. 13
SInstrumental concert
Vernon Humbert will per-
form on cello and Laraine


Olustee meeting
Thq Blue Grey Army is
meeting 5:30 p.m. Sept. 14
at the Central Building to
plan for Olustee 2012. The
building is located at 409
SW St. Johns St. across from
Aquatics Center.
LC Activity
Cowboy Dave performs
at 11 a.m. Nov. 16 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235. The
center'is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.

Thursday, Nov. 17
IFAS workshop
SA"Make a Rain Garden.
Recharge.Your Aquifer"
workshop is 5:45 p.m.
Nov. 417 at the Fort White
Library Branch. Learn how,
to install a simple, native
plant rain garden.' Fiter
stormwater.to'proteet and
; recharge grouhdwatef.
Learn about bio-filtering
and which plants to use in
,your 'filter. The workshop
is free and presented by
Nichelle Demorest, UF/IFAS
Extension Agent.

Friday, Nov. 18
LEC Activity
Create a beaded cochet
dedkklace froni'12:45 to 2
p. mi* NoKw l~'8--ati fheLifeStyle ,-
Enrichment. Center. Call ;.,
(386) 755-0235 to reserve
your space. The center is
located at 628 S.E. Allison
Court.

Submit Community .
Calendar announcements
by mail or drop off at the
Reporter office located at 180
E. Duval St., via fax to ,(386)
752-9400 or e-mail
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com.


OBITUARIES


Larry Monroe Bryan
Larry Monroe Bryan, 65, died.
Sunday, October 23, 2011. He
was born in Lake City, the son
of the late Roe & Clarice Brin-
kley Bryan. He graduated from
Columbia High School in 1964
and then went on to graduate
from Louisiana-Monroe Uni-
versity with a Bachelors Degree
in Physical Education in 1969.
He was a loving husband, fa-
ther and grand father that loved
spending time with. his family
as well as meeting and talking
with people. He is preceded in
death by his parents,'and his two
brothers, Allen & Joe Bryan.
Survivors include his wife of
20years, Martha Bryan; daugh-
ters, Lanette (Adam) Strosser,
Mandy(Phillip)Flint; step daugh-
ter, Lisa Tedder (Bob) Hampson
all of Lake City, Fl; grandchil-
dren, Taylor Thompson, Madi-
son Plissey, Emma Flint, Sa-
vannah Amparo, Evan Amparo,
& Riley Strosser also survive.
Funeral services will be con-
ducted at 11:00 a.m. on Friday,
October 28, 2011 in the chapel
of Gateway-Forest Lawn Funeral
Home with Roy Dicks officiating.
Visitation with the family will be
Thursday evening, October 27,
2011 from 5:00 p.m. until 7:00
p.m. GATEWAY-FOREST
LAWN FUNERAL HOME,
3596 South U.S. Hwy 441, Lake
City, FL 32025, (386) 752-1954
are in charge of arrangements.
Please sign our guestbook at
www.gatewayforestlawn.com

Myrtle Lee Dicks
Mrs. Myrtle Lee Dicks, 86 of
Lake City passed away peace-
fully at her home on Monday,
October 24, 2011. She was born
in Crossville, TN to the late Wil-
lis and Rebecca Webb Kerley.
Mrs. Dicks had lived in Lake
City since 1957 having moved
here from Dayton, Ohio. She
enjoyed cooking for her family
and those working on the farm,
growing her vegetables in her
garden and taking care of her


family. Everyone that knew her
knew that she loved the Lord.
She passes on to her. family
.strong Christian values and faith
in God. It is this faith in God that
will carry her family through this
difficult time. She leaves behind
hard work ethics and love for
her family and God. Mrs. Dicks
was a member of Hopeful Bap-
tist Church since 1957 and loved
being active in her church and
Sunday School Class. She loved
to sing tb the Lord, pray and read
her Bible. Mrs. Dicks always
believed that God was always
in control. She was preceded in
death by her husband, Kenneth
Otto Dicks, Sr. in 1975, one son,
Kenneth Otto Dicks, Jr. in 2011,
one grandson, Kenneth, John
Dicks in 2001, one brother, Ar-
nold Kerley and two sisters, Ar-
lena Cole and Bernice Merseau.
Mrs. Dicks is survived by three
sons, Ralph (Linda) Dicks and
Donald Dicks both of Lake But-
ler and Jeff Dicks, Lake City,
four daughters, Linda (Ron)
Vandevoren and Janet (Larry)
Lones both of Lake City, Dar-
lene (Wayne) Green, Lake But-
ler and Lisa (Mike) Gravel, Lake
City and a daughter in law, Ann
Dicks, Lake City. ,One brother,
Marvin (Rachel) Kerley, Cross-
ville, TN, one sister, Dorothy
Tate, Hillsboro, OH, three grand-
sons, Brian (DeAnn) Chase,
Jason Dicks and Jacob Gravel
all of Lake City, two grand-
daughters, Jackie (Scott) Britt,
Lake City and April Dampier,
Lake Butler. three great grand-


children, Courtney Britt, Joshua
Chase and Sarah Chasd all of
Lake City and her very,special
pet dog, "Rusty" also survive.
Funeral services for Mrs. Dicks
will be conducted on Friday,
October 28, 2011 at 10:00 AM
at Hopeful Baptist Church with
Dr. Rodney Baker, Pastor and
Rev. George Kerce officiating.
Interment will follow at Hopeful
Baptist Church Cemetery. Visi-
tation will be from 6-8:00 PM
Thursday evening at the funeral
home. In lieu of flowers dona-
tions may be made to the Hope-
ful Baptist Church Cemetery
Fund, 289 SE Hopeful Drive,
Lake City, Fl. 32025. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 SW Main Blvd., Lake
City. Please sign the guestbook
at www.guerryfuneralhome.net

Dennis Thomas Murrin, Jr.
Mr. Dennis Thomas Murrin, Jr.,
74 of Starke, Fl passed away on
October 23, 2011 at his home
following a brief
illness. Den-
nis was born
on September -
29, 1937 in Sa-
vannah, GA to Dennis Thomas
Murrin, Sr. and Winnifred Todd
Murrin. After growing up in
Miami, Fl he.joined the U.S.
Navy which led him to Jack-
sonville, where he resided for
many years following his mili-
tary service. He worked for the


iae City li& ibtu

8 AND UNDER MACHINE PITCH

Tryouts Today Oct. 26

5:30 P.M.
SSouthside Ball f .,
i. :Southside Ball
'~T, _,' -.. ... _. ,,... . ..-,,


Glidden Company while earn-
ing a degree in Chemistry from
Jacksonville University, and
then experienced a rewarding
career of over 30 years with the
Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection. His love of
the outdoors and desire for coun-
try living inspired him to move
to the Lake City and Starke area
where he spent the last several
years, while also becoming an
active member of Bethlehem
Lutheran Church. Dennis will
always be remembered for his
devotion to his family, friends,
and the environment, along
with a true caring nature toward
his beloved dogs and horses.
He is survived by his loving and
devoted wife, Florence Mur-
rin, his daughter, Denese Mur-
rin, his son, Jordan Murrin, one
grandson, Skye Murrin and two
granddaughters, Michelle Mur-
rin and Moriah Murrin. Ad-
ditional survivors include two
stepsons, Ronald (Keri) John-
son, Glen (Sandra) Johnson, five
step grandchildren, Matthew
Johnson, Christopher Johnson,
Dakota Johnson, Amanda Bur-
cham and Amy Hinkson and four
step great grandchildren, Allison


A I Y li a I \1 tik

[(%\K 11511l\lW 11)



[ P ilMIPIM ,I IAND


C- C RIE


Johnson, Micah Johnson, Justin.
Burcham and Daniel Burcham.
Funeral services for Mr. Murrin
will be conducted on Thursday,
October 27, 2011 at 2:00 PM at
the Bethlehem Lutheran Church
in Lake City. Interment will
follow at Bethlehem Lutheran
Church Cemetery. Visitation
with the family will be from 6-
8:00 PM Wednesday evening
at the funeral home. In lieu of
flowers donations may be made
in memory of Dennis Murrin to
Haven Hospice, 4305 NW 90th
Blvd., Gainesville, Fl32606. Ar-
rangements are under direction of
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME,
2659 SW Main Blvd, Lake City.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhfome. net

Mary Carolyn Osterhoudt
Mrs. Mary Carolyn Osterhoudt,
84 of Lake City passed away
early Monday morning, October
24, 2011 at the Avalon Health-
care and Rehabilitation Center
in Lake City. She was born in
Live Oak, Florida to the late
Escoe and Lillian Thompson
Green. Mrs. Osterhoudt was of
the Baptist faith and member of


Berea Baptist Church. She was
preceded in death by her hus-
band, Harry Osterhoudt, Sr., her ,
daughter, Carolyn Fabal and one
granddaughter, Vanessa Reeves.
Mrs. Osterhoudt is survived
by two sons, Harry "Buddy"
Osterhoudt, Jr. and David Os-
terhoudt both of Lake City,
three grandchildren, Steven
Fabal and Andrew and Wesley
Osterhoudt, one great grand-
daughter, Beth Reeves and nu-
merous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services for Mrs. Oster-
houdt will be conducted on Sat-
urday, October 29,2011 at 11:00
AM at Berea Baptist Church with
Rev. Kenneth Edenfield officiat-
ing. Visitation with the family
will be from 6-8:00 PM Friday
evening at the funeral home.
Interment will be held at a later
date at Forest .Lawn Memorial
Gardens Cemetery. Arrange-
ments are under the direction of
GUERRY FUNERAL HOME.
Please sign the guestbook at
www.guerryfuneralhome.net

Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Sweet Mom


Verlinda

Galloway
Dec. 13, 1947 ~ Oct. 26, 2010
It has been one year since you
became one of God's Angels.

My heart is full of sadness and my eyes
full of silent tears, but I thank my God for
blessing me with the BEST MOM EVER!


L)


Missing You,
Your Daughter Michelle


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


-yci~


| Dear









6A LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


SHot enough to wear pink
wear^--.r *"*'a"1--


Pink shirts
promote breast
cancer awareness.
From staff reports

In 2010 the Columbia
County Fire Department
Auxiliary purchased and
sponsored the pink shirt
campaign for the Columbia
County Fire Department
to bring awareness to
October as Breast Cancer
Awareness Month.
Firefighters assisted with


recycled fire hose, spray
painted pink to decorate
the vehicles.
There were so many
requests for the pink T-
shirts the auxiliary decid-
ed to make them avail-
able to the general public
this year. The shirts are
$15 and quantities are
limited. To place your
order for a shirt, please
call Penny Stanley at 386-
365-3535 or Linda Howard
at 386-365-0711.
All proceeds from the
sale of the pink shirts will


stay in Columbia County
to assist our firefighters in
the performance of their
duties, provide assistance
to fire and disaster victims,
sponsor firefighter activi-
ties, provide fire safety
materials to the schools
and recognize citizen heros
in Columbia County.
The CCFDA cook-
book to be arriving iii
time for Christmas gift
giving. More details will
be available from the aux-
iliary when the cookbooks
are available.


LEFT: Fire Chief Tres Atkinson (front row), Fire Division Chief David Boozer, Linda Howard,
Vicky Simmons, Penny Stanley, Lonnie Boozer, Michael Carson, and Rusty Noah. Ret
COURTESY Tompkins (back row), Aaron Johns, Adam McCook and Arness Thomas.


Robert Rutledge won a deer feeder after participating in a drawing at the Kiwanis Club of
Lake City Inc Big Boy Toys Expoon Oct. 15, Pictured are Lake City Reporter circulation clerk
Amber Meads.(from left), Rutledge, and Lake City Reporter circulation director Mandy Browt


Columbia County Farm Bureau President, Charlie Crawford receives a plaque recognizing
achievements during 2011 from Florida Farm Bureau President John L. Hoblick at the state
annual meeting Oct 6-7 at The Peabody hotel in Orlando.


Columbia County


Farm Bureau honored


From staff reports

Members of the
Columbia County Farm
Bureau proudly accepted
center stage recognition
at Florida Farm Bureau's
2011 State Annual Meeting
held at The Peabody hotel,
Oct 6 through 8.
Volunteers and employ-,
ees at the local Farm
Bureau received the state
organization's Award of
Excellence in all five cat-


egories: Legislative/Policy
Implementation, Public
Relations/Information,
Organization &
Management, Education/
Agriculture Promotions
SOutreach, and Leadership
Development.
Columbia County Farm
Bureau President Charlie
Crawford accepted a plaque
denoting the award cate-
gories from Florida Farm
Bureau President John
Hoblick during an evening


banquet on Oct. 7.
Hoblick offered special
praise for the good work
of county Farm Bureau
volunteers as well as their
support of production agri-
culture and the quality of
life in their home commu-
nities. "I thank you for all
that you do as grassroots
Leaders of Farm Bureau,"
Hoblick said. "You continue
to make Farm Bureau the
voice of agriculture in our
state."


Jordan Wade (center), 28, of Lake City, poses next to a deer feeder Tuesday he won in
a drawing at the Kiwanis Club of Lake City Inc Big Boy Toys Expo held on Oct. 15, at the
Columbia County Fairgrounds. About 200 people participated in the drawing. Pictured are
Lake City Reporter circulation clerk Amber Meads (from left), Wade and Lake City Reporter
circulation contractor Cheyenne Brown.


Casey Anthony jurors lay low after names revealed


By KYLE HIGHTOWER and
TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG -
The names of the Casey
Anthony jurors are pub-
lic, yet the reason they
acquitted her is still largely
unknown.
Jurors were either
unavailable or didn't want to
talk to the media Tuesday
when a judge released
their names, three months
after they found Anthony
not guilty in the death of
her 2-year-old daughter,
Caylee. In the days since
the verdict, Anthony and
the jurors received death
threats and angry mes-
, sages were posted online.
Many people across the
nation thought the jurors
let a guilty woman go free.
Anthony went into hid-
ing,. and it appears jurors
have done the same thing.
Associated Press report-
ers went to the homes


where jurors were thought
to live, but in most cases,
the blinds or drapes
were closed and no one
answered. Dogs could be
heard barking inside some
of the homes. When some-
one did come to the door,
they said the juror didn't
want to speak or in one
case, said the juror didn't
live there.
'The jurors have known
that this' day would be'
coming for a long time.
They've.had plenty of time
to think about it," said
Tampa defense attorney
John Fitzgibbons, who was
not involved in the Anthony
case. "It may simply be that
the jurors want to move on
from this case. Or it could
be some sort of collective
decision by .the jurors if
they are working on some-
thing else jointly."
Fearing for their safety,
Judge BelVin Perry delayed
releasing their names, say-
ing he wanted a "cooling off


period" to pass. It may have
worked. Vitriolic comments
popped up online Tuesday,
but in far less numbers.
Legal experts said
Perry's decision was rea-
sonable, but highly unusu-
al.
"I can't recall another sit-
uation like this, but I think
in this case it was neces-
sary," said Leslie Garfield,
law professor at Pace Law
School in New York. "...
You ask people to serve the
justice system, but in situ-
ations like this there has
to be protection for these
people. We have to try to
protect them somehow.'"
Anthony was accused
of killing her 2-year-old
daughter Caylee in June
2008. After extensive
searches for the little girl,
her body turned up about
six months later in woods
near Casey's parents' home
in Orlando.
Prosecutors said that
Anthony a single mother


living with her parents -
suffocated Caylee with duct
tape because she wanted to
be free to party at night-
clubs and spend time with
her boyfriend.
But prosecutors could
never say with certainty
how Caylee died and
defense lawyers success-
fully cast enough doubt on
their case.
Anthonywas convicted of
lying to investigators who
were searching for Caylee
and released from jail for
time served about two
weeks after the trial ended.
She is serving probation on
an unrelated check fraud
charge at an undisclosed
location in Florida.
John Nighland, husband
of.juror Kathleen Nighland,
spoke to The Associated
Press by telephone. He
said his wife wasn't inter-
ested in talking about the
verdict. When asked how
she has been since the
trial, he said: "She's doing


well. She's doing well."
The husband .of alter-
nate juror Elizabeth Jones
answered the door at their
home. and said she was at
work.
"I'll leave your card with
the pile here," Mike Jones
said. "But I don't think she
is going to want to talk." He
added that since she didn't
deliberate, "she doesn't
have a whole lot to say."
A few of the jurors spoke
with various media out-
lets immediately after the
trial, but none went into
extensive details about
,their deliberations or the
public's reaction to their
decision.
The jury foreman, David
W. Angelo, told Fox News
Channel in July: "We don't
know the cause of death,
and that was one of the
major issues that we had
and one of the major issues
that we had to address.
We don't know the cause
of death. Everything was


speculation."
Russell Huekler, one of
the alternate jurors, was
not involved in the delibera-
tions but sat through more
than 33 days of testimony.,
"I'm sure they looked at
the law and the evidence
that was presented and
unfortunately, the prosecu-
tion didn't meet their bur-
den of proof," he told AP
after the verdict.


CONNECTED
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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@lJkectyreporter.com


SPORTS


Wednesday, October 26, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


ommanders


Bowl


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Richardson Middle School captains Gabriel Williams (from left), Michael Jackson, Ladarius Powell and Dillion Brown and head coach Joey O'Neal, along with D.A.V. Chapter 20 first
vice-chairman Carl Rentz, adjutant Arthur Fleming and past commander Willie Merrell, join Lake City Middle School head coach Billy Jennings and captains Brandon Little, Mariaun Dallas,
Dariaun Dallas and Devante Sercey in displaying the Commanders Trophy to announce the playing of the 12th annual Commanders Bowl at 7 p.m. Thursday at Columbia High Stadium.


Richardsc

I.By TIM iBY :
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
The Commanders. Bowl
football game is this week
and both Richardson
Middle School and Lake
City Middle School come in
on a roll.
Richardson is the host
for this 12th annual edi-
tion and the game is 7 p.m.
Thursday at Columbia High
stadium. Lake City leads
the series, 6-5.
Richardson has arranged
for Rev. Isadore Williams


)n, Lake City meet in middle
t *.* .-' ^ ;. .

the Voice of the Tigers started by the Disabled the teams for the VA, as
to announce the game. American Veterans Chapter did past pAV. commander
The host school is offer-. 20 when Richardson Middle Willie Merrell, who was
ing an incentive for fans School opened. there at the beginning of
wearing the Wolves' orange A part of the lead-up to the Commanders Bowl.
and green colors: the first the game is a gathering of First vice-chairman Carl
50 at the game will receive coaches and players at the Rentz and adjutant Arthur
a prize. Richardson also is VA Medical Center, and Fleming led those in
setting up a separate table the Wolves and Falcons attendance in the Pledge
for those with passes to cut were at the VA on Monday. of Allegiance and 23rd
down on the crowd at the After an introductory meet- Psalm.
entrance for those attend- ing the players break up Richardson is 4-2 and
ing the game. into groups and visit with riding a three-game win
The Commanders patients in the facility, streak. Lake City is 3-2 and
Bowl and accompanying Recreation Therapist on a two-game win streak.
Commanders Trophy was, Fannie Fields welcomed Both teams have beaten


school showdown


Madison County Central
School and Taylor County
Middle School. Richardson
beat Suwannee Middle
School which defeated
Lake City. Lake City beat
Hamilton County Middle
School, which knocked off
Richardson.
"I think we will be in
good shape if we don't have
any injuries during prac-
tice," Wolves head coach
Joey O'Neal said. "The
atmosphere of playing each
other in the same home


town will be exciting. We
should be well-prepared
going in there with them."
"We are not exactly
where we want to be, but
things are clicking and we
are getting better every
game," Falcons head coach
Billy Jennings said.
Bothcoachesemphasized
the importance of interact-
ing with the veterans and
that the players would all
one day wear the purple
BOWL continued on 2B


Two for playoffs


CHS controls fate
over course of last
2 district games.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter. com
Two wins. That's all
Columbia High needs to
guarantee itself a playoff'
spot.
Thd Tigers have an out-
side shot of winning District.
3-6A, but would need help
Leon and Middleburg high
schools. The Panthers are
on the road for the final
two district games, but
would need to lose both
of them since Ridgeview
owns the tiebreaker over.
the Tigers.
Columbia needs wins
over Orange Park and
Leon in two road contest to
assure a playoff spot The
Tigers travel to Orange
Park at 7 p.m. on Friday
in a game that will pit first-
year coach Brian Allen
against former Columbia
coach Danny Green.
Allen expects the game
to have the build up of a
rivalry game.
"I'm going in with the
same mindset that I would
for a Florida/Florida State
game," Allen said. "It's that
type of contest on a high-
school level. When our


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High School's Jayce Barber (5) throws a pass Friday during a game against
Middleburg.


teams hook up, you can
throw out the records."
Allen's history with
Green goes back to his
senior season when Green
accepted the job to become
Tigers coach. Now in his
first year, Allen must beat
his former coach to keep
the Tigers in the playoff
hunt,
"We know each other


so that's going to add -to
our preparation and focus,"
Allen said. "I'm sure it will
be the same for them."
Allen also wants the
Tigers to know that last
time Green and the Raiders
met up with Columbia it
wasn't a good outcome.
"I want to put that mem-
ory in their minds," Allen
said. "Last time we met,


they gave us a pretty good
whipping at our place. We
need to go out there and
take care of business with
district implications on the
line."
The Orange Park game
also marks the beginning of
a three-game road stretch
for the Tigers. Allen hopes
CHS continued on 2B


Thomas'

resurrection

coinciding with

Seminole rise


Senior running
back gives Florida
State oost.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE The
return of senior tailback
Jermaine Thomas gives
Florida State's offense a big
boost
Other than Thomas
himself, no one is happier
to have the veteran run-
ner back in the fold than
Seminoles quarterback EJ
Manuel as the Florida State
goes after a third straight
win on Saturday.
"That's huge for us,"
Manuel said Monday, add-
ing that Thomas brings "a
lot of speed" to the league's
top passing offense already
noted for its speed.
A proven quantity just 40
yards shy of 2,000 career
yards rushing, Thomas ran
for 86 yards on nine car-
ries, caught a pass for 25
yards in his first extended
action Saturday against
Maryland. He also cut down
a Maryland defensive end


trying to sack Manuel in
Florida State's 41-16 win.
"It was a great cut block,"
Manuel said after seeing it
on film. "I heard it ... wow!"
The Seminoles (4-3, 2-2
Atlantic Coast Conference)
begin their stretch drive in
quest of a 35th straight win-
ning season with Thomas
and his career 5.7 yards a
carry career average, seem-
ingly in top form.
"Jermaine is a hard-
running, running back,"
Manuel said.."When he hits
the hole he hits it 100 per-
cent, at full speed."
And he provides Manuel
another yet another danger-
ous weapon in the passing
game too.
"He's going to make
somebody miss and get
upfield," Manuel said about
Thomas' receiving skills.
Thomas missed much of
the August preseason with
dizzy spells that he said
resulted from a car accident
earlier this year. By then
freshman Devonta Freeman
and last year's leading rush-
er, Chris Thompson, had
locked up playing time at
tailback.










LAKE CITY REPORTER


SPORTS


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN UConn at Pittsburgh
GOLF
I a.m.
TGC PGA TourAsia Pacific Classic
Malaysia, first round, at Selangor, Malaysia
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 6, Texas
at St. Louis
PAN AMERICAN GAMES
8 p.m.
ESPN2 Men's volleyball: Brazil vs.
United States, at Guadalajara, Mexico
RODEO
9 p.m.
VERSUS PBR, World Finals, first
round, at Las Vegas
BASEBALL

World Series

Texas vs. St. Louis
St. Louis 3,Texas 2
Texas 2, St. Louis I
St. Louis 16,Texas 7
Texas.4, St. Louis 0
Monday
Texas 4, St. Louis 2,Texas leads series
3-2
Today
Texas (Lewis, 14-10) at St. Louis
(Garcia 13-7), 8:05 p.m
Thursday
Texas (Harrison 14-9) at St. Louis
(TBA), 8:05 p.m.

Game 3
St. Louis 100434211 IA 15 0
Texas 000330100- 7 13 3
Lohse, Salas (4), Lynn (5), Dotel (7),
M.Boggs (9) and Y.Molina; M.Harrison,'
Feldman (4), Ogando (6), M.Gonzalez (6),
M.Lowe (8), D.Oliver (9) and Torrealba.
W-Lynn 1-0. L-M.Harrison 0-1. HRs-
St Louis, Craig (I), Pujols 3 (3). Texas,
Mi.Young (I), N.Cruz (I).
Ga~e 4
St. Louis 000000000--0 2 0
Texas 1.0000300x -4 6 0
EJackson, M.Boggs (6),Westbrook (8)
and Y.Molina; D.Holland, Feliz (9) and
Napoli. W--D.Holland Il0. L-EJackson
0-I. HRs-Texas, Napoli (2).
Game 5
St. Louis 020000000--2 7 I
Texas 00100102x-4 9 2
C.Carpenter, Dotel (8), Rzepczynski
(8), Lynn (8), Motte (8) and Y.Molina;
C.Wilson, Feldman (6), Ogando (7),
D.Oliver (8), Feliz (9) and Napoli. W-
D.Oliver I-0. L-Dotel 0-1. Sv-Feliz (2).
HRs-Texas, Moreland (I),A.Belre (I).

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE.


New England
Buffalo
N.Y.Jets
Miami


Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Baltimore
Cleveland


San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
Denver


East
W L T Pct PF PA
5 I 0.833185 135
4 2 0.667188 147
4 3 0.571172 152
0 6 0.000 90 146
South
W L T Pct PF PA
4 3 0.571182 131
3 3 0.500112 135
2 5 0.286 84 139
0 7 0.000111 225
North
W L T Pet PF PA
5 2 0.714151 122
4 2 0.667137 III
4 2 0.667155 83
3 3 0.500 97 120
West
W L T Pct PF PA
4 2 0.667141 136
4 3 0.571160 178
3 3 0.500105 150.
2 4 0.333123 155


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East


N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Washington
Philadelphia


New Orleans
Tampa Bay
Atlanta
Carolina


Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis


W L
4 2
3 3
3 3
2 4
South
W L
5 2
4 3
4 3
2 5
North
W L
7.0
5 2
4 ,3
1 6
West
W L
5 1
2 4
I 5
0 6


T Pct PF PA
0.667154 147
0.500149 128
0.500116 116
0.333145 145

T Pct PF PA
0.714239 158
0.571131 169
0.571158 163
0.286166 183

T Pct PF PA
01.000230141
0.714194 137
0.571170 150
0. 143148 178

T Pct PF PA
0.833167 97
0.333 97 128
0. 167116 153
0.000 56 171


Sunday's Games
Houston 41 Tennessee 7
Carolina 33,Washington 20
N.Y. Jets 27, San Diego 21
Cleveland 6, Seattle 3
Denver 18, Miami 15, OT
Atlanta 23, Detroit 16
Chicago 24,Tampa Bay 18
Kansas City 28, Oakland 0 .
Pittsburgh 32,Arizona 20
Dallas 34, St. Louis 7
Green Bay 33, Minnesota 27
New Orleans 62, Indianapolis 7
Monday's Game
Jacksonville 12, Baltimore 7
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Giants,
New England, Philadelphia, San Francisco
Sunday, Oct. 30
Indianapolis atTennessee, I p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, I p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Baltimore, I p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
:Washington vs.' Buffalo at Torinto,
4.05 p.m.
Clevelaid at San Francisco, 4:1-5 p.m.
Cncinnnati at Seattle,4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh,4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 820 p.m,
Open: Aanta, Chicago, Green Bay,
N.Y. Jets, Oakland,Tampa Bay
S Monday, Oct. 31
San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.

College games

Today
UConn (3-4) at Pittsburgh (3-4),
8 p.m.
Thursday
Virginia (4-3) at Miami (4-3),
8 p.m.
Rice (2-5) at Houston (7-0), 8 p.m.
Friday
BYU (6-2) vs.TCU (5-2) at Arlington,
Texas, 8 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Thursday
No. 18 Houston vs. Rice, 8 p.m.
Saturday
/ No. 3 Oklahoma State vs. Baylor,
3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Stanford at Southern Cal,
8 p.m.
No. 6 Clemson at Georgia Tech,
8 p.m.
No. 7 Oregon vs. Washington State,
3 p.m.
.No. 8 Arkansas at Vanderbilt,
12:21 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State at No. 13
Nebraska, Noon
No. 10 Kansa State vs. No. II
Oklahoma, 3:30 p.m.
No. 12 Wisconsin at Ohio State,
8 p.m.
No. 14 South Carolina at Tennessee,
7:15 p.m.
No. 15 Virginia Tech at Duke,
12-30 p.m.
No. 16 Texas A&M vs. Missouri, Noon
No. 17 Michigan vs. Purdue, Noon
No. 19 Texis Tech vs. Iowa State,
7 p.m.
No., 21 Penn State vs. Illinois,
3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Georgia vs. Florida,


3:30 p.m.
No. 23 Arizona State vs. Colorado,
6:30 p.m.
No. 25 West Virginia at Rutgers,
3:30 p.m.

GOLF

Golf week

PGATOURIASIAN TOUR
ASIA PACIFIC CLASSIC
MALAYSIA
Site: Selangor, Malaysia.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: The Mines Resort and Golf
Club (6,966 yards, par 71).
Purse: $6.1 million. Winner's share:
$1:3 million.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 1-4 a.m., 5-7 p.m.).
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
Asian Tour site: httpl/www.asiantour.
com
CHINA GOLF ASSOCIATION
SHANGHAI MASTERS
Site: Shanghai.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Lake Malaren Golf Club,The
Masters Course (7,585 yards, par 72).
Purse: $5 million. Winner's share: $2
million.
Television: None.
Online: http://www.shanghalmasters.
com.cn
EUROPEAN TOUR
ANDALUCIA MASTERS
*Site: Sotogrande, Spain.
Schedule:Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Valderrama Golf Club (6,988
yards, par 71).
Purse: $4.17 million. Winner's share:
.$695,450.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Friday, 9 a.m.-noon, 9:30-11:30 p.m.;
' Saturday-Sunday, 8 a.m.-noon, 9:30-
11:30 p.m.).
Oiilne: httpJ/www.europentourcom
NATIONWIDE TOUR
CHAMPIONSHIP
Site: Charleston, S.C.
Schedule-Thursday-Sunday.
Course: Daniel Island Club, Ralston
Creek (7,446 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1 million. Winner's share:
$180,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-
Sunday, 2:30-5 p.m., 7:30-9:30 p.m.).
LPGATOUR
Next event Mizuno Classic,
Nov. 4-6, Kintetsu Kashlkojima Country
Club, Shima, Japan.
Online: htp://www.lpga.com
CHAMPIONS TOUR,
Next event Charles Schwab Cup
Championship, Nov. 3-6, TPC Harding
Park, San Francitco.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Monday's Games
Philadelphia 4,Toronto 2
Florida 2, Montreal I
N.Y. Rangers 2,Winnipeg I
Tuesday Games
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders (n)
Otawa at Carolina (n) 4
Detroit at Columbus (n)
Tampa Bay at Buffalo (n)
San Jose at Nashville (n)
Anaheim at.Chicago (n)
Vancouver at Edmonton (n)
Dallas at Phoenix (n)
New Jersey at Los Angeles (h)
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at Calgary, 10 p.m.
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Thursday's Games
Montreal at Boston,'7 p.m.
Columbus at Buffalo, 7 p.m.
Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m:
Winnipeg at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Rorida at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Nashville, 8 p.m.
AnaheIm at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Washington at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Phoenix, 10 p.m. .


CHS: Travel to Orange Park Friday


Continued From Page 1B

it turns into four game on
the road.
"We hope to make it
four on the road unless
something wild happens
to Ridgeview," Allen said.
'There's the potential to
play four road games with
the possibility of going
to St. Augustine for the
playoffs. We've got to think



BOWL

From Page 1B


and gold of Columbia High.
"For some of our guys, it
was the first time they had
seen anything like it and
they were excited," O'Neal
said of the VA visit. "We tell
them it is just a game and all
about the feeder programs
helping Brian (CHS head
coach Allen). The kids get
a kick out of playing each
other."
"It is a good experience
for the kids to see the free-
doms we have are because
of those guys," Jennings
said. 'The players will be
on the same team one day,
and it is good for them to
be able to experience that
together."


about this game though
before we even start think-
ing about Leon, live Oak or
the playoffs."
Allen's hoping he can
make these road games
feel a little more like home
through fan support.
"We'd like to see fan
support there and create
sort of a home atmosphere,"



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I GLUHA I


Allen said. "Jacksonville
isn't but a hop, skip and,a
jump away. We'd pack them
in on the sidelines if we
have to. We'd just like to see
them show up the way we
know they can and the way
they did when we started
the season out on the road
against Brooks County
(Ga.)."

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


EEIDDF 5 -<

HE WAA SHOCKEP
S TO 5EE ALL THE
RUAOAR IoMDIE--
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
esterday'sI Jumbles: MAMBO CLUNG BURROW TIGHTS
SAnswer: Her eyes had become dry and itchy, but luckily the
person next to her had this THE SOLUTION


GOLF REPORTS
A


COURTESY PHOTO
The Rountree two-man best ball tournament winners are Mike Streicher (from left) and
Grady Moore in second place, club pro Carl Ste-Marie, and first-place winners Phillip Russell
and Jason Watts.


Watts/Russell win Rountree


After two days of golf
over the weekend, The
Rountree two-man best
ball tournament came
down.to a one-hole shoot-
out among flight winners
and a chip-off.
Jason Watts and Phillip
Russell finally claimed
The Rountree tournament
championship. Grady
Moore and Mike Streicher
were- runners-up.
Flight winners were:
First Flight gross -
Steve Thomas and Dennis
Crawford, first; Walter
Smith and Bill Adams,
second; net score Buddy
Slay and Charlie Timmons,
first; John Brewer and
Timmy Rogers, second;
Second Flight gross
- Zack Paulk and Todd
Carter, first; Tyson Johnson
,and David Barber, second;
net score Al Alvarado
and Greg Lyons, first; Jerry
West and Andy Peterson,
second;
Third Flight gross
- Jason Watts and Phillip
Russell, first; Eric Roske
and Tony Kent, second;


World Golf Ranking

I. Luke Donald Eng 10.75
2. Lee Westwood Eng 7.48.
3. Rory Mcllroy NIr 7.31
4. Steve Stricker USA 6.24
5. Dustin Johnson USA 6.24
6. Martin Kaymer Ger 6.0.9
7.Jason Day Aus 5.73
8.Adam Scott Aus 5.48
9. Matt Kuchar USA 5.40
10.Webb Simpson USA 5.36
II. Phil Mickelson USA 5.26
12.NickWatney USA 5.24
13. KJ. Choi Kor 4:75


ACROSS
1 Big book
5 Household
member
8 Repartee pros
12 Lemon
coolers
13 Web-footed
bird
14 Ms. Falco
15 May honorees
16 Group of,
boats
18 Wandered
20 Pointed arch
21 Fabric means.
22 Like, stupid!
23 Prevails upon
26 Jelly
thickener
29 Water the
plants
30 Race off
31 -
Wiedersehen
33 Mrs. Peron
34 German
import


10-26


COUNTRY CLUB
at LAKE CITY
Ed Goff

net score Grady Moore
and Mike Streicher, first;
Bill Ryan and Dave Taylor,
second.
Eli Witt ,used a 6-iron
to ace No. 7 in Good Old
Boys play.
Witt's third career hole-
in-one led teammates Ed
Snow, Mike Spencer and
Bill Wheeler to a 10-8 win
over Monty Montgomery,
Tom Elmore and Tony
Branch. Marc Risk, Bobby
Simmons and Joe Persons
finished third with 6 points
in the three-way match.
Match 2 went to Jerry
West, Bill Rogers, Carl
Wilson and Din Stephens,
6-1, over Stan Woolbert,
Paul Davis, Jim McGriff
and Jim Bell,
-Montgomery (37-36-73)
led individual scoring. Risk
(76), Woolbert (77), West
(77), Bell (78), and Snow
(79) had the other scores
of note.


14. Charl Schwartzel SAf
15.Gr.McDowell NIr
16. BubbaWatson USA
17.Justin Rose Eng
18. Hunter Maharn USA
19. David Toms USA
20. Bill Haas USA
21. Kim Kyung-Tae Kor
22. Paul Casey Eng
23. Robert Karlsson Swe
24. Rickie Fowler USA
25. lan Poulter Eng
26.Thomas Bjorn Den
27. Brandt Snedeker USA
28. Keegan Bradley USA
29. Simon Dyson Eng


35 "Puppy Love"
singer
36 Marshes
38 Cleared the
dishes
39 Strive to win
40 Get wrong
41 Thick
carpeting
43 Conceit
46 Green-eyed
monster
48 Murmurs
50 Ricelike
pasta
51 Seance
sound
52 "- Horizon"
53 Babysitter,
often
54 Pistachio
55 Wonder
Woman's
friend


Eddy Brown and Don
Combs battled to a first-
place tie at +7 in the
Wednesdayblitz.JerryWest
(+5) edged Greg Lyons by
a sti-oke for third.
Mike Gough. led the
skins parade with two.
Jordan Hale, Lynn.Smith,
Mike.McCranie and Combs
posted the other skins. Both
pot holes carried over.
A dozen LGA members
challenged the greens and
each other in a "least putts"
format. ,Dottie Rogers,
aided by a chip-in on
No. 5, used her flat stick
only 29 times to best Cathy
Steen who finished with 30
putts. Natalie Bryant .and
Caroline Stevens pushed
the winners with 31 putts.
Roger and Nancy Mitzel
shot a 57 to claim this
month's A division-win in
the mixed scramble. Ken
and Peggy Radcliffe took
second with 58.
In B division, Tony
and Marcella Garcia's 52
was good for a three-shot
win over Scott and Sandy
Kishton.


30.Jim uryr USA
3 Sergio Garcia Esp
32. Darren Clarke Nlr
32.Anders Hansen Den
34. Fr'cesco Molinari Ita
35.Jason Dufner USA
36. Martin Laird Sco
37.Y.E.Yang ,Kor
38. Geoff Ogilvy Aus
39. BoVan Pelt USA
40.Zach ohnson USA
41. Gary Woodland USA
42. Bae Sang-moon Kor
43.Alvaro Quiros Esp
44. Retief Goosen SAf
45. Ernie Els SAf


3.31
3.29
-3.25' '
3.25
3.18
3.17
3.09
3.05
3.05
3.04
3.03
3.01
2.99
2.99
2.93
2.90


Answer to Previous Puzzle


3 Quick
reminder
4 Made a try
5 Restaurants
6 lang syne
7 Marciano stat


9 Not employed
10 Mosaic part
11 Neptune's
kingdom
17 Handle
19 Rx givers
22 Ricky Ricardo
23 Navaho foe
24 Guns the
engine
25 Chew at
26 Shoulder
enhancers
27 Holm and
Fleming
28 Microwave
30 Deceive
32 Hot trend
34 Buddy, in
Baja
35 Outer ear
37 Arthurian
paradise
38 Fam. member
40 Cairo locale
41 Dry and
withered
42 Thin fog
43 Genesis
hunter
44 Chimney dust
45 Nearly all
46 Scribble down
47 Samovar
49 Depot (abbr.)


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


B E GW A S 0HC S H



S EE I VI SAS
AD S DI M
VA YS OVAL EL K
AIBEE F I OIB M- I
DUN TU B I LL
I TSHLESE A N

ClgolA NOISE


A V R E ARD EI D

EINIDIS YIUIRIT AF T


I








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


PREP ROUNDUP


COURTESY PHOTO
Fort White High cross country team's Marissa Fletcher (left) and Carolee Morrow run in the
Alligator Lake XC Invitational on Saturday. -


Indians, Tigers run


at Alligator Lake


From staff reports

Columbia High and
Fort White High runners
competed in the Alligator
Lake XC Invitational on
Saturday.
Providence School won
the gills' competition, fol-
lowed by Oak Hall School
and Ridgeview High.
Danielle Van Liere of
Providence was the individ-
ual winner in 18:41.02.
Fort White placed, 11th
in the 16-team field: Sydni
Jones, 30th place-21:19.99
time; Ashley Jones, 41st-
22:09.44; Seaira Fletcher,
65th-23:27.59;. Carolee
Marrow, 80th-25:03.55;
Marissa Fletcher, 82nd-
25:10.13; SheridanPlacentia,
84th-25:26.21; Colby.Laidig,
93rd-26:41.00.
Makenzie Laiding
(28:58.07) and Kayleigh
Stokes (32:44.94) also
ran varsity, while Katrina
Padillo, Isabel Haire and
Kaitlin Hunter ran junior
varsity.
Columbia's Haley Lewis
(21:33.83) and Ashlyn
Martin (22:33.32) ran as


individuals.
. Leon High won the boys'.
competition, with Flagler
Palm Coast High in second
and PK. Yonge School in
third. Garrett Westlake of
PK Yonge won the indi-
vidual title in 15:52.31.
The Tigers were last in
the 14-team field: Octavious
Buiey, 56th-18:59.90; Taylor
Viens, 74th-20:10.46; Noah
Henderson, 86th-21:14.26;
Wyatt Snook, 88th-21:18.75;
Zach Peterson, 93rd-
22:24.85; Johnathan Key,
95th-23:39.26; Gabriel
Bellamy, 98th-27:31.38.
Josh Compton (25:50.78)
ran for the Indians.
Fort White's District
4-2A meet is at Starke Golf
& Country Club on Nov.
3 (girls-5 p.m., boys-5:40.
p.m.).
Columbia's District
2-3A meet is at Apalachee
RegionalParkinTallahassee
on Nov. 5 (girls-8 a.m., boys-
8:30 a.m.).

Columbia bowling
Columbia's bowling team
swept Suwannee High and


Fort White at Lake City
'Bowl last Wednesday.
The Lady Tigers rolled
847-828 in the traditional
games and 142 in the Baker
scoring game.
Suwannee bowled 645-
691-136, and Fort White
bowled 426446-108.
Columbia's bowlers who
counted in the. first game
were Christine Peters 179,
Chelsea Williams 176,
Lauren Snipes 175, Linden
Barney 173 and Danielle
Mathis 144.
In game two, they were
Barney 176, Courtney
Schmitt 175, Williams 161,
Peters 160 and Tori Wise
156.
For the Baker game;
Columbia used Schmitt,
Peters, Williams and Snipes,
with Barney and Wise split-
ting the 3-8 frames.
Columbia's match against
Vanguard High and North
Marion High was canceled.
The three regulars will bowl
at 4 p.m. today at Thunder
Alley in Live Oak.
The District 2 tourna-
ment is at AMF East in
Ocala at 8 a.m. Tuesday.


Columbia moving


on in district tourney

From staff reports

Columbia High is mov-
ing on in the District 4-6A
tournament after a four-set
win against Wolfson High
at Atlantic Coast High on
Tuesday.
The Lady Tigers used 15
aces, 33 kills and 75 digs as
a team to pick up the match. 1 IM
in a 25-6, 25-20, 13-25, 25-16
victory.
Annie'Milton led the team
with nine aces in the match.
Jara Courson had 12'digs
and seven kills. Hannah -
Baker also had seven kills.
Jessie Bates led the team
with 33 assists and added
12 digs.
"I'm very proud of the
way'we started out tonight,"
Columbia coach Rebecca
Golden said. "We jumped
out to our best start of the
season and hopefully it
carries over to tomorrow
night."
Columbia meets St.
Augustine High at 5 p.m.
today at Atlantic Coast JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
High. Fort White High sophomore Emily Roach (12) watches as
The winner will move her ball sails over Columbia High's Ashleigh Bridges (9) and
on to play the winner ofn Annie Milton (1) in a game on Sept. 14.
Atlantic Coast and Stanton
Prep at 6 p.m. on Thursday.


Fort White volleyball
Fort White High's sea-
son came to an end in the
District 5-4A tournament
against Keystone Heights
High in Keystone on
Tuesday.
Keystone Heights took


the match in three sets
25-16, 25-17 and 25-18.
"Honestly it was probably
the best game we've played
all season," Fort White
coach Doug Wohlstein said.
"We gave them everything
we had and the scores prob-
ably don't reflect that we
played them as tough as


we did."
Fort White was led by
Lync6 Stalnaker with 15
kills and 15 digs. Carson
Robison had six kills and
sid digs.
Ali Wrench led the Lady
Indians with 20 assists in
'the match. She also had
seven digs.


RECREATION ROUNDUP


COURTESY PHOTO
Winfield Recreation
Winfield Recreation won the 2011 Lake City Recreation Department's Women's Summer
'Softball League. Team members are Keta Bryant (front left) and Jackie Clark. Second row
(from left) are Reka Smith, Debbie Perry, Tammy Young, Denise Griffis, Chella Blocker,
Cassandra Smith, Sweet Perry, Mary Thomas, Pam Hart and Tyrone Bones. Back row
(from left) are Clayton Thomas, Karen Harper, Mike Felton, Mia Carter and Kim Gaskins.


NAPA No Pop
NAPA No Pop was runner-up in the 2011 Lake City Recreation Department's Women's
Summer Softball League. Team members are (front row, from left) Michaela Burton,
Jordan Williams, Erick Lasseter, Holly Boris and Brittany Shearer. Back row (from left) are
Erica Townsend, Jordan Windham, Robby Crews; Beverly Lasseter, Tara Harrell,
Lauren Spoo, Heather Law, Jamie Crews and Sarah Barthle-Simmns.


Hit Lab
Hit Lab won the 2011 Lake City Recreation Department's Co-ed Summer Softball League.
Team members are (front row, front left) Jordan Windham, Erick, Jonathan Taylor,
Bubba Langford and Miranda Stephens. Back row (from left) are Kevin Bennett,
Aaron Butler, Bev Lassiter, Wes Cothran, John Lassiter and Jarrod Butler.


COURTESY PHOTO
Winfield Wildcats
Winfield Wildcats was runner-up in the 2011 Lake City Recreation Department's Women's
Summer Softball League. Team members are Pat Davis (front left) and Ronnie Preston.
Second row (from left) are Teresa Perry, Debra Perry, Cassandra Smith and Mike Grissom.
Back row (from left) are'Clayton Thomas, Tyron Bones and Mike Felton.


S, rchable l Got Connected w .Iakeyrrter.
I gj ea h, Clagased Ads OnliO 'ER


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421








LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


DEAR ABBY


Couple clashes over bringing

sex offender home for holidays


DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band recently asked how
I would feel about him
buying a plane ticket for
his brother "Jake" to visit
us over the holidays. I
told him I wouldn't like it
- not because my husband
would be paying for the
ticket, but because Jake is
a registered sex offender. '
My husband says Jake
"served his time." I under-
stand that, but the under-
age girl he messed around
with was his niece. My
daughter is 10 and start-
ing to develop. She's also
affectionate with family.
I don't want her hugging
Uncle Jake.
My husband told me
that if his family isn't wel-
come in our house, he will
start treating MY family
badly. Am I wrong for not
wanting Jake sleeping
under the same roof as my
daughter?,- PROTECTIVE
MOM IN THE MIDWEST
DEAR PROTECTIVE
MOM: No, you're not
wrong. That your husband
would try to blackmail you
into allowing a registered
sex offender to sleep in, the
same house as your ado-
lescent daughter is deplor-
able. Your daughter is old
enough to be told that
Uncle Jake has a problem
with young girls, and that
if he ever makes a move
on her, you want to know
immediately.
It isn't like Jake did
time for bank robbery.


Abigail Van Buren
www.deorabby.com
Sex offenders are usually
prohibited from having
contact with minors. The
man has a sexual impulse
disorder that shouldn't be
ignored, and your husband
should not allow any risk
that your daughter might
be molested.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My
son accidentally hit my
neighbor's car with his
bike. We immediately
vent over, told hihn to get
an estimate, and I said I
would gladly pay the cost
of repair. Three days later,
our neighbor came over
with the estimate and I
wrote him a check.
As time went on, I
noticed the car wasn't
fixed, so one day when I
saw him outside I asked
him about it He told me
his wife needed some
things, so he gave her the
money I had given him. He
said he wasn't really that
concerned about the car.
Since I gave him the
money to fix the car,
shouldn't he have used it
for that purpose? My hus-
band says once I gave our
neighbor the money, it was


his to do with as he liked.
What do you think? TOO
GOOD A NEIGHBOR IN
OHIO
DEAR TOO GOOD: I
don't think a person can
ever be "too good" a neigh-
bor, and I agree with your
husband.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band, of two years, "Cash,"
can't fall asleep or stay
asleep unless the TV is
on. I am the opposite. The
noise keeps me awake,
and I have heard it's not
good to have a TV in the
bedroom.
We compromised by get-
ting a remote with a timer.
I can give up the 60 or 90
minutes he needs to fall
asleep. But he frequently
wakes up in the middle
of the night and turns the
TV back on, or moves to
the couch to watch the TV
there.
I asked Cash if he'd
remove the TV from our
bedroom. His response
was, "Well, I guess I'll be
sleeping on the couch
a lot." Advice, Abby? -
- SLEEP-DEPRIVED IN
CALIF.
DEAR SLEEP-
DEPRIVED: Yes. There
must be a reason for your
husband's irregular sleep
habits. He should discuss
the matter with his doctor.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Money matters will
not be clear-cut. Be cau-
tious of any deal that
sounds too good to be
true. A partnership will
lead to a challenging
enterprise. Someone with
whom you do business will
cause you stress. Anger
won't solve a problem, but
patience will.***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Put pressure on any-
one that doesn't follow
through with a promise.
A partnership will be on
shaky ground if one or both
of you refuse to accept the
inevitable. Don't let a stub-
born attitude cause a plan to
come to a halt. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Consider your health
and well-being. You may
be left out of the loop with
regard to a job project or
employment opportunity..
Don't let anyone interfere
with your plans. Don't
make domestic changes
that affect others. ***'
CANCER (June 21-July
22): Love is highlighted.
Socializing and networking
will broaden your circle of
friends and your interests.
Taking time to update
your image or add to your
qualifications will lead to
greater opportunities in
the future. Favors will be
granted. *****
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
You'll face opposition if


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

you spend time at home or
interacting with relatives
or roommates. Tempers
will be close to the surface
and financial problems or
disagreements are likely.
You will have to make
some tough decisions, as
well as changes to your
lifestyle. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): You'll get your point
across and drum up the
'help you need. Getting
involved in an event or
activity will add to your
experience and confidence,
bringing you greater
knowledge and opening
the door to future opportu-
nities. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): The pressure to fin-
ish what you start will be
stressful. Make a positive
change that will help you
promote a creative idea.
Update your resume or
look for a way to make
extra cash. Someone you
used to work with will give
you a lead. ***
SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Don't let secrets, jealou-
sy or possessiveness cause
you grief Arguments will
get you nowhere, and over-
reacting will lead to separa-
tion. If you want to resolve
a problem, you have to be
willing to meet halfway.


Don't let the past hold you
hostage. ***
SAGITARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21): Truth will count
You may not want to hurt
someone's feelings, but.
attempting to avoid the
inevitable will make things
worse. Rather than putting
money into other people's
ventures, invest in your
own. A secret affair may
*entice you. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan. 19): You will get
recognition for your tal-
ents, skills and attributes.
Network with people
you feel can help you get
ahead. There is money to
be made if you are honest
about what you have to
offer. Don't let love cost
you. ****
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): The people you
meet or deal with will
confuse or mislead you.
Consider your motives
before you get involved
in a group or activity that
may not be suitable. Don't
be a follower when you
should be a leader. **
* PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Good fortune is
within reach. Reconnect
with someone'from your
past Personal and home
improvements will pay
off. What appears to be a
negative turn of evd'nts will
end up being a blessing
in disguise. Look for new
beginnings. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: Z equals L
"IROODYE EXU WRPESY SWS P A IE
NDRY TXUIE, HDY EXU ODUEYN DH
EXU KRIPT IXDRZV YUIDRAV PA NDRY


FRANK & ERNEST


XUSYE."


- SAVYUI IUWDMPS


Previous Solution: "You have got to keep autistic children engaged with the
world. You cannot let them tune out." Temple Grandin
02011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-26


FOR BETTER ORWORSE


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BEETLE BAILEY


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


CLASSIC PEANUTS












olum bia i

Your marketplace source for Lake Citv and Columbia


1C.

County


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011


LAKE CITY REPORTER


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
The Fifth Generation Farms produce store, located at 3739 W. U.S. 90, offers a variety of locally grownfruits-and-vegetables, as well as specialty.items, like-jams and saucesfrozen food --
and locally grown meats. Fifth Generation Farms hangs and ages their beef for two weeks, which adds flavor to the cuts. Pictured are meat manager Jeff Wott (from left), head cashier Mary
Lucks, store manager Abigail Dicks, produce manager Edward Dicks and co-owner Delvey Dicks.


For locally grown


treats, specialties,


try Fifth Generation


From staff reports
Fifth Generation Farms carries a full
line of meats, produce and lots of specialty
items, including jams, jellies, syrups and
spices, as well as organic and natural
products.
"As much as we can get of the products
are sourced locally and I raise the beef,"
said Delvey Dicks, who owns the busi-
ness with wife Cindy Dicks. "It's raised in
Columbia County, slaughtered in Columbia
County and sold in Columbia County."
Dicks is also the president of 'North
Florida Natural Black Angus.
"The natural means it's been raised by,
without any hormones, any antibiotics or
fed any animal by-products," Dicks said.
"It's true dry-aged beef and hangs for a
minimum of 14-days to dry-age before it is
cut and wrapped."
Fifth Generation Farms has been open
since Aug. 23.
The business is located at 3739 West
U.S. Highway 90 and is open for business
from 8 a;m. 7 p.m. Monday Fridays and
from 8 a.m. 6 p.m. on Saturdays. The busi-
ness is closed on Sundays.
Fifth Generation Farms is staffed by 10
employees full- and part-time.
'The thought of what we're doing in a
nutshell is trying to provide something
that is produced and consumed local to cut
down on fossil fuel miles that things travel,
to get a fresher and healthier product to
the public," Dicks said.
The Fifth Generation Farms business
originated as a way for Dicks' children to
continue the family tradition of farming.
Dicks is a self-proclaimed rancher/farm-
er and his children wanted to continue the
farm and the family devised a way to carry
the farm farther into the future.
"We grow a lot of the crops that the
animals consume, so we just thought we
would integrate the farm," Dicks said. 'To
help our local economy that's why we want
to buy as much stuff as we can buy locally
to support the area farmers."
Fifth Generation Farms has products


grown in Columbia County; tomatoes, egg
plant and green beans from Madison;
Wainwright milk from local dairies; a full
line of Amish clTeeses and honey, jams, jel-
lies and syrups that are produced locally.
"Our goal is to be as local as possible,"
-Dicks said,. noting the emphasis is on
selling a premium product at a reason-
able price. "People like the custom meat
service. It's like an old-fashioned butcher
shop."

G E www.lakecityreporter.com
C N TE
CONE TED

REPORTER

NEWS
WEATHER
OPINION
SPORTS
ARCHIVES
CLASSIFIED
COMMUNITY
ENTERTAINMENT

STAY.
A3 -www.Iakecityieporter.com

CONNEiTED


s J










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


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IBUY


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personal erch Ise totalling $6,000 or e es.
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Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
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Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for eaqh Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,.
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a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
'ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at'180
East Dpval Street.
You can also fax or e-mail your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
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on the first day of publication.
We accept responsibility for only.
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only the charge for the ad space
Iin error. Please call 755-5440
immediately for prompt correc-
tion and billing adjustments. .
Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the ,accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the'first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakecityreporter.com


Legal

COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
POST OFFICE BOX 1529
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32056-
1529
COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE
COMPLEX
372 WEST DUVAL STREET
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32055
AGENDA
NOVEMBER 3,2011
3:00 P.M.
Invocation (Commissioner Ronald
Williams)
Pledge to U.S. Flag
Staff Agenda Additions/Deletions
Adoption of Agenda
Public Comments
Jody DuPree, Chairman
(1) Presentation of National Hospice
and Palliative Care'Month Proclama-
tion
Marlin Feagle, County Attomey
PUBLIC HEARING:
(1) Ordinance. Relating to Boating
Restricted Areas
STAFF MATTERS:
HONORABLE JODY DUPREE,
CHAIRMAN
(1) Consent Agenda
DISCUSSION AND ACTION
ITEMS:
(1) Offer of'Sale to Columbia Coun-
ty from Ellisville Investments, Inc.
(2) Redistricting Proposals
COMMISSIONERS COMMENTS
ADJOURNMENT
COLUMBIA COUNTY BOARD
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
POST OFFICE BOX 1529
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA 32056-
1529
CONSENT AGENDA
NOVEMBER 3,2011
3:00 P.M. '
(1) Proclamation Designating No-
vember 3, 2011 as Children's Griev-
ing Day
(2) Cancelation State Revolving
Fund Loan DW102401' ARRA
Funds'used to. construct the Water
Distribution System Ellisville
(3) External Budget Amendment -
CARC BA #12-04 Grant Fund-
ing Assistance of Van' Purchases -
$8,400.00
(4) External Budget Amendment -
Public Works Department BA#12-
01 Requedting to Bring FY 2011
Balance Forward Stockroom Oper-
ating Supplies $8,400.00 '
(5) Human Resource Revision to
County Engineer Job Description
(6). Suwannee River Economic
Council, Inc. S.H.I.P. Release of
Lien Agreement'- Earl R. Persinger -
$10.00.
(7),Purchasing Director Insurance
Coverage for 2011-2012 Public
Risk Insurance Agency, Florida As-
sociation of Counties Trust and Flor-
ida Sheriff's Self-Insurance Fund -
Decreased from $1;302,278 to
$1,027,024
(8) Utility Permit Comcast Cable -
NW Guerdon 'Street
(9) Utility Permit Comcast Cable -
SW Ring Court
(10) Columbia County Health De-
partment Activities and Expendi-
tures Report Period Ending Sep-
tember 30, 2011
(11) 9-1-1 Communications Com-
mittee Motorola R-56 Audit for
Tower Sites Installation Agree-
ment, R56 Compliance Audit &
Statement of.Work $16,250.00
(12) Cglumbia County Sheriff's Of-
fice Request to Locate (80') Tower
at Fort White Library
05528725
October 26, 2011


REQUEST FOR VOLUNTEERS
COLUMBIA COUNTY
The .Columbia County Board of
County Commissioners is seeking
volunteers for the following posi-
tions (4 vacancies)
CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD
The Columbia. County Code En-
forcement Board has the authority to
impose administrative fines and oth-
er non-criminal penalties and to pro-
vide an effective and inexpensive
method of enforcing the ordinances
in force in Columbia County where a
pending or repeated violation contin-
ues to exist, as to all county ordinan-
ces. Members of the Code Enforce-
mrent Board shall be residents of Co-
lumbia County. Appointments to the
Code Enforcement Board shall be
made. by the Board of County Com-
missioners on the basis of experience
.or interest in the fields of zoning and
building control. The membership of
the Enforcement Board, shall, when
possible, include an architect, a busi-
nessman, an engineer, a general con-
tractor, a subcontractor, and a realtor.
The term of office shall be for three
(3) years..
Persons interested in volunteering for
appointment should submit their re-
sume to the Columbia County Board
of County Commissioners, P.O.
Drawer 1529, Lake City, Florida
32056-1529 o or before October 31,
2011.
05528529
October 19, 26, 2011


020 Lost & Found

Reward! Lost Parrot, 10/20. Near
Deputy Jeff Davis. Severe McCaw
Red edged wings. Hand tamed.
Squawks to "Nasdak" 752-0347


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


o00 Job
1 Opportunities

05528608
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for a part-time (25
hr/wkly) 4-H Program Assistant
in the County Extension Office.
Position involves performing a
variety of leadership & organi-
zational development tasks to
support the 4-H program. Will
prepare educational materials,
recruit volunteers & members,
train volunteers to work with
community clubs and school
programs. Minimum
requirements: High school
diploma/GED, associate or
bachelor's degree preferred, 4-H
experience preferred, at least
two,(2) years working with
youth and or volunteers in
instructional setting preferred.
Must be able to work evenings
& weekends. Valid FL drivers
license req. Salary: $10.02/hr
with limited benefits
(no health/life). Successful
applicant must pass a pre-em-
ployment physical, criminal
history check & drug screen.
Applications available at the
Human Resources Office Board
of County Commissioners, 135
NE Hetnando Ave., Suite 203,
Lake City, FL 32055 or online
at www.columbiacountyfla.com,
(386)719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139. Application
deadline: 11/04/2011.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

Or5528643,
Another Way Inc. seeks
Shelter Coordinator (FT w/bene-
Sfits) Lake City. Supervisory exp
req'd. Coordinates & assist in
providing svcs to survivors of
domestic & sexual violence in a
shelter setting. Minorities &
formerly battered women
encouraged to apply. EOE. Send
resume w/cover letter and salary
requirements to: hr@another-
wayirc.net or P. O. Box 1028,
Lake City, FL 32056 or Fax
386-719-2758. No phone calls

05528665
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY
COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County is accepting
applications for County
Engineer. Highly responsible
administrative, technical, and
professional work in directing
the planning and engineering
activities of the County.
Minimum Experience:
Graduation from an accredited
college or university with a
degree in Civil Engineering
and/or 10 years of progressively
responsible work in Public
Works and engineering, 4 of
which Should have been in
supervisory capacity, or an
equivalent combination of
training, education, and
experience. Must be registered
as a professional engineer in the
State of Florida with extensive
experience in roadway design,
construction, maintenance &
drainage. Columbia County
residency required within six
months of date of employment.
Salary is negotiable depending
upon experience and qualifica-
tions. Excellent benefits pack-
age. Successful applicant must
pass pre-employment physical,
criminal history & drug screen-
ing. Applications may be
obtained at the Human
Resources Office, Board of
County Commissioners, 135 NE
Hemando, Suite 203, Lake City,
FL 32055, or online at
www.columbiacountvfla.com .
(386)719-2025, TDD
(386)758-2139. Review of
applications will begin on
11/14/11 & continue until
position is filled.
AA/EEO/ADA/VP Employer.

05528670
IMMEDIATE OPENING
PART TIME NIGHT
AUDITOR;
(FRONT DESK)
FRIDAY TO SUNDAY
Applicants must be matured,
seeking long term employment.
Must be self motivated
with Excellent customer
service skills.
Hotel experience
preferred but. not required
Excellent work environment
Apply in person
414 SW Florida Gateway Dr.
Lake City, FL 32024
US Hwy 90 & 1-75 intersection
SERIOUS
0d,^ APPLICANTS
AoNf ONLY!
Of NO PHONE
' CALLS PLEASE


FLEET MECHANICS Needed
Tractor / Trailer Mechanics
Needed for late model fleet,
Must have experience and tools
Welsing experience helpful
Good Pay & Benefits
Apply in Person at
PRITCHETT TRUCKING
Lake Butler, FL. Or online at
www.pritchettrucking.com

Field Data Collector. P/T
opportunity in Lake City
performing fieldwork & computer
reporting for a national industry
leader. No exp. Paid training.
Performance based pay,
$1-$12/hr. Apply at
www.muellerreports.com.
Task# 16826


to Job
100 Opportunities


05528675
Third Circuit guardian ad
Litem program
Full Time Victim Advocate-
Case Coordinator Grant Funded
Position located in Lake City
office. salary $28,080.00 yr-no
benefits. Bachelors Degree in
Social Work, Criminology,
Psychology or two years
comparable service. Excellent
communication skills, ability to
work independently and with
others of various ages,
professions and backgrounds.
Must maintain a strong
commitment to Victims of
Crime and respect confidentiali-
ty of victims. Deadline for
submission of STATE
application to Linda Dedge at
213 Hpward Street, Live Oak,
Florida, 32064 is October 28th,
2011 @5pm. EOE

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies



FLORIDA
S -'. a



ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
MATHEMATICS
(to commence Spring l'erm 2012)
mathematics; work with colleagues for
the advancement of departmental goals.
SPosition is a spring term appointment with
possible continuance based on enrollment
needs. Requires a Master's degree'in
mathematics; or master's degree with
minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in
course work centered on mathematics.
Ability to use technology In instruction.
Ability to teach on-line and distance
learning courses. Ability to work well with
others. Ability toleam from colleagues
and to share knowledge. Ability to utilize
various instructional strategies to teach
students. Ability to present information in
a coherent manner and the ability tfailrty
evaluate student retention of that
information. Desirable Qualifications:
teach college level and preparatory
mathematics. Salary: Based.on degree
and experience. Application Deadline:
Open Until Filled.:
Persons interested should provide Col-
lege application, vita, and photocopies
of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at:
www.fac.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 3 -25007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr@fac.edu
FGC is accredted by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Sctools. VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education and Employment



FLORIDA

" v !. ..' "-


ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING TERM 2012
COLLEGE LEVEL MATHEMATICS
Master's degree In mathematics or a
credit'hours in mathematics required.
Contact Paula Cifuentes at 386-754-4260
or caula.cifuenteslfac.edu for more
information.
CHEMISTRY
Evening.classes. Applicants must have a
master's degree in chemistry or a master's
degree with at least 18 graduate credit
hours in chemistry. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at 386-754-4260 or
paula.cifuentes(ifoc.eddu
for more information.
MEDICAL BILLING AND INSURANCE
Classes meet on Monday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is at least two
years of experience preferred. Contact
Pam Carswell at 386-754-4266 or send
resume and unofficial transcripts to
pamela.carswelliafoc.edu
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS
Bachelor's degree in Industrial
Engineering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol
at 386-754-4225 or
lohn.oiersol@tfac.edu
MANUFACTURING MATERIALS AND
PROCESSES
Bachelor's degree in Industrial
Engineering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol at
386-754-4225 or iohn.piersolffgc.edu.
INDUSTRIAL SAFETY
Bachelor's degree in Industrial
Engieenering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol at
386-754-4225 or iohn.Diersol@foc.edu.
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required. Master's degree in nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent
clinical experience required. Contact
Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or

College application an copies of transcripts
required All foreign transcripts must be
submitted with a translation and evaluation.
Application available at wwwf ed
FGC is accrdried by the Southerns Asocataion of
College anEd Schools
VP/ADA/EAIEO College in Education & Employment


o10 Job
Opportunities
CLASS A Driver wanted.
Clean records. Exp. w/hopper,
dump, live floor a plus. Serious
inquires only. 386-755-7700
Experienced Short Order Cook
with minimum 2 YEARS EXP.
with good references. No Phone
Calls, Apply in person IHOP
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp.-Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.

120 Medical .
Employment


440 Miscellaneous

2 Wheel Utlity trailer.
$100.
386-365-1187



450 Good Things
to Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

630 Mobile Homes
for Rent

16X80 Almost new. 10 mi S of
Lake City. off Branford.Hwv. 3/2.


05528667 " p" : -'
SLEARN TO DRAW BLOOD fenced yd, Dish Washer private.
Local Phlebotomy Course $650. mo + sec. No Pets. 984-7478
offered inLake City, p A lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
Certificate program. ential RV lots. Between Lake
(904)566-1328 City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441.(352)317-1326 Call for terms.
05528686,:
ainesvile Women's Center 2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
For Radiology plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D. nished. Cannon Creek MHP
EXP. MAMIOGRAPHY: ., 386-752-6422
EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY 2/2 Units.
TECH Wanted full time or.part 2/2 Units.
time, for private Radiology of- $5October Special
fice. AART & Mammography $525. mo. Includes water.
certification req. Fax resume to: 386-984-8448
Tracy: (352)331'2044 2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer; garbage.
Qualified caregiers needed to $495. mo + $495 dep.
provide personal care.to individu- 386-961-8466
als w/disabilities 352-692-4930"n-
specialfriendsinct@yahoo.com Country living.
S V3br/2ba Mobile Home
,idA Schoolsh& Very clean! 386-497-1116.


0' Education.

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express'Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/07/AO

*Phlebotomy national certific
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11'

a Continuing education .
Fees incl. books, supplies,.exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets &Supplies

Free Kittens!
7 weeks, Male and Female
Calico and Grey Tabby!
386-365-0042


Mixed-short haired terrier. I
FREE to good home.
Please call for info.
386-755-9333 or 755-7773
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs-
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish arid Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
'office for information.


401 Antiques


ANTIQUE OAK
Side Board. $100.
386-365-1187


402 Appliances

HEAVY DUTY Whirlpool
dryer, great working condition.
Less than 2 yrs. old. $100.
386-755-9239


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

419 TV-Radio &
419 Recording
20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$65.00
386-984-7510


420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress, Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


Mobile Homes for rent in'
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404 -*
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2-& 3br. in 5 Points.
Sareh; 3/br Westsidp & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482 .

4 Mobile homes
fi40 r Sale I
Just Reduced!Clean inside & out.
SUpdated kit cabinets & counters.
;.Qwner Finance offered $99,000;
SMLS75853, Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub ZerO" Top Quality Home
withh lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566


Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900


3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac: Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"
cond. Split floor plan, Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
SOver 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or Doubles. Must have
cle title. Call North Point Homes
( (352)872-5566
650 Mobile Home
& Land
Outside of Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
-tamper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473


- ADvantage









LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 26. 2011


650 Mobile Home
650 & Land
3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

710 Unfurnished Apt.
For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2'& 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








2/1 CH/A Duplex Apt.
$450. mo No pets.
Near Beachville.
Call Margie 386-935-3447


2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ Iba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
Nice, large 2 br Apt.
Close to town & shopping
$500. mo. plus $500 dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
.from $125/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer..Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181













'I
Cuu
B C


710 U rishe dApt 805 Lots for Sale


Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free'
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


720 Furnished Apts.
12 For Rent


Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135.
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
2BR/1.5 ON 1/2 acre, fenced.
Off Turner Rd.
$650. mo. plus deposit.
352-335-8330 or 352-258-9598

3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3BR/2BA HOME. Private
wooded lot. Rent $695. mo + sec.
dep. $450. Application required.
Call 3.86-935-1482
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $200
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
3br/2ba on 2 ac.
North of Lake City.
$750. mo + full security.
386-965-7534 or 386-365-1243
4BR/2BA CH/A 2 miles
out on Price Creek Rd.
$700. mo $500 security.
386-752-4597


4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1250. nio.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
Nice in town 2br/lba CH/A
$700. mo. $700 deposit.
486-758-3922 or
386-344-5065
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.,

750 Business &
Office Rentals

05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group


780. Condos for Sale

Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool'privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
.755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900


BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109.500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference.
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This,
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
Stised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale


2BR/1BA mfg honle on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
S386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 mi. NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
:386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
,2br/2ba 1 car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
LAKE CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,700 sq.
ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer, Call 417-396-2134.
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
.wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com


810 Home for Sale

Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytec.llorida-properly-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Island kit. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banier/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900


Coldwell Banker/Bishop-Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances,
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269,000 Pam' Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com'
Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
'Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres.
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group






biy
p an t


810 Home for Sale

4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, Fl room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
3/2 w/1 car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-propeny-search.com
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
.JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield-Realty Group
Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept 3/2 DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Ginger Parker..
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen.
Wired 24x36 workshop, steel roof,
pole barn. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
7,19-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
SINC. 386-755-5110 #77307
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
.family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
-Jots of space ONLY $45,000
-MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, pQssible
mother-in-lav' suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on comer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!*
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110 .
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110


820 Farms &
SAcreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com

4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres. Wellborn, New Well
installed. Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site. owner fin.
no down, $39.900, $41(0 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
830 cProperty
3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181

Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group

850 Waterfront
85 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821

870 Real Estate
S Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605


940 Trucks
2005 Ford F-350 Lariat
50,000 miles, many extras,
excellent condition.
$18,500 386-755-0139

North Florida


L otRmes.comm

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Lake City Reporter


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Classified Department: 755-5440


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Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED WEDNESDAY,*OCTOBER 26, 2011


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OTH ATTHEFAI
DECORATE YOUR TREE
with Custom Design
Christmas Ornaments
No 2 the same
TImeess Ifoniies
3Waminv *A3TJ oUwCT5s
386-46 61888
to the Money Man)Lake City, FL 32055 .


Si. .. . .. .... www.aspenlakecity.com


Please join us to celebrate this SPECIAL DAYI Great Savings on Tanning and Lotions!
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