<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



The Lake City reporter
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01680
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 23, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01680
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




000015 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF' FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117'007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Sunday, October 23, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 231 $1.00


Ichetucknee
Springs is one
of the jewels of
North Florida fed
by the Floridan
Aquifer, from which
the Jacksonville
Electric Authority
has been given
permission to
pump 155 mil-
lion gallons of
water a day to
icool machin-
ery. Regional
'officials plan to
Fight the permit,
issued by the
St. Johns Water
Management
District in May.

JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City Reporter


Strate yfor water wars



is strength In numbers


By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
An environmental group recently ques-
tioned if public officials understand how
a permit allowing 155 million gallons
of water a day to be pumped from the
Floridan Aquifer could impact water levels
in the region.
Annette Long, president of
Save Our Suwannee, said some
elected officials are "pretending
that there isn't a problem." She
said scientists predict crisis low
water levels in some areas by
2015 because of groundwater
pumping draw downs.
"Do our local officials under-
stand?" she said. "I think they're
starting to.".
Suwannee County
Coordinator Joe Gerrity said
there is no doubt elected offi-
cials at the county level under-
stand the threat
"Part of the issue here is Tourism b
we've got lots of springs and as an eco
they are drying up," he said. "I the 21st c


believe ift's a very important issue." .
And the concerns aren't just from
Suwannee County. The county com-
missions from Columbia, Hamilton and
Suwannee counties will meet soon to dis-
cuss the issue.
(A meeting had been scheduled for 6
p.m. Tuesday at a restored train depot
in Live Oak, but was canceled Friday out


ased on the area's natural resources is seen
nomic engine that will drive North Florida in
century. .:.


of concerns the venue, which holds 60,
wasn't large enough to accommodate all
interested parties. A new date will be set
soon, say officials.)
Commissioners plan to fight a permit
that allows the St. Johns River Water
Management District to draw 155 mil-
lions from the aquifer for use daily, by
the Jacksonville Electric Authority.
Elected officials believe springs and riv-
ers, throughout north central Florida are
threatened.
The big challenge is how three smaller,
rural counties can take on a water dis-
trict that includes nine counties, part of
nine other counties, and encompasses
Jacksonville, a metropolitan area with
more than one million people.;
"It's almost a- David and Goliath thing,
and we're David," Gerrity said. "When
you're talking about 155 million of any-
thing, that's a lot."
Columbia County Manager Dale
Williams said the three governments
will likely discuss possible legal action
to challenge the St Johns River Water
Management District.
"You can't let size and geography scare
you, even if it's a David and Goliath situa-
tion," he said. "Bad decisions are always
worth reviewing."
Danny Johnson, Hamilton County coor-
WATER continued on 3A


A hundred years of healing


By LAURA HAMPSON
thampson@lakecityreporter.com
When the facility now known as Shands
Lake Shore Regional Medical Center
opened in 1911, Columbia County had
about 18,000 residents (just over a quarter
its current total), the U.S. comprised 45
states and home telephones were uncom-
mon. .


Community leaders, hospital .adminis-
' trators and staff gathered' Thursday to
celebrate the hospital's 100th arnhiversary
and recent major renovations.
Hospital CEO Rhonda Sherrod cut the
ribbon to the refurbished lobby area, cafe
and first floor.
"It definitely needed a fresher look,",
said Linda Silecchia, marketing 'and com-
munications director for Shands Lake


Shore.
Silecchia said the hospital building
should reflect how the hospital is moving
towards the future.
"It's very beautiful," said Pat Hunziker,-
president of the auxiliary group that runs
the hospital gift shop. She said the inte-
rior and exterior has a' more modern
HOSPITAL continued on 3A


Rhonda
Sherrod, Shands
LakeShore
Regional Medical
Center CEO, cuts
a ceremonial rib-
bon Thursday in
front of the newly
renovated wel-
come center. The
hospital is cel- '
ebrating its 100th
anniversary.


Ililll lllll CALLUS: '--< Opinion ............... 4A
u: 78(386) 752-1293 Business ......... IC
SUBSCRIBE TO Mostly sunny Obituaries ...... 6A -
THE REPORTER: Advice ... . 3D :


U.S. FOREIGN POLICY



Big wins


may not


matter


to voters

By CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON By declaring the
Iraq war over, President Barack Obama
scored what his allies see as a fourth
big foreign policy success in six months,
starting with Osama bin Laden's kill-
ing.
But in his re-election bid, these events
might play a discouragingly small role
even if they burnish his
eventual place in his-
tory.
Voters'tend to focus
heavily on domestic
issues, especially in
times of high unem-
ployment. That will
Obama limit Obama's campaign
options.
His supporters are seeking ways to
make the most of his foreign policy
accomplishments. One approach is to
contrast them with Congress' partisan-
driven gridlock on taxes, the deficit and
other domestic issues.
"Look at the progress the presi-
dent can make when he doesn't have
Republicans obstructing him," said
Karen Finney, a former Democratic
spokeswoman who often defends the
party on TV and radio. .
Democratic strategist Rebecca
Kirszner Katz distributed a similar
remark on Twitter this past week:
'Terrorists and dictators, lacking the
filibuster, have no effective defense
WINS continued on 3A



Walk raises

awareness of,

funds for, CF


By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com


'Misty Taylor's 2-year-old son, Colton,
has the Delta F 508 strain of Cystic
Fibrosis the most severe form of an
already deadly disease. Colton's natural
enzymes don't break down his foods
and exces-
sive mucus
in his lungs
makes it dif-
ficult for him
to breathe.
Saturday '
more, than
150 people
gathered
at Florida
Gateway
College g e
to raise
money for TONY BRITTILa e lr Refper
the Cystic Misty Taylor and her son,
F i b r o sis Colton, were partof Team
Foundation Boo Boo during Saturday's
in honor cystic fibrosis fundraiser at
of Colton's Florida Gateway College.
and an FGC Colton is a cystic fibrosis
student. As
part of their patient.
fundraising
efforts, they walked six miles around
the FGC campus.
Taylor works at FGC in the purchas-
ing department and the college's staff
and local sponsors decided to take part
in the Great Strides Cystic Fibrosis
fundraiser.
"It really touches my heart to see.
the community come together," she
said. "It's just amazing that so many
people could come together, help raise
money and just be a part of this,
something that really doesn't affect
WALK continued on 3A

TODAY IN COMING
BUSINESS TUESDAY
Vvhere to go 'Veekend nev..s
for unq.ue gifts. Coundup


La


Columbia, Hamilton, Suwannee will join
forces to fight JEA move to pump 155 million
gallons a day from the Floridan Aquifer.


Voice: 755-5445
1 Fax: 7S2-9400


L .- ,-- ,; Puzzles ....


2B


WEATHER, 8A








LAKE CITY REPORTER SUNDAY REPORT SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


Friday: Friday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday: Saturday:
27-33-34-42 MB 11 13-14-17-20-35 Afternoon: N/A Afternoon: N/A N/A N/A
Evening: N/A Evening: N/A


AROUND FLORIDA


Goliath grouper's comeback creates conflict


By KATE SPINNER
Sarasota Herald-Tribune

SARASOTA When
anglers targeting sweet-
eating snapper instead see
the hulking shape of a 400-
poynd goliath grouper at
the end of their line, exple-
tives usually follow.
Not in awe over the size
of the fish the Gulf of
Mexico's largest grouper
that can reach 8 feet in
length and top out at 800
pounds but in anger over
the loss of their dinner.
The goliaths often eat
hooked or speared game
fish before anglers can get
them in the boat While
reputably tasty, the giant
groupers are protected
and illegal to keep.
"They eat any fish
you put a hook in," said
Captain Gary Gilliland,
who works at Economy
Tackle in Sarasota.'"Most
recreational guys that want
to catch something differ-
ent, they hate them."
S As goliath have grown
in size and number, so has
the vitriol toward the giant
fish, a product of their par-
tial rebound since a 1990
ban on their harvest saved
them from extinction.
The goliath's rebound,
driven by continued state
and federal restrictions,
has created an unusual
conflict between wildlife
officials who see them as
threatened and anglers
who see them as a nui-
sance.
' In Southwest Florida,
more fishermen are hav-
ing encounters with goli-


aths, in part because of the
expansion of artificial reefs
that concentrate fish and.
anglers in the same places.
As a result, fisher-
men both commercial
and recreational are
beginning to demand the
right to harvest goliath.
Conversely, conserva-
tionists want the federal
government to give the
goliaths further protection
by putting them on the
endangered specieslist.
To help solve the con- -
flict, scientists Christopher.
Koenig and Felica
Coleman of Florida State
University are beginning a
3-year study to document
the goliath's recovery
and figure out whether
it makes sense to allow
anglers to catch and keep
them.
Formerly known as jew-
fish, goliath are the largest
groupers in the Western
North Atlantic, thriving
mainly in tropical regions.
They can reach 800
pounds and live 50 years.
They prefer to eat bdx
crabs and require little
sustenance because of
their lazy habits. When
goliath see a hooked or
speared fish, however,
it looks like easy dinner,
and they will defend their
claim to it, giving fisher-
men the perception that
goliath are ravenous
beasts.
'They're like big puppy
dogs, they really are.' I
could show you video
where they come right
up to you and you could
put a hand on their face,"
Koenig said.


Fantasy

Fest begins

in Key West

-Key West Key West's
decadent Fantasy Fest is
under way with a packed
schedule of masquerade
balls, street parties apd
costume contests.
This year's themes
"Aquatic Afrolic." The
annual festival continues
through Oct. 30 with,
nearly 50 events includ-
Sing a costume cdmpeti-
tion for pets and their
owners and a headdress
ball. An evening parade
on an Oct. 29 is expected
to attract more than
50,000 revelers.
Fantasy Fest debuted
in 1979 to bolster tour-
ism during a slow period.
Now, tourism officials said
it pumps.some $30 mil-
lion into the Florida Keys
economy each year.


$100K

for rodeo

injuries


RAPID CITY, S.D. -A
jury has awarded a Florida
man injured by a bull
at a 2004 Scenic rodeo
$100,000.
The 7th Circuit Court
jury found that Longhorn
Enterprises, Crazy Horse
Tokala Society and Crazy
Horse Tokala agent.


I& j-K 1 - -\ `U /Fm
ASSOCIATED PRE
In this photo provided by the Florida Keys News Bureau, Dave Hutchinson airbrushes a
huge lionfish in Key West. The fish replica is slated to roll down Key West's Duval Street in
a Saturday, Oct. 29, parade that is to highlight the island city's annual 10-day Fantasy Fest
costuming and masking festival that began Friday.


Richard Swain were neg-
ligent for injuries Fred.
Breeding suffered after
the bull struck him in the
chest.
The Rapid City Journal
reports the jury awarded
Fred Breeding, of Stuart,
more than $460,000,
but also found he was
a voluntary rodeo con-
testant. A state statute
caps the amount a rodeo
competitor can collect t4
$100,000.
Fred Breeding's wife
Naomi Breeding says heri
husband has a limited
range of motion and can't
sit for very long. He has
been unable to return to
his job as a private yaht
captain.


'Occupy'

protesters

arrested

ORLANDO Orlando
Police have arrested 19
Occupy Wall Street pro-
testers for trespassing in a
city park after hours.
The group is protest-
ing corporate influence
and police say they have
been compliant with city
rules. But police said a
small group ignored a city
ordinance banning them
from the park after hours.
They were arrested early
Saturday morning.


Street

named for

victim

MIAMI Miami-Dade
County has named a street
after a 10-year-girl who
died after chronic child
abuse.
Officials on Friday
renamed a portion of a
street "Nubia Way" after
Nubia Barahona.
Her decomposing body
was found in her father's
truck along Interstate 95
in February.

* Associated Press


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS,


Radio convention meets for last time


By WARREN LEVINSON
Associated Press

NEWARK, NJ. For one week-
end a year, the ghosts and survivors
of Jack Benny, Benny Goodman,
Goodman Ace and hundreds of othei
legends of the old days of radio hold
court at a hotel across the road from
Newark Airport
The annual Friends of Old-Time
Radio Convention has been meeting
for 36 years. But when it signs off
Saturday night, it will be for the last
time: The reason is simple, says Jay
Hickerson, a rmuiician who has been
running the sh&w from the begin-
.ning: the march of time..
"Lack of OTR (old-time radio) *
guests. And the committee is getting
older," he said.
The gathering, humble as it is,
used to be able to call on a constel-
lation of stars from the early days of
radio.
Now it's down to former child
stars in their 80s and 90s. Arthur
Anderson, 88, who acted as a teen-
ager with Orson Welles, is an hon-
ored guest. Grandsons of 1930s song
and dance star Eddie Cantor and
Brace Beemer, the voice of the Lone
Ranger for most of its run on radio,
are on the program.
Collecting old-time radio shows
and trivia has never been a young
person's game. But most of the con-
vention-goers.are too young to have
firsthand recollections of the shows
they're buying, recreating and dis-
cussing on panels.
Gary Yoggy, 73, has been to all 36
of the conventions.
"It's my favorite weekend of the
year. It tops Christmas," he said.
Yoggy, a retired history teacher
from Corning, N.Y., is part of the
committee that puts on the conven-
tion. He direct of a,,
Tom Mix epist after-
noon program.
"It's like reliving my youth," he
said. "I was a kid when the golden
age of radio was beginning to die."

Simon Jones is one of the celeb-


-
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lauri Bortz is dressed in a 1940's outfit as she looks through bins of old radio pro-
grams and movies at the Friends of Old-Time Radio convention in Newark, N.J. op.
Friday.


rity guests for the weekend. Jones
doesn't exactly qualify as a Golden
Age of Radio star. He played
Arthur Dent in the BBC's hugely
popular radio and TV adaptations
of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the
Galaxy, starting in 1978. But he's
been here before and is delighted
to be asked.
"I've learned quite a lot about what
went on before me," he said.
listeners who started as children,
he said, make the most loyal fans. "If
you can catch them that young, maybe
they'll become addicted later on."
But it's not just the radio programs
that bring participants back year
after year.
Stuart Weiss has been part of the
steering committee from the begin-
ning. He moderates a music panel
*.fth Brian Gari, the Cantor grand-
son. Weiss likens the gathering to a
family reunion.
'These are old friendships. But
you don't keep in touch during the
year. We come here, it's as if we
were together yesterday," he said.
Weiss, a party supply salesman froln


Staten Island, was inspired by the con-
verition to start his own radio show on
the Internet Ifs eight hours long.
"I can't stop," he said. The party
supply business isn't doing too well
these days, but "when I do my show,
I forget all my problems. And for
eight hours, I'm in heaven."
Sometimes the family aspect is lit-
eral. Gary Yoggy met his wife at the
convention. They've been married
29 years. Jeff Muller, 45, has been
coming since he was a teenager. He
brings his father.
"I guess it's his second childhood,
in a way," he said:
And when the curtain comes
down, after Jay Hickerson and his
wife Karen play "I'l Be Seeing You"
and a version of 'Thanks for the
Memories," with special lyrics writ-
ten for the convention?
Weiss joked he'll come back to the
Newark Airport Ramada anyway and
wander around empty rooms.
Yoggy said he wants to help revive
radio drama, which withered away
'decades ago, in the United States at
least.


Celebrity Birthdays
I Singer Barbara Ann Hawkins of The Dixie Cups is 68.
0 Director Ang Lee is 57.
SJazz singer Dianne Reeves is 55.
* Country singer Dwight Yoakam is 55.
1 Singer "Weird Al" Yankovic is 52.
. Bassist Robert Trujillo of Metallica is 47.
9 Singer David Thomas of Take 6 is 45.
E Drummer Brian Nevin of Big Head Todd and The Monsters
is 45.
* Bassist Eric Bass of Shinedown is 37.


Daily Scripture



"A person finds joy in giving an
apt reply- and how good is a
timely word!"
Proverbs 15:23 NIV.


Lake City Reporter


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ..........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is.pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated Press.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Fla. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .... .754-0418
(twilson@laketyreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .7544419
(sbrannon@lakectyreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake CtyReporter
should be completed by 630' am.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 730.
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-7555445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 am. to report a ser-
vice error for same day redelvery. After
1030 am., next day redelivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued..
In all other counties where home very
is available, next day re-devery or ser-
vice related credits wil be issued. ,
Circulation ...............755-445
(circulation@akectyreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.. ............... $26.32
24 Weeks ................... $4.79
52 Weeks .................. $83.46
Ratesincude7% salestax
Mail rates
12 Weeks .................. $41.40
24 Weeks ................$.82.80
52 Weeks ................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion,
please call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifica-
tions will run in this space. And thanks for reading.


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428











Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428 LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011 3A


Nevada moves caucus



to Feb. 4 after backlash


By CRISTINA SILVA and
STEVE PEOPLES
Associated Press

MANCHESTER, N.H Nevada
Republicans have shifted their pres-
idential caucuses to early February,
a move that ends an increasingly
bitter standoff among rival states
and for the first time clarifies the
path to the Republican presidential
nomination.
There will be no voting before
Christmas. That's despite warnings
from New Hampshire's top election
official that Nevada's initial insis-
tence to host its contest in mid-
January could force the Granite
State to schedule the nation's first
Republican primary election in
roughly six weeks.
But facing boycott threats from
campaigns, incentive offers from
the Republican National Committee,
and the private blessing of the
Mitt Romney campaign, Nevada
Republicans voted Saturday to set
their caucuses for Feb. 4. It will be
the West's first stop in the race for
the. Republican presidential nomina-
tion and the fifth contest overall,
after Iowa, New Hampshire, South
Carolina and Florida.
'The candidates, are anxious to
come here and campaign and don't
want to have the heat put on them
by New Hampshire to stay away,"
former Nevada Gov. Bob List, a
national Republican committeeman,
said before Saturday's vote. "We
have to eat a little crow perhaps in
some people's minds, but I think in
the end it's a win-win."
The calendar scramble had con-
sumed Republican officials in early
voting states and complicated.candi-
dates' decisions about travel, the tim-
ing of television advertisements and
the distribution of limited resources.
But with New Hampshire now free
to settle on its preferred date of Jan.
10, the final puzzle pieces appear to
have fallen into place.
Iowa will keep its Jan. 3 caucus
date despite Nevada's move, Iowa
GOP chairman Matt Strawn said
Saturday.
SThe Republican presidential con-
tenders are free to shift their cam-
paigns into high gear with the first
stop on the road to the GOP nomi-
nation set for Iowa in just 10 weeks.
"Now you'll see the campaigns
ramp up very quickly," said Michael
Dennehy, a New Hampshire


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this June 24 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Utah Gov.
Jon Huntsman, and his wife, Mary Kaye, talk to the media during a'campaign


stop at the Reno Rodeo in Reho, Nev.

Republican operative who led Sen.
John McCain's political operation
four years ago and was a central
player in the Granite State's boycott
push in recent weeks.
Nevada's shift ensures the state
won't suffer penalties expected for
states that violated national party
rules by skipping ahead to boost
their political influence. Nevada
Republicans also stand to earn
some perks at the party's national
convention in Florida next August.
As part of negotiations in recent
days, the Republican National
Committee promised Nevada del-
egates they could sit on the floor
"in the best positions," and would
have prime hotel space if they
made the, change, according to
Nevada GOP Chairwoman Amy
Tarkanian.
"This will be well worth it" she
said. 'We will be the good guys in
the end because we doh't need to be
New Hampshire's pifiata."
Republican Nevada Gov. Brian
Sandoval endorsed the move, say-
ing it would allow the state GOP to
focus on its principal goal win-
ning elections.
'The move preserves Nevada's
first-in-the-West standing and cre-
ates a scenario where all candidates
will likely compete here," he said in
a statement.
The RNC would not comment on
its specific role in the discussions,
but Chairman Reince Priebus, who
had called for a compromise, praised


Nevada's decision.
"Nevadans should be proud of
their Republican leaders," he said.
'They have restored their state's
key role in the nomination process
and in the 2012 presidential elec-
tion."
The Romney campaign also
played an active, but private, role ,
in the flap.
Campaign. officials initially
encouraged Nevada to schedule
its caucuses before Florida, hoping
that Romney's popularity in Nevada
would fuel a victory there and cre-
ate momentum heading into the
critical Florida contest. But sens-
ing a political backlash in New
Hampshire, Romney representa-
tives in recent days encouraged key
Nevada Republicans to settle on a
later date.
The Romney campaign would not
discuss its actions publicly when
asked Saturday, but did not dispute
its role.
New Hampshire officials were
clearly happy.
"It's a win for the process
and it's certainly a win for New
Hampshire," said Phyllis Woods,
a RNC member from the Granite
State. "Going forward, we really
want to haye Nevada as an ally. We
really don't want to have enemies
as we go into the next primary
calendar."
Also Saturday, Nevada Democrats
said they would hold their caucuses
on Jan. 21.


WALK: Making strides against cyctic fibrosis


Continued From Page 1A

them. It says a lot about Columbia
County and people from the sur-
rounding counties that could come
out, especially Florida Gateway
College."
Patricia Orender, a Florida
Gateway College employee, said
Columbia County had a cystic fibro-
sis walk about seven years ago and
event organizers wanted to start it
up again.
"By doing this we've raised aware-
ness of cystic fibrosis," she said. "It
only affects about 30,000 children in
the United States and about 70,000
worldwide. But it's a really devastat-
ing genetic disease because right
now they are only really growing
into their 30s or 40s before an early
death."
During the event's opening cer-
emonies, an announcement was
made indicating research had
resulted in two new medications,
one of which was presented to
the Food and Drug Administration
earlier this week and could be


on the market within six months.
The medication could help up to
four percent of the cystic fibrosis
population.
The second medication, which
could become available within the
next year, will have an impact
on 90 percent of cystic fibrosis
patients.
"The medications*are changing
the gene shapes so it decreases
the signs and symptoms of the
disease," Orender said.
Claudia Werner, North Florida
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation execu-
tive director, said the event was
organized by a volunteer. She said
representatives from her group
took note and got involved.
"We have well over 150 people
here and that's very, very notable
for a first year event," she said.
Organizers were hoping to raise
$5,000 with the Saturday's Great
Strides Cystic Fibrosis Walk fund-
raiser.
"We will achieve that," Werner-


said.
She said organizers plan to
hold another Great Strides Cystic
Fibrosis fundraising walk locally
in the near future.
"We're of the belief that once
you start a Great Strides it lives
forever until we cure this disease,"
Werner said. "We expect to do
another one here and we just need
to figure out when.
"Any time you can raise aware-
ness of the needs to support the
CF Foundation, it's a good thing,"
Werner continued. "People with
Cystic Fibrosis live in all sorts of
towns, big.and small, across the
United States."
Taylor said she was pleased
organizers are considering holding
another Cystic Fibrosis fundraising
event here next year.
"I am so excited," she said. "My
thought is let's keep doing this until
we actually get this cured and then
find something else to find a cure
for."


WATER: 155 million gallons per day allowed

Continued From Page 1A


dinator, believes his coun-
ty's historically low water
table is a direct result of the
draw down. The Hamilton
County Commission
recently passed a resolu-
tion opposing removal of
water from the aquifer for
use in Jacksonville.
Johnson believes the
combined influence of
three counties could gen-
erate enough support to
overturn the permit.
"I would say we are very
alarmed aboutthis," he said.
"Our rivers and streams are
the mainstream of our tour-


ism. It's very important.
Studies show our low water
table is directly connected
to the draw down."
Johnson said the
Jacksonville Electric
Authority could use
desalinated water from
the Atlantic Ocean to
cool equipment instead of
endangering water levels
in the region.
Long said the science
showing the harm to local
waterways is "irrefutable."
"It's so horrible, people
don't want to believe it,"
she said.


Long said dozens of
lakes are now dry because
so much water has been
drawn from the aquifer.
"There is nothing any-


one in our district can do,"'
Long said. "It's going to be
really hard to grow with-
out water."


WINS: Foreign policy

Continued From Page 1A


against Barack Obama."
It referred to the stall-
ing tactic that Senate
Republicans frequently use
to kill Democratic bills even
though they hold only 47 of
the chamber's 100 seats.
These Democrats hope
people will see a bold and
capable president who
keeps his promises when
Republicans don't create
roadblocks. They note that
he approved the raid to kill
bin Laden in Pakistan on
May 1 and policies that led
to last month's drone-mis-
sile killing of American-
born al-Qaida figure Anwar
al-Awlaki in Yemen; backed
allied actions that led to
Libyan leader Moammar
Gadhafi's ouster and death;
and ended U.S. involvement
in Iraq on schedule.
"It is very important
for any incumbent to be
able to talk about promises
made and promises kept,"
Finney said. The list of
achievements, contrasted
with President George W.
Bush's erroneous claims
about Iraq's weaponry in
the first place, should help
Democrats shake their
image of being the weaker
party on national security,
she said.
'That baggage is finally
lifted," Finney said.
Translating that claim
into votes for Obama 13
months from now may be
difficult, however. The latest
Associated Press-GfK poll
confirmed that Americans
place far greater emphasis
on domestic issues, espe-
- cially the economy, than' on
foreign matters, including
the fight against terrorism.
The poll found Obama's
overall approval rating at
a new low, 46 percent, for
the second straight month,
even though 64 percent
Sof adults approved of his
handling of terrorism. Only
40 percent approved of his
handling of the economy.,.:
Ninety-three percent of
those questioned said the
economy was an extremely
or very important issue. By
comparison, 73 percent put
the same emphasis on ter-


rorism.
Democratic officials
believe Obama's foreign.
policy record will look even
better when the Republican
presidential candidates
hold a debate on that topic
Nov. 15. Leading contend-
ers Mitt Romney and Rick
Perry are current or for-,
mer governors, and busi-
nessman Herman Cain has
never held public office.
None has extensive foreign
policy experience.
But voters routinely.
accept that. In recent ,
presidential elections they'
have chosen governors'
from Georgia, California,'
Arkansas and Texas, plus a
first-term senator, Obama.
On Friday, Romney and:
Perry criticized Obama's
handling of Iraq. Some
Democrats found Romney's
remarks exceptionally
harsh.
"President Obama's
astonishing failure to
secure an orderly transi-
tion in Iraq has unnecessar-
ily put at risk the victories
that.were won through the
blood and sacrifice of thou-
sands of American men
and women," Romney said.
"The unavoidable question
is whether this decision is
the result of a naked politi-
cal calculation or simply
sheer ineptitude in negotia-
tions with the Iraqi govern-
ment."
Obama's defenders fired
back. "Is there anything
more hollow than Mitt.
Romney decrying 'politi-
cal considerations' in deci-.
,sion-making?" said former
White House spokesman
Bill Burton.
-Perry said in a statement
"I'm deeply concerned that
President Obama is putting
political expediency ahead'
of sound military and secu-
rity judgment by announc-
ing an end to troop level
negotiati6fis and a with-
drawal' frdni raq 'by year's
end." He said Obama "was
slow to engage the Iraqis'
and there's little evidence
today's decision is based on
advice from military com-
manders."


HOSPITAL: 100 years

Continued From Page 1A


and updated feel, making it
more user-friendly.
"We are honored to serve
this community for. 100
years. We are excited for
the future of this hospital,"
Sherrod said.
"I am honored to work
with an outstanding team
of physicians and staff that
are committed to delivering
high quality health care,"
she said. "Our goal is to
keep health care local,"
Sherrod said.
Improvements are also in
the works for the hospital's
other floors, Sherrod said.
The intensive care unit
on the third floor will be
expanded and the fourth
floor obstetrics unit remod-


eled.
The first floor renova- -
tions cost about $2 mil-'
lion and were paid for
by Health Management
Associates, which holds a
60 percent share in the hos-
pital. The third and fourth
floor remodeling will cost.
about $4 million and will be'::
paid for by the Lake Shore
Hospital Authority Board,
Sherrod said.
"It's awesome," said Dr.4
Emad Atta, a hospital ob-
gyn, of the new look. He
said when the obstetrics
unit is remodeled it will.
be a nice atmosphere for
expecting mothers. "It'll
make people come back
again."


OB/
DA A GREENE, MD
"WE ARE WOMEN, WE ARE MOTHER'S, WE UNDERSTAND'














FREE pregnancy tests in the office and
offering DaVinci Robotic Surgeries.
SPECIALIZING IN: New Patients Welcome
* Non-Invasive Laparoscopic
Gynecological Surgery Call today for a
" Adolescent Gynecology personal appointment:
" High and Low Risk Obstetrics 386-755-0500
N Contraception
" Delivering at Shands Lake Shore 449 SE Soya Dri
SIn-Office ultrmoundfa or our patients ae Cnoy, Floedo 32025
S3D/AD Enteraiinmen Scans
S. .s


3A


LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428













OPINION


Sunday, October 23, 201 I


OUR ANOTHER


OUR
OPINION


Worth


the wait

Disappointing as
it was to learn
Tuesday's tri-
county meeting
to discuss water
strategy had been postponed
(see story, Page 1A), the rea-
son not only made sense but
was somewhat encouraging.
So many public and private
citizens had expressed interest
in attending that the venue, a
renovated train depot in Live
Oak, wouldn't likely hold them
all.
Good reason to wait
We want a packed house,
but we want it to be a really
big one.
The issue here is one that
affects everyone in the most
fundamental way.
If the Jacksonville Electric
Authority, aided by the St.
Johns Water Management
District, continues with its plan
to pull 155 million gallons of
water a day from the Floridan
Aquifer for the next 20 years,
we and bur neighbors in
Suwannee, Hamilton and else-
where might soon be facing
trouble of a sort we can't now
fathom.
Water is our lifeblood, but
not just in terms of biological
necessity. North Florida's natu-
ral springs are the economic
engine that drives tourism, the
force we hope will propel us,
well into the new century.
Some of these springs, most
notably that which gave the
town of White Springs its name,
have already gone dry. There's
no cause to wait for more of the
landscape to wither..
We know JEA isn't the only
culprit but it's very likely the
largest. That and the fact these
permits are usually granted for
just-five years not 20 really
makes one sit up and take
notice.
St. Johns officials say they're
willing to work with their
North Florida counterparts on
the matter, but we're not quite
sure what that means.
We're not giving up on this
one anytime soon, folks.
We'll let you know when
the meeting's rescheduled.
Meanwhile, be ready to block
out a few hours of yofr sched-
ule in the next few weeks
to let the powers that be in
Northeast Florida know just
where you stand.

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LE T.TERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


it that the occu-
pation of Wall
Street seems to be
spreading rapidly?
Not very, considering the eco-
nomic distress caused by almost
unlimited greed among money
managers, venture capitalists
and chief executive officers
here and abroad who receive
huge personal benefits despite a
growing pressure on their busi-
nesses.
It had to happen sooner or
later in an economic climate
plagued by a ruptured hous-
ing market, nearly double digit
joblessness, loss of confidence
by consumers and an increas-
ing income gap between the top
and bottom. With the Internet
revealing to the masses the
astronomical compensation for
those responsible for much
of the problem, it is actually a
wonder that widespread protest
hadn't begun earlier.
Add to that the fact that mil-
lions of American taxpayers are
increasingly unhappy about bail-
ing out those who control the
-money flow only to find credit
tight and increasing joblessness
and the country is ripe for a
long period of unrest From this
set of circumstances, revolu-
tions are born.
Ironically, these protests
come as Goldman Sachs just
reppoted its first quarterly loss
in years and predictions of less-
er profits abound. Wells Fargo
and Chase Bank, however,
reported record third quarter
profits despite regulations that
force the giant financial institu-
tions to revert to a more tradi-
tional role without the record
revenues produced by propri-
etary business.


www.lakecityreporter.com


Dan K.Thomasson
Huge compensation packag-
es, golden parachutes and major
stock options to those who. are
presiding over even struggling
corporations are not the stuff of
good public relations, especially
since millions of Americans
are frying to find a job that will
allow them to eat on a regular
basis.
That's the.door a whole
bunch of us walked through to
get into this world in the 1930s
and. most of us would just as
soon not have to go out the
same way. So a little compas-
sion and common sense on the
part of those.guiding what we
once thought was the great-
est industrial nation ever seen
would help. Salaries in the mil-
lions aren't conducive to good
feelings between those who
have and those who don't. And
if you think for a moment that
the next election won't reflect
this you are dead wrong. No
one wants to destroy the wealth
incentive. But there is rich and
then there is RICH! Ore is
desirable but the other can be
particularly treacherous during
hard times.
I have seen any number of
bad decisions that were debili-
tating to employees and to the
spirit of a company when the
people who made them were
rewarded with special consider-
ations. One set of officials about
whom I have some knowledge


abolished A still quite viable and
profitable property out of a fit
of pique, throwing several thou-
sand workers to the wolves and
justifying the whole business by
contending that it all would have
happened eventually and that.
the overall health of the com-
pany was made more secure by
their hasty decision. They then
gave themselves large bonuses.
It is all part of the same pat-
tern that has stimulated the "99
Percent" protesters and made
us all a little more uncomfort-
able. The American dream we
have consistently pledged to .
our young men and women is
.slipping rapidly away. Gloom
and doom, huh? You bet. But
the impact of all this will be felt
at the polls for those politicians
who don't get the. message.
The country is in one heck of
a shape and someone needs
to answer for it as unwilling as
they seem to be to do so.
The Congress pathetically
refuses and the White House
matches that with schemes it
knowsavon't fly but satire sound
good. Where is the leadership?
Perhaps the Wall Street tycoons
and their kin around the globe
might start leading by example,
bringing their own greed under
control. How can we be in such
shape and remain at the top of
the world's economic ladder?
We can't and every day the
news makes that clearer.
As I said, are you surprised
about the growing number of
protesters? I must say that one
group had a good idea. They
pitched their symbolic tett in a
bar.

Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service.


Free trade agreements good news


Adam'Smith, master-
ful 18th century
analyst of emerging
industrial capitalism,
wrote that "individu-
al ambition serves the common
good."
After four years delay,
Congress has ratified free trade
agreements with Colombia,
Panama and South Korea.
Congressional approval was
timed to coincide with the visit
of South Korean President Lee
Myung-bak. He faces no short-
age of challenges and conflicts
at home, not least the always
dangerous and recently lethal
long-term military standoff with
North Korea. In stark strategic
terms, this treaty will help him
bolster influence at homw as
well as abroad.
The agreements generated
bipartisan support in Cotigress,
Normally warring 1 )eocratts
and Republicans have found
temporary consensus ou intter-


Arthur I. Cyr
acyricaJthoge.edu
national trade. That is no small
accomplishment when U.S.
unemployment remains at the
high level of approximately 9
percent and the occupant of the
White House has his principal
political base in the left wing of
the Democratic Party, where
plr'lc i.iislidil sentiment runs
strong.
Colombia for years has
been plagued by the FARC, an
teormous drug-based criminal
enterprise. For a time, expand-
ing U.S. Pentagon involvement
encouraged eerie parallels with
American military entrapment


in Vietnam in the early 1960s.
However, the FARC is now con-
tained. The trade accord can
help that process.
Panama has a distinctive
history as a country liter-
ally carved out by Theodore
Roosevelt's administration to
construct the Panama Canial.
South Korea reflects other
Asian economies in abandon-
ing previous protectionism
designed to shelter promising
but weak domestic enterprises.
Following the Korean War, the
nation was among the poorest
in the world, but today ranks
among the richest and most
productive economies. The
Korea Institute for International
Economic Policy has predicted
that exports under the new
agreement will expand initially
by 12 percent annually, and
grow more in future years.
* Arthur I. Cyr is Clausen
Distinguished Professor at
Carthage College.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


One more

reason for

foreign aid

The death of
Moammar Gadhafi
on Thursday was
a victory for the
Libyan people,
for the NATO coalition, for
U.S. forces and for President
Barack Obama's foreign
policy vision of "leading from
behind." Criticism of the effort
to oust the Lilyan dictator -
that it was unfocused and too
slow looks silly in retrospect.
Even Sen. John McCain, no .,
fan of the president, said the
administration "deserves cred-
it" for the outcome.
And yet the wild swings
in the Libya campaign are a
reminder that events in the
broader Middle East are best
understood over time, pot
judged by way of the 24-hour
cable-hews cycle. Gadhafi's
end is a major milestone, but
it will be years before we can
accurately assess what has
happened in the past seven
months. What happens from
now on will be just as essential
to that assessment as Gadhafi's
death.
Gadhafi demolished the
country's civic structure over
40 years, and its inexperienced
new leaders must rebuild their
nation from scratch. Obama
pledged Thursday that the
United States will support
them, but our ability to do so
is constrained. Congress cut.
$8 billion from the foreign -
aid budget in the spring, and
House Republicans proposed
an additional $12 billion cut
this fiscal year 20 percent.
The Senate, controlled by
Democrats, has proposed
smaller but still significant
cuts.
The New York Times
reported this month that these
cuts already were limiting the
State Department's ability to
assist the people of Tunisia and
Egypt, who rose up to oust dic-
tators this year.
Understanding of the value
of international development
work is shockingly absent
among some budget-cutting
zealots. The GOP candidates
for president all seem to favor
cutting if not eliminating for-
eign aid. Rep. Kay Granger
of Texas, chairwoman of the
House subcommittee oversee-
ing foreign affairs, recently
told the Times her reaction to
the United States' sending $250
Million to Pakistan for flood
relief: "I said I think that's bad
policy and bad politics. What
are you going to say to people
in the United States who are
having flooding?"
You're going to help them
too, of course. America is still
the wealthiest nation on Earth.
Slashing foreign aid, which
is less than 1 percent of the
federal budget, will lead to more
military spending. It would be
smarter to make modest trims
to the far larger Pentagon bud-
get so that the State Department
can continue to pursue develop-
ment and diplomacy alongside
our military missions.
That fits with Obama's view
that America doesn't need to
carry a big stick to get big
results. The proof is the killing
of Osama bin Laden and other
al-Qaida leaders. In Libya,
we got the job done by work-
ing with our NATO allies and
remaining behind the scenes
while using our intelligence
and technological capabilities.
Democracy is marching on
in the Middle East, but there's
no guarantee that will continue
or that it will go in a direction
beneficial to the U.S. Remember
Hamas' victory among the
Palestinians. Continuing to sup-


port freedom fighters through
diplomacy and foreign aid is the
best way to ensure we will not
be called upon to fight again.
E San Jose Mercury News


Wall Street protesters


have a point










LAKE CITY REPORTER INTERNATIONAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


Saudi heir's death brings conservative to fore


By ABDULLAH AL-SHIHRI and
BRIAN MURPHY
Associated Press

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -
Saudi Arabia's ruling mon-
archy moved into a criti-
cal period of realignment
Saturday after the death
of the heir to the throne
opened the way for a new
crown prince: most likely a
tough-talking interior min-
ister who has led crack-
downs on Islamic militants
but also has shown favor to
ultraconservative traditions
such as keeping the ban on
women voting.
A state funeral is planned
for Tuesday in Riyadh for
crown prince Sultan bin
Abdul-Aziz Al Saud, who
died in New York at the age
of 80 after an unspecified
illness, the official Saudi
Press Agency said.
Now, Saudi rulers are
expected to move quickly
to name the new king-in-
waiting '- which royal
protocol suggests will be
Sultan's half brother, Prince
Nayef.
Moving Nayef to the top
of the succession ladder
would not likely pose any
risks to Saudi Arabia's pro-
Western policies and, in
particular, its close alliance
with Washington. But Nayef
cuts a much more mercu-
rial figure than Saudi's cur-
rent leader, the ailing King
Abdullah, who has nudged
ahead with reforms such
as promising women voting
rights in 2015 despite rum-
blings from the country's
powerful religious estab-
lishment.
Nayef, 78, has earned
U.S. praise for unleashing
the internal security forces
against suspected Islamic
extremist cells in Saudi
Arabia, which- was home
to 15 of 19 of the Sept 11
hijackers. Yet he brought
blistering rebukes in the
West for a 2002 interview
that quoted him as saying
that "Zionists" a refer-
ence to Jews benefit-
ed from the 9-11 attacks
because it turned world
opinion against Islam and
Arabs.
Nayef also has expressed
displeasure at some of
Abdullah's moves for more
openness, saying in 2009
that he saw no need for
women to vote or partici-
pate in politics. It's a view
shared by many Saudi
clerics, who follow a strict
brand of Islam known as
Wahhabism. Their support
gives the Saudi monarchy
the legitimacy to rule over
a nation holding Islam's
holiest sites.
"Nayef is more religious,
and is closer to the Saudi
groups who are very criti-
cal of the king's decisions
regarding women and
other steps he's taken to
balance out the rigid reli-
gious practices in society,"
said Ali Fakhro, a political
analyst and commentator
in Bahrain.
But it remains doubt-
ful that Nayef if ever
made king would out-
right annul Abdullah's
reforms, which include the
establishment of a coed
university where both gen-
ders can mix. More likely,
Nayef would put any fur-
ther changes on hold, said
Abdulkhaleq Abdulla, a
political affairs professor at
Emirates University.
"It's not good news for
Saudis or for the region," he
said. "(Nayef) is the security
guy. He is the mukhabarat
(secret police) guy. He is
the internal affairs guy."
Although it's not certain
that Nayef will be selected
to succeed Sultan, the signs
point clearly in that direc-
tion.
After Sultan fell ill two


years ago, Nayefwas named
second deputy prime minis-
ter, traditionally the post
right behind the crown
prince. For the first time,
however, the mechanism of
picking the next No. 2 .in
the royal succession is not
entirely clear.
Traditionally, the king
names his successor. But


this time it is possible
that Abdullah will put the
decision to the Allegiance
Council, a 33-member body
composed of his brothers
and cousins. Abdullah cre-
ated the council as part
of his reforms and gave it
a mandate to choose the
heir.
Abdullah formed the
council in order to modern-
ize the process and give a
wider voice. When it was
created, it was decided that
the council would choose
the heir for the first time
when Sultan rose to the
throne, and his crown
prince would need to be
named. But it was not speci-
fied whether it would be
used if Sultan died before
the king.
The choice of whether
to convene the council now
will likely be made by the
87-year-old Abdullah, who
is. currently 'recovering
from his third operation to
treat ba6k problems in less
than a year.
"It is with deep sorrow
and grief that the Custodian
of the Two Holy Mosqdes
King Abdullah mourns
the loss of his brother and
Crown Prince, His Royal
Highness Prince Sultan,"
the palace said in a state-
ment announcing Sultan's
death.
The announcement did
not elaborate on his ill-
ness. According to a leaked
U.S. diplomatic cable from
January 2010, Sultan had
been receiving treatment
for colon cancer since.
2009.
Sultan was the kingdom's
defense minister in 1990
when U.S. forces deployed
in Saudi Arabia to defend it
against Iraqi forces that had
overrun Kuwait His son,
Prince Khaled, served as
the top Arab commander in
the 1991 operation Desert
Storm, in which U.S.-led
troops drove the Iraqis out
of Kuwait.
. As defense minister,
Sultan closed multibillion-
dollar deals to establish the
modern Saudi armed forc-
es, including land, air, naval
and air defense forces. On
more than one occasion,
the deals implicated several
of his sons in corruption
scandals charges they
have denied.
Sultan is survived by
32 children from multiple
wives:They include Bandar,
the former ambassador to
the United States who now
heads the National Security
Council, and Khaled,
Sultan's assistant in the
Defense Ministry.
U.S. President Barack
Obama called the prince "a
valued friend of the United
States" in a statement of
condolence. "He was a
strong supporter of 'the
deep and enduring partner-
ship between our two coun-
tries forged almost seven
,decades ago."
"He will be missed,"
said U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton during a visit
to Tajikistan. "Our relation-
ship with Saudi Arabia is
strong and enduring and we
will look forward to working
with the leadership for many
years to come."
Britain's foreign secre-
tary, William Hague, said
Sultan served his country
with "great dignity and ded-
ication."
Saudi Arabia has been
ruled since 1953 by the
sons of its founder, King
Abdul-Aziz, who had more
than 40 sons by multiple
wives. Sultan was part of the
aging second generation of
Abdul-Aziz's sons, includ-
ing Nayef, the full brother
of the late King Fahd, who
died in 2005.
While Nayef has taken
only minor roles in foreign


affairs, he has been outspo-
ken in one of Saudi Arabia's
chief regional concerns:
ambitions by rival Iran to
expand its influence in the
Middle East
Earlier this year, he
blamed the Shiite power
for encouraging protests
among Saudi Arabia's
minority Shiites.


Then U.S. Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger takes leave of Saudi defense minister Prince Sultan bin Abdel Aziz after a
meeting at the Saudi minister's residence in Paris in this May 12, 1983 file photo. The heir to the Saudi throne, Crown Prince
Sultan bin Abdel Aziz, died abroad Saturday after an illness, state TV said. He was 85 years old.



Banks nowhere near deal on Greece


By GABRIELE STEINHAUSER
AP Business Writer

BRUSSELS A top bank
lobbyist insisted Saturday
that banks and the euro-
zone are far from reaching
a deal to cut Greece's debt,
despite claims by eurozone
finance ministers that they
will ask banks to take steep-
er losses on their Greek
bonds.
Although the ministers
did not say how much of a
cut they are aiming for, a
report from Greece's inter-
national debt inspectors
suggested that the value of
Greece's bonds may have
to be slashed as much as 60
percent to get the country
solvent enough to repay its
debt
TheministersonSaturday
sent their chief negotiator,
Vittorio Grilli, to start dis-
cussions with banks and
other private investors on a
new deal for Greece.
However, Charles Dallara,
the managing director of
the Institute of International
Finance, which has been
'leading the negotiations,
said in an interview with
The Associated Press that


an agreement remained
elusive.
"We're nowhere near a
deal," he said.
Banks in July agreed
to accept 21 percent loss-
es on their Greek bonds.
However, eurozone leaders .
have since reopened the
deal and Greece's interna-
tional debt inspectors -
the so-called troika of the
European Commission, the
European Central Bank and
the International Monetary
Fund have said that
Greece's economic'situa-
tion has deteriorated dra-
matically since the sum-
mer.
They said that under the
July deal, Greece would
need an extra 252 billion
($347 billion) in loans from
the eurozone and the IMF
- on top of the 110 billion
($152 billion) it has been
relying on to pay bills since
May 2010.
But Dallara said new
plans to slash Greece debt
would still leave the coun-
try as "a ward of Europe"
for years.
He declined to say how
much in losses banks would
be willing to accept.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Managing Director of the IMF Christine Lagarde, right, greets
Spanish Finance Minister Elena Salgado during a meeting of
EU finance ministers at the EU Council building in Brussels
on Saturday. Eurozone finance ministers said Saturday they
have agreed that banks should accept substantially bigger
losses on their Greek bonds, with a new report suggesting
that writedowns of up to 60 percent may be necessary.


Shark'kills American diver off Australia


By ROD McGUIRK
Associated Press

CANBERRA, Australia-
A great white shark killed
an American recreational
diver on Saturday in a third
fatality in recent weeks off
southwest Australia that
has shaken beach-loving
residents and sparked fears
of a rogue predator target-
ing humans.
Australia averages fewer
than two fatal shark attacks
a year nationwide.
The state government
has promised to hunt the
killer and is considering
more aircraft surveillance
off west coast beaches as
whales migrating in larg-
er numbers attract more
sharks.
The first sign that the
32-year-old American man,
whose name and hometown
have not been released,
was in trouble as he dived
alone was when a stream
of bubbles erupted on the
ocean surface beside his
25-foot (8-meter) dive boat;
police said.
His two horrified com-
panions on the boat saw his
lifeless body surface and
a 10-foot (3-meter) great
white swim away, Western
Australia Police Sgt. Gerry
Cassidy said.
The shark struck 500
yards (meters) north of the
picturesque tourist haven
of Rottnest Island, which


is 11 miles (18 kilometers)
west of a popular Perth
city beach where a 64-year-
old Australian swimmer-is
believed to have been taken
by a great white on Oct 10.
Authorities cannot say
whether the American was
killed by the same shark
that is believed to have
taken Bryn Martin as he
made his regular morn-
ing swim from Perth's
Cottesloe Beach toward a
buoy about 380 yards (350
meters) offshore.
But an analysis of
Martin's torn swimming
trunks recovered from
the seabed near the buoy
pointed to a great white
shark being the culprit. No
other trace of Martin has
been found.
"It's a cloudy old day




IA l Ao l ml


today which is the same
as we had the other day
with Cottesloe, and they're
the conditions that sharks
love," Cassidy said.
The American had a
work visa and had been
living in a Perth beachside
suburb north of Cottesloe
for several months.
The tragedies follow
the death on Sept. 4 of


21-year-old bodyboarder
Kyle Burden, whose legs
were bitten off by a shark
described as 15 feet (4.5
peters) long at a beach
south of Perth. Witnesses
were unsure of the type of
shark.
Perth is the capital of
Western Australia state and
one of Australia's largest
cities.


I Florida
SCredit Union



CD Specials


25-Month Special



36-Month Special


- 1.07% APY



- 1.61% APY


* $10,000 Minimum


583 West Duval Street
Lake City


755-4141
www.flcu.org


Deposits are federally insured by the NCUA a US Goernmment Agency, for up to $250,000. Annual
Perentage Yield (APY) effective 9/2/2011 and subject to change at any ime. Offer expires 9/30/2011. "CUA


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428









LAKE CITY REPORTER OBITUARIES SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


Iraqis face future without US troops


By LARA JAKES and
REBECCA SANTANA
Associated Press

BAGHDAD For
the first time in decades,
Iraqis face a future on their
own, with neither Saddam
Hussein's iron fist nor the
United States' military might
to hold them together. This
has been both their dream
and nightmare: They want-
ed American troops (the
occupiers) to go, but they
wanted American troops
(the protectors) to stay.
Now many fear an
increase in violence, grow-
ing Iranian influence and
political turmoil after
President Barack Obama's
definitive announcement
that all U.S. forces will leave
by the end of the year.
In conversations with
The Associated Press,
Iraqis across the political,
religious and geographic
spectrum on Saturday
questioned what more than
eight years of war and tens
of thousands of Iraqi and
U.S. lives lost had wrought
on their country. They won-
dered how their still strug-
gling democracy could face
the challenges ahead.
"Neither the Iraqis nor
the Americans have won
here," said Adnan Omar,
a Sunni from the northern
Iraqi city of Kirkuk.
Rifaat Khazim, a Shiite
from the southern city of
Basra, said, "I do not think
that this withdrawal will
bring anything better to Iraq
or that Iraqi leaders will be
able to achieve stability and
security in this country
Most of the Iraqis yearn
now for Saddam's time.
Now, Iraq is defenseless in
the face of the threats by
the neighboring countries."
Across the country there
was a strong sense of disbe-.
lief. The Americans, having
spent hundreds of billions
of dollars, lost nearly 4,500
troops' lives and built up
sprawling bases as big as
many Iraqi cities, would
never really leave, many
Iraqis thought. Some cel-
ebrated the exit of foreign
occupiers and the emer-
gence of real sovereignty.
Bht there was also an appre-
hension, almost a sense of
resignation, that things will
get worse.
Though greatly reduced
from the depths of near
civil war from 2006 to 2008,
shooting and bombings rat-
tle Iraqis daily. Significantly
all the elements from those
darkest days remain: al-
Qaida militants, Shiite
militias, Sunni insurgents.
Resentment still simmers
among the Sunni Muslim
minority over domination by
the Shiite majority, Kurds
in the north still hold aspi-
rations of breaking away.
Despite years of promises
of better government set-
vices, most of the country
gets by on a few hours of
electricity a day.
In the eyes of Iraqis, the
Americans were both the
cause of those woes and
the bulwark against them
exploding. Many blame the
2r 33 U.S.-led invasion for
.ileashing all the demons
kept bottled up by Saddam's
dictatorship, and allowing
new ones like al-Qaida
to slip in.
Yet at the same time,
U.S. troop reinforcements
helped rein them in by
2008. Many feel the pow-
erful American presence
prevents Iraqi politicians
from dragging the country
into the worst of sectarian
reprisals and hatreds. Few
believe Iraqi forces are up
to keeping security or can
avoid falling into the same
'sectarian splits.
"After the American with-
drawal, the security in Iraq


will definitely deteriorate.
More attacks by al-Qaida
are likely to happen," said
Dhia Abdullah, a Shiite
from eastern Baghdad.
"The security elements are
not loyal to Iraq but to par-
ties and militias therefore
the security situation will
be very bad after the with-
drawal."


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Iraqi men watch U.S. President Barack Obama's speech on television at a coffee shop in Baghdad, Iraq on Saturday. Iraq's prime minister says disagree-
ments about legal protection for U.S. soldiers scuttled months of negotiations to keep American troops in Iraq beyond this year. Nouri al-Maliki told reporters
Saturday that he still wants American help in training Iraqi forces to use military equipment Baghdad is buying from the United States.


Charles David Dolamore
Mr. Charles David Dolamore,
78, of Lake City, passed away
early.Friday morning, October
21, 2011 at his residence follow-
ing an extended illness. A native
of Elyria, Ohio, Mr. Dolamore
had been a resident of Lake City
since 1999 having moved here
from Houston, Texas. Mr. Dol-
amore graduated in 1951 from
the Elyria District Catholic High
School in Elyria, Ohio and went
on to graduate from Capitol
Radio Engineering in Washing-
ton D.C. and received his B.S.
Degree in Vo-Tech Education
from the University of Central
Florida. He was a veteran of
the United States Army having
served during the Korean Con-
flict. Mr. Dolamore worked as
an engineer for many years prior
to retiring. He worked with Lo-
rain Products in Lorain, Ohio;
the Martin-Marietta Defense
Plant in Orlando, Florida and
finally with Lockheed-Martin
and the NASA Space Center in
Houston, Texas. Mr. Dolamore
was a very active member of the
Elk's Lodge for more than thirty
years. He was an extremely tal-
ented, self taught musician who
could play many different in-
struments and he loved to golf.
Mr. Dolamore was a member of
Epiphany Catholic Church.
Mr. Dolamore is survived by
his wife offifty-five years, Pat
Dolamore of Lake City; his
mother, Mary Dolamore of Eu-
stis, Florida; three sons, Larry
Dolamore (Sue) Asheville,






"Your Image is Our Image"


Announcing


"Image"


Skin


Care


Clinical


Grade Peels
1(I/(ll' Deep Jines
L"'ilten m, d Brilqten I l i
*Iffralae / nn' riuiltine

t.uilch time 4 Ilay'r Ieel

386-758-2088
Please call to schedule
aKaren C. green, cmp
Skin Specialist


North Carolina; Bill Dol-
amore (Barbara) Gainesville,
Florida; Tom Dolamore (Stacy)
Greenville, South Carolina;
two daughters, Kathy Gould
(Linden) Casselbery, Florida
and Jeanne Anderson (Mike)
of Lake City, Florida; and his
brother, Harland Dolamore of
Tavares, Florida. Ten grandchil-
dren and three great-grandchil-
dren also survive.
Funeral services for Mr.
Dolamore will be conducted at
2:00 P.M. on Tuesday, October
25, 2011 in the Chapel of the
Dees-Parrish Family Funeral
Home with Father Michael Pen-
dergraft officiating. Interment
will be held later in the week
in the St. Mary's Cemetery in
Elyria, Ohio. The family will
receive friends in the chapel for
one hour prior to the funeral
service. In lieu of flowers the
family requests that memorial
contributions be made to the
St. Jude Children's Research
Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Dept.
142, Memphis, TN 38148.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 South Marion Ave., Lake
City, FL 32025. (386)752-1234
please sign our online family
guestbook at parrishfamilyfu-
neralhome.com
Thomas E. Booth
Mr. Thomas E. Booth, 68, of
Fort White, passed away peace-
fully late Friday evening Oc-
tober 21, 2011 at his residence
following an extended illness. A



BATHROOM

RENU


904-652-5449

We understand
the importance
of price and
customer service

Solid Surface
bathtub liners and
wall surrounds
(lifetime warranty)

Special needs bathing
& showering systems
Bathtub to shower
conversions

100% Financing
available @ 0% O.A.C.

Call us today for
a free in home
estimate !


OBITUARIES

native of High Springs, Florida
Mr. Booth was the son of the
late Melvin and Bernice Ingram
Booth. Mr. Booth was a lifelong
resident of the area having
moved just across the county
line into the Fort White area of
Columbia County many years
ago. Mr. Booth very proudly
served as a Deputy Sheriff with
the Columbia County Sheriffs
Office for eighteen years prior
to retiring. During that time he
was awarded the Medal of Valor
for his act of endangering his
own life to save the lives of oth-
ers. In his spare time he enjoyed
fishing, wood working and
riding his motorcycle. He was
a member of the High Springs
Church of God.
Mr. Booth is survived by his,
wife of fifty-one years, Emma
Jean Beasley Booth; his daugh-
ters, Janice Peacock (Nicky) of
High Springs, Florida; Karon
Cribbs (David) of Fort White,
Florida; and Nancy Bednarek
(Tom) ofAlachua, Florida; a
brother, George Booth (Pat) of
Fort White, Florida; and a sister
Dorothy Cribbs (Byron) Fort
White. Five grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren also
survive.
Funeral services for Mr. Booth
will be conducted at 10:00 A.M.
on Tuesday, October 25, 2011
in the Chapel of the Dees-Par-
rish Family Funeral Home with
Rev. Glen Barrs, Bro. Zack
Douglas, Rev. Marc Pargo and
Rev. Brian Coleman officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in
the Old Providence Baptist
Church Cemetery. The family


will receive friends from 5:00-
7:00 Monday evening in the
Chapel of the funeral home. The
family is accepting flowers but
if you so choose they request
that memorial donations be
made to Hospice of the Nature
Coast, 150 N. Main Street, High
Springs, FL 32643. Columbia
County Sheriffs Officer's will
serve as Active Pallbearers with
Mr. Booth's nephews, Dennis
Harden, Craig Beasley, Paul
Tomlinson, Michael Tomlinson,
Jeff Hampton, Wayne Poppell,
Jake Beach and Nathan Beasley
serving as Honorary Pallbearers.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of the DEES-PARRISH
FAMILY FUNERAL HOME,
458 South Marion Ave., Lake
City, FL 32025. (386)752-1234
please sign our online family
guestbook at parrishfamilyfu-
neralhome.com

Hubeart Tyre
Mr. Hubeart Tyre, 78, of Lake
Butler, died Friday evening at
the Veterans Administration
Medical Center of Lake City af-
ter an extended illness. Mr. Tyre
was born near Lulu. He lived
in Colorado Springs, Colo. for
12 years before moving to Lake
Butler in 1974. He was a career
serviceman, having retired as
a master sergeant in 1973 from
the U.S. Army after 23 years
of service and participating in
both the Korean Conflict and
the Viet Nam Conflict. He also
worked as a correctional officer
with the Reception and Medical


Center of Lake Butler for 15
years before retiring in 1989.
Mr. Tyre was a lifetime member
of the Lake Butler V.F.W. Post
10082 where he was a former
post commander. He was a
member of the Florida Chapter
90 Disabled American Veterans
and Masonic Lodge #52 of Lake
Butler. He was a member of the
Jacksonville Scottish Rites and
the Lake Butler Order of the .
Eastern Star Chapter #40. He
was a member of Faith Baptist
Church of Lake Butler. He was
born the son of the late Marvin
and Lillie Lee McMikell Tyre.
Mr. Tyre is survived by his
loving wife of53 years, Ruth A.
Tyre of Lake Butler; one son,
Kelly (wife Kathy G.) Tyre of
Lake Butler; two grandchildren,
Staff Sergeant Kelley C. Tyre of
Anchorage, Alaska and Rainor
B. Tyre of Starke; three sisters,
Irita (husband Roger) Richerson
of Lake Butler, Dorthy'M. (hus-
band Dick) Nolan of Lake City
and Evelyna Phipps of Lake
City; one brother, Leroy (wife
Shirley) Stalvey of Lake Butler
and several nieces and nephews.
Memorial services with military
rites will be held Saturday, Oct.
29, 2011, at 11 a.m. at the Faith
Baptist Church of Lake Butler
with Rev. Ralph Durham 4f-
ficiating. Archer Funeral Home *
of Lake Butler is in charge of
arrangements.


Obituaries are paid advertise-
ments. For details, call the Lake
City Reporter's classified depart-
ment at 752-1293.


Make it GROW

For a limited time, Prosperity Bank is offering an exceptional rate on our
"Make it GROW" Money Market Account. Higher interest rates for
higher balances that's one way to make your money grow!



1.00



000 APY*



Come see me today!

Sherri Cassidy
Banking Center Manager
Lake City Banking Center
295 NW Commons Loop, Suite 101 C
386-719-6909

PROSPERITY BANK

*Annual percentage yield (APY) is effective 10/14/11 and guaranteed through June 30, 2012. Offer for
personal and business accounts. APYs are variable and may change after account opening. On balances of
$25,000.00 and above, APY is 1.00%; on balances of $5,000.00 $24,999.99, APY is 1.00%; on balances of
$0.01 $4,999.99, APY is 1.00%. If balance falls below $5,000, a $15 service charge will be applied. Other
fees and restrictions may apply. Fees may reduce earnings. Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender k


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428








LAKE CITY REPORTER NATIONAL SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


WHEN LIFE IS TOO LONG



The debate over older prisoners


By MICHAEL VIRTANEN
Associated Press

DANNEMORA, N.Y.
- Yohannes Johnson is
serving 75 years to life in
a remote upstate New York
prison, behind 30-foot con-
crete walls and locked steel
doors, 300 miles and 30
years and 10 months from
home in New York City.
He measures time in long,
slow, personal change. And
he maintains hope he will,
someday, walk outside the
Clinton Correction Facility.
"One thing I don't do
is subject myself to the
thought I'll never leave
prison," said Johnson, now
55, slender and soft-spoken,
his hair flecked with gray.
He's a convicted robber and
killer and president of the
prison's Lifer's and Long-
Termer's Organization,
part of a growing club of
inmates locked up for life
nationwide. "I can't afford
to do that. I do that, I lose
hope. I lose hope then I
don't care about anything.
I don't care about anything
then I become a detriment
to myself and those around
me."
Now, even corrections
officials are consider-
ing different options for
older inmates while some
research suggests keeping
them locked up until they
die might be an expensive
and unnecessary price for
the public to pay.
Nationally, nearly 10
percent of more than 2.3
million inmates were serv-'
ing life sentences in 2008,
including 41,095 people
doing life without parole,
up 22 percent in five
years, according to The
Sentencing Project, which
advocates alternatives to
prison. The increase result-
ed from lawmakers "dra-
matically" expanding the
types and repeat offenses
that carry potential: life
terms, research analyst
Ashley Nellis said.
"The theme is we're
protecting society, then
the question is: From
what?" said Soffiyah Elijah,
executive director of the
Correctional Association


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Oct. 6 photo, inmates participate in a Liferis and Long-Termeris Organization meeting at Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, N.Y. Participants in
the program are serving long-term or life sentences.


of New York, a watchdog
group. She said with .the
cost of keeping a state
inmate $55,000 a year a
cost that grows as they age
and their medical needs
increase a financial anal-
ysis shows that parole and
probation are far cheaper
punishments that can also
satisfy the public need for
retribution.
Meanwhile, data show
new crimes by convicted
felons steadily declining
from their teens through
their dotage.
"Most criminal behavior
is tied with impulse control.
The section of the brain that
controls impulse control is
the last section of the brain
that becomes fully devel-
oped," Elijah said. There's
a large drop-off in criminal
behavior and recidivism


after 40 or 45, she said, a
point seldom made in pub-
lic discussion "becatise it's
not convenient. It doesn't
dovetail with the kind of
tough-on-crime mentality
that results in votes."
Patricia Gioia, whose
daughter was murdered 26
years ago in California and
who runs the Albany chap-
ter of Parents of Murdered
Children, said killers
should spend their lives
locked up, contemplating
what they did, the person
whose life they took and
the lifelong suffering of
families and friends. 'They
should in effect be pun-
ished for this and should
not enjoy the freedom that
other people have to wvan-
der the world," she said.
The lifers know well the
patterns of youth.


"In the '80s I used to say,
'No, I don't regret nothing.
I'd do it all again,'" Johnson
said. "In the '90s I realized
it was that attitude that got
-me in the position I'm in."
Johnson went to prison
at 17 for attempted rob-
bery and again at 21 for
grand larceny and attempt-
ed weapon, possession. In


1982, at age 24, he was
convicted of murder.
Some of the lifers
and long-termers meet-
ing 'last week discussed
Dannemora's younger pris-
oners, whom they variously
described as still having "a
child-like mentality," over-
riding selfishness, a ten-
dency to respond to difficul-


ties with violence and those
"who just don't know how
to conduct themselves."
"We got a lot of young
brothers in here who are
going to return back to
society," said Doran Evans.
a thick-shouldered man
doing life without parole
for murder. "As lifers we've
got an obligation."


Mass. man goes to trial


on US terror charges


By DENISE LAVOIE
AP Legal Affairs Writer

BOSTON Prosecutors portray Tarek
Mehanna as a terrorist in the making, a
man who tried to help al-Qaida by pro-
moting violent jihad online and traveling
to Yemen to seek training in a terrorist
camp.
But Mehanna's lawyers say he was just
a college kid expressing his political views
the way many people do over the
Internet and no matter how unpopular
his opinions, they are protected by the
First Amendment
As Mehanna goes on trial in Boston
next week, some experts see it as a case
that will test the limits of counter-terror-
ism laws.
"Mehanna's case is a classic example
of the so-called anti-terrorism paradigm
at work, which is prevent the terrorist act
from occurring," said professor Boston
College Law School professor George
Brown, who teaches national security law.
"Now how do you do that? It's this ques-
tion of at what point does the person cross
the line to where they can be prosecuted
for this sort of pre-terrorist activity?" said
Brown.
Jury selection begins Monday in U.S.
District Court
Mehanna, 29, seemed an unlikely ter-
ror suspect He was born in the United
States and grew up in Sudbury, an afflu-
ent suburb west of Boston. His father,
Ahmed Mehanna, was a professor at the
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and
Health Sciences. Tarek earned a doctorate
at the school and taught math and religion
to children at his Worcester mosque.
Prosecutors say Mehanna "radicalized
himself' over the last decade and began
translating and distributing videos and


textbooks intended to encourage others
to participate in violent jihad, including.
a publication entitled "39 Ways to Serve
and Participate in Jihad." They say he got
together with friends who shared similar
views and watched videos of Americans
being beheaded and mutilated overseas.
'This is someone who enjoyed that,"
Assistant U.S. Attorney Aloke Chakravarty
said during a court hearing.
Mehanna was first arrested in 2008,
charged with lying to federal authorities
about the whereabouts of Daniel Maldonado,
a New Hampshire native who was later con-
victed of training at an al-Qaida terrorist
camp in Somalia. Maldonado is now serving
a 10-year prison sentence.
More serious terror-Melated charges
were added against Mehanna in 2009,
including conspiracy to provide material
support to a designated terrorist organi-
zation and conspiracy to kill in a foreign
country.
Prosecutors said Mehanna conspired
with Ahmad Abousamra to promote jihad
and tried to create "like-minded youth" in
the Boston area and discussed going to a
terrorist training camp so that they could
then go to Iraq and join with others "to
fight and kill United States nationals."
Authorities say Mehanna, Abousamra and
a third man flew to Yemen in 2004, but
were unable to get into a training camp.
Prosecutors say the men told friends they
were turned, down because of their nation-
ality, ethnicity or inexperience, or that the
people they'd hoped would get them in were
either in jail or an a religious pilgrimage.
That's when, according to prosecutors,
Mehanna began seeing himself as being
part of the "media wing" of al-Qaida, and
started translating and distributing text,
videos and other media to inspire others
to engage in violent jihad.


PACKAGE INCLUDES: YOU PAY: YOU PAY:
$3500FREEPUY $4000 $3500
Plus'$5 Meal Voucher &
Roundtrip Transportation From Valdosta From Lake City & Gainesville


SFor more information call FABULOUS COACH LINES at
: L S 1.866.352.7295
,4 R, .d pwdaa.,. e-. or visit their website at fabulouscoach.com

PICK-UP LOCATIONS & TIMES
Service from Valdosta/Lake City/Gainesville
TUSDYS &STUDY


VALDOSTA MALL
VALDOSTA, GA
1700 Norman Drive


LAKE CITY MALL
LAKE CITY
2469 West
US Hwy. 90


OAKS MALL
GAINESVILLE
6419 Newberry Road


For group charter information, please call the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino 877.529.7653


1-4 AT NORTH ORIENT ROAD 813.627.ROCK
SEMINOLEHARDROCKTAMPA.COM


-J d. -

.a;


'2 "A PA

. .' .


m.
,,
,' 7 -'+ +-_ ; .'


"See Player s Club for complete details Must be at least 21 years old and a Seminole Player's Club member to participate. Valid Irequired. Management reserves all rights Offers
are non-negotiable non-transferable and must be redeemed in person at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tampa Offer s for the slot and gaming machine of your choice,
not valid or live Poker or Table Games No cash value Persons who have been trespassed or banned by the Seminole Tribe of Flonda or those who have opted into the sell-eclusion
program are not eligible, If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call 1-888-ADMr-I . 2011 Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino.All rights reserved


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


~l~b~
r~spi~
Ilj~dl~













LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011 Page EdItor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


THE WEATHER


MOSTY MOSTLY M MOSTLY ISOLATED ISOLATED
L. .
SUNNY SUNNY SUNNY SHOWERS SHOWERS



HI 741.0 48 HI Q HI84 HI 584L 57 HI 8410 59
sRuGNA.FORECAS MAP orli na, Octsober 23 ,.

SnashighSna ih' o


Talahassee
75/45

Paima City
73/51


* hldsta
75/47 *Jac nvle
Lake City 74/57
76/48
Gainesvile Daytona Beach
75/53 77J61
Ocala
77/5 c; a


T7
79,


TEMPERATURES
High Saturday
Low Saturday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Saturday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


74
39
80
57
90 in 20Q6
38 in 1989


0.00"
2.13"
30.67"
1.87"
43.00"


City
Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale-
Fort Myers
Gainesvllle
Jacksonville


Key West
Orando Cape Canaveral Keyest
81/61 78/64 Lake City
Miami
Ipa 9 Naples
/58 West Palm Beach Ocala
80/69 Orlando
S Ft Lauderdale Panama City
FL Myers. 82/71 Pensacola
82/60 Naples Tallahassee
79/65 Miani Tampa
K . t 82/71 Valdosta
.Key s* W. Palm Beach
8... 1/73


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise torm.
Sunset torm.


7:38 a.m.
6:52 p.m.
7:39 a.m.
6:51 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 3:59 a.m.
Moonset today 4:30 p.m.
Moonrise tom. 5:05 a.m.
Moonset tom. 5109 p.m.


00031


Oct. Nov. Nov.
26 2 10
New First Full


6

30mhniestolibbm
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk
for the area on
a scale from 0
to 10+


^^rp


Monday
79/69/s
80/65/s
83/73/pc
85/64/s
79/54/pc
76/60/s-
82/75/sh
80/52/s
83/73/pc
85/68/s
80/56/pc
82/65/s
78/56/s
79/57/s
79/50/s
83/63/s
79/49/s
81/73/pc


Tuesday
82/69/pc
82/67/pd
85/75/pc
86/68/s
82/56/s
81/62/s
83/76/sh
83/53/s
84/74/sh
87/70/pc
83/57/pc
84/67/pc
80/60/s
81/61/s
85/53/s
85/66/s
83/52/s
82/75/sh


An exclusive
serve
brought to
our readers


The Weather
Channel.


Nov. Forecasts, data and
S18 graphics 2011 Weather
Last | I|V Central, LP, Madison, Wis.
..w, w www.weatherpubllsher.com


SNATIONAL FORECAST: A storm system will bring a chance of scattered showers to portions
of the Great Lakes and Upper Midwest. Scattered showers are also possible across the
southern portions of Florida. High pressure will promote dry conditions across much of the
Southeast, Mid-Atlantic and Northeast. High pressure will also promote dry weather in the
Rockies and Southwest.


NAIONA FREAS MP pm.toa


odrnt
Worm Front
w 7

Stationary
Front
Occluded
Front


Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday Today:


CITY HI/Lo/Pcp.
Albany NY t 57,49.0
Albuquerque 68/44/0
Anchorage 38/33/0
Atlanta 67/41/0
Baltimore 60/42/0
Billings 63/46/0
Birmingham 66/37/0
Bismarck 63/28/0
Bolse 62/43/0
Boston 163/52/0
Buffalo 51/44/0
Charleston SC 68/40/0
Charleston WV 59/38/0
Charlotte 65/41/0
Cheyenne 57/36/0
Chicago 64 341 0
Cincinnati 61 35,0
Cleveland 55/41/0
Columbia SC 67/38/0
Dallas 82/62/0
Daytona Beach 73/51/0
Denver 67/37/0


HI/Lo/W CITY
58/40/pc Des Molnes
75/44/s Detroit .
40/33/c El .Paso
71/43/pc Fairbanks
63/50/pc Greensboro
66/40/pc Hartford
72/45/s Honolulu.
64/36/pc Houston
67/42/pc Indianapolis
56/48/s Jackson MS
58/53/pc Jacksonville
73/53/pc Kansas City
65/46/pc Las Vegas
70/42/pc Uttle Rock
69/38/s Los Angeles
65/49/pc Memphis
68/49/pc Miami
61/51/pc Minneapolis
73/44/pc Mobile
83/62/pc New Orleans
77J61/pc New York
,r7/47/s Oklahoma City


HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W CITY
64/40/ : 71/50/pc Omah
59 35'0 62/47/pc Ordand
81/53.'0 62,54's Phllad
19/10/0 27/12/c Phoer
63/43/0 68/45/pc Pittsb
59/48/0 59/43/pc Portla
80/72/0 85/71/sh Portla
83/58/0 85/64/pc Ralelg
61/34/0 68/50/pc Rapid
73/41/0 77/54/pc Reno
71/39/0 74/57/pc Rlchn
70/42/0 77/54/pc Sacra
77/60/0 85,61, s St. Lo
75/44/0 75/58/t Salt L
63/55/0 74/60/s San A
72/42/0 77/60/pc San D
79/64/0 82/71/sh San F
61/40/0 65/44/pc Seattl
69/39/0 76/49/s Spoka
73/53/0 76/58/s Tampa
60/47/0 63/52/s Tucso
77/49/0 80/57/s Washi


ITERNAT ION


7 p 7p 1 Ga
Sny Mqnday-




il* .'



s ,'. 'Fel s eL
I^ *y it" t~ fo ,q ,,dtt*tlllM |


On tris date In
1843. "Indian
Summer' was
routed ty cold and
snow mtat Drougnt
sleighing from Ine
Poconos to Vermont.
A fool of snow
blanketed Havernill.
N.H. and NewDerry,
Vermont.

,L .-..-... .
;, "


CITY
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Beljing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Geneva
Havana
Helsinki
Hong Kong
Kingston


= ..
"* ,t "


Saturday 'Today
HI/Lo/Pcp; HI/Lo/W
84/75/0 85/70/t
50/37/0 64/39/pc
69'44,0 66/59/pc
63/57/0 66/52/pc
64.48,'0 64. 39. c
52/32/0: 52/39/s
70,59,0 ;,,:70/66/c
;9.6J 0 81 61 p6 c
52..'32,(0 55. 39, s
79/66/0 81/72/t
50/34/.07," 50/41/r
86/73/0 82/76/pc
S90'79,0 88/79/t


CITY
La Paz
Urma
London
Madrid
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscojw
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Oslo
Panama
Paris'


Saturday
HI/Lo/Pcp.
61/28/0?
72/63/0
57/39/0
73/45/0
66/36/0
50/46/0
45/37/0
79/61/0
82/75/0
90/66/0
54/45/0
86/77/0
54/32/0


Today
HI/Lo/W
59/37/r
70/63/c
64/50/pc
68/48/s
72/43/s
54/41/
45/32/c
81/61/pc
85/77/t
91/68/pc
54/46/c
82/73/t
64/48/c


CITY
Rio
Rome
St. Thomas VI
San Juan PR
Santiago
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vienna
Warsaw


Saturday Today I
HI/Lo/Pcp. HI/Lo/W.
S75/68/0 73/66/s-
64/46/0 64/54/sh,'
85/75/0 87/75/t
86/75/.01 85/73/t
77/50/0 77/50/p1'
72/54/0 70/55/pc"
88/77/0 88/77/t;
79/63/0 77/63/pc,
86/64/0 81/66/pc
73/61/0 81/66/t
48/43/0 61/50/pc
50/30/0 50/46/c
50/27/0 50/39/pc'


KEYTO CONDmONS: c-.:.:,, h jr-drizzle, f-fair, fg-fog, h-haiy, i-ice, pc-partly cloudy, r-rain, s-sunny,
sn-snowers, sn-snow, ts-thunderstorms, w-windy.


We'll pay you $25'when you exchange your old "bank" debit card
for a shiny new CAMPUS USA Credit Union debit card!

742 We'll pay you $502for signing up for direct deposit of your paycheck!

FREE checking account with eStatements3
No minimum balance requirement3
FREE online banking with bill pay3
-* FREE CAMPUS and Publix Presto! ATMs

Visit any CAMPUS USA Credit Union Service Center today or call
754-9088 and press 4 to make the switch it's easier than you think!

OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS DEBIT CARDS. OFFER IS FOR NEW CHECKING ACCOUNTS AND DEBIT CARDS ONLY. OFFER MUST BE PRESENTED ATTIME
OF NEW ACCOUNTS/DEBIT CARD OPENING AND MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Turn in your current"bank' debit card to CAMPUS, open a new
CAMPUS Free Checking Account with eStatements, and use your new CAMPUS debit card 3 times in 30 days, and CAMPUS will deposit $25 to your New CAMPUS
Free Checking Account. 2. Direct deposit of at least $200 a month is required and must be established within 90 days. S50 reward will be deposited to the member's
savings account and will be on hold for 90 days. At that time, if the requirements are met, the bonus will be made available, otherwise they will be debited from the
account. 3. Members must elect to receive eStatements to sign up for the CAMPUS Free Checking Account with no monthly fee, no minimum balance and free bill pay.
4. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and we'll waive the $15 new member fee.


CAMPUS



USA
d e' it union


www.campuscu.com


Membership is open to anyone in Alachua,
Columbia and Suwannee counties."


This credit union is federally insured by
the National Credit Union Administration.


Lk C y1 aNrriDr -.ampus12 hAv Ct .J v ie' *.iS 7 5 .a o
_ _ __Cm m n_2 0_ __3 tv ecl a 3 9_Sol e e R ._at O c l_4 4_.S i v r S p i g _B v W et__ _1 1 1 W 3 r o rt R S u m r l e d 7 5 S w .4 1 C m i g S o n l c h a 1 7 5iW1 5 t i n


76/54


IAKECT ALMANAC


a
do
lelphia
iix
urgh
and ME
and OR
gh
City
oond
mento
iuls
ake City
ntonlo
lego
ranclsco
Ie
me
a
n
ington


HI/Lo/Pcp.
59/40/0
75/53/0
59/43/0
90/68/0
55/45/0
59/45/0
65/58/0
65/43/0
62/39/.01
63/38/0
61/49/0
72/50/0
71/41/0
65/42/0
82/62/0
66/58/0
65/54/0
58/55/.33
52/48/.02
73/52/Q
88/62/0
60/47/0


HI/Lo/W
73/45/pc
81/61/pr-
63/46/pc"
97/66/s"
62/45/pcO
57/42/s
61/45/pc-
68/45/pc:.
67/40/pc':
76/42/s.'
66/44/pc:
80/55/s:
74/52/pc,
70/49/s:
86/64/pc'
75/59/si
74/57/s'
57/48/pc;
59/38/pc
79/58/pc.
92/62/s;
64/48/pc'


CRED T
UN ONS
we re gsug banking
a better name'


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


1! SUN El


[24'M 0


Nl =61


QWDESA
^^^^^^^^*^y


311URS


C3EEI


....... !


ER HMOYT PNOE HY^^^^^^^^^^^^^


*Ht~u~com I


LAKE CITY REPORTER WEATHER


'I iid










Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421
tkirby@akecityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Sunday, October 23,201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

CHS FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meets Monday
The Columbia County
Quarterback Club meets
at 7 p.m. Monday in the
Jones Fieldhouse.
For details, call club
president Blake Lunde at
867-0296.

FORT WHITE FOOTBALL
Q-back Club
meeting Monday
The Fort White
Quarterback Club's
weekly meeting is 7 p.m.
Monday in the teacher's
lounge at the high
school.
For details, call
club president Shayne
Morgan at 397-4954.

CHS SOFTBALL
Players, parent
meeting Nov. 3
A meeting for all
interested Columbia
High softball players and
parents to discuss
tryouts and conditioning
is 6 p.m. Nov. 3 in the
CHS auditorium.
For details, call coach
Jimmy Williams at
303-1192.

CHS BOWING
Gas card raffle
for fundraiser
Columbia High's
bowling team is selling
raffle tickets for a $250
gas card as a fundraiser.
Tickets are $5 for one,
$10 for three, and $20
for 10.
For details and
tickets, call coach Brian
Saunders at 755-8080,
Ext 148.

FORT WHITE BASEBALL
Team at Walmart
for donations
Fort White High's
baseball team will be
accepting donations in
front of Walmart in Lake
City on Nov. 5.
For details, call Jeanne
Howell at 288-5337.
From staff reports -

GAMES

Monday
Columbia High
girls golf in Region 1-2A
tournament at Eglin
Air Force Base Eagle's
course in Niceville, 8 a.m.
(CDT)
Fort White High
volleyball vs. Bradford
High in District 5-4A
tournament at Keystone
Heights High, 5 p.m.
Tuesday
Columbia High
volleyball vs. Wolfson
High in District 4-6A
tournament at Atlantic
Coast High, 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Columbia High
bowling vs. Vanguard
High, North Marion High
in Gainesville, 4 p.m.
Thursday
Columbia High
swimming in District 2-2A
meet at Trousdell Aquatic
Center in Tallahassee,
9 a.m.
Richardson Middle
School vs. Lake City
Middle School in
Commanders Bowl,
7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High
football at Orange Park
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High


football vs. Rickards
High, 7:30 p.m.


JASON MATTHEW WALKERILake City'Reporter
Columbia High's Austin Reiter (52) tackles Middleburg High's Rick Lassiter (12) Friday during
Columbia's 28-0 win.


Homecoming
victory puts CHS
back in 3-6A race.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityreporter.com
All week long Columbia
High head coach Brian
Allen said that the reason
for homecoming was a
football game and not vice
versa. After the Tigers'
28-0 win against Middleburg
High on Friday, Columbia's
homecoming was left in the


Williams has first
100-yard game of
season on Friday.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FERNANDINA BEACH
- Homecoming emotion
could only take Fernandina
Beach High's football team
so far.
The Pirates received the
opening kickoff in Friday's
game against Fort White
High and rolled up three
first downs on the way to a
32-yard field goal by Conner
Nelson.
The Indians took .over
from there.
TavarisWilliamsreturned
the following kickoff 41
yards and quarterback
Andrew Baker busted out a
37-yard run on the first play


background.
Next up for the Tigers,
a chance to get back in the
District 3-6A race.
The Tigers will need
a little help to win the
district championship, but
a spot in the playoffs is still
Columbia's to lose.
Ridgeview High is still
undefeated in the district
after a 45-32 win against
Oak Leaf High on Friday,
but the Panthers have two
tough games remaining on
CHS continued on 4B


FSU thrashes Maryland


Manuel, Freeman
lead Seminoles
in 41-16 victory.
By BRENT KALLESTAD
Associated Press
TALLAHASSEE EJ
Manuel passed for 264
yards and a touchdown, and
freshman Devonta Freeman
ran for 100 yards a second
straight week as Florida
State routed Maryland 41-
16 on Saturday.
Jermaine Thomas
chipped in with 86 yards
and a 35-yard rushing
score for the Seminoles
(4-3, 2-2 Atlantic Coast
Conference.)
Dustin Hopkins added a
pair of field goals for the
winners, but had his con-
secutive streak stopped at
17 when his first attempt
narrowly missed.
Maryland (2-5,1-3) got its
first touchdown on Danny
O'Brien's 5-yard run in
the third quarter. O'Brien
replaced starting quar-
terback C.J. Brown, who
left the game four minutes
into the second half after
a vicious helmet-to-helmet
collision with Florida State's
Nigel Bradham, who was
penalized for the hit.
Florida State had 482
yards to Maryland's 331.
Florida State built its larg-
est lead at 41-10 on Debrale
Smiley 's 1-yard TD run
with 47 seconds left in the
game. Freeman's 41-yard
TD with 5:57 left had put
the Seminoles into a 34-10
lead.
The Seminoles, who have


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Florida State's Jermaine Thomas is cheered on by teammate Bert Reed as he gets past
Maryland's Cameron Chism to score in the third quarter of an NCAA college football game.
Florida State won 41-16 on Saturdayin Tallahassee.


had a tough time getting a
ground game untracked all
season, finished with 218
rushing yards Saturday.
Freeman had 100 yards
on the nose on 11 carries
while Thomas, who has
been working his way into
a more prominent role -the
last couple of weeks, added
86 more yards on 9 carries
and caught a pass for 25
yards.
Manuel started red-hot


for the second straight
week. He hit 8 of his first 9
passes for 120 yards, includ-
ing a 26-yard TD throw to
Kenny Shaw to climax a 90-
yard drive and give Florida
State a 14-0 lead 10 minutes
into the game. Manuel ear-
lier scored the game's first
touchdown on a 7-yard run.
Hopkins 38-yard field
goal boosted Florida State's
lead to 17-0 with 2:35 left
in the half and Maryland


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Jonathan Dupree makes a tackle against a Newberry High runner in a
game played earlier this season.


answered on Nick Ferrara's
23-yardfield goal on the final
play of the half.
O'Brien's 69-yard pass
to Quintin McCree gave
Maryland a first down at
Florida State's 6 to set up
his own scoring run in the
third quarter. O'Brien, last
year's ACC Rookie of the
Year, completed 9 of 18
passes for 180 yards and
NOLES continued on 3B


FROM THE SIDELINE


Phone: (386) 754-0420
bfinley@Jakecityreportercom


Jernigan

stands

out for

FSU
Timmy
ernigan has
quickly been
making his
way up the
Florida State Seminoles
roster,.but in Saturday's
41-16 win over the
Maryland Terrapins, the
Lake City native made
his best case.
Jernigan made his
first appearance on
the Seminoles' second
possession and made his
presence felt throughout
the rest of the game.
Jernigan ended with
four tackles, a sack and
multiple quarterback
pressures by my
account.
Its not the sack or
the tackles that showed

JERNIGAN continued on 3B


from scrimmage. It was the
spark for a 65-point night
for Fort White.
Coach Demetric Jackson
had been trying to get a
100-yard game for Soron
Williams all season, and the
senior made it with room
to spare in the first half. He
had seven carries fqr 123
yards in the first two quar-
ters with touchdown runs
of 56 and 24 yards.
Williams signaled he was
ready on a carry in Fort
White's second drive. He
stiff-armed one defense
and ran over another for a
24-yard gain. On the long
touchdown run, Williams
broke into the secondary,
cut to the right and out-
ran everybody. On the 24-
yard run, he followed the
great blocking the Indians
INDIANS continued on 4B


Defense shines


in Tigers 28-0


shutout win


Indians own Pirates'

homecoming, 65-30











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


SCOREBOARD


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
AUTO RACING
2 p.m.
ESPN NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Good
Sam Club 500, atTalladega.Ala.
GOLF
7:30 a.m.
TGC European PGA Tour, Castello
Masters, final round, at Castellon, Spain
2 p.m.
TGC PGA Tour, Children's Miracle
Network Classic, final round, at Lake
Buena Vista
5 p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Jacksonville
Open, final round, at Ponte Vedra Beach
(same-day tape)
7:30 p.m.
TGC LPGA,Taiwan Championship,
final round, at Yang Mei, Taiwan (same-
day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
8 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 4,
St. Louis at Texas
NFL FOOTBALL
I p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
FOX Regional coverage
4 p.m.
CBS Regional coverage
4:15 p.m.
FOX Doubleheader game
8 p.m.
NBC Indianapolis at New Orleans
PAN AMERICAN GAMES
9 p.m.
ESPN2 -Women's basketball, United
States vs. Mexico, at Guadalajara, Mexico

Monday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 5,
St. Louis at Texas
NFL FOOTBALL
8:30 p.m.
ESPN Baltimore at Jacksonville
PAN AMERICAN GAMES
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Events TBA, at Guadalajara,
Mexico

BASEBALL

World Series

Texas vs. St. Louis
St. Louis 3,Texas 2
Texas 2, St. Louis I
Saturday
St. Louis atTexas (n)
Today
St. Louis (Jackson 12-9) at Texas
(Holland 16-5), 8:05 p.m.
Monday
St. Louis atTexas, 8:05 p.m.
Wednesday
Texas at St. Louis, 8:05 p.m. (if
necessary)
Thursday
Texas at St. Louis, 8:05 p.m. (if
necessary

FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE


New England
Buffalo
N.Y. Jets
Miami


Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
Denver


N.Y Giants
Washington
Dallas
Philadelphia


Tampa Bay
New Orleans
Atlanta
Carolina


Green Bay
Detroit
Chicago
Minnesota


San Francisco
Seattle
Arizona
St. Louis


East
W L T Pct PF PA
5 I 0.833185 135
4 2 0.667188147
3 3 0.500145131
0 5 0.000 75 128
South
W L T Pct PF PA
3 2 0.600105 94
3 3 0.500141 124
1 5 0.167 72 132
0 6 0.000104163
North
W L T Pct PF PA
4 I 0.800148 71
4 2 0.667137 11I
4 2 0.667119 102
2 3 0.40091 117
West
W L T Pct PF PA
4 I 0.800120 109
4 2 0.667160 150
2 3 0.400 77 150
I 4 0.200105 140


East
W L T Pct PF PA
4 2 0.667154147
3 2 0.60096 83
2 3 0.400115 121
2 4 0.333145 145
South
W L T Pct PF PA
4 2 0.667113 145
4 2 0.667177 151
3 3 0.500135147
I 5 0.167133 163
North
W L T Pet PF PA
6 0 01.000197114
5 1 0.833178 114
3 3 0.500146132
I S 0.167121 145
West
W L T Pct PF PA
5 I 0.833167 97
2 3 0.400 94 122
I 4 0.200 96 121
0 5 0.000 49 137


Today's Games
Houston at Tennessee, I p.m.
Washington at Carolina, I p.m.
San Diego at N.Y. Jets, I p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, I p.m.
Denver at Miami, I p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, I p.m.
Chicago vs. Tampa Bay at London,
I p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesota, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday's Game
Baltimore at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Giants,
New England, Philadelphia, San Francisco
Sunday, Oct. 30
Indianapolis a Tennessee, I p.m.
New Orleans at St. Louis, I p.m,
Jacksonville at Houston, I p.m,
Miami at NY. Giants, I p.m,
Minnesota at Carolina, I p.m.
Arizona at Baltimore, I p m,


Detroit at Denver, 4:05 p.m.
Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto,
4:05 p.m.
Cleveland at San Francisco, 4:15 p.m.
Cincinnati at Seattle, 4:15 p.m.
New England at Pittsburgh, 4:15 p.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 3
San Diego at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay,
N.Y. Jets, Oakland,Tampa Bay

College scores

Saturday
EAST
Brown 35. Cornell 24
Dartmouth 37, Columbia 0
East Carolina 38, Navy 35
Harvard 56, Princeton 39
Penn 37,Yale 25
SOUTH
Appalachian St. 35, Samford 17
Arkansas 29, Mississippi 24
Cincinnati 37, South Florida 34
Clemson 59, North Carolina 38
Florida A&M 27, SC State 24
Florida St.41, Maryland 16
Georgia Southern 48, Presbyterian 14
Grambling St. 30, MVSU 24, OT
Howard 35. NC A&T 28, OT
Jacksonville 56, Davidson 13
Kentucky 38, Jacksonville St. 14
LSU 45,Aubur 10
Liberty 38, Charleston Southern 16
Memphis 33,Tulane 17
Miami 24, GeorgiaTech 7
NC State 28,Virginia 14
Virginia Tech 30, Boston College 14
Wake Forest 24, Duke 23
MIDWEST
Ball St. 31, Cent. Michigan 27
Bowling Green 13,Temple 10
E. Michigan 14,W. Michigan 10
Iowa 45, Indiana 24
Kansas St. 59, Kansas 21
Nebraska 41, Minnesota 14
Ohio 37,Akron 20
Oklahoma St. 45, Missouri 24
Purdue 21, Illinois 14
Texas A&M 33, Iowa St. 17
WEST
TCU 69, New Meaico 0'
BYU 56, daho St. 3
Boise St. 37,Air Force 26
LouisianaTech.24, Utah St. 17
Nevada 45, Fresno St.38
Oregon 45, Colorado 2
Friday ,
Syracuse 49,WestVirginia 23
Louisville 16, Rutgers 14

BASKETBALL

USA Today/ESPN Top 25

The top 25 teams in the USA Today.
ESPN men's preseason college basketball
poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
final records, points based on 25 points
for a first-place vote through one point
for a 25Sth-place vote and 2010-11 final
ranking: /
SRecord Pts Pvs


I. North Carolina (30)29-8
'2. Kentucky (1) 29-9
3. Ohio State 344:3
4. Connecticut 32-9
5.Syracuse 27-8
6. Duke 32-5
7.Vanderbilt -23-11
8. Louisville 25-10.
9.Memphis 25-10
10. Florida 29-8
II. Pittsburgh 28-6
12.Baylor 18-13
13. Kansas 35-3,
14.Wisconsin 25-9
15.Xavier 24-8
16.Arizona 30-8
17.Alabama 24-11
18. Michigan 21-14
19.Texas A&M 24-9
20. UCLA 23-11
21.Marquette 22-15
22. Cincinnati 26-9
23.Gonzaga 25-10
24. California 18-15
25. Missouri 23-11


774 8
721 3
702 5
655 1
,649 18
635 7
567 NR
514 22
482 NR
474 10
471 12
358 NR
331 4
313 15
277 NR
269 9
194 NR
187 ,N
161 NR
147 NR
.145 20
141 NR
125 NR
III NR
I 10-NR


Others receiving votes Florida
State 108; Texas 107; Michigan State
73;Temple 59;Washington 29; Butler 25;
New Mexico 22; Crelghton 19;Vlllanova
18;Purdue 17;UNLV 16;WestVirginia 13;
George Mason 12; Mississippi State II;
St John's II; Saint Mary's 5; Virginia 5;
Virginia Commonwealth 4; Drexel 2;
Kansas State 2; Long Beach State 2;
Brigham Young I;Notre Dame I.

AUTO RACING

Race week

NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
GOOD SAM CLUB 500
Site:Talladega.Ala.
Schedule: Today, race, 2 p.m. (ESPN,
1-6 p.m.)
Track: Talladega Superspeedway (oval,
2.66 miles).
Race distance: 500 miles, 188 laps.



Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

RMYAR I


Good Sam Club lineup

AtTalladega (Al.) Superspeedway
Saturday qualifying; race today
(Car number in parentheses)
1.(5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 181.367
mph.
2. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
181.36.
3. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet,
181.243.
4. (21)Trevor Bayne, Ford, 181.01 I.
5. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet,
180.918.
6. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
180.905.
7. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet,
180.655.
8. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 180.608.
9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 180.21.
10. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet.
180.203.
1 I.(17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 180.196.
12. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet,
180.108.
13. (29) Kevin .Harvick, Chevrolet,
180.047.
14.(22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 179.97.
15.(42)Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
179.875.
16. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge,
179.831.
17. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 179.831.
18. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 179.784.
19. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford,


179.736.
20. (97)
179.693.
21. (47)
179.672.
22. (78)
179.645.
23. (15)
179.629.
24. (43)
179.602.
25. (31)
179.602.


Kevin Conway, Toyota,

Bobby Labonte, Toyota,

Regan Smith, Chevrolet,

Michael Waltrip, Toyota,

A J Allmendinger, Ford,

Jeff Burton, Chevrolet,


26. (4) Kasey Kahne,Toyota, 179.575.
.27. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
179.42.
28. (55) J.J.Yeley, Ford, 179.349.
29. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
179.346.
30. (83) Brian Vickers,Toyota, 179.054.
31. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota,
178.944.
32. (32) Terry Labonte, Ford, 178.897.
33. (71)Andy Lally, Ford, 178.884.
S34. (18)Kyle Busch.Toyota, 178.78.
35. (20) Joey LoganoToyota, 178.773.
36. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota,
178.673.
37. (56) Martin Truex Jr.,. Toyota,
178.67.
38. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet,
178.603.
39. (1) Jamle McMurray, Chevrolet,
178.52.
40. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 178.427.
41.(36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet,owner
points.
42. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, owner
pointsts.
43. (7) Robby Gordorn, Dodge,
178.567.
Failed to Qualify
44. (35) Geoffrey Bodine, Chevrolet,
178.533.
45. (46) Scott Speed, Ford, 177.478..
46. (77) T.J. Bell, ord, 177.071.
47. (37) Josh Wise, Ford, 177.055.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Thursday's Games
Minnesota 2, Edmonton I, SO
Boston 6,Toronto 2
Washington 5 Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 3, Montreal I
Ottawa 4,Winnipeg I
Tampa Bay 4, N.Y. Islanders I
Buffalo 3, Florida 0
Chicago 3, Colorado I
N.Y. Rangers 3, Calgary 2, OT
Vancouver 5, Nashville I
Los Angeles 2, Phoenix 0
Friday's Games
San Jose .4, New Jersey 3, SO
Detroit 5, Columbus 2
St. Louis 3, Carolina 2, OT
Dallas 3,Anaheim I
Saturday's Games
Nashville 2, Calgary 0
Vancouver 3, Minnesota 2, OT
San Jose at Boston (n)
Toronto at Montreal (n)
Columbus at Ottawa (n)
St. Louis at Philadelphia (n)
New Jersey at Pittsburgh (n)
Detroit at Washington (n)
Carolina atWinnipeg (n)
Buffalo at Tampa Bay (n)
N.Y. Islanders at Florida (n)
Colorado at Chicago (n).
N.Y. Rangers at Edmonton (n)
Dallas at Los Angeles (n)
Today's Game
Phoenix at Anaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Florida at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y Rangers.at Wlnnipeg,,8:30 p.m.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


7 -- -- sNow arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
swuggeslod by the above cartoon.

Answer here:
(Answers tomorrow)
nluo |Juy' mble JHMOVE YOKEL SPLINT WINNER
S' Answer When ltho able~ on his flight began to cry,
he was afraid II would be NONSTOP


Miami easily beats



Georgia Tech, 24-7


By TIM REYNOLDS
Associated Press

MIAMI Before every
game, Miami safety JoJo
Nicholas reaches into his
gym bag and pulls out a
blanket, then rubs it on
his hands while saying a
quick prayer.
He prays to his son, who
died a few weeks ago after
being prematurely born.
Ifs these moments that
make him savor days like
Saturday so much more.
Nicholas recovered a
fumbled punt for a touch-
down plus added an inter-
ception, Lamar Miller ran
for 93 yards and a score
and Miami's banged-up
defense was dominant as
the Hurricanes topped
No. 20 Georgia Tech 24-
7 on Saturday holding
the high-octane Yellow
Jackets mQre than 300
yards and nearly 36 points
below their season aver-
ages entering the game.
"The first thought that
came to my mind was my
son," Nicholas said. "I've
always appreciated foot-
ball, and then you learn
Sto appreciate it even more,
because life is never guar-
anteed."
Mike James also had a
touchdown run for Miami
(4-3, 2-2 Atlantic Coast
Conference), which won
consecutive games for the
first time this season and
has now beaten Georgia
Tech three straight times
by a combined score of 92-
34.
"Everybody talks about
the ACC race. or this and
that," Miami coach Al
Golden said. "I'm trying
to teach them the process.
The process, when it takes
traction, is what allows you
to win multiple games in a
row. That's it."
Georgia Tech (6-2, 3-2)
came into Saturday averag-
ing 517.yards of offense.
The.Yellow Jackets got only
211 on Saturday, their low-
est total since a loss to Iowa
in the Orange Bowl after
the 200,9 season. In its last
35 games, Georgia Tech
has rushed for less than
200 yards only three times,
'all at Sun Life Stadium -


ACROSS
1 Keep out
4 Firms up
8 Poached
edible
11 Lyric poem
12 Become
broader
.13 Expected any
time
14 Wistful feeling
16 Mi. above sea
level
17 On horseback
18 Free tickets
20 Depot info
21 Approves
22 Garden hose
crimps
25 Pancreas
product
29 Historical
periods
30 Gigantic bird
of myth -
31 Sci-fi saucer
32 Felt boot
33 Hydrocarbon
suffix


95 at Miami in 2009, 143 in
the Orange Bowl and 134
in this one.
"It's frustrating every
time you lose," said Georgia
Tech quarterback Tevin
Washington, who threw for
63 yards and ran for 36
more a team-best "All
week long we had a good
game plan to come out and
get a victory. It's frustrat-
ing for me because I feel I
let the team down."
Washington threw right
to Nicholas on the Yellow
Jackets' first offensive snap
of the game, a mistake that
set Miami up at the Georgia
Tech 46. It was doubly cost-
ly for the Yellow Jackets,
with center Jay Finch going
down with what appeared to
be a kneeinjury and eventu-
ally getting carted off the
sideline for evaluation.
The Hurricanes needed
12 plays to score from
there, Harris extending


34 Japanese
soup
35 Maui et al.
38 Humped
beast
39 "-
Miserables"
40 Vacuum part
41 AM/FM device
44 Laptop maker
48 Color
49 Those owed
money
51 Suffix for
forfeit
52 Caravan halts
53 1'- -Pan"
(Clavell novel)
54 Scratch or
dent
55 Court dividers
56 RN's group


DOWN
- fide
Fusses
Take a
breather
Funny -
Radner


the drive with a 13-yard
pass to Phillip Dorsett on
fourth-and-3 from the 39,
and James later capping it
with a 2-yard run for a 7-0
Miami lead.
Nicholas' other big plays
in the first half?
Lots of hustle, and lots of
help from Georgia Tech.
"Something we're doing
ain't right," Georgia Tech
coach Paul Johnson said.
Georgia Tech wide
receiver Roddy Jones took
a pitch and ran 34 yards
with 4:09 left in the first
quarter, fighting Nicholas
off a little too vehemently
for -the last few of those.
Jones was pulled down
by an illegal horse-collar
tackle, but he also got his
fingers inside Nicholas'
face mask while stiff-arm-
ing the Miami safety on the
play. The penalties offset,
and the big gain was wiped
away.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


WE BIS Y|MA DE F Y
ADAM AUF ALOE
LI RE MER IDI AN
KE BAB SA D ELS
RE -ALIST
BLPAfGR L I IDOHU
RIB A GRID OHU

OCEAN CIDERS
WEST LAUD LEA


PRO APE DOZ ED
R I VET ING RE BA
IDEM NAE IRON
GENT EST SONG


Perimeter
Luau wreath
Chips and
dips.
Mild cheese
Nervous
swallow


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com
2 13 4 15 16 17 8 19 110 1


10 Figures out
12 Hangs around
15 Hikes
19 Buckeye
campus
21 Almost never
22 Military cap
23 Retirees'
kitties
'24 Salt, in a lab
25 Charged
particles
26 San Obispo
27 In that case
(2 wds.)
28 Lunch hour,
often
30 Half the
checkers
34 Power
36 Frazier foe
37 Political
stance
38 Grounds
40 Is an omen of
41 Baba au -
42 Mystique
43 Whitetail
44 tube
45 Modicum
46 Kind of muffin
47 Where India is
50 "Norma -"


10-24 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami running back Lamar Miller (6) runs for yardage during
second half of an NCAA football game against Georgia Tech,
Saturday in Miami. Miller ran for 93 yards and scored as
Miami defeated No. 20 Georgia Tech 24-7.


NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


,ASSOCIATED PRESS
LSU wide receiver Rueben Randle (2) scores on a 42-yard touchdown reception as Auburn
defensive back Robenson Therezie (27) and defensive back Demetruce McNeal (12)
pursue during the second quarter of an NCAA college football game in Baton Rouge,
Saturday.


LSU sends resounding


message before Bama


Associated Press

LSU's last statement
before its biggest game of
the season was a doozy.
SThe top-ranked Tigers,
playing without three key
suspended players, pum-
meled Auburn 45-10 and
now can start looking
toward their matchup with
No. 2 Alabama on Nov. 5.
The Tide played
Tennessee at home later
Saturday, and with a win,
could set up a No. 1 vs. No.
2 matchup in Tuscaloosa,
Ala.
:,No. 19 Auburn stayed
close for about a-quarter
and a half. LSU led 7-
3 before Reuben Randle
caught two long touch-
down passes in the final
five minutes of the first
half. The Tigers scored
three touchdowns in about
2 1-2 minutes in the third
and the game was a rout.
LSU was without star cor-
nerback Tyrann Mathieu,
leading rusher Spencer
Ware and defensive back
Tharold Simon all sus-
pended one game for vio-
lating the team's drug pol-
icy. Still, the Tigers rolled
to their eighth double-digit
win of the season.
Randle caught a 42-yard
scoring pass from Jordan
Jefferson and a 46-yard
touchdown pass from
Jarrett Lee.
FreshmanKennyHilliard
scored the first two touch-
downs of his career while
rushing for 65 yards on only
10 carries for LSU (8-0, 5-0
Southeastern Conference)..
Randle finished with five
receptions for 106 yards..
Lee was 14 .of 20 for 165
yards and two touchdowns,
while Jeffersori completed
two of three passes for 54
yards .
With Michael Ford lead-
ing the way (12 rushes,
82 yards), LSU gained 174
yards on the ground.

No. 5 Boise State 33,
Air Force 26
BOISE, Idaho Kellen
Moore threw three touch-
downs, Doug Martin
scored twice and the
defense and special teams
did just enough to help
Boise State hold off Air
Force.
Moore was precise as
usual, going 23 of 29 for
281 yards. His three TDs
give him 123 in his career,
making him fourth best all-
time. The victory gave him
45 career wins, putting him
in a tie with Colt McCoy
for most wins for college
quarterbacks.

No. 6 Oklahoma State
45, Missouri 24
COLUMBIA, Mo.
- Joseph .Randle scored


four touchdowns, two on
runs that capitalized on big
defensive plays by Shaun
Lewis, and Oklahoma State
ended Missouri's 10-game
home winning streak.
Randle had 138 yards on
14 carries and scored on
runs of 16, 59 and 12 yards.
He also caught a 13-yard
touchdown pass in the sec-
ond quarter.
Brandon Weeden had
three touchdown passes
after the opening snap
of the second quarter.
Lewis' interception and
fumble recovery helped
the Cowboys (7-0, 4-0 Big
12) pull away despite inju-
ries to both starting wide
receivers.

No. 8 Clemson 59,
North Carolina 38
CLEMSON, S.C. Tajh
Boyd tied a school record
with five touchdown pass-
es, defensive end Kourtnei
Brown scored on intercep-
tion and fumble returns
and Clemson improved to
8-0 for the first time in 11
years.
The Tigers (5-0 Atlantic
Coast Conference) again
put on an offensive display
with 450 yards as Boyd
matched Cullen Harper's
2007 mark on the day the
school celebrated the 30th
anniversary of its 1981
national champions.

No. 9 Oregon 45,
Colorado 2
BOULDER, Colo.-
Playing without )arron
Thomas and LaMichael
James, Oregon bulldozed
injury-riddled Colorado.
SThe Ducks lost none of
their quick-strike scoring
ability without their injured
quarterback and running
back. Thomas was out with
a knee injury and James
missed his second straight
game while recovering
from a dislocated elbow.

No. 10 Arkansas 29,
Mississippi 24
OXFORD, Miss. -Tyler
Wilson threw for 232 yards
and rushed for two touch-
downs, and Arkansas ral-
lied from an early 17-point
deficit.
Arkansas (6-1, 2-1
Southeastern Conference)
continues its best start
under fourth-year coach
Bobby Petrino, stay-
ing in the mix in'the
loaded Western Division
that includes LSU and
Alabama.

No. 12 Kansas State
59, Kansas 21
MANHATTAN, Kan.
- Collin Klein threw for a
career-high 195 yards and
accounted for five touch-


downs, freshman Tyler
Lockett returned a kick-
off for a score and caught
a touchdown pass, and
Kansas State tuned up for
a big showdown next week
with Oklahoma.
The Wildcats (7-0, 4-
0) are riding their best
start since 1999, when
they won their first nine
games. They'll host the
third-ranked Sooners next
Saturday in a matchup
that should go a long way
toward deciding the Big 12
champion now that there's
no conference title game.

No. 13 Nebraska 41,
Minnesota 14
MINNEAPOLIS Rex
Burkhead rushed for 117
yards and a touchdown and
No. 13 Nebraska racked up
346 yards on the ground.
The Huskers (6-1, 2-1 Big
Ten) took over TCF Bank
Stadium in their first trip to
-the Twin Cities since 1989.
More than two-thirds of
the stadium was filled with
red-clad Nebraska back-
ers, and they had plenty to
cheer about.

No. 16 Virginia Tech
30, Boston College 14
BLAGKSBURG, Va. -
David Wilson got Virginia
Tech's offense untracked
with a long touchdown run
in the third quarter and
Logan Thomas threw for
a touchdown and ran for
another as the Hokies won
their third straight.
The Hokies .(7-1, 3-1
Atlantic Coast Conference)
trailed 7-6 at halftime, but
Wilson broke off a 42-yard
touchdown run on their
first possession of the third
quarter, and Thomas then
led consecutive scoring
drives, waking up a Lane
Stadium crowd, that had
had little to cheer about

No. 17 Texas A&M 33,
Iowa State 17
AMES, Iowa Ryan
Tannehill threw for 263
yards and two touchdowns
arid Texas A&M held off
Iowa State for its third
straight Big 12 win.
Christine Michael and
Cyrus Gray each rushed
for more than 100 yards for
the Aggies (5-2,3-1 Big 12),
who used Tannehill's scor-
ing passes late in the first
half to jump ahead 20-7.

Purdue 21,
No. 23 Illinois 14
WEST LAFAYETTE,
Ind. Caleb TerBush
passed for 178 yards
and two touchdowns
to help Purdue upset
Illinois.
Illinois (6-2, 2-2) lost its
second straight.


COURTESY PHOTO
Columbia High's girls golf team qualified for Region 1-2A play with a third-place finish at the
district tournament. Members of the team at district are Brooke Russell (from left),
Shelby Camp, Ashley Mixon, Darian Ste-Marie, Gillian Norris and coach Todd Carter.


Lady Tigers in Region 1-2A

tournament on Monday


From staff reports

Columbia High's Lady
Tiger golf team will com-
pete in the Region 1-2A
tournament at Eglin Air
Force Base Eagle's course
in Niceville at 8 a.m. on
Monday.
The Lady Tigers are led
by Darian Ste. Marie with a
79 average per 18 holes.
"She's a big contender for
the individual qualifier at
the tournament," Columbia
head coach Todd Carter
said. "She's got a real good
chance. It'll probably take
a round in the low 70s, but
she's 22 shots better than
she was at the district tour-
nament last year."
Ashley Mixon, Shelby
Camp, Gillian Norris and
Brooke Russell are also set
to compete for the Lady
Tigers.
'The. girls are pumped
and practicing hard,"
Carter said. "Mixon.is 12
shots better than she was
last year and Camp is 11
shots better. The improve-
ment is showing and they'll
continue to get better and
better."
The top-two teams and
top-two individuals qualify
for the state tournament at
Mission Inn Golf Club in
Orlando.

Fort White volleyball
Fort White High volley-
ball loaded up with tough
teams last week leading up'
to the District 5-4A tourna-
ment.
The Lady Indians (8-17,
4-6) earned the No. 4 seed
in the district and will play
Bradford High at 5 p.m.
Monday. Keystone Heights
High is hosting the tourna-
ment.
Fort White swept
Bradford in the regular
season.,
Fort White's final two
matches were a25-20,25-20,
25-18 loss at Union County


High on Wednesday, and
a 25-9, 25-12, 20-25, 25-15
loss at Oak Hall School on
Thursday.
The district final is 7 p.m.
Thursday.

Columbia swimming
Columbia's swim team
closed out the regular
season with a home meet
against Suwannee High on
Oct. 13.
The Tigers travel to
Tallahassee for the District
2-2A .meet at Trousdell
Aquatic Complex on
Thursday.
Sara Woodfield had wins
for CHS in the 200 free
and 50 free. Heather Burns
won the 200 IM. and 100
free. Hannah Burns (100
fly) and Lindsay Lee (100
breast) also had wins for
the Lady Tigers.
Stephanie Silva placed
second in the 200 IM
and 500 free. Joatih'Mata
was second in the 200
free and third in the 100
back. Courtney Britt was
second in the 100 back and
third in the 500 free. Syndey
Morse was second in the
50 free and fifth in the 100
back. Aleena Fields was
second in the 100 breast.
Meghan Collins placed
third in the 100 fly and
100 free. Kaicie Chasteen
was third in the 100 breast
and fourth in the 200 free.
Brianna Pope was fourth
in the 500 free and sixth
in the 50 free. Micheala
Polhamus was fourth in the
200 IM and sixth in the 100
back. Kayla Williams was
fifth in the 100 free and
Nichole Bapista was fifth in
the 50 free.
In the relays the Lady
Tigers were first (Britt,
Fields, Hannah Burns,
Woodfield) and third
(Madeline Ault, Chasteen,
Pope, Bapista) in the 200
sprint medley, first (Britt,
Ault, Pope, Mata) and
third (Collins, Lindsay Lee,


Silva, Williams) in the 200
free, and first (Cheyenne
Brown, Fields, Woodfield,
Williams) and second
(Heather Burns, Hannah
Burns, Silva, Polhamus) in
the 400 free.
David Morse won the 200
IM and 100 free. Joseph
Piccioni placed first in the
100 breast and second
in the 100 fly. Cale Shaw
placed first in the 500 free
and second in the 200 IM.
Jackson Nettles placed
second in the 200 free
and 100 back. Justin
Tompkins placed second
in the .50 free and 100
breast.
Marlon Polintan was
third in the 100 back and
fourth in the 200 free.;
Randal Soltis was third
in the 50 free and fourth
in the 100 free. Andrew
Fortier was third in the 500
free and fourth in the 200
IM. Cody Smith was third
in the 100 breast and fourth
in the 50 free.
Jacob Finley was third in
the 100 fly and sixth in the
100 free. Joshua,O'Connell
was fifth in the 200 free and
100 free.
Columbia won the 200
sprint medley with Shaw,
Morse, Tompkins and
Piccioni. In the 200 free
relay, Finley, Polintan,
Tompkins and O'Connell
placed first, and Nettles,
Soltis, Fortier and Morse
placed third. Fortier,
Piccioni, Nettles and Shaw
placed second in the 400
free relay.

Columbia volleyball
Columbia High's Lady
Tigers volleyball team will
compete in teh District 4-
6A tournament against
Wolfson High at 6:30 p.m.
on Tuesday at Atlantic
Coast High.
The Lady Tigers
would meet St. Augustine
on Wednesday with a
win.


JERNIGAN: Makes mark Saturday


Continued From Page 11

his real worth. It was his
ability to disrupt plays
as he continually did
throughout.
Jernigan was nominated
for the Seminoles' fan
player of the game, which
allows fans to vote for the
MVP of the contest by text
vote. He surely was the
best defensive player on
the field during the game.
Jernigan showed a flare
and energy that made the
Seminoles defensive
lines of the past so


dominant. His engine ran
before, during and after
plays.
The kind of attitude
that Jernigan displays will
only make the players
around him better. Other
players feed off that kind
of energy and Jernigan has
a motor that doesn't stop.
He might not be flashy on
every play, but he wasn't
taking any breaks.
It's early in his career,
but it's easy to see that
Jernigan has the talent to


become a special
player for the Seminoles in
the same fashion as
other former Seminole
greats from Lake City.
Jernigan was part of
a defense that limited
Maryland's rushing game
throughout the first half.
His unit, which rotated,
didn't allow an offensive
point in the first half.
For the Seminoles and
Jernigan, the future is
bright along the defensive
front


Continued From Page 11
a touchdown a 15-yard
throw to Marcus Leak with
5 seconds left in the game.
Brown, however, had
a rough afternoon before
leaving the game. He
passed for 92 yards, but


did not gain any yards
on 10 rushing attempts
after gaining 286 yards in
Maryland's two previous
games.
McCree had a big game
with 9 catches for 177


yards.
Maryland running back
Davin Meggett led the
Terps with 44 yards and
moved past 2,000 career
rushing yards on his first
carry of the game.


NOLES: Come up big over Terps


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


FILE PHOTO
Fort White High's Soron Williams looks for an opening against Newberry High in a game


played earlier this year.


INDIANS: Beat Pirates
Continued From Page 1B


showed all night
Williams caught his first
touchdown pass of the sea-
son. It was just a short toss
from Baker, but Williams
turned it into a 53-yard
score. He started down the
left sideline and cut back
all the way across the field
and went in pretty much
untouched.
Williams also ran a kick-
off back 94 yards to the
end zone, but a block in the
back negated the score.
'The biggest surprise was
Soron," Jackson said. "He
ran great very physical."
Fort White had another
100-yard rusher in the game,
as Tavaris Williams used an
80-yard touchdown run to
propel him to 107 yards on
six carries. He added to his
first kickoff return with one
for 35 yards.
Baker didn't have to
throw much, and was effi-
cient in his efforts. He had
a lob pass to AJ. Legree for
a touchdown the fifth of
the season for the duo.
Baker also connected
with Kellen Snider for 20
yards and Melton Sanders
for 19 yards, both times
converting on third-and-
long. It was the first catch
of the season for both. On
defense, Snider forced a
fumble and recovered the


blocked punt.
Baker rushed for 52 yards
and Zach Cormier added
44, all in the first half. Both
scored touchdowns.
Sanders, who blocked
a punt for good measure,
quarterbacked most of the-
second half. He had touch-
down runs of 30 and 57
yards and finished with 90
yards on the night
Fort White rolled up 457
yards on the ground.
"I was real pleased with
the young offensive line in
the second half," Jackson
said.
Jackson began substi-
tuting freely in the second
quarter, and Fernandina
Beach's offense took advan-
tage in the second half. After
totaling 84 yards in the first
half, the Pirates added .196
yards after intermission.
Jordan Holland finished
with 140 yards on 18 car-
ries and scored on runs
of three and 55 yards. He
also returned a kickoff 63
yards.
Fellow senior Tai
Dunwood ran for 77 yards
and also scored two touch-
downs.
Fort White now has a
homecoming of its own
to protect Rickards High
comes to Arrowhead
Stadium this Friday.


Fern.Beach 3 0 20 7 30
FortWhite, 14 23 21 7 65
First Quarter
FB-Nelson 32 FG, 7:40
FW-Legree 2 pass from Baker (Jones
kick), 5:15
FW-Baker 6 run (ones kick),:00
Second Quarter
FW-S. Williams 56 run (Jones kick),
9:09
FW-Cormier 12 run (kick failed),
5:59
FW-S. Williams 24 run (Jones kick),
4:14
FW-Jones 21 FG
Third Quarter,
FW-S.Williams 53 pass from Baker
(Jones kick), 10:58
FB-Holland 3 run (Lendry kick), 5:21
FW-T. Williams 80 run (Escalante
kick), 5:08
FB-Dunwood 7 run (kick blocked),
2:39
FW-Sanders 30 run (Escalante kick),
2:12
FB-Holland 55 run (Lendry kick),
1:01
Fourth Quarter
FW-Sanders 57 run (Escalante kick),
9:27
FB-Dunwood 6 run (Lendry kick),


3:29.

First downs
Rushes-yards
Passing
Comp-Att-lnt
Punts-Avg.
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards


FortWhite
12
39-457
94
4-5-0
0-0
2-1
6-50


Fern. Beach
9
40-257
23
2-7-1
2-45
2-1
2-7


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING-Fort White, S. Williams
8-129, T. Williams 6-107, Sanders 4-90,
Baker 5-52, Cormier 5-44, Fulton 3-15,
Newman 1-7, Calloway 2-5, Phillips 1-5,
Chatman 4-3 Fernandina Beach, Holland
18-140, Dunwood 15-77, Morris 5-31,
Willis 1-I0,Tucker I-(-t).
PASSING-Fort White. Baker 4-5-94-
0. Fernandina Beach,Willis 2-7-23-1.
RECEIVING-Fort White, S. Williams
1-53, Snider 1-20, Sanders 1-19, Legree
1-2. Fernandina Beach, Somora 1-15,
Stewart 1-8.


:7NOW






Includes lenses & frames.
Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED EXPIRES OCTOBER 31 2011
mmmn mm mm a m m m mMM mM












Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES OCTOBER 31. 2011
A















Buy one complete pair of glasses at
Like us on regular price & receive a






Some Restrictions Apply.
COUPON REQUIRED. EXPIRES OCTOBER,31.2011
*. .1 . .1 I . . I1 I .*


JASON MATTHEW WALKER -L C i e.-~vr er
Columbia High's Trey Marshall (21) runs the ball in a game against Middleburg on Fnday.


CHS: Defense shuts down Broncos
Continued From Page 1B


the district schedule.
Both of the Panthers
two remaining district
contest are on the road.
First up, Ridgeview goes
to Leon before ending the
district schedule against
Middleburg on Nov. 4.
Columbia must go on
the road for its final two
district contest as well.
The Tigers head to
Orange Park High for a
matchup with former
Columbia coach Danny
Green on Friday and end
the district slate against
Leon High on Nov. 4 in
Tallahassee.
The Lions have the
better end of the travel
arrangements with both of
their remaining games at
home. Leon begins its final
two games of the district
stand with Ridgeview on
Friday.
The game against
Columbia on Nov. 4 could
decide who receives the
final playoff spot in District
3-6A.
Columbia got back to
doing some of the things
that made it successful
early in the season.
Ronald Timmons had
his most carries since a
win over Santa Fe in the
kickoff classic. He finished
with 122 yards on 13
carries.
Jayce Barber got back
on track after a couple of
games where passes fell
incomplete more often
than not for the Tigers.
Barber completed 7-of-8
passes during the contest


and had touchdown passes
from 78 and 53 yards. He
totaled 180 yards through
the air.
Nate Ayers was the
recipient of the two
touchdown passes from
Barber and hauled in three
catches in total for 141
yards.
Tyrone Sands set the
defensive mentality early
with a fumble recovery
on the first drive. Austin
Reiter followed up on
Middleburg's second drive
with two more sacks.
After a three and out
forced by the Tigers
defense on the Broncos'
third possession, Barber
connected with Ayers
for the first of his two
touchdown receptions
from 78 yards. Hayden
Lunde kicked the extra
point for a 7-0 lead with 27
seconds remaining in the
first quarter.
A Javere Smith sack
forced the Broncos into a
third-and-long situation on
Middleburg's next drive
and Columbia took over
at its own 42 with 9:16
remaining in the second
quarter. Braxton Stockton
carried it for five yards and
Barber hooked up. with
Ayers for 53 yards on the
next play to open up a 14-0
lead.
"Coach called the play
and I knew it would work,
because he could bite
on the fake," Ayers said.
"When the call was made,
I was ready to make the
play."


Reiter continued to
make his presence felt
with a fumble recovery
on Middleburg's next
possession, but Columbia's
offense couldn't capitalize.
Following exchanged
possessions to begin the
second half, Timmons
paced the Tigers drive.
He rushed five times for
62 yards and finished the
drive off with a 17-yard run
to open up a three-score
lead.
'Timmons ran the ball
well," Allen said. "He's a
kid that got a lot of carries
against Santa Fe, but hasn't
got the ball a lot since.
Still, he-fiasn't complained
and keeps making plays
for our special teams. I told
him that what he's doing in
practice for our scott team
doesn't go unnoticed and
tonight he got a chance
and responded,"
John Fulton made the
best out of a botched extra
point by picking up the
hold and running it in f6r
two points and a 22-0 lead.
With 5:34 remaining
in the' third quarter,
Middleburg had its
deepest drive as it reached
the Columbia 37-yard line
before failing to convert on
fourth down.
Columbia then used 13
plays and 7:12 of the gar~e
clock to move 69 yards for
a score. Timmons began
the drive with a 16 yard
run and Stockton capped
off the drive with a three
yard run to reach the 28:0
final. /


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Columbia High quarterback Jayce Barber (5) attempts to evade a sack made by Middleburg
High's James Griffin (21) on Friday. Columbia got a bounce-back win, 28-0, in the District
3-6A game against the Broncos on homecoming.


Page Editor: Brandon Finley, 754-0420










SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23,11
m' ilvl e//,


CLASSIC PEANUTS/ by Charles Schulz
I HATE IT fHEN THERES A PREARINE6S EVERWTHIN6 GEEM, AD...EVEN THE OL'
THE BAsEALL. IN THE AIR THAT PITCHER'5 MOUND 6 COVERED LOITH dEEDS...


I 6UES5 ALL A PERSON CAN DO 15 DREAM
Hsl DREAMS..MA'BE I'LL BE A GOOD BALL
PLAYER SOMEDAY... MAYBE I'LL EVEN PLAY IN
THE OORLD SERIES, AND BE A HERO...


c I -C


EY!w LOOK WHO'S OUT HERE
TALKING TO HIMSELF!


(IHAT ARE 'OU D01N6, CHARLIE
BROON, THINKING ABOUT ALL
THE TIMES WO0 STRUCK OUT?.

,]AS,7


THEREIS A DREARlNESS
IN THE AIR THAT
DEPRESSES ME!

-"-9


GARFIELD/ by Jim Davis
OKAY,THE MONSTER HAS eATEN FRER
CHARLEN, ANP WILBERFORCE


HOW ABOUT
VYOu, LUMPY?


CL
5


S0**


rl Iii












"WHEN IN LURCH THESE PEONS,
DRAGGhIG Ti S- THIS-WHATEVER
HE IS! THEY FOUND MM SKULAG
IN THEIR FIELDS AND THOUGHT IT
BEST TO TURN HIM OVER TO THE
COURT RATHER THAN KILL HIM
THEMSELVES.


'BUT THE RUFFIAN FIGHTS VICOUSLY, DEVOID OF ALL GOOD
MANNERS! IT WAS ALL I COULD DO TO KEEP MYSELF FROM
AN UNSEEMLY HUMIUATION AT THE HANDS OF
b- THIS ANIMAL"


"WHOEVER HE IS, HE'S OBVIOUSLY OF
NOBLE BIRTH- HIS ARROGANCE SAYS
AS MUCI. I GRACIOUSLY OFFERED HIM
THE CHANCE TO SHOW HIS METTLE
AGAINST A KNIGHT OFARTHUR'S TABLE.


Lose Lose


1

and









BRIAN
and
*REG
WALKER


Thi BEll LISER:







by Art & Chip Sansom






































While Mommy and
Daddy are out celebrating
their wedding anniversary,
little Billy fills in with this
page of definitions.


'oo : ^ ,t,


HAGAR THE HORRIBLE/ by Dik Browne


B.C./ by Mastroianni & Hart


SHOE/ by Chris Cassatt & Gary Brookins


IiM Mor WERM
SoMIN&GFOR A Vir
**


BY ..4EANUt 9I0JoHN MARSHAL=


www.blondie.com


2011 King Features Syndicate Inc. World Rights Reserved.


ma :i


W Mort Walker's

beetle

btailev


7-
47


GRE;+ S+

tL FFr


I


mm


ARM






FOXTROT/ by Bill Amend


BY BUNNY HOEST AND JOHN REINER


LEROY, NOT THE LIBRARIAN."


"IF I WANTED TO ATTRACT SOMEONE LIKE
LEROY, I'D CHOOSE A BACON SCENT."


"THE REASON I'M HOLDING? TO GET MY
NAME ON A WAITING LIST."


"CLOTHES MAKE THE MAN, BUT IN LEROY'S CASE,
IT'S NOT THE CLOTHES' FAULT."
-< - >_ _1- --


CLOSE TO HOME/ by John McPherson


Fr.
R
A
N
14



R

N
IE
a4


GET FUZZY/ by Darby Conley
HIS is IT'S AUT RoW LoTS of YD'OUE Rmr-nN A, TT'HV BSUCKf, HoWW
YOUR NEW LoSE TR To OMAK BooK ACUT T11W CORRECT. AFE To'
Boc.'? "IHE CASH 11 SHAMLE&SLI LEECHLIKE INDUSTRY'" DIFFERENT
DA VIINCI FIGG'YBACK lt, ON -THiE of MAKIM MONET FROM ALL.
PI COPE 19EAS OF SMARtERK Off of MORE fl e oTHER
EfE. TALhb PEOPLE 7 ? LEECHe&!



WH AT THE SO ...''KE WATINer A ACTUALLY, I'LL
CHARITY iUCKI BK ABoUT GReED, AND BE OSi0c, A
S A FUND. THE COVER WILL SAY "6Y FSE-UDo YM. JOST
TBuc PROFrTv r Go G /AN OtD FAMIL'f AME,
TO TO BUL'C FUNM Al NOTHI.G FANCY.


SATCH-EL, 1, AS THe
AUTHOR, WILL NOT MAKE
A PENN'( cFF THIS 00K.
ALL PROCEEDS ARE
6COINC To CHAiTnf.





THE ROWLLN4.
NAME?

.1 - -


0* **00


10-1.3


L ~ _______~~.


BPbiy 'CS EMWS rip~ *< uijat un M KIB Fu-F~


**











Story ideas?

Contact
Robert Bridges
Editor
754-0428
rbridges@lakecityreporter.com


Lake City Reporter




BUSINESS


Sunday, October 23, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section C


Obama

signs

3 trade

deals

By JIM ABRAMS
Associated Press
WASHINGTON -
President Barack Obama
signed off Friday on the
First three and possibly
last free
trade agree-
ments of his
administra-
tion, deals
with South
Korea,
Colombia,
and Panama
Obama that could
be woYth
billions to
American exporters and
create tens of thousands
of jobs.'
The three deals were
years in the making, and the
difficulty of bringing them
to fruition make it unlikely
there will be another bilat-
eral trade agreement dur-
ing Obama's current term.
Obama signed them with
none of the ceremonial fan-
fare that normally accom-
panies such triumphs.
Republicans, while support-
ive of, the deals, continue
to find fault with Obama's
trade policies. And nearly
three-fourths of House
Democrats voted,; against
the trade measures.
The agreements will
OBAMA continued on 2C


LCMC is the place to go for

unique, handmade items


'Last year, the
gift shop donated
about $17,000
to charities.'
0 1 ) Linda Butler, gift shop manager


By GORDON JACKSON
giackson@lakecityreporter.com
Staff at the Lake City
Medical Center gift shop
are already busy prepar-
ing for Black Friday, the
busiest shopping day of
the year for merchants across the
nation.
For those who don't have the
gift shop on their list of destina-
tions for Christmas shopping,
Linda Butler says they are losing
an opportunity to find unique, rea-
sonably priced handmade items
that make perfect gifts.
Butler, the gift shop manager,
said jewelry is the big seller, fol-
lowed by collegiate memorabilia
and an assortment of other mer-
chandise such as wind chimes,
dolls, purses and wallets. The gift
shop is also preparing to bring in
additional items for the 20 percent
off sale on most merchandise
sold between Black Friday the
day after Thanksgiving and
Christmas.
"We're doing our best to have a
good Christmas," she said. "We've
got unique things at a reasonable
price."
The non-profit gift shop is
staffed entirely by volunteers, with
proceeds going to local charities,
GIFT SHOP continued on 2C


GORDON JACKSON/Lake City Reporter
Linda Butler, a Lake City Medical Center Auxiliary volunteer, sorts bracelets she makes by hand that are sold at the
medical center's gift shop. Butler, who volunteered more than 1,100 hours managing the non-profit gift shop last
year, said all profits go to local charities. The gift center donated more than $17,000 last year.


ij ,
: \ \'cofd A mer Boar' d









Dr. Nidadavolu has always been driven by a strong desire to
ease the pain and suffering of others. He first demonstrated
that passion by participating in numerous vaccination and
prevention programs early in his career. And now, along with
his considerable neurological training and expertise, he brings
that same desire to case suffering and improve lives to Lake City.
We proudly welcome a true professional with a very big heart.


Shandsi...c 5 i
Regional Medical Center


4355 NW American Lane
Lake City, FL 32055 386-755-1221


Successful Surgery depends on

being in the Right Hands.


Our surgeons
specialize in


Breast
Colon and rectal
Cystoscopic
Endoscopic
Gallbladder
General surgery
Heria repair
Hysterectomy
Laparoscopic
Thyroid and parathyroid


FL4.Y'- r Polme sk!iM.D.
r ^ G'..w i4fSurgery


Edwin Gonzalez M.D., FACS
General Surgery


Hands hold the skill to create and renew. They hold the
power to heal, which is why you want to be in the right hands
should the need for surgery arise. At Shands Lake Shore
Regional Medical Center, our surgeons are trained in the latest
techniques and procedures to provide more treatment options
and reduce recovery times. We offer some of the most advanced
technology and expertise with all the convenience of staying
close to home. If you need the experience of a gifted surgeon
like Dr. Jerzy Polmerski or Dr. Edwin Gonzalez, call Shands
Lake Shore Surgical Specialists, where you're in the right hands.

For an appointment, call 386-755-7788


Shands r ,
Regional Medical Center



Shands Lake Shore Surgical Specialists
755 SW State Road 47 Lake City, FL 32025
ShandsLakeShore.com


i










& ICLK IYRPRE U IES SNAOTBR2,21


Reverse That
Stock Split!
Q What's so bad about reverse
stock splits? B.A.,
Worcester, Mass.
A They rarely involve compa-
nies in the pink of health. It's
mainly outfits in trouble that execute
reverse splits, in order to prop up
their stock prices.
Imagine a stock trading at
$2 per share. If you own 150
shares and the company executes a
1-for-10 reverse split, you'll nd up
with 15 shares, priced around $20
each. Note that before and after the
split, the value of your shares is
the same: $300. All that happened
is that the company increased
its stock price by decreasing its
number of shares.
Some reverse splits happen
so companies can avoid being
delisted from stock exchanges
that have required minimum price
levels or not have their stock
ejected from any mutual funds
that aren't allowed to own stocks
priced below $5.
It's often smaller, less well-
known firms that do reverse splits,
but here are some companies you
may have heard of that executed
them: Citigroup, AIG, AT&T,
7-Eleven, Priceline.com.
If a company you're interested
in plans a reverse split, consider
that a big red flag. Odds are, it's
i trouble. And if you see that a
beleaguered company is suddenly
trading at a thgher price, that
may signal a reverse split.
more than an operational turn-
around.
***
Q What's "profit-taking"? -
A..,T Wilkes Barre, Pa.
A When a stock price suddenly
surges, some investors will
sell their shares, taking their profits
and moving the proceeds into some
other investments. If many inves-
tors sell their shares, this will have.
the effect of depressing the stock's
price for a while. So you're lilkly
to hear now and then that such-
and-such stock is down due
to some profit-taking.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
see Write to Us


Skip This Insurance
Insurance is critical. If you own
a home or a car or a body, you
can find yourself in very hot water
without it. For many of us, other
kinds of insurance are smart pur-
chases, too such as disability
insurance, renter's insurance or
long-term care insurance.
But not all insurance is equally
valuable. Don't waste money buy-
ing insurance you don't need.
Consumer Reports magazine
listed several kinds of insurance'
policies that most people don't
need. Here are some of them:
Mortgage life insurance. It's
cheaper to use term life insur-
ance to cover your mortgage debt,
should you perish.
Credit-card-loss prevention
insurance. This has been known to
cost more than $ 100 per year, but
by law, your losses due to card theft
are capped at $50 per card.
Cancer insurance. Regular
health insurance plans often cover
medical expenses related to cancer
treatments. So don't buy this unless
it's offering more than you have, at



Yo


IL


a reasonable price.
Accidental death insurance.
Since you're extremely unlikely to
die,via an accident, term life insur-
ance is a more logical investment.
Involuntary-unemployment,
insurance. This is designed to
make minimum payments on
your credit card or auto loan debt
should you become unemployed.
Instead, you might maintain an
emergency fund that can cover
your living expenses for three to
six months or more. (Drop by our
savings nook at www.fool.com/
savings for tips on how to'best
invest short-term money.)
Flight insurance. You're
Extremely likely to survive every
flight you take. If you're worried
about premature death, look into
term life insurance.
Even life insurance can be unnec-
essary for some people. If you're
.single and childless, for example,
and no one depends on your
income, skipping it may be best.
Life insurance is meant to protect
critical income streams.
Learn more about insurance and
choosing it well at www.fool.com/
insuradicecenter and (the not-
unbiased) www.iii.org.


Name That Company,
u probably don't know my name,


V but you should. I trace my history
back to-1909, when the Hanover Pret-
Szel Co. started churning out OldeTyme
Pretzels. Today, based in Charlotte,
N.C., I'm a big snack-food company with
brands such as Cape Cod, Tom's, Jays,
Krunchers!, Grande, Padrinos, EatSmart,
Archway, O-Ke-Doke, and Stella D'oro. Two.
najor snack companies merged in 2010 to form
me. One of them is especially active in making
snacks for private labels.and third parties. I was
the first to sell potato chips in foil bags. I rake in
more than a billion dollars annually. Who am I?


Bought Too Soon
My dumbest investment was
buying into Vonage several years
ago. I was taken with its tech-
nology and bought at its IPO at
around $17 per share. It dropped.
fast and is trading below $3 per
share now. J.S., Canton, Ohio
The Fool Responds: It's often
smart to avoid initial public offer-
ings (IPOs). They've been known
to surge upon their debut,
only to settle down later,
hurting their early investors.
Remember, too, that it's
never enough for a com-
pany to have an exciting technol-
ogy or a wonderful product Krispy
Kreme Doughnuts had millions of
fans, but it still ended up causing
many shareholders much pain, as
franchisees filed for bankruptcy and
debt ballooned. Vonage, meanwhile,
had been racking up losses and piling
on debt when it IPOed, and it's still
on shaky ground, with a falling cus-
tomer count and shrinking cash flow.
Don't take unnecessary chances
with your money; remember that
there are lots of attractive stocks
out there, many of which' have little
to no debt and strong track records.
Don't be lured by seemingly low
* prices, either even $1 stocks can
Sbe too expensive.
Do you have an embarrass-
ing lesson learned the hard
Sway? Boil it down to 100 words
* (or less) and send it to The Motley Fool
Scdo My Dumbest Investment. Got one that
W worked? Submit to My Smaatest Investment.
. Ifwe print yours, you'll win a Fool's cap!
*.S@SS. BOO 555005 S


Food Fight at Darden
Sometimes, free breadsticks
aren't enough. Thinning margins
and sluggish sales at Olive Garden
ate into casual-dining juggernaut
Darden Restaurants (NYSE: DRI)
in its latest quarter.
The company behind Red Lob-
ster, Olive Garden and LongHorn
Steakhouse saw net earnings slip 6
percent, while revenue rose 9 per-
cent, approaching $2 billion.
Disruptions caused by Hurricane
Irene weighed on Darden's perfor-
mance, but profitability still would
have inched slightly lower on a.
storm-free basis. New openings and
sales growth at Red Lobster and
LongHorn were more than enough
to offset the 2.9 percent eatery-level
decline at Olive Garden.
There's no point in wondering
what exactly is going wrong at the
Italian chain. Multi-concept opera-
tors are rarely running on all cylin-
ders. A year earlier, it was strength
at Olive Garden that helped pull up
a stalled Red Lobster.
Besides, there's more to running
a successful restaurant chain than
sales growth. Darden saw food
and beverage costs rise faster than
sales, as it didn't pass on higher
commodity costs to its diners. And
it's not just Darden being affected
by rising costs.
Analysts will be watching how
food and beverage costs are holding
up elsewhere, but there won't be a
lot of hope for casual dining com-
panies until the economy improves
and restaurateurs can wean diners
off margin-chomping promotions.
_O.'..'.." ... """" "


LAST WEEK'S TRIVIA ANSWER
Based in Phoenix, I'm a leading waste collection and recycling company.
I employ about 31,000 people, oversee 348 hauling companies, and oper-
tte 193 landfills and 76 recycling centers. I dispose of solid waste in 40
states and Puerto Rico, serving millions of residential customers via con-
tracts with more than 2,800 municipalities. I serve commercial custom-
ers, too, and operate close to 1,000 alternative-energy vehicles. You may
not know my name, as my local units operate under a variety of names,
such as Allied Waste (a company I acquired). I rake in more than $8 billion
annually. Who am I? (Answer: Republic Services)
S Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or
Smartest) Investments (uin to 100 words), and your Trivia entries


Know theanswer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you'll be to Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
entered into a drawing for a nifty prize! Motley Fool. Sorry, we can'tprovide individualfinancial advice.
S 0 0 a .2011 T*IE MOTLEY F OOL/D* BY UNIV RSL *CICK OR * RELE SE10/20* /2011)
0 2011 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIT. BY UNIVERSAL U.IU LK (FOE RELEASE 10/2012011)


(EDITORS: For editorial questions, contact Alan McDermott at amcdermott@amuniversal.com.)


More cuts voted in Greece; riots leave 100 hurt


.By DEREK GATOPOULOS and
SNICHOLAS PAPHITIS
- Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece -
' Greek lawmakers passed a
-deeply resented new auster-
Sity bill Thursday, caving in
Sto the demands of interna-
tional creditors in order to
: avoid a national bankruptcy,
Sas a second day of riots left
one protester dead and more
than 100 people wounded.
The austerity measures
S. won 154-144 in the 300-mem-
ber parliament despite
dissent from a prominent
Socialist lawmaker who
Voted against a key article
of the bill. The vote was.
expected to pave the way
for a vital 8 billion ($11 bil-
lion) payout from creditors
within weeks so Greece can
stay solvent
Clouds of tear gas choked
central Athens ahead of the
vote as riot police intervened
to separate rival demonstra-
tors who fought for several
hours with firebombs and
stones outside parliament
A 53-year-old construction
worker died of heart failure
after attending a mass rally,


SASUUIAITU PKESS
Protesters try to avoid the effects of tear gas fired by police forces during rioting in central
Athens on Thursday. A protester died and dozens were injured during an anti-austerity dem-
onstration that turned violent in the Greek capital, hours before lawmakers were to vote on
deeply unpopular new cutbacks demanded by creditors to keep Greece financial solvent.


while 74 protesters and 32
police officers were hospi-
talized with injuries, police
and state-hospital officials
told The Associated Press.
Several dozen more injured
protesters received first aid
from volunteer medics who
set up a makeshift treat-
ment site on Athens' main


Syntagma Square.
Police said they detained
79 people suspected of vio-
lent conduct.
After initial hours of
calm, the rioting erupted
when hundreds of masked
anarchist youths attacked a
peaceful rally of about 50,000
people outside parliament,


pelting them with firebombs
and jagged chunks of mar-
ble. The Communist-backed
union meinbers counterat-
tacked, and chaos ensued
as the twbo sides fought with
sticks and rocks before riot
police fired volleys of tear
gas to separate them.
Running battles ensued


through the avenues and
side streets of ,central
Athens, with anarchist.riot-
ers ripping up paving stones,
hewing masonry from build-
ings and using garbage to
set up burning barricades.
Unions kept the coun-
try's services crippled on
the second day of a general
strike, in opposition to the
new measures that include
pay and staff cuts in the civil
service as well as pension
cuts and tax hikes for all
Greeks.
Former Labor Minister
Louka Katseli voted against
one article that scales back
collective bargaining rights
for workers. Although she
voted in favor of the overall
bill, Prime Minister George
Papandreou expelled her
from the party's parliamen-
tary group, whittling down
his parliamentary major-
ity to a bare three seats -
down from ten seats two
years ago.
Passing the entire bill was
"a matter of national respon-
sibility for the critical nego-
tiations that lay ahead in the
next few days," Papandreou
said in a statement announc-


ing Katseli's expulsion.
"The government exhaust-
ed every possible effort to
incorporate proposals made
by members of parliament"
Greece now heads into
a series of. tough negotia-
tions in Brussels involving
the 17 finance ministers of
the eurozone and European
leaders. The meetings
kick off on Friday, when
eurozone finance ministers
gather, with the finance'min-
isters of the full 27-nation
European Union in talks on
Saturday, and the EU heads
of state and government on
Sunday.
Greece has avoid bank-
ruptcy only with an 110
billion ($152 billion) bail-
out loan from its 16 euro-
zone partners and the
International Monetary
Fund since May of last year.
Creditors worried about
Greece missing budget tar-
gets had demanded that
Athens pass extra austerity
measures before its gets the
next payout Greece says
it will run out of money in
mid-November without the
next 8 billion ($11 billion)
installment


GIFT SHOP. LCMC is the place to go


OBAMA: President signs 3.trade deals


Continued From Page 1C
Butler said. Last year, the
gift shop donated about
$17,000 to charities.
Butler, who volunteered
at the gift shop 1,100 hours
last year, aid she also
spends much of her free
time making earrings and
bracelets to sell at the gift
shop. She is also constantly
looking for new items to
sell at the shop such as a
football with a University of
Florida logo that has been
turned into a purse.
The gift shop also takes
special orders for hard to


find items or handmade jew-
elry made by volunteers.
"We'll custom make what-
ever style the want, what-
ever charm they want" she
said.
Judy Carr, president
of the Lake City Medical
Center Auxiliary, said busi-
ness has been slower than
last year, but she hopes
a strong Christmas shop-
ping season will enable the
gift shop to raise as much
money as in 2010 to support
local charities.
"We hope we can do bet-


ter than last year, but I don't
know," she said.
Butler said the gift shop
is always seeking volun-
teers to work four-hour
shifts.
"We desperately need
volunteers here," she said.
"We like helping people. It's
a fun place to work."
The gift shop is open
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. week-
days and from noon to 4
p.m. weekends, if volun-
teers are available.
Call (38(i) 7194o008 for
information or to volunteer.


Continued From Page 1C
bring to 20 those countries
that have free trade relations
with the United States.
Trade won't go away as
an issue, as the administra-
tion pushes ahead with a
major Pacific rim trade pact,
Congress and the White
House scuffle over China,
and Republicans take aim at
Obama's policies during the
presidential campaign.
But, "I don't see this
administration coming up
with new free trade agree-
ments," said National
Foreign Trade Council pres-


ident Bill Reinsch. "For the
next six months we ought to
go after trade liberalization
in manageable pieces."
Republicans accuse the
administration of moving
too slowly to find new free
trade partners, resulting in
U.S. exporters losing out to
foreign rivals. The admin-
istration says it is promot-
ing free trade, but wants to
assure that the other side
is playing by the rules, that
basic worker and environ-
mental rights are observed,
and that deals promote U.S.


job growth.
"From day one," U.S.
Trade Representative Ron
Kirk told The Associated
Press, the guiding principle
has been not just to complete
the three trade agreements
but "to develop a new para-
digm for trade, and rebuild
and restore America's confi-
dence in our trading policy."
He added that the admin-
istration was on track of
reaching Obama's goal, set
early last year, of doubling
U.S. exports over a five-year
period.


The Motley Fool

To Educate, Amuse & Enrich


I Ask thefT


-2C


LAKE CITY REPORTER BUSINESS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011













BUSINESS & HOME SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23,2011


THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW THE WEEK IN REVIEW


S. .. :. ,- ... ,:~
.... .. ... .. fd


NYSE AAmex
7431.10 +80.64 2,219.16 +32.63


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
EPasoCp 24.99 +5.40 +27.6
asStrg 9.50 +2.02 +27.0
sny 23.88 +4.90 +25.8
GlobPts 18.96 +378 +24.9
ZaleCp 3.71 +.70 +23.3
Danaos 3.96 +.73 +22.6
SemGrpwt 5.91 +1.06 +21.9
KosasEn 15.31 +2.66 +21.0
Kodak Og 6.32 +1.03 +19.5
iPLXR1K 56.11 +8.92 +18.9

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Bkldrsed 5.70 -2.60 -31.3
Agnicog 43.84-15.43 -26.0
BiPGCrT 12.00 -4.13 -25.6
Calix 6.82 -2.23 -24.6
Jaguar g 4.07 -1.33 -24.6
AMR Cp 3912.02 -3.87 -24.4
Hospira 29.39 -8.68 -22.8
DemMdan 6.14 -1.43 -18.9
Checdpnt 11.96 -2.77 -18.8
CIBER 3.15 71 -.71 -18.4

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
BkofAm 14270313 6.46 +.27
S&P500ETF11365631123.97+1.40
SPDR Fnd6724890 13.13 +.53
DrxFnBull 3943182 13.67+1.24
iShR2K 3471973 71.13 -.01
Ciligrprs 3458792 30.30+1.90
FordM 3349892 12.26 +.70
iShEMkts 3265213 38.86 -.74
GenElec 3264627 16.31 -.29
WellsFargo2660125 26.31 -.36

Diary
Advanced 2,048
Declined 1,095
New Highs 94
NewLows **' 51
Total Issues .3,199
Unchanged 56
Volume 21,460,533,328





Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg


ACELtd 1.36 1.9
AESCorp ... .
AFLAC 1.20 2.8
AK Steel .20 2.5
AMR ... ...
AT&T Inc 1.72 5.9
AbtLab 1.92 3.6
AMD ...
Aeropost ...
Aetna .60 1.6
Agilent ... ...
Agnicog .64 1.5
AlcatelLuc... .
Alcoa .12 1.2
Allstate .84 3.1
AlphaNRs ...
Altria 1.64 6.0
AMovllLs .41 1.7
AEP 1.84 4.7
AmExp .72 1.5
AmlntlGrp ...
Anadarko .36 .5
AnalogDev1.00 2.8
Annaly 2.51 15.7
AonCorp .60 1.2
Apache .60 .6
ArcelorMit .75 4.0
ArchCoal .44 2.7
ArchDan .64 2.2
ArcosDorn .12 ...
ATMOS 1.36 4.0
Avon .92 3.9
BB&TCp .64 2.8
BHP BilIt 2.02 2.7
BakrHu .60 1.1
BcoBrades .80 4.7
BcoSantSA .84 10.1
BcoSBrasil1.65 19.4
BkofAm .04 .6
BkNYMel .52 2.5
Barclay .36 3.1
BariPVixrs...
BanickG .48 1.1
Baxter 1.24 2.3
BerkH ... ...
BestBuy .64 2.5
Blackstone :40 2.9
BlockHR .60 ~.2
Boeing 1.68 2.6
BostonS ...
BrMySq 1.32 4.1
CBREGrp ...
CBSB .40 1.6
CMSEng .84 4.0
CSXs .48 2.2
CVSCare .50 1.4
CdnNRsgs .36 ...
CapOne .20 .5
CapitlSrce .04 .6
Carnival 1.00 2.9
Caterpillar 1.84 2.1
Cemex
CenterPnt .79 3.7
CntryUnk 2.90 8.2
ChesEng .35 1.3
Chevron 3.12 3.0
Chimera .57 19.7
Chubb 1.56 2.3
Ciligrprs .04 .1
CliffsNRs 1.12 1.9
CocaCola 1.88 2.8
Comerica .40 1.6
CompPrdS ...
ConAgra .96 3.8
ConocPhil 2.64 3.7
ConEd 2.40 4.0
ConstellEn .96 2.5
Coming .30 2.2
Covidien. .90 2.0


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Eectmed 4.31 +.80 +22.8
TrangPet 5.0 +.87 +21.1
XPOLogrs10.65 +1.59 +17.5
WstC&Ggs 2.05 +.30 +17.1
TravelCtrs 4.45 +.64 +16.8
Engex 2.32 +.28 +13.7
VoyagerOG 2.57 +.29 +12.7
PernixTh 11.05 +1.18 +12.0
MexcoEn 6.86 +.73 +11.9
Protalix 5.39 +.57 +11.8

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Quepasa 2.96 -.64 -17.8
GoldRsvg 2.02 -.39 -16.2
GtPanSilvg 2.11 -.37 -14.9
PitWVa 12.65 -2.22 -14.9
GoldenMin 7.62 -1.31 -14.7
Nevsung 4.67 -.80 -14.6
QuestRMg 2.75 -.47 -14.6
Medgenicn 4.00 -.63 -13.6
TrioTch 2.61 -.38 -12.7
FullHseR 2.44 -.34 -12.2

Most Active ($1 or more)
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
NwGoldg 217988 11.17 -.53
Rentech 196726 1.22 +09
NovaGldg 154279 7.54 +.13
GoldStrg 146670 2.06 -.20
NthglMg 129032 3.28 -.43
ChqiniereEn111770 6.03 +.29
VantageDd 104806 1.30 +.02
DenisnMg 83116 1.38 +.14
GtPanSilvg 77550 2.11 -.37
NAPallg 69681 2.90 +.13

Diary
Advanced 244
Declined 265
New Highs 3
NewLows 18
Total issues 531
Unchanged 22
Volume 398,908,162


YTD Wkly
%Chg Last


9 +4.04
13 +.68
9 +1.42
..+.53
... -.25
15 -.04
19 +1.13
4 -.20
8 +.62
8 +.26
13 +1.93
20-15.43
.. -.43
10 -.03
26 +1.94
53 +.08
17 -.22
10 +.01
13 +.47
12 +2.36
... +.64
47 +8.47
12 -.69
5 -.11
18 +4.21
10 +3.52
9 -1100
12 -.92
9 +.84
... -3.38
'15 +.46
14 +1.14
15 +.51
... -2.63
17 -2.18
... .11
... -.10
+.29
... +.27
10 +1.73
... ,+.41
... +3.33
12 -3.65
15 -1.11
16 +2.70
9 +.42
... +.38
13 -.47
14 +.70
15 -.30
17 +.12
20 +.07
15 +1.32
14 +.49
13 +.73
14 +.55
... +.78
6 +1.23
20 +.33
14 +1.05
14 +3.76
... -.23
18 +.88
13 +.59
10 +.06
9 +5.06
5 +.05
11 +5.84
8 +1.90
6 -5.18
13 +.34
'11 -1.28
15 -.20
15 -.11
9 +2.84
17 +2.21
18 +.04
7 +.03
12 -.68


Name


Nasdaq
'2,637.46 -30.39


Gainers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
dysPh 3.68 +2.64+253.4
FstSecurrs 3.47 +1.33 +2.1
SCanttyPk 11.21 +3.20 +40.0
Pizzalnn 4.90 +1.40 +40.0
Halozyme 8.22 +2.13 +35.0
SelCt 21.57 +5.35 +33.0
HorizPhn 7.25 +1.77 +32.3
Trunkbwn 2.62 +.63 +31.7
PureCyde 2.49 +.59 +31.1
SeagateT 15.42 +3.62 +30.7

Losers ($2 or more)
Name Last Chg %Chg
Crocs 15.25-11.72 -43.5
EssexRent 2.13 -.86 -28,8
PorterBp 2.03 -.77 -27.5
Polycos 16.51 -6.12 -27.0
AcmePkt 30.37-10.88 -26.4
GreenMtC 67.85-24.24 -26.3
Iridiumun 6.90 -1.80 -20.7
Cirrus 14.54 -3.78 -20.6
NVECorp 55.20-13.65 -19.8
supportcrn 2.06 -.51 -19.8

Most Active ($1 ormore
Name Vol(00) Last Chg
Intel 477303 24.03 +.53
PwShsQQQ346268157.30 -.88
Microsoft 2836663 27.16 -.11
SiriusXM 2778547 1.78 -.03
Cisco 1995854 17.38 -.17
Yahoo 1737635 16.12 +.21
Dellinc 1593619 15.24-1.38
MicronT 1418283 5.46 -.24
Oracle 1374097 32.12 +.27
HuntBnk 1373893 4.90 -.33

-Diary
Advanced 1,162
Declined 1,542
New Highs 68
NewLows 118
Total issues 2,773
Unchanged 69
Volume 9,837,988,702





Wkly YTD Wkdy
iv YId PE, Cho %Cho .Last


CSVS2xVxS... .
CSVellVSt s... .
CredSuiss 1.40 5.2
Cummins 1.60 1.7
DDRCorp .24 2.0
DRHorton .15 1.4.
DTE 2.35 4.5
Danaher .10 .2
Deere 1.64 2.3
DeltaAir
DenburyR ...
DeutschBk 1.07 2.8
DevonE .68 1.1
DrSCBrrs ...
DirFnBr rs ...
DrxEnBear ...
DirEMBear ... .
DrxFnBull ... ...
DirxSCBull .. ...
DirxEnBull ...
Discover .24 1.0
Disney .40 1.1
DomRescs1.97 3.8
DowChm 1.00 3.7
DukeEngy 1.00 4.9
DukeRIty .68 6.0
EMCCp .. ..
Eatons 1.36 3.2
EIPasoCp .04 .2
EldorGldg .12 ...
EmersonE 1.38 2.9
EnCanag .80 3.8
Exelon 2.10 4.8
ExxonMbl 1.88 2.3
FstHorizon .04 .6
FirstEngy. 2.20 4.8
FordM ...
ForestOils ...
FMCGs 1.00 2.7
FrontierCm .75 12.2
GameStop ...
Gannett .32 2.9
Gap .45 2.4
GenGrPrn r.40 3.0
GenMills 1.22 3.1
GenMotn ...
GenOn En ...
Genworth ...
Gerdau .25 3.2
GoldFLtd ..24 1.5
Goldcrp g .41 .9
GoldmanS 1.40 1.4
Goodyear ...
HCPInc 1.92 5.1
Hallibrtn .36 1.1
HarleyD .50 1.3
HartfdFn .40 2.1
HItMgmt ... ...
HeclaM
Hertz
Hess .40 .7
HewlettP .48 1.9
HomeDp 1.00 2.7
Honwillnt 1.33 2.6
Hospira
HostHotls .16 1.2
Huntsmn .40 3.9
ING
iShGold
iSAslla 1.06 4.6
iShBraz 3.42 5.9
iShGer .67 3.2
iSh HK .42 2.7
iShJapn .17 1.8
iSh Kor .50 .9
iSTaiwn .29
iShSilver ...
iShChina25.85 2.5
iSSP500 2.45 2.0


... +6.76
-.75
... -1.07
12 -3.38
... +.70
90. +.87
13 +1.31
17 +1.53
12 +.84
17 +.09
23 +1.61
... +.48
5 +3.70
... -.67
.. -6.44
... -1.36
...' +.82
... +1.24
-.38
... +3.36
6 -.98
15 +.69
17 +1.58
12 -.44
14 +.63
56 +.75
24 +.94
12 +.08
33 +5.40
40 -.24
15 '.-.09
37 +.08
13 +.08
11 +2.02
29 +.36
19 +1.56
6 +.70
11 -.62
6 -.19
38 +.16
9 -.12
5 +.22
10 +.93
.. +.70
15 +.13
7 +.19
... +.06
... +.13
-.48
2 +.05
15 -3.75
16 +5.36
... +.70
32 +1.54
12 -3.93
20 -.27
5 +.72
12 +.30
20 -.46
15 -.02
7 +2.33
6 -.73
17 +1.81
13 +1.83
9 -8.68
... +1.08
8 -.05
.. +.35
-.40
-.30
... -1.24

-.34
-.03
.. +.16
.-.26
.. -.86
... -1.21
.. +1.39


-12.5 56.65
-47.5 6.27
-33.2 26.98
-14.4 94.22
-15.0 11.98
-9.2 10.83
+14.5 51.89
-.6 46.91
-13.0 72.23
-31.3 8.66
-16.7 15.91
-25.6 38.72
-18.0 64.41
-23.5 35:81
-4.2 45.25
-38.6 13.84
+13.1 22.95
-50.9 13.67
-40.8 42.85
-19.3 47.16
+24.9 23.15
-6.3 35.16
+21.9 52.07
-20.2 27.24
+15.4 20.55
-9.5 11.28
+4.9 24.03
-16.8 42.25
+81.6 24.99
-8.5 17.00
-17.1 47.42
-28.2 20.91
+4.0 43.31
+9.6 80.13
-41.3 6.92
+23.9 45,86
-27.0 12.26
-56.5 11.87
-39.1 36.58
-37.0 6.13
+9.4 25.04
-26.0 11.16
-15.1 18.71
-12.9 13.48
+11.8 39.79
-33.9 24.35
-25.5 2.84
-54.3 6.00
-44.3 7.79
-13.7 15.64
-2.9 44.63
-39.3 102.09
+9.5 12.97
+3.2 37.97
-18.0 33.50
+8.5 37.60
-27.6 19.19
-10.6 8.53
-50.9 5.53
-24.4 10.96
-21.9 59.80
-39.7 25.38
.+5.1 36.86
-3.5 51.28
-47.2 29.39
-24.7 13.45
-34.0 10.31
-10.5 8.76
+15.0 15.99
-9.5 23.02
-25.6 57.55
-12.8 20.87
-17.0 15.71
-12.1 9.59
-13.4 52.98
-19.6 12.57
+1.0 30.48
-22.3 33.46
-1.5 124.33


STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST .


Name Ex Div Last


Wiy WMy YTD
Chg %Chg %Chg


AT&Tlnc NY 1.72 29.13 -.04 -0.1 -.9
Alcoa NY *.12 10.23 -.03 -0.3 -33.5
AutoZone NY ... 327.50 -.62 -0.2 +20.1
BkofAm NY .04 6.46 +.27 +4.4 -51.6
BobEvans Nasd 1.00 31.73 +38 +1.2 -3.7
BostonSc NY ... 5.39 -.30 -5.3 -28.8
CNBFnPANasd .66 13.92 -.32 -2.2 -6.0
CSXs NY .48 21.86 +.73 +3.5 +1.5
Chevron NY 3.12 105.53 +5.06 +5.0 +15.6
Cisco Nasd .24 17.38 -.17 -1.0 -14.1
Ciigrprs NY .04 30.30 +1.90 +6.7 -35.9
CocaCola NY 1.88 68.19 +.34 +0.5 +3.7
Delhaize NY 2.45 65.51 -.29 -0.4-11.1
Dell Inc Nasd ... 15.24 -1.38 -8.3 +12.5
DrSCBrrs NY ... 35.81 -.67 -1.8 -23.5
DrxFnBull NY ... 13.67 +1.24 +10.0 -50.9
DirxSCBullNY ... 42.85 -.38 -0.9 -40.8
EMCCp NY ... 24.03 +.94 +4.1 +4.9
EIPasoCp NY .04 24.99 +5.40+27.6 +81.6
FamilyDIr NY .72 59.10 +4.70 +8.6 +18.9
FordM NY ... 12.26 +.70 +6.1 -27.0
GenElec NY .60 16.31 -.29 -1.7 -10.8
Hallibrtn NY .36 33.50 -3.93-10.5 -18.0
HomeDp NY 1.00 36.86 +1.81 +5.2 +5.1
iShEMkts NY .84 38.86 -.74 -1.9 -18.4
iShR2K NY 1.02 71.13 -.01 ... -9.1
Intel Nasd .84 24.03 +.53 +2.3 +14.3
JPMorgChNY 1.00 33.42 +1.53 +4.8 -21.2


Name Ex DIv
Lowes NY .56
McDnlds NY 2.80
MicronT Nasd
Microsoft Nasd .80
MorgStan NY .20
NY Tuies NY
NextEraEnNY 2.20
NobtyHlf Nasd
NokiaCp NY .55
OcciPet NY 1.84
Oracle Nasd .24
Penney NY .80
PepsiCo NY 2.06
Pfizer NY .80
Potash s NY .28
PwShsQOQNasd .41
PrUShS&PNY
Ryder NY 1.16
S&P500ETFNY 2.46
SearsHldgsNasd ...
SiriusXM Nasd
SouthnCo NY 1.89
SprintNex NY
SPDRFndNY .20
TimeWam NY .94
WalMart NY 1.46
WellsFargo NY .48
Yahoo Nasd ...


Wkb Wkly YTD
Last Chg%Chg Chg
22.13 +1.34 +6.4 -11.8
92.32 +238 +2.6 +20.3
5.46 -.24 -4.2 -31.9
27.16 -.11 -0.4 -2.7
17.02 +1.80 +11.8 -37.4
7.21 +.26 +3.7 -26.4


55.87 +1.01
5.20 -.16
6.61 +.27
86.74 +1.32
32.12 +.27
32.89 +2.85
62.28 +.04
19.06 +.02
49.26 -1.44
57.30 -.88
20.91 -.55
47.09 +2.12
123.97 +1.40
74.95 +3.41
1.78 -.03
43.94 +1.27
2.77 -.02
13.13 +.53
34.77 +1.24
56.92 +1.46
26.31 -.36
16.12 +.21


+1.8
-3.0 -
+4.3 -
+1.5 -
+0.8
+9.5
+0.1
+0.1
-2.8

-2.6-
+4.7-
+1.1
+4.8
-1.4
+3.0 +
-0.7 -
+4.2 -
+3.7
+2.6
-1.3 -
+1.3


+7.5
35.9
35.9
11.6
+2.6
+1.8
-4.7
+8.9
-4.6
+5.2
12.0
-10.5


Weekly Dow Joe

Dow Jones Industrals -247.49 180.05 -72.43 37.16 267.01
Close: 11,808.79 !
1-week change: 164.30 (1.4%) MON TUES WED THUR FRI
13,000 ........ ...... ........ .. .... ... . .


12,000 -....... ....


11,000 -................ .. ..



10,000-A M J........ .... ..... ...A .............. S


-1.4

+168 [ .AmUTU m FDS :
4.9 TotalAssets Total RetunlRank Pct ln Init
34.5 Name Ob) ($Mlns) NAV 4-wk 12-mo 5-year Load Invt
.17


-I/.'
+8.1
+5.5
-15.1
-3.1


Stock Foototes: g = Dividends and eamng In Canadian dollars. h Does not meetcontinued-ellelng standards.
f = Late filng with SEC. n= New In past 52weeks.pf = Preferred.rs= Stockhas undergone a reverse stock spl
of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Rigt to buy secudly at a specified price., = Stock has spt by at
least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distrbuled, wi
When issued. wt= Warants.
Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs Is paid from fund assets, d Deferred sales hrge
redemption fee. f= front toad (sales charges). m :Multiple fees are charged. NA= not avalabla: p prevlou day
net asset value, s = fund splt shares during the week. x =fund paid a dstrbutondung the weeGalne d
Loser must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Mot Actives must be worth at tast $1. Volume in
hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Salesfigures are unofficial.


I' Currencies -


Last Pvs Day


Australia .9672 .9749
Britain 1.5939 1.5790
Canada 1.0093 1.0142
Euro .7213 .7258
Japan 76.12 76.85
Mexico 13.6690 13.6550
Switzernd .8846 .8942


British pound expressed in U.S. dollars. All oth-
ers show dollar in foreign currency.


New York Stock Exchange


KEEP A LEVEL HEAD

IN AN UP-AND-DOWN MARKET


Amid recent market volatility, we've seen substantial
upswings and downturns. But when the market reacts one
way, it doesn't mean you should, too. The actions you take
today can Lignifiaantll impact your financial future.
So before you alter your investment strategy, schedule a
financial review. We can help you stay focused despite the
market's recent disappointments and d idppinriulnitir'.
for the long term.


Call todav to schedule your financial review.

Steve Jones, CFPM
Financial Advisor
2929 West US Highway 90
SSuite 114
Lake City; FL 32055
386-752-3847

ww.edwardjoneS.com Member SIPC


Wkly YTD Wkly Wly YTD Wly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last Name Dlv Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


iShEMIks .84 2.2
iShB20T 3.94 3.5
iSEafe 1.68 3.2
iShR2K 1.02 1.4
iShREst 2.18 4.0
IngerRd .48 1.7
IBM 3.00 1.7
IntlGame .24 1.5
IntPap 1.05 4.0
Interpublic .24 2.8
Invesco .49 2.6
ItauUnibH .84 4.6
JPMorgCh 1.00 3.0
Jabil .32 '1.6
JanusCap .20 3.0
JohnJn 2.28 3.6
JohnsnCtl .64 2.0
JnprNtwk ...
KB Home .25 3.3
KeyEngy .
Keycorp .12 1.7
Kimco .72 4.4
KindMorn 1.20 4.1
Kinrossg .12 .9
KodiakOg ...
Kohls 1.00 1.8
Kraft 1.16 3.3
LSICorp ...
LVSands ...
LennarA .16 1.0
Level3 rs
UllyEli 1.96 5.1


... -.74
... -.82
-.04
-.01
... +1.71
.-2.59
14 -8.90
19 -.05
9 -.08
16 +.42
10 +.59
... +.05
7 +1.53
12 -.15
7 +.07
16 -.94
15 .+.35
22 -.44
... +.85
10 -.57
7 +.44
91 +.83
... +2.33
19 -.93
90 +1.03
14 +3.74
20 -.03
11 -.08
30 -3.96
35 +1.46
... -1.25
9 -.22


-18.4 38.86
+20.2 113.13
-10.5 52.08
-9.1 71.13
-2.9 54.36
-40.7 27.94
+23.8 181,63
-8.1 16.25
-4.8 25.93
-20.6 8.43
-22.1 18.74
-24.0 18.16
-21.2 33.42
-.8 19.92
-49.2 6.59
+3.1 63.78
-14.4 32.69
-42.8 21.12
-44.2 7.53
-15.6 10.95
-21.5 6.95
-9.5 16.32
-5.9 29.22
-27.7 13.70
-4.2 6.32
-.3 54.19
+11.7 35.20
-2.2 5.86
-10.1 41.29
-10.8 16.73
+59.9 23.50
+8.6 38.07


UncNat .20 1.1
UzClaib
LyonBasA .80 2.6
MEMC
MFA Fncl 1.00 15.5
MGIC ...
MGMRsts ...
Macys .40 1.3
MagHRes ...
Manitowoc .08 .9
ManpwrGp .80 2.0
Manulifeg .52 ...
MarathnOs .60 2.3
MklVGold .40 .1
MktVRus .18 .6
MarlntA .40 1.3
MarshM .88 2.9
Masco .30 3.3
McDrmlnt ...
Medtmic' .97 2.8
Merck 1.52 4.6
MetUfe .74 2.2
MetroPCS ...
MobileTele 1.06 7.5
Molycorp ...
Monsanto 1.20 1.6
MorgStan .20 1.2
Mosaic .20 .3
NCRCorp ... .
Nabors
NBkGreece .29 ...
NatGrid 2.92 5.7


5 +1.04
+.31
+1.82
18 -.30
7 -.10
... -.09
+.01
12 +.58
... +.22

... -.79
.. -.10
5 +1.26
... -3.98
... +.15
61 +.31
17 +2.16
... +.53
17 -.41
12 +1.19
12 +.37
9 +1.34
14 +.09
10 -.26
... -1,28
25 +.43
10 +1.80
12 +1.34
13 -.17
16 -.15
.. +.01
... +.58


PIMCO TotRelts CI
Vanguard TotStldx LB
American Funds CaplncBuA m IH
Fidelity Contra LG
Vanguard Instldxl LB
American FundsGrthAmA m LG
American Funds IncAmerA m MA
Vanguard 500Adml LB
Vanguard TotStlAdm LB
American Funds'CpWidGrlA m WS
American FundslinvCoAmA m LB
Dodge & Cox IntlStk FV
American Funds WAMutlnvA m LV
Dodge & Cox Stock LV
FraniTemp-FranKin Income A m CA
Vanguam instPlus LB
PIMCOTolRerAdm b CI
Vanguard ToIBoAdm Cl
Amencan Funbs EurPacGrA m FB
American Funds BalA m MA
Vanguard Totint d FB
American Funds FnlnvA m LB
Vanguard WellnAdm MA
American Funds NewPerspA m WS
PIMCOTotRetA m CI
Vngurd 5001nv LB
ranTemp-Templeton GBondAdv IB


143,222
54,584
52,811
52,421
52,251
51,434
48,664
46,205
43,815
43,482
39,741
35,768
34,692
34,245
32,845
32,673
31,525
30,034
29,151
28,742
28,698
27,768
26,965
26,896
26,312
25,318
25,305


-0.2/E
+6.7/B
+2.5/A
+6.4/C
+7.1/A
+1.8/E
+5.1/A
+7.0/A
+6.9/B
4.9/D
+2.5/D
-9,8/D
+9.6/A
+2.1/D
+3.6/B
+7.1/A
-0.5/E
+4.1/A
-9.8/0
+6.7/A
-8.7/D
+3.1/D
+5.4/A
-1.9/C
-0.6/E
+6.9/A
0.0/E


,NL 1,000,000
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 2,500'
NL' 5,000,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL, 10,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 2,500
5.75 250
NL 2,500
4.25 1,000
NL 200,000,000
NL 1,000,000
NL 10,000
5.75 250
5.75 250
NL 3,000
5.75 250
NL 50,000
5.75 250
3.75 1,000
NL 3,000
NL 50,000


CA~Cmssntvakuriss cI -lntennedatelra turd. E5.urwe Stod reFren La~gs Blen, FO-Parsigs Lsrgel setrFV Farl


. .~.. .. .


WkIy YTD Wkly
Name Div YId PE Chg %Chg Last
NOilVarco .44 .7 16 -.69 -2.3 65.72
NwOriEds ......... -3.25 +2.4 26.95
NYCmtyB 1.0 8.1 11 -.30 -34.2 12.41
NewellRub .32 2.4 12 +.35 -26.1 13.44
NewfldExp ... ..., 8 -4.95 -49.1 36.73
NewmtM 1.20 1.9 14 -4.23 +2.0 62.63
NextEraEn2.20 3.9 14 +1.01 +7.5 55.87
NiSource .92 4.0 21 +1.15 +30.0 22.90
NobleCorp .53 1.5 26 +3.27 -2.9 34.75
NokiaCp .55 8.3 ... +.27 -35.9 6.61
NorflkSo 1.72 2.4 16 +2.73 +12.9 70.90
Nucor 1.45 3.9 19 +.92 -16.0 36.80
OcciPet 1.84 2.1 12 +1.32 -11.6 86.74
OfficeDpt ... ...... +.11 -58.0 2.27
OilSvHT 1.58 .9 ... -1.49 -14.1 120.66'
PG&ECp 1.82 4.2 16 +.50 -10.1 43.00
PMIGph ... ...... +.02 -90.7 .31
PNC 1.40 2.6 9 +3.25 -11.0 54.06
PPLCorp 1.40 4.8 12 +.90 +11.8 29.42
ParkerHan1.48 1.9 11 +4.24 -9.8 77.85
PatriotCoal ... ...... -.87 -48.6 9.96
PeabdyE .34 .9 12 -.57 -39.2 38.89
Penney .80 2.4 19 +2.85 +1.8 32.89
PepsiCo 2.06 3.3 16 +.04 .4.7 62.28
PetrbrsA 1.34 6.1 .. ;-.96 -35.2 22.14
Petrobras 1.26 -5.3 ':. 9 -36.7 23.94
Pfizer .80 4.2 ,1 +.02 +8.9 19.06
PhilipMor 3.08 4.4-46--+2.60 +19.6 70.00
Potash s .28 .6 18 -1.44 -4.6 49.26
PSUSDBul.., ... .. -.11 -5.2 21.54
PrecDrill ......... -.11 +13.2 10.97
ProLogis 1.12 4.1 ... +1.82 -13.0 27.60
ProShtS&P... ... ... -.54 -4.6 41.84
PrUShS&P ... ...... -.55 -12.0 20.91
PrUIShDow ... ...... -.56 -17.0 17.18
ProUltQQQ... ..... -2.71. +6.2 86.44
PrUShQQQrs... ..... +1.16 -22.8 44.91
ProUtSP .31 .7 ... +.89 -5.8 45.27
ProUShL20 ... ...... +27 -41.1 21.83
ProUltFin .15 .3 ... +3.03 -33.0 44.50
ProUSSPSOO... ...... -.65 -22.2 15.10
PrtJItSP500s.03 .1 ... +1.74 -13.4 59.18
ProUSSIvrs... ...... +.58 -63.7 14.24
ProUShEuro.. ...... -.07 -12.2 17.83
ProgsvCp 1.40 2.2 11 +.64 -6.4 18.59
ProUSR2Krs... ...... -.37 -9.0 45.71
Prudent 1.15 2.2 8 +2.31 -9.3 53.23
PuteGrp ... ....... +.47 -34.8 4.90
QksilvRes ... ... 4 -.92 -47.5 7.74
RadianGrp .01 .4 ... +.03 -69.6 2.45
Raytheon 1.72 3.9 7 +1.20 -4.3 43.97
RegionsFn .04 1.1 ... +.08 -46.0 3.78
RioTinto 1.17 2.3 ...-3.07 -29.6 50.44
RiteAid ......... +.03 +23.4 1.09
SLMCp .40 2.9 15 +45 +11.1 13.99
SpdrDJIA 3.23 2.7 ... +1.70 +1.9 117.85
SpdrGold ... ...... -3.88 +15.0 159.52
SPMid 1.64 1.0 ... +1.01 -5.0 156.49
S&P500ETF2.46 2.0 ... +1.40 -1.4 123.97
SpdrHome .31 1.9 ... +.00 -7.8 16.03
SpdrKbwBk .26 1.3 ... +.45 -25.3 19.36
SpdrLehHY4.28.10.4 ... +.81 -3.3 38.40
SpdrLel-3bllb... ... ... ... ... 45.84
SpdrKbwRB.40 1.7 ... +1.38 -13.4 22.91
SpdrRetl .49 .9 ... +1.22 +7.9 5?.16
SpdrOGEx .50 .9 ...+1.95 +.1 52.80
SpdrMetM .42 .8 ... -.67 -26.1 50.82
Safeway .58 3.1 11 +1.18 -16.2 18.85
StJude .84 2.1 14 +1.55 -6.4 40.03
SandRdge .. .. 30 +.37 -2.3 7.15
SaraLee .46 2.6 9 +.01 +1.5 17.77
Schlmbrg 1.00 1.5 20 -3.56 -19.3 67.38
Schwab .24 2.0 18 -.49 -28.3 12.26
SemiHTr .64 2.1 ... +.04 -5.8 30.65
SiderurNac .81 10.0 ... -.62 -51.6 8.07
SilvWhtng .12 .4 23 -2.35 -23.7 29.80
SouthnCo 1.89 4.3 19 +1.27 +14.9 43.94
SwstAir .02 .2 40 +.26 -31.7 8.87
SwstnEngy... ... 23 +1.23. +7.5 40.25


Wky YTD Wkly
Name Div Yld PE Chg %Chg Last


SpectraEn 1.04
SprintNex ...
SP Mails .82
SPHIthC .64
SP CnSt .85
SP Consum .61
SPEngy 1.08
SPDR Fnc .20
SP Inds .69
SPTech .36
SPUtil 1.36
StarwdHtl .30
StateStr .72
StatoilASAI.10
Suncorgs .44
Suntech ...
SunTrst .20
SupEnrgy ...
Supvalu .35
SwiftTmsn ...
Synovus .04
Sysco 1.04
TE Connect .72
TaiwSemi .52
TalismE g .27
Target 1.20
TeckRes g .60
TenetHth ...
Teradyn
Terex
Tesoro
Texinst .68
Textron .08
-ThennoFis ...
3MCo 2.20
TimeWam .94
TollBros ...
Total SA 2.38
Transocn .79
Travelers 1.64
TrinaSolar ...
UBSAG ...
USAlrwy ...
UnionPac 1.90
UtdCont ...
UPSB 2.08
UtdRentals ...
USBancrp .50
USNGsrs ..
USOilFd ...
USSteel .20
UtdhlthGp .65
UnumGrp .42
Vale SA 1.14
Vale SA pf 1.14
ValeroE .20
VangEmg .82
VerizonCm 2.00
Visa .88
VMware ...
Walgm .90
WsteMInc 1.36
Weathflntl
WellsFargo .48
Wendys Co .08
WDigital
WstnUnion .32
Weyerh .60
WhiingPts ...
WmsCos 1.00
XLGrp .44
Xerox .17
Yamanag .18
YumBmds 1.14


16 +1.63 +13.1
... -.02 -34.5
... -.11 -13.1
... +.23 +5.1
+.60 +7.4
+.65 +5.1
...+1.95 +.4
+.53, -17.7
+.48 -6.3
... -.47 11.3
.. +.90 +11.3
19 +.91-20.6
12 +4.88 -16.3
... +.59 +7.4
14 -.27 -21.4
2 -.33 -74.2
18 -.47 -37.1
17 -.25 -24.6
67 -.18 -17.0
+.76 -27.7
-.02 -50.4
14 +.28 -8.3
12 -.38 -4.3
.. -.12 -2.9
... +51 -37.4
.13 +1.69 -9.1
...-1.78 -44.1
2 4.31 -27.2
7 +:60 -3.4
... +.35 -55.1
9 -.30 +42.4
12 -.47 .-6.3
18 +.53 -19.3
16 -.03 -3.8
14 +1.59 -6.7
14 +1.24 +8.1
39 +2.45 -4.8
... +.70 -1.7
... +4.01 -21.7
15 +6.08 +2.9
2 -.05 -69.5
... +.30 -24.4
5 -.17 -41.4
15 +4.99 +4.6
13 -,35 -14.2
18 +1.10 -3.5
41 +2.51 +5.5
11 +.6A -5.9
.. -.22 -26.4
.-.02 -13.2
...-1.27 -60.0
11 +.70 +32.7
9 +.45 +.5
... -2.03 '-34.0
.. -1.91 -29.3
19 +4)6 +2.4
.. -.62 -17.8
15 +.09 +4.6
20 -.49 +32.8
64 +2.74 +7.8
12 +1.14 -12.4
17 +.99 -8.0
79 +.25 -34.1
10 -.36 -15.1
-.08 +.6
8 -2.37 -23.4
12 +.44 -7.4
4 -.10 -9.7
17 +6.17 -21.1
22 +2.84 +22.0
28 +1.79 -1.3
15 +.10 -32.0
17 -.85 +12.1
20 +1.60 +9.6


28.26
2.77
33.37
33.11
31.47
39.32
68.55
13.13
32.67
25:53
34.88
48.23
38.78
25.52
30.08
2.07
18.57
26.37
7.99
9.04
1.31
26.95
33.87
12.18
13.88
54.64
34.59
4.87
13.56
13.94
26.4Q
30.46
19.07
53.26
80.48
34.77
18.09
52.59
54.43
57.35
7.15
12.45
5.87
96.96
20.43
70.06
24.01
25.39
8.81
33.85'
23.37
47.92
24.35
22.81
21.37
23.68
39.60
37.42
93.43
95.82
34.14
33.91
15.03
26.31
4.65
25.97
17.19
17.09
46.22
30.16
21.54
7.83
14.35
53.74


Nasdaq Most Active


Wky YTD Wkly
Name DIv YId PE Chg %Chg Last


ASML Hid .58 1.4
AcmePkt ...
ActivsBliz .17 1.2
AdobeSy ... ...
AkamrnaiT ......
AlteraCp I .32 .9
Amazon
ACapAgy 5.60 20.2
AmCrapLtd ...
Amgen 1.12 1.9
Amylin


AnadysPh ...
A123 Sys ...
ApolloGrp ...
Apple Inc ...
ApldMatl .32
AriadP
ArmHId .15
ArubaNet ...
AsscdBanc .04
Atmel
Autodesk ...
AutoData 1.44
AvagoTch .44
BMCSft ..
Baidu
BedBath ...
BrigExp ..
Broadcom .36
BrcdeCm ...
CAInc .20
Celgene ..
CienaCorp ...
Cirrus
Cisco .24
Clearwire ...
CognizTech...
ColdwtrCrk ...


... +.18
43-10.88
25 +.57
15 +.49
24 -.61
14 +1.12
...-11.93
4 +.05
2 -.07
12 +1.10
... +.92


+5.6 40.50
-42.9 30.37
+8.4 13.49
-11.3 27.30
-49.3 23.85
+4.1 37.05
+30.4 234.78
-3.6 27.70
-7.1 7.03
+6.7 58.59
-21.1 11.61


...... +2.64+158.8 3.68
...... -.30 -64.2 3.42
... 12 +3.70 +20.6 47.64
.. 14-29.13 +21.8 392.87
2.7 8 +.09 -16.8 11.69
... ... +.77+115.1 10.97
.6 ...-1.56 +29.5 26.88
... 38 -1.45 +10.5 23.08
.4 37 +.58 -26.2 11.18
... 8 +.34 -14.6 10.53
... 29 -.64 -16.8 31.78
2.8 21 +.53 +12.9 52.25
1.3 15 -1.86 +19.1 33.84
15 -.45 -18.2 38.55
... 57-15.44 +26.6 122.16
.. 18 +.64 +25.8 61.81
... 51 +6.18 +34.1 36.54
1.0 21 -.71 -14.5 37.22
... 18 -.23 -19.1 4.28
.9 13 +.23 -10.1 21.97
... 31 +.63 +13.2 66.93
...... +.28 -39.8 12.67
... 6 -3.78 -9.0 14.54
1.4 15 -.17 -14.1 17.38
... ... -.04 -69.9 1.55
.. 26 -2.00 -4.2 70.22
S-. 2 0 7 0 1 9 5


S W My YTD Wly
YId PE Chg %Chg Last I Name


Comcast .45
Comcspcl .45
Compuwre ..
Costco .96
Cree nc '...
Crocs
CubistPh ...
CypSemi .36
Dell Inc
Dndreon
DirecTVA ...
DishNetwk ...
DonlleyRR 1.04
DryShips .12
E-Trade
eBay
EstWstBcp .20
ElectArts
EricsnTel .37
Expedia .28
ExpScripts ...
Fastenal s .56
FifthThird .32
Finisar
FstNiagara .64
FstSolar ...
Rextm ...
FultonFncl .20
GTAdvTc ..
GileadSci ...
Google
GreenMtC ...
Hasbro 1.20
Hologic ...
HudsCity .32
HumGen ...
iShAsiaexJ 1.27
Informant


17 +.39 +11.2 24.33
17 +.28 +15.6 23.94
18 -.15 -26.6 8.56
26 +3.53 +18.1 85.30
27 -5.06 -62.6 24.67
14-11.72 -10.9 15.25
71 +2.50 +88.7 40.38
21 +1.51 ... 18.58
8 -1.38 +12.5 15.24
... +.61 -70.3 10.36
15 -.61 +16.3 46.42
9 -1.59 +31.8 25.91
16 -.07 -9.6 15.79
13 -.14 -52.6 2.60
42 +.21 -37.4 10.01
23 -1.57 +15.4 32.12
13 +1.52 -7.8 18.02
-.96 +44.0 23.58
... -.71 -12.6 10.08
18 -.19 +10.9 27.82
17 -1.04 -27.6 39.14
31 +2.11 +18.5 35.51
10 +.32 -20.6 11.66
19 -1.12 -42.4 17.10
13 -.89 -36.3 8.90
9 -2.46 -58.7 53.77
8 +.11 -16.1 6.59
14 +1.14 -5.6 9.76
5 -.65 -22.8 7.04
12 +1.04 +14.4 41.47
19 -1.19 -.6 590.49
66-24.24+106.5 67.85
13 +.33 -25.6 35.08
... -.04 -17.6 15.50
.. +.33 -51.5 6.18
... +2.25 -44.0 13.37
.. -.90 -19.5 51.25


Wkly YTD Wkly
Div Yld PE Cha %Cha Last


Intel .84
JA Solar ...
JDS Uniph ...
JetBlue
KLATnc 1.40
LamResrch ..
UbtlntAh
UnearTch .96
lluulemn gs ..
MarinaBio ...
MarvellT ...
Mattel .92
Maximlntg .88
MelcoCrwn ..
Microchp 1.39
MicronT
Microsoft .80
NIl Hldg ...
NasdOMX ...
NetApp ...
Netlix ...
NewsCpA .19
NewsCpB .19
NorTrst 1.12
NuanceCm ...
Nvidia
OmniVisn ...
OnSmcnd ...
Oracle .24
PMC Sra ...
Paccar .72
PattUTI .20
Paychex 1.28
PeopUtdF .63
PharmPdt .60
Polycom s ..
Popular


... 43-5.19 -2.5 42.94 Power-One.


3.5 10 +.53 +14.3 24.03
... 2 +.27 -69.1 2.14
... 34 -.39 -27.3 10.52
... 14 -.27 -34.6 4.32
3.2 9 -.55 +12.1 43.30
.. 8 -3.20 -21.6 40.61
.. 13 -.34 -3.3 15.25
3.1 13 -.47 -11.1 30.74
... 48 -4.14 +46.4 50.10
... ... +.05 -87.6 .19
.. 11 -1.84 -29.2 13.14
3.3 14 +.18 +8.9 27.69
3.5 15 -.37 +7.1 25.30
... 57 -.83 +58.5 10.08
4.1 16 +.35 -1.2 33.80
... 36 -.24 -31.9 5.46
2.9 10 -.11 -2.7 27.16
... 12 +1.75 -32.0 30.38
... 11 -.35 +5.8 25.11
... 23 -1.13 -30.7 38.10
... 30 +1.00 -33.4 117.04
1.1 15 +.02 +18.1 17.20
1.1 15 +.10 +5.9 17.39
2.8 16 +3.06 -27.8 39.99
26 +1.37 +39.0 25.27
16 -1.24 -6.0 14.48
... 7 +.82 -43.4 16.77
.. 10 -1.60 -33.5 6.58
.7 18 +.27 +2.6 32.12
... 42 -.39 -26.4 6.32
1.8 21 +.92 -28.9 40.76
1.0 13 -.54 -11.0 19.17
4.4 20 +.28 -6.9 28.78
5.1 22 +.22 -12.6 12.24
1.8 23 +.04 +21.9 33.09
... 25 -6.12 -15.3 16.51
... ... +.06 -42.7 1.80
... 4 -.43 -50.5 5.05


Name


Wky YTD
DIv Yld PE Chg %Chg


PwShs QQQ .41
Powrwav ...
PriceTR 1.24
PrUPShQQQ...
Qualcom .86
RF MicD ...
RschMotn ..
Riverbeds .
SanDisk
SeagateT .72
SelCmft ...
Sequenom ...
Sina
SiiusXM ..
SkywksSol ...
Staples .40
Starbucks .52
StlDynam .40
Symantec ...
TDAmeritr .20
Tellabs .08
TevaPhrm .87
TibcoSft ...
TriQuint
UranmRs ..
UrbanOut ...
VarianSemi
VertxPh ..
VirgnMdah .16
Vodafone" 1.45
Windstrm 1.00
Wynn 2.00
Xilinx .76
YRC rsh ..
Yahoo
ZionBcp .04


.7 ... -.88 +5.2
... 7 -.77 -71.3
2.3 19 +1.28 -15.0
... ... +.78 -36.1
1.7 22 -2.96 +5.1
... 19 -.09 -2.2
... 4-1.20 -60.8
70 +1.11 -30.3
10 +2.97 -.2
4.7 14 +3.62 +2.6
23 +5.35 +136.3
... ... -.47 -39.6
...... -8.62 +22.7
59 -.03 +8.9
... 19 -1.47 -26.9
2.7 11 +.02 -34.6
1.2 28 -.13 +31.0
3.3 11 +.59 -34.4
... 24 +.43 +10.0
1.3 16 +.33 -15.7
1.8 ... +.17 -33.5
2.2 12 -.01 -24.9
... 47 +.24 +35.8
6 -.32 -41.2
... ... +.40 -61.8
... 17 +1.23 -30.0
16 +.35 +69.6
... ... -1.54 +19.2
.6 ... +.72 -.5
5.2 ... +.41 +5.9
8.3 20 +.17 -13.8
1.7 28-14.08 +15.9
2.5 14 -.37 +4.3
... ... -.00 -98.5
.. 20 +.21 -3.1
.2 ... +.27 -29.9


I-

Name Div
AbdAsPac .42
Adventrx ...
AlexcoRg ...
AlidNevG ...
AntaresP ...
Aurizon g ...
AvalRaren ...
BarcUBS36..
BarcGSOi ...
Brigus grs ...
BritATob 3.86
CanoPet ...
CardiumTh ...
CelSci ..
CFCdag .01
CheniereEn...
DejourE g ...
DenisnMg ...
EVLtdDur 1.25
ExeterR gs ...
ExtorreGg ...
FrkStPrp .76
GabGldNR 1.68
GascoEngy ..
Gastargrs ...
GenMoly ...
GoldStrg ...
GranTrra g ...
GrtBasGg ...
GtPanSilvg ...
ImpOil gs .44
IndiaGC ...
IntTowerg ...
KeeganR g ...
LadThalFn ...
LucasEngy ...
MadCatzg ...
MdwGoldq ...


' AMEX Mo sAv e:


Wkly YTD Widy
Yid PE Chg %Chg Last
5.9 ... +.08 +4.9 7.08
... +.02 -59.4 1.06
... ... -.36 -14.1 7.04
...... -2.76 +34.1 35.28
... ... -.10 +30.6 2.22
...... -.27 -27.0 5.34
... ... -.27 -50.3 3.10
... ... -1.05 -11.6 43.43
... ... +.03 -13.5 22.15
... ... -.02 -45.7 1.14
4.2 ... +3.20 +18.4 92.01
... ... -.00 -62.7 .14
... ... -.04 +6.9 .42
... ... +.00 -65.9 .28
... ... -.62 +1.4 21.01
... ... +.29 +9.2 6.03
... ... +.01 +9.4 .35
... ... +.14 -59.6 1.38
8.5 ... +.22 -8.1 14.75
... ... -.36 -43.6 3.50
... ... -.33 +17.6 7.95
6.1 23 +.45 -12.8 12.42
11.0 ... -.19 -20.6 15.30
... ... -.01 -42.9 .20
... ... +.11 -18.6 3.50
... ... -.11 -51.7 3.13
... ... -.20 -55.1 2.06
... ... +.13 -23.9 6.13
... ... -.11 -47.0 1.57
... ... -.37 -24.9 2.11
... ... +.63 +.4 40.68
... ... +.05 -60.0 .23
... ... -.48 -53.0 4.73
... ... -.08 -38.1 5.44
... ... -.10 +47.0 1.72
... ... +.15 -21.5 1.83
... 5 ... -33.3 .68
... ... -.28 +141.7 2.03


Name DIv
Minefnd g ...
NeoStem ..r
Neoprobe ...
Nevsun g .06
NwGoldg ...
NA Pallg ...
NDynMng ...
NthnO&G ...
NthgtMg ...
NovaGld g ..
Osandsg ..
ParaG&S ...
PhrmAlh ...
PionDrill ...
Quepasa ..
QuestRM g
RareEle g
Rerntech ..
Richmnt g ..
Rubicon g
SamsO&G
SeabGldg ...
TanzRyg
Taseko
TmsatlPet
TravelCtra ...
TriValley ...
TriangPet ..
Ur-Energy ...
Uranerz
UraniumEn ...
VantageDr ...
VimetX
VistaGold ...
VoyagerOG ..
Walterinv .22
YM Biog ...


Wkly YTD Wkly
YId PE Chd %Chg Last
... ... -1.13 +20.8 13.34
... ... -.03 -53.8 .65
... ... -.21 +37.9 2.84
1.3 23 -.80 -38.0 4.67
... ... -.53 +14.4 11.17
.... ... +.13 -58.2 2.90
...... -.28 -49.3 7.24
.. 92 +1.12 -19.2 21.99
8.. 82 -.43 +2.5 3.28
... ... +.13 -47.2 7.54
... ... -.01 -46.4 .23
... 11 -.14 -39.8 2.40
... ... +.02 -60.0 1.69
... ... -.20 +1.5 8.94
... ... -.64 -74.7 2.96
... ... -.47 -51.2 2.75
... ... -.36 -66.3 5.42
... ... +.09 .. 1.22
... ... -.89+100.2 10.23
... ... +.10 -37.0 3.60
... ... .. +87.1 2.47
+.34 -22.9 23.64
... -.07 -50.1 3.64
... -.05 -38.1 3.25
3 -.07 -78.4 .72
... ... +.64 +18.0 4.45
... ... -.01 -66.7 .19
... ... +.87 -23.1 5.00
... ... +.09 -61.2 1.16
... ... ... -49.9 2.00
... ... -.14 -48.5 3.11
... ... +.02 -36.0 1.30
... ... -.40 +5.1 15.60
... 6 -.40 +31.8 3.15
... ... +.29 -52.4 2.57
... 20 +1.24 +38.2 24.80
... ... -.05 -27.5 1.69


Weekly Stock Exchange Highlights


Money Rates
Last Pvs Week
Prime Rate' 3.25 3.25
Discount Rate 0.75 0.75
Federal Funds Rate .00-25 .00-25
Treasuries
3-month 0.02 0.02
6-month 0.05 0.05
5-year 1.07 1.12
10-year 2.21 2.25
30-year 3.26 3.23


EAmkard one
MAKIN,, SENA OF NVESTN(


. - 1V


U I


:-


~


LAKE CITY REPORTER










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


-
INDITii


Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


ADvantageI


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755.5440


Legal

NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS
NAME ACT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage
in business under the fictitious name
of Lake City Surgical Group, located
in Columbia County, Florida, with
an address of 3140 NW Commerce
,Dr., Ste. 180, Lake City, FL 32055,
has registered said name with the Di-
vision of Corporations of the Depart-
ment of State, Tallahassee, Florida.
Dated the 12th day of October, 2011.
Ocala Health Surgical Group, LLC
05528694
October 23, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
File No. 11-242-NT
IN RE: GAYLE B. HAHN TRUST
UTD AUGUST 5, 2010
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is hereby given that GAYLE
B. HAHN, the settlor of the above-
references trust, died on September
28, 2011. The name of the trust is
Gayle B. Hahn Trust, and said trust
was established, by Agreement dated
August 5, 2010. The name and ad-
dress of the currently acting trustee,
servicing as a result of the settlor's
death, and said trustee's attorney are
set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons, who have claims or de-
mands against settlor's estate on
whom a copy of this notice have
been served must file their claims
with the trustee WITHIN THE LAT-
ER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All creditors of the settlor and per-
sons having claims or demands
against the settlor's estate must file
their claims with the Trustee WITH-
IN (3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS
OCTOBER 16,2011.
By:/s/ TERRY MCDAVID
TERRY MCDAVID
Post Office Box 1328.
Lake City, FL 32056-1328
Telephone (386) 752-1896
Florida Bar No. 052454
Attorney for Successor Trustee
By:/s BETH H. WARREN
Successor Trustee
187 Golden Pond Dr.
Lexington, SC. 29073
05528574
October 16, 23, 2011
100 Job
100 Opportunities

05528596
FT & PT PC Tech needed for
busy local shop. Exp required.
Sales Help wanted.
Electronic/Computers FT & PT
FT Help Needed. Vehicle
maint., yard work, general
repairs etc.
Send email to: bdj@startech.cc


05528632
Position available for
Costing-Estimator
Will need to estimate sale prices
on commercial steel buildings
and design concepts.
Evaluate and maintain material
cost structure. Will need to
contact Vendors to source new
supplies for cost improvements.
EXPERIENCE IN STEEL OR
COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS.
Only applicants with Costing/
Estimating experience need to
apply. Full benefits package for
large Local Manufacturing Co.
Send Resume to P.O. Box
2097., Lake City, FL 32056

Hiring Locally This Week
Liberty National Life Insurance
.Company. Full training provided -
Potential of $60K+ annually.
401(k), BCBS Insurance &
Pension for those who qualify.
Call 1-800-257-5500 to
set up an interview.







Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't'
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187

Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


100 Job
Opportunities

05528643
Another Way Inc. seeks
Shelter Coordinator (FT w/bene-
fits) Lake City. Supervisory exp
req'd. Coordinates & assist in
providing svcs to survivors of
domestic & sexual violence in a
shelter setting. Minorities &
formerly battered women
encouraged to apply. EOE. Send
resume w/cover letter and salary
requirements to: hr@another-
wayinc.net or P,. 0. Box 1028,
Lake-City, FL 32056 or Fax
386-719-2758. No phone calls

05528670
IMMEDIATE OPENING
PART TIME NIGHT
AUDITOR,
(FRONT DESK)
FRIDAY TO SUNDAY
Applicants must be matured,
seeking long term employment.
Must be self motivated
with Excellent customer
service skills.
Hotel experience,
preferred but not required
Excellent work environment
Apply in person
414 SW Florida Gateway Dr.
Lake City, FL 32024
US Hwy 90 & 1-75 intersection
S SERIOUS
0ed APPLICANTS
ONLY!
IOWr NO PHONE
CALLS PLEASE


05528675
Third Circuit guardian ad
Litem program
Full Time Victim Advocate-
Case Coordinator Grant Funded
Position located in Lake City
office. salary $28,080.00 yr-no
benefits. Bachelors Degree in
Social Woik, Criminology,
Psychology or two years
comparable service. Excellent
communication skills, ability to
work independently and with
others of various ages,
professions and backgrounds.
Must maintain a strong
commitment to Victims of
Crime and respect confidentiali-
ty of victims. Deadline for
submission of STATE
application to Linda Dedge at
213 Howard Street, Live Oak,
Florida, 32064 is October 28th,
2011 @5pm. EOE

05528678
NOW HIRING:
COMPANY DRIVERS
Enjoy the open road with
Our Line Haul division!
Now Hiring Driver Trainers!
CDL-A & 3 mos.OTR exp req'd



Our tradition of stability gives
you a future of strength!
www.arnoldtrans.com
800-299-4744



AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+ ,
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
CLASS A Driver wanted.
Clean records. Exp. w/hopper,
dump, live floor a plus. Serious
inquires only. 386-755-7700


Experienced Real estate closer/
Title agent needed for local office.
Send reply to Box 05078, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
Experienced Short Order Cook
with minimum 2 YEARS EXP.
with good references. No Phone
Calls, Apply in person IHOP
Field Data Collector. P/T
opportunity in Lake City
performing fieldwork & computer
reporting for a national industry
leader. No exp. Paid training.
Performance based pay,
$11-$12/hr. Apply at
www.muellerreports.com.
Task # 16826
FLEET MECHANICS Needed
Tractor / Trailer Mechanics
Needed for late model fleet,
Must have experience and tools
Welsing experience helpful
Good Pay & Benefits
Apply in Person at
PRITCHETT TRUCKING
Lake Butler, FL. Or online at
www.pritchettrucking.com
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.

1 02 Medical
A120 Employment

05528667
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328


120 Medical
120 Employment

05528679
Meridian Behavioral
Healthcare Inc.
www.mbhci.org
Please visit our website to view
current open opportunities and
to apply online :
Meridian is an active partner
with the National Health
Service Corps
For its Student Loan
Forgiveness program. Licensed
Clinicians who serve in our
approved locations may qualify
for up to $60k in Student Loan
forgiveness for F/T
2yr commitment.
Therapists:

Program Manager ( Licensed)
Licensed, or Master's Level
in Outpatient
Master's Therapist in Screening
LCSW or Certified Behavioral
Analyst
Preferred
Bachelor's-Level in Counselor
Support
Case Management (adult &
child)
Master's Therapist in
Methadone Clinic
Administration:
Client Relations Specialist
Medical Services
RN Nursing Manager DETOX
(Gville)
RN full-time Lake City CSU
PRN RN, LPN, C.N.A.
Recovery Specialist
(Direct Care)

To see our current openings in
Mental Health and to apply
online, please go to:
www.mbhci.org
EOE, DFWP, E-Verify

05528686
Gainesville Women's Center
For Radiology
Arlene Weinshelbaum, M.D.
EXP. MAMMOGRAPHY
TECH wanted full time or part
time, for private Radiology of-
fice. AART & Mammography
certification req. Fax resume to:
STracy: (352)331-2044


240 Schools &
Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-11/07/10

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-11/28/11

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

Free Kittens!
7 weeks, Male and Female
Calico and Grey Tabby!
386-365-0042
Golden Retriever puppies. Pure-
bred! Champion Line. Available
Nov. 1. Wellborn/Lake City area.
$275./$300. ea. (719)429-6232
Mixed-short haired terrier.
FREE to good home.
Please call for info.,
386-755-9333 or 755-7773
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

401 Antiques

ANTIQUE OAK
Side Board. $100.
386-365-1187


402 Appliances
HEAVY DUTY Whirlpool
dryer, great working condition.
Less than 2 yrs. old. $100.
386-755-9239

REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture

Formal Dining set. Queen Anne
Style. Pecan color. Table, 6 chairs.
2 leaves, custom pads. Large china
cabinet. $600. 386-965-0762
OUTDOOR SET.
3 piece white cast iron ivy pattern
bench & 2 chairs. Vintage look.
All for $200. 386-965-0762
Roll Top desk. Cherry/Oak. Mar-
ble inset. 2 work trays, 2 file draw-
ers. Center knee-hole. 30"x60"
Lighted. $500. 386-965-0762
SOFA & LOVE seat. Plush
overstuffed, dark teal velvet.
Very clean. $500.
386-965-0762

413 Musical
413 Merchandise

CONN PIANO.
Sounds great. Spinet model.
Has bench. $250.
386-965-0762

419 TV-Radio &
Recording
20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$80.00
386-984-7510


420 Wanted to Buy

K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress; Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales

Every weekend til sold. 603 SW
Long Leaf. Off 247. Exercise
equipment, antiques, furniture, col-
lectibles, bicycle. 386-397-3390
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous

2 Wheel Utlity trailer.
S$100.
38-365-1187

DOE & BUCK
Concrete Decorative
statues for yard. $150.
386-965-0762

450 GoodThings
450 Eat

The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252'Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

14 Wide, 3/2-$525, 2/2-$475.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References.
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448


FLORIDA


-. C LLEGE

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
MATHEMATICS
(to commence Spring Term 2012)
Teach college-level and preparatory
mathematics; work with colleagues for
the advancement of departmental goals.
Position is a spring term appointment with
possible continuance based on enrollment
needs. Requires a Master's degree in
mathematics; or master's degree with
minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in
course work centered on mathematics.
Ability to use technology in instruction.
Ability to teach on-line and distance
learning courses. Ability to work well with
others. Ability to leam from colleagues
and to share knowledge. Ability to utilize
various Instructional strategies to reach
students. Ability to preseht information in
a coherent manner and the ability to fairly
evaluate student retention of that
information. Desirable Qualifications:
College teaching experience. Ability to
teach college level and preparatory
mathematics. Salary: Based on degree
and experience. Application Deadline:
Open Until Filled.
Persons interested should provide Col-
lege application, vita, and photocopies
of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at:
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place


Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrnfac.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education and Employment


Mobile Homes
630 for Rent

2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482
VERY CLEAN
2br/lba 10 mi West of
Lake City $400. mo
No pets. 386-963-2282

Mobile Homes
640 for Sale

Just Reduced! Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Co1dwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"
cond. Split floor plan, Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group.
NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Delivery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Red Tag Sale
Over 10 Stock Units Must Go
Save Up To 35K!
800-622-2832
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WE BUY HOMES!
Singles or Doubles. Must have
clear title. Call North Point Homes
(352)872-5566

Mobile Home
650 & Land

Outside of Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a.gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
Will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
camper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473


FLORIDA
.- sA -- AY
k: L_ .LL GE


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NURSING AND
HEALTH SCIENCES
Position #: A99962
(Re-advertised)
This is a professional classification
responsible for the development and
supervision of Innovative and forward-
thinking programs. The primary
responsibilities are to implement and
maintain the Bachelor of Science degree
in Nursing, continue to expand all program
areas and resources, provide effective
leadership for administration, faculty, and
students, manage multiple budgets, and
an understanding of strong personnel
management. The Executive Director
will have the responsibility of developing
and maintaining a premier institute that
will support'Florida Gateway College as
it moves into the baccalaureate degree
program level. The individual applying
for this position must hold a minimum of
a master's degree and be eligible for or
hold a Florida Nursing license or closely
related field, have at least five years of
progressive administrative experience, a
strong background in program design and
accreditation, and a valid Florida driver's
license. Desirable Qualifications:
Doctorate degree in Nursing or health
related field preferred. Record of teaching
at tenured professor level; experience
in business in conjunction with health
background. Experience in the community
college teaching/working environment.
Salary: Based on Degree and Experience.
Application Deadline: Open Until Filled.
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and photocopies
of transcripts. All foreign transcripts must
be submitted with official translation and
evaluation. Position details and
applications available on web at:
WWW.fflt.Adu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place


650 Mobile Home
60 & Land

3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

710 iUnfurnished Apt.
7 For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net








2/1 CH/A Duplex Apt.
$450. mo No pets.
Near Beachville.
Call Margie 386-935-3447
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
A Landlord You Can Love!
2 br Apts $550. & up + sec. Great
area. CH/A washer/dryet hookups.
386-758-9351/352-208-2421
Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplexw/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgrnd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ Iba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1.5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large 2 br Apt In town
$500. mo $500 dep.
386-344-2972

Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com


FLORIDA


7- ,- .* *: *'
(?>COLLE:
ADJUNCT INSTRUCTORS
SPRING TERM 2012
COLLEGE LEVEL MATHEMATICS
Master's degree in mathematics or a
master's degree with at least 18 graduate
credit hours in mathematics required.
Contact Paula Cifuentes at 386-754-4260
or oaula.cifuentesifoc.edu for more
information.
CHEMISTRY
Evening classes. Applicants must have a
master's degree in chemistry or a master's
degree with at least 18 graduate credit
hours in chemistry. Contact Paula
Cifuentes at 386-754-4260 or
oaula.cifuentes@ifgc.edu
for more information.
MEDICAL BILLING AND INSURANCE
Classes meet on Monday evenings 6:30-
9:10. Minimum requirement is at least two
years of experience preferred. Contact
Pam Carswell at 386-754-4266 or send
resume and unofficial transcripts to
oamela.carswelliifac.edu
INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONICS
Bachelor's degree in Industrial
Engineering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol
at 386-754-4225 or
iohn.oiersol@fac.edu
MANUFACTURING MATERIALS AND
PROCESSES
Bachelor's degree in Industrial
Engineering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol at
386-754-4225 or iohn.Diersol@(afac.edu.
INDUSTRIAL SAFETY
Bachelor's degree in Industrial
Engineering or similar required. Master's
degree preferred. Contact John Piersol at
386-754-4225 or iohn.oiersoli'fac.edu.
NURSING CLINICAL
BSN Required. Master's degree in nursing
preferred. At least two years of recent
clinical experience required. Contact
Mattie Jones at 386-754-4368 or


Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanri(fac.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools. VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education and Employment


mattie.ionesgfac.edu.
College application and copies oftraoncripti
required All foreign tiranscripi must hbe
submitted with a translation and evaluation.
Application available at wy..fgc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Southern Ascation of
Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/E/VEO (Collge in f-ducaon & inmploymnni











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


710 Unfurnished Apt.
1 For Rent
Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & IBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
7 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent: Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

0 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3br/lba brick home in Lake City
Available 10/22 .
$650 mo. + $450 dep.
Call 561-723-4306 or 4302
3BR/1BA HOME off McFarlane.
CH/A, lg yard, No pets.
$600. mo $600. dep.
Call (850)421-3617 for info.
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $200
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
4BR/2BA CH/A 2 miles
out on Price Creek Rd.
,$700. mo $500 security.
386-752-4597


4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $700 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
4BR/3BA, close to 1-75. Close to
town, great schools. Well water &
septic, Clay electric, $1250. mo.
$1000 Dep. (850)346-8318 Chris
BEAUTIFUL 2BR/1.5BA.
Available Now! In town.
$600. mo. Call after 9am.
386-405-3269
BRICK 3BR/1BA 1350 sf.
with garage. In town close
to school. $700. mo + $700 dep.
386-719-0584
Nice in town 2br/lba CH/A
$700. mo: $700 deposit.
386-758-3922 or*
386-344-5065
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'I or cothm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.'
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
S7 Days-7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
750 Business &
170 Office Rentals

05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq'$450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
,Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak; FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group

780 Condos for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065


805 Lots for Sale
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status4
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


810 Home for Sale
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2,010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal,
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 mi. NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181.
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; ,1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
SLAKE CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,700 sq.
ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer, Call 417-396-2134.
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
Swide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
IPatti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-689.6
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
Q237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS '78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool0house w/half bath, 2:25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-progerty-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage Inground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Islarid kit. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.Sba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group


810 Home for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances,
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group


Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109,900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group


Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821


Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres."
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223


Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411, $79;900,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, Fl room, shed, .
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
3/2 w/1 car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florita-property-search.com


Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 Fl room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MILS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept 3/2.DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
( MLS79144. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen ..
Wired 24x36 workshop,-steel roof,
pole barn. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.





2006 EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.

To Ge


810 Home for Sale
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2.012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39.000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg. possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110


Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on comer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110

820 Farms &
20 Acreage


$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com


For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened.porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015'$137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield'Realty Group

830A Commercial
930 Property
3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage ar.d-building
site $129,000 386-961-9181
Wellborn Commercial lot; 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l'bldg oit
highway frontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield RealtyGroup


850 Waterfront
850 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River. Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
870 Real Estate
870 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles
1996 Harley Sportster 1200CC
Excellent cond. To many upgrades
to list. Previous owner was a Har-
ley mechanic. Customized for 5'4"
body height. Less than 12K mi.
Dark forest green. My biker
husband passed away & I married
a boater so I no longer ride. $4,200
Call Linda (850)973-6110

940 Trucks
2005 Ford F-350 Lariat
50,000 miles, many extras,
excellent condition.
$18,500 386-755-0139

950 Cars for Sale
2000 Olds Intrigue: Loaded, Mint
.cond. Garage kept 4 dr sedan. due
to sickness has to sell. $7000.
Only has 50k miles. 386-752-6956

REPORTER Classifieds
In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


maknde

ADVERTISE YOUR ...to never miss day's

GARAGE SALE ort of all-the
.. WITH TH Lake City Reporter
LAKE CITY REPORTER has to offer:
OnlY o Home delivery.
$ l 5 0 50 To subscribe call
i ... 755-5445


4 LINES 3 DAYS
2 FREE SIGNS

(386) 755-5440
: I' .


I Lake City


i R e P P *S

Auction Location: 1396 SW Main Blvd., Lake City, FL 32025

." ".! 4 -". 'REA L E SV ^ E '.: ".. ..

C mmercid Lae- City,'Fl

Pipperty Location: '139 $WMfin Blvd., Lake OCity

7,200 SF Comn aieI Bulding

Located on Ac.


Property Loa ion:26E 2tsfTerrace, Branford'


2/2 Home on Saiita Fe River

1.4 Ac Private boat ram with dock

r3 _- *r -- I-


IMii


28,300 shares of People's State Ban6&'k k isold 'i.2 block
of Peplb.!


HGGENDOrTM 800-257-4161
AUCTIONEERS
INTERMA ONAL LTD., IN higgenbotham.com
A Licensed Real Estate Broker
an alliance partner o NP GIObal" M.E.HIggenbotham,CAI,FtLkcAU305AB158


II


Classified Department: 755-5440


i


i







LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


- - - - - -


JUST ARRIVED!


Assorted Baskets
Wall Pictures
Rocking Chairs

'. R- ] rURB ANTIQUES COLLECTmLEs
386-466-1888
1034 SW Main Blvd., (next to the Money Man)Lake City, FL 32055


Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks Rountree Moore Toyota Bucks
o 10% %OFF
< TOYOTA 0 /
Please resentRountre e
Moore Toyota Bucksat
time of purchase. No cash
value: No reproductions AN T
of the Rountree Moore
oBucks is allowed.
coupon. One coupon per
customer. Fees, tax,
shop uppliesnot Expires 10-31-11
included Not Legal Tender
-- -- -- --- f ^ ^ --- -- -- -- -- --


Large Selection of Soap Fragrances
(ask for your favorite scent)
We do favors for:
Weddings, Baby Showers
and any occasion
Ask about
Wedding
Flowers


275 N. Marion Avenue
Silk (38a) 243-8298
ArranDithni wnh(. (next to kowans)
Arrangements Oprn Tr ,i ay-.alurday
for the Holidays ,onia hyde, owner


aM~hiha


Please join us to celebrate this SPECIAL DAY! Great Savings on Tanning and Lotions!
Register for Drawings to win Tanning and Lotion Free! All Day! One Day Only!
CAKE MUSIC FROZEN DRINKS GIVE-A-WAYS!
7,1165 SIN: r- P 17 5


GREAT FUN
GREAT DEALS
GREAT TAN
Everyone who
comes in gets a
Free Packet of
Lotion!
Stock up on
Tanning and
Products at Great
Discounts!


FLU SHOTS*


*BAYA EAST LOCATION ONLY.
Covered by Medicare & Many Insurance Plans Walk-In or by Appointment 755-6677


r




.,.Aji.~;,






PRESCRIPTIONS


c'


CHAMBER -
THINK

FIRST


r as.


Classified Department: 755-5440


T~


m









Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?

contactt
lobert Bridges
-ditor
154-0428
bridges@akecatyreporter.com


LIFE


unday, October 23, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section D


^ARDEN TALK


Nichelle
Demorest
dndemorest@ufl.edu

Seed

saving

for spring

perfect time to
do some catch-
up work
in your garden.
'Go ahead and pull some
weeds, edge the sidewalk,
remove dead annuals and
deadhead perennials. If
you haven't tried saving
seeds'yet, now is the time
to consider saving some for
next year.
Many perennials and
annuals have already set
seed and are ready to
harvest. The seed heads
or pods should be mostly
brown and dry when you'
pick them. Some easy to
collect seeds include mari-
gold, zinnia, black-eyed
Susan, and coneflower.
Tear the pods apart over
plain white paper to reveal
and capture the seeds.
Place the seeds in labeled
envelopes and store the
envelopes in a sealed con-
tainer which has a couple
tablespoons' o cornmeal )n' -
the bottom. Store the c6n-
tainer in a cool, dry place
until you are ready to plant
them next year. Even the
fridge works, if you have
room!
Have fun collecting the
seeds, sharing them with
other gardeners, and sav-
ing money in the spring.
Keep in mind, however,
that some of your seeds
might not produce the
same flower characteristic
as the parent plant, if they
were hybrids. If you do
get something different, it
could be a nice surprise.
As you work outside
this fall, try to tame your
desire to prune back that
plant jungle that grew
while you were hiding in
air conditioning. Many
plants will be stimulated
to put on a flush of new
growth if pruned now and
our eminent cold weather
will damage that tender
growth. Wait until after a
December freeze to prune.
More pruning information
GARDEN continued on 4D


By LAURA HAMPSON
lhampson@lakecityreporter. corn
T eresa Byrd
Morgan says
she's running
her butt off.
She is training
to run in the New York
City Marathon on Nov.
6, but her goal is not to
improve her health.
Morgan is running for
the health of her best
friend, Joanne Duke, who
was diagnosed with anal
cancer three years ago.
To raise awareness
and money for anal can-
cer, often a taboo topic,
Morgan, a Lake City
estate planning and elder
law attorney, has trained
for about 6 months to run
in the marathon.
She has raised more
than $5,000 in three
weeks for the HPV and
Anal Cancer Foundation.
Donations have come
from family, friends and'
clients.
Morgan hopes to raise
$1,000 for each of the 26.2
miles she will run in the
marathon, for a total of
$26,200.
Most anal cancers are
linked to infection with
HPV (human papilloma
virus), the same virus
that causes cervical


JASON MATTHEW WALKED
Teresa Byrd-Morgan., an attorney at the Morga
Center in Lake City, speaks about the lack of a
of anal cancer. Morgan will be running the Ne\
Marathon on Nov. 6 for her friend Joanne Duk
fers from the disease.


cancer, according to the '
American Cancer Society.
There will be about 5,829
new cases of anal can-
cer this year. About 770
people will die from it,
according to the society.
A vaccine called


Gardasil can p
against some t
HPV infection.
it was approve
women to preN
cal cancer, but
been shown to
other cancers


Lake City attorney
Teresa Byrd Morgan
is competing in the
NYC Marathon to raise
awareness of anal
cancer, which afflicts
her childhood friend


cancers caused by HPV.
It was recently approved
for use in both men and
women to prevent anal
cancers and pre-cancers,
according tb the society.
Last November,
Morgan was walking
with a group of friends
and suggested walking
in the NYC Marathon as
a group to support Duke
and raise awareness for
anal cancer.
Morgan said she was
shocked to learn how
little research and knowl-
edge there is about anal
cancer after accompa-
nying Duke on doctor
appointments.
Ten friends signed up
for the marathon but later
found out runners are
selected in a lottery sys-
tem. Morgan was the only"
Lake Ciy Reporter one selected.
in Law Before marathon train-
awareness ing Morgan said she '"
W York City exercised, buit had nev&r
e, who suf- run more than two miles
at a time inher life..
Now she runs about 34
miles a week. Her longest
protect run yet was 20 miles. Her
types of friend Missy Lee, a Lake
. At first City nurse, trains with
d only for her. Together they run,
vent cervi- five to six times a weekly
it has also early in the morning.
prevent They lift weights with a
and pre- RUNNING continued on 4D


Growlers roaring as a

new old way to buy beer


In this Oct. 3, a growler is
filled at the bar at Gritty
McDuffs in Portland, Maine.
Around the country, hun-
dreds of brewpubs, brewer-
ies and even grocery stores
are cashing in on the grow-
ing popularity of growlers.


By CLARKE CANFIELD
Associated Press
PORTLAND, Maine -
Ed McAleer likes to drink
his brown ale and IPA
straight from a beer tap.
But he doesn't need to be
in a pub to do so.
When he has a hankerr.
ing for a draft beer at home,
McAleer pours himself a
cold one from a growler, a
refillable 64-ounce glass jug
that he buys from Federal
Jack's, a brewpub and res-
taurant in his hometown
of Kennebunkport. If he's
having friends over, he'll
sometimes pick up two or


three growlers filled with
different types of beer so
his guests can sample a
variety.
Around the country, hun-
dreds of brewpubs, brew-
eries and even grocery
stores are cashing. in on
the growing popularity of
growlers, a term that dates
back more than a century.
when people would carry
fresh beer in buckets.
"I like the ability to get a
draft taste instead of a bot-
tiled beer. To me it's a fresh-
er taste," said McAleer,
61, who is retired. "I also
can't get some of the beers
in bottles. And the


price is good."
Most everybody knows
beer comes in bottles, cans
or kegs. Mention the word
"growler" and you might
get a blank stare.
But the moonshine jug-
looking containers are
catching on, said Julia Herz
of the Brewers Association
in Boulder, Colo. Generally
speaking, people buy
growlers at brewpubs,
where they're filled with
beer and capped. After
they're brought home, the
beer will stay good for two
to five days once opened.
Consumers like growl-
BEER continued on 2D


TASTE BUDDIES


Running


her butt off


Gainesville Women's Center for Radiology
6820 NW 1 1th Place Gainesville, FL
Specializing in Imaging for Women
Mammography, Cyst Aspiration, Core Biopsy of the Breast, Ultrasonography and Bone Densitometry
EXPERIENCE Mammography
In the quiet setting of a private radiology office.
Dr. Weinshelbaum will study your mammogram and you will be given the results before you leave.
For an appointment please call: (352) 331-0115
Member American College of Radiology Accredited in Mammography by the
Diplomate, American Board of Radiology American College of Radiology & the FDA
SVWe participate in most insurance plans &,,, ,I .


Genie Norman and
Mary Kay Holllngsworth
TaoteBuddiesLakeCity@gmail.com.


Going

Victorian

at the

Telford

W Tting to
have lunch
somewhere
outside of
Lake City,
we drove up to White
Springs on Sunday to try
the buffet at the Telford
Hotel. We were not disap-
pointed. The Telford was
opened in White Springs
in 1903 and was one of
15 hotels located in this
sleepy, moss draped small
town. People came from
far and wide for thewhite'
spring" water'.which was
thought to be medicinal
`and'good for w~it might be
ailing you. On display in
one of the rooms are hotel
registers starting in 1903.
Interesting to us were
two,of the July 13, 1913
entries, former Presidents
W.H. Taft,and Theodore-
Ropsevet. On jue 1,1
Believe ior as
signed on the register..
Now back to the buffet.
There is plenty of seating
and adequate staff who
are attentive and helpful.
Drinks were refilled with-
out your having to ask,
always a nice touch. The
salad bar was loaded with
fresh greens and all the
toppings you could want.
There Were lots of choices
of food so let's start with
the meats ... roast pork,
fried chicken, roast beef in
gravy, fried catfish, baked
chicken, baked tilabia and
whole roast beef and ham
which were carved for
you. Soups were chicken
*& rice and Northern bean.
Vegetables were many and
the usual found at buffets
e.g. dressing, corn, green
beans, mashed potatoes,
okra/tomatoes and espe-
cially-good was the new
potatoes boiled with melted
butter drizzled on top.
Absolutely delicious yeast
TASTE continued on 4D


hi


;9








2D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011



Trains and space stations


W y am so I fasci-
c nated with-trains,
S/planes, and the
W space station? I
V check with the
NASA web page a couple of
times a month, to see when the
International Space Station will
fly over our part of Florida. I've,
often up and gone outside both
at 5 a.m. or at 10 p.m. to see it fly
by. Because of the Earth's rota-
tion and the station's 90-minute
tilted orbit, it ventures north as
far as Canada and farther south
than the tips of South America
or Africa. It takes a computer to
keep track of its schedule.-
I've invited my wife to join me
on these viewings, and I've even
been a nagging pest, but she
shows no interest Why is it that
I'm so fascinated with it?
. Pondering that question, a
childhood memory came to me.
When I was 8 or 9 years old, we


lived in a small town between
Biloxi and Gulfport, Mississippi.
My Dad sometimes kept me
awake after bedtime, or woke
me before dawn, to walk to the
railroad tracks to see one of the
big steam engines thunder down
the tracks pulling a load of pas-
senger cars with lighted windows.
They had about five miles to get
up to speed from their stop at the
Gulfport station, and roared by
us at over 60 miles per hour. The
bright headlight could be seen
coming several miles away. When
one thundered by, it would shake
the ground, blow a blast of wind
in our faces. You couldn't hear
yourself talk. We might see the
engineer and exchange a wave, or
he might pull the whistle cord.
My Dad was an interesting
character. He lived through the
Great Depression, and would use*
his thumb to hitch rides all over
the country. He visited every.


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com

state in the nation, looking for
work and some kind of a break.
On one job at Hunt's Tomato
Soup, he worked huge tanks of
tomato soup, on long cold nights.
The pay was poor, but he had
tomato soup for every meal on the
job. Once when extra hungry and
weary in Indianapolis, Indiana,
he was walking down a street
in town and heard a scream. A
roofer slipped and fell off the foof
he was working on, killing him


instantly. The first thing Dad did
was to hurry into the building and
to apply for the new job opening
before someone else could.
Yes, times were hard. When
he was still alive, he shared these
stories with us, his family. He told
also of hopping freight trains in
his quest, as other jobless men
did. I believe that he was able to
find some kind of satisfaction in
the struggle and the adventure
that he found on the road. Later
on, having a son, I think he knew
me well enough that he recog-
nized my interests in trains and
adventures, and cared enough to
feed that fascination and excite-
ment He would get up on a cold,
dark morning, and wake me to
take that walk to the tracks, even
though he had to hurry home to
get ready for his full-time, respon-
sible government job. Looking
' back, I can see and appreciate
what he did for me.


I also remember rainy days that
could easily have ruined a family
vacation. On our trip to Lookout
Mountain, Tennessee, Dad was
considerate enough to go shop-
ping.for a small toy or gift to
brighten up an otherwise dreary
day. I remember playing all day
with a cardboard rocket that held
candies or cookies. Now I under-
stand why I still have good feel-
ings about rainy days. I think lots
of us probably have both some
pleasant memories, and some
unpleasant memories of growing
up with our families. It's taken
me some half a century to fully
realize some of the nice things
that a caring parent did for me.

Bob Denny is a mental health
therapist in Florida, and teaches
at Florida Gateway College. Your
comments and thoughts are wel-
comed at Bob.Denny8@gmail.
com.


Midwest, West

highest in suicidal

thoughts in U.S.


By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer
ATLANTA More
adults in the Midwest and
West have suicidal thoughts
than people in the rest of the
country, but Rhode Island
leads in suicide attempts,
according to the first gov-
ernment study of its kind.
The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
study, released Thursday,
presents a different look
at sultide
in America
one that The s
focuses on was bas
suicide in confide
the planning survey'
stages. M m
"iTh is
report high- 90,O00
lights that adull
we have 2008
opportuni- 200
ties to inter-
vene before
someone dies by suicide.
We can identify risks and
take action before a suicide
attempt takes place," said
CDC Director Dr. Thomas
Frieden, in a statement
Overall, the Midwest and
West had significantly high-:
er rates of suicide contem-
plation than the South and
Northeast Researchers say
they don't have any data to
explain why some states or
regional were different than
others.
Utah had the highest rate
of serious thoughts of sui-
cide (1 in 15 adults) while
Rhode Island was at the top
of the range for planning a
suicide (1 in 36) and suicide
attempts (1 in 67).
Georgia was at the bot-
tom of the range for suicide
thoughts (1 in 50), plan-
ning a suicide (1 in 1,000)
and, along with Delaware,
for suicide attempts (1 in
1,000).
The study was based
on confidential surveys
of more than 90,000 U.S.
adults in 2008 and 2009. The
participants did not include
homeless people, those in
the military or those hos-
pitalized' With psychiatric
problems.'
The government's previ-
ous state-by-state suicide


t

e
y

LI

II


datawas suicide deaths, with
the highest rates in rustic
Western states like Alaska,
New Mexico, Wyoming and
Montana.
The new study's results
suggest that places where
a lot of people report con-'
templating suicide may not
be the same places where
suicide is most common.
For example, Rhode
Island had one of the nation's
lowest suicide iates in 2007.
But in the new study, it
ranked at the
top in terms of
tudy both suicide
ed on planning and
intial attempts.
fs of Researchers
than aren't sure why,
S but' there are
S. theories.
s in Perhaps
and demograph-
9. ics are part of
the answer.
Adolescents
and females had the high-
est rates of thinking about
suicide, while older males
have the highest rates of
actual suicide deaths, said
Dr. Alex Crosby, a CDC
epidemiologist who is the
study's lead author.
So a state with a lot of
young people and women
might look high in suicide
thoughts and planning, but
not as high in deaths.
Also, it's possible that sui-
cide attempts in places like
Alaska or Wyoming tend to
use guns or other methods
that are more lethal.
It's also possible that sui-
cide planners in sparsely
populated Western states
have fewer friends or health
professionals around to
save them, said Matthew
Nock, a Harvard University
psychology professor who
has researched suicide pat-
terns.
The CDC collaborated
with the 'Substance Abuse
and Mental Health Services
Administration on the study,
which is part of a federal
effort to get better data on
the nation's suicide problem.
About 36,000 Americans die
from suicide annually, and
more than 600,000 go to
hospitals with injuries from
suicide attempts.


BEER: Growlers roar back

'Continued From Page 1D


ers because they're green
- they're reusable and
don't contribute to the waste
stream they're good for
sharing with friends and the
beer is less expensive than
buying pints at a pub, Herz
said. They're also nostalgic.
The pails that people used
to haul beer from a pub to
home or to work in times
long past became known
as growlers because of the
growling sound they emitted
Sa the beer sloshed about or
perhaps from the growling
of a worker's hungry stom-


ach just before he enjoyed a
beer with his lunch.
But its the taste that keeps
people coming back, Herz
said on a recent day when
she had a growler filled
with 400-Pound Monkey,
an English-style IPA made
by Left Hand Brewing Co.
in Longmont, Colo., in her
refrigerator at home.
"What's nice about the
growler is you pour it into
the glass, and that's the
proper way to enjoy all that
a beer has to offer for flavor
and aroma," Herz said.


Engineers inspect Washington

National Cathedral for damages


By BEN NUCKOLS
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
same engineers who cap-:
tivated tourists and' pass-
ersby by rappelling down-
the Washington Monument
began a similar operation
Monday at the National
Cathedral,. the other major
landmark to be damaged by
an earthquake that shook the
nation's capital.
The "difficult access team"
from Wiss, Janney, Elstner
Associates, Inc. began its
work Monday when Emma
Cardini emerged at the top
of a 234-foot tower. She was
joined minutes later by Katie
Francis and, using ropes and
harnesses, the two women
efficiently worked their way
down the front of the build-
ing.
.The inspection is expected
to last about two weeks, said
Dan Lemieux, who heads
WJE's Fairfax, Va., office and
is supervising the project
The engineers are looking
*for loose, cracked or unsta-
ble stones-that could pose a
risk to people on the ground.
Those stones will be removed
before the cathedral's sched-
uled reopening on Nov. 12.
Last week, stone masons
removed 2 tons of stonework
from a pinnacle damaged by
the 5.8-magnitude earthquake
on Aug. 23. Three of the four
pinnacles on the 300-foot cen-
tral tower were severely dam-
aged and the 2-ton section
had shifted off its base.
The 4-foot-tall top portions
of the pinnacles, called the fin-
ials, fell off during the earth-
** I


quake and crashed onto the
cathedral roof The cathedral
sustained additional damage
during Hurricane Irene, the
Category 1 storm that blew
through Washington five days
after the quake.
Initial repairs to the cathe-


Katie Francis a
member of the diffi-
cult access team of
engineers, dangles
down the facade
of the Washington
National Cathedral
in Washington,
Monday, checking
for damage from
the recent East
Coast earthquake.


dral are expected to cost at
least $15 million, and the
price tag for fully restoring the
building remains unknown.
The cathedral was complet-
ed in 1990 after 83 years of
work. A campaign has begun
to raise $25, million by


the end of 2012.
Four of the five engineers
who climbed outwindows and
a hatch atop the Washington
Monument are participating.
in the cathedral inspection.
While the monument descent
was more dramatic, the cathe-
dral has more variety, said
Erik Sohn, one of the climb-
ers.
'The Washington
Monument is such a huge,
historic structure, but its rela-
tively stark while you're up
there on the side of the build-
ing. There's not a whole lot
to look at," Sohn said. "This,
with all the ornamentation
that we're going to be crawl-
ing around and touching and
feeling, it's more entertaining
for us."


Bates-Head


John and Brenda
Roberts of Lake
City, FL announce
the engagement and
approaching mar-
riage of their daugh-
ter, Renee Margaret
Bates of Lake City, FL
to James Kyle Head of
White 'Springs, FL, son
of James and Shelley
Head and Craig and.
Rhonda Baker of Live,
Oak, FL. The bride is
also the daughter of
the late Horace Bates.
The bride-elect is a
2005 graduate of Columbia
High School, 2010 gradu-


ate of St. Leo University.
She is currently pursing a
degree in nursing at Florida


Gateway College and
works at Ward's Jewelry
and Gifts.
The future groom is a
2006 graduate of Melody
Christian Academy and
'is employed at PCS.
He enjoys hunting and
working on his truck.
The couple were child-
hood sweethearts.
The wedding is
planned for 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011
at Evangel Church of
God, Lake City, FL. A
reception will follow at
the Women's garden Club
of Lake City. V


'I


China, Crystal,
Flatware and Gifts
Couples registered:
Renee Bates
Kyle Head
November 5, 2011


Ashley Owens
Kenneth Gamble
December 3, 2011

Jazan Nabinger
Blaiyze Neeley
SJanuary 21, 2012
We know exactly what they
want in a wedding or shower
gift. We update their list as gifts
are purchased, and gift wrap.

WARD'S
JEWELRY & GIFTS
156 N. Marion Ave.
Lake City
752-5470










LAKE CITYREPORTER ADVICE & CROSSWORD SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011


DEAR ABBY


tRomance is not on the menu


for waitress's elderly patron


DEAR ABBY: I work as a
waitress although I have a col-
lege degree. I am happy with
my life. I'm unattached, child-
less and take three or four
vacations every year.
A couple of years ago I
started waiting on 'Tom" at
the restaurant where I work.
As time went on, we became
friendly. Tom is in his 70s,
and I am in my early 40s. Last
year at Christmas he gave me
some nice costume jewelry
and asked if I'd have dinner
with him sometime.
I was touched and saw no
harm in it We had dinner a
few times and went to a cou-
ple of movies. Soon after, he
started acting as if we were a
",couple" and I began declin-
ing his dinner invitations. A
family emergency came up
and I was able to remove
myself from the situation for a
couple of months. I thought it
would cool him off.
For my birthday last
month, Tom presented me
with a jewelry box and a
bracelet with my birthstone.
He was angry because I
wouldn't go out to dinner and
because I went on vacation for
10 days the following week.
I'm having a difficult time let-
ting him know I'm not inter-
ested because I know he's a
lonely old man. I don't want
any more gifts from hin.
What on earth is Tom think-
ing? He's my father's age. Do
you know what they call a mid-
dle-aged woman who hooks up.
with an old man? A nurse! How


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearabby.com

can I stop Tom's attentions
without being rude or hurting
his feelings? REALLY NOT
MYTYPE
DEAR REALLY: You may
not be able to manage that
'You and I both know what
he is thinking, and his inten-
tions are not "fatherly." In
fact, because you accepted
his gifts'and his dinner invi-
tations, he thinks you have
a relationship and he has
become possessive.
Return his gifts with a
short note explaining that
you did not understand when
he gave them to you that you
were being courted. Tell him
you like him and always will,
but not in the way he would
like you to, and that you hope
he will find someone who
can reciprocate his feelings.
And do not be surprised if he
takes his business to some
other restaurant
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: We recently
moved to a small town. Our
neighbors came over to
introduce themselves, and
we adore them already. The
husband speaks with a stutter.


HOROSCOPES


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Take better care of your
health. Put more effort into
the way you look and the
image you present Self-
improvement projects will
turn out well. Updating your
look will result in compliments
from your friends and jealousy
from your enemies. ***
TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
A partnership with someone
you've known for some time
will interest you.Run your .
plans by someone objective
before you step into territory
that is questionable. Doors will
open and opportunities will
develop that can change your
life. *****
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Keep your thoughts to
yourself. Wait and see what
everyone else does before you
decide to join in or sign up for
something you aren't sure you
want to do. Focus on your own
creative ideas and how you
can get ahead. **
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You'll stand out at social
networking events. Turn
on your charm and you will
attract someone who wants
to spend more time exploring
your friendship. Make your

CELEBRITY


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Word

place available for a gathering
or intimate get-together. Love
and romance are highlighted.

LEO (uly 23-Aug. 22):
Watch your step, especially
when conversing with friends
or family. You are likely to say
something that starts an argu-
ment Leave the past alone;- "
you can't change what's been
done, but you can make a dif-
ference in the present and the
future. *** .
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept 22):
Do your best to fit as much as
you can into your day. Travel,
learning and socializing with
friends are all highlighted.
Taking time to make improve-
ments that will help you get
ahead personally or profes-
sionally will pay off. Gains can
be made. ***
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct. 22):
Keep your past a secret or
you'll be judged for what
you've done, not who you are.
Stay true to your word as well
and you will be successful.
Take a vested interest in your
home and in building your

CIPHER


This doesn't bother me, but I
want to be sure that I'm being
respectful to him when he's
trying to get a word out. Is it
preferable to wait him out, or
would it help if I "suggest" the
word I think he might say? -
UNCERTAIN IN IOWA
DEAR UNCERTAIN:
Although you mean well, the
respectful way to handle it is to
let the man speak for himself -
even if it takes a little longer.
** ** **
DEAR ABBY: Today, after
an absence of many years, I
met a former employee. He
looked the same as he did,
except he had no hair. He said
he feltfine but could it be can-
cer? Chemotherapy? Should
one comment? I ignored it and
we exchanged small talk going
back several decades. Would it
have been proper to ask about
his baldness? CURIOUS IN
NEW ENGLAND
DEAR CURIOUS: The
questions, "How are you?"
and "How have you been?"
are a part of normal dis-
course. If his response was he-
is "fine," then that's an indica-
tion that he didn't want to dis-
cuss his changed appearance.
He could be in treatment for
cancer. He could also have an
immune disorder that caused
him to lose his hair. Because
he didn't volunteer more
information, you were right
not to question him.
* Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.


assets. ***
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Rely on your strength
and courage to get you to
the winner's circle. Love and
romance are highlighted, and
special plans should be made
to ensure a cherished relation-
ship is honored. An argument
will disrupt your plans if a
promise isn't kept. ****
SAGIfTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21): Emotions will be over-
whelmining. Don't say something
that willget you into trouble. A
secret meeting with someone
will put you in a vulnerable
position with someone else. Be
careful not to end up in an irre-
versible situation. **
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19): Rely on your com-
mon sense, your charm and
your way with words to get
what you want Money mat-
ters can be dealt with and
home improvements made.
A proposal you've been wait-
ing for is heading your way.

AQUARIUS (lan. 20-Feb. 18):
Don't argue a moot point Let
things slide and avoid an upset-
ting situation. Take a greater
interest in your personal and
family goals and you will please
whoever is being difficult or
causing you grief Encourage
positive action. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Sift through your financial
papers, improve your portfolio
or update your resume and.
you will ease your stress as
well A relationship is looking
very positive and can benefit
you mentally, emotionally and
financially if you join forces.
A-' i


SUNDAY CROSSWORD


GETTING IN SHAPE By Joel.Fagliano / Edited by Will Shortz


Across
1 Small amount
6 Nab,, as a base
runner
13 Well-known maze
traveler
.49 Slings
20 "I kid you not!"
22 "Things Fall
Apart" author
Chinua __
23 Full-length
'24 See shaded
letters
intersected by,
this .answer
26 Game hunters
28 Business card
abbr.
29 Friend of Fifi
30 Fleur-de-_
31 Frozen beverage-
brand
32 One in debt
34 Author-.. '
Htbbard
35 Guest on a
.tarmac: Abbr.
36 Geological
S'feature on a Utah
license plate
38 Polite
40 Some batteries
41 Speak horsely?
43 ___ hall
44 Tennis's Berdych
45 Type
46 Golfer
nicknamed "The
King"
47 Year ,
Michelangelo
began work on
"David"
48 As ___ (usually)
For any three answers,
call from a touch-tone
phone:, 1-900-285-5656,
1.49 each minute; or,
with a credit card, 1-800-
814-5554.


49 Charades-
participant, e.g.
52 Newsroom
workers, for
short
53 "Unfortunately,
that's the case"
55 "Hurry!"
57 Obedient
58 Umpire's ruling
60 "I ___ the day
61 Priestly garment
64 Folkie Guthrie
65 Repeated musical
phrases
67 Mazda model
69 Facility often
closed in the
winter '
71 Home state for
86-Across: Abbr.
72 Soviet space
station
73Zig. or zag
'74 Home to the
Velus de Milo
76 "Easy as pie"
80 Majority figure?
82 Texans' org.
85 Palindromic
vehicle
86 Cheney's
successor
87 82-Across stats
' 88 Launch
90 Jack or jenny
91 Beginning of un
ano
92, Eggs in a'sushi
restaurant
93 Freshen, as a
stamp pad
94 Isn't wrong? -
96 Popular pie
flavor
97 Ends
98 PC key:
99 1977 thriller set
at sea
100 Comedy
Central's
"__.0"


101 Prefix with -gon
103 Pointed tool
104 ... __ saw
Elba"
105 Co. that owns
Moviefone
106 Commonlty
called
109 See shaded
letters
intersected by
this answer
114 Child's pet
115 Phenomenon
associated with
the Southern
Oscillation
116 Message seen
after 13-Across
dies
117 Setting for van
Gogh's "Cafe.
Terrace at
Night"
118 Phillies div.
119 Drama has it
120 Shooting sport

Down
1 So
2 Character in "The
Hobbit"
3 See shaded letters
intersected by
this answer
4 Critical situation
*5 Cosmetician
Lauder
6 They have mtgs. in
schools
7 Not std.
8 Share
9 Harvey of
"Riservoir
Dogs"
10 Two-for-one, e.g.
11 Flunk
12 Media watchdog
org.
13 "Going Rogue"
author
14 Rheumatism
,symptom


15 19"69 film with an
exclamation
point in its title
16 When the table is
set
17 Missing parts
18 Realizes
21 Jewel holder
25 Book after Joel
27 Cousin of an
oboe
32 See shaded
letters
intersected by
this answer
33 Sassy
34 Site of a key
battle in the.War
of 1812
35 Flotsam or
Jetsam in "The
Little Mermaid"-
36 Fleet
37 He played the
candidate in
"The
Candidate,"
1972
39 in the
Morning"
40 '10 or '11
person, now
41 Buster
42 Shop posting:
Abbr.
44 Follow :
45 Aviation pioneer
Sikorsky
46 ,Designer of the
pyramid at the
744Across
50,See shaded
''letters
'intersected by
this answer
51 It's for the birds
54 Garlicky.
mayonnaise
55 "__ for Cookie"
("Sesame Street"
song)
56 Totaled
59 Ashanti wood
carvings, e.g. ,
62 See shaded
letters
intersected by
this answer


63 Reasonto doodle
66 Aple debut of
1 8
67 "I'm less than
impressed"
68 Mouse in a
classic Daniel
Keyes book
70 Contact ___
73 RCA products
75 "I didn't mean to
do that!"
77 Quite a schlep
78 "Do the Right
Thing" pizzeria
owner


79 Thomas who
lampooned Boss
Tweed
81 "You have no
82 '"Tell Me More"
'network
83 Age-old
philosophical
opic
84 Fictional reporter
86 Buzzers
89 Park, home
T-F the ,
itts urgh
Pirates,
94 Cdzanne's "Boy
in ___ Vest"


95 Bonus to
something that's
already good
96 Spanish chickens
97 Active
99 Doubting words
100 Representative
102 Musical
symbols that
resemble cross
hairs
103 Gulf of ___
104 A very long
time


105 Top
106 "Show Boat"
composer
107 Writer James
108 The "S" of TBS:
Abbr.
110 Unaccounted
for, briefly
111 Take sides?
112 Prefix with
culture
113 Boss of bosses


4 6 2 9


8 6 7 2


79 ,4


1 82 35


7 14


7 6


9 183 5


2 1 9


3 9 5


Answers to last Sunday's Crossword.
TRIP WALESA CIGAR JAY
YETI ANODES CLARO AXE
RAZZ DEFENSIVEPAX CIA
AMAZEDAT TIP SPARKS
AVERY TSARS ANAP
SPI REWD PO ISONTHEHOOD

ARH TER A SlD TA
EZ E NATURAL L I RO






MAGI FLOCK RE 0 D FOSTER

RUNE DIANA AERIE
SPEEDS REN SALADB'AR
RHO SECRETPALATE ARLO
A L CRAB IN H E UL
GEL o NAD I R S STYX


9 6


6 L Z


9 8 6





17 L L
9 L








6 L 9 8


'6 9 17


Page Editor: Emogene Graham 754-0415


by Luls Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people.past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY'S CLUE: U equals K
"EWLA LACE FJ NBEHR N AENGHF
G I A LC FAA. LE A H LU F EZR LC K EV
AENCP IT LC N B 1A CV F DOLEW RVIZ
TNCEA PVDC." B H LMM ZV'G FZEAVC

Previous Solutio'n: "My acting technique is to look up at God just before the
camera rolls and say, 'Give me a break.' -James Caan
0 2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-24








40D LAKE CITY REPORTER LIFE SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2011



Jon Bon Jovi's charity restaurant opens in NJ


By WAYNE PARRY
Associated Press
RED BANK, NJ. In
three decades as one of the
world's biggest rock stars, Jon
Bon Jovi has eaten in some of
the world's best restaurants,
savoring the best food the
planet has to offer.
Yet there's no place he'd
thther have dinner than The
Soul Kitchen, a "pay-what-you-
can" restaurant he and his
wife Dorothea established. in
a former auto body shop near
the Red Bank train station in
central New Jersey.
The restaurant provides
gourmet-quality meals to the
hungry while enabling them
to volunteer on community
projects in return without
the stigma of visiting a soup
kitchen. Paying customers are
encouraged to leave whatever
they want in the envelopes on


Rock star Jon Bon Jovi sits in the Soul Kitchen restaurant
in Red Bank, N.J., Wednesday, during the opening of the
restaurant which is designed to help the hungry without the
stigma of a soup kitchen. Diners pay whatever they're able to.


each table, where the menus Jersey rocker's Jon Bon Jovi
never list a price. Soul Foundation, which has
The restaurant is the lat- built260homesforlow-income
est undertaking by the New residents in recent years.


"With the economic down-
turn, one of the things I
noticed was that disposable
income was one of the first
things that went," Bon Jovi
told The Associated Press
in an interview Wednesday
before the restaurant's grand
opening' ceremony. "Dining
out, the family going out to
'a restaurant, mom not hav-
ing to cook, dad not having to
clean up a lot of memories
were made around restaurant
tables.
"When I learned that one
in six people in this country
goes to bed hungry, I thought
this was the next phase of the
Foundation's work," he said.
It started several years ago
when Dorothea Bongiovi (she
uses the legal spelling of her
husband's name) and Jon
started helping out at a food
pantry at nearby St Anthony's
Roman Catholic Church.


They later moved their focus
to the Lunch Break program,
which feeds 80 to 120 people
a day, dubbing it "The Soul
Kitchen."
They brought that name
with them to a former auto
body shop down the street
from the Count Basie Theater,
where Jon and his self-tited
band have played many fund-
raising shows for local chari-
ties.
It took a year and $250,000,.
but the restaurant now rivals
any of its competitors in trendy
Red Bank, with entrees like
cornmeal crusted catfish with
red beans and rice, grilled'
chicken breast with home-
made basil mayo and rice
pilaf, and grilled salmon with
soul seasonings, sweet potato
mash and sauteed greens,
many of which were grown in
the herb and vegetable garden
right outside the restaurant's


doors.
Bon Jovi, who has a home
in next-door Middletown, is
adamant about one thing.
"This is not a soup kitchen,"
he emphasizes. "You can come
here with the dignity of linens
and silver, and you're served a
healthy, nutritious meal. This
is not burgers and fries.
"There's no prices on our
menu, so if you want to come
and you want to make a differ-
ence, leave a $20 in the enve-
lope on the table. If you cant
afford to eat, you can bus
tables, you can wait tables, you
can work in the kitchen as a
dishwasher or sous chef," he
said. "If you say to me, Tm
not a people person,' I say,
'Thafs not a problem. Well
take you back to Lunch Break
to volunteer with those people.
If you don't want to volunteer
with that, we'll take you to the
FoodBank."


Army museum's morbid

oddities resettled in Md.


By DAVID DISHNEAU
Associated Press
SILVER SPRING, Md. The bullet that
killed Abraham Lincoln is mounted under
glass, like a diamond in a snow globe, in
its new home at the National Museum of
Health and Medicine.
The lead ball and several skull fragments
from the 16th president are in a tall, antique
case overlooking a Civil War- exhibit in a
museum gallery in Silver Spring, just off
the Capital Beltway.
The military museum, known for its
collection of morbid oddities, moved in
September from the former Walter Reed
Army Medical Center in Washington. At
Walter Reed, visitors had to pass through
a security gate and find the museum on
the campus, where parking could be a
problem.
The new building stands outside the
gates of Fort Detrick's Forest Glen Annex.
Visitors, can just drive up, walk in and
come face-to-face with a perpetually grin-
ning skeleton directing them to an exhibit
on the human body. There, one can see
a hairball from the stomach of a 12-year-
old girl and the amputated leg of a man


If You GO,..

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH AND
MEDICINE: 2500 Linden Lane, Silver
Spring, Md., at the Fort Detrick-Forest
Glen Annex; http://nmhm.washingtondc.
museum/ or 301-319-3300. Open daily 10
a.m.-5:30 p.m. Free admission.


with elephantiasis a disease that causes
limbs to become bloated. The leg floats
upright in a glass jar like an enormous,
pickled sausage.
The museum's collection of 25 million
objects includes plenty to inspire fascina-
tion or disgust or both. But it's also a
treasure trove for researchers like Candice
Millard, author of the new book "Destiny
of the Republic," abput the assassination
of President James Garfield. She wrote in
her acknowledgements that she held in her
gloved hands at the museum the section
of Garfield's spine pierced by a .44-caliber
bullet from Charles Guiteau's gun.
' Guiteau's brain and partial skeleton are
also in the museum's collection.


RUNNING: Attorney runs for a cause


Continued From Page 1D
with a personal trainer to
build strength and have
taken spin classes to build
stamina.
"You never know what
you can do. I never thought
I could run this far in a mil-
lion years," Morgan said.
Morgan, who will turn 56
the day after the marathon,
has broken her back twice,
most recently in 2005 after
being thrown from a horse.
Unable to work for three


months, Duke, who lives in
Tampa, came to take care
of her, Morgan said. Since
their days at King High
School in Tampa, Morgan
said they've been together
through major life events-
weddings, the birth of chil-
dren, and now cancer.
"I do not want to lose
her," Morgan said of Duke,
whose birthday is just
a week after Morgan's.
"She's got an incredible


outlook, very positive,"
Morgan said.
Morgan said her goal is
to get people thinking and
talking about this cancer to
break down the stigma.
"We have to get to the
point where we are freely
talking about these can-
cers," she said.
To help Morgan with her
goal of $26,200, visit first-
giving.com and search for
Teresa Morgan..


GARDEN TALK: Seed saving for spring


Continued From Page 11
can be found at www.solui-
tionsforyourlfe.com
Spring flowering shrubs
such as azalea,'spirea
and camellia shouldn't be
pruned now because their
flower buds are already
set and ready to go this
spring: Summer flowering
shrubs, however, bloom on
new growth. They should


be pruned in late February
or early March so the new
growth will be ready for
summer buds and blooms.
Summer flowering shrubs
,include crape myrtle,
roses, and some hibiscus.
For more information
,ion pruning, contact the
UF/IFAS Extension Office
at 752-5384 or refer to the


UF document 'Pruning
Landscape Trees and
Shrubs' at http://edis.ifas.
ufl.edu/mg087

* D. Nichelle Demorest is
a horticulture agent with the
Columbia County Extension
of the 'University of Florida
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.


TASTE: Going Victorian at Telford


Continued From Page 11
it all off.
If you still have room
there is a dessert table
with homemade goodies.
Today there was hum-
mingbird cake, banana
pudding, chocolate cake,
blueberry pie and two, cob-
blers. Price for Sunday
buffet is $9.50 but the
weekday price is $6.50
plus beverage cost of
$1.25. Menu items are
available in the evenings.
Picking our favorite of all
that was offered was not-
easy but the fried chicken,
roast pork, banana pud-
ding and the yeast rolls
were all in the running.
As we waddled out to
the cashier we talked to
our waitress about the
ghost stories and 'sight-
ings she had observed and
heard in the hotel. She


personally has observed
several strange happen-
ings. One in particular
stood out for her. She
said at certain times of the
day cigar smoke can be
smelled in the front room,
which was formerly .a
parlor. (Today there is no
smoking allowed.)
Others have told us
about one of the bedrooms
upstairs that has had
many strange sightings
and unexplained noises.
So, think how much fun
or ghostly it would be to
spend Halloween night in
one of their B&B rooms.
Hopefully you'll still be
there the next morning
to go downstairs for their
continental breakfast.
Originally there were 40
rooms but there are fewer
than 10 now open. When


you ate in the mood for a
short drive and a chance
to see an old and maybe
haunted Victorian Hotel
in person, visit the Telford
*Hotel but only go when
you are hungry.
Hours:
Monday Thursday
11:00 2:30 p.m.
Friday Satur'day
11:00 9:00 p.m.
Sunday
11:00 3:00 p.m.
Telephone: 386 397-
2000
I Genie Norman and
Mary Kay Hollingsworth are
Columbia County residents
who love good food and
fun, at home and out. Their
column on area restaurants
appears twice monthly.
You can contact them at
TasteBuddiesLakeCity@
gmail.com.


Fully Furnished Office &


Executive Suites .


For Lease



Utilities Included _

Conference Room

Professional Setting



Convenient Located
V S in Westfield Square
ultes 386-755-3117


I