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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01677
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 20, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01677
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text





S000017 12051, ***-DIGI1 22,
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
IPO 1 BOX 117007
205GSMA UNIVL O FL 321-
GalAINESVILLE FLOR21IDAJ


Reporter


Thursday, October 20, 2011


www.lakecityreptrter.com


Vol. 137, No. 228 0 75 cents


SUWANNEE TRIPLE SLAYING



Search begins for jurors


in McAlpin murder trial


O'Brien man faces death
penalty for 2010 murder
of 3 Suwannee residents.

By TONY BRITT
tbritt@lakecityreporter.com
LIVE OAK Jury selection in the
James Lindsey Howze murder trial began
Wednesday morning at the Suwannee
County Courthouse with officials pulling


from a pool of 198 potential jurors.
Close to 11 hours later, the pool of
potential jurors had been narrowed to
42. Jury selection is slated to continue
today.
In September a Suwannee County
grand jury indicted Howze, 38, of O'Brien
and Lonnie Robert Munn, 47, of live
Oak, on charges of first-degree murder,
conspiracy to commit home invasion rob-
bery and kidnapping.
A third suspect in the case, Keith Allen
Hughes, 26, O'Brien, committed suicide


in the county jail days after the incident
The indictments followed the shooting
deaths of Joseph and Nancy Militello and
their nephew, Angelo Rosales, in their
McAlpin farm home on Aug. 25, 2010.
Third Circuit Judge Leandra Johnson
presided over jury selection, which began
shortly after 9 a.m.
Johnson ordered potential jurors not to
discuss the case with anyone, to. ignore
media coverage of the case and not to
TRIAL continued on 3A


I JASON MATTHEW WALKERJLare Cry Rep:rler
James Howze at the defendant's table Wednesday morning at the Suwannee County Courthouse during jury selection for his murder
trial, set to start Monday. Howze, along with Lonnie Munn, faces the death penalty for the first-degree murder of Joseph Militello, his wife
Nancy Militello and their nephew Angelo Rosales on Aug. 25, 2010 in McAlpin. .



News story lands $10K


sponsors for Snow Day


By LAURA HAMPSON
Ihampson@lakecityreporter.com
Let it snow!
B&B Food Stores and
Gainesville Ice have donated the
$10,000 needed to bring 30 tons
of manmade snow to downtown
Lake City for Snow Day.
"The Chamber continues to
be amazed by the generosity of
businesses in our community.
For the third year in a row, a
local business has read about
the need for a title sponsor in
the Lake City Reporter and for
the third year have matched us
with a sponsor," said Dennille
Folsom, Lake City-Columbia
County Chamber of Commerce
executive director. "The
Chamber is thankful that we
will have the opportunity to
host this event for Lake City
and surrounding communi-
ties."
A story in the Oct. 7 edition of
the Reporter chronicled the lack
of funding for this year's event,
which faced cancellation.
' Snow Day kicks off on Dec. 10
with the Dashing to the Snow 5K
Reindeer Run/Walk at 8 a.m.
Two giant piles of snow, two


slides and 10 bounce houses
will be open from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. in the Columbia County
Courthouse annex parking lot
where children can play, sled
and bounce. There will also be
live entertainment, free pictures
with Santa and food vendors. ,
B&B will be giving away a
2012 Jeep Wrangler during the
event to one of 400 people who
win a key card. There will be
chances to win the Jeep during
Snow Day or you can visit any
Busy Bee B&B Food Stores to
register for a key card.
"I expect this event to be the
biggest one yet with the addi-
tion of the Jeep giveaway. It adds
extra excitement to the already
packed day of entertainment,"
Folsom said.
A Christmas parade will light
up the streets at 6 p.m., hosted
by the Rotary Club of Lake City.
"Snow Day is an event unique
to Lake City and'I hope that it
will continue for many years to
come," Folsom said.
For more information about
Snow Day, becoming a food ven-
dor or the Christmas parade,
contact the chamber at (386)
752-3690.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/L ae C.,y Repcrler
Seth Willis, 10, of Lake City, launches a snowball during last
year's Snow Day.


Fair 's


theme:



2 lost


heroes


Firefighters Josh Burch and
Brett Fulton commemorated
in A Smokey Bear A Fair.'

By GORDON JACKSON
gackson@lakecityreporter.com
Two Florida Division of Forestry fire-
fighters who died June 20 while battling
a wildfire in Hamilton County will be
honored at the Columbia
County Fair, which opens
Oct 28.
The theme of the event
held at the Columbia
County Fairgrounds in
Lake City, is "A Smokey
Bear A Fair."
Wanda Jones, presi- Burch
dent of Columbia County Burch
Resources, said her
organization decided
the theme would be an
appropriate and timely
way to honor the fallen
firefighters, Josh Burch,
31, of Lake City and
Brett Fulton, 52, of the Fulton
Springville community,
as well as all wildfire firefighters.
"We wanted to pay tribute to the brave
men and women who protect our woods,
wetlands and homes," she said.
Kurt Wisner, a forestry division wildfire
mitigation specialist and public informa-
tion officer, saidit"'was "quite an honor"
when organizers told him the county fair's
theme.
"We're vesy pleased the fair has been
dedicated to Joshua Burch and Brett
Fulton," he said. "We're very appreciative
of this."
Wisner said Adam Putnam, conmmiis-
sioner of
the Florida
Department
o f
Agriculture
a n d
Consumer
Services,
will present

of Burch and
Fultoie o an
opening-day
ceremony at
4 p.m. JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City
W h i I e Reporter
the fair may Teens enjoy the Freak Out
begin on a ride at last year's Columbia
bittersweet County Fair.
note, the
rest of the nine-day event, which ends Nov.
5, will be festive.
Organizers expect about 26,000 people
to attend. Jones said there are plenty of
family oriented events to appeal to every-
one.
Featured events include a tractor pull,
lumberjack shows, livestock programs and
a rainforest
experience -.
featuring ani-
as Bengal
tigers, mon-
keys and an
Asian fishing
cat.
Discounts
willbeoffered
through -
event such JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City
as Matinee A view of last year's faiReporter
Discount and foai a Feris wheel.
Senior Day
on Oct. 29,
Family Day on Oct. 30, a Halloween cel-
ebration Oct. 31 and a Saturday matinee
discount and military and senior day on
Nov. 5.
There will be plenty of local live enter-
FAIR continued on 3A


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
SFax: 752-9400


7041
Sunny
WEATHER, 2A


O pinion ................
People ..................
Obituaries ..............
Advice & Comics........
Puzzles .................


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE FRIDAY
Apple celebrates County commission
Steve Jobs. coverage.


----'-------~a ..... -I_-II-__LL I ~ -- sl- LL L L . .I- Ia II ..... .... ZIO


,~.,, 11-.------""~ilR~1~.nlllWLllliOl~TC~~I ~L~;-rr-~








LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


IH 3 Wednesday:
Afternoon: 9-3-2
Evening: 6-9-8


k4 3)


Wednesday:
Afternoon: 0-5-4-8
Evening: 7-6-1-0


STuesday:
^ 2-9-23-25-36


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Apple employees celebrate Jobs, stores close


CUPERTINO, California
Apple leaders, employees and pop
culture stars celebrated the life of
Steve Jobs in a tribute Wednesday to
a computer visionary who changed
the world when he incorporated
music, media and lifestyle into a
sleek line of products.
The service at company headquar-
ters in Cupertino drew hundreds of
employees. They crowded into an
outdoor amphitheater to reflect on
the legacy of the company co-found-
er, who died Oct. 5 after battling pan-
creatic cancer.
Across America, Apple stores shut
their doors for several hours so retail
employees could watch through a
live webcast. The ceremony was
closed to the public and media han-
dlers shooed reporters away from
the famously private company.
Despite the best efforts at keep-
ing the 90-minute ceremony private,
music drifted across the campus
when Norah Jones and British rock
band Coldplay performed. And
employees took to Twitter to relay
some of the scene.
Apple Inc..CEO Tim Cook, chief
designer Jony Ive and former Vice
President Al Gore, who is on Apple's
board, were among those who took
to the stage to reminisce about their
experiences working with Jobs,
according to employees leaving the
service.
Elsewhere, Apple customers found
shutteredstores but rarely an expla-
nation for the closure. Most who vis-
ited didn't mind the inconvenience
once they learned of the tribute.

Lohan in custody after
probation issue
LOS ANGELES Lindsay Lohan
wore a new accessory Wednesday
after a judge revoked her probation:
Handcuffs.


.' ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo provided by Apple Inc., Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks, to employees at
a celebration of Steve Jobs' life Wednesday at Apple headquarters in Cupertino,
Calif. Jobs died Oct. 5, after battling pancreatic. cancer. ,


The actress was taken into custo-
dy and escorted from. a hearing after
Superior Court Judge Stephanie
Sautner revoked her probation
because she was ousted from com-
munity service at a
women's shelter.
'The development
marked the latest
legal problem for
Lohan, 25, who was
given probation for
Lohan a 2007 drunken driv-*
ing case and a mis-
demeanor theft case thisyear..
Lohan had been ordered in April
to serve 360 hours at the Downtown
Women's Center, an agency that
helps homeless women' She
"showed up once-and left after an
hour," Sautner said.


Schwarzenegger
back on movie set
LOS ANGELES Muscleman-
turned movie star-turned California
governor Arnold Schwarzenegger is
returning to the movies.
He's on the New
Mexico set of '"The,,
Last Stand," playing
the starring role as
a small town border

Schwarzenegger
.Schwarzenegger plays a former Los
Angeles police offi-
cer who ends up sheriff of a small
border town after a botched opera-
tion ;:-., . !.' : -
U Associated Press ,


Celebrity Birthdays


* Rockabilly singer Wanda
Jackson is 74.
* Actor William Russ is 61.
* Actress Melanie Mayron
is 59.
* Retired MLB All-Star Keith
Hernandez is 58.
* Movie director Danny Boyle
("Slumdog Millionaire") is 55.


HOW TO REACH US
Main number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number .............752-9400
Circulation ...............755-5445
Online ... www.lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., is pub-
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Ra. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Ra.
Member Audit Bureau of Circulation and
The Associated PBess.
All material herein is property of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction in whole or
in part is forbidden without the permis-
sion of the publisher. U.S. Postal Service
No. 310-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, Ra. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson.....754-0418
(twilson@lakecltyreporter.com) .
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .... ,754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com) .
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ....754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED ,
to placeea classified ad, call 755-5440


* Singer Tom Petty is 61.
* Rock musician Jim
Sonefeld is 47.
* Rock musician David Ryan
is 47.
* Rock musician Doug El-
dridge is 44.
* Rapper Snoop Dogg is 40.


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .754-0419
(sbrannon@lakecityreporter.com)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake CityReporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report" any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 10:30 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-delivery. Alter
1030 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
In all other counties where home delivery
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation..............755-5445
(clrculatlon@lakecltymporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks................. $26.32
'24 Weeks...............$48.79
52 Weeks................. $83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mall rates '
12 Weeks................. $41.40
24 Weeks...................$82.80
52 Weeks...................$179.40


CORRECTION
The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in news
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
call the executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.


AROUND FLORtDA THE WEATHER_


Clerk shoots, kills
would-be robber
TAMPA A conve-
nience store manager
grabbed a gun from under
the 'counter and shot a.
would-be robber in the
knee before the man
scooped up the clerk's
infant daughter and tried';
to flee, sheriffs deputies
said Wednesday,.
:- Daniel Ramont '
Hernandez, 32, died at
hospital after the Tuesday,
afternoon shooting at Del's
24-Hour Food. Store in
Naples, according to the
Collier County Sheriff's
Office. The child wasn't
hurt.
Hernandez came in
store acting, erratically,
causing 22-year-old man-
ager Elizabeth Easterly to
be worried for her safety,
according to the sheriff's
office. When Hernandez
came around to her side of
the counter, she grabbed a
gun and shot him once in
the leg.
When she ran outside
to alert a school crossing
guard, Hernandez grabbed
the stroller with Easterly's
child and carried it toward
the door. He put the stroll-
er down, ran outside and
was tackled by another
man who was coming to
work, the report said...

Man gets 15 years
for stabbing lover
WEST PALM BEACH
- A South Florida man
has been sentenced to 15
years in prison for fatally
stabbing his cross-dress-
ing lover.
A Palm Beach County
judge sentenced Juan
Carlos Atenco Camacho,
25, on Wednesday after
he pleaded guilty to man-
slaughter. He had been
facing a second-degree
murder charge, which
carries a possible 30-year
sentence.
Deputies arrested


I SUNNY1 SUNNY



HI70L41 H73L42


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Severe weather
Harold Wilson inspects his Sunrise neighborhood Wednesday
after a possible tornado damaged more than two dozen
homes in the area. Officials said a possible tornado left a 2
mile-long trail of damage in a suburban South Florida neigh-
borhood. Plantation Fire Battalion Chief Joel Gordon said-
Wednesday that the quarter-mile-wide debris trail has "all the
classic signs" a tornado.-


Camacho in July 2010 after
they said he confessed,
to killing Naum Rafael
Mendez, 33, and dumping
his body.
Mendez was last seen
in February 2008, leaving
a Boca Raton restaurant
where he worked. He was
wearing a red dress and
blond wig and carrying a
silver purse.

Body found belved
missing man
KEY WEST- Monroe.
County authorities said
a body found floating off
Wisteria Island in the
Florida Keys is believed to
be that of a man missing
since Monday.
The sheriffs office said
Wednesday an autopsy will
be performed to determine
what killed Donald Roller,
42.
Roller lived on a boat
in Key West harbor with,
his girlfriend, Beverly
Anderson, 42.
She told investigators
they argued Monday
night and she decided to ,
leave aboard their dinghy.


The engine had prob-
lems starting and Roller
jumped in the water to
)Aelp. Investigators said
Anderson rowed toward
land and told them she did
not see what happened to
Roller after he entered the
water.

Gun found on
student after fight
LAKELAND Police
said a school resource
officer used a stun gun to
break up a fight among
two students at Lakeland
High School.
An 18-year-old was
arrested Tuesday after
fighting with a sophomore
near the school's cafeteria.
Police say they found a
.38-caliber pistol in a back
pack belonging to the
older teen.
The older teen faces
charges of fighting in a
public place and causing
a disturbance and posses-
sion of a concealed firearm
on school property. The
younger student also faces
charges for fighting.
Associated Press


Pensacola
69/45


MOSTLY SUNNY
l SUNNY 11


HI77 LO 51 HI TI 51


SCity Friday Saturday
; : '".. ,' ."/41 ......City Friday Saturday1


Tallahassee*
67/40


*
Panam City
69/48


Lake City
70/41 "
Gainesvil
69'43
,6


Tam
74/


TEMPERATURES
High Wednesday
Low Wednesday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low


PRECIPITATION
Wednesday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


81
70
80
58
90 in 1980
36 in 1927

0.01"
2.13"
30.67"
1.66"
42.79"


Thursday


Jacksonlville .
,68/48

le Daytona Beach
3 70/50
Ocala *
6O A 4A *


Cape Canaveral
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Fort Myers
Gainesville
Jacksonville


Orlado Cape Canaveral Key West
74,. 53 70/52 Lake City
Miami
Ipa W Naples
53 West Palm Beach Ocala
78,'64 Orlando
Ft Lauderdale Panama City
Ft Myers 79,62 0 Pensacola
78/55 Naples Tallahassee
76'58 Miain Tampa
Key West 80, 63 Valdosta
80/70 W. Palm Beach


SUN
Sunrise tdday
Sunset today
Sunrise torn.
Sunset torn.

MOON


7:36 a.m.
6:55 p.m.
7:36 a.m.
6:54 p.m.


Moonrise today 12:50 a.m.
Moonset today 2:35 p.m.
Moonrise torn. 1:51 a.m.
Moonset torn. 3:14 p.m.


Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov.
26 2 10 18
New first Full Last


Friday


W- FuscituiustAu "** Maf wh ure


on this date in
1987, Bakersfield,
Calif., reported a
recorded a record
146 days in a row
with daily highs
reaching 80 degrees
or warmer.


71/ 56,/.
72/51/s
77/63/pc
78'54,'pc
73/42/s
i 1,' 50s
78/,70,pc
73!/42/s
78/60/pc
77/56/pc
14'44,'s
74-, 50, s
71 50's
71, 47/s
71 47,,s
75 51/pc
70,43/,s
7 7,'61,'pc


74.'62/pc
75/58/pc
81/69/s
79/60/s
75/48.'s
73/,55,/s
79/72/pc
76/48/s
81/170,pc
80/62/s
75/49/s
77/57/s
71/53/s
72/49/s
74/46/s
78/57/s
73/45/s
18/71/pc


An exclusive
7 service
brought to
olr our readers
I-iniubes bs b

Today's by
ultra-violet The Weather
radiation risk Channel.
for the area on Cae
a scale from 0 l *
to

*.- : woather.cam

34 & Forecasts, data and
' Vgaphics 02011 Weather
SCV Cetral, Madison, WI' .
weather www.weatherpubheisim.con


Daily Scripture

"Take delight in the Lord, and
he will give you the desires of
your heart'"
Psalm 37:4

Thought for Today
"The happiness of most people
is not ruined by great catastro-
phes or fatal errors, but by the
repetition of slowly destructive
little things."
-- Ernest Dimnet,
French priest, lecturer and author (1866-1954).

Lake City Reporter


THURSDAY


mF ,Y


ly


[23SUfiN


1! MON


r_ I -------c~------ II


I LAKE CITY ALMANAC


p~-Iin .iiiii i- 7n I;,g Rai?


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


(386) s S5-54-


-1








LAKE CITY REPORTER LOCAL & STATE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


COLUMBIA COUNTY FAIR

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

The 2011 Columbia County Fair runs from Oct 28
through Nov. 6 at the Columbia County Fairgrounds in
Lake City. Admission is $5 for everyone older than five
years old. Here is a schedule of events:

Oct. 28
4 p.m. Opening ceremony. Free admission until
6p.m.
8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. Early Bird Madness $20 for
all rides
10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Midnight Madness $15 for all
rides

Oct. 29
Noon to close $5 admission, seniors 65 and older
admitted free
Noon to 6 p.m. $10 armband for rides with $5
coupon for all rides
6 p.m. to close $15 for all rides

Oct. 30
Noon to close Family Day $10 includes admis-
sion, rides and all shows

Oct. 31
5 p.m. to close Halloween Night $5 admission; $10
for rides with discount card

Nov. 1
5 p.m. to close Buddy Night $15 for all rides or
two people for $20

Nov. 2
5 p.m. to close School Day $5 free admission ages
under 18 and college students'with ID; $13 for rides with
$2 off school coupon

Nov. 3
5 p.m. to close Free admission with S&S coupon;
$15 for all rides

Nov. 4
5 p.m. to close Midnight madness
8 p.m. to 1 a.m. $20 for all rides .
10 p.m. to 1 a.m. $15 for all rides .

Nov. 5
Noon to close Military/Senior day. Military and
seniors 65 and older admitted free
6 p.m. to close $15 for all rides



FAIR: Poignant theme

Continued FromPage 1A


TALLAHASSEE Gov. Rick
Scott is grudgingly complying with a
Florida Supreme Court decision.
Scott on Wednesday issued a new
executive order on state rules. The
justices in August ruled the previous


engage in any investigation
of the case on their own.
"We're looking for a
jury that can follow the
law and decide with an
open mind," Johnson said,
as she explained the capi-
tal case would have two
phases.
First will be the guilt
phase, in which the jury
will be tasked with decid-
ing whether Howze com-
mitted the crimes with
which he is charged. The
second. part, should he
be convicted, will be the
penalty phase, in which
jurors will decide whether
Howze should face the
death penalty.
David Collins is serv-
ing as the lead defense
attorney in the case with
Baya Harrison as assistant
defense counsel., Collins is


one exceeded his authority. they proceeding with new rules.
It'still requires agencies to submit However, the order says recommen-
existing and proposed rules to Scott's dations by his office "constitute the
office for review, strongly held views of the governor."
The key difference is they no lon-
ger must get Scott's approval before Associated Press


a court-appointed private
attorney.
Assistant State Attorney-
Craig Jacobsen is lead pros-
ecutor with Kyle McLebd
assisting.
Most of Wednesday was
devoted to interviewing
potential jurors.
Johnson and the attor-
neys began interviewing
potential jurors around
10:30 a.m. and the pro-
cess continued until about
6:35 p.m. According to
Suwannee County Clerk of
Court records, more than
114 jurors were interviewed
Wednesday.
Potential jurors were
called into the jury room
and asked about their
prior knowledge' of the
case, how they gained
that knowledge, whether
they've formed an opinion


tainment, more than 30 rides and nearly 200 exhibitors. r "
About 30 food booths and 15 arts and crafts booths will THE W
also be at the event. AND F11
"We've got about anything you can think,of," said Steve 611 N. Main St. -F 9:30 5;30
Briscoe, one of the fair organizers. "Thisis'th. nrbst-ecd0 Gain-esvillee"Ct. 9:30 4:00
nomic entertainment you will encounter."i l


about the defendant's guilt,
and whether they could put
aside what they've read or
-heard and render a verdict
based on evidence and the
law.
In addition, potential
jurors were asked about
their view of the death
penalty and whether they
could keep an open mind
during the case.
When the jury selection
is completed, there will be
12 jurors and three alter-
nates.
According to reports
from Suwannee County
Sheriff Tony Cameron, the
victims were shot in the


head execution-style.
Their bodies were found
by an employee of the
farm.
Hughes was arrested,
less than three days after
the crime.
Munn and Howze were
arrested a week later near a
campground in Minnesota
by state authorities and
U.S. Marshals.
Authorities believe rob-
bery was the primary
motive behind the shoot-
ings.
Munn is scheduled to
go to trial sometime in
November.


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Scott grudgingly complies with court ruling


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Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428












OPINION


Thursday, October 20, 201 I


OUR ANOTHER


OUR
OPINION


Perfect

choice for

fair theme

Turning this year's
Columbia County
Fair into a tribute
to two local heroes
was a fine idea.
The theme A Smokey Bear
A Fair captures perfectly the
spirit of the event Pay homage
to local forest rangers Joshua
Burch and Brett Fulton, who
lost their lives in the line of
duty in June, while still manag-
ing to maintain the festive air
one expects at a county fair.
And just what can you
expect?
All the standard fare: Rides,
festival food, livestock exhibits
and a whole lot more.
?lus a tractor pull, lumber-
jack shows and animals you
wouldn't otherwise likely see
this side of the Jacksonville
Zoo.
Sounds great
More than 25,000 are exect-
ed to attend.
Hope to see you there.


HIGHLIGHTS
IN HISTORY

Today is Thursday, Oct 20,
the 293rd day of 2011. There
are 72 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Oct 20, 1973, in the
so-called "Saturday Night
Massacre," special Watergate
prosecutor Archibald Cox
was dismissed and-Attorney
General Elliot L Richardson
and Deputy Attorney General-
William B. Ruckelshaus
resigned.
/
On this date:
In 1740, Maria Theresa
became ruler of Austria,
Hungary and Bohemia upon
the death of her father, Holy
Roman Emperor Charles VI.
In 1803, the U.S. Senate rati-
fied the Louisiana Purchase.
* In 1944, during World War
II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur
stepped ashore at Leyte in the
Philippines, 2 1/2 years after
saying, "I shall return."
In 1964, the 31st president
of the United States, Herbert
Hoover, died in New York at
age 90.
* Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
get things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY.
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop off at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) 752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


What's around the bend?


Ever think about
what's around the
bend in your life?
The future offers
opportunity for joy,
satisfaction, and fulfillment
Have you ever had dreams
about things you'd like to do?
As a child, did you think one
day you might be an astronaut,
or fireman?
Any dreams lately? How
about joining a club or group?
How about learning golf, music,
drawing, or photography?
Millions have enjoyed these
things, and even made success-
ful livings from them. If they
could do it, why couldn't you?
Success at anything you do is
said to be 10 percent talent and
90 percent effort The spice of
life is trying and exploring new
territory. When you stop learn-
ing and growing, you begin to
decline and waste away. New
directions can beexciting, fun,
and motivating. You're'.never
too old or too young. I started
counseling troubled youth and'
families in my 40's, teaching in
my 50's, and took up golf and
joined a band in my 60's. 'I'm
thinking about being a charter
boat captain, too.
Howcan you get started? .
Start it by -remembering somne-


Robert Denny
Bob.Denny8@gmail.com


thing you wanted to do. Pick
one new activity, and plan
a quick and easy first step.
Write.down that first step on
your calendar. When the date.
comes up, take that step. Don't
leave that new direction you
- started without following it up:
Schedule a second easystep.
They say that it takes about
21 days to develop a new habit
When it becomes a habit, it
becomes automatic. I thought
about walking my dog on the
local prairie, but it was never
convenient or eas until we
went on that first walk. From
then on, it was easy.
We're creatures of habit We
walk or drive without much
thought Ever drive on a really
muddy road? You may not real-
ize you're stuck in the muck
until you try to turn. New
thoughts or activities require


getting out of that rut or groove.
The first time is the hardest
You'll probably feel strange,
doubtful, and maybe some fear
of the unknown. Habit gets in
the way. But, nothing ventured,
nothing gained. We learn best
by stretching our limits and
allowing ourselves to make
mistakes. It's hard to start
when we've been standing still
a long time. Then, once you're
in motion, momentum tends
to keep you going. It's easy to
put off doing something new,
to break new ground. Make it
easier by taking simple steps
that offer a good chance of
small successes. They can be
very rewarding.
So, how about trying some-
thing new? If it works, try
something else hew. Enjoying
new experiences is stimulating,
. and your brain responds by cre-
ating hormones and endorphins
that improve moods, and prob-
ably improve health. Beginning
new adventures can open an
exciting new door in your life.

Robert Denny is a licensed
mental health therapist, and
teaches psychology at Florida
Gateway College in Lake City.
Comments welcome at Bob.
Denny8@gmail.com.


n 1979, journalists and
diplomats reported from
Iran on a revolution
against the Shah. They
were mistaken. The
. Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini
and his followers were thinking
bigger. Their goal was a global
revolution a revolution against
the United States and other
"oppressor" powers.
The Ayatollah famously called
America "the Great Satan." This,
too, was misunderstood. His
intention was less to insult than
to describe: He knew that free-
dom, the rule of (man-made)
law, peace, and equal rights for
both the servants and enemies
of Allah are seductive ideas that
could subvert the truths and
laws revealed by the prophet as
interpreted by him. Promoting
such ideas is what makes
America Satanic.
With this in mind, Khomeini
moved quickly to estab-
lish a militia, the Iranian
,Revolutionary Guard Corps or
IRGC. It was designed to be the
clerical regime's "sword and
shield against domestic opposi-
tion forces," writes Emanuele
Ottolenghi, a senior fellow at
the Foundation for Defense of
Democracies.
The Guards and their sub-
sidiaries, Ottolenghi notes, are
"directly involved in all phases
of the oil supply chain." They
run businesses and front com-
panies. They are involved in
international drug trafficking,
and they collaborate with orga-
nized crime, not least in Latin
America. Increasingly, former
IRGC commanders have moved
into powerful political positions
within Iran. Most ominously,
this military/industrial/terror-
ist/criminal/political complex


Cliff May
clifl@defenddemocracy.org
now supervises Iran's nuclear
weapons development and bal-
listic missile programs.
Last week, the Revolutionary
Guards were implicated in a ter-
rorist plot targeting the Saudi
ambassador and anyone else
who happened to be in or near
a posh Washington, D.C., res-
taurant that was to be bombed
While he was dining. Among
the key characters involved:
Mansour Arbabsiar, an Iran-
born American citizen, his
cousin, senior Quds commander
Abdul Reza Shalai, his deputy,
Col. Gholam Shakuri, and a
Mexican drug trafficker who, it
turned out, was working under-
cover for U.S. authorities.
Had the plan succeeded, it
would have appeared to be the
work of a Mexican drug cartel
- though Iran's rulers, their
friends and some of their ene-
mies, would have known better.
Instead, the operation failed
and, as Iran's terrorist masters
undoubtedly expected, many
experts have been quick to voice
skepticism about whether the
Quds Forces could be behind
such "recklessness," and to
suggest that perhaps this was
a "rogue operation" lacking
approval from Khomeini's succes-
sor, Supreme Leader Ayatollah
Ali Khamenei. Ottolenghi consid-
ers that nonsense, emphasizing
that the Guards "respond to the


leader's orders, and do not take
such daring initiatives to under-
mine him."
Those who say this opera-
tion Was clumsy also are wrong
but even if they were right it
should be no cause for com-
placency. Recall that, in 1993,
one of the terrorists involved
in the first bombing of the
World Trade Center returned
to the van rental company to
retrieve his deposit and was
promptly arrested., However,
those responsible for the bomb-
ing were not brought to justice
and, eight years later, Osama
bin Laden was able to field a
more skillful team to complete
the mission. In other words:
Al-Qaeda learned from its mis-
takes. Tragically, we did not
What do we need to learn
from the latest terrorist plot?
That Iran's rulers are not open to
engagement no matter what mix
of carrots and sticks are offered;
that Iran's rulers view peaceful
co-existence with the Great Satan
as ideologically/theologically
unacceptable; that Iran's rulers,
despite the erroneous reports
written from Iran 32 years ago
and the many misguided analyses
since, continue to have grand and
global ambitions not just griev-
ances and fears.
The hard fact is that the
Islamic Revolutionary Guards and
the supreme leader they serve
represent the most critical threat
confronting the West Terrorism
is one of their weapons. Nuclear
devices will be another unless
effective measures are taken to
prevent the Islamic Revolution
from advancing.
* Clifford D. May is president of
the Foundation for the Defense
of Democracies, a policy institute
focusing on terrorism.


4A


ANOTHER
VIEW


Wall


Street


whiners

B y their list of
complaints, most
members of the
"Occupy" move-
ment are simply
disaffected graduate stu-
dents. These products of the
most left-wing institutions in
America have discovered that
expensive degrees in useless
fields don't deliver instant
wealth. What a surprise.
A substantial number of
protest signs posted online by
occupiers blame the U.S. high-
er education system for their
woes. "I have a degree but
no future," one complained.
"I will trade you my master's
degree for a permanent job,"
another offered. "I am about to
graduate with my bachelor's,"
another lamented. "All I want
is to feel like that means some-
thing." "I worked as a stripper
in NYC," another noted. "I ,
made more money doing that
than I do now, after receiv-
ing a graduate degree." She's
another sad victim of the law of
supply and demand.
Some of the complainers are
desperate to blame others for
their poor life choices. "I am a
28-year-old college student with
24k in school debt and a useless
degreee," reads a white board
next to a young bearded man
with arms crossed. "I under-
stand that I made the choices
that'got me here. However, my
choices were led by the FAILED
INSTITUTIONS that make up
this nation." Here is the emblem
of American education, an over-
ly entitled loser staring angrily
out at a world that he thinks
owes him something.
One demonstrator held a
sign saying he had a doctor-
ate, three postdocs and would
"work for food." Even not
!knowing the young man's field,
it makes sense that he couldn't
find a job. His resume tells
a prospective employer that
.he's a perpetual student who's
spent most of his life hiding
from the real world. This pro-
tester proves the point that you
can be extremely well-educat-
ed and still not know anything.
Many occupiers complain
about their outstanding stu-
dent-loan debt "One semester
from graduating college with
a degree no one seems to
hire," one sign read, "In mas-
sive debt because of that once
'dream degree.'" Obviously,
Wall Street is not to blame for
that Since 1985, college costs
have risen more than 450 per-
cent, which is about 4.5 times
the rate of inflation. The occu-
piers' anger over student loans
shouldn't be directed at banks
that made their education pos-
sible but at the colleges and
universities that exploit the
loan system to soak students
for tuition in exchange for
those worthless degrees.
Not everyone backs these
crybabies. An older woman
lectured the whiny youngsters:
"My husband and I raise our
family of six on a poverty-level
income. But we live frugally
and built a home business
from the ground up. So we live
pretty comfortably (though *
simply). Refuse debt. Live
within your means and be a
part of a productive solution."
That's the attitude that made
America great Work hard, sac-
rifice and don't expect some-
thing for nothing. It's the exact
opposite of the entitlement
mentality that has transformed
a nation that once was the
world's greatest lender into its
largest debtor.
Our country needs to fun-


damentally change course and
re-instill the virtue of discipline
in individuals and government
'Wall Street occupiers represent
the problem, not the solution.
M The Washington Times


www.lakecityreporter.com


The most critical threat

confronting America









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


Occupy Wall Street becomes NYC tourist stop


By VERENA DOBNIK
Associated Press

NEW YORK Some
women from Kansas were
taking in as much of New
York City as they could
Wednesday. They hopped
on a subway, watched the
construction at the World
Trade Center site and vis-
ited lower Manhattan's
newest tourist destination:
the park where Occupy
Wall Street protesters have
camped out for more than
a month.
It's now common to see
tourists at Zuccotti Park
taking photographs of
themselves, with protest-
ers in the background. On
a typical day they clog the
pedestrian traffic in the
area, which is often bus-
tling with financial district
employees pushing their
way through.
Jackie Qualizza of
Bucyrus, Kansas, chal-
lenged protester, Art
Udeykin, asking him to
explain the purpose of
the demonstration, which
has inspired similar activ-
ism in many cities across
the nation and around the
world.
"Right now, we don't
have a goal except to
back away from the system
that's not working," replied
Udeykin, a 23-year-old
Russian-born Iowan. "This
is a way to feel free, to feel
normal."
Qualizza said shecouldn't
see herself demonstrating,


but added, "I don't disagree
with them. The government
bailed out everyone, and
things are still not working.
Something has to change."
The protest against cor-
porate influence in govern-
ment and wealth inequal-
ity has many of the things
tourists look for, including
photo-worthy moments and
even some trinkets. In this
case, the T-shirts and but-
tons offered by protesters
are generally free, though
they accept donations.
The double-decker buses
offering tours of Manhattan
pass by on Broadway, with
guides pointing out the
park site and tourists in
sunny weather often
waving sympathetically
at protesters from the top
decks.
Wednesday was rainy,
but visitors included a
group of Chinese tourists
accompanied by an inter-
preter and a guide.
Visitors do get a show
at times. Shawn Lahey, a
ruler factory worker from
Poughkeepsie, watched
a dancing man holding a
pole marked "corporation,"
attached to a noose marked
"financial system" from
which another dancing man
was "hanging." Masked
drummers provided a
thumping soundtrack.
"I think it's great -
they're trying to make a
point," Lahey said, though
he added with a wry smile,
"... I don't think it'll make
any difference ... The gov-


Spectators swarm the Occupy Wall Street protests with their
cameras in Zuccotti Park in New York. The protests against
corporate greed and various issues have continued for more
than a month and spawned similar uprisings around the
world, attracting participants and tourists from around the


country and beyond.

ernment won't make any
changes, because it's all
about money."
Molly Schwad, a jeweler
from Kansas traveling with
Qualizza and other friends,
said she was surprised by
what she saw, compared
to the TV coverage of the
protest movement
She saw a rather quiet
encampment in the rain,
of only about 200 people.
At times several hundred
people have camped at the
park, and some of the dem-
onstrations organized as
part of the Occupy Wall


Street movement have
drawn thousands.
"I thought it was much
bigger," Schwad said. "We
were afraid there might be
violence here." .
Marsha Spencer, an
unemployed seamstress
knitting in the rain at the
park Wednesday, gives visi-
tors a view of the protests
they may not have expected
to see. She returns to her
home in the Hell's Kitchen
neighborhood at night but
spends most of each day at
the protest
"When people see a 56-


year-old grandmother sit-
ting here, knitting they
pay attention," she said. "...
I tell them I'm here because
I want things to change for
my five grandchildren."
Some visitors echoed her
concerns, including Karen
Conrad of Johnstown, Pa.,
who was in New York last
week to visit family and
stopped by to show her
support
"I'm a middle-class moth-
er and I can't get ahead. If
anything I'm going down-
ward," she said. She said
her two children are bur-
dened by debt from college
loans and "won't be out of
debt until their own chil-
dren are ready for college
probably."
Demonstrator Julian
DeMayo, a law student
from Montreal bundled
up against the wind and
rain, said the tourists'
attitude toward the pro-
test has changed- over
the weeks.
"At first, they seemed
skeptical, looking at this
like it was a circus show,"
he said. But more recent-
ly, he said, many visitors
"looked genuinely inter-
ested, and inspired. And
they seem impressed by
the level of infrastruc-
ture."
He added, "I think they
also see that there's a huge
variety of people here -
youngand old, of all races,
from everywhere."
Some nearby businesses
are far less enamored of


the protesters, and say the
hubbub outside their doors
is costing them money.
Stacey Tzortzatos, man-
ager of Panini & Co., a
casual restaurant that's nor-
mally bustling as it serves
financial district clients,
said the eatery has been
losing business because
police barricades discour-
age customers from com-
ing in, and media vans are
blocking the view.
But the biggest problem,
she said, was protesters
coming in to use the bath-
room "30 at a time."
She said she put locks on
the bathroom doors in
response.
"They take showers
using the sink, they brush
their teeth, and they make
a huge mess," she said.
Tzortzatos said she's
been harassed and verbally
abused by protesters, who
have come in eating donat-
ed food.
"I was called 'evil' for ask-
ing whether they were cus-
tomers, when they came
in eating their free pizza,
smelling so bad," she said.
"It's a constant battle, and
it's getting worse as the
weeks go by."
Other food venues didn't
mind.
"Business is business!"
said Alex Gervis, who
works behind the coun-
ter at Manon, a cafe near
Zuccotti Park that sells
imported Italian coffee and
Belgian chocolates.


Lions and tigers shot in Ohio; owner freed them


By ANDY BROWNFIELD and
KANTELE FRANKO
Associated Press

ZANESVILLE, Ohio
- Sheriff's deputies shot
nearly 50 wild animals -
including 18 rare Bengal
tigers and 17 lions in
a, big-game hunt 'across'
the Ohio countryside
Wednesday after the owner
of an exotic-animal park
threw their cages open and
committed suicide in what
may have been one last act
of spite against his neigh-
bors and police.
As .homeowners ner-
vously hid indoors, Afficers
armed with high-powered
rifles and shoot-to-kill
orders fanned out through
fields and woods to hunt
down 56 animals that had
been turned loose from
the Muskingum County
Animal Farm by owner
Terry Thompson before
he shot himself to death


Baby Ayden Robert Cooper
Baby Ayden Robert Cooper, 5
days old infant son of Miranda
Stidham and Ryan Cooper died
unexpectedly
of an unde-
tected heart
problem. i n
He is survived
by his ma-
terral grand-
mother Tina
Chick, South
Carolina, and his fraternal
grandparents Robert and Ette
Cooper Lake City, FL.; Numer-
ous aunts, uncles, and other
family members also survive.
Memorial services for Ayden
Cooper will be conducted Sat-
urday, October 22, 2011 at
10:00 A.M. in the chapel of
DEES-PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, interment
will follow at a later date. 458
South Marion Ave. Lake City,
FL. 32025. (386) 752-1234.
Please sign guest book at www.
parrishfamilyfuneralhome. corn

Neil Herbert Dietz
Mr. Neil Herbert Dietz passed
away peacefully on Tuesday,
October 18, 2011 surrounded
by his loving
family. He was
born June 13,
1930 in Wah-
peton, North
Dakota. Mr.
Dietz gradu-
ated from the
State School of
Science in Wah-
peton, North Da-,
kota and served
in the U.S. Navy
from 1951 to
1955 during the Korean War.
He then served at NAS Jax for
35 years in Aviation Engineering
He was predeceased in death by


Tuesday.
After an all-nighthuntthat
extended into Wednesday
afternoon, 48 animals were
killed. Six others three
leopards, a grizzly, bear
and two monkeys were
captured and taken to the
Columbus Zoo. A wolf was
later found dead; leaving a"
monkey as the only animal
still on the loose.
Those destroyed includ-
ed six black bears, two griz-
zlies, a baboon and three
mountain lions.
"It's like Noah's Ark
wrecking right here in
Zanesville, Ohio," lamented
Jack Hanna, TV personality
and former director of the
Columbus Zoo.
Hanna defended the
sheriff's decision to kill the
animals but said the deaths
of the Bengal tigers were
especially tragic. There
are only about 1,400 of the
endangered cats left in the
world, he said.


his parents Herbert and Lauraine
Murray Dietz and his stepson
Ralph Paul Witt, III. He is sur-
vived by his devoted wife, of
47 years, Marjorie H. Dietz, his
stepson Stephen Michael Witt
and daughter-in-law, Jodi. He
was very proud of his step grand-
children, Ralph Paul Witt IV, Ni-
cole Renee Bush, Trevor Michael
Witt, Trey Allen Witt, Leah Ke-
aton and Jamie Taylor. He is also
survived by his sister Margaret
Elizabeth Svingen -and brother-
iin-law, Dale; two brothers, Ken
F. Dietz and Dennis J. Dietz.
Neil loved the ocean and had
been a resident of the beach
for more than 30 years, he was
a die-hard Gator fan who held
season tickets and attended
football games for over 40
years. He was a wonderful hus-
band, he was a stoic Father and
Grandfather, who will be dearly
missed by his family and friends.
Visitation will be from 5:00 to
7:00 pm, Friday, Oct. 21st in
Quinn-Shalz Family Funeral
Home of Jacksonville Beach.
The Funeral Service will be held
at 3:00 pm, Saturday, Oct. 22nd
in the chapel of Quinn-Shalz. A
Graveside Service will be held at
2:00 pm, Monday, Oct. 24th in
Forest Lawn Cemetery, Lake City.
In lieu of flowers donations
may be made to Operation
New Hope, 1830 No. Main
Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202.
Local arrangements, are under
the direction of the DEES-
PARRISH FAMILY
FUNERAL HOME, 458 South
Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
32025. (386)752-1234 please
sign our online family guestbook
at parrishfamilyfimeralhome.com

James L. "Leonard"
Huffstuttler
James L. "Leonard" Huffstut-
tler, 64, passed away Tuesday


"When I heard 18 I
was still in disbelief," he
said. "The most magnifi-
cent creature in the entire
world, the tiger is."
As the hunt dragged
on outside of Zanesville,
population 25,000, schools
closed in the mostly rural


ior," Sheriff Matt Lutz said.
"Once the nightfall hit, our
biggest concern was having
these animals roaming."
The sheriff would not
speculate why Thompson
killed himself and why he
left open the cages and
fences at' his 73-acre pre-


area of'farms and widely -.,serve,; dooming the' ani-"
spaced homes 5miles. ti .na he se.e med tq. love s
of Columbus. Parents were much.
warned to keep children Thompson, 62, had had
and pets indoors. And flash- repeated run-ins with the
ing signs along highways law and his neighbors.
told motorists, "Caution Lutz said that the sheriff's
exotic animals" and "Stay office had received numer-
in vehicle." ous complaints since 2004,
Officers were ordered to about' animals escaping
kill the animals instead of onto neighbors' property,
trying to bring them down The sheriff's office also
with tranquilizers for fear said that Thompson had
that those hit with darts been charged, over the
* would escape in the dark- years with animall~cruelty,
ness before they dropped animal neglect and allow-
and would later regain con- ing animals to roam.
sciousness. He had gotten out of fed-
"These animals were eral prison just last month
on the move, they- were after serving a year for pos-
showing aggressive behav- sessing unregistered guns.


OBITUARIES

October 18, 20.11 in Suwannee
Valley Care Center, Lake City,
Florida following a long illness.
.Mr. Huffstut-
tier was bom r
March 14,
1947 in Green-
wood Springs,
Mississippi and moved to the
Hatchbend area from Lake City,
Florida in 1998. He was a saw-
mill supervisor, a peacetime Vet-
eran of the U.S. Air Force, and
a member of Hatchbend Baptist
Church. He is predeceased by
two sisters, Eloise and Margaret.
Survivors include his wife of
28 years, Arlene Huffstuttler of
Hatchbend, FL., one daughter,
Janice Eversole (Jay) of Doug-
lass, GA., sons, James "Jimmy"
Huffstuttler of Dickson, TN.,
Chris Huffstuttler (Lindsay) of
Valdosta, GA., Chris Howard
(Laura) and Shawn Howard
(Laura) of Live Oak, FL., sis-
ters, Lorene Pingitore (Jim) of
Wisconsin, Rene Harrell (Bo)
of Statesboro, 'GA., brothers,
William Huffstuttler (Revia)
of Adele, GA., Gene Huffstut-
tler (Anita) of Adele, GA., Bill
Huffstuttler (Pam) of Doug-
las, GA., Dave Huffstuttler
(Kathy) of Tifton,. GA., and
11 grandchildren also survive.
Funeral services will be conduct-
ed Friday, October 21, 2011 at
11:00 am in Hatchbend Baptist
Church with Rev. George Dunn
and Rev. Brett Patterson officiat-
ing. Interment will follow in the
church cemetery. Visitation will
be held 6-8 pm on Thursday.
DANIELS FUNERAL
HOME AND CREMATO-
RY, INC. BRANFORD, FL.,
in charge of arrangements.

Rosa Mikell Mott
Rosa Mikell Mott, 100 ycars
and 8 months old, passed away
on October 18, 2011. She wai


a native of Olustee, FL. Par-
ents preceded her in death: Mr.
William P. and Virginia Mikell.,
Her husband and son preceded
in death, .Mr. Lester Mott and
Mr. William "Buck" Mott that
resided on Nolan Street in Jack-
sonville, FL until 2003. Rosa re-
sided at Baya Pointe Nursing and
Rehabilitation for eight years.
In lieu of flowers contributions
may be made to, Baya Pointe
Nursing and Rehabilitation, 587
South Ermine, Lake City, FL
32055. The family visitation to
greet friends will be held from
1:15 1:55 pm at Hardage-Gid-
dens Town and Country Funeral
home, 7242 Normandy Blvd.,
Jacksonville, FL. Followed by a
2 pm Graveside Service at Riv-
erside Memorial Park, Jackson-
ville, FL 32055. Arrangements
entrusted to: HARDAGE-
GIDDENS FUNERAL HOME
EDGEWOOD CHAPEL.


Southwest flight makes

emergency landing


AMARILLO, Texas A
man was arrested Tuesday
after his unruly behavior
aboard a Southwest Airlines
flight from Los Angeles to
Kansas City compelled the
flight crew to make an emer-
ge6icy :l'aftidhfi'Texas.
Ali Reza Sh4sivari, 2P,
of Indialantic, Fla., has
been charged with interfer-
ing with a flight crew, said
Patrick Rhodes, Amarillo's
aviation director. He was
booked into the Randall
County Jail in Canyon.
. Flight 3683 landed with-
out incident and the man
was taken into custody
for questioning by federal
officials. None of the 136.
passengers and five crew'
members was injured,
and the aircraft resumed
its flight after a security
sweep, said Brad Hawkins,
spokesman for the Dallas-
based airline.


Annie Allbritton
Mrs. Annie Allbritton 78 of
Wellborn, FL died late Wednes-
day evening at the Health Cen-
ter of Lake City. She is survived
by her husband of 61 years,
John "Buck" Allbritton a son,
David Allbritton and a daugh-
ter Kathy Hunt. Visitation will
be held Thurs. evening from
5 to 7 p.m. in the Chapel of
Dees Parrish Funeral Home.
Funeral services will be held at
11:00 a.m. Friday, October 21,
2011 in the Mt. Olive Baptist
Church in Wellborn with Rev.
Lewis Gooch officiating. In-
terment will follow in the Mt.
Olive Cemetery. A .full obitu-
ary will appear in the Lake City
Reporter on Friday, October 21,
2011. Services are under the
direction of DEES PARRISH
FUNERAL HOME. Please
sigh guest book at www.par-
rishfamilyfuneralhome. com.


Initially, authorities
said the man had tried to
break into the cockpit but
Amarillo
Aviation
Director
P'a t ri 'ck
es'o's
i....uae said
She was
Shahsavari "not try-
ing to
break into the cockpit, but
was unruly and had con-
fronted the cabin crew."
Passenger' Doug
Oerding said Shahsavari
started screaming
obscenities at other pas-
sengers during the flight
Attendants attempted to
Scalm Shahsavari and then
he went to the bathroom at
back of plane and started
making a commotion.
"All of us guys were
looking at him like are we
going to have to do some-
thing," Oerding said.
He said a flight attendant
got Shahsavari to calm
down. The flight landed
and police officers came
onto the plane and took him
into custody, Oerding said.

Associated Press


"Your Image is Our IMage"


Announcing


Image


Skin


Care


Clinical


Grade Peels
S'o/len Deep tines
If iqten and Briatlen .Sti
/l/ordalte tiome routine
' junch time 4 taf er iee'

386-7S8-2088
7Please call to schedule
97Xaren C. green, cmp
Skin Specialist


John R. Geiger, Sr.
April 15, 1936 Oct. 20, 2006
Daddy, It's hard to believe 5
years have come and gone. We
still see your smile and hear
your laughter. We really miss
you and all the wonderful times
we shared with you Dad. We
love you.
Your wife: Leonora
Kids: ILA, Mark & Julie
and grandkids


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


.


I









LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


SM M T T Submit Community Calendar announcements
RI M by mail or drop off at the Reporter office located
at 180 E. Duval St., via fax to (386) 752-9400 or
e-mail bridges @Iakecityreporter.com.


Today
Retired educators
meeting
The Columbia County
Retired Educators will meet
Thursday Oct. 20 at the
School Board Adult Center
room 120 at 1 p.m. Flu shots
will be given to any retired
educator. Any retired person
interested in education may
join is. For information call
Will Brown at 752-2431.
Camera Club meeting
The Branford Camera
Club meets 7 p.m. Oct. 20 at
the Branford Public Library.
Bring in three photos taken
over the last three months,
on a digital storage device,
along with information on
the equipment used, set-
tings/conditions for photo,
and why that particular
composition was chosen
to participate. Call Carolyn
Hogue, Program Chair, (386)
935-2044.
Nursing home planning
workshop
A free nursing home plan-
ning workshop is 2 p.m.
Oct. 20 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Everyone
who is concerned about
how they will pay for nursing
home care should attend
this informative workshop
led by local elder law attor-
ney Teresa Byrd Morgan.
Reservations are required.
Call Shana Miller at 386-755-
1977.
Master Gardeners
workshop
A Master Gardener work-
shop, "Caring for Roses in


.North Florida" is 5:45 p.m.
Oct. 20 at the Fort White
Library Branch. Learn all the
best tips for growing your
own rose bushes. The work-
shop is free and presented
by UF Master Gardener
Geoff Hart.

Friday, Oct. 21
Quilt Show and Sale
The 23rd Annual Stephen
Foster Quilt Show and Sale
is 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.-Oct. 21-22
and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 23
at the Stephen Foster Folk
Culture Center State Park.
More than 200 quilts and a
special exhibit of Heritage
Quilts will be on display dur-
ing this three-day show. This
year's theme is "Fostering a
Legacy of Quilting." Quilts
will be displayed throughout
the park, in the Stephen
Foster Museum, the Stephen
Foster Memorial Carillon
Tower and the park's audito-
rium. Admission to the Quilt
Show is $4 per person.
Homecoming events
The Columbia High
School Homecoming Alumni
Breakfast is 8:30 a.m. in the'
CHS Cafeteria. Following
the breakfast, all alumni are
invited to attend the CHS
Pep Rally from 10:30-12:00
in the CHS Gym. The home-
coming parade is 3 p.m.
Homecoming game time is
7:30 p.m.. Homecoming
Court will be presented and
the Homecoming Queen is
crowned during halftime of
the game.

Saturday, Oct. 22

Pumpkin decorating
American Family Fittness


Center, 4578 S.W. Heritage
Oaks Circle, will be selling
and decorating pumpkins
to support breast cancer
awareness on Saturday Oct.
22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
All proceeds to benefit the
North family of Lake City.
Pumpkin Fest
The Third Annual Family
Pumpkin Fest is 3:30 7:15
p.m. Oct. 22 at Big Shoals
State Park in White Springs
There is a children's pump-
kin decorating contest and
a costume contest open
for both kids and adults.
Admission is $2 per per-
son or $4 per carload and
includes entry into all con-
tests, drinks and snacks,
live music, hayride through
the woods, twilight camp fire
with marshmallow roasting
and a park ranger lead hike
with hundreds of Mexican
Free-Tailed Bats. Call (386)
867-1639.
Park workshop
A Planting and
Propagating Workshop is
9 a.m. -12 p.m. Oct. 22, in
the herb garden of the Craft
Square at Stephen Foster
Folk Culture Center State
Park. There is a hands bn
segment of the class and
students will take home
items they work on. The
workshop fee is $25 includ-
ing regular park admission.
For more information on any
of these workslhops or to
register, please call (386)
397-1920 or visit www.ste-
phenfosterCSO.org.

Sunday, Oct. 23
Ole fashion day
Falling Creek M.B. Church


will be having "Ole Fashion
Day" on Sunday Oct. 23 at
11 a.m. The speaker will be
Deacon Herman Holland.
There will also be "ole fash-
ion" food served on this
special occasion. Come
and help us lift the name of
Jesus.

Monday, Oct. 24
FFA meeting
The FFA Alumni/Booster
Monthly Meeting is 6 p.m.
Oct. 24 at the Land Lab at
CHS. Please bring a cov-
ered dish. All parents of FFA
students are encourage to
attend. The discussion will
feature fundraisers and spe-.
cial events coming up. Call
Lori Harkey at 386-397-9453
for any questions.


Thursday, Oct. 27
Landlords Meeting
Thursday Oct. 27 at 6
p.m. at Lake City Medical
Center classroom 101. All
rental managers welcome.
Will discuss up to date insur-
ance needs. For information
call 755-0110.
Livestock
announcements
The mandatory End
Weigh-Ins for Steer, Swine,
Beef Heifer and Meat Goat
is 3-8 p.m. Oct. 27 and the
Record Book Deadline is
one hour following close of
scales. The YOUTH SWINE
& STEER SHOW is sched-
uled for 7 p.m. Nov. 3. Call
752-8822.


Tuesday, Oct. 25 LEC Activity


LEC Activity
A Sponge Toss Game is 1
p.m. Oct. 25 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. Call
(386) 755-0235. The center
is located at 628 S.E. Allison
Court.

Wednesday, Oct. 26
LEC Activity
A Geriactors performance
is 11-11:45 a.m. Oct. 26'at
the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call (386) 755-0235.
The center is located at 628
S.E. Allisoq Court.

Fort White LEC
Senior Home Care is 10-
11 a.m. Oct. 26 at Fort White
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call 386-497-1504. The cen-
ter is located at 18829 Hwy.
47 South.


A Costume Contest is
11:30 a.m. Oct. 27 at the
LifeStyle Enrichment Center.
Call (386) 755-0235. The
-center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.
Fort White LEC
A Halloween Party and
Senior Home Care is 10
a.m.-noon Oct. 27 at Fort
White LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. Call 386-497-1504.
The center is located at
18829 Hwy. 47 South.

Info fair
The "Wealth of Information
Fair" is 9 a.m.-noon Oct. 27
at the LifeStyle Enrichment
Center. It promotes a "one
stop shop" where seniors
and soon to be seniors can
find out how physical activ-
ity, social connection, mental
stimulus and good nutrition
can promote "Independent


living for a lifetime." The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court..

Friday, Oct. 28


LEC Activity
A Free ZUMBA Class is 1
p.m. Oct. 28 at the LifeStyle
Enrichment Center. The
event is open to the public.
Call (386) 755-0235. The
center is located at 628 S.E.
Allison Court.

Saturday, Oct. 291
BBQ Cookout
The Vineyard, 1832 SW
Tomaka Terrace, will be hav-
ing a barbecue cookout from
3 to 7 p.m. on Oct. 29 with
music, games and fellow-
ship. Everyone is welcome.
For information call 365-
0764
Fall Safety Bash
The second annual White'
Springs Fire Department Fall
Safety Bash is 6-9 p.m. Oct.'
29 at Ogburn Ball Field. Free
flashing necklaces, blinking I
lights, reflective trick-or-treat;
bags and candy. Also food,
games, bounce house, hay
ride and more. Call 386-623-,
4758 or 386-292-1720.

Monday, Oct. 31
Train-the-Trainer class
A vehicle rescue "Train-
the-Trainer class is Oct. t
31 at the Columbia County
Sheriff's Office and Nov. 1 at
LQK North Florida. The class
provides the most up-to-dat
information available for
new vehicle technologies. I
Register at www.sceneofthe-)
accident.com. I


Big Boy winner


TODD WILSON/Lake City Reporter
Darrell Hunt (right) of Lake City was the winner of a turkey fryer given away by the Lake
City Reporter during the Lake City Kiwanis Big Boy Toys Expo on Saturday. Presenting
Hunt with the prize are Mandy Brown, centere) Lake City Reporter circulation director; and
Joe Smith, circulation district manager.


Scott: Florida will reject

grant if strings attached


By BILL KACZOR
Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE -
Florida will reject a federal
early learning grant of up
to $100 million if it comes
with -strings attached
including any requirement
for state funding, Gov. Rick
Scott said Wednesday.
Scott's warning coincid-
ed with the state's applica-
tion for the grant'offered
through President Barack
Obama's Race to the Top
program. It is part of the
federal stimulus program
that Scott has criticized in
the past
Florida is one of only
four states eligible for
- the grants. The others
are California, New York
and Texas. If approved,
the state Office of Early
Learning plans to use
the funds to partner with
private businesses in pro-
grams for high-risk chil-
dren.
Scott, though, said state
dollars cannot be used to
continue those programs
when the federal money
runs out.
'To be clear, Florida will
only accept these grant
dollars if the award comes
back with no strings
attached," Scott said in a


statement
The Republican gover-
nor said Florida's applica-
tion is "anchored on the
bedrock conservative
. principles of smaller gov-
ernment and local solu-
tions."
Private child care pro-
viders that choose to
participate would receive
mini-grants to build capac-
ity for services. Local early
learning coalitions would
administer the process
and be held accountable
for how the money is allo-
cated and spent
The application says
Florida will not abide by
any additional state spend-
ing obligations, now or
in the future. Scott also
is insisting there be "no.
requirements for future
legislative action, and no
government programs
that unduly burden state
taxpayers and commit
state dollars to federal
unfunded mandates."
.He added that Florida
also would not implement
the program if new regu-
lations are unexpectedly
placed on private busi-
nesses.
"Additionally, any pro-
vider receiving funds will
be asked to acknowledge
that these grant funds are


temporary and not intend-
ed to build programs that
will require additional
state spending when the
grant dollars are gone,"
Scott said.
He said he believes,
though, that as long as the
grant programs last they'll
help save at-risk children
from long-term depen-
dence on taxpayer-funded
welfare programs.


Authorities target


TI derVQ~l mu lers D


By CINDY HORSWELL
Houston Chronicle

HOUSTON -The smug-
gling operation across the
Texas border proved lucra-
tive, netting over $2 million
for hauling the undocu-
mented 41 who went by
such aliases as "Hit Man"
and "Spike."
But the illegal cargo
wasn't immigrants from
Mexico.
It was white-tailed deer,
secretly brought into Texas
from northern states to.
breed with native deer in
an effort to produce trophy
bucks with chandelier-sized
antlers.
The imports are illegal
as the state tries to protect
Texas deer against diseases
that could decimate native
herds.
When the smuggler
a prominent East Texas
deer breeder named Billy
Powell was sentenced
three weeks ago to six
months home confinement
and fined $1.5 million, it
sent shock waves through
a growing Texas industry.
Some people might find
deer-breeding a strange
niche, since the state's deer
are so plentiful they can
be nuisances, munching on
gardens and straying onto
roadways.
But Texas game warden
Capt. Greg Williford. said
breeders cater to high-dol-


lar hunters who want that Amber Andel, Texas
"trophy showpiece for their h ga,. ait. Wildlife breedeI
mantle."' specialist, said the'fild hAs
Deer breeding can also grown by about 20 percent
be' profitable 1n a tatt a y) arut coulrde sl6oed
where hunting is practi- by the drought.
cally a birthright, with a The laws are aimed at
$2 billion annual economic stopping the spread of
impact "chronic wasting disease,"
It's legal, as long as it .which has infected deer in
involves registered, cap- at least 12 states and is
tive deer from within similar to mad cow disease1
the state. Capturing wild It can t 'be transmitted to
deer, or importing new humans. No state has erad-
stock from out of state, is icated the disease once it's
not. Importing semen is established.
allowed. Violations can also be
"There's a strong market prosecuted under the fed&
for deer with those monster eral Lacey Act, which car-
antlers. Hunters will pay ries harsher penalties.
thousands of dollars to bag "Antler fever is what we
one," said Michael Merida, call it," said Roy Douglas
U.S. Fish and Wildlife spe- Malonson, owner of th4
cial agent in Fort Worth. RS Deer Ranch, covering
"That's why a frozen semen 221 acres of rolling green
straw from a big-name buck country in Waller County.
can be worth $2,000, and a "Some get caught up in it.
breeder can extract 70 or. They want the best of th6
80 straws at a time." best and get obsessed."
The actual animals can Mounted deer with mast
sell for "insane amounts," sive antlers including one
much like purebred race he bred, "Cajun Bakerman
horses, he said, noting that hang from walls at
one buck recently sold for Malonson's hunting lodge,
$450,000. which opened this month.
A Texas A&M University He said he bought "some
study found deer breed- genetics," or semen, from
ing pumped $650 million Powell.
into the U.S. economy four "Powell is one of the nic-
years ago and was the fast- est guys you'd ever meet,'"
est-growing industry in said Malonson, who said
rural America. In Texas, he was stunned by Powell't
permits have been issued recent conviction. "I can't
to 1,233 breeders, who have imagine him doing some'-
103,000 deer registered. thing like that"


Conservative Countdown to 2012
October 22, 2011
10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m.
Columbia County Fairgrounds
Lake City, Florida
U.S. Senate Candidates
Congressional Candidates
Government Gone Wild
Americans For Prosperity and more

Attend an Old-Fashioned Political Rally with food,
entertainment, political candidates & speakers.
Enter our drawing to win a Glock 9-mm pistol.
www.conservyativec~_ ntdown.com
www nQrthcentralfloridateaparty.org
Call: 386-288-3364 or 386-935-0821


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Invites everyone to our
Invites everyone to our


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Page Editor: Laura Hampon, 754-0427


|


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I








LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


HEALTH BRIEFS


In this Sept. 14 photo, fresh fries are scooped into containers during lunch at Gardiner High
School in Gardiner, Maine.

Senate votes for unlimited

potatoes in school lunches


By MARY CLARE JALONICK
Associated Press

WASHINGTON The
Senate threw its support
behind the potato Tuesday,
voting to block an Obama
administration proposal
to limit the vegetable on
school lunch lines.
Agriculture Department
rules proposed earlier this
year aimed to reduce the
amount of french fries in
schools, limiting lunch-
rooms to two servings a
week of potatoes and other
starchy vegetables. That
angered the potato indus-
try, some school districts
and members of Congress
from potato-growing states,
who say USDA should
focus on the preparation
instead and that potatoes
can be a good source of
fiber and potassium.
Following a bipartisan
agreement, on the issue,
the Senate by. voice vote.
accepted an amendment
by Republican Sen. Susan


Collins that would block
the USDA from putting
any limits on serving pota-
toes or other vegetables in
school lunches.
Collins, who is from
Maine, a potato-growing
state, says the vegetables
are a cheaper and nutri-
tious way to feed children
when school -budgets are
strapped. She said after the
vote that it was a "victory
for common sense" and
hoped the strong biparti-
san vote would send a mes-
sage to the USDA.
Amended was a spend-
ing bill that includes dol-
lars for the Agriculture
Department The 'House
passed a similar bill ear-
lier this year including lan-
guage that would ask the
department to rewrite its
school lunch rules entirely.
Advocates and govern-
ment officials 'say chil-
dren get enough potatoes
already and should have
more diversity in their
diets


"USDA's proposal was
about helping kids to eat a
very wide variety of vegeta-
bles and I think, that point
has been lost in all this,"
said Margo Wootan, direc-
tor of nutrition policy at
the advocacy group Center
for Science in the Public
Interest, which pushed for
the standards. "Other veg-
etables have a hard time
competing with potatoes."
Since the proposed guide-
lines apply to federally sub-
sidized meals, schools are
generally fine with broad
federal guidelines on nutri-
tion how many servings
a week children are allowed
of grains or vegetables, for
example. But some schools
have balked at the attempt
to tell them exactly what
foods they can't serve.
The way the amendment
is worded would still give
USDA flexibility to regulate
the preparation of the pota-
toes when it issues the final
version.


Scuba diving helps veterans,

others with disabilities


Py AMANDA SCHOENBERG
Albuquerque Journal

1. ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
- When Cody Unser dives,
she is weightless.
And, for a few minutes at
least, she is unencumbered
by the wheelchair she has
used since she was 12.
Unser, 24, daughter of
Albuquerque racing legend
Al Unser Jr., was paralyzed
from the chest down in
1999 during a sixth-grade
basketball game, when she
was struck with transverse
myelitis, an autoimmune
condition that attacks the
spinal cord.
Two years later, she
earned her scuba certifica-
tion. She has been diving
ever since.
"I always say that it
saved my life," says Unser,
a graduate student in pub-
lic health, at Georgetown
University who lives in
Houston. "It's the best
thing in the world."
Through the Cody Unser
First Step Foundation,
which she and her mother,.
Shelley Unser, started in
2000, Unser has spentyears
lobbying doctors and gath-
ering funding to research
the therapeutic benefits of
diving on people with spi-
nal cord injuries.
In May, Unser's vision
became reality when
researchers spent a week
in the Cayman Islands
,studying the impact of div-
ng on 10 liaraplegics and
Quadriplegics and 10 able-
bodied divers. In addition
to spearheading the study,
1Jnser was the only woman
'and non-veteran in the dis-
abled group.
Dramatic results
The privately funded
study was small, but results
were dramatic. Divers
with disabilities showed
improved strength and
dexterity, and those with
post-traumatic stress disor-
der averaged an 80 percent
improvement in symptoms,
says principal investigator
Dr. Adam Kaplin, assistant
professor at Johns Hopkins
University and psychiatric
consultant to the school's


Transverse Myelitis
Center.
In some paralyzed div-
ers, sensation, tone or
motor function improved
by 20 percent to 30 per-
cent, according to a Johns
Hopkins release.
It was the kind of
response Cody Unser
expected. For years, Unser
.had told Kaplin, whom
she met at the Transverse
Myelitis Center, about tin-
gling sensations in her legs
when she. dives that last
for weeks. When she intro-
duced Kaplin to other dis-
abled divers who had also
regained feeling, he was
intrigued.
Although Unser started
the foundation to raise
awareness about trans-
verse myelitis, she has
also focused on organizing
scuba trips for people with
disabilities. In 2005, Unser
added diving for veterans
with disabilities with a new
project called Operation
Deep Down.
Working. with veter-
ans was a natural move.
As Unser traveled around
the country, she met vet-
erans injured in Iraq and
Afghanistan who sought
advice about living with dis-
abilities. She realized div-
ing could help them, too.
In Albuquerque,
Operation Deep Down vol-
unteers now train people
from all over the country
with disabilities and their
diving buddies. They also
instruct certified divers to
teach people with disabili-
ties.
Michele Monsam, who
works at Inlel and is a
member of the Air National
Guard, has volunteered
with Operation Deep
Down since 2008 when she
returned from duty in Iraq.
Teaching diving to people
with disabilities is now a
"lifetime commitment"
Paralyzed divers wear
webbed gloves, not fins,
but the "sense of adventure
and serenity is the same
whether you're using your
hands or your feet" she
says.
Monsam trained divers


on the Cayman Islands
trip and was in the control
group.
For participants, the trip
was transformative.
"I think the scuba-diving
trip fixed the problems I
didn't even know I had,"
says Chris Sullivan,.28, an
Army sergeant who was
paralyzed when he was
shot in the neck in Iraq in
2005. "When it was over, I
just felt like a burden was
lifted off me." '
Sullivan, who. lives in
Duson, La., loved the sur-
real feeling of being under-
water. He liked it so much
that he plans to take his
family diving next year.
Underwater, he is not
restricted to his chair, he
says. He can stand upright
and maneuver in the Water.
"Ifs like a Whole world
that you have total access
to," he said.
Al Kovach Jr., a former
Navy SEAL and senior vice
president of the Paralyzed
Veterans of America, helped
organize the trip and joined
the study. It was his first
open-water dive since 1991,
when he was paralyzed
from the chest down in a
parachuting accident
For Kovach, diving had
never been recreation. As
a Navy SEAL, diving was
simply part of the mission.
Now, he compares div-
ing to meditating or outer
space, he said in a tele-
phone interview from his
home in San Diego.
"People with paralysis
are susceptible to pres-
sure sores," he says. "Once
you're in the water, -it's so
relieving to have that neu-
tral buoyancy. In Cayman,
you can see forever. Just
going along the coral reefs
and seeing all those big fish
- it was almost like being
explorers."
"It was awesome," he
adds. "I can't wait to do it
again."
Diving often appeals to
veterans with disabilities,
Monsam says, because
many of them are thrill-
seekers. Also, she says,
"It's gear-intensive. Guys
love gadgets."


CDC: 1 in 25 adolescents
take drugs for depression
ATLANTA Health officials said
roughly 1 in 25 adolescents in the United
States are taking antidepressants.
A new study from the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention is the
first to offer statistics on how many kids
ages 12 to 17 take antidepressants. It's
based on surveys and depression screen-
ings of about 12,000 Americans.
The study found about 1 in 10 adults
take antidepressants. And perhaps more
should the researchers said only one
third of people with depression symp-
toms in the study were taking medica-
tion.
The CDC report was released
Wednesday. It also found that women
take the drugs more than men, and
whites use them more than blacks or
Mexican-Americans.

FDA cites dirty equipment
in cantaloupe outbreak
WASHINGTON The Food and
Drug Administration said the deadly
listeria outbreak in cantaloupe was
probably caused by pools of water on
the floor and old, hard-to-clean packing
equipment at a Colorado farm.
The agency said Wednesday that
contamination at the packing facility
at Jensen Farms is likely to blame for
the outbreak that killed 25 people in a
dozen states. Investigators found positive
listeria samples on equipment and fruit
there.
The FDA said Jensen Farms had/
recently purchased used equipment that
was corroded and hard to clean. The
agency said the way the cantaloupes.
were cooled after coming off the fields
may have also contributed to listeria
growth.
The Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention said the outbreak sickened
123 people.

Global Fund suspends
$28m AIDS grant in Mali.


About 250 people marched from
City Hall to the federal courthouse on
Tuesday.
Earlier this month, U.S. Attorney
Laura Duffy warned the owners and
landlords of pot clinics that they must
shut down within 45 days or risk pros-
ecution and property seizure. Similar
warnings have been sent throughout
California, where state law legalizing
some pot use clashes with a federal ban.

Police dog stricken by
cancer retires
ROCK SPRINGS, Wyo. A Rock
Springs police dog suffering from cancer
is retiring but will get to live out his life
with his handler.
City councilors voted Tuesday to allow
officer Anthony Hall to buy his canine
partner, Athos, so he can live with the
Hall family.
The 10-year-old dog developed a limp
in his right foreleg which turned out to
be caused by cancer. His veterinarian
said the German Shepard has about a
year left to live.
Hall said Athos worked on the two
largest drug busts in the department's
history and his retirement will leave a
big hole in the agency.

ER closes to treat meth
lab-contaminated man
HOPE, Ark. The emergency room
at a hospital in Hope had to shut down
for seven hours to be decontaminated
after treating a man covered with anhy-
drous ammonia when his methamphet-
amine lab exploded.
The ER at Medical Park Hospital
was closed from midnight uritil 7 a.m.
Tuesday.
Hempstead County officials said emer-
gency room workers felt a burning sen-
sation on their skin and eyes. The man,
who wasn't named by authorities, then
admitted he had been making meth and
his lab exploded.
The patient was airlifted to a Little
Rock hospital and a hazardous materials
cleanup team got to work in the hospital.
Pnlirp.we bmor nlt i t.41 in ripi thp


BAMAKO, Mali The Global Fund patient before he was transported.
to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria patient before he was transported.
says it will stop a $28 million HIV/AIDS
grant to Mali's government after inves- Sick engineer evacuated
tigators found evidence money is being from South Pole had stroke
misused.
The Global Fund announced CONCORD, N.H. An American
Wednesday that it will suspend funding engineer who was successfully evacu- '
all but essential services-under the grant~a-tEd-froffithe-otfith Pole to New Zealand
until a new structure can be found to said preliminary medical tests indicate
manage the money. she had a stroke..
Dr. Youssouf Diallo from Mali's High Renee-Nicole Douceur told The
Council for the Fight Against AIDS Associated Press in an email Tuesday
called the decision premature and said night that she's expected to recover,
the Council had not been shown any of' although not 100 percent
the evidence against it Douceur landed in Christchurch, New
The Global Fund and another interna- Zealand, on Monday, two months after
tional body have previously suspended she began experiencing vision, language
millions of dollars worth of grants to and memory problems while working at
Mali for the same reason, the National Science Foundation's South
The poor, landlocked West African Pole research station.
nation relies on international donors to The 58-year-old Seabrook, N.H., resi-
fund its health system. dent said the neurologist who reviewed
her medical tests believes she, had a
Mylan settles lawsuit over stroke on the left side of her brain.
Douceur asked for an emergency
contraceptive Femcon FE evacuation in August, but officials reject-
AU Pa. Generic drug-' ed her request because of bad weather,
CANONSBURG, Pa. Generic drug-that sending a rescue plane was
maker Mylan Inc. became the latest saying that sending a rescue plane was
company to settle litigation with Warner toolidangerouseatening.
Chilrottnl- P LC ve vnr einr.ver ronnof life-threatening.


%di1MUt JLL Lit' V fl 5tkiflt f i t 'ge V 01A 51
the oral contraceptive Femcon Fe.
Mylan, based in Canonsburg, Pa., said
Wednesday settlement details were con-
fidential but it can start selling a generic
version of the chewable tablets once it
receives regulatory approval. The drug
had U.S. sales totaling $44 million in the
12 months that ended June 30.
Last year, Warner Chilcott, based in
Ireland, settled a lawsuit over Femcon
with India-based Lupin Ltd., which also
is authorized to sell a version of Femcon
in the United States.
Watson Pharmaceuticals Inc. and
Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. also
have reached agreements with Warner
Chilcott, permitting them to sell generic
versions of Femcon.

Protest held over San
Diego pot clinic crackdown
SAN DIEGO A federal crackdown
on medical marijuana clinics has sparked
a protest in San Diego.


Helping veterans
Unser, who presented
her study last month to the
present the study Saturday
at the Paralyzed Veterans
of America Summit 2011 in
Orlando, Fla., says she is
thrilled with the results.
Simply finishing the
study was a "10-year mile-
stone," Shelley Unser says.
Cody Unser hopes the
study will spark more
research.
"My hope is to get more
people in the water and
show them what you can
do and not what you can't"
she says.


Jury said to award $130M
in brain trauma suit
PONTIAC, Mich. An Oakland
County attorney announced a $130 mil-
lion jury verdict in favor of the family of
a girl who suffered brain injuries during
birth.
Geoffrey Feiger said Tuesday that
Markell VanSlembrouck suffered the
"severe" injuries at William Beaumont
Hospital in Royal Oak. The girl now is
15.
The civil lawsuit was filed in 2006.
Beaumont Health System said in a
statement Tuesday that the hospital
disagrees with the verdict and plans an
appeal.
Spokesman Bob Ortlieb said the hos-
pital believes it proved scientifically that
the "child's disabilities are related to a
genetic condition." '


* Associated Press


A--
r ..

.r-U I


W386-I7557595 ToFree8o247

Call Today for an Appointment


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427








8A LAKE CITY REPORTER HEALTH THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


Heart failure hospital stays.

fall, saving billions


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


By CARLA K. JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer
CHICAGO Hospital
stays for heart failure fell
a remarkable 30 percent
in Medicare patients over
a decade, the first such
decline in the United States
and forceful evidence that
the nation is making head-
way in reducing the billion-
dollar burden of a common
condition.
But the study of 55
million patients, the larg-
est ever on heart failure
trends, found only a slight
decline in deaths within a
year of leaving the hospi-
tal, and progress lagged for
black men.
"While heart failure
hospitalizations have
decreased nationally over-
all, certain populations
haven't seen the full benefit
of that decrease," said lead
author Dr. Jersey Chen of
Yale University School of
Medicine.
Possible explanations
for the decline in hospi-
tal stays abound, includ-
ing healthier hearts, bet-
ter control of risk factors
like high blood pressure,
and more patients treated
in emergency rooms and
clinics without being admit-
ted to hospitals, said Dr.
Mariell Jessup, medical
director of the Penn Heart
and Vascular Center in
Philadelphia.
More than 5 million
Americans and 22 million
people globally have hearty
failure. Their hearts strain
to pump blood because
of damage, often from a
heart attack or from high
blood pressure. Fluid back-
ing up into the lungs can
leave people struggling to
breathe.
Heart disease contrib-


utes to heart failure. Last
week, federal health offi-
cials reported that the
prevalence of self-reported
heart disease in the U.S.
decreased from nearly 7
percent to 6 percent from
2006 to 2010.
Fewer hospital stays
saves Medicare a lot of
money because heart fail-
ure is the most common
cause of hospitalization in
older patients.
From 1998 to 2008, the
rate fell from 2,845 hos-
pitalizations per 100,000
Medicare beneficiaries to
2,007 per 100,000, accord-
ing to research appearing
in Wednesday's Journal
of the American Medical
Association.
If the rate had remained
the same, there would have
been 229,000 more heart
failure hospital stays in
2008 at an additional cost
to Medicare of $4.1 billion,
Chen said.
Other reasons for declin-
ing hospital stays may
include specialized pace-
makers and better use of
medications such as ACE
inhibitors that relax blood
vessels, diuretics that pre-
vent fluid buildup, digox-
in ,that boosts heartbeat
strength and beta block-
ers that ease strain on the
heart.
Shortness, of breath
sent heart failure patient
Maria Marure to several
Chicago hospitals this year.
In August, the 56-year-old
spent a week at Our Lady of
the Resurrection Medical
Center, where leaders are
focused on keeping heart
failure patients healthy once
they're home and avoiding
readmissions. Next year,
the nation's new health law
begins punishing hospitals
with high readmission rates


for heart failure by shrink-
ing Medicare payments.
The Chicago hospital
made sure Marure had
a medical interpreter to
translate a nurse's instruc-
tions into Spanish and con-
vey her questions. Marure
said it was the first time she
understood her heart fail-
ure and why it was impor-
tant for her to watch her
weight which can signal
excess fluid. The hospital
sent her home with a scale,
made sure she had home
care and a nurse called her
periodically.
Even with all that, in less
than three weeks, Marure
was struggling to breathe
again. A doctor sent her to
a different hospital, where
she was admitted for four
days.
Thatpatient's experience
illustrates why heart failure
is still a challenge, despite
' the new findings as does
the one-year death rate
found in the study. The
proportion of patients who
died within a year after
being discharged fell, but
only slightly, from about 32
percent to about 30 percent
during the decade.
"The death rate is still
unacceptably high," said
Dr. Mihai Gheorghiade of
Northwestern University's
Feinberg School of
Medicine in Chicago.
Hospitals need to aggres-
sively treat heart failure
patients' other ailments and
immediately schedule fol-
low-up care after discharge,
said Gheorghiade, who
wrote an accompanying
editorial in the journal.
"It is a sign of hope.
However, we are far from
achieving our goals," he
said.


ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this Aug. 25 photo, registered nurse Mary Schlitter (left) speaks to heart patient Maria
Marure, with the help of medical interpreter Marina Moreno at Our Lady of the Resurrection.
Medical Center in Chicago. A study has shown that hospital stays for heart failure fell a
remarkable 30 percent in Medicare patients over a decade. Next year, the nation's new health
law begins punishing hospitals with high readmission rates for heart failure by shrinking
Medicare payments.


WASHINGTON Does
your teen show normal
nerves about the week-
end party, or alwaysstay
home?
Nearly half of teenagers
say they're shy, perhaps a
bit surprising in our say-
anything society. But a gov-
ernment study finds a small
fraction of those teens show
signs of a troubling anxiety
disorder that can be mis-
taken for extreme shyness.
The report challenges
criticism that the .terms
"social phobia" or "social
anxiety disorder" medical-
ize normal shyness.
"Shyness is a normal
human temperament,"
says lead researcher Dr.
Kathleen Merikangas
of the National Institute
of Mental Health, whose
teachers always noted her
own childhood shyness onr
her report cards.
But just as it can be
hard to tell when feeling
sad turns into depression,
"there is a blurred bound-
ary between people who
describe themselves as shy
and -clinically significant
impairment," Merikangas
adds.
The difference: The shy
can be drawn out and adapt,
while teens or adults with
full-fledged social anxiety
become so paralyzed dur-
ing social situations that it
interferes with everyday
functioning.
The report also opens
a window into the broad-
er field of temperament
research. Even garden-vari-
ety shyness worries par-
ents, particularly fathers
of boys, says Dr. Nancy
Snidman of Children's
Hospital Boston.
In school-age boys espe-
cially, "shyness isn't very
well tolerated in the United
States," says Snidman who
wasn't involved with the
new research.
Snidman and colleagues
at Harvard Medical School


have tracked infants to their
college years, and know
that babies who react very
negatively to new people
I and objects tend to grow
* into shy children.' That's
r not a bad thing caution
is considered an important
3 evolutionary adaptation.
i Usually, the clinging tot
does just fine as he or she
grows older and finds a
I niche, Snidman says. Yet a'
very shy child is considered
* more at risk than others, of
later developing some type
* of anxiety disorder just
3 as the opposite extreme, a
very outgoing child, can be
I at greater risk for attention
* or conduct disorders, she.
says.
The new study, published
by the journal Pediatrics, is
based on in-person surveys
of more than 10,000 U.S.
teens about a variety of
mental health issues. More
r than 6,000 of their parents
i were. surveyed, too.
About .47 percent of
the teens identified them-
selves as shy around peers
they don't know well. More
than 62 percent of parents
thought their teens were
shy, perhaps a reflection of
t parental worry.
Then Merikangas'
team analyzed how many
teens appeared to meet
the American Psychiatric
i Association's criteria for
social anxiety disorder or
social phobia. Roughly 1 in
t 10 of the self-described shy
r kids did.
Social phobia tends to
appear during adolescence
when kids take their first
t real steps toward inde-
pendence, but there's
* little information about
i how often. The National
Institutes of Health esti-
3 mates it affects about 15
million adults.
Still, those identified as
potentially socially phobic
were more likely to have
another mental health
problem, such as depres-
sion or substance abuse.
But they were no more
I likely than the other teens


but for


?ribus
to be taking .psychiatric
medications.
There are anxiety-treat-
ing medications but the
main treatment is behavior-
al therapy, exposing people
very gradually to fear-induc-
ing situations and teaching
them coping techniques
What's a worried parent
to watch for? This isn't stan-
dard stage fright, where
you get sweaty palms
before a speech but each
one you-do becomes easier.
People with social anxi-
ety disorder experience a
more out-of-proportion fear
that can make them shake,
their hearts pound, or even
cause a panic attack during
a range of social situations.
,They start avoiding those
scenarios.


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Story ideas?

Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421 I
tkirby@lakeityreportercom


Lake City Reporter





SPORTS


Thursday, October


20, 2011


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B.


BRIEFS
AM1r Wn rtFOOTMA
Pep bus going
to Fernandina
The Fort White High
Pep Club is taking a
bus to the football game
at Fernandina Beach
High on Friday. The bus
is open to any school
board approved student
or volunteer. Cost is $15
per person. The bus will
leave Fort White High at
3:30 p.m. Friday and stop
for dinner on the way.
For details, e-mail
fwhspepclub@gmail.com
or call DeShay Harris at
497-5952.
-UWM
Alligator Lake
XC Invitational*
Columbia High is
hosting the Alligator
Lake XC Invitational
Presented by Half Mile
Timing on Saturday.
Varsity, junior varsity and
middle school runners
have been added to the'
traditional community
run. The middle school
division will serve as a
qualifier for the state'
meet in November.
There also will be a
mile run for elementary'
school students.
For details, go to.
www.milesplit.com/
meets/87260 or e-mail
Dusty Smith at.dusty@
halfniletiming.com.


's~m, parent
meeting Nov. 3
"A meeting for all.
interested-Columbia
High softball players and
parents to discuss
tryouts and conditioning
is 6 p.m. Nov. 3 in the
CHS auditorium.
For details, call Jimmy
Williams at 303-1192.
CHS OWUNG
Gas card raffle
for fundraiser
Columbia High's
bowling team is selling
raffle tickets for a $250
gas.card as a fundraiser.
Tickets are $5 for one,
$10 for three, and $20
for 10.-
For details, call Brian
Saunders at 755-8080. -
From staff reports

GAMES

Today
Fort White High
volleyball at Oak Hall
School, 6 p.m. (JV-5)
Columbia High JV
football at North Marion
High, 7 p.m.
Friday
Columbia High.
football vs. Middleburg
High, 7:30 p.m.
Fort White High
football at 'Fernandina
Beach High, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday
Host Columbia High,
Fort White High cross
country in Alligator Lake
XC Invitational, 9 a.m.


Weather could play factor in World Series


Game 1 goes on
without delay at
press time.
Associated Press

Play or Ppd? Talk about
October pressure the
barometric kind, that is.
The forecast for Game 1
Wednesday night at Busch
Stadium was daunting:


Temperatures dropping
through the 40s, a decent
chance of rain, a lot of wind.
After a season that includ-
ed more than 50 rainouts,
MLB's highest total since
1997, bad weather intruded
-in the playoffs.
A game at Yankee
Stadium was stopped in
the second inning and sus-
pended until the following
day. A game at Texas was


Voice


Williams,
Harrison bring
life to broadcast.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@lakecityrepor ter. com
Sdds are there
aren't many
men around
the country .
thht have
reached fame and fortune
by cAlling high school
'football-games on the local
radio station. For the-men
, that do,-it's a labor of love.
Isadore Williams and
'Donnie Harrison have
'been Columbia High's
commentating duo since
Harrison stepped into the
booth in 2007.
s alley of
sahwitei a laueh. -
"'*afg fodtbaU ii my
backyard as a kid I used
to broadcast the games.. I
thought I was the only one
until I heard Jerry West
say he did .the same thing.
in-his backyard as a child.
He would play, offciatp
and do the play-by-play."
Now in their fifth season
together, the duo can be
heard during each Tigers'
football game across the'
radio dial.
For Williams and-
Harrison, their love for
Tiger football goes back
much further. Harrison
played for the Tigers in the
70s and Williams played for
Richardson High School
before desegregation


of


postponed because rain
was lingering too bad for
the teams and fans, those
showers never came.
Getting it exactly right
isn't easy, Paul Gross said.
He's a meteorologist with
WDIV-TV in Detroit and
has been helping the Tigers
with their forecasts since the
days when Sparky Anderson
was their manager.
"There is a tremendous


a


amount of weather informa-
tion on the Internet these
days. Everyone has access
to it, everyone can try to
be a weatherman," he said.
"But the average person,
without any formal train-'
ing in meteorology, doesn't
understand that things can
change very dramatically."
"We have a joke in this
business: 'Don't try this at
home,'" he said.


No matter, check the
stands at any ballpark when
the skies turn dark. Fans
whip out their cell phones,
put the maps in motion and
make their own predictions.
Players, too, turn into
amateur weathermen.
Boston slugger David Ortiz
has been known to dial up
the radar and study the mul-
ticolored blobs and bands
that show precipitation.


program


.. . JASON MATTHEWWALKUEkae City Reporter
The voices of Columbia High's radio broadcast Isadore Williams (left) and Donnie Harrison show their frustrations towards
officiating.


took place in the 60s.
Even while playing for the
Wolves, Williams didfi't
miss a chance to catch
Tiger football.
"Back then, people
would pack the stands for
Columbia games on Friday
and they would pack the
stands for Richardson
games on Thursday or
Saturday," Williams said.
"Football tradition has


Indians will be

Pirates playoff test


Former Bolles
player now leads
Femandina Beach.
By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com
FORT WHITE -
Fernandina Beach High
football doesn't have much
of a history of playoff
appearances.
The Pirates are taking
steps to change that and a
good test will be when Fort
White High visits on Friday.
Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.
Fernandina Beach's play-
off years are few and far
between 1970, 1995 and


2007 -but now the Pirates
have playoff experience
from their head coach.
FernandinaBeachbought
Travis Hodge on board.
The Bolles School gradu-
ate played on the Bulldogs
state championship team in
1998. He went on to play
college ball at The Citadel.
Hodge returned to Bolles
to begin his coaching
career and followed with,
stints at Episcopal High and
Bartram Trail High.
Of more concern to Fort
White, Hodge spent five
years on the staff at Madison
County High before moving
INDIANS continued on 2B


been strong in Columbia
county through the years."
In 1964, Williams was
a senior for Lake City's
uncrowned champion.
"We were undefeated my
senior year," he said. "The
game. against Madison
stands out when current
Tiger Braxton Stockton's
grandfather Sam Stockton
intercepted two passes for
touchdowns at Memorial


SStadium. We didn't have
playoffs, but we called
ourselves the uncrowned
champions."
Harrison's bowl game as
a Tiger senior stands out
to him. Columbia, coming
off an 8-2 regular season,
was selected to play in
the Meninak Bowl against
Ely High from Pompano
Beach.
"We arrived at the


banquet about an hour late
at Jacksonville University,"
he said. "When we got
off the bus all we heard
from the other teams was
how the rednecks couldn't
even make it on time. The
Jacksonville schools, which
had played us, were telling
them they better shut up.
They weren't worried, but
VOICES continued on 6B


Tigers to host
Middleburgin
district contest.
By BRANDON FINLEY
bfinley@fakecityreporler.com
/ After a week 4o sit back
and think about playing
football, the Columbia
Higf Tigers will return
to the field at 7:30 p.m.
on Friday. A homecom-
ing kickoff also plays part
as a district game as the
Middleburg High Broncos
come into Tiger Stadium.


At 3-2, (1-1, District 3-
6A) Columbia needs a win
over the Broncos to stay
in the hunt for a district
crown. Coach Brian Allen
is making sure that the
Tigers are focused on the
district and not the distrac-
tions of homecoming. Will
the Tigers be ready to hit
someone Friday?
"Well see come Friday,"
Allen said. "The practices
have been up and down.
I gave them a few days
off last week, but we were
able to get through the
Monday and Tuesday prac-


For A Smokey Bear A "FAIR!"
October 29 thru November 5
.At The Columbia County Fair
A Tribute to the Wildland Firefighters
I Is P Customer
A Appreciation Day
"h .ae 3 Buy Our Fair Sponsors Quantity
WoOv VCa Depis and Receive a FREE
"While supplies last. pi't M market ($5.00 value Admission Ticket


tices without much inter-
ference from the weather.
I think we'll be ready to
go."
After a dissapointing loss
to Ridgeview High, Allen
knows that the Tigers have
to remain focused.
"We were extremely let
down against Ridgeview,"
he said. "We didn't play
well' defensively. The
offense played well enough
to win. Myself and Dennis
(Dotson) were disappoint-
ed with the effort We're


CHS continued on 2B


Columbia back at


it after bye week









LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports
Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN UCLA at Arizona
GOLF
9 am.
TGC European PGA Tour, Castello
Masters, first round, at Castellon, Spain
2p.m. ,
TGC PGATour, Children's Miracle
Network Classic, first round, at Lake
BuenaVista
S p.m.
TGC Nationwide Tour, Jacksonville
Open, first round, at Ponte Vedra Beach
(same-day tape)
7:30 p-m.
TGC LPGA.Talwan Championship,
first round, at Yang Mel, Taiwan (same-
day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m.
FOX World Series, game 2, Texas
at St. Louis
PREP FObTBALL
8 p.m.
FSN Louisville (Miss.) at Noxubee
County (Miss.)
SOCCER
8 p.m.
ESPN2 MLS, Philadelphia at New
York

BASEBALL

World Series
Texas vs. St. Louis
Wednesday
Texas at St. Louis (n)
Today
Texas (Lewis 14-10). at St. La is
(Garcia 13-7),8:05 p.m. .
Saturday
,St. Louis (Jackson 12-9) at Texas
(Holland 16-5), 8:05 p.n. .
St. Louis (Lohsa 14-8) at Texas
(Harrison 14-9). 8:05'p.m.

FOOTBALL

NFL schedule
Sunday Games ,
Houston atTennessee, I p.m.
Washington at Carolina, I p.m. ,
SanDlego at N.Y.Jets, I, p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, I p.m.
Denver at Miami, I p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit. I p.m.
Chicago vs. Tampa Bay at London,
I p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.mn,
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. .
St. Louis at Dallas, 4:15 p.m..
Green Bay at Minnesota,.4:15 p.m..
Indianapolis at New Oriepis4. 820 p.m.
fMonday's Gamie
Baltimore acjJacksonville. 8:30 p %i.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati. N.Y. GIants,
New England. Philadelphia. San Fr ncisco

College schedule
Today
Bethune-Cookman (3-3) at


CHS
From Page 1B

taking responsibility."
The Tigers defense will
get a little help as Dequan
Ivory returns to the lineup
for the first time in three
games after a violation of
team rules.
"He's learned his les-
son," Allen said. "I think
he's excited to be back and
it's shown him how impor-
tant football is in his life.
Hopefully it'll help him be a
better man down the road."
And it should help the
Tigers be a better defense.
"You just look ,at the
Ridgeview game where we
played two or three guys in
that spot that were blown off
the ball," Allen said. "You get
a 300 pound guy back that's
low and fires off the ball. He's
disruptive. Hell continue to
improve and he can be domi-
nant We want to see him be
dominant all the time."
But for Allen, he's not as
concerned about how Ivory
will respond to the situation
as he is keeping the Tigers
focused from the off-the-
field distractions that come
with homecoming.
"For me, its business as
usual," he said. "I've got to
keep the guys grounded.
We have to remember we
have homecoming because
of a football game. It's not
vice versa."
To keep the Tigers focused
on football, Allen- is making
sure that Columbia doesn't
break from it's usual routine.
"We'll get out early
on Friday, but I'm going
to have them here doing
something," he said. "We've
got to maintain the routine,
because that's something
that can throw you off. It's
year one for me and I'm
learning some of those
things."


Norfolk St.(6-1), 7:30 p.m.
UCF (3-3) at UAB (0-6), 8 pm.
UCLA (3-3) atArizona (1-5),9 p.m.
Friday
Ruqgers (5-1) at Louisville (2-4).
8 p.m.

College scores
Tuesday
Arkansas St.34, FIU 16

Top 25 schedule


Friday
No. II West Virginia at


Syracuse, I


Saturday
No. I LSU vs. No. 19 Auburn,
3:30 p.m.
No. 2 Alabama vs. Tennessee,
7:15 p.m.
No.3 Oklahomavs.Texas Tech,8 p.m.
No. 4 Wisconsin at No. 15 Michigan
State, 8 p.m.
No. 5 Boise State vs. Air Force,
3:30 p.m.
No. 6 Oklahoma State at Missouri,
Noon
No. 7 Stanford vs. No. 22 Washington,
8p.m.
No. 8 Clemson vs. North Carolina,
Noon
No. 9 Oregon at Colorado, 3:30 p.m.
No. 10 Arkansas at Mississippi,
12:21 p.m.
No. 12 Kansas State at Kansas, Noon
No. 13 Nebraska at Minnesota,
3:30P.m.
No. 16VirglniaTech vs. Boston College,
3 rp.m.
No. 17 Texas A&M at Iowa State,
3:30 p.m.
4 No, 20 Georgia T*ch at Miami,
3:30 pmn.
No. 21 Houston .,vs. Marshall,
4:30 pan.
No. 23 Illinois t Purdue, Noon

AUTO RACING.

Race week
MASCAR -
SPRINT CUP
GOOD SAM CLUB 500
Schedule'Friday; practice (Speed. 2:30-
s p.m.) Saturdi ; qualng (Speed, noon-
3 p.mi.); Sunday. ra:e, 2 p.m. (ESPN,
1-6 pm.) .
L ;TradMc Talldep Supe apeedway (oal.
266 miles). '
Race distance: 500 miles. 188 laps.'
Next race Trims Fast Relief 500. Oct.
30. Martinsvllle Speedway. Mardnsville.Va.
Online: hdpl/wwkv.nascar.com
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
COCA-COLA 250
SitLTalladega.Ala.
ScIheule: Friday, practice. qualifying
(Speed. 5-7 p.m.). Saturday, race, 4 p.m.
(Speed. 3:30,7 p.m.);,I-,, , '. ;. ,'
Track. Talladega Superspeedway
Race distance 20. n4ile, 94 laps.'
S Next race:- Kgei' 200, Oct. 29.
MartinsvilleSpd Martinsville.Va
Next: race:' O'kelly Auto Parts
Challenge, NovA.,Tea Motor Speedway
Fort Worth,Texas:
FORMULA ONE


Next race: Grand Prix of India, Oct.
30, Buddh International Circuit, New
Delhi.
Online: http/www.fornnulal I.comn
NHRA FULLTHROTTLE
Next event Big 0 Tires NHRA
Nationals, Oct. 27-30, The Strip at Las
Vegas Motor Speedway, LasVegas.
Online: http://www.nhro.con
OTHER RACES
WORLD OF OUTLAWS: Sprint Car,
Talladega Sage Fruit Showdown, Saturday,
Talladega ShortTrack, EastabogaAla. Super
DirtCar, Eastern States, Sunday, Orange
County Fair Speedway Middletown, N.Y.
Online: httpJlwww.worldofoutlaws.com

GOLF

Golf week
PGATOUR
CHILDREN'S MIRACLE
NETWORK HOSPITALS CLASSIC
Site: Lake BuenaVista
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Courses: Walt Disney World Resort,
Magnolia Course. (7,516 yards, par 72)
and Palm Course (6,957 yards, par 72).
Purse: $4.7 million. Winner's share:
$846,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Today-
Sunday, 2-5 p.m.).
NATIONWIDE TOUR
JACKSONVILLE OPEN
Site: PonteVedra Beach
Schedule:Today-Sunday.
Course: TPC Sawgrass, Dye's Valley
Course (6,864 yards, par 70).
Purse: $600,000. Winner's share:
$108,000.
Notes: The tournament Is the final
full-field event of the year. The top 60 on
the money list will qualify for the season-
ending Nationwide Tour Championship
next week at Daniel'Island Club in South
'Carollna.The flnal.top: 25 will earn 2012
PGATour cards.

HOCKEY

NHL schedule
RTuesday's Games
Carona4, Boston I .
Washington 3, Florida 0 '
.Dallas 3, Columbus 2
SBuffalo 3. Montreal I
SPilladelphia 7, Ottawa2
Pittsburgh 4, Minnesota2
Calgary 2. Edmonton I
N.Y. Rangers 4,Vancouver 0
Chicago 5, Phoenix 2
Los Angeles 5, St. l.ouis 0
Wednesday's Game: '
Winnipeg at Toronto (n)
Today's Games
Toronto at Boston, 7 p.m.
Washington atPhiladelphia, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Ottawa, 730 p.m.
SN.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Buffalo at Florida. 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
Nashville atVancouver, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Friday's Games
San Jose at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Columbus at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at St. Louis, 8 p.m.


CORRECT JUMBLE FOR OCT. 19
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, be good to
one letter to each square, .hodbeg od to
to forn four ordinary words. go now

LKLUS I. .


S-Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above .cartoon.

Answer: .
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday'sI Jumbles: ICIER YEAST GROUCH EMBARK
I Answer: The program about the history of baseball
was a BIG HIT

r THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
S by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles, SumIt' fuel efent.
one letter to each square, Itgesorething like
to form four ordinary words. l pesr gallon. -
DYOLD I "-- T 1' .


S ) | | mTHE CAR SALES Tol.P |
THM THE CAR GOT 70
I | | MLe PER GAU-ON,.
TTDIBI I" -ur Ti --
I I- Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:T O =
(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: SKULL WHISK UPROAR FONDUE
I Answer: When a battery is completely charged, it is
this "POWER-FULL"


INDIANS: Travel to Fenandina Friday


SCOREBOARD


and Hilliard High (7-6).
Other losses are 22-7 to
Eagle's View Academy, 27-
14 to Matanzas High last
week, and 44-0 to Yulee
High in a District 2-4A
game.
In the win at Keystone
Heights, Jordan Holland
rushed for 147 yards on 22
carries and had a 25-yard
touchdown run. Fullback
Dartaine Dunwood had
two short touchdown runs.
Quarterback John Willis


was 2-of-4 passing for 44
yards.
In the loss to Eagle's
View, the Pirates had 202
yards on the ground includ-
ing 95 from Dunwood on 15
carries. Willis scored the
' touchdown.
Holland scored the touch-
down in the win at Hilliard.
Even in the shellack-
ing by Yulee, Trey Morris
rushed for 79 yards and
Holland added 77 yards.
Willis was 3-of-3 passing.


CORRECT CROSSWORD PUZZLE FOR OCT. 19


1
6
11

12

13

14

15

16
17

18

19

23
25
26
S29
31


34


ACROSS
Shut out
Assumed as
fact
XX'
chromosomally
Exceedingly
elaborate
Came down in
buckets
Classified
(2 wds.)
Kate's sitcom
friend
Butte kin
All-purpose
trucks
Boat
implement,
Diplomat's
asset
Sledding spot
Tired
Jogged
Knack
Like cool cats
Khan of note
Silly comedy
Bishop's
rinmain .


35 Disgusting
37 Hong -
39 Put on the
block
40 Sword
vanquisher
41 Every
45 Deuterium
discoverer
47 Chocolate
bean
48 Bamboo
eaters
51 Action star
Chuck -
52 Orchard
problerp
53 Well-versed
54 Jazz
, instruments
55 Gmove

DOWN
i Started the
hand
2 Novelist -
Zola
3 Exile
4 Helm position


Answer to Previous Puzzle


GENA GM ELMO VlE R
E NIABE L|M|L Ell A
MOUNTAIN DERN
SALOON LAPPED
IND ERR
DOORS TACOMA
ER LE TAE OPT
W|EE lWADEiRO'BE
EA RGSN H IE

AT E R URANU S
BLAS TA.KE BAC K
L IIFIE EW I L E
If S DS L A W


Fire-engine
color
Mardi -
Present from
birth
Large tank
Depot info


10 Rorem or
Beatty
11 Herr's wife
12 Person in
debt
16 Baloney
18 Earthen pot
20 Contented
murmurs
21 Manitoba tribe
22 Work'at a
Keyboard
24 Far from a
sure thing
25 Brown
songbird
26 Flashlight.
output
27 The chills \
28 Salt, in a lab
30 Desktop

36 Inele ant
solution
38 Get ready
(2 wds.)
40 Ant or roach--
42 Large lots
43 "Al fie" star
44 Throng -
46 Cheerleading
yells
47 Ariz. neighbor
48 "Mystery!"
channel
49 - carte
50 Veto
51 Gridiron div.


10-19 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


ACROSS
1 Cocktail
6 Engine parts
10 Trace element
in salt
12 Leeway
14 Bellyached
15 Vim and vigor
16 Tried out
18 Feminine
pronoun
19 Ancient
cosmetic
21 Tex. neighbor
23 Hoop site
24 Piglet's
mother
26 Sidle past
29 Part of GTO
31 Move to
and -
33 Govt. branch
35 Big
celebration
36 banana
37 Blizzard
maker
38 Sugar amts.


10 Kind of rally
12 Environmental
Sprefix
03 And then -!
t5 Hurry
,7 Sitcom E.T.
iO Honda rival
H2 Flour infester
54 Bird or beast
58 Lure
59 Gasoline
rating
10 Kangaroo
pouches
51 Staring at

DOWN
1 Murky
2 Pooh's pal
3 Ms. Lupino
4 Beethoven
symphony
5 Pays
homage
6 Light source
7 Is, for them
8 Baseball
VIPs


Answer to Previous Puzzle


D E B ARG I-E
FEMALE ORNATE
RAINED WANTED
ALLIE MESA
A. I N EA NT

fUTES|OAR T|ACT

RAN FLAIR HEP
AGA FARCE SEE
YUC KY K ONG
SELL PEN EACH
UREY CACAO
PANDAS NORRIS
BLIGHT FLUENT
SAX ES COPSE


9 Express relief
11 -Magazine
execs
12 Mild-
mannered
13 PBS "Science
Guy"


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuIIIlDriverBooks.com


17 Water-ski gear
19 Jeweler's
measure
20 Doctoral
exams
22 Calculates the
total
23 Quiche base
25 Frequently
27 Trait carriers
28 Important
period
30 Enjoys a
siesta
32 Unfold, in
verse
34 Tango
quorum
39 Seattle team
41 Horse's gait
44 Marathon unit
46 Total
agreement
47 Floor -
48 Hubble
component
49 Goat cheese
51 Tome
53 Tayback or
Damone
55 After April, in
Paris
56 -Margret
57 Piano support


10-20 2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


Continue From Page 1B


to Fernandina Beach.
Fernandina Beach is 3-4,
but on a two-game slide. The
Pirates lost 29-3 to Union
County High in the opening
game of the season. The
team beat Williston High
26-14 in the kickoff classic.
Fort White beat Williston,
35-20, last week and fell to
Union County, 16-14.
Fernandina Beach has
wins over Keystone Heights
High (21-15 in overtime),
Cocoa Beach High (10-8)


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


I hhrr~llll









LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


DILBERT


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


ZITS


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


DEAR ABBY

Woman struggling to put happy

face on Facebook is not alone


DEAR ABBY: "Unsure
Out West" (July 26) felt
inadequate because she
had no upbeat messages
to send to her friends on
Facebook. Please tell her
she's not alone.
I attended a prestigious
college, but 35 years later
I also find myself with
no job, in debt, battling
depression and dealing
with a host of phobias. I
read' the school's quar-
terly magazine and see
my peers have great jobs,
travel extensively and are
happily married. I once
sent in "news" that not
everyone is so lucky and
that I am neither success-
ful nor wealthy. Needless
to say, it wasn't published.
When my FB
friends ask how I am, I
reply that it's a difficult
question to answer. I
then ask about THEM
and let them know I'm
glad they're doing well.
And when times get bad,
I know I can deactivate
my Facebook account
until I feel better. -
- UNDERSTANDING
"FRIEND" IN
MASSACHUSETI'S .
DEAR "FRIEND":
Thank you for writing to
support "Unsure." Many
people identified with her
feelings. My newspaper
readers comment.
DEARABBY: As a
recovering survivor of
severe childhood trauma,


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobby.com
I can relate to "Unsure's"
situation. I have college.
degrees, am married to a
wonderful man and have
two grown children. All my
energy went into recover-
ing from what happened
to me.
For years I felt ashamed
that I hadn't lived up to my
potential, but it takes cour-
age to recover from abuse
or addiction. People who
understand this view indi-
viduals like "Unsure" and
me as SUCCESSES in the
things that really matter.
She should be hon-
est, and as discreet as
she wishes. When I have
opened up, others have
learned the realities'of
recovery and seen me as
proof that it's possible. Too
many suffer in silence.
I reconnected with a
popular, successful high
school friend over thm
Internet and, discovered
that her adult path was
similar to mine. We have
been a source of support
and encouragement to
each other ever since. -
WENDY IN TEXAS
DEAR ABBY: While


everyone brags about their
kids, careers and wonder-
ful lives, don't forget that
they too have put a "spin"
on things. Nobody's life is
perfect. We've all had our
share of hardships.
I have been in
"Unsure's" shoes for sev-
eral years (minus the great
hubby), but Facebook has
given me confidence and
enabled me to meet people
who share my interests.
Accept yourself for who
you are. You don't have to ..
hide the truth. Problems
with alcohol or depres-
sion do not define you. -
AMANDA IN ILLINOIS
DEAR ABBYi "Unsure"
should get rid of her
Facebook page. If she
doesn't, shell continue
reading about the lives of
her old acquaintances and ,:
feel bad about hers.
I'm 19 never had a
FB page and never will.
Friends have fought over
rumors spread there, and
I've seen their self-esteem
suffer because of the
entries andcomments of
others. Since she has a
history of depression, it n
would be healthier to focus
on the positives in her
life and eliminate some- '
thing that makes her feel
negatively. K.V. IN NEW .,
JERSEY.:
* Write Dear.Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los 5
Angeles, CA 90069.


ARIES"(March 21-April
19): Self-improvement
tempered by discipline
and moderation will help
you conquer your goals.
Someone who has put
demands on you in the
past may 'lf-t6, ,ds6~ '
again. Stop any form of
manipulation before it has
'a chance to. stir.doubt or
cause problems. *****
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Give a partnership
a chance. Whether it is
personal or professional,
you stand to gain if you are
accommodating. Be open
about your plans for the.
future and you will get con-
structive help fine-tuning
your ideas. ***
GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Don't donate or give
away something that
doesn't belong to you
alone. Keep in mind that
charity begins at home and
that you must put family .
first. Look for an opportu-
nity through an institution,
agency or large corpora-
tion that can use your ser-
vices. ****
CANCER (June 21-
July 22): A relationship
will take a new direction.
Prepare to go with the flow
and learn from the experi-:
ence. A youngster's inno-
cence will help you see a
situation clearly. Project
happiness and you'll get
the same in return. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Protect your assets. Pay


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

off debts that are costing
too much in interest Come
to terms with anyone who,
has the potential to cost"' -
you in .thefuture. ake ,"
up your mind, set your
price and follow through.
Cl6se one door and open
another. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): Unpredictable behav-
ior will cost you dearly
in the end. Concentrate
on what you can do to
improve your life and
your personal situation.!
Consider Inaking a move if
it will help you financially.
Love is in the stars if you
travel or socialize. ****
LIBRA (Sept 23,Oct&
22): Uncertainty will lead
to depression if you let
someone confuse you or
ruin your plans. You have
to continue down whatever
path you choose, regard-
less of what someone else
decides to do. An uplifting
attitude will attract a posi-
tive associate. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Don't let emotions
dictate when leadership is
what's required. Love will
play a role in the outcome
of a situation you face.
There will be no room for
jealousy or possessiveness
if you want to come out on
top. Avoid overindulgence.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): Focus on mak-
ing your life better. Any ,
change you implement
will be invigorating, but
be 'careful that you can
afford to follow through
with your-pTardisbTO&e
you make any promises.
Taking on too much will .
be your downfall. *****
'CAPRICORN (Dec. )
22-Jan. 19): Stick close to
home arid have in place
everything that affects
your personal and emo-
tional well-being. Nurture
important relationships '
and don't let anyone use
guilt to pressure you into,
taking on responsibilities
that infringe on your time
off.***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Back away and
reassess an unwinnable
situation. Cut youth losses
and. prepare to move on.
Concentrate on securing
your- assets and improving
your lifestyle. Discipline
and hard work will pay off.
New friendships are in the
stars. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-
March 20): Keep'the
momentum going. Don't -
let details bog you down.
Get someone else to take
care of trivial matters. A
partnership will be trying b
if you cannot agree on
the way you want thing
done. Prepare to move on
alone. ***


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another. .
TODAY'S CLUE: E equals G
"KWY H S ASI SC LM D S RA F D F I S G -


EIZM, ZGT DZT UZKD BWYYA


Z U S R K


KWY DKYYOAY SC LM TIYZLD."
- HAZRTY TYURDDM

Previous Solution: "Ours is a world where people don't know what they want
and are willing to go through hell to get it." Don Marquis
02011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-20


FOR BETTER OR WORSE


HOROSCOPES


Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415


3B .-


CLASSIC PEANUTS










LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011

Lake City Reporter





CLASSIFIED


Classified Department: 755-5440


Take ADvantage of the
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eI 2mperad
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4 lines 6 days line 5i
pRats la p to private Indvdu a l ling
person erchandse totaling 00 r e
Each Item moat Include a price
T^his laeenon-relundable rt.


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....s92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



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Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some
ad categories will require prepay-
ment Our office is located at 180
East Duval Street.
tou can.also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





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Tuesday' Mon., 1000a.m. M, ,9:00 a.m
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only the charge for the ad space
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deadlines apply for cancellation.
Billing Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
required regarding payments or
credit limits, your call will be trans-
ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Legal


Legal


.IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA 3RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
PROBATE DIVISION FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
IN RE: ESTATE OF: BIA COUNTY
File Number. 11-240-CP Case #: 2010-CA-000026
ORBRA WARTHEN HARRELL, Division #:.
.Deceased. OneWest Bank, FSB
NOTICE TO CREDITORS Plaintiff,
The administration of the estate of vs.
Orbra Warthen Harrell, deceased, Kengeth K. Koch and Shirley L.
whose date of death was August 22, Koch, Husband and Wife; Aqua Fi-
2011, File Number 11-240-CP, is nance, Inc.; Unknown Parties in Pos-
pending in the Circuit Court for Co- session #1; Unknown Parties in Pos-
lumbia County, Probate.Division, the session #2; If living, and all Un-
address of which is P.O. Box 2069, known Parties claiming by, through,
'Lake City, Florida 32056. The under and against the above named
names and addresses of the personal Defendant(s) who are not known to
representative and the personal rep- be dead or alive, whether, said Un-
resentative's attorney are set forth known Parties may claim an interest
below. as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grant-
All creditors of the decedent and oth- ees; or Other Claimants
er persons having claims or demands Defendant(s)
against decedent's estate on whom a NOTICE OF SALE
copy of this notice is required to be NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
served must file their claims.with suant to an Order of Final Judgment
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF of Foreclosure dated October 6,
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE 2011, entered in Civil Case No.
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- 2010-CA-000026 of the Circuit
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR- Court of the 3rd Judicial Circuit in
TY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE and for Columbia County, Florida,
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF wherein OneWest Bank, FSB, Plain-
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. tiff and Kenneth K. Koch and Shir-
All other creditors of the decedent ley L. Koch, Husband and Wife are
and other persons haviing claims or defendantss, I will,sell to the highest
demands against decedent's, estate and best .bidder for cash AT THE
must file their claims with this court WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AF- COLUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST HOUSE, LOCATED AT 145 HER-
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. NANDO STREET, LAKE CITY,
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH- COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA,
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET AT 11:00 A.M. on December 7,
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF 2011, the following described prop-
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE erty as set forth in said Final Judg-
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. ment, to-wit:
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME A PARCEL OF LAND IN SEC-
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, TION 21, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) RANGE 16 EAST, MORE PARTIC-
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE ULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH LOWS:
IS BARRED.A F COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA- EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-.
TION OF THIS NOTICE IS EAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHEAST
October 20,2011.. .. 1/4; THENCE RUN SOUTH 010 22'
Attorney for Personal Representa- EAST, ALONG THE EAST LINE
tive: OF SAID SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF
KyleE. Petteway THE SOUTHEAST 1/4, 221.00
23349 Northwest CR 236, Suite 10 "FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89Q 39'
High Springs, Florida 32643 WEST, 25.00 FEET TO A POINT.
(386) 454-1298 ON THE WEST LINE OF TURNER
Florida Bar I.D. 0062316 ROAD, AND TO THE POINT OF
Personal Representative: BEGINNING;, THENCE .RUN
SKaien'H. Lewis SOUTH 012 22' EAST, 191.33
423 SW Carl Wilson Rd. FEET; THENCE NORTH 740 03'
Ft. White, FL 32038 15" WEST, 309.50 FEET TO A
POINT 325.44 FEET SOUTH OF
05528617 THE NORTH LINE OF SAID
October 20, 27, 2011 SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE
SOUTHEAST 1/4; THENCE
NORTH 01 '20' 25" WEST, 150.40
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FEET; 'THENCE EASTERLY,
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUS IN 300.10 FEET TO THE .POINT OF
FLORIDACOLUMBIA COUN UATE, LYING AND BEING IN
CASE NO. H 14 .CA ... COLUlBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA.,
CAMPUS USA CREDIT UNION ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
S'Plaintiff, UNIN ... .TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
Sain ,THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
MELANIE MOTT, UNKNOWN THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
SPOUSE,' BLAINE ESTATES AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
INC., UNKNOWN TENANTS) WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
POSSESSION and SECOND UN- SALE.
KNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSES- If you are a person with a disability
SIONi, who needs any accommodation. in
Defendants order to' participate in this proceed-
AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that you, to the provision of certain assis-
on the 16th dayof November, 2011, tance. Please contact the ADA Coor-
at 11:00 A.M. at the Columbia Coun- dinator;, 173 Northeast Hernando
ty Courthouse, 173 N.E. Hernando Street, Room 408, Lake City, Florida
Avenue, Lake. City, Florida, the un- 32056' (386) 719-7576 at least 7
designed Clerk will dffer for sale days before your scheduled court ap-
the following real and personalprop- pearance, or immediately upon re-
erty more particularly described as: .cving this notification of the time
Lot 9, Blaine Estates, Phase I, a sub- before the scheduled appearance is
division according to the plat thereof less than 7 days. If you are hearing
as recorded in Plat Book 7, Pages 21- or voice impaired, call711.
22, of the Public Records of Colum- P. OEWTIT r CASON
bi.a County, Florida. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
TOGETHER WITH: all the im- Columbia County, Florida
provements now or hereafter erected /s/B. Scippio
on the property, and all easements, DEPUTY'CLERK OF COURT'
appurtenances, and fixtures now or Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR
hereafter a part of the property PLAINTIFF:
Theaforesaid ale will be de pur- SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE,
aforesaid sale will be made LLP'
suant to the' Final Judgment entered 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
Sin Civil No. 11-83-CA now pending 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd.
in the Circuit Court of the Third Ju- te 100 .
dicial Circuit in and for Columbia' Tampa, FL33614
County Florida (813) 880-8888
m. Any person claiming an interest in (813) 880-8800
the surplus from the sale,' if any, oth- 05528553
er than the property, owner as of the
. date of the Lis Pendens, must file a October 20, 27, 2011
claim within 60 days after the sale._________________
DATED this 13th day of October, IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
2011. THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
SClerk of Court AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
By:/siB. Scippio FLORIDA
As Deputy Clerk CIVIL ACTION
CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE CASE NO.: 10-CA-165
I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and DIVISION: MF
correct copy of the foregoing has PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCI-
been furnished by U.S. Mail this 5th ATION,
day of August 2Q11 to Andrew J. Plaintiff,
Decker III, Esquire PO Drawer 1288, vs.
Live Oak, FL 32064; Blaine Estates JOSEPH JOHNSON, et al,
Homeowners Association, Inc., c/o Defendant(s)
Daniel Crapps, reg,. agent, 2806 W NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
US 90, Lake City, FL 32055; and to SALE
Meredith I Minkus, Burr & Foreman NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pur-
LLP, Post Office Drawer 1690, Win- suant to an Order Rescheduling the
ter Park, Florida 32790. October 13, 2010 Foreclosure Sale
By/s/B. Scippio dated October 10, 2011, and entered
Clerk in Case No. 10-CA-165 of the Cir-


.05528588
October 20, 27,.2011


-t a e


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
lication. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
abbreviations are acceptable; how-
ever, the first word of each ad may
not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.com


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
alLyour outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.

HAULING. Rental clean out,
garage clean out. Cut up and
remove4 tsh. FREE Estimates!!
386-497-3099


cuit Court of the Third Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for Columbia County,
Florida in which PNC Bank, Nation-
al Association, is the Plaintiff and
Barbara V. Johnson, Joseph L. John-
son, are the defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
in/on on the third floor of the Colum-
bia County Courthouse at 173 N.E.
Hemando Avenue, Lake City, Flori-
da 32055, Columbia County, Florida
at 11:00 AM on the 16th day of No-
vember, 2011, the following descri-
bed property as set forth in said Final
Judgment of Foreclosure:
TRACT 26, GREAT SOUTH TIM-
BER SUBDIVISION, UNRECORD-
ED, BEING IN SECTION 24,
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS -FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST QUARTER OF SAID SEC-
TION AND RUN THENCE SOUTH
0 DEGREES, 28 MINUTES, 53
SECONDS WEST, 54.80 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 0
DEGREES, 28 MINUTES, 53 SEC-
ONDS WEST, 460.87 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT ON


k


NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE,
341.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE CONTIN-
UE S 87'10'02" W ALONG SAID
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE,
4341.84 FEET; THENCE N 1'32'39"


I


Legal

THE SOUTH LINE OF A 60 FOOT
EASEMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES, 58 MINUTES, 38 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 372.03 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 89
DEGREES, '58 MINUTES, 38 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 455.47 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES, 15
MINUTES, 54 SECONDS WEST,
99.60 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 20 OF PARA-
DISE SOUTH, A SUBDIVISION
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,
PAGES 67-67A; THENCE NORTH
89 DEGREES, 32 MINUTES, 45
SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 20,
381.80 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0
DEGREES, 15 MINUTES, 54 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 972.69 FEET TO
THE POINT ON THE SOUTH
LINE OF A 60 FOOT EASEMENT
AND THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
TOGETHER WITH A PERPETU-
AL NON-EXCLUSIVE INGRESS-
EGRESS EASEMENT OVER AND
ACROSS A 60 FOOT WIDE STRIP
OF LAND DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS;
SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP .5
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST; COM-
MENCE AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THE SOUTH HALF
OF THE NORTHWEST QUAR-
TER, SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 5
SOUTH, RANGE 16 EAST, CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES, 45 MINUTES, 31 SEC-
ONDS EAST,.' ALONG THE
NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH
HALF OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER, 39.43 FEET TO THE
EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
OLD WIRE ROAD WEST;
THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES, 05
MINUTES, 07 SECONDS WEST,
ALONG SAID 'RIGHT OF WAY
LINE, 759.07 FEET TO THE
SOUTHWEST IN PLAT BOOK 6,
PAGES 67-67A, AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE CON-
TINUE SOUTH 0 DEGREES, 22
MINUTES, 35 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT OF
WAY LINE, 60.00 FEET TO THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT
8, PARADISE SOUTH; THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES, .5 MI-
NUTES, 31 SECONDS EAST,
ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID LOT 8, PARADISE SOUTH,'
674.57 FEET TO THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 8;
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES,
58 MINUTES, 38 SECONDS
EAST, 2356.38 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 0 DEGREES, 28 MI-
NUTES,. 53 SECONDS EAST,
60.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES, 58 MINUTES, 38 SEC-
ONDS .WEST, 2356.60 FEEET TO
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 7, PARADISE SOUTH;
THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES,'
45 MINUTES, 31 SECONDS
WEST, ALONG THE SOUTH
LINE OF SAID LOT 7, PARADISE
SOUTH, 674.45 FEET TO THE
EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
OLD WIRE ROAD AND THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A
670 SW INFINITY PLACE, LAKE
CITY, FL 32024
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated in Columbia County, Florida
this 11 day of October, 2011.
(seal)
Clerk'of Circuit Court.
Columbia County, Florida
By:/s B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost -to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation in order to
participate should, tell 'Jacquetta
Bradley, ADA Coordinator, Third
Judicial Circuit, P.O. Box 1569,
Lake City, Florida, at (386)719-7428
within two (2) working days of your
receipt of this notice; if you are hear-
ing impaired call (800) 955-8771; if
your voice impaired, call (800)955-
8770. 'To file response please contact
Columbia County Clerk of Court,
173 NE Hemando Ave., Lake City,
FL 32056-2069; Fax: -(386)758-
1337. The above is to be published in
the Lake City Reporter 180 East
Duval Street, Lake City, FL 32055.
05528554
October 20, 27, 2011
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 12,2011-CA-000112
Division
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSEPH J. METZGER and CHER-
YL A. METZGER MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC. AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to
Final Judgment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this cause on Au-
gust 29, 2011, in the Circuit Court of
Columbia County, Florida, I will sell
the property situated in Columbia
County, Florida described as:
PARCEL A-2:
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH RANGE
16 SECTION 11:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF NE 1/4 OF NW
1/4 OF SW -1/4 OF SECTION 11,
TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 16
EAST, COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE N
1"32'39" W ALONG THE EAST
LINE OF SAID NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4
OF SW 1/4, 25.01 FEET TO THE
NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
OF YOUNG ROAD; THENCE S
8710'02" W ALONG SAID


&WATERCRAFT


200UU7 seaFox
17 ft. center console,
approx. 40 hrs., Mercury
90hp. New 551b trolling
motor. Alum. trailer.
Pay off
$12,600
Call
386-758-7766


UUU UICIs Intrigue
Mint condition, garage
kept, 4dr sedan, due to
illness have to sell.
Only 50,000 miles.
$7,000
Call
386-752-6956
(cell) 386-984-2627


BYIT~ili


SELLITii


FIND ITi


I


Legal

W 637.89 FEET TO THE NORTH
LINE OF THE SW 1/4; THENCE N
87'09'04" E ALONG SAID NORTH
LINE, S 341.84 FEET; THENCE
1'32'39" E 637.99 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
and commonly known as: 263 SW
WILLIAM YOUNG LN, LAKE
CITY, FL; including the building,
appurtenances, and fixtures located
therein, at public sale, to the highest
and'best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE THE CO-
LUMBIA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE, 145 N. HERNANDO
STREET, LAKE CITY, FLORIDA,
on November 16, 2011 at 11a.m..
Any persons claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, oth-
er than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 13th day of October, 2011
(seal)
Clerk of the Circuit Court .
. By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05528589
October 20, 27, 2011

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR COLUMBIA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2010-809-CA
FRIER FINANCE INC.,
2123 NW 11TH Drive
Chiefland, Florida 32626
Plaintiff
V.
KELLY DANIELS, A/K/A KELLY
OLIVIA DANIELS BROWN,
Defendant
NOTICE'OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN.
THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff's final
Summary Judgment Of Foreclosure
entered in the above-captioned ac-
tion, I will sell the property situated
in Columbia County, Florida, descri-
bed as follows, to wit:
SEE EXHIBIT "A."
File Number: 08Y-04013KW
. EXHIBIT A
TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH' RANGE
17 EAST .
SECTION 35: COMMENCE AT
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE NW 1/4 OF NW 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 35, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH,
RANGE 17 EAST,. COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN
SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE
OF SAID NW 1/4 OF NW 1/4 A
DISTANCE 1389 FEET TO THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
THE S.A.L. RAILROAD FOR A
POINT OF BEGINNING; AND
RUN THENCE SOUTHERLY
ALONG THE EAST LINE OF THE
SW 1/4 OF NW 1/4 OF .SID SEC- '
TION 35, 524 FEEt;" THENCE
WEST. 292 FEET; THENCE
NORTHERLY 524 FEET TO THE
SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF
SAID RAILROAD; THENCE
EASTERLY 292 FEET TO POINT
OF BEGINNING; EXCEPT 1
SQUARE ACRE IN THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER THEREOF; ALL
IN THE SW 1/4 .OF NW 1/4 OF
SAID SECTION 35.
TOGETHER WITH A 2006 28X64
FLEETWOOD DOUBLE, WIDE
MOBILE HOME ID
#GAFL53A78716FE21 AND IID
#GAFL534B78716FE21.
at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash at the Court Roomf
of the Columbia County Courthouse,
173 NE Hernando Street, Lake City,
Florida 32055, at 11:00 AM (EST),
on the 16th day of November, 2011.
If you are a subordinate lien.holder
claiming a right to funds remaining
after the sale, you must file with the
Clerk of Court no later than 60 days
after the sale. If you fail to file a
claim, you will not be entitled to any
funds. '
Notice to Persons With Disabilities:
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation to
participate in this proceeding, you
are entitled, at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Court Administra-
tor's office not later than seven days
prior to the proceeding.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05528592
October 20, 27, 2011


100 Job
Opportunities

05528596
FT & PT PC Tech needed for
busy local shop. Exp required.
Sales Help wanted.
Electronic/Computers FT & PT
FT Help Needed. Vehicle
maint., yard work, general
repairs etc.
Senid email to: bdj@startech.cc

Experienced Real estate closer/
Title'agent needed for local office.
Send reply to Box 05078, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056


100 Job
100 Opportunities

05528632
Position available for
Costing-Estimator
Will need to estimate sale prices
on commercial steel buildings
and design concepts.
.Evaluate and maintain material
cost structure. Will need to
contact Vendors to source new
supplies for cost improvements.
EXPERIENCE IN STEEL OR
COMMERCIAL.BUILDINGS.
Only.applicants with Costing/
Estimating experience need to
apply. Full benefits package for
large Local Manufacturing Co.
Send Resume to P.O. Box
2097., Lake City, FL 32056
\AVON!! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
Swww.youravon.com/tdavies
Cloth Cutter: Person to cut cloth
from patterns in small
sewing company.
Call Hafners 386-755-6481
Due to increased sales volume at
Burkins Chevrolet of Macclenny,
we are currently seeking 2
professional sales consultants.
Experience is a plus, as well as
GM training. We have an
excellent working environment
with opportunity to grow in our
organization. Please contact Bob
Burkins at Burkins Chevrolet in
person Monday through Friday.
Looking for physically Fit and out-
going individuals with clean driv-
ing & clean criminal history. Call
386-752-2112 Mon. Fri. 8a-5p.
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.'
Resolutions Health Alliance has
an immediate opening for a PT .
Office Clerk in Lake City.
Must be: timely, proficient in
SMicrosoft Word, Excel and
Outlook, organized, detail
oriented,.data entry, filing,
excellent phone skills, and
customer oriented. Salary is $8.00
an hour. Email resume to:
employment@rhapa.net or
fax (386)754-9017 or website:
www.rhapa.com

240 Schools &
240 Education

05528364
Interestediti'd'Medical Caredr?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp'
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class-10/24/10'

Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class-l11/28/ 1

Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com



310 Pets & Supplies

PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are.
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

402 Appliances

FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $160.
386-292-3927
Lg capacity White Whirlpool
Washer. Works great.
$165.
386-292-3927


407 Computers

DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170


408 Furniture
Formal Dining set. Queen Anne
Style. Pecan color. Table, 6 chairs.
2 leaves, custom pads. Large china.
cabinet $600. 386-965-0762

OUTDOOR SET.
3 piece white cast iron ivy pattern
bench & 2 chairs. Vintage look.
All for $200. 386-965-0762


I ADvantage -











LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


408 Furniture
Roll Top desk. Cherry/Oak. Mar-
ble inset. 2 work trays, 2 file draw-
ers. Center knee-hole. 30"x60"
Lighted. $500. 386-965-0762


SOFA & LOVE seat. Plush
overstuffed, dark teal velvet.
Very clean. $500.
386-965-0762

413 Musical
41 Merchandise
CONN PIANO.
Sounds great. Spinet model.
Has bench. $250.
386-965-0762

419 TV-Radio &
Recording
20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$80.00
386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy
K&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO title needed !386-878-9260
After 5pm 386- 752-3648.

430 Garage Sales
10/21, 22 (8-2) 10/23 (9-1) 14995
SW Tustenuggee, 1/2 mi S of
CR 18. Lots of household, tools,
hunting,& fish gear. Cast iron
cookware. 386-965-1308
FRI. 10/21 & SAT. 10/22, 8 1,
90 West, left on Pinemount Rd,
follow to Magical, then follow
signs to Lucky Dr. 386-755-1984
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads'
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneoug
.)^^ ^^ ^^ ^^


22,000 BTU Window AC
WORKS GREAT,
$15(. -
386-292-3927


DOE & BUCK
Concrete Decorative
statues for yard. $150.
386-965-0762
FL/GA License plates before
1958. $1000- Cblumbia Co. tags
1911-1917 gobucsl3(@aol.com
Top dollar pd. Jeff (727)424-1576
Set of Michelin used tires.
225X50X17
$100.
386-292-3927.

450 Good Things
to Eit
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans -
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420


630 Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
14 Wide, 3/2-$525, 2/2-$475.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO
PETS! 386-758-2280 References.
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to 1-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
S386-984-8448
2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in, 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482


n640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale ..
Just Reduced! Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate


Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737 $59,900
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"
cond. Split floor plan, lg master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings
Over 40K Off
800-622-2832
MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. 3br/2ba in pristine
condition on 1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110

650 Mobile Home
6 & Land
Outside of Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-
sults Realty 386-397-3473


Mobile Home
650 &Land
Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
camper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
. sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MIH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 mmin. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from Lake City
$23,999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv-
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

710 Unfurnished Apt.
7 V For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages.
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhllvillage.net


2/1 CH/A Duplex Apt.
$450. mo-No pets.
Near Beachville.
Call Margie 386-935-3447
2BR/1BA. Close to town.
S$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922


", 2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150


Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area.. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/1. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/2
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A,
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or,352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ lba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village, Reqlty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626


Great location W of 1-75, spacious
deluxe 2br apts., garage, W/D
hookup. patio. $600 & 700 & up,
+ Sec, 386-965-5560 or 344-3715
Greentree Townhouse
Summer special. 2/1,2/1.5. Free
* water & sewer. Balcony & patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens on Hwy 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmyflapts.com
Large 2 br Apt In town
$500. mo $500 dep.
386-344-2972

Move in Special from $199-$399.
1, 2 & 3 br apartments. Also, 2/br
MH close to town. Incl water.'
386-755-2423 rigsbyrentals.com
Redwine Apartments. Move in
Special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome. with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hwy 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com


/ Windsor Arms Apartments.
, Summer.special $199. Move fin!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com


X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
720 For Rent
Neat as a Whistle! lbr., utilities,
AC TV, Cable, micro, clean, quiet,
shady, Close to town. 41S,
$135 wk. 386-755-0110
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, microwave. Weekly
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

Unfurnished
730 Home For-Rent
2br/lba Huge living area. W/D in-
cluded. New carpet, nice area.
Convenient: VA, DOT, schools &
shopping. $750.mo. 386-344-0565.
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3br/lba brick home in Lake City
Available 10/22.
$650 mo. + $450 dep.
Call 561-723-4306 or 4302
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. 1st, last plus $200
sec.$900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755'9476
4br/2ba CHA Brick, 1200 sqft
lac., Close to FGCC, CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet, $700 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd


730 Unfurnished
730 Home For Rent
4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
"CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Nice in town 2br/lba CH/A
$700. mo. $700 deposit.
386-758-3922 or
386-344-5065
Prime location 2br/lba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
,7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.
VERY CLEAN
2br/lba 10 mi West of
Lake City $400. mo
No pets. 386-963-2282

7 0 Business &
5v Office Rentals

05528566
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Buildigg
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Dontotown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
SCall 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space unitsor
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group


780 Condos for Sale
Coldwvell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lot for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner-financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
- of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
'./garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
S386-365-7039,Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject tdo the fair
housing act which'makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex, .
disability, familial status or nation-
, al origin; or any intention to make
.such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
.18 living with parents or legal
custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers'are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal'opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2BR/1BA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
.3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O, Realty Group
3800 sf two story, 5 br 3b, metal
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 mi. NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900 .
Westfield Realty Group
CUTE 3BR/1.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000 -.
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290


IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233


LAKE CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,700 sq.
ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer, Call417-396-2134.
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896


810 Home for Sale
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. Country area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906 -
Westfield Realty Group -
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custorp Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Island kit. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp '
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900.
Coldwell Banker/Bishop' Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New roof & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed -
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143.
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
woodon 1.46 ac: SS appliances,
granite'couhtertops & more. MLS#
7918 $269,000 Pam Beauchamp
Rem Professionals 758-8900
SShorftSale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2.5ba, Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@rempaxnfl.com
Well maintained home in adult
.conlununiN Spaciouf Iloor plan.
ail season porch. carpon $67.900.
M1.LS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group
Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block,'& stucco. 3br/2ba openfloor
(, plan. MLS#76395 $109,900 .
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053'
-Westfield Realty Group


Lofty home on Itchetucknie'River,
. ;Wrap-around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres.
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#7741l, $79,900,
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
., tures. Lg kitchen, Fl room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
3/2 w/1 car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
www.jolytte.floRda-property-search.com
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful `.terior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group'867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 FI room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC apple & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen,' sun room. Wel
kept 3/2 DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen.
Wired 24x36 workshop, steel roof,
pole bam. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/living rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110


810 Home for Sale
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on corer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110

820 Farms &
20U Acreage
$10,000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
4 acres, Wellborn, New Well
installed, Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site, owner fim,
no down, $39,900, $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

8Q30 Commercial
(J3 Property
3 lots zoned RMFl near Baya/
McFarlape: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181
Wellborn Commercial lot 1.84
acres w/34', of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scot Stewart 386-867-i3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comn'l bldg bn'?
highway frontage. Across from the i
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewait$67-,
3498 Westfield Realty Groupi

850 Waterfront
Property


Upscale River Cabin on
Suwarinee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @.Remax
S.386-365-2821 '

870 Real Estate .
870 Wanted
I Buy H6osei
GASH! -
Quick Sale Fair Price '
386-269-0605

930 Motorcycles


, ...to never miss a day's
worth of all the
Lake City Reporter
has to offer:
Home delivery.
To subscribe call
755-5445


1996 Harley Sportster 1200CC
Excellent conid. To many upgrades
to list.'Prey.ious owner was a Har-
ley mechanic. Customized for 5'4"
body height. Less than 12K mi.
Dark forest green. My biker
husband passed away & I married
a boater so I no longer ride. $4,200
Call Linda (850)973-6110

950 cars for Sale
2000 Olds IntriMgu Loaded, Mint
cond. Garage kept 4 dr sedan. due
to sickness has to sell. $7000.
Only has 50k miles. 386-732-6956


SUBSCRIP1ON

386-755-5445



All OTHER DEPARTMENTS

S386-752-1293


Bring the picture in or
we will take it for youl
-* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo in the
newspaper and online E-edition.
Ad runs 10 consecutive days as-a
classified line ad online.
You must include vehicle price.
All ads are prepaid.
Private party only.


2006 EF250
Ford.Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc. cond.
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
f you don't sell your vehide
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run.




Mary r Bri ge


Ilr


Classified Department: 755-5440


)


L








LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2011


VOICES: Bring football to life


Continued From Page 11
by the time it was half,
they were asking us to call
off the dogs."
Of course, the duo
also has their share of
memories together.
One of them comes
when Harrison was athletic
director before stepping
into the booth with
Williams '
"I remember taking the
trip to Pensacola High and
that was the first time we)
got a victory in the playoffs
west of Tallahassee,"
Harrison said. "There were
bars on the windows and
bullet holes, but we won
17-12."
Williams learned that
night that Harrison might
have a future in the booth.
"We had a procedure
penalty and I didn't see
it," Williams said. "I said
on the radio that nobody
moved, and coach was
sitting by me in the booth
at the time. He had a'
coach's eye and told me
someone did move. He
saw the real deal and that's
what makes us the team
that we are."
Still, Harrison feels that


his time in coaching helps
make the duo a better team
on the radio.
"It helps in some regard,
because I can think how
the coaches do," he said.
"I speak with coach Brian
Allen and his staff before
the games, so I know what
they are trying to achieve."
Together on the radio,
the duo doesn't have to
look back too far for their
most memorable game. -
In 2009, the Tigers were
thought to be done against
Ed White High for the
game and district title. As
it turned out, Columbia
wasn't done in a 36-32
victory.
"That one has to stick
out," Williams said. "I
thought we were dead
in the water. During the
timeout we were saying
how we were ready to get
it over with, then boom,
a punt return by Jamaal.
Montague sparked a
comeback. My voice took
on new life. People always
tell me they can tell when
were winning or losing
just by my voice. For 2'
quarters, I didn't have


much life. It was until the
punt that I got life."
Now as the Tigers look
to mark 100 years, the duo
will be together on CJX
106.5 for Friday's game
against Middleburg
High. For Harrison, itfs
part of staying with the
tradition.
"To me, its about
being part of the 100 year
tradition of being the
winningest team in the
state of Florida," he said.
"We are still the
winningest team and even
though some traditions go
away, some stay the
same."
And Williams enjoys that
he's bringing a view of the
game for those that can't
be there.
"I run into people all
the time that tell me they
listen," he said. "They say
how they look forward to
our broadcast. I just try to
put them on the 50-yard
line. I try to put them in
the huddle and describe
the action."
For those that listen,
Williams and Harrison
bring the action to life.


Tebow helps Dolphins' ticket sales


Associated Press

MIAMI Tim Tebow is
giving the winless Miami
Dolphins a welcome boost
in ticket sales.
Tebow will make his first
start of the season Sunday,
when the Denver Broncos
play at Miami, and Dolphins
CEO Mike Dee said he's
optimistic the game will be
sellout
More than 10,000 tick-.
ets have been sold since
Tebow was promoted to the
starting job last week, Dee
said Wednesday.
"The demand and inter-
est in the game certainly
has picked up since the
announcement," Dee said.
"Clearly this matchup and
the buzz that's out there
have helped with tickets."


The Dolphins have avoid-
ed black outs since the
start of the 2001 season,
but attendance has been
in decline the past couple


of years. They have an 0-5
record this year and have
lost 11 of their past 12 home
games, further fueling fan
apathy.


MIDDLE SCHOOL ROUNDUP


Richardson football

shuts out Baker County


From staff reports

Coach Joey O'Neal
returned to his stomping
groundsandledRichardson
Middle School's football
team to a 20-0 win over
Baker County Middle
School on Tuesday.
O'Neal is a Baker County
High graduate.
"We needed that win,"
O'Neal said. "We have been
off for two weeks."
The Wolves struck with
long plays a 60-yard
touchdown run by Gabriel,
Williams, a 70-yard TD run
by Alfonso Battle and a
50-yard TD run by Ronnie
Collins. Battle scored the
two-point conversion.


Richardson led 6-0 at the
half, but that was enough
for a defense that posted
its second straight shutout
and third of the season.
"The defense was led
by Gabe Williams and
Ladarius Powell and played
real good," O'Neal said.
"The offensive line opened
up big holes. It was not
just one person, it was the
whole front line.
Richardson (4-2) plays
host to Lake City Middle
School in the annual
Commanders Bowl at
7 p.m. Oct 27.
Falcons cross country
Lake City's cross coun-


try team ran against host
Queen of Peace Academy
and Bradford Middle
School in a meet at
St Francis Catholic High
on Saturday.
The Lady Falcons won
with Nicole Morse first,
Jillian Morse second,
Bridget Morse third,
Bernita .Brown fourth
and Grace Kolovitz ninth.
Shannon Evans and Reilly
Morse also ran.
Lake City's boys only had
four runners competing,
not enough to field a team.
Timothy Pierce won over-
all first, with Kelly Varndell
fifth, Dalton Devers sixth
and Austin Barwick in the
running.


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