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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01681
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 25, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01681
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





Local man arrested in Gainesville shooting death. Story below.


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Reporter


Tuesday, October 25, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 1,37, No. 232 0 75 cents


SUWANNEE TRIPLE SLAYING




Plea deal spares Howze


Gets three life terms;
will testify against.
former co-defendant.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
James Lindsey Howze
pleaded guilty Monday to nine
felony charges in connection
with a grisly 2010 McAlpin
triple murder and was sen-
tenced to three consecutive
life terms without chance of
parole. He was.sentenced to
an additional 180 years on kid-
napping and home invasion
charges. By pleading guilty
Howze escaped the death pen-
alty in the capital case.
The plea was entered
moments before Howze's
murder trial' was set to
begin Monday morning in
Suwannee County Courthouse
Courtroom A with about 50
people, including several of
the victims' family members,
in attendance.
Howze, of O'Brien, faced
the death penalty for his role
in the Aug. 25, 2010 shooting
deaths of Joseph and Nancy
Militello and their nephew,
Angelo Rosales, in their
McAlpin farm home. The door
to the home was broken in and
the three victims were forced
to lie on the floor where they
were shot in the head, execu-
tion-style. Robbery was said
to be the motive.
Howze, 37, entered the
courtroom, his hands shack-
led, wearing a set of yellow
inmate coveralls, his hair
closely-cropped, in contrast to
the well-groomed man in' a
suit and neatly-trimmed beard
that potential jurors,had seen
the previous two days.
The trial was slated to begin
at 9 a.m. but Third Circuit
Judge Leandra Johnson
entered the courtroom at
8:48 a.m., announcing the
jury would not be needed,
as Howze had withdrawn his
PLEA continued on 3A


Man

dies in

Sunday

crash

From staff reports

A Lake City man died
Sunday when the vehicle he
was driving crashed into a
tree at 288 Jafus Allen Road.
Florida Highway Patrol
troopers said Larry Monroe
Bryan, 65, was traveling north
at 7:20 p.m. when the 2003
Nissan SUV he was driving
crossed Jafus Allen Road,
drove onto the unpaved shoul-
der and struck a tree. Bryan
was taken to the Lake City
Medical Center where he was
pronounced dead.
Investigators said they are
unsure why Bryan's vehicle
left the roadway. He was wear-
ing a seat belt when the acci-
dent occurred, according to
the accident report.
A traffic homicide inves-
tigation is being conducted,
investigators said.


CALL US:
SUBSCRIBETO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 752-9400
1 l846m ,l


TOP: Susan Cosgrave (center left) stares down James Lindsey Howze (left) as Marcia Riegel
(center), an employee of Joseph and Nancy Militello, becomes emotional during court proceedings
Monday while reading a letter about the Militellos written by her children. CENTER: Howze (left)
and lead defense attorney David Collins in court Monday. BOTTOM: Investigators comb the crime
scene the day following the Aug. 25, 2010 shooting.


82 -
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


-1~


Opinion ...............
People ..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics.........
Puzzles .................


Accomplice

was shooter,

it's claimed.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.cor
James Lindsey Howze avoided a pos-
sible death sentence Monday by admitting
his role in the 2010 robbery and murder
'of three members of a McAlpin family.
However, he claimed an accomplice who
later committed suicide was the triggger-
man. Howze named Keith
Allen Hughes, 25, as the
shooter. Hughes, a former
employee of the victims,
hanged himself in his jail
cell days after the mur-
ders.
Following Howze's state-
ments, prosecutor Craig Hughes
Jacobsen and defense
attorney David Collins
were asked by Circuit
Judge Leandra Johnson if
there was any DNA evi-
dence that would later
exonerate Howze. Both
attorneys said there was
not. Munn
Johnson then sentenced
Howze to three life terms without parole
on the first-degree murder charges and
180 years for kidnapping and home inva-
sion robbery.
Jacobsen then offered an account of
what happened the evening of Aug. 25,
2010 that lead to the deaths of Joseph and
Nancy Militello and their nephew Angelo
Rosales.
According to Jacobsen, weeks before the
incident, Hughes told Howze and Lonnie
Robert Munn that the family kept large
sums of cash at the house upwards of
$30,000 $40,000 and that he needed
money for his ailing mother, child support
and to pay bills.
"He said they were going to 'hit a lick,"'
Jacobsen said.
Jacobsen said Howze had a 9 mm pistol
and that Hughes was armed with a bayonet
when one or more of the three'kicked in


HOWZE continued on 3A


Local man

arrested in

Gainesville

slaying

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
Alachua County authorities and
Gainesville Police continue their search
for a Lake City man wanted in connection
with a fatal weekend shooting that spilled
over from a nightclub argument and
ended at a Gainesville parking garage.
Two other men from Lake City were
arrested in connection with the incident
Sunday morning, one of them charged
with homicide.
Angelina Valuri, Gainesville police
department spokeswoman, said the third
suspect'in the shooting has not been
identified.
S"All we have is he has a first name of
'Craig'," she said. "He's rumored to be
from the Lake City area. He's a black
man, estimated to be in his 20s."
The shooting occurred at 2:17 a.m.
Sunday at a city-owned parking garage at
ARRESTED continued on 3A


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE WEDNESDAY
Doubts at trial Local news
of lackson HD coundup
'~' W ~ .W -


- - - - - - - - - -









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


FLORID A
LOTIO Saturday: 8tfl 3
..jSEr 7-15-32-34-43-48


Monday:
Afternoon: 2-2-3
Evening: N/A


4


Monday:
Afternoon: 6-8-4-5
Evening: N/A


-ezrnatch-
', Sunday:
6-12-26-30-35


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Expert: Effects on Jackson hard to know


LOS ANGELES
An expert on the power-
ful anesthetic blamed for
Michael Jackson's death
told jurors Monday that
it's difficult to know the
drug's precise effect on the singer
because he had been given so much
of it for his insomnia in the months
before he died.
Dr. Steven Shafer pointed out that
Jackson had been receiving the anes-
thetic propofol almost every night
for more than two months, according
to a police statement by Dr. Conrad
Murray. Murray, a cardiologist, has
pleaded not guilty to involuntary
manslaughter.
Shafer was being cross-exam-
ined by lead defense attorneyEd
Chernoff, who noted the risk that
Jackson would stop breathing should
have been low after the first few
minutes the drug was administered.
Chernoff based that conclusion on
Shafer's research.
"In Mr. Jackson's case, it's harder
to have that certainty," Shafer
replied. "There's very little, almost
no precedent for this level of propo-
fol exposure."
Shafer previously testified that he
thinks a propofol overdose killed
Jackson. But he said Murray kept no
records about how much of the drug
he gave the singer.
SShafer has said the only possible
explanation for Jackson's death
based on the evidence was that
Murray put the singer on an IV drip
of propofolthen left the room after
the singer appeared to be asleep.

Lynn out of hospital,
recovering at home
NASHVILLE Loretta Lynn, 76,
is out ofthe hospital and resting at
her homen in Hurricane Mills, Tenn.
A statement Monday from Loretta
Lynn Enterprises said the country
music icon has been treated for
bacterial pneumonia. She was forced


Dr. Conrad Murray sits in a courtroom during his involuntary manslaughter trial in
Los Angeles Friday. Murray has pleaded not guilty and faqes four years in prison
and the loss of his medical license if convicted of involuntary manslaughter in
Michael Jackson's death.


to cancel a show'
in Ashland, Ky., on
Saturday because of
the illness.-
She woke up on
her tour bus around
1:30 a.m. Sattirday
Lynn having difficulty
breathing. She was
treated at a Bowling Green, Ky., hos-
pital over the weekend and*released.

U2 honored as 'Greatest


Brian May and Roger Taylor,
meanwhile, accepted entry into the
Q Hall of Fame on behalf of the band
Queen. *
U.K. singer/songwriter Adele won
two awards, Best Fe'male Artist and
Best Track for her song "Rolling in
the Deep." Coldplay was voted Best
Band in the World at the Moment,
while the U.S. Internet sensation
Lana Del Ray wa s crowned the Next
Big Thing.


Act' in last 25 years Jersey sore"ouse
trAnf fnr $2 Inl0 Ohifv'


LONDON Rock icons U2 have
something new to brag about win-
ning Q Magazine's Greatest Act of
the Last 25 Years
award.
The annual music
awards by Britain's.
best-selling music
monthly took place
Monday at London's
Grosvenor House.
ono The Irish quartet
were present at the ceremony.


IrIEI iun ~f,-VJ a 1116 11u.
' SEASIDE HEIGHTS, New Jersey
SFans of MTVs "Jersey Shore"
can get a firsthand look at the gym-
tan-laundry lifestyle by renting the
house where the reality series is
taped.
Just firing $2,500 a night and your
own drama. Renters to the home in
Seaside Heights have access to the
duck phone and the double bed in
the Smush Room.
W Associated Press


,Celebrity Birthdays


* Former American League
president Dr. Bobby Brown
is 87.
* Actress Jeanne Cooper is
83.
* Actress Marion Ross is 83.
* Country singer Jeanne


Black is 74.
* Basketball Hall of Famer
Bobby Knight is 71.
* Rock singer Jon Anderson
(Yes) is 67.
* Political strategist James
Carville is 67.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ..............752-9400
Circulation ...........755-5445
Online... www.lakecltyreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St., Lake City, Fla. '32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is propertyof the Lake
City Reporter: Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,.
Lake City, Fla: 32056.
PublisherTodd Wilson .....754-0418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakqcityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad. call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon....754-0419
(sbrannon@lakectyreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6.30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7.30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. After
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............7555445
(circulation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks ................. $26.32
24 Weeks.................. $48.79
52 Weeks...... ...........$83.46
Rates include 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................. $82.80
52 Weeks .................$179.40


CORRECTION


The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


Man, 68, accused
of killing agent
FORT LAUDERDALE
Lawyers for a
68-year-old man accused
of killing a federal agent
during a road-rage incident
are preparing to use the
state's 'Stand Your Ground'
law during an immunity
hearing. They contend
their client used deadly.
force in self-defense.
James Patrick Wonder is
accused of manslaughter
in the 2008 shooting of
U.S. Customs and Border
Protection Agent Donald
Pettit. Authorities said'
they were involved in a
road-rage incident before
the off-duty agent followed
Wonder into a post office
parking lot and yelled at
him. That's when Wonder
- opened fire. He faces up to
15 years.

Parks report 12
injuries to state
ORLANDO -A state
report shows there
were 12 guest injuries at
Orlando's big theme parks
Sand water parks during the
third quarter of 2011.
The report filed quarter-
ly with the state of Florida
includes seven injuries at
Walt Disney World, three
at Universal Orlando and
one each at SeaWorld
Orlando and Wet 'n Wild.
The Orlando Sentinel
reports a man from Puerto
Rico was struck by some-
thing while riding the
Dragon Challenge roller
coaster at Universal's
Islands of Adventure. The
man's lawyer told the
newspaper that Carlos
Montalvo suffered a lacer-
ated eye and had to have
his eyeball removed.

2 max-security
prisoners escape
VERO BEACH =
Ainhlorlli i- said two mlen
being held on flrtsl:It--vr'e-


THE WEATHER


1


A fantastic Fantasy Fest
A portion of about 500 participants ride their bicycles in the
Zombie Ride in Key West Sunday. Scheduled through Oct.
30, Key West is staging its annual Fantasy Fest costuming
and masking festival that is to be highlighted'by the Fantasy
Fest parade.


murder charges have
escaped from the Indian
River County Jail.
Indian River Sheriff's
officials said the inmates
were last seen about 4:30
a.m. Monday. They believe
the men were picked up
outside the jail. Officials
are reviewing surveil-
lance tapes and jail phone
records.
Leviticus Taylor, 25, and
Rondell Reed, 51. were
cellmates at the jail.
Law enforcement offi-
cials were searching a
wooded area near the
Vero Beach airport early
Monday. Officials did not
know if the men were
armed, but say they are
considered dangerous.

FPL's full nuke
request granted
TALLAHASSEE -
Customers of Florida's two
largest electric utilities will
pay $282 million in nuclear
cost recovery fees next
year.
The Public Service
Commission on Monday
approved the charges for
construction and other
pre-operational costs for
new and upgraded nuclear


plants.
That's even if those proj-
,ects are never completed.
Florida Power & Light
.Co. received the full $196
million it sought.
The commission,
though, cut Progress
Energy Florida's $141 mil-
lion request by $55 million.
That's a 40 percent reduc-
tion:
The FPL request will
raise the currently month-
ly nuclear fee for 1,000
kilowatt hours which is -
about average by $1.76
per month.

Courthouse
closed for testing
CORAL GABLES The
Coral Gables courthouse
remains closed for fur-
ther testing after several
employees became ill.
All hearings have been
cancelled through Monday
and officials will announce
later Monday whether the
courthouse will open on
Tuesday.
Miami-Dade County
officials ordered test-
ing on the building after
employees became ill on
Thursday.
* Associated Press


SUNNY MOSTLY
\ SUNNY


HI 82 L052 HI 83 56


Pensacola
,79/59g


Tallabi
81/

.7


Vailosta
81/51
assee Lake City,
'5ase .. 82/52
S Gainesvile I
ama City, .82/54
7/57 Ocala *
'82/56
Oi
3 / 83


FtMyeis.
86/66

Key
83,


OF
SHOWERS

I183 L 57


Jacksonville
70 CA


City W
Cape Canaveral


S1 Uj Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
DatoBeach Fort Myers
807'66 Gainesville
I i Jacksonville
rlando Cap Canaveral Key West
3/64 79/69 Lake City
Miami
\ Naples
West Pan Beach Ocala
81/74 0 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
84/74.* Pensacola
SNaples Tallahassee
85/68 I Wami Tampa
est', 84/75 Valdosta
fS* S W. Palm Beach


I' 1


L T ALANA


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


49
51
79
57
90 ip 1949
33 in 1937


0.00"
.2.13"
30.67'
.2.01"
43.14"


SUN
Sunrise today 7:39 a.m.
Sunset today 6:50 p.m.
Sunrise tom. 7:40 a.m.
Sunset tom. 6:49 p.m.

MOON
Moonrise today, 6:14a.m.
Moonset today 5:51 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 7:24 a.m.
Moonset tom. 6:36 p.m.


Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov.
26 2 10 18
New First Full Last


7a p "p la 6a
Tuesday Wednesday







m- Frec tetemnatr "Fee e'teltmpratre


6
Ho:
30 mirltes toD
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+.
-. -- I.


Wednesday
81'67.pc
81/64/s
85/74/pc
88/71/pc
82/57/pc
78/62/s
84/76/sh
83/56/s
84/75/pc
86/71/pc
83/58/pc
86/65/pc
81/62/s
79/62/pc
83/55/s
85/66/pc
84/55/s
82 75 pc


Thursday
83,'69 /s
85/66/sh
85/74/sh
87/72/sh
82/59/sh
81/62/sh
85/76/sh
83/57/sh
85/76/sh
86/73/sh
84/60/sh
87/68/sh
78/62/sh
79/57/sh
82/61/sh
86/70/sh
83/61/pc
84 75-sh


Y., Forecasts, data and
wa h e graphics 0 2011 Weather
II I V central, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather ] www.weatherpubllsher.com


On this date in
1997, a major
snowstorm contin-
ued over Colorado, get
Kansas, and E-edition Online Access
Nebraska. 19.3 Absolutely
inches of snow R E
was recorded in
Goodland, Kans., to
set a new 24-hour
snowfall record. The Call for login information.
high wind piled the
snow into 15 to 20
foot drifts.


Daily Scripture
"The fear of the Lord is the
beginning of wisdom, and
knowledge of the Holy One is
understanding"
Proverbs 9:10
Thought for Today
"Is it really so difficult to tell a
good action from a bad one? I
think one usually knows right
away or a moment afterward, in
a horrid flash of regret."
Mary McCarthy,
American author and critic (1912-1989)

Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel.



weather.com
II I1


-----~31_ -1 -3111~-


Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


12 ";21


rRFUOJ'AiT~fCAA.'O~lt


MQUI2 ByakI^puMi


I


+~ ,


I














Judge blocks new welfare drug testing law


By KELLI KENNEDY and
MIKE SCHNEIDER
Associated Press

ORLANDO A federal judge temporar-
ily blocked Florida's new law that requires
welfare applicants to pass a drug test
before receiving benefits on Monday, say-
ing it may violate the Constitution's ban on
unreasonable searches and seizures.
Judge Mary Scriven ruled in response
to a lawsuit filed on behalf of a 35-year-
old Navy veteran and single father who
sought the benefits while finishing his col-
lege degree, but refused to take the test.
The judge said there was a good chance


plaintiff Luis Lebron would succeed in his
challenge to the law based on the Fourth
Amendment, which protects individuals
from being unfairly searched.
The drug test can reveal a host of private
medical facts about the individual, Scriven
wrote, adding that she found it "troubling"
that the drug tests are not kept confiden-
tial like medical records. The results can
also be shared with law enforcement offi-
cers and a drug abuse hotline.
'This potential interception of positive
drug tests by law enforcement implicates
a 'far more substantial' invasion of pri-
vacy than in ordinary civil drug testing
cases," said Scriven, who was appointed by


President George W. Bush.
The judge also said Florida didn't show
that the drug testing program meets
criteria for exceptions to the Fourth
Amendment.
The injunction will stay in place until the
judge can hold a full hearing on the matter.
She didn't say when that hearing will be
scheduled.
More than two-dozen states have also
proposed drug-testing recipients of wel-
fare or other government assistance, but
Florida was the first state to enact such a
law in more than a decade. Should any of
those states pass a law and face a court
challenge, Scriven's ultimate ruling would


likely serve as a legal precedent.
The law's proponents include Gov.
Rick Scott, who said during his campaign
the measure would save $77 million. It's
unclear how he arrived at those figures.
A spokesman for the Florida Department
of Children and Families deferred all com-
ments to the governor's office.
"Drug testing welfare recipients is just a
common-sense way to ensure that welfare
dollars are used to help children and get
parents back to work," said Jackie Schutz,
a spokeswoman for Scott. "The governor
obviously disagrees with the decision and
he will evaluate his options regarding
when to appeal."


White Springs man suffers

critical injuries in accident


HOWZE: Accuses dead accomplice

Continued From Page 1A


From staff reports

A White Springs man was critically
injured in an early morning crash on
County Road 242.near SW Granite Court
Sunday. A Lake City man suffered serious
injuries in the single vehicle accident
Janay Courtney Economou, 24, White
Springs, was westbound in a 2011 Ford
Focus at 12:25 a.m. when the vehicle
crossed into the eastbound lane and onto


the grassy shoulder where it struck a
driveway embankment and became air-
borne, according to the Florida Highway
Patrol. The car came to rest on its roof in a
ditch facing southeast
Economou's passenger, 35-year-old
Thomas Edward Johns, Lake City, suf-
fered serious injuries, according to FHP
Economou and Johns were both flown to
Shands at the Universty of Florida. Neither
was wearing a seat belt, FHP reported.


PLEA: Life in prison without parole

Continued From Page 1A


plea of not guilty.
Howze pleaded guilty to
three counts of first-degree
murder, three counts of
home invasion robbery
and three counts of kidnap-
ping. He was sentenced to
three life sentences, each
of which will run consecu-
tively, for the murders. The
180-year kidnapping and
home invasion sentences
will run consecutively to
the life sentences.
In exchange Howze will
testify for the state in the
murder trail of Lonnie
Robert Munn, 47, of Live
Oak, who faces charges of
first-degree murder, con-
spiracy to commit home
invasion robbery and kid-
napping in connection
with the killings. Munn's
trial, previously set for
November, has tentative-
ly been rescheduled for
January.
A third defendant, Keith
Allen Hughes, 25, commit-
ted suicide in his Suwannee
County Jail cell shortly after
his Aug. 27, 2010 arrest
James Militello, brother
of Joseph Militello, said he
has to come to terms with
the plea agreement
"What was done I'll
work with that but I feel he
(Howze) should have done
to him what he did to my
family and let me do it,"
Militello said.
James Militello Jr. ques-
tioned the fairness of the
plea deal.
"It is what it is," he said
of the plea agreement. "I'm
not happy that he gets to
live. I'm not happy with that
at all, but as far as hini
not seeing the light of day
again and him rotting in
jail ... that's worth my time.
As far as him being able to
see his kid, his family and
see everybody else I
don't get to see my fam-
ily again, my aunt, uncle
and my brother so I don't
see the fairness of the plea
agreement."
"At least he won't harm
anyone else," added James
Militello's fiance, Susan
Cosgrave.
Marcia Riegel, of Live
Oak, worked for the
Militellos for more than
three years and said they
were like family. She was
the only person to address
the court before sentenc-
ing and read a statement
by her daughter commem-
orating the victims.
"My daughter and
my son felt like they
(Militellos) were their
grandparents," she said.
"You couldn't tell them any
different Everything I read
was straight from what she
wrote."
Riegel had mixed feel-
ings about the plea arrange-
ment.
"I'm kind of numb about


the plea," she said. "I'm not
sure how I feel about it. I'm
thankful hell never get out
of prison, he'll serve his
time and that's all we can
really ask for. I'm kind of
numb on my feeling for it."
Suwannee County Sheriff
Tony Cameron said he sup-
ported prosecutors' deci-
sion.
"I think anytime you
try to prove a death pen-
alty case there is always the
chance that it won't go your
way with the state," he said.
'The jury is out there and
they (defense attorneys)
are making these pleas to
the jury not to sentence a
man to death. I think it is in
the best interest of every-
body concerned to accept
this plea."
Assistant State attorney
Craig Jacobsen, lead pros-
ecutor in the case, thanked
Cameron, SCSO investi-
gators Jeff Cameron and
Chris Fry and other law
enforcement' officers in
Minnesota, where Howze
and Munn were captured.
'They did a professional
job in capturing these kill-
ers," Jacobsen said. 'They
used judgment, restraint
and they saved lives. The
defendant was armed when
he was captured. This
defendant, James Lindsey
Howze, is a cold-blooded
killer. He said previously,
'killing is better than sex
because you determine
who lives, who dies, how
they die and where they
die.' This man will never
again be in the position to
be a threat to our society.
As far as where people die,
we know what's going to
happen to him: He's going
to walk into prison and be
carried out stone cold dead
on a gurney. Justice, I think,
has been served."
Howze previously served
14 years in prison for a
1993 homicide in Hernando
County.
Johnson asked Howze if
he understood his rights
in making the plea bargain
and whether he made the
decision with a clear mind
and of his own free will.
Howze said after speak-
ing with his family he
decided to take the plea.
"I do believe the plea is in
my best interest" he. said.
After the proceedings
Jacobsen explained why
the state offered Howze a
plea.
"It was the State Attorney
Skip Jarvis' judgment for
the plea agreement and he
gave me every support I
needed," Jacobsen said. "In
times of tight funds pro-
vided funding for travel to
Minnesota and Kentucky
and for the cost of experts,
it was his judgment in the
end with the total support
of sheriff Tony Cameron.


ti
i]
t(

b

V


t
r
t


I


The sheriff was 100 percent
behind this plea agreement t
that justice would be served t
to the family, there would c
be closure on the legal end 1
of it and this man will die t
in prison. For the rest of
his natural life he will live
among other wrongdo-j
ers. A family has suffered
immensely because of his s
actions. It's a horrible thing t
to happen in our county u
when you are sitting down
for supper and criminals
kick your door in, make
you lie on the ground and
execute you. As for as I'm
concerned, Mr. Howze will
never again threaten any-
one."
Jacobsen said the. plea.
deal was reached at the last
minute just before court
began Monday.
He said Howze's lead
attorney, David Collins,
came to his office Friday
to discuss evidence in the
case.
"Collins brought up the
subject and offered to plead
to three consecutive life
sentences," Jacobsen said.
"After we had lengthy dis-
cussion, I discussed it with
the sheriff, who said he
was 100 percent behind the
plea, and with Jarvis."
Jacobsen said there
was no plea agreement
on Friday, Saturday or
Sunday.
'The plea agreement was
finalized today (Monday)
and signed today," he said.
"As far as working on a plea
agreement, I was prepared
to go to trial. I had my open-
ing statement ready and I
was ready to proceed with
my witnesses, many who
came from out of state."
At 9:18 a.m. the jury
was brought in as Johnson
explained the state had
accepted a plea agreement
and she sentenced Howze.
By 9:31 a.m. the jury was
released and the case over.


Q Outfit by




b ,

f 4 q


'-

i I//fum 's
Deco- ij/u e
168 N. MARION AVENUE
DOWNTOWN
386-752-4009


he door at the Militello home as the fam-
ly was eating dinner. Joseph Militello was
old to open the family safe and all three
vere told to lie down.
"Howze told them to get down on their
bellies," Jacobsen said.
He then explained how Joseph Militello
vas shot in the back of his head. Rosales
ifted his head and he too was shot in the
back of the head, as was Nancy Militello.
Three bullet casings were found after
he shooting. The bullets that killed the
Militellos were fragmented but the bullet
hat killed Rosales, still lodged in his skull,
was more or less intact, Jacobsen said,
which allowed Florida Department of Law
Enforcement investigators to eventually
ink Howze's pistol to the killings.
The men then took some jewelry from
he home and fled. Howze and Munn fled
he state while Hughes was captured two
lays later in Suwannee County. Hughes
hanged himself in his cell days later. At
he time he had only been charged with
conspiracy to commit armed robbery.
Howze admitted pawning some of the
ewelry in Kentucky and when he was
captured in Minnesota days later, Jacobsen
said he was wearing six rings that belonged
:o the Militellos and still had the pistol
used in the shootings.


When Johnson asked Howze if he had
any problems with the plea agreement, he
said he was pleading guilty to the murders
because the Militellos died during the rob-
bery.
"I'm not the shooter who shot those
people," he said. "I'm not the shooter in
this case. I want to clarify that gun was not
in my hand when the bullets came out and
killed those people in that house."
Johnson then accepted the guilty plea
and allowed a Militello family friend,
Marcia Riegel, to address Howze, who
nodded as if in agreement as she spoke of
her loss.
"I know what I did that night was wrong,"
Howze said after Piegel finished. "That
night we went off in that house we commit-
ted a terrible crime. I wish it would have
happened differently."
Howze said he didn't know the family
before the incident and was told they were
drug dealers with plenty of cash on hand.
"I feel terrible about what happened and
those people losing their lives," he said.
"Your involvement was beyond wrong,
Johnson said. "No one has the right to
unlawfully take the life of another person.
So, you will never get out the Department
of Corrections and you will pay for the
crimes you committed."


ARRESTED: Third man sought

Continued From Page 1A


105 SW Third Street.
Artrel Dubose, 30, of Atlanta, suffered a
gunshot wound to the head and was taken
to Shands at the University of Florida.
He was pronounced dead around noon
Sunday.
Authorities arrested two Lake City men
Sunday morning. Both remain in custody
at the Alachua County Jail, Valuri said.
Brandon Brashod Wilson, 20, no address
given, was charged with homicide and bur-
glary.
Deron Matthews, 22, no address given,
was charged with burglary.
Both Wilson and Matthews have crimi-
nal records, were on probation and have
recently spent time in prison, Valuri said.
According to the Gainesville Police
Department, an argument between two


groups of about three men each started in
the Plasma Lounge nightclub.
The argument escalated when the two
groups met at the parking lot and one of
Dubose's friends reportedly took a blow to
the face and was knocked down.
Authorities said two shots were fired.
One went into the air and the other struck
Dubose, who was helping his friend get to
his feet.
Dubose was reportedly in the area to
attend a family member's funeral.
Matthews, Wilson and the other suspect
fled the scene, but Matthews and Wilson
were caught a short time later.
Valuri said authorities have not yet recov-
ered the weapon used in the shooting.


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m-9


LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Tuesday, October 25,201 I


ONE


ONE
OPINION



Don't put


UN in


charge of


the Web


The U.S.-has run the
Internet, since the
late 1960s when
it first emerged a
communications
network among U.S. defense
agencies and research labs, and
considering the net's ubiqui-
tous presence worldwide, the
U.S. has done a remarkable job.
If ever there were a case for
the maxim, "If it ain't broke, don't
fix it," the U.S. management of
the Internet would seem to be
it But there are few issues that
a United Nations commission,
in solemn conclave assembled,
can't make worse.
Last month, four authoritar-
ian nations, Russia, China,.
Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, none
of them noted as beacons of
human rights and unfettered
expression, proposed that
individual states be allowed to
regulate the Internet on their
own, or, failing that, to let the
U.N. do it.
Cold War veterans must have
felt a twinge of nostalgia read-
ing the language of the Russia,
China, et al resolution. It called
for "the earliest possible consen-
sus on international norms and
rules guiding the behavior of
states in the information space."
In the bad old days, the
Soviet bloc was regularly com-
ing up with "international
norms and rules" that it had no
intention of following but would
have shackled those nations
that believed in the rule of law.
The resolution recalled the
infamous 2005 UNESCO con-
ference on a "new world infor-
mation order" that proposed a
supranational agency to control
"global media" and censor the
world's press, especially its
reporting on the Third World.
It was suggested that if the
U.N. felt it had to act on the
Internet it take on the problems
of cybercriminals and cyber
attacks. This held little appeal
for the sponsors of the resolu-
tion, perhaps because Russia
and China are two of the big-
gest offenders.
Scripps Howard News Service

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LETTERS
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Today is Tuesday, Oct. 25, the
298th day of 2011. There are 67
days left in the year.
On this date:
In 1760, Britain's King
George I succeeded his late
grandfather, George II.
In 1854, the "Charge of the
Light Brigade" took place dur-
ing the Crimean War as an
English brigade of more than'
600 men, facing hopeless odds,
charged the Russian army and
suffered heavy losses.
In 1859, radical abolitionist
John Brown went on trial in
Charles Town, Va., for his failed
raid at Harpers Ferry. (Brown
was convicted and hanged.)
In 1918, the Canadian steam-


www.lakecityreporter.com


Black America s divide


over Obama


When Barack
Obama was
elected presi-
dent, millions
of Americans
believed that the United States
finally was entering a post-racial
period when race no longer
mattered in any serious way.
But the Obama presidency has,
ironically, heightened racial
tensions, and we are seeing old
divisions return.
One of the most unexpected
developments resulting from
the Obama presidency has been
the resurgence of conflicts and
name-calling among,blacks
themselves. Not since the hey-
day of the Black Nationalist
movement of the 1960s and
1970s has there been such bit-
terness among blacks about
who is "authentically black" and
who is not
The source of this renewed
infighting is the dashed hope
that Obama, the first black
president, would improve life for
blacks "his people." Life has
not improved for blacks under
Obama. The unemployment rate
among blacks is 16.7 percent,
nearly double the national aver-
age. Forty percent of black chil-
dren are living in poverty, and
the housing crisis has hit blacks
harder than other groups.
Many blacks are disappointed
and angry, and those who speak
out and question Obama's
performance are having their
loyalties to "the race" and to the
first black president challenged.
Some are being called, among
other insulting names, 'Tomns,"
"traitors" and "sellouts." Media
personality Tavis Smiley,
Princeton University profes-
sor Cornel West, California
Democratic Rep. Maxine
Waters, and former pizza CEO
Herman Cain, a Republican
presidential candidate, are four
of the most outspoken critics of
Obama's performance.
During the summer,
Smiley and West conducted a


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.com
15-city "Poverty Tour." On their
website, they say the tour was
"to highlight the plight of poor
people of all races, colors and
creeds so they will not be for-
gotten, ignored, or rendered
invisible during this difficult and
dangerous time of economic
deprivation and political coward-
ice."
Referring to Obama's debt
ceiling deal with the GOP, West
said the measure was a "war on
the poor" and that Obama "has
no backbone." Later, he said
of Obama: "He can speak to
Jewish voters.... He can speak
to gay voters .... Why can't he
speak to black voters?"
Waters, while critical of the.
president, has not been as
harsh. 'The Congressional
Black Caucus loves the.presi-
dent, too," she said. "We're
supportive of the president,
but we're getting tired.... We
want to give'the president every
opportunity to show what he
can do and what he's prepared
to lead on. But our people are
hurting. The unemployment is
unconscionable. We don't know
what the strategy is."
But West, Smiley and Waters
are being excoriated. During
'one of his recent syndicated
radio segments, comedian Steve
Harvey, for example, accused
West and Smiley of using per-
sonal vendettas to undermine
Obama's re-election prospects.
He mocked the outspoken duo,
as being affiliated with UTLO.
org, an imaginary website
whose initials stand for "Uncle
Tom Look Out."
The Rev. Al Sharpton, an


Obama loyalist, who has a radio
show and a television program,
issued a stern warning to the
president's black critics. "I'm
not telling you to shut up," he
said. "I'm telling you: Don't
make some of us have to speak
Up."
And then there is Obama
critic Herman Cain who, in addi-
tion to claiming that racism in
the United States "doesn't hold
anybody back in a big way," said
that Obama has "never been a
part of the black experience in
America" and thatblack voters
are "brainwashed" for being
loyal to Obama.
On the Joy Behar Show,
entertainer and civil rights
activist Harry Belafonte
attacked Cain, along with black
Republicans in general.
'The Republican Party, the
tea party, all of those forces to
the extreme right have con-.
sistently tried to come up iith
representation for what they
call black, what they call the
real Negroes and try to push
these images as the kinds of
voices that America should, be'
(looking) to," Belafonte said.
"So we've got Condoleezza Rice.
We've got Colin Powell. They
are heroes for some people, but
for a lot of us they are not And
Herman Cain is just the latest
incarnation of what is totally
false to the needs of our com-
munity and the needs of oui
nation. I think he's a bad apple
and people should look at his
whole card. He's not what he
says he is."
The fear for black leaders is
not that the internal squabbles
will cause Obama critics to vote
Republican. It is that too many
will stay home and deny the
first black president the votes
needed for him to return t6 the
White House.

a Bill Maxwell is a columnist
and editorial writer for the
St. Petersburg Times.


ship Princess Sophia foundered
off the coast of Alaska; some
350 people perished.
In 1929, former Interior
Secretary Albert B. Fall was
convicted in Washington, DC.
of accepting a $100,000 bribe
from oil tycoon Edward L
Doheny. (Fall was sentenced
to a year in prison and fined
$100,000; he ended up serving
nine months.)
In 1957, mob boss Albert
Anastasia of "Murder Inc."
notoriety was shot to death in
a barber shop inside the Park
Sheraton Hotel in New York.
In 1960, the Bulova Watch
Co. introduced its electronic
"Accutron" model.
In 1962, U.S. ambassador
Adlai E. Stevenson presented


photographic evidence of Soviet-
built missile bases in Cuba to
the U.N. Security Council.
In 1971, the U.N. General
Assembly voted to admit main-
land China and expel Taiwan.
In 1983, a U.S.-led force
invaded Grenada at the order of
President Ronald Reagan, who
said the action was needed to
protect U.S. citizens there.
Ten years ago: Laboring in
the frigid murk of the Barents
Sea, divers found and removed
the first bodies from the wreck-
age of the nuclear submarine
Kursk, which sank on Aug. 12,
2000, with the loss of all 118
sailors aboard.

* Associated Press


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW



Congress

and the

housing

market


Politicians and
realtors want to
maintain a perma-
nent government
occupation of the
:housing market If the hippies
clogging the streets of major -
cities had any integrity for
their cause, they'd speak out
against mortgage lending prac-
tices that stick taxpayers with
the bills when.banks make bad
loans. On Thursday night, the
Senate voted 60-38 to do more
of the same.
Atthe beginning of the
month, the maximum amount
of a home loan that Uncle
Sam would back dropped 17
percent That spurred a mostly
Democratic group of lawmak-
ers to take steps to restore the
higher conforming loan limits.
They want to see the Federal
Housing Administration
(FHA), Department of
Veterans Affairs, Freddie Mac
and Fannie Mae backing loans
at the boosted rate of $729,750
instead of just $625,500. Here
we, go again.
It wasn't so long ago that
congressional meddling
diluted lending standards so
thoroughly that the public
bought more house than it
could afford with low rates and
zero down. The deals appeared
too good to be true because
they were. When payments
were not met and defaults
mounted, the unsustainable
housing market collapsed. The
implicit government guarantee
behind the Freddie and Fannie
loans became explicit and tax-
payers absorbed at least $150
billion in losses. We have yet
to recover from the resulting
Great Recession.
Now 60 senators led by
Robert Menendez, New
Jersey Democrat, and Johnny
Isakson, Georgia Republican,
insist government-sponsored
enterprises need to keep buy-
ing larger loans because, the
Housing market is weak, credit
is tight and housing prices con-
tinue to decline. Their cause
is supported by the National
Association of Realtors, the
homebuilders and mortgage
bankers the groups with the
most to gain from socializing
the risk of pricier financing on
more expensive estates.
If'approved by the House
and signed into law, the
Senate-passed amendment
would impose an extra fee on
the high-dollar loans made by
the government-sponsored
enterprises, but not FHA. That
would drive business to FHA
and even further away from
the private market
When it comes to pouring
public money into housing,
Capitol Hill can't control
itself. The old limit was put
in place by the Economic
Stimulus Act of 2008 as
a "temporary" measure.
President Obama's stimulus
spending bill extended the
subsidies through 2009, and a
pair of continuing resolutions
had extended the subsidies
through the beginning of the
month. The amendment from
Mr. Menendez would extend
those temporary limits until
January 2014.
The House ought to rec-
ognize this as a move in the
wrong direction. The loan
limits should be reduced, not
increased, so government can


gradually withdraw from the
sector it destroyed. Taxpayers
have already paid enough for
the folly of Washington's hous-
ing policies.
* The Washington Times


HIGHLIGHTS I.N HISTORY









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


Schools brace for more cuts


By KIMBERLY HEFLING
AP Education Writer

LANCASTER, Pa. Educators are
bracing for a tough reality: As difficult as
budget cuts have been on schools, more
tough times are likely ahead.
Even in a best-case scenario that assumes
strong economic growth next year, it won't
be until 2013 or later when districts see
budget levels return to pre-recession
levels, said Daniel Domenech, executive
director of the American Association of
School Administrators in Arlington, Va.
That means more cuts and layoffs are
likely ahead.
"The worst part is that its not over,"
Domenech said.
Already, an estimated 294,000 jobs in
the education sector have been lost since
2008, including those in higher education.
The cuts are felt from Keller, Texas,
where the district moved to a pay-for-
ride transportation system rather than
cut busing altogether, to Georgia, where
20 days were shaved off the calendar for
pre-kindergarten classes. In California,
a survey found that nearly half of all dis-


tricts last year cut or reduced art, drama
and music programs. Nationally, 120 dis-
tricts primarily in rural areas have
gone to a four-day school week to save on
transportation and utility costs, accord-
ing to the National Conference of State
Legislators. Others are implementing fees
to play sports, cutting field trips and end-
ing after-school programs.
Districts have little choice but to put
off buying textbooks and technology and
training teachers, said Rob Monson, a prin-
cipal in Parkston, S.D., who is president of
the National Association of Elementary
School Principals.
On a recent day at Abraham Lincoln
Middle School in Lancaster, teenage girls
in ponytails and boys in long athletic shorts
dashed across the gym, pausing their
game of indoor tennis to motion "Y-M-C-
A" with their arms as the Village People's
song blares from the loudspeaker. It's a
scene happening less frequently these
days. Budget cuts and teacher layoffs have
forced the school to cut some P.E. classes,
reduce library hours and eliminate small
literacy classes for struggling readers and
Spanish for sixth- and seventh-graders.


Principal Josh Keene says he's worried
- not just about offering electives next
year, but whether class sizes in core sub-
jects will jump from around 25 to 35 or 40.
His district received $6 million less from
the state this year, which meant six staff
positions in his school were cut. Even if
state funding remains the same next year,
the district expects to have from $5 million
to $7 million less because of increased
pension obligations and other expenses.
"I'm scared to death. As we continue
to look at fewer and fewer non-classroom
positions that are there, at some point it's
going to impact core classroom positions
and that's a very, very scary thing," said
Keene.
Recognizing the reality districts face,
President Barack Obama included $30
billion in his $447 billion jobs creation
package to save teachers' jobs. The Senate
rejected the jobs package as well as a
separate measure focused on saving the
jobs of teachers and emergency respond-
ers. Senate Republican leader Mitch
McConnell has said the plan resembles
"bailouts" that haven't proven to work and
only perpetuate economic problems.


Not everyone sees all doom and gloom
in schools' budget woes. Some say many
districts haven't wisely spent tax dollars
or didn't adequately prepare for the end of
the $100 billion in federal stimulus dollars
for schools. And that while the number of
students per teacher in America dropped
from 22.3 in 1970 to 15.3 in 2008, accord-
ing to the National Center For Education
Statistics, they say the reduction hasn't
made a noticeable difference.
Karen Hawley Miles, executive direc-
tor of Education Resource Strategies, a
nonprofit based in Watertown, Mass., that
helps urban districts develop ways to more
effectively use resources, encourages dis-
tricts to use this time to make changes
they have beenreluctant to do. They
include strategically raising class sizes to
refocus on teacher quality and changing
teacher compensation to be more tied to
performance, she said.
"In tough days when it's incredibly
urgent, sometimes these conversations
can take place in a different frame. We see
districts really thinking about how they
can really do things differently and really
focus in on their priorities," she said.


BPA in pregnant women might



affect kids' behavior, study says


By LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO Exposure
to the chemical bisphe-
nol-A before birth could
affect girls' behavior at age
3, according to the latest
study on potential health
effects of the compound
used in the manufacturing
of some plastic drink bot-
tles and food can linings.
Preschool-aked girls
whose mothers had rela-
tively high urine levels of
BPA during pregnancy
scored worse but still
within a normal range on
behavior measures includ-
ing anxiety and hyperactiv-
ity than other young girls.
The results are not con-
clusive and experts not
involved in the study said
factors other than BPA
might explain the results.
The researchers acknowl-
edge that "considerable
debate" remains about
whether BPA is harm-
ful, but say their findings
should prompt additional
research.
The researchers mea-
sure'd BPAin 244 Cincinnati-
area mothers' urine twice


during pregnancy and at
childbirth. The women
evaluated their children
at age 3 using standard
behavior questionnaires.
Nearly all women had
measurable BPA levels, like
mostAmericans. Butincreas-
ingly high urine levels dur-
ing pregnancy were linked
with. increasingly worse
behavior in their daughters.
Boys' behavior did not seem
to be affected..
The researchers said if
BPA can cause behavior
changes 'that could pose
academic and social prob-
lems for girls already at
risk for those difficulties.
"These subtle shifts can
actually have very dra-
matic implications at the
population -level," said Joe
Braun, the lead author
and a research fellow at
Harvard's School of Public
Health.
For every 10-fold.
increase in mothers' BPA
levels, girls scored at least
six points worse on the
questionnaires.
The study was released
online Monday in
Pediatrics.
Linda Birnbaum, direc-


tor of the National Institute
of Environmental Health
Sciences and the National
Toxicology Program, said
the study contributes
important new evidence to
"a growing database which
suggests that BPA expo-
sure can be associated with
effects on'human health."
Grants from that federal
agency helped pay for the
study.
The Food and Drug
Administration has said
that low-level BPA expo-
sure appears to be safe. But
the agency also says that
because of recent scientific
evidence, it has some con-
cern about potential effects
of BPA on the brain and
behavior in fetuses, infants
and small children.
The FDA is continuing
to study BPA exposure and
supports efforts to mini-
mize use in food contain-
ers.
BPA has many uses, and
is found in some plastic
bottles and coatings in
metal food cans. It was
widely used in plastic baby
bottles and sippy cups but
industry phased out that
use.


Braun said it's possible
that exposure to BPA dur-
ing pregnancy interferes
with fetal' brain develop-
ment, a theory suggested
in other studies, and that
could explain the behav-
ior differences in his study.
Why boys' behavior wasn't
affected isn't clear. But
BPA is thought to mimic
the effects of estrogen, a
female hormone.
The researchers evaluat-
ed other possible influenc-
es on children's behavior,
including family income,
education level and wheth-
er mothers were married,
and still found an apparent
link to BPA.
But Dr. Charles McKay,


a BPA researcher and
toxicologist with the
Connecticut Poison
Control Center, said the
researchers failed to ade-
quately measure factors
other than BPA that could
explain the results.


*SA AliT
FEST~IVALI^








1FOWI<*i N [-41^ n 4tiit?4r*^
5ponsored by
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Hubeart Tyre
Mr. Hubeart Tyre, 78 of Lake
Butler died Friday evening at the
veterans Administration Medi-
cal Center of Lake City after
an extended illness. Mr. Tyre
was born near
Lulu. He lived
in Colorado
Springs, CO
for 12 years
before moving
to Lake Butler
in 1974. He
was a career .
serviceman, hav-
ing retired as a
Master Sergeant "- .
in 1973 from -<
the U.S. army after 23 years of
service and participating in both
the Korean Conflict and the Viet
Nam Conflict. He also worked a
correctional officer with the Re-
ception and Medical Center of
Lake Butler for I1 years before
retiring in 1989. Mr. Tyre was a
lifetime member of the Lake But-
ler V.F.W. Post 10082 where he
was a former Post Commander.
He was a member of the Florida


OBITUARIES

Chapter 90 Disabled American
Veterans and Masonic Lodge #52
of Lake Butler. He was a mem-
ber of the Jacksonville Scottish
Rites and the Lake Butler Order
of the Eastern Star Chapter #40.
He was a member of Faith Bap-
tist church of Lake Butler. He
was the son of the late Marvin
and Lillie Lee McMikell Tyre.
Mr. Tyre is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 53 years, Ruth A.
Tyre of Lake Butler. One son:
Kelly (Kathy G.) Tyre of Lake
Butler. Two grandchildren: Staff
Sergeant Kelley C. Tyre of An-
chorage, Alaska and Rainor B.
Tyre of Starke. three sisters: Irita
(Roger) Richerson of Lake But-
ler; Dorothy M. (Dick) Nolan
of Lake City; Evyleana Fipps of
Lake City. One brother: Leroy
(Shirley) Stalvey of Lake But-
ler. Several nieces and nephews.
Memorial services with Mili-
tary rites will be held Saturday,
October 29, 2011 at 2:00 P.M.
at the Faith Baptist Church of
Lake Butler with Rev, Ralph
Durham officiating. ARCHER
FUNERAL HOME OF LAKE


BUTLER
of


is in charge
arrangements.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
inent at 752-1293.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


First black Marines' story to be told


By JULIE WATSON
Associated Press

OCEANSIDE, Calif. -
Oscar Culp does not like
to remember. His mind has
erased the harshest details.
But the pain still stings for
the 87-year-old WWII veter-
an, who endured boot camp
in a snake-infested North
Carolina swampland as one
of the first blacks admitted
to the Marine Corps.
He wipes a tear. Black
Marines were barred from
being stationed with whites
at nearby Camp Lejeune.
But what hurt worse, he
says, was returning from
the battlefield to a home-
land that ordered him to
sit at the back of the bus
and'drink out of separate
fountains from the white
Americans he had just put
his life on the line to pro-
tect.
"ltxcuse me," he says,
pulling out a handkerchief.
"Sometimes we get a little
emotional about it."
The story of the first
black Marines is a part
of history few Americans
and even few Marines
have learned. Unlike the
Army's Buffalo Soldiers or
the Air Force's Tuskegee
Airmen, the Montford
Point Marines have never
been featured in popular
song% or Hollywood films,
or recognized nationally.
The Corps' new com-
mandant intends to change
that.
Nearly 70 years after
becoming the last military
branch to accept blacks
underordersfromPresident
Franklin D. Roosevelt in
1941, Congress will vote
Tuesday on whether to
grant the Montford Point
Marines the Congressional
Gold Medal, the nation's
highest civilian honor.
The Corps up until now
has not actively broadcast
the painful chapter in the
235-year-old history, of an
institution that still is large-
ly white, especially in the'
higher ranks where less
than 5 percent of officers
are black.
But Commandant Gen.
James Amos whose own
2010 appointment made
him the first Marine aviator
named to'the Corps' top job
has made diversifying
the staunchly traditional
branch a top priority. Amos
has ordered commanders
to be more aggressive in
recommending qualified
black Marines for officer
positions. The Corps this
summer named the first
black general, Maj. Gen.
Ronald Bailey, to lead its
storied 1st Marine Division
at Camp Pendleton.
The Marine 'Corps
also plans to teach all
Marines next year about
Montford Point, the base
near the coastal town of
Jacksonville, N.C., that the
Corps set up for blacks to
keep them separate from
white Marines. It operated
from 1942 to 1949.
"Every Marine from
private to general will
know the history of those
rr n. who crossed the
ureshold to fight not only
the enemy they were soon
to know overseas, but the
enemy of racism and seg-


regation in their own coun-
try," Amos said.

Amos has spent the year
lobbying Congress to grant
Montford Point Marines
the civilian medal, which
was given to the Tuskegee
airmen in 2006. "Its long
overdue," Amos recently
told the last remaining
Montford Point Marines.
Most of the 19,000
Montford Point Marines
have died, their fellow
Marines say.
"For the most part, we
lost our history purposely,"
said Culp, who has only
a few black-and-white pho-
tographs from those days.
"They didn't want the world
to know our history."
Unlike the Tuskegee
pilots featured in the
upcoming Hollywood film
"Red Tails" to be released
in January the Montford
Point Marines were not offi-
cers in the war. The Corps
gave those promotions to
whites, said University of
North Carolina historian
Melton McLaurin, whose
book "The Marines of
Montford Point" is being
considered by Amos for his
must-read list for Marines.
'The Corps did not want
these guys," McLaurin
said. "The commandant
of the Corps at the time
said if he had a choice'
between 250,000 African
Americans he used the
term negroes and 5,000
whites, he would rather
have the whites."
Culp had just gradu-
ated from high school in
Charlotte, N.C. at 18 when
ie volunteered to join
in 1943 at the height of
WWII.
"The Marine Corps was
advertised as the most elite
military organization, and
I wanted to be part of the
best to prove, given the
chance, that we can do
whatever anybody else can
do," he said.
He was bused with the
other black recruits and
dropped at a small shed
with a guard who led them
into the woods to huts that
would serve as their bar-
racks.
The white drill instruc-
tors let it be known they
did not agree with the new
policy forced on the Corps,
with some calling it a dis-
grace.
The Montford Point
recruits were not allowed
to enter Camp Lejeune
unless accompanied by a
white officer. The few times
they went for a training
exercise they had to wait to
eat until the white Marines
had finished.
"Montford Point was
hell really," Culp said. 'The
water was bad. The bar-
racks were made out of
some kind of cardboard.
It was cold in the winter.
There was ice on the deck
where we would sleep."
He saw drill instructors
beat those who did not
march correctly.
"You just had to take it,
take a rifle snapped across
your head or be kicked. It
didn't happen to me but I
saw it happen to other peo-
ple," Culp said. "I really try
to forget about the worst
things that happened."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this April 1945 image provided by the Marine Corps, o r oo r
Monfort Marines train with artillery in New River, Northert W dar
Carolina. Nearly 70 years after the Marine Corps, the last Edward Jones Financial Advisor
military branch to racially integrate, accepted segregated MAIN'" SENSE OF INVEST.NG
black units, the Marine Corps' top general is pushing to honor 148 North Maon Ave.
the history of the Monfort Point Marines. 1 kea CO n .3LnF93'rA-3.1


He was sent to the Pacific
where his all black ammu-
nition company dodged
gunfire as they ferried sup-
plies to the front lines and
carried back the dead and
wounded. He oversaw the
care of white Marines in
the brig.
Montford Point Marines
participated in the seizure
of Okinawa and came under
heavy fire at Iwo Jima, win-
ning praise from some
white officers for their
actions. They were sent to
Japan to clean up the ash
after the atomic bomb was
dropped over Nagasaki.
But after the war, the
Corps discharged all but
1,500 of them..
Culp remained, driven
by the injustice that "they
wanted us to get out."
"Even after the war they
wanted it to be lily white
again," he said. "They did
certain things to try to get
the African Americans out
and show they were not
needed anymore. But we


had proven that we could
do anything the whites
could do and sometimes
even better."
Carrel Reavis, 88,
was among those who
were discharged. But he
took a bus from Camp
Pendleton across country
to Baltimore, Md. where
he signed up again.
The Corps continued to
resist desegregation even
after President Harry S.
Truman's 1948 order, his-
torians say. It wasn't until
the Korean war that black
Marines fought alongside
their white counterparts.
Moving up the ranks
remained difficult. Reavis
stayed the same rank for
10 years while he watched
the Corps promote white
corporals over him to
staff sergeant in a couple
of months. "We resented
things like that and that's
what happened to us," he
said, "but who could we
go to correct it or stop it?
Nobody."


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LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


BulletinBoard

NEI WSABOUT OURSCHOOLS.


Homecoming at CHS


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter
Brittany Bethea, the 2011 Columbia High School homecoming queen, poses with members of the Homecoming. Court Friday
night. Pictured are Felicia Bosland ,(from left), Amanda Faulkner, Bethea, Samantha Faulkner and Payton Sund.


Young writers


Lake City Reporter


Declining numbers of

.blacks in math, science


By JESSE WASHINGTON
AP National Writer


With black unemploy-
ment reaching historic
levels, why aren't more
African-Americans looking
toward science, technol-
ogy, engineering and math
- the still-hiring careers
known as STEM?


The percentage of African-
Americans earning STEM
degrees has fallen. It may
seem far-fetched for an under-
educated black population to
aspire to become chemists or
computer scientists, but the
door is wide open, colleges
say, and the shortfall has cre-
ated opportunities for those
who choose this path.


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Courtesy
Students from Westside Elementary School pose for a photograph with Scott Berns, the Mix 94.3 morning host. The students
are the school's Young Writers of the Month for October. Pictured are Rhett Feagke (from left), Amanda Hillyard, Megan Mills,
Nigeria Mitchell, Morgan Hoyle, Bems, and Megan Mills.



CALENDAR


OCTOBER 2011 j


A


I.UEJ RUI UB WEEK (24 28)
CCE Kindergarten field trip to Roger's Farm in Gainesville 9:00 a.m. 1:30 p.m.
EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY "Wear Red!" Day "Dress Like a Star" Day
SUMMERS ELEMENTARY School Advisory Council meeting in Media Center 4:00 p.m.' "A" School Celebration @ Skate
Palace 4:30 6:30 p.m.; CPR training in All Purpose Room 8:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
FWHS Indian Lady Varsity Volleyball Districts (24 27) TBA
CHS Tiger Lady Volleyball District Tournament @ Atlantic Coast High School (24 27)
WESTSIDE ELEMENTARY Canned Food Drive (10/24 10/28)
NIBLACK ELEMENTARY "Team up against Drugs" (Wear favorite team shirt or colors)
LCMS 6th grade, Vision/Hearing Scoliosis screening in the gym 9:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m.


REPORT CARDS GO HOME
COLUMBIA TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CENTER iMovie training 8:00 a.m. 12:00 noon
SUMMERS ELEMENTARY LSW (Value Teachers) 403B rep in workroom
ALL PRINCIPALS Meeting @ CCSD Administrative Complex, Room 227 10:00 a.m.
CCE Picture Day
EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY 3rd & 5th to Shriners for Kid Power; "Wear Favorite Team Colors Day
PINEMOUNT ELEMENTARY School Board recognition for PTO
SOCIAL STUDIES CIT Meeting @ CCSD Administrative Complex, Room 207 3:30 4:30 p.m.
FWHS Indian Varsity Lady Volleyball Districts TBA
FWMS Indian Football SMAC Championship @ Eastside TBA; Indian Football vs Ruth Raines 6:00 p.m. Away
COLUMBIA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Meeting @ CCSD Administrative Complex Auditorium -7:00 p.m
WESTSIDE ELEMENTARY 2nd grade field trip to Bodyology 9:00 11:30 a.m.
NIBLACK ELEMENTARY "Turn your back on Drugs" (Wear shirt backwards); Picture Day
LCMS 6th eade Vision/Hearine Scoliosis screening in the evm 9:00a.m. 2:30 .m.: Readi Sten testing for grade 8 only


'tiNEM UUiN i ELEivMtN i AK 2nd grade students to VA Hospital for VITAL 10:00 a.m.
LCMS 6th grade Vision/Hearing Scoliosis screening in the gym -9:00 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Faculty meeting in Media Center-8:00 a.m.
SUMMERS ELEMENTARY Fall pictures
EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY Fall pictures in Tiger Den; Book Fair; Hat Day
MELROSEPARK ELEMENTARY Fall portraits
FORT WHtE ELEMENTARY Teain Leaders meeting'- 2:30 p.m.
NIBLACK ELEMENTARY Faculty meeting in Media Center 2:30 p.m; "Sock it to me Day" & "Wear Pink Day" (wear wacky
socks
WESTSIDE ELEMENTARY Vickie Steward. Melissa Anderson & Gary Hamm classroom play
FIVE POINTS ELEMENTARY Faculty meeting 2'30 P M


EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY Annual Fall Festival; Camo Day
ADULT EDUCATION STUDENT Meeting CCSD Central Building, Room 130 9:00 10:30 a.m.
TH FORT WHITE ELEMENTARY Data meetings during planning times
TH PINEMOUNT ELEMENTARY Data day for grades K & 1
COLUMBIA TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CENTER iRespond (Student Response System) training 12:30 3:30 p.m.
27 FWHS Indian Varsity Lady Volleyball Districts- TBA
27 CCE A+ School Celebration 5:00 -7:00 p.m.
RIS Wolf Football vs LCMS 7:00 p.m. Home
LCMS Falcon Football vs RMS @ CHS Stadium 7:00 p.m. Away
__ NIBLACK ELEMENTARY "Dru s make me see Red" (Wear Red Day)


COLUMBIA COUNTY FAIR (10/28 11/5)
MELROSE PARK ELEMENTARY Fall Costume Parade; PreK Fall Festival
FUNKY FITNESS DAY FGC 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
EASTSIDE ELEMENTARY "Wacky/Crazy Dress" Day
SUMMERS ELEMENTARY Costume Parade on PE Field 8:30 a.m.
FORT WHITE ELEMENTARY 2nd grade field trip to Roger's Farm; Funky Fitness filming ( FGC
PINEMOUNT ELEMENTARY Costume Parade @ PE Shelter
CHS Tiger Football vs Orange Park 7:30 p.m. Away
FWHS Indian Varsity Football vs Rickards (Homecoming) 7:30 p.m. Home
WESTSIDE ELEMENTARY 1st grade to Roger's Farm; Kindergarten Fall Festival; 2nd grade Pumpkin Day
'IBLACK ELEMENTARY "Put a Cap on Drugs" (Wear your favorite cap/hat)
LCMS UF Health Students speak to all Science classes; Chorus Candygram fundraiser ends; Early dismissal for CHS Homecom-
ng Parade 12:40'p.m.
FIVE POINTS ELEMENTARY Pictures, PreK & Kindergarten to Roger's Farm: Fall Festival 4;30 6:00 p.m.
I 1/29 LCMS School-wide Hoo Shoot 8:00 a.m. 12:00 .m.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


Student shot at NC high school


FAYETTEVILLE, N.C.
A 15-year-old student
was shot in the neck with
what appeared to be a
small-caliber bullet dur-
ing a lunch period out-
side a North Carolina
high school Monday and
police have not been able
to find the gun or any
suspects.
Catilyn Abercrombie was
in fair condition after sur-
gery at Cape Fear Valley
Medical Center, according
to sheriff's office .spokes-
woman Debbie Tanna.
Abercrombie was able to
respond to questions by
nodding and shaking her
head, Tanna said. Cape Fear
High School and a nearby
middle school were locked
down for hours before stu-
dents were allowed to go
home.
Police were still combing
the rural, wooded area on
the outskirts of Fayetteville,
searching for clues.
"Right now, we don't
know what happened or
who's responsible," Tanna
said.
Police are investigating
several possibilities con-
cerning how the shoot-
ing might have happened
Tanna said, including the
chance that it might have
been an accident. The
area is popular with hunt-


ers, and hunting season is
under way.
"There is nothing in
stone as to what happened
today," she said.
A police officer assigned
to the school was standing
near Abercrombie when
she was shot at about 1 p.m.
and immediately called 911,
Tanna said.
Students from Mac
Williams Middle School
were sent home before
their high school counter-
parts, who were still grad-
ually leaving the campus
by 6 p.m. Students were
searched by police and left
the building in long lines
holding their hands above
their heads before board-
ing buses that took them
from campus.
Cumberland County
school officials plan to have
heightened security in
place for when classes start
on Tuesday.
'Therewillbemetaldetec-
tors and beefed up secu-
rity inside both schools,"-
Tanna said. "Some parents
have said they don't plan to
send their kids to school.
Those who do come can
be assured 'there will be
increased security on both
campuses."

* Associated Press


ASSOCIATED PRESS
A Cumberland County Sheriffs deputy rolls crime scene tape around the scene after a shooting at Cape Fear High School
east of Fayetteville, NC on Monday afternoon. Authorities say a 15-year-old student was shot and wounded at the school. No
arrests have been made, and no gun has been recovered.


Price alone matters this


holiday shopping season


By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

NEW YORK Forget
style, quality and custom-
er service. This holiday
season, all that matters is
price.
A week before
Halloween and two full
months before Christmas,
stores are desperately try-
ing to outdo each other
in hopes of drawing in
customers worn down by
the economy.
Wal-Mart, the biggest
store in the nation, joined
the price wars Monday by
announcing that it would
give gift cards to shoppers
if they buy something
there and find it some-
where else cheaper.
Staples and Bed Bath &
Beyond have already said
they will match the lowest
prices of Amazon.com and
other big Internet retail-
ers. Sears is going a step
further, offering to beat a
competitor's best price by
10 percent
"The days of mar-
keting the stuff in your
store because it was a
hot brand are over," sayp
Dave Ratner, owner of
Dave's Soda & Pet City,
a Massachusetts pet food
and supplies chain.
For the holidays, Ratner
plans to offer 20 percent
off pet accessories if cus-
tomers buy a bag of dog
food. Customers, he says,
just want a deal.
Almost four years after
the onset of the Great
Recession, they've learned
to expect one, too. In bet-
ter times, retailers could
afford to keep prices high-
er and use promises of
higher quality and better
service to lure people into
stores.
Those days are over.
In a recent poll of'1,000
shoppers by 'America's
Research Group, 78 per-
cent said they were more
driven by sales than they
were a year ago. During
the financial meltdown in
2008, that figure was only
68 percent.
Wal-M art last year went
back to its "everyday low
prices" roots, a bedrock
philosophy of founder
Sam Walton, rather than
slashing prices only on
certain items to draw in
customers. Now every-
day low prices might not


be low enough.
So it's trying something
it is calling the Christmas
Price Guarantee. It works
this way: If you buy some-
thing at Wal-Mart from
Nov. 1 to Dec. 25 and find
the identical product edse-
where for less, you get a
gift card in the amount of
the difference.
The deal excludes
online prices and some
categories of merchandise
groceries, live plants,
tobacco, prescription drugs
and wireless devices that
require' a service agree-
ment
But it is good even if
weeks pass between your
purchase and spotting the
better deal. And it applies
even to big items like
TVs, for which prices can
drop steeply as Christmas
approaches.
Duncan MacNaughton,
chief merchandising officer
for Wal-Marts U.S. stores,
told reporters Monday that
he has noticed "much more
promotional intensity 'and
gimmicks" among competi-
tors.
'This gives, customers
peace of mind that we are
an advocate for them," he
said.
Toys R Us' big book
of holiday offers will be
packed this year with


$8,000 of savings, com-
pared with $5,600 last year,
said Bob Friedland, a com-
paty spokesman. And it
has added an incentive this'
year: If customers who sign
up for its loyalty program
:spend $200 or moit during
the holiday season, they
will get coupons on toys
every month next year.
Retailers are'responding
to a customer base that is
better informed, and more
comfortable shopping
online, than ever.
Jenna Wahl, a cardiac
unrse from Bloomington,
Ind., said she 'expects to
spend about as much on
holiday gifts this year as
last roughly $500 but
will try to get more for her
money.
She'll be asking stores
to do more price-matching
and plans to use her iPhone
to check prices and down-
load coupons.
"I will take things back
in order to get the better
deal," she said.
Wal-Mart left online
prices out of its Christmas
offer, but other stores have
decided they may not have
that luxury. Staples, for
example, is leaving it to the
discretion of its store man-
agers to decide whether to
match online prices.
Sears' offer of beating


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The holiday price wars
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Lowe's, the nation's No.
2 home improvement
store, said in August it
was starting to focus on
everyday low prices for
items that customers can
easily comparison-shop
at rivals like Home Depot
and Sears.
And J.C. Penney, the
department store chain,
said earlier this month
that it plans to overhaul
its pricing strategy start-
ing in February. So far,
it has kept the details a
secret.
Wal-Mart stepped up its
price matching in April by
directing store employees
to comb through competi-
tors' advertisements so
price matches at the regis-
ter would be easier.


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Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirb@lakecityreporterxcom




Tuesday. October


SPORTS


25.2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


BRIEFS

CHS BOWUNG

Gas card raffle

for fundraiser
Columbia High's
bowling team is selling
raffle tickets for a $250
gas card as a fundraiser.
Tickets are $5 for one,
$10 for three, and $20
for 10.
For details, call coach
Brian Saunders at
755-8080, Ext 148.

CHS SOFTBALL

Players, parent

meeting Nov. 3
A meeting for all
interested Columbia
High softball players and
parents to discuss
tryouts'and conditioning
is 6 p.m. Nov. 3 in the
CHS auditorium.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL

Team at Walmart.
for donations

Fort White High's
baseball team will be
accepting donations in
front of Walmart in Lake
City on Nov. 5.
For details, call Jeanne
Howell at 288-5337.

SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL

Lake City team
seeking players
SThe Lake City Falcons
semi-pro football team
is seeking players for
the upcoming season,
and dancers for a dance
squad. Players must be
18 years old or older.
Females and males are
encouraged to try out for
the dance team.
For football, call Luis
Santiago at (386)
697-6956; for dance, call
Clara at (386) 697-5249.

RUNNING

Veterans Day Run,

Walk, Roll 5K

Gainesville Fisher
House Foundation has
a Veterans Day 5K in
Gainesville. The event
begins at 8 a.m., with
registration at 6:30 a.m.
Registration is $25 and
day-of registration is $30.
Go to www. Gainesville
FisherHouse.org.

From staff reports


GAMES

Today
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Wolfson
High in District 4-6A
tournament at Atlantic
Coast High, 6:30 p.m.
1 Fort White High
volleyball vs. host
Keystone Heights High in
District 5-4A tournament,
7 p.m.
Wednesday
Columbia High
bowling vs. Vanguard
High, North Marion High
in Gainesville, 4 p.m.
Thursday
S Columbia High
swimming in District 2-2A
meet at Trousdell Aquatic
Center in Tallahassee,
9 a.m.
Richardson Middle
School vs. Lake City
Middle School in
Commanders Bowl,
7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football at Orange Park
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High


football vs. Rickards
High, 7:30 p.m.


Harris
Pts
2854
2777
2559
2410
2346
2523
2136
1764
1866
1851
1760
1343
1378
1508
1731
1040
975
1072
769
407
542.
337
60
152
330


Winless Rickards


visits Fort White


for homecoming


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A Williston High gets nothing but the jersey of Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) in
the Indians' 35-20 home win on Oct. 14.


Brantley





expected





to return


Gators' SEC East
hopes hanging
by a slim thread.

By MARK LONG
Associated Press'

GAINESVILLE
- Florida coach Will
Muschamp expects quar-
terback John Brantley's
return to provide a "huge
psychological shock."
The Gators could.use a
huge offensive boost, too.
Muschamp's team has
scored just 17 points in
10 quarters since Brantley
injured his right ankle
against Alabama on
Oct 1 the program's
worst three-game stretch
of offense since 1988.
It has the Gators
clinging to hope in the
Southeastern Conference's
Eastern Division race.
Brantley could help turn
things around.
The fifth-year senior
returned to practice in
a limited role Monday
and was expected to play
against No. 22 Georgia in
Jacksonville on Saturday.
"We expect his reps
to increase as the week
grows," Muschamp said.
"But we wanted to get him
out today and get him out


there moving around and
get people around him and
throw the football around
a little bit. I fully expect
him to continue to prog-
ress through the week
unless we hit something
that we're not predicting.
I fully expect him to be
fine."
Brantley has completed
65 percent of his passes
for 942 yards this season,
with five touchdown and
three interceptions.
His numbers are mod-
est, but his importance
became evident when
Charlie Weis' offense was
turned over to two true
freshmen.
Jacoby Brissett started
at top-ranked LSU and
completed 8 of 14 passes
for 94 yards and a touch-
down in a 41-11 loss. He
also threw two intercep-
tions and often looked lost
against one of the nation's
top defenses.
He wasn't any better
against one of the SEC's
worst defenses. Brissett
completed 5 of 10 passes
for 45 yards, with an inter-
ception against Auburn
the following week. He
was benched at halftime
.in favor of fellow freshman
Jeff Driskel, who threw for
75 yards in a 17-6 loss.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
University of Florida quarterback John Brantley (12) is
helped off the field after being hurt during the game against
Alabama on Oct. 1. Brantley is expected to play this week.


Rk
I.LSU I
2.Alabama 2
3. Okla. St 3
4. Boise St. 5
5. Clemson 6
6. Stanford 4
7. Oregon 7
8.Kan.St. 10
9. Okla. 8
10.Arkansas 9
SI. Mich. St I I
12.Va.Tech 15
13. S.Car. 14
14.Nebr. 13
15.Wisc. 1.2
16.TexA&M 17
17. Houston 18
18. Michigan 16
19.Penn St. 19
20.TexTech 21
21.Ariz.St. 20
22. Georgia 22
23.Auburn 30
24.Texas 25
25.WestVa. 23


Class 5A'Raiders are
tune-up for district
showdown Nov. 4.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirbylakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE For home-
coming football, Fort White
High is bringing in a team with
nothifig to lose.
Rickards High will provide
the opposition for the special
week. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
Friday.


Rickards hosted Godby
High in a District 2-5A game
last week and lost 30-7. The
Raiders are 0-7 overall and 0-2
in district play.
Fort White's District 3-3A
partner, Trinity Catholic High
(4-3), bounced back from a
shutout loss to pound host
Glades Day High, 46-0. Glades
Day was ranked No. 4 in
Class 2A.
Trinity Catholic has an open
date to prepare for the district

INDIANS continued on 2B


BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES


USA Today


Pct
0.9927
0.9659
0.8901
0.8383
0.8160
0.8776
0.7430
0.6136
0.6490
0.6438
0.6122
0.4671
0.4793
0.5245
0.6021
0.3617
0.3391'
0.3729
0.2675
0.1416
0.1885
0.1172
0.0209
0.0529
0.1148


Rk

2
4
5
6
3
7
12
9
8
10
15
14
13
I I
16
18
17
19
22
20 ,
21
38
26
24


Pts
1457
1434
1301
1213
1174
1327
1121
827
964
974
932
729
730
798
867
520
507
519
448
180
253
208
3
49
15s


Pct
0.9878
S0.9722
0.8820
0.8224
0.7959
0.8997
0.7600
0.5607
0.6536
0.6603
0:6319
0.4942
0.4949
0.5410
0.5878
0.3525
0.3437
0.3519
0.3037
0.1220
0.1715
0.1410
.0.0020
0.0332
0.1051


.Computer
k Pct
.930
.950
1.000
.830
.860
.660
2 .560
.830
.690.
.670
5 .370
0 .640
3 .530
I .250
4 .110
I .570
4 .420
9 .300
7 .350
8 .340
3 .. .130
2 .220
5 .370
0 .270
0 "".obb


Avg
0.9702
0.9627
0.9240
0.8302
0.8240
0.8124
0.6877
0.6681
0.6642
0.6581
0.5380
0.5338
0.5014
0.4385
0.4333
0.4281
0.3676
0.3416
0.3071
0.2012
0.1633
00,1594
0.1310
0.1187
"0.03


Explanation Key
The BCS Average is calculated by averaging the percent totals of the Harris Interactive, USA Today Coaches and Computer polls.
Team percentages are derived by dividing a team's actual voting points by.a maximum 2875 possible points in the Harris Interactive
Poll and 1475 possible points in the USA Today Coaches Poll. Six computer rankings are used to determine' the overall computer
component.The highest and lowest ranking for each team is dropped, and the remaining four are added and divided to produce a
Computer Rankings Percentage.


COLLEGE POLLS


APTop 25

The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football'poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through
Oct. 22, total points and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
I.LSU(49) 8-0 1,489 I
2.Alabama (10) 8-0 1,448 2
3. Oklahoma St. 7-0 1,326 6
4.Stanford 7-0 1,318 7
S. Boise St. () 7-0 1,269 5
6.Clemson 8-0 1,225 8
7. Oregon 6-1 1,136 9
8.Arkansas 6-1 1.003 10
9. Michigan St. 6-1 964 15
10. Kansas St. 7-0 945 12
I'l. Oklahoma 6-1 912 3
12.Wisconsin 6-1 887 4
13. Nebraska 6-1 756 13
14. South Carolina 6-1 675 14
15.VirginiaTech 7-1 673 16
16.TexasA&M 5-2 614 17
17. Michigan 6-1 508 18
18. Houston 7-0 400 21
19.TexasTech 5-2 350 NR
20. Southern Cal 6-1 340 NR
21.Penn St. 7-1 312 NR
22. Georgia ,5-2 290 24
23.Arizona St. 5-2 239 24
24. Cincinnati 6-1 71 NR
25.WestVirginia 5-2 64 11
Others receiving votes: Auburn 62,
Southern Miss. 48, Baylor 47,Washington
32, Georgia Tech 30, Texas 26, Syracuse
24, Miami 6,TCU 4, Rutgers 3, BYU 2,
Illinois 2.

Top 25 results

No. I LSU (8-0) beat No. 19 Auburn
45-19. Next at No. 2 Alabama, Saturday,
Nov. 5.
No. 2 Alabama (8-0) beat Tennessee
37-6. Next vs. No. I LSU, Saturday,
Nov. 5.
No. 3 Oklahoma (6-1) lost to Texas
Tech 41-38. Next: at No. 12 Kansas State,
Saturday.
No. 4 Wisconsin (6-1) lost to No. 15
Michigan State 37-31. Next at Ohio State,
Saturday.
No. 5 Boise State (7-0) beat Air Force
37-26. Next at UNLV, Saturday, Nov. 5.
No. 6 Oklahoma State (7-0) beat
Missouri 45-24. Next vs, Baylor, Saturday.
No. 7 Stanford (7-0) beat No. 22
Washington 65-21. Next at Southern Cal,
Saturday.
No. 8 Clemson (8-0) beat North
Carolina 59-38. Next at No. 20 Georgia
Tech,Saturday.
No. 9 Oregon (6-1) beat Colorado
45-2. Next vs.Washington State, Saturday.
No. 10 Arkansas (6-1) beat Mississippi
29-24. Next atVanderbilt, Saturday.
No. II West Virginia (5-2) lost to
Syracuse 49-23, Friday. Next at Rutgers,
Saturday.
No. 12 Kansas State (7-0) beat
Kansas 59-21. Next vs*No. 3 Oklahoma,


Saturday.
No. 13 Nebraska (6-1) beat Minnesota
41-14. Next vs. No. 15'Michigan State,
Saturday.
No. 14 South Carolina (6-1) did not
play. Next at Tennessee, Saturday.
No. 15 Michigan State (6-1) beat
No 4 Wisconsin 37-31. Next at No. 13
Nebraska, Saturday.
No, 16 Virgina Tech (7-1) beat Boston
College 30-14. Next at Duke, Saturday.
No. 17 Texas A&M (5-2) beat Iowa
State 33-17. Next vs. Missouri, Saturday.
No. 18 Michigan (6-1) did not play.
Next vs. Purdue, Saturday.
No. 19Auburn (5-3) lost to No. I LSU
45-19. Next vs. Mississippi, Saturday.
No. 20 Georgia Tech (6-2) lost to
Miami 24-7. Next vs. No. 8 Clemson,
Saturday.
No. 21 Houston (7-0) beat Marshall
63-28. Next vs. Rice,Thursday.
No. 22 Washington (5-2) lost to
Stanford 65-21. Next vs. Arizona,
Saturday.
No. 23 Illinois (6-2) lost to Purdue
21-14. Next at Penn State, Saturday.
No. 24 Arizona State (5-2) did not play.
Next vs. Colorado, Saturday.
No. 24 Georgia (5-2) did not play.
Next vs. Florida, Saturday.

ACC standings

Atlantic Division
W L PF PA.
Clemson 5 0 209 130
Wake Forest 4 I 137 137
Florida St. 2 2 142 102
NC State I 2 90 93
Maryland I 3 109 142
Boston College 0 4 66 113
Coastal Division


Virginia Tech
GeorgiaTech
Miami
Virginia
Duke
North Carolina


109 89
129 127
113 101
55 77
59 84
118 141


SEC standings


South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Vanderbilt
Kentucky
Tennessee

Alabama
LSU
Arkansas
Auburn
Mississippi St.
Mississippi


East
W
4
4
2
0
0
West
5
5
2
3
0
0


PF PA
147 76
146 108
108 129
61 95
20 137
48 128

199 37
178 41
81 76
98 136
62 98
51 138


USA Today Top 25

The USA TodayTop 25 football coaches


poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records, total points and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
I. LSU (41) 8-0 1.457 2
2.Alabama (18) 8-0 1,434 3
3. Stanford 7-0 1,327 5
4. Oklahoma State 7-0 1,301 6
5.Boise State 7-0 1,213 7
6. Clemson 8-0 1,174 t8
7. Oregon 6-1 1,121 t8
8.Arkansas 6-1 974 10
9. Oklahoma 6-1 964 I
10. Michigan State 6-1 932 13
SI.Wisconsin 6-1 867 4
12. Kansas State 7-0 827 16
13. Nebraska 6-1 798 II
14. South Carolina 6-1 730 12
15.VirginiaTech 7-1 729 t14
16.TexasA&M 5-2 520 18
17.Michigan 6-1 519 17
18. Houston 7-0 507 20
19. Penn State 7- 1 448 22
20.Arizona State 5-2 253 25
21.Georgia 5-2 208 NR
22.TexasTech 5-2 180 NR
23. Cincinnati 6-1 .159 NR
24.West Virginia 5-2 155 14
25. Southern Miss 6-1 128 NR
Others receiving votes: Texas 49;
GeorgiaTech 39;TCU 33; Baylor 29; Illinois
22; Washington 20; Iowa 14; Syracuse 10;
Brigham Young 9; Southern Methodist 7;
Wake Forest 6; Notre Dame 5;Auburn 3;
Rutgers 2; Florida I; Miami I.

Harris Top 25

TheTop25teamsinthe Harris Interactive
College Football Poll, with first-place votes
in parentheses, records, total points and
previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
I.LSU (94) 8-0 2,854 I
2.Alabama (20) 8-0 2,777 2
3. Oklahoma State 7-0 2,559 6
4. Stanford (I) 7-0 2,523 7
5.Boise State 7-0 2,410 5
6. Clemson 8-0 2,346 8
7. Oregon 6-1 2.136 9
8. Oklahoma 6-1 1,866 3
9.Arkansas 6-1 1,851 10
10. Kansas State 7-0 1,764 12
II.Michigan State 6-1 1,760 15
12.Wisconsin 6-1 1,731 4
13. Nebraska 6-1 1,508 II
14. South Carolina 6-1 ,378 13
15.VirginiaTech 7-1 1.,343 16
16. Michigan 6-1 1.072 17
17.TexasA&M 5-2 1,040 19
18. Houston 7-0 975 22
19. Penn State 7-1 769 24
20.Arizona State 5-2 542 23
2 I.TexasTech 5-2 407 NR
22. Georgia 5-2 337 NR
23.WestVirginia 5-2 330 14
24. Cincinnati 6-1 239 NR
25.Texas 4-2 152 NR
Other teams receiving votes: Georgia
Tech 137; Southern Miss 135; Baylor 83;
TCU 83; Auburn 60; Syracuse 57; Illinois
51;Washington 32; BYU 21;SMU 14; Iowa
13; Miami 10; Ohio State 6; Rutgers 4.


Section B


I'


I












2B LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 -Troy at FlU
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 pm.
VERSUS -Tampa Bay at Buffalo

BASEBALL

World Series

Texas vs. St. Louis
St. Louis 3,Texas,2
Texas 2, St Louis I
Saturday
St. Louis 16,Texas 7
Sunday
Texas 4, St. Louis 0
Monday
St Louis at Texas (n)
Wednesday
Texas (Lewis 14-10) at St. Louis
(Garcia 13-7), 8:05 p.m
Thursday
Texas at St. Louis, 8:05 p.m. (if
necessary

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Buffalo
N.Y.Jets
Miami


Houston
Tennessee ,
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Baltimore
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Cleveland


San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
Denver


East
W L T Pct PF PA
5 I 0.833185 135
4 2 0.667188 147
4 3 0.571172 152
0 6 0.000 90 146
South
W L T Pet PF PA
4 3 0.571182 131
S3 3 0.500112 135
I 5 0.1.67 72 132
0 7 0.000111225
North
W L T Pct PF PA
4 I 0.800148 71
5 2 0.714151 122
4 2 0.667137 III
3 3 0.500 97 120
West
W L T Pct PF PA
4 2 '0.667141 136
4 3 0.571160 178
3 3 0.500105 150
2 4 0.333123 155


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


N.Y. Giants
Dallas
Washington
Philadelphia.

N.4.Orleans_
Tampa Bay
Atlanta.. .
Carolina


Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis


East
W L
4 2
3 3
3 3
2 4
South
W L


T Pct PF PA
0.667154 147
0.500149 128
0.500116 116
0.333145 145

T Pct PF PA


5s .. .L2 9 .158
4 3 .0.571131 169
.4,. 3-0 .571J58 163
2 5 0.286166 183
North


W L
7 0
5 2
4 3
1 6
West
W 1
5
2 4
I 5
0 6


T Pct PF PA
01.000230141
0.714194 137
0.571170 150
0.143148 178

T Pct PF PA
0.833167 97
0.333 97 128
0.167116 153
0.000 56 171


Sunday's Games
Houston 41,Tennessee 7
Carolina 33,Washington 20
N.Y.Jets 27, San Diego 21
Cleveland 6, Seattle 3
Denver 18, Miami 15, OT
Atlanta 23, Detroit 16
Chicago 24,Tampa Bay 18
Kansas City 28, Oakland 0
Pittsburgh 32,Arizona 20
Dallas 34, St Louis 7
Green Bay 33, Minnesota 27
New Orleans 62, Indianapolis 7
Monday's Game
Baltimore at Jacksonville (n)
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Giants,
New England, Philadelphia, San Francisco
Sunday, Oct. 30
Indianapolis atTennessee, I p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, I p.m.
Jacksonville at Houston, I p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Giants, I p.m.
Minnesota at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Baltimore, I p.m.
Detroit at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto,
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay,
N.Y. Jets, OaklandTampa Bay
Monday, Oct. 3 I
San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.

NFL career receptions


(x-active)
.Jerry Rice
2. x-Tony Gonzalez
3. Marvin Harrison
4. Cris Carter
5.Tim Brown
6.Terrell Owens
7. Isaac Bruce
8. x-Hines Ward
9. Randy Moss
10.Andre Reed


College games

Today
Troy (2-4) at FIU (4-3), 8 p.m.
Wednesday
UConn (3-4) at Pittsburgh (3-4),
8 p.m.
Thursday
Virginia (4-3) at Miami (4-3),
8 p.m.
Friday
BYU (6-2) vs.TCU (5-2) at Arlington,
Texas, 8 p.m.

Top 25 schedule

Thursday
No. 18 Houston vs. Rice, 8 p.m.
Saturday
No. 3 Oklahoma State vs. Baylor,


3:30 p.m.
No. 4 Stanford
8 p.m.
No. 6 Clemson


at Southern Cal.

at Georgia Tech,


8 p.m.
No. 7 Oregon vs. Washington State.
3 p.m.
No. 8 Arkansas at Vanderbilt,
12:21 p.m.
No. 9 Michigan State at No. 13
Nebraska, Noon
No. 10 Kansas State vs. No. II
Oklahoma, 3:3 p.m.
No. 12 Wisconsin at Ohio State,
8 p.m.
No. 14 South Carolina at Tennessee.
7:15 p.m.
No. 15 Virginia Tech at Duke,
12:30 p.m.
No. 16Texas A&M vs. Missouri, Noon
No. 17 Michigan vs. Purdue, Noon
No. 19 Texas Tech vs. Iowa State,
7 p.m.
No. 21 Penn State vs. Illinois,
3:30 p.m.
No. 22 Georgia vs. Florida,
3:30 p.m.
No. 23 Arizona State vs. Colorado,
6:30 p.m.
No. 25 West Virginia at Rutgers,
3:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING

Good Sam Club 500

AtTalladega Superspeedway
Talladega,Ala.
Sunday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (3) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 188
laps, 125 rating, 47 points, $260,558.
2. (25) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 188.
122.3,43,$170,500.
3. (41) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 188,
82.6,42, $160,833.
4. (16) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 188,
79.3,41, $143,483.
5.(30) BrianVickers,Toyota, 188,107.9,
40, $135,964.
6.(26) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 188,103.9,
39, $122,033.
7. (12) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 188,
107.4,39, $143,433.
8. (31) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 188,
65.2,36, $134,000.
9. (23) Michael Waltrip, Toyota, 188,
61.6,36, $83,500.
10. (37) Martin Truex Jr..Toyota, 188,
63.8,34, $94,825.
11. (9) Carl Edwards, Ford, 188, 57.2,
34,$128,866. *
12. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 188,
81.1, 32, $91,775.
13. (36) David Reutimann,Toyota, 188,
60.8,31,$111,308.
14. (18) Greg Biffle, Ford, 188, 54.5,
31,$95,825.
15. (4) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 188, 70.1,
0, $81,325.
16.(38) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 188,
86.1,0,$9.1,608.
S17.(42)tasey ears.Toyta, 188,90.6,
27, $79,050.
18. (1I) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 188, 99.6,.
27, $121,836.
19. (19) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 188.
74.4,26,$108,366.
20. (I) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 188,
64.6,25, $93,250.
21. (17) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 188, 75.1,
0, $88,097.
22.(40) David Gilliland, Ford, 188,73.3,
22, $77,175.
23.(15) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet.
188,83,22, $115,783.
24. (35) Joey LoganoToydta, 188,80.5,
20, $84,525.
25. (6) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
188,57.6,20, $84,225.
26. (2) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 188,
57.7, 19, $127,611.
27. (5) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 188,
59.3, 18,$112,461.
28. (8) David Ragan, Ford, .188 87.8,
17, $81,250.
29. (39) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,


RM4 U


Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

IMMOBA


184,80.3, 16,$1 11,189. ,
30. (22) Regan Smith, Chevrolet,
accident, 180, 79.1, 14, $98,745.
31. (24) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 179.
53.3, 13,$109,686.
32. (13) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 179.
66.9, 13. $121,786.
33. (34) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 175, 56,
12,$121,691.
34. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 175, 38,
10, $71,700.
35. (21) Bobby Labonte, Toyota,
accident, 173,48.7,9, $97,870.
36. (14) Kurt Busch, Dodge, accident,
173,76.49, $115,950.
37. (43) Robby Gordon. Dodge, rear
gear, 173,50.9,8, $71,250.
38. (10) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet,
172.73,1, 7, $113200.
39. (33) Andy Lally, Ford, accident, 162,
36.1,6, $80,500.
40. (29) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
clutch, 6,30.1,4, $70,860.
41. (27) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, rear
gear. 4,28.9,0, $70,710.
42. (28) J.J.Yeley, Ford, wheel bearing, 3,
27.9,2, $70,580:.
43. (20) Kevin Conway, Toyota,
vibration, 2. 26.8,0, $70,964.
.Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
143.404 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 29 minutes,
14 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 0.018 seconds.
Caution Flags: 9 for 38 laps.
Lead Changes: 72 among 26 drivers.

Sprint Cup leaders

Points
I, Carl Edwards, 2,237. 2, Matt
Kenseth, 2,223.3, Brad Keselowski, 2,219.
4, Tony Stewart, 2,218. 5, Kevin Harvick,
2,211..6, Kyle Busch, 2,197. 7, Jimmie
Johnson, 2,187. 8, Kurt Busch, 2,185.
9. Dale EamhardtJr,,2,163. 0,Jeff Gordon,
2,155. 1I, Denny Hamlin, 2,153. 12, Ryan
Newman,2,149.
13, Clint Bowyer, 915. 14. Kasey
Kahne, 896. 15, Greg Biffle, 887. 16, A J
Allmendinger, 878. 17, Marcos Ambrose,
847. 18, David Ragan, 846. 19, Mark Martin,
841.20,Juan Pablo Montoya, 841.
Money
I, Carl Edwards, $7,493,950. 2, Kyle
Busch, $5,809,100. 3, jimmie Johnson,
$5,740,590. 4, Kevin Harvick, $5,659,400.
5, Matt Kenseth, $5,566,940.6, KurtBusch,
$5,458,326. 7, Tony Stewart, $5,316,814.
8, Jeff Gordon, $5,314,640. 9, Clint
Bowyer, $5,085,669. 10, Denny Hamlin,
$4,881,518.
II, Ryan Newman, $4,778,223.
12, Brad Keselowski, $4,673,287. 13,
Juan Pablo Montoya, $4,556,669. 14,
Jamie McMurray, $4,3430311. 15, A J
Allmendinger, $4,305,945. 16, Marcos
Ambrose, $4,300,800. 17, Regan Smith,
$4,162,728. 18, Kasey Kahne, $4,131,985.
19, Bobby Labonte, $4,093,548. 20, David
Reutimann, $3,933,084.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Sunday's Game
Phoenix 5,Anaheim 4
Monday's Games
Toronto at Philadelphia (n)
Florida at Montreal (n)
N.Y. Rangers at Winnipeg (n)
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Dallas at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
New Jersey at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Philadelphia at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at'Calgary, 10 p.m.
St. Louis atVancouver, 10 p.m.


I


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


PREP ROUNDUP




Fort White advances



in district volleyball


From staff reports

Fort White High's vol-
leyball team beat Bradford
High in Monday's open-
ing round of the District
54A tournament hosted by
Keystone Heights High.
The Lady Indians won
in four sets 25-18, 25-17,
26-28, 25-23 to sweep
Bradford this season.
Fort White was the No. 4
seed and Bradford was No.
5. No. 3 seed Williston High
played No. 6 Interlachen
High in Monday's late
game.
Fort White plays top-
seed Keystone Heights at
7 p.m. today. No. 2 Seed
Santa Fe High plays the


Williston/Interlachen win-
ner at 5 p.m.

Lady Tigers golf

Columbia High's girls
golf team placed square in
the middle at the Region
1-2A tournament on
Monday.
The Lady Tigers scored
a team 367 at Eglin Air
Force Base Eagle's Course
in Niceville. Host Niceville
High won the tournament
with a 314 and Buchholz
High placed second with
a 318. The top two teams
advance to state.
Darian Ste-Marie led
Columbiawith an 81. Ashley
Mixon shot a career best 87,


as did Gillian Norris with a
98. Shelby Camp shot a 101
and Brooke Russell shot
a 108.
"Everybody came in
with a decent score," coach
Todd Carter said. "It was
the lowest 18 holes we shot
all year. We had a good
season."
Columbia loses a couple
of seniors, including No. 1
player Ste-Marie.
"We will be looking for
new Tigers to make the
program stronger and get
ready for next year," Carter
said. "I want to thank Quail
Heights Country Club and
The Country Club at Lake
City for their support of the
program."


Game 7 goes to Harrison


St. Louis led Texas,
2-1, after fourth innings in
Game 5 on Monday.

Associated Press

If the World Series
extends to seven games,
Rangers manager Ron
Washington has no plans to
alter his pitching rotation.
"It's Harry's game,"
Washington said Monday,
referring to Matt Harrison.
Even if potential weather
issues in St. Louis were to


push the series back an
extra day; Washington said
he wouldn't change his
pitching plans.
The question came up
after left-hander Derek
Holland threw 8%A scoreless
innings in Game 4 against
the Cardinals. Harrison,
who made it through only
3% innings in Game 3 on
Saturday, would get his
next turn in the rotation in
Game 7.
"Matt Harrison earned
it," Washington said.


In his previous start,
Holland gave up four runs
in 42 innings and got a
no-decision in the Rangers'
AL championship series-
clinching win over Detroit.
Cardinals manager Tony
La Russa isn't saying who
would pitch in a Game 7.
"My attitude is really con-
sistent," La Russa said. "It's
about today, and you have
to get somebody ready for
6, and that's Jaime (Garcia).
Then stop and see where
we are at that point"


INDIANS: District showdown Nov. 4

Continued From Page 1B


showdown with Fort White
in Ocala on Nov. 4.
Santa Fe High took a
big fall rom the unbeaten
ranks, losing 38-0 at North
Marion 'High in a District
5-5A game.
The Raiders (6-1, 2-1)
host Belleview High in a
district game this week.
Fort White's and Santa
Fe's annual Battle for the
Paddle game is Nov. 11.
. Among Fort White's
earlier opponents, Hamilton
County High stayed alive in
District 5-1A with a 52-34
home win over Branford

ACROSS 36 Li
1 Plead 37 TI
4 Clean up 38 -
8 Blackjack 39 C
12 Toon Olive to
13 Frankenstein's 40 TE
helper er
14 Recent 41 E)
15 Tans and 43 W
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grays W
17 Quark's home 46 A
18 First name in p
cosmetics 50 C
19 Travel 51 Li
documents 54 SI
20 Website 55 Oi
clutter 56 Y;
22 River tamer 57 W
23 Techniques 58 N
26 Egg-shaped dv
28 Wid bugler 59 T(
31 Busy as - st
32 Watch pocket
33 Me, to Miss
Piggy 1 D
34 Hassle a 2 Pc
debtor 3 Fi
35 Movie m
popcorn 4.1n
size el


High. The Trojans (2-5,
1-1) host The Villages High
on Friday.
Newberry High lost 30-6
at Dixie County High in a
District 7-1A matchup. The
Panthers (2-6, 1-1) travel to
Baldwin High for a district
game on Thursday.
Taylor County High lost
a District 1-4A game to East
Gadsden High at home last
week.
The Bulldogs (4-3, 1-1)
play at Suwannee High this
week.
Wakulla High whipped
visiting Suwannee,


42-0, last week in a District
2-5A game. Wakulla (5-2,
2-0) hosts Trinity Christian
Academy this week.
Union County High
stayed undefeated with a
34-7 win at Baldwin in a
District 7-1A game. The
Tigers (7-0, 3-0), ranked
No. 1 in Class 1A, host
Williston High this week.
Williston (4-3) won 42-13 at
Chiefland High.
Fernandina Beach High
(3-5, 0-1 in District 2-4A)
has the week off to recover
from its 65-30 loss to the
Indians.


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Smajeste EG G
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endearment NS L GIAA
excavate A STRIDE COMPS
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problem ERAS ROC UFO
onfess
looked upon PAC ENE M ISO
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DOWN
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lood the
market
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ectricity


Turkish
official
Earth's star
Coll. credits
Assert
Quaker
product


Want more puzzles?
Check-out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDrlverBooks.com


Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.


Answer here: THE
(Answers tomorrow)
Ysterdas Jumbles: MARRY MODEM SETTLE LAVISH
Answer: Stopping to look for his missing watch
caused the runner to LOSE TIME


10 Portico
11 Finishes a
skirt
16 Kid or rib
19 Kilmer of
films
21 Unfreeze
22 Applied
lightly
23 Dry riverbed
24 Meet edge to
edge
25 Cravings
27 You, to Yves
28 Sheik
colleague
29 "Damn
Yankees"
vamp
30 Potter's need
36 Harshness
38 Mauna -
40 Serenades the
moon
42 Ill-chosen
43 Batman's
garb
44 Pizzeria must
45 Sorority
member
47 Hunch
48 The "I"
49 Proofread
51 Sunbeam
52 Perfume label
word
53 Watchdog's
warning


10-25 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


SGITTH

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LAKE CITY REPORTER


ADVERTISEMENT


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


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NAME
CONTEST RULES
On Tuesday selected games will be sponsored in each of the ads of the participating ADDRESS
merchants. Indicate which team you think will win by writing the team name beside the
sponsoring merchant's name in the entry blank. Entries may be mailed or dropped off at
the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Dubl St., Lake City, FL 32055 or fax to 386-752-9400. PHONE
Entries must be received by 5:00pm on Thursday following the contest. Prize will be
awarded weekly on the basis of most games selected correctly. In case of a tie, the
winner will be determined by the most accurate guess on the Tie-Breaker (score AGE
required). You must be 18 years of age to enter; one entry per person. Participating
sponsors and their families, employees of the Lake City Reporter and their families are
not eligible to enter.


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LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


DILBERT


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY'


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE


DEAR ABBY


Families may not be thrilled

to learn about threesomes


DEAR ABBY: I read
with interest your excel-
lent advice to "Nowhere
and Everywhere" (Aug.
17), who asked about let-
ting family members know
about her polyamorous
relationship. As a coun-
selor, nurse and consult-
ing hypnotist in private
practice, I counsel people
every day in develop-
ing healthy, happy, open
relationships. Polyamory
and other forms of non-
monogamous relationships
are becoming more widely
practiced and accepted,
as many individuals and
couples find the limits of
traditional marriage do not
meet their needs.
It is not realistic to
expect family members to
immediately accept this
lifestyle if they were raised
with different beliefs about
Sexual exclusivity in mar-
riage. I advise couples to
"test the waters" first with
the most open-minded
family member by bring-
ing up the subject of a
"friend" who is in an open
relationship. If the relative
reacts in a neutral or posi-
tive way, it may be safe to
disclose the truth. Ask this
person how the rest of the
family might respond to
the news. Couples should
carefully assess whether
their relationship is strong
enough to withstand poten-
tial rejection.


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com
There is a price to pay
for being open, and one for
staying secretive. The lat-
ter requires lying to family
members and excluding
one partner from family
events, causing pain for
everyone. (The corner-
stone of polyamorous rela-
tionships is HONESTY.)
Families do become
more accepting over time
if they see that the couple's
marriage is not threatened
by the polyamory and that
everyone seems happy. I
advise couples to expect
drama and disapproval at
first, but to be patient and
keep reaching out to fam-
ily members to give them
time to get used to this
new situation. KATHY IN
BERKELEY
DEAR KATHY: Thank
you for writing. Responses
to that controversial let-
ter were passionate and
numerous. My newspaper
readers comment:
DEARABBY: In
response to "N and E's"
request for a tip on how to
let her boyfriend's conser-
vative family know about


their illicit, immoral poly-
amorous relationship, my
advice is to say nothing.
If she's asked directly,
only then should she defer'
to the boyfriend to explain '
their unorthodox lifestyle
to his parents. Why does
she feel the need to flaunt;
her private sexual rela-
tions?
If she loves the two men,
her actions will speak for
themselves without hav-
ing to offend the family's
ingrained sensibilities. -
ON HIGHER GROUND IN
SALEM, MASS.
DEAR ABBY: My hus-
band and I have been
non-monogamously mar-
ried for many years. My
lover joined the house-
hold four years ago. Some
members of my family,
welcome all three of us,
some don't. One, who
doesn't otherwise identify
as conservative, has cut
me off.
I'm sad that my happy
family life offends them,
but my household is
my primary family unit,
and I don't lie or cover
it up. Different family
styles work for differ-
ent people. Why is this
. hard to grasp? JEAN IN
PROVIDENCE

a Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


HOROSCOPES


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


SATM THIE NEW OPPO$AgML- THUMBS
0 / O (OWIN TO
S~1 WORK OUT1


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Concentrating on
partnerships will help you
avoid a misunderstanding.
Ask questions'if something
appears to be dubious.
Get involved in something
challenging and you will
enjoy the success you '
achieve. A networking
function will pay off. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Pay attention to the
people you care about
most. A personal partner-
ship can turn sour if you
are stubborn. An opportu-
nity to get a job or advance
where you are currently
employed is apparent Do
what is necessary to posi-
tion yourself for success.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Added discipline
will help you get things
done at home. A friend or
relative in need will offer
you something special in
return for a problem you
help solve. Make a positive
change to your looks, your
resume or the skills you
have to offer. *****
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You cannot take care
of everything all by your-
self. Take a break and
enjoy your life. Love is on
the rise, and socializing
or spending time with
someone special will ease
stress, help you rejuvenate
and give you strength to
make necessary decisions.
**


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

LEO (July 23-Aug.
22): An unexpected emo-
tional situation.wllea .
to a change of plans and
a change in your lifestyle.
Problems at home must
not be allowed to escalate.
Don't let old troubles
surface, making matters
worse. Now is not the time
for a rash decision. ****
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept
22): Get out and about
Traveling or visiting places
you've never been before
will open your eyes to new
ideas and opportunities.
Sharing with someone you
love will lead to a stronger
relationship. Avoid emo-
tional spending or lending.

LIBRA (Sept 23-0ct
22): Emotional matters will
be difficult to control. Take
a wait-and-see approach,
especially if money is
Involved. An opportunity
will come through an old
connection or idea you
, resurrect You'll prosper if
you offer your assistance.

SCORPIO (Oct 23-Nov.
21): Structure your time
carefully. You want to fit
as much in as possible,
especially if it pertains to
a creative project that can
lead to profits. Love is on
the rise, and a chance to
rekindle the flame should
be taken. ***


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Stick to
what you know and avoid
meddling in the affairs
of others. Dealings with
institutions, government
agencies or banks will.be
difficult Avoid arguments
or run-ins with authority
figures. Travel with cau-
tion. Communicate with
diplomacy. ****
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Positive action
and hard work will bring
good results. Don't let an
emotional matter cost you
financially. A change of
scenery will do you good,
but it may also cause a
change of heart Consider
altering your living
arrangements. **
AQUARIUS (an. 20-
Feb. 18): You are capable
of doing more than you
realize..Don't let an emo-
tional concern cloud your
vision or hold you back.
An investment or a small
business venture will work'
if you put in the effort. You
need to take action now.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March'
20): Give more thought to
ways you can earn extra
cash. Set up a workspace
at home that will help you
manufacture and market
a skill or talent you have.
Love is highlighted and
should be part of your
plan for the evening
hours.***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: C equals V
"TDA Y R C F K D B BD PFFS RABOLBOG
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TDA GRWWDB MFB BYFX BAWF. DAB."
BFXSMF KIRWNOW


Previous Solution: "This isn't exactly a stable business. It's like trying to stand
up in a canoe with your pants down." Cliff Robertson
S 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-25


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Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415












LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


61113-
ww.l~Y


Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


1ADvantage


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL-DIVISION
Case No. 12-2010-CA-000046
Division
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
KATRYNA J. LUMBERT AND.
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given to Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on Octobei 11,
2011, in the Circuit Court of Colum-
bia County, Florida, I will sell the
property situated in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida described as:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4; SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST AND
AND RUN THENCE NORTH 0
DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST,
613.38 FEET; RUN THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MI-
NUTES WEST, 280.00 FEET, RUN
THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 40
MINUTES WEST, 150.00 FEET.TO
'fHE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID LOT; CONTINUE NORTH 0
DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST,
125.00. FEET; RUN THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MI-
NUTES WEST 105.00 FEET; RUN
THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 40
MINUTES EAST, 125.00 FEET,
RUN THENCE SOUTH ,89 DE-
GREES 22 MINUTES EAST,
105.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, A/K/A LOT 2,
BLOCK C, AZALEA PARK SUB-
DIVISION.
and commonly known as: 266 SW
DAHLIA LN, LAKE CITY, FL
incv< l..d:i ta hp h li4:n annir-


Legal

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The North Florida Broadband Au-
thority ("NFBA") announces a public
meeting to which all interested per-
sons are invited. The-NFBA is a le-
gal entity and public body created
pursuant to the provisions of Section
163.01, Florida Statutes, and an In-
terlocal Agreement among: Baker,
Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist, Ham-
ilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy,.
Madison, Putnam, Suwannee, Tay-
lor, Uriion and Wakulla Counties and
.municipalities of Cedar Key, Cross
City, Lake City, Live Oak, Monticel-
lo, Perry, White Springs and Wor-
thington Springs, Florida. The meet-
ing will be held at 10:00 a.m. on
Monday, October 31, 2011 at the Su-
wannee River Water Management
District, Suwannee Room, 9225
County Road 49, Live Oak, Florida
32060. The meeting agenda will be
posted to the NFBA website
www.nfba-fl.org at least 48 hours
prior to the scheduled meeting. The
NFBA Board will address general
operating issues of the NFBA. If a
person decides to appeal any deci-
sion made by the NFBA with respect
to any matter considered at the meet-
ing, such person will need a record
of the proceedings and may need to
ensure that a verbatim record is
made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to
be made. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons* needing special accommoda-
tions or an interpreter to participate
in this proceeding, or if you have any
questions regarding this meeting,
please contact the Clerk to the NFBA
Board at (877) 552-3482, at least two
business days prior to the date of the
meeting.
05528702
October 25, 2011


32u235; including ne Duildng, appur-
"" ing, appur- NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS
tenances, and fixtures located there- NOTICEOF PUBLIC METI
in, at public sale, to the highest and OF TDE NORTH FLORIDA
best bidder, for cash, AT THE BROADBAND AUTHORITY,
FrTRANSITION COMMITTEE
-FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM- TRANSITION COMMITTEE
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, The North Florida broadbandd Au-
145 N. HERNANDO STREET, thority ("NFBA") announces meet-
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on No- ins of the NFBA Operations Com-
vember 16, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Any nmttee that allinterested persons are
person claiming an. interest ,in the invited to attend. The NFBA is a le-
surplus from the sale, if any, other gal entity and public body created,
than the property, owner as of th pursuant to the provision1 of Section
date of the lis pendens' must file a 163.01, Florida Statutes, and an In-
claim within 60:days after the sale. terlocal Agreement among Baker,
Dated this llth day of October, Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gil-
2011. christ, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafay-
Clerk of the Circuit Court ette, Levy, Madison, Putnam, Su-
By:/s/B. Scippio wannee, Taylor, Union and Wakulla
Deputy Clerk Counties and municipalities of Cedar
Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live
05528536 Oak, Monticello, Perry, White
October'18, 25 2011 Springs and;'Worthington Springs,
_______________ Florida. The' NFBA's, TransitionA
IN THE IR T OURT F Committee meetings will .beheld, at
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM- 26, 2011 at the City of Lake City
BIA COUNTY I Council Chambers; 205 N.E. Marion
CIVIL DIVISION' Avenue, Lake City, FL 32055 and at
Case No.: 12-2010-CA-000743 1:00 p.m. on the following Wednes-
Division days, November 2, 2011; November
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS 16, 2011;'and at Noon on November
BANK OF FLORIDA 9, 2011 all Suwannee River Water
Plaintiff, Management District, Suwannee
vs. Room, 9225 County Road 49, Live
CHRISTIAN GONZALEZ-ORTIZ, Oak, Florida 32060. The NFBA's
DORIS A. GONZALEZ AND UN- Transitional Committee meeting is to
KNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, conduct general business. If a per-
Defendants. son decides to appeal any decision
NOTICE OF SALE made by the NFBA with respect to
Notice is hereby given to Final Judg- any matter considered at the meeting,
ment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en- such person will need a record of the
tered in this cause on October 5, proceedings and may need to ensure
2011, in the Circuit Court of Colum- that a verbatim record- is made, ih-
bia County, Florida, I will sell the eluding the testimony and evidence
property situated in Columbia Coun- upon which the appeal is to be made.
ty, Florida described as: In accordance with the Americans
LOT 22, OF MAY-FAIR UNIT with Disabilities Act, persons need-
TWO, A SUBDIVISION ACCORD- ing special accommodation or an in-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF terpreter to participate in this pro-
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, ceeding or have any questions please
PAGE 95-95A, OF THE PUBLIC contact Faith Doyle, Clerk to the
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA NFBA Board at (877) 552-3482 or
COUNTY, FLORIDA. (407) 629-6900 at least two (2) busi-
and commonly known as: 277 SW ness days prior to the date of the
COURTESY WAY, LAKE CITY, meeting.
FL 32024; including he building, ap-
purtenances, and fixtures located 05528701
therein, at public sale, to the highest October 25, 2011
and best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET, We will sell the following units at
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on No- Community Self Storage 814 SW
vember 16, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Any State Road 247/Branford Hwy., No-
person claiming an interest in the vember 11,2011 at 1:00PM
surplus from the sale, if any, other WE SELL FOR CASH ONLY
than the property owner as of the 386-961-9926
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale. ANGELA COPLEY
Dated this 5th day of October, 2011. Personal Property
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/B. Scippio SHEILA CRAWFORD (2 units)
Deputy Clerk Household, furniture, clothes


05528500
October 18, 25, 2011


Ndi#a "'-pr


VIRGIL WILSON
Household Goods
JAN BENSON (2 units)
Personal Property
LYNDON RAINBOLT
Electrical Materials
PAMELA WIGGINS
(Household goods)
BRIAN SHIPP
Household, furniture
EVELYN BALDWIN
Furniture
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REFUSE ALL BIDS.
Cash only, 10ko Buyers premium,
Jerry Duncan #AU527
05528421
October 25, 2011
November 1, 2011


Lawn & Landscape Service 100 Job
SJ&M LAWN Service & more for O or
all your outdoor needs. Don't 055285%
waste your time or weekend, FT & PT PC Tech needed
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187 busy local shown. Exo reouir


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
Opportunities
05528632
Position available for
Costing-Estimator
Will need to estimate sale prices
on commercial steel buildings
and design concepts.
Evaluate and maintain material
cost structure. Will need to
contact Ven'dors to source new
supplies for cost improvements.
EXPERIENCE IN STEEL OR
COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS.
Only applicants with Costing/
Estimating experience need to
apply. Full benefits package for
large Local Manufacturing Co.
Send Resume to P.O. Box
2097., Lake City, FL 3t056

05528643
Another Way Inc. seeks
Shelter Coordinator (FT w/bene-
fits) Lake City. Supervisory exp
req'd. Coordinates & assist in
providing svcs to survivors of
domestic & sexual violence in a
shelter setting. Minorities &
formerly battered women
encouraged to apply. EOE. Send
resume w/cover letter and salary
requirements to: hr@another-
wayinc.net or P. 0. Box 1028,
Lake City, FL 32056 or Fax
386-719-2758. No phone calls


05528675'
Third Circuit guardian ad
Litem program
Full Time Victim Advocate-
Case Coordinatdr Grant Funded
Position located in Lake City
Officee. 'saly $28,080:00' yr-ho
benefits. Bachelors Degree in
'Social Work, Criminology,
Psychology or two years
'comparable service. Excellent
communication skills, ability to
work independently and with
others of various ages,
professions and backgrounds.
Must maintain a strong
commitment to Victims of
Crime and respect confidentiali-
'ty of victims. Deadline for
Submission of STATE
application to Linda Dedge at
213 Howard Street, Live Oak,
Florida, 32064 is October 28th,
2011 @5pm. EOE

AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CLASS A Driver wanted.
Clean records. Exp. w/hopper,
dump, live floor a plus. Serious
inquires only. 386-755-7700
Experienced Short Order Cook"
with minimum 2 YEARS EXP.
with good references. No Phone
Calls, Apply in person IHOP
Field Data Collector. P/T
opportunity in Lake City
performing fieldwork & computer
reporting for a national industry
leader. No exp. Paid training.
Performance based pay,
S $11-$12/hr.'Apply at
www.muellerreports.com.
Task# 16826 1

FLEET MECHANICS Needed
Tractor / Trailer Mechanics
Needed for late model fleet,
Must have experience and'tools
Welsing experience helpful
Good Pay & Benefits
Apply in Person at
PRITCHETT'TRUCKING
Lake Butler, FL. Or online at
www.pritchettrucking.com

NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.

12 Medical
21 U Employment


310 Pets & Supplies
Free Kittens!
7 weeks, Male and Female
Calico and Grey Tabby!
386-365-0042

Mixed-short haired terrier.
FREE to good.home.
Please call for info.
386-755-9333 or 755-7773
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.


401 Antiques
ANTIQUE OAK
Side Board. $100.
386-365-1187


402 Appliances
HEAVY DUTY Whirlpool
dryer, great working condition.
Less than 2 yrs. old. $100.
386-755-9239

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Formal Dining set. Queen Anne
Style. Pecan dolor. Table, 6 chairs.
2 leaves, custom pads. Large china
cabinet. $600. 386-965-0762

OUTDOOR SET.
3 piece white cast iron ivy pattern
bench & 2 chairs. Vintage look.
All for $200. 386-965-0762
Roll Top desk. Cherry/Oak. Mar-
ble inset. 2 work trays, 2 file draw-
ers. Center knee-hole. 30"x60"
Lighted. $500. 386-965-0762
SOFA & LOVE seat. Plush
overstuffed; dark tealeelvet...
Very. clean. $500.
386-965-0762

413 Musical
413 Merchandise
CONN PIANO.
Sounds great. Spinet model.
Has bench. $250.
386-965-0762


419 TV-Radio &
Recording
20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$80.00
386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.

Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
Every weekend til sold. 603 SW
Long Leaf. Off 247. Exercise
equipment, antiques, furniture, col-
lectibles, bicycle. 386-397-3390

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

2 Wheel Utlity trailer.
$100.
386-365-1187

DOE & BUCK
Concrete Decorative
statues for yard; $150.
386-965-0762

450 Good Things
to Eat
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans


05528667 2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
Local Phlebotomy Course 386-963-4138 or 961-1420
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program. 630 Mobile Homes
(904)566-1328 6 0 for Rent


40 Schools &
2 Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
* Nursing Assistant, $479.
next class-11/07/10
* Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11
* Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


14 Wide, 3/2-$525, 2/2-$475.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References.







openI plan. oi-ts.m
$ 100/1lot h.m


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
16X80 Almost new. 10 mi S of
Lake City, off Branford Hwy. 3/2,
fenced yd, Dish Washer private.
$650. mo + sec. No Pets. 984-7478
Ibedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH, $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482
VERY CLEAN
2br/lba 10 mi West of
Lake City $400. mo
No pets. 386-963-2282

|640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale
Just Reduced! Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
'(352)872-5566
Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaknfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"
cond. Split floor plan, Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No.Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WE BUY HOMES!
.Singles or Doubles. Must have
Clear title. Call North Point Homes
(352)872-5566

650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
Outside of Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to.Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
SResults Realty 386-397.3473
Hunting Tract 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
camper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2,1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473


ZUUf 6SiaOX
17 ft. center console,
approx. 40 hrs. Mercury
90hp. New 551b trolling
motor. Alum. trailer.
Pay off
$12,600
Call
386-758-7766


650 obileHome
650 &Land
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

71 Unfurnished Apt.
710U For Rent
05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







2/1 CH/A Duplex Apt.
$450. mo No pets.
Near Beachville.
Call Margie 386-935-3447
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.'
Call for details.
386-365-5150
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ Iba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.,
SFrom $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
SGreat locationW of 1-75, zsacieus
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/11
hookup. pati8 o $600& 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer spedial.:2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbvrentals.com
Nice, large 2 br Apt.
Close to town & shopping
$500. mo. plus $501 dep.
386-344-2972
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & 1Br's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer, Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.mvflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
2 For Rent '
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
'cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
S386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished '
S73 Home For Rent

3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $200
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476


20o00 Oas Intrigue
Mint condition, garage
kept, 4dr sedan, due to
illness have to sell.
Only 50,000 miles.
$7,000
Call
386-752-6956
(cell) 386-984-2627


05528670
IMMEDIATE OPENING
PART TIME NIGHT
AUDITOR,
(FRONT DESK)
FRIDAY TO SUNDAY
Applicants must be matured,
seeking long term employment.
Must be self motivated
with Excellent customer
service skills..
Hotel experience
preferred but not required
Excellent work environment
Apply in person
414 SW Florida Gateway Dr.
Lake City, FL 32024
US Hwy 90 & 1-75 intersection
SERIOUS
APPLICANTS
ONLY!
NO PHONE
fml CALLS PLEASE


dfor
red. I


......- .- ...-F -- .. .
* Sales Help wanted.
Electronic/Computers FT & PT
* FT Help Needed. Vehicle
maint., yard work, general
repairs etc.
Send email to: bdj@startech.cc


ON WHEELS WATERCRAFT


Classified Department: 755-5440


grorw


________~___











Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2011


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
4BR/2BA CH/A 2 miles
out on Price Creek Rd.
$700. mo $500 security.
386-752-4597
4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric. $1250. mo.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
Nice in town 2br/lba CH/A
$700. mo. $700 deposit.
386-758-3922 or
386-344-5065
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.

750 Business &
5 Office Rentals

05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group

780 Condos forSale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty,
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnantwomen and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
State which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 mi. NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
.386.961.9181
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vpted; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290


IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
LAKE CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,700 sq.
ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer, Call 417-396-2134.
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BRY2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
to.ian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896


810 Home for Sale
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
S$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
.5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Island kit. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances,
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2,5ba. Fairway Vills in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
S0808 Westfield Realty Group
Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
'Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres.
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, Fl room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group,
3/2 w/1 car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223


810 Home for Sale
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept 3/2 DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen.
Wired 24x36 workshop, steel roof,
pole barn. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
rother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on comer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area! -
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585 -
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110

820 Farms &
O U Acreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com









0NIWHEELSaWAT RF









Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and.photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online..
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private partyonly.


2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
'Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15,00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.


V cS


227 ellfowlr Drive
Modd Hour
Corial V Homes ope Dai-pm
by Arthur Rutenberg CallBrya Zacer
b.i ,i; r .i i.; r.drJ, F .'.J.. (3 6) 752-6 53
..l \rntu. .e.te -l .T-o ,,:r.'... '- .: "' 55





OPEN :.,LOC
TAKE A TOUR

e24/7 ; pL r

rnWe never close!

0*


820 Farms &
2| Acreage
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018,
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fin,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

830 Commercial
Property
3 lots zoned RMFI near Baya/
McParlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group
To place your
classified ad call

755-5440


850 Waterfront
Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
87 0 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles
1996 Harley Sportster 1200CC
Excellent cond. To many upgrades
to list. Previous owner was a Har-
ley mechanic. Customized for 5'4"
body height. Less than 12K mi.
Dark forest green. My biker
husband passed away & 1 married
a boater so I no longer ride. $4,200
Call Linda (850)973-6110

940 Trucks
2005 Ford F-350 Lariat
50,000 miles, many extras,
excellent condition.
$18,500 386-755-0139

950 Cars for Sale
2000 Olds Intrigue: Loaded, Mint
cond. Garage kept 4 dr sedan, due
to sickness has to sell. $7000.
Only has 50k miles. 386-752-6956


Noh Florida r

HoN ler
4L.- 4. .i*t 4 CR.r-r

Lake City Reporter


Contact us


at the paper.


higgenbotham.corm



I'/TRFNATAO'NAL, LTD., IIC
A ae wsect Real Estate Broker
mn alliance partner of r(4jAlFid#Ob BaE Ll'
MF VlInnanhnth-n, CAL Fl I Idi~f~l ln* AR1' ;R


Adoption

A childless, young, successful woman seeks
to adopt. Will provide loving home/doting
grandma. Large extended family. Excellent
support. Financial security. Expenses paid.
Jessica orAdam. 1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789

Announcements

Advertising that Works. Put your ad in Over
100 Papers throughout Florida for one LOW
RATE! Call (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida-
classifieds.com


Autos Wanted


CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year.
We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car
or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer:
(888)420-3807


Business Opportunities


THINK CHRISTMAS, START NOW!
OWN A RED HOT! DOLLAR, DOLLAR
PLUS, MAILBOX OR DISCOUNT PARTY
STORE FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! 100%
TURNKEY (800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.
COM

Condos For Sale

BANK FORECLOSURE! FLORIDA
WATERFRONT CONDOS! SW Coast! Brand
new upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,675sf condo.
Only $199,900! (Similar unit sold for $399,900)
Prime downtown location on the water! Call now
(877)888-7571, X 63

Education

ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend
college 100% online. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.
CenturaOnline.com


Financial Services


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging?
Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-
Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com

Help Wanted


Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos. CDL Class A
Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.
cor

Land For Sale

UPSTATE NY FARM LIQUIDATION!
October 29th & 30th! 3 to 41 acre lots, $12,900
- $49,900! Less than 3 hrs NYC! Call to register!
(877)352-2844. www.newyorklandandlakes.com

GA LAND SALE 32 AC $1,650/AC Perfect
small hunting tract. Creek, hardwoods, planted
pine. Visit our website. www.stregispaper.com
(478)987-9700 St. Regis Paper Co.

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting,
*Criminal Justice. Job placement, assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
Call (888)203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if qualified
- Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)314-3769.

SAWMILLS from only $3997- MAKE MONEY
& SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship.
FREE Info & DVD: www:NorwoodSawmills.
com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N

Movie Extras People needed NOW to stand in
the background for a major film Earn up to $300
per day. Exp not REQ. CALLNOWAND SPEAK
TO A LIVE PERSON (877)435-5877

Out of Area Real Estate

New log house in Fancy Gap, Virginia.
Recession prices, 139k. 5 acres 42K. Magnificent
views, creeks, waterfalls, Paved, Mountain Top.
Call (336)210-2999 or visit mountainlandvirginia.
cor


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ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA

Cla:.ifed I Drilay I Metro DaIly


Week of October 24, 2011