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The Lake City reporter
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028308/01675
 Material Information
Title: The Lake City reporter
Uniform Title: Lake City reporter (Lake City, Fla. 1967)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: John H. Perry
Place of Publication: Lake City Fla
Creation Date: October 18, 2011
Publication Date: 1967-
Frequency: daily (monday through friday)[<1969>-]
weekly[ former 1967-<1968>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Lake City (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Columbia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Columbia -- Lake City
Coordinates: 30.189722 x -82.639722 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 95, no. 4 (Oct. 5, 1967)-
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000358016
oclc - 33283560
notis - ABZ6316
lccn - sn 95047175
sobekcm - UF00028308_01569
System ID: UF00028308:01675
 Related Items
Preceded by: Lake City reporter and Columbia gazette

Full Text




000017 120511 ****3-DIGIT 326
LIB OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
205 SMA UNIV OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-1943


Reporter


Tuesday, October 18, 201 I www.lakecityreporter.com Vol. 137, No. 226 U 75- cents


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
A firefighter from Lake City Fire Department gives crews more slack on a fire hose Monday while attempting to extinguish a blaze that gutted a three-
bedroom home at 395 Northeast Fronie Street. No one was hurt. Officials are still looking for what started the fire.



Family escapes harm



when fire guts home
$ :


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City
Reporter
Columbia County Sheriff's
Cpl. Don Meyer (from
left), Lake City Police
Department Cpl. Robert
Milligan and Linda Ivery
watch as firefighters
scramble to hose down
a fire at Ivery's home
Monday.


By GORDON JACKSON
'gackson@lakecityreporter..com
' A house at 395 NE Fronie Street in
Lake City was severely damaged by.
fire Monday.
Lake City Fire Chief Carlton
Tunsil said the fire was reported at
10:21 a.m. City and county fire crews
responded to the blaze, which had
engulfed much of the home by the
time they arrived.


Abouthalfthe house was destroyed
and the remainder of the structure
had smoke damage. ,Investigators
are uncertain where the fire started.
An occupant in the home was
asleep and woke up when he heard
the crackling of flames, Tunsil said.
There were no reported injuries.
Tunsil declined to identify the
home's occupants, saying the case
FIRE continued on 3A


City may suspend impact fees


Water, sewer impact fees
would be waived for
one year to spur growth.

By GORDON JACKSON
gjackson@lakecityreporter.com
The Lake City Council will consider waiv-
ing new construction water and sewer impact
fees for one year, beginning Jan. 1.
City Manager Wendell Johnson asked coun-
cil members at last night's meeting to consid-
er his request as a way.to spur new growth,


which has been very slow
the past two years.
"I know other cities are
doing this," he said. "It's
just an attempt and means
for a little spike in growth."
Councilman George
Ward said Johnson's pro- Johnson
posal was worth consider-.
ation.
"I think in the long run, it would be good
for the city," he said. "Let's do it for a year.
By this time next year, we'll know whether it
works or not."


Johnson expressed confidence that his pro-
posal will work. Both residential and commer-
cial construction will be eligible.
"I think we'll get a good response from it,"
he said.
One condition, Johnson suggested, is that
businesses and property owners must begin
construction before the end of 2012 to have
impact fees waived.
The fees have been in effect since 1993 as a
way to defray the cost of new additions to the'
city's water and sewer systems.
FEES continued on 3A


O'Brien

men die

in Suw.

crash

From staff reports
LIVE OAK Two O'Brien
men were killed early Sunday
when the driver lost control
and struck a tree in Suwannee
County.
Matthew Timothy Egloff,
18, was driving a 1995 two-door
Saturn west on 208th Street
when for unknown reasons
he lost control and ran off the
road to the right, according
to a Florida Highway Patrol
report.
Egloff then over-corrected
to the left, causing the car to
spin counter-clockwise. The
driver's side of the car then
struck an oak tree, according
to reports.
Egloff and passenger
Jon-Ryan Nazworth, 20, were
pronounced dead at the scene
around 1:15 a.m. Nazworth
was wearing a seatbelt, but
Egloff was not
,Nazworth's grandmother,
Janet Mon, of Jacksonville,
said he was preparing to enter
the military.
Difficulty notifying the vic-
tims' families delayed release
of the report, FHP said.


Golf cart

hit by car;

1 killed

From staff reports

LIVE OAK A Live Oak
man was killed Sunday when
he was struck by a car on
County Road 136 while push-
ing a golf cart
Florida Highway Patrol
investigators said Clark Dean
Eplin, 53, was pushing the
cart on the county road at 5:31
p.m. when he was struck by a
1999 Toyota Camnry. Eplin was
declared dead at the scene by
Suwannee Fire Rescue.
The car's driver, Matthew
Christopher Schroeder, 21,
also of Live Oak, was not
injured, according to reports.
Investigators were uncertain
why Eplin was pushing the
cart.
Lt. Pat Riordan, a Florida
Highway Patrol spokesman,
said its illegal to drive a golf
cart on roads that are not des-
ignated by local ordinances. He
said driving a golf cart on a
highway such as the one where
the accident occurred is illegal.


For a jobs bill in pieces, Obama hits the road


By JULIE PACE
Associated Press
FLETCHER, N.C. Rolling through
small.Southern towns in a campaign-style
bus; President Barack Obama on Monday
pressed lawmakers back in Washington to
start taking up pieces of his rejected jobs
bill and mocked the Republicans who had
shdt it down in total. The Senate moved to
vote soon on one part, a plan to help states
hire teachers, but the proposal seemed
doomed.
Deep in the mountains of politically
important North Carolina, Obama soaked
up the region's autumn beauty at the same
time he assailed foes of his jobs legisla-
tion, accusing them of failing to listen to
the public. -
Back at the Capitol, Senate Democrats
announced they would act first on a single


part of Obama's plan, a longshot bid to
help states hire teachers and police. A
Senate vote could come as soon as the end
of the week. If not, it would probably fall
into November because the Senate plans
to take a break next week, even as Obama
urges quick action.
In North Carolina, the president direct-
ed his, most pointed remarks at Senate
Republicans, who last week blocked action
on his full $447 billion proposal combining
tax cuts and new spending.
"Essentially they said no to you," Obama
told a supportive crowd outside Asheville.
Noting that Republicans will now get a
chance to vote on elements of his jobs
agenda one by one, he said: "Maybe they
just couldn't understand the whole thing
all at once. So we're going to break it up
OBAMA continued on 3A


ASSOCIATED PRESS
With his bus in the background, President Barack Obama greets people outside of Mast
General Store in Boone, N.C., Monday. Obama is on a three-day bus tour promoting the
American Jobs Act.


1 8426410002 I 1


CALL US:
(386) 752-1293
SUBSCRIBE TO
THE REPORTER:
Voice: 755-5445
Fax: 752-9400


7866
Mostly cloud, T-Storms
WEATHER, 2A


Opinion ................ 4A
People .................. 2A
Obituaries .............. 5A
Advice & Comics ......... 4B
Puzzles ................. 2B


TODAY IN COMING
PEOPLE WEDNESDAY
Darth Vader Local news
gets his due. roundup.


La


~~~~~ ~~ I! . iIII I I I I I I ..lIo N. . .. . . . . .. .


I llllBI'll 1111, I'fT" *^* I' 1 "1 * I I W ME









LAKE CITY REPORTER DAILY BRIEFING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011


FLORIDA i
0o1 3Saturday: 3
-i a 3-9-36-41-42-44
X 3


Monday:
Afternoon: 5-4-5
Evening: N/A


Monday:
Afternoon: 8-4-9-9
Evening: N/A


PEOPLE IN THE NEWS


Potter, Vader honored at Scream Awards


UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif

the worlds of horror,
fantasy and sci-fi shared N
the stage at Spike TVs
annual Scream Awards.
More television event than tradi-
tional awards ceremony, the Scream'
Awards were presented in an
amphitheater built on the Universal
Studios backlot just for the occasion.
The Saturday night show was as
much about how the awards were
presented as who got them, but
for starters, the top honorees were .'
Harry Potter, Darth Vader, Nicolas
Cage, Pee Wee Herman and Robert
Downey Jr. : :
Resembling a psychedelic circus, '
one side of the stage was a life-sized '
dollhouse populated by costumed
characters, the other a staircase
topped by a giant keyhole, and in 'Darth Va tr'
the middle was a lake that lit up with Lucas during l
fire. is dedicated'to
Fans picked the night's winners vision and cor
and also filled the makeshift theater
for the 2 1/2 -hour presentation,
which is set to air Tuesday as a two-;'
hour special on Spike TV and VH1.
The show literally began with a :
Scream, opening with a giant crane
carrying a woman across the sky,
then dropping her into the fiery lake.
Blasts of fire and various stunts con- Obama
tinued throughout the program..
Potter took the night's top prize. Obama's men
The eight-part film franchise was biographies f
named the Ultimate Scream, which Frank asse
awards presenter Chloe Grace W. Bush's me
Moretz described as "the most awe- book, "Bush.
some, most rocking thing that the concluded th
universe has ever seen." megalomania


ASSCUIAlhUrKEPIS
a accepts the Ultimate Villain award from 'Star Wars' creator George
the 2011 Scream Awards Saturday in LosAngeles. The award show
Sthe horror, science fiction and fantasy genres of feature films, tele-
nic books.


psychoanalyst Justin
A. Fra decided he
would try.
Frank, a clini-
cal professor of
psychiatry at
George Washington
University Medical
Center, studied
moirs, interviews and
or clues to his psyche.
ssed President George
mental health in his 2004
on the Couch," and
at he was afflicted with
a.


Review: Psychoanalyst Accused Berry stalker
puts Obama on the couch ordered to stand trial


WASHINGTON "Obama on
the Couch: Inside the Mind of the
President" (Free Press), by Justin
A. Frank, M.D. Many people have
trouble figuring out the complex
personality of the U.S, president, so


LOS ANGELES -- A judge ruled
Monday that a man charged with
stalking Halle Berry should stand
.trial on two charges filed after he
was repeatedly seen on the actress'
property earlier this year.


Los Angeles
Superior Court
Judge Melissa
Widdifield issued
her ruling after hear-
ing from two wit-,
nesses called during
Berry a preliminary hear-
erry ing to'show some of
evidence against Richard A. Franco,
who has pleaded not guilty to bur-
glary and stalking charges..

YouTube 'Sesame Strdet'
resumes after hacking
NEW YORK The YouTube
channel for the.popular children's
television show "Sesame Street" is
back online after hackers forced its
shutdown for a day by loading X-
rated material.
YouTube had taken the channel
down Sunday after noticing the racy
material.
0 Associated Press


. Celebrity Birthdays


* Singer Gogi Grant is 87.
* Actress-comedian Anne
Meara is 82.
* Actress Sophia Loren is 77.
* Pro Football Hall of Famer
Jim Taylor is 76.
* Rock musician Chuck


Panozzo is 64.
* Hockey Hall of Famer Guy
LaFleur is 60.
* Actress Debbi Morgan is
60.
I Jazz musician Peter White
is 57.


HOW TO REACH US
SMain number ........(386) 752-1293
Fax number ...............752-9400
Circulation .............. 755445
Online... www.lakecityreporter.com .
The Lake City Reporter, an affiliate of
Community Newspapers Inc., Is pub-'
lished Tuesday through Sunday at 180
E. Duval St, Lake City, Fla. 32055.
Periodical postage paid at Lake City, Fla.
Member Audit Bureau'of Circulation and
The Assocated Press.
All material herein Is pperty of the Lake
City Reporter. Reproduction.In whole or
In part Is forbidden without'the plnmls-
slon of thepublisher.'U.S. Postl Service
No. 31,0-880.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box 1709,
Lake City, FlRa. 32056.
Publisher Todd Wilson .....754-04418
(twilson@lakecityreporter.com)
NEWS
Editor Robert Bridges .....754-0428
(rbridges@lakecityreporter.com)
ADVERTISING
Director Ashley Butcher ...754-0417
(abutcher@lakecityreporter.com)
CLASSIFIED
To place a classified ad, call 755-5440


BUSINESS
Controller Sue Brannon... .7544419
(srann @aktyreputer.om)
CIRCULATION
Home delivery of the Lake City Reporter
should be completed by 6:30 a.m.
Tuesday through Saturday, and by 7:30
a.m. on Sunday.
Please call 386-755-5445 to report any
problems with your delivery service.
In Columbia County, customers should
call before 1030 a.m. to report a ser-
vice error for same day re-deliyery.After,
10.30 a.m., next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be Issued.
In all other counties where home delivery,
is available, next day re-delivery or ser-
vice related credits will be issued.
Circulation ..............755-5445
(drculation@lakecityreporter.com)
Home delivery rates
(Tuesday through Sunday)
12 Weeks.................. $26.32
24 Weeks...............!...$48.79
52 Weeks..................$83.46
Rates indude 7% sales tax.
Mall rates
12 Weeks.................. $41.40
24 Weeks................... $82.80
52 Weeks.................$179.40


CORRECTION

The Lake City Reporter corrects errors of fact in neWA
items. If you have a concern, question or suggestion, please
callthe executive editor. Corrections and clarifications will run
in this space. And thanks for reading.
'i"


Woman gets life
for teen's murder
OCALA A young
North Florida woman has
been sentenced to life in
prison for participating in
the murder of a teenager
at her home near Ocala.
A Marion County judge
sentenced Charlie Kay Ely,
19, on Monday. She was
convicted last month of
first-degree murder:
Ely is one of five people
accused in the April 17 .
death of 15-year-old Seath
Jackson.
Authorities said
Jackson was lured to Ely's
Summerfield home, where
he was beaten, tied up
and shot. Arrest reports
said Jackson's body was
burned, and his remains
were placed into buckets
and tossed into a lime pit.
Still facing first-degree
murder charges are 19-
year-old Michael Bargo,
15-year-old Amber Wright,
20-year-old Justin Soto and
17-year-old Kyle Hooper.
Prosecutors are seek-
ing the.death penalty for
Bargo, who authorities'
identified astheshooter.-

Unemployment
tax among lowest
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's average unem-
ployment tax rate is among
the nation's lowest.
So are Florida's benefits.
A study released
Monday'by the conserva-
tive; Tax Foundation shows
Florida's unemployment
tax averages about 0.5 per-
cent of all wages.
That was eighth lowest
among the 50 states.
Florida's average benefit
of about $230 a week is the
fifth lowest. Florida ranks
behind only Mississippi,
Louisiana, Alabama and
Arizona.
The report also said
Florida is one of three
states that have made
significant cuts in benefits
and eligibility over the past


THE WEATHER ,,


MOSTLY SHOWERS
CLOUDY, f EARLY
T7-STORMS \

H178 LO 66 1 I 73 L046


SUNNY



HI 75 L047


* FORECAST MA f Td Oc o 18.


All Bucs aboard
Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Josh Freeman (left)
speaks with a. member of the Virgin Atlantic Cabin Crew as
he joins his team in boarding a Virgin Atlantic Boeing 747-
400 at Tampa International Airport on Monday in Tampa.
Virgin Atlantic, the official airline of the 2011 NFL International
Series, is flying the Buccaneers to London to take on the
Chicago Bears as part of the series.


two years.
Starting Jan. 1,. Florida
will cut the 26-week maxi-
mum benefit period. It'll
go on a sliding scale with
a 23-week maximum if
the unemployment rate is
more than 10.5 percent.
It'll be only 12 weeks if.
the jobless rate falls below
" 5, percent.

Ag. Dept. takes
over school lunches
JACKSONVILLE -
Agriculture Commissioner
Adam Putnam has gotten
federal approval to take
over Florida's school nutri-
tion programs.
Putnam announced
the decision Monday at a
Jacksonville elementary
school.
The state's Department
of Education currently
has oversight of school
lunches and other nutri-
tion programs.
Putnam has made taking
responsibility for the pro-
grams a priority since his
election last year.
He said it'll let him
direct more fresh fruits
and vegetables to schools.
Putnam said that will


result in healthier eating
habits.
The Florida Legislature
earlier this year passed a
law transferring oversight
to the Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services. That was contin-
gent, though, on getting
a waiver from the U.S.
Departminent of Agriculture.
The transfer will take
place Jan. 1.

Minimum wage to
go up 36 cents
TALLAHASSEE -
Florida's minimum wage
is going up by 36 cents to
$7.67 per hour effective
Jan. 1, 2012.
The state's new
Department of Economic
Opportunity quietly posted
a notice of the increase on
its website Saturday.
The increase will add
$14.40 to the weekly pay
of employees working 40
hours.
The minimum wage
goes up to match increases
in the cost of living.
It took a lawsuit to force
the last increase of 6 cents
per hour.
* Associated Press


85/51


'i 'City w
J#cksomnle Cape Canaveral
Taahassee akeC 19/75 Daytona Beach
79/62 78/66 \ Ft. Lauderdale
. Gaiesvlle. Daytona Beach Fort Myers
Panama City 79/68 8375 Gainesvllle
80/57 Ocala Jacksonville
79/69 ey West
Oando Cape Canaveral Lake City
83/73 82/77 Miami
Tam pa Naples
83/72 West Palm Beach Ocala
84/77 Orlando
Ft Laudefdali Panama City
FL Myer 86, 79 0 Pensacola
86/76 Naples Tallahassee
86/78 Miami Tampa
85,'79 Valdosta
Key West W. Palm Beach


07 /7


I I I II ILMANAC


TEMPERATURES
High Monday
Low Monday
Normal high
Normal low
Record high
Record low

PRECIPITATION
Monday
Month total
Year total
Normal month-to-date
Normal year-to-date


87
59
S 81
59
93 in 1925
39 in 1977

0.00"
2.08"
30.62"
1.51"
42.64"


SUN
Sunrise today
Sunset today
Sunrise tom.
Sunset tom.


7:34 a.m.
6:57 p.m.
"7:35 a.m.
6:56 p.m.


MOON
Moonrise today 11:51 p.m.
Moonset today 1:09 p.m.
Moonrise tom. -
Moonset tom. 1:54 p.m.

@e 00
Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov.
19 26 2 10
Last New First Full


On this date in
1987, thunder-
storms in northeast-
ern Texas produced
golf ball size hail at
Atlanta, Ga., along
with wind gusts to
86 mph, and 4 inch-
es of rain. Damage
from the storm was
estimated at more
than a million dol-
lars.


3
MODE
45 nnmest lM b
Today's
ultra-violet
radiation risk


Wednesday
81/61/sh
. 80/55/t
87/64/t
84'64,t
74,'14 7, pc
75,.'51/I
86,74.'1
73'46,'pc
87,68.'t
82.68,'1
76.49 'pc
81 57/,1
70'47/s
69 48,s
71., 45, s
19, 58.'I
69 46'pc
84'68,/1


Thursday
75/57/s
73/54/s
80/63/s
77, 56/pc
71146/s
70,'51,,s
79' 72,/pc
72.,46,s
79. 67,'pc
77,62/s
72'48/s
75/55/,s
69.,47/s
68149 s
70, 44,s
73,,53, s
71 45,s
79,173 s


An exclusive
service
brought to
our readers
by
The Weather
Channel


for the area on
a scale from 0 "
to 10+

-' weather.com
4V Forecasts, data and
graphics C 2011 Weather
SV ntral, LP, Madison, Wis.
weather www.weatherpubl corn
weatY graphic


I


I


-P-ED B


SE-edition Online Access
Absolutely
FREE

Call for login information


Daily Scripture
"Do not let any unwholesome
talk come out of your mouths,
but only what is helpful for
building others up according to
their needs, that it may benefit
those who listen."
Ephesians 4:29
Thought for Today
"A faith is a necessity to a man.
Woe to him who believes in
nothing.".
Victor Hugo,
French author (1802-1885)

Lake City Reporter


AROUND FLORIDA


7a ip 7p la 6a
Tuesday Wednesday







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- -I -I I -9F I I -I I ==IF -


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Page Editor: Jason M. Walker, 754-0430


F 22 SA


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS k'TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011


Panetta hopeful of Iraqi deal on US troops


By ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security Writer

WASHINGTON Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta expressed hope Monday
that the United States and Iraq can soon
reach agreement on a possible U.S. mili-
tary training role in Iraq beyond Dec. 31,
when all American troops are scheduled
to depart
Panetta's remarks contrasted with indi-
cations from a senior Obama adminis-
tration official and a senior U.S. mili-
tary official on Saturday that the U.S. is
abandoning plans to keep any troops in
Iraq past the year-end withdrawal deadline
- other than about 160 troops who would
be attached to the U.S. Embassy.
Panetta and other top U.S. officials have
pressed the Iraqis for months to decide
whether they want a substantial U.S. mili-


tary training mission in 2012. During his
first visit to Baghdad as Pentagon chief in
July, Panetta appeared exasperated by the
Iraqis, at one point saying, "Damn it, make
a decision."
But more recently Obama administra-
tion officials have displayed less of a public
sense of urgency, while noting that the
current U.S. force of about 39,500 troops is
on track to shrink to zero by year's end.
"At the present time I'm not discouraged
because we're still in negotiations with the
Iraqis," Panetta said Monday when asked
by a reporter whether the talks had hit an
impasse. He said James Jeffrey, the U.S.
ambassador to Baghdad, and Army Gen.
Lloyd Austin, the top U.S. commander
there, were in "discussions with Iraqi lead-
ers" that could still yield agreement on a
post-2011 U.S. military presence.
Asked whether the U.S. had given the


Iraqis a "drop dead" date beyond which the
U.S. would not agree to halt its troop draw-
down, Panetta said, "No, not at this point,"
adding, "We're continuing to negotiate."
In comments aired Monday in Iraq,
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki said there
will be no post-2011 U.S. military train-
ing mission if the Obama administration
insists on legal immunity for its troops.
Speaking to Al-Masar television station,
which is affiliated with al-Maliki's Dawa
Party, he emphasized the Iraq security
forces' need for further training but said
the immunity issue "remains' a sticking
point. The U.S. routinely negotiates legal
' protections for troops based abroad.
"We have said from the beginning and
the political blocs have said as well that
there is a necessity for training, but the
size is being left to the Iraqi technical side,
while the immunity we had said is not


possible and from the beginning we have
said that it can't get the approval from the
parliament," he said.
The prime minister said there is a
"NATO alternative," although he did not
describe what he meant by that.
NATO has a small training.presence in
Iraq now and is in talks over continuing
that mission into next year. But putting
more U.S. troops under the NATO umbrel-
la would face similar challenges over how
to protect them legally.
Al-Maliki also mentioned the possibility
of using non-military personnel such as
contractors to provide training.
The interview with Al-Masar television
was recorded Saturday.
At the State Department, spokesman
Mark Toner said no final decisions about
a future U.S. military presence have been
made.


OBAMA: Prtsident hits the road in effort to salvage defeated jobs bill

Continued From Page 1A


into bite-size pieces."
Republicans denounced
the bus trip as nothing
more than a taxpayer-fund-
ed campaign trip through
two must-win states to try
to bolster Obama's stand-
ing for the 2012 election.
As he traveled along on
his imposing black bus,
there was little denying the
presidential politics at play
at each stop. Over three
days, Obama is covering the
countryside of both North
Carolina and Virginia, two
traditionally GOP-leaning
states that he won in 2008
on his campaign's ability to
boost turnout among young
people and black voters.
Senate Democrats
unveiled the first individual
bill, which would spend $30
billion to create or saveedu-
cation jobs and $5 billion to
do the same for police and
firefighters.
The money would come
from a new half-percent tax
on income over $1 million, a
proposal vigorously opposed
by GOP lawmakers.
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid promised a vote
"as soon as possible."
The outcome seemed
clear: The plan is unlike-
ly to gain the 60 votes it
would need to proceed in
the Senate. And it's a non-
starter in the Republican
House.
More broadly, some
aspects of Obama's jobs
agenda are expected to
become law this fall.
The most likely include
extending tax breaks for
businesses that buy new
equipment, and offering a


$4,800 tax credit to com-
panies that hire veterans.
There's also bipartisan sup-
port for repealing a law that
requires the withholding of
3 percent of payments to
government contractors.
Democrats and the
White House, meanwhile,
are confident that Obama's
call to extend cuts in Social
Security payroll taxes will
pass. A two percentage
point payroll tax cut enact-
ed last year expires at the
end of the year; Obama
has proposed cutting it by
an additional percentage
point and extending the cut
to the first $5 million of a
company's payroll.
That proposal is hugely
expensive almost $250
billion by administration
estimates and it is not
clear how and whether the
parties would agree on how
to pay for it
Happy to be back on
the road, Obama found
a friendly audience that
broke into a chant of "four
more years." Said the presi-
dent in response: "I appre-
ciate the four more years,
but right now I'm think-
ing about the next thirteen
months."
Still, his travel essen-
tially doubles as his bid
for another term. His jobs
bill serves as a platform
to contrast himself with
Republicans on both the
legislation and his vision
for the nation.
Obama's poll numbers
are down in both Virginia
and North Carolina, lan-
guishing in the mid- to
low-forties in recent polls.


FEES: Waiver proposed


Continued From Page 1A

Currently, the city charges
$1,050 for water impact fees
and $3,120 for sewer impact
fees. During the 2010 and
2011 calendar years, new
construction was at all-time
lows, Johnson said. In 2011,
only $1.2 million in new con-
struction came to the city.
Council members voted
unanimously to have the
city attorney draft a resolu-
tion for consideration at an
upcoming meeting.
Mayor Stephen Witt said
if impact fees are waived,
the information needs to
be shared with banks and
construction companies.
In other business dis-
cussed at the meeting,
Council members unani-
mously approved an agree-
ment to renew a contract
for the Florida Departmeht


of Corrections to provide
inmate labor for work
details in the city.
The city also agreed to
schedule two public hear-
ings on Nov. 7 and Nov.
21 to discuss a request to
grant brownfield designa-
tion at the site of the old
Howard Johnson restaurant
on U.S. 90 near Interstate
75. Johnsoh said a potential
employer wants the desig-
nation to earn tax credits
for improvements on the
property.
Johnson said he couldn't
identify the company, but
as many as 100 new jobs
will be created by the busi-
ness if the designation is
approved.
"If they cannot get the
designation, they will go
elsewhere," he said.


FIRE: No injuries reported

Continued From Page 1A


is still under investiga-
tion and the names would
be released once an inci-
dent report is completed.
However, the Lake City
Reporter has identified the
occupants as Lucious and
Linda Ivery.
"My spirits are up.
Nothing could get my spir-,,
its down," Linda Ivery said.


"God is in control."
The fire is under investi-
gation but there is no indi-
cation of foul play, Tunsil
said. The house is insured
and the residents told fire
investigators they have a
place to stay.
Jason Matthew Walker
contributed to this story.


The numbers mirror his
approval ratings nationally.
Obama's campaign is press-
ing to hold both Southern
states, even choosing to
hold nextyear's Democratic
convention in Charlotte.
The president's bus tour
fit into that effort, giving
Obama a chance to engage
in some of the retail politics
that is a staple of presiden-
tial campaigns.
Obama's sleek, $1.1 mil-
lion bus rolled through
North Carolina's Blue
Ridge Mountains for more
than four hours, an unusu-
ally long stretch that includ-
ed unannounced stops.
. AtCountrysideBarbeque
in Marion, he shook hands
and took photos, and he
also had a chance of to talk
to potential voters about
his jobs bill. The tour took
him through a blaze of
.bright red and orange fall
colors. He later stopped
at the Mast General Store
in Boone, near the cam-
pus of Appalachian State
University, for some
Halloween candy.
Capping his public com-
ments at a high school in
Millers Creek, N.C., Obama
chided Republicans again,
this time in an apparent
reference to the influence
of the tea party. "It's way
overdue for us to stop try-
ing to satisfy some branch


of the party and take some
common-sense steps to help
America," Obama said.
House Republicans were
quick to point out that
they originally proposed
breaking Obama's jobs
plan into pieces. House
Speaker John Boehner's
office said Monday that
the Ohio Republican has
offered to work the presi-
dent on aspects of the bill
Republicans agree with
but the president opted for
a bus trip instead.
However, Obama and his
opponents on Capitol Hill
don't agree on how much
they have tried to agree.
Obama insisted he would-
work with the GOP "in any


Let us help
your business

SHINEr


way possible." Noting the
angst within some in his
own party about his willing-
ness to compromise, Obama,
said: "I tried so hard to
cooperate with Republicans,
Democrats have been get-
ting mad at me."


Associated Press writ-
ers Andrew Taylor, Ken
Thomas and Ben Feller in
Washington, Bob Lewis in
Richmond, Va., and Tom
Breen in Raleigh, N.C., con-
tributed to this report.


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The Columbia County Tobacco Free
Partnership and the Columbia County
Health Department have come together
to form a partnership in order to create a
) tobacco free community. This year, the
partnership is focusing on polices that
CO effect our youth. We are working to-
wards developing 100% tobacco free
schools. Please come join us and help
protect our youth.
All community members, service
workers, and school aged youth...are in-
vited to attend.


BE FRE


PLO (DA DEPARTMENT OF

HEALTH


in you local Tobacco Free Partnership, please
contact:
Kyle Roberts
Columbia County Health Department
386-754-7083 or Kyle Roberts@doh.state.fl.us.


Event: Columbia County Tobacco Free Partnership
Meeting
When: Wednesday, October 19, 2011
Where: Central School Board Office Room 153
409 SW St. Johns ST.
Lake City, FL 32055
Time: 1:15-2:15pm



All partnership meetings are open to the public.
For more information on how to become involved


Page Editor: Robert Bridges, 754-0428


Columbia County

Tobacco Free Partnership












OPINION


Tuesday, October 18,201 I


OUR


OUR
OPINION


The best

idea we've

heard in

a while

City Manager
Wendell Johnson's
suggestion the city
waive sewer and
water impact fees
for a year to spur growth is a
fine idea. (See story, Page 1A.)
Under Johnson's proposal,
construction would have to
begin before the end of 201.2
in order to be eligible. Sewer
impact fees now stand at
$3,120. The fee for water is
$1,050. Commercial and resi-
dential property owners alike
would qualify.
We're pleased to note the city
council voted unanimously to
ask their attorney to draft a res-
oluton to that effect for future
consideration.
You might wonder whether a
$4,000 waiver would be enough
to sway a potential customer
considering a multi-million dol-
lar establishment for our town.
You bet it is.
What this gesture shows is
that Lake City isn't just open for
business, it's ready, willing and
enthused to do business.
Good job, all concerned.

HIG HLI G H, TS
IN HISTORY

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 18,
the 291st day of 2011. There
are 74 days left in the year.
On this date:
In 1685, King Louis
XIV signed the Edict of
Fontainebleau, revoking the
Edict of Nantes that had
established legal toleration of
France's Protestant population,
the Huguenots. (The French
Parliament recorded the new
edict four days later.) ,
In 1858, the play "Our
American Cousin" by Tom
Taylor premiered at Laura
Keene's New York theater.
In 1867, the United States
took formal possession of
Alaska from Russia.
. In 1931, inventor Thomas
Alva Edison died at age 84.
N Associated Press

Lake City Reporter
Serving Columbia County
Since 1874
The Lake City Reporter is pub-
lished with pride for residents of
Columbia and surrounding counties by
Community Newspapers Inc.
We believe strong newspapers build
strong communities -"Newspapers
gel things done!"
Our primary goal is to
publish distinguished and profitable
community-oriented newspapers.
This mission will be accomplished
through the teamwork of professionals
dedicated to truth, integrity and hard
work.
Todd Wilson, publisher
Robert Bridges, editor
Sue Brannon, controller
Dink NeSmith, president
Tom Wood, chairman

LETTERS
POLICY
Letters to the Editor should be
typed or neatly written and double
spaced. Letters should not exceed
400 words and will be edited for
length and libel. Letters must be
signed and include the writer's name,
address and telephone number for
verification. Writers can have two
letters per month published. Letters
and guest columns are the opinion of
the writers and not necessarily that of
the Lake City Reporter.


BY MAIL: Letters, PO. Box 1709,
Lake City, FL 32056; or drop olf at
180 E. Duval St. downtown.
BY FAX: (386) -752-9400.
BY E-MAIL:
news@lakecityreporter.com


The Solyndra case
that has stuck U.S.
taxpayers with a half
a billion-dollar bad
debt, with little pros-
pect of getting any back, isn't
going away soon nor should it.
It isn't just the amount spent
on this solar panel fiasco that
matters the most, although that
certainly is substantial when the
nation's economy appears head-
ed once again into a recession.
What is also important is
what this debacle says once
again about White House policy:
Mainly that there really isn't any.
As in other initiatives, President
Barack Obama has made lofty
pronouncements about alterna-
tive energy without delineating
any coherent coordinated plan for
moving forward. His approach
has been to throw out one idea
after another without connecting
the dots into tan overall initiative
If you haven't kept up with
it, Solyndra is the failed manu-
facturer of solar panels that the


www.lakecityreporter.com


When high achievers


shortchanged, we all suffer


or nearly two
decades, public *
school educators
have been trying to
close, or at least nar-
row, the race- and income-based
achievement gaps in gradua-
tion rates and test scores. The
movement, which became a
mandate with passage of the No
Child Left Behind Act during
PresidentGeorge W. Bush's
first term, has become an obses-
sion.
For several years, supporters
of the act, along with some early
detractors, did not question the
perceived benefits of NCLB. But
that easy acceptance is chang-
ing.
The first serious doubts about
the measure's effectiveness
came after a 2008 report by the
Thomas B. Fordham Institute,
a Washington think tank, which
showed that from 2000 to 2007,
progress for students who
were the highest achievers on
the National Assessment of
Educational Progress did not
increase, while progress for
the lowest-achieving students
greatly improved.
Now, Fordham has reaf-
-firmed the 2008 findings and
introduced more critical statis-
tics in a new study, "Do High
Flyers Maintain Their Altitude?"
This study found that the feder-
ally mandated effort to make
schools more accountable for
increasing low-performing
students' achievement may be
harming the highest-performing
students.
Researchers tracked the
scores of approximately 82,000
students on the Measure of
Academic Progress. They found
that many high-performing
students lose ground from the
elementary grades to middle
school and from middle school
to high school.
Here is the question for U.S.
educators: Is focusing on get-


Bill Maxwell
maxwell@sptimes.com
ting all students to be proficient
on reading and math tests hav-
ing unintended negative conse-
quences? It is a tough question
for.many Americans to answer,
because it goes to the core of
our concept of equality.
Still, the mounting empirical
evidence cannot be ignored.
"Is helping kids at the bot-
tom improve hurting kids at the
top?" Michael Petrilli said in an
interview with Education Week.
He is the executive vice presi-
dent of the Fordham Institute
and was a U.S. Education
Department official when NCLB
was written. "Let's be honest
about the trade-offs. It doesn't
make you a bad person or a rac-
ist ... We've been making good
progress for kids at the bot-
tom and for poor children and
minority kids.
It just can't be the only thing.
that we do." Petrilli and others
seriously question, for example,
the effectiveness of the cam-
paign to get as many students
as possible, even if they have
so-so academic records and
questionable abilities, to take
Advanced Placement courses.
In Hillsborough County, for
example, the school district has
been criticized for aggressively
steering so many average stu-
dents into Advanced Placement
courses regardless of whether
they are prepared for college-
level curriculum.
Who benefits when such
students take these courses?
Do high-achieving students suf-
fer when teachers are forced


to devote too much time to. the
lowest achievers?
Evidence shows that to relent-
lessly devote excessive time and
resources to helping students
at the bottom, many districts
are scrapping programs such
as after-school science labs for
Advanced Placeihent classes.
High-achieving students lose
out; and many excellent teach-
ers are being let go or are being
reassigned to courses to help
lower-achieving \students.
Is this a desirable trade-off?
At the national level, Education
Week reports, Congress has
eliminated $7.5 million for
the Jacob K Javits Gifted and
Talented Program that serves
gifted and high-achieving stu-
dents. The cut was made to free
up money to finance programs
for the lowest-achieving stu-
dents.
I support efforts to help our
lowest achievers, but like Petrilli
and others, I believe that we
have tipped the scales and are
ill-serving our highest achiev-
ers. As Americans who believe
in equality we have a philo-
sophical difficulty in grouping
students by ability. Too many
of us cannot accept the reality
that high-achieving students
should be permitted to go as
high as they can when we divvy
up federal and state funds for
education.
In truth, it is a moral impera-
tive for us to do as much for
these students as we do for
those at the bottom. This is not
elitism or insensitivity. It is a
simple calculation that if our
highest-achieving children are
shortchanged, we all suffer. We
will lose our competitive edge in
the world, and we may heedless-
ly diminish our quality of life.

* Bill Maxwell is a columnist
and editorial writer for the
St. Petersburg Times.


Dan K.Thomasson
thomassondan@oolcorr
president once cited as a cor-
nerstone of his energy hopes.
The White House, although
denying it, clearly was behind
the expedited efforts to fund
Solyndra despite all the warn-
'ing signs. Obama and Vice
President Joe Biden both visited
the company and paid it enor-
mous compliments as the first
in the president's energy plans.
So anxious was the adminis-
tration to give this company tax-
payer money, Energy secretary
Steven Chu personally approved
more cash even though
Solyndra had already defaulted


on one loan. It has since
declared bankruptcy and two
of its chief officers have taken
the Fifth Amendment against
self-incrimination before a con-
gressional committee investigat-
ing the matter. And, oh yeah,
the FBI raided the company's
offices not long ago.
These things have a way of
hanging around, especially in
an election season. Some years,
ago, this matter might have been
dubbed "Panelgate" or "Solargate"
after the Watergate scandal and
resulted in appointment of a special
prosecutor. The matter at the very
least raises questions about wheth-
er the Energy department had
failed to performnn its due diligence
under pressure from the White
House. Energy department sourc-
es have said that they expressed
concern about the project but were
ignored at the top.

* Dan K. Thomasson is former
editor of Scripps Howard News
Service,


4A


Phil Hudgins
phudgins@cninewspapers.com


Sloshing

around

Legoland


we were backing
out of our driveway
when our grandson,
Alex, 5 years old at
the time, piped up from the back
seat-
"Granddad, isn't this the best
birthday ever?"
"Yes," I said, finally, "I guess
it is."
I must admit I hesitated in
answering for two reasons.
First, it was 6:30 in the morning.
Second, it wasn't Alex's birthday.
It was mine.
At first blush, it seemed that
getting up at 5:45 a.m. and
driving to Dillsboro, N.C., to
board Thomas the Train, whose
top speed might hit 15 miles
an hour, would not have been
my idea of "the best birthday
ever." But, on second thought, it
could've been.
I was thinking of that morn-
ing as Alex, his grandmother,
his mother and I arrived for a
preview at Legoland in Winter
Haven. Alex, now 10, has gradu-
ated from Thomas the Train.
He's a dedicated Legos man.
And there we were at 7:30 in the
morning, possibly the first cus-
tomers pulling through the gates
of Florida's brand-new Legolanid,
driving around hundreds of
empty parking spaces, 'debating
which one was best, as the first
of several downpours pounded
our car.
"What time does this place
open?" I asked after finally set-
tling in a parking space and
unwrapping my McDonald's
biscuit.
"Nine o'clock," someone said.
"Nine o'clock? So why are we
here at 7:30?" ,,
"Because the gates open at 8,"
was what I heard.
Actually, the gates opened
before 8, because we were there
30 minutes early for the gates,
an hour and a half early for the
activities.
Once we were inside, though,
the rains stopped-at least until
lunchtime, when they returned
for several encores. But Alex
didn't care. He donned my base-
ball cap for minor protection
and-sloshed around happily over
much of the 150-acre park. He
rode roller coasters. He mar-
veled at Miniland USA, all made
from Legps. He attended driv-
ing school and steered his own
mini-car, one with no top and no
windshield wipers. He watched
water skiers dressed as swash-
buckling pirates perform stunts
on the shores of Lake Eloise. He
fashioned his own race car from
Legos. He even took time out to
eat.
All the while, Alex was build- -
ing stories, stacking them up
like little Lego buildings inside
his memory bank.
It has been decades since my
dad took my brother and me
fishing, but I have no trouble
conjuring up those days. Even
further back are memories of
playing on my grandparents'
farm and riding Papa's mule,
Bill.
My daughters remind me-
because I had forgotten-that I
read C.S. Lewis' "Narnia" books
to them when they were little,
hoping, I'm sure, they'd drop off
to sleep before I did.
"God gave us memories
that we might have roses in
December," author J.M. Barrie
said.
Years from now, I imagine, Alex
will pluck a Lego rose from our
trip to Winter Haven. But he prob-
ably won't remember that it got
rained on.
* Phil Hudgins is senior editor of
Community Newspapers Inc.


What Solyndra case says

about White House policy









Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


LAKE CITY REPORTER


NEWS


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011


Mo. mom admits she

was drunk on night

baby vanished


KANSAS CITY, Mo.
- The mother of a miss-
ing Kansas City baby said
Monday that she was
drunk when her daugh-
ter disappeared, may have
blacked out and actually
last saw the child hours
before the time she
originally told police she
checked on her.
The revelations came
hours before, a New York
attorney best known for
defending Joran Van der
Sloot, the Dutch man sus-
pected in the 2005 dis-
appearance of Natalee
Holloway in Aruba, said he
had been hired to represent
parents Deborah Bradley
and Jeremy Irwin.
The couple reported
their 10-month-old daugh-
ter missing Oct. 4 after
Irwin returned from work-
ing a night shift and found
the front door unlocked,
the house lights blazing, a
window tampered with and
the baby gone. Bradley
and their two sons were
asleep elsewhere in the
home.
Bradley told police she
last saw her daughter,
Lisa Irwin, when she
checked on her at 10:30
0.m. But Monday, she
told NBC's "Today" show
she actually\last saw Lisa
when she put her to bed
at 6:40 p.m. She gave no
explanation for the modi-
fied times.
Bradley told Fox News


that she got drunk after
she put her children to bed
that night and may have
, blacked out Asked how
much she drank that night
and whether it was more
than five glasses of wine,
she responded, "probably."
She said she didn't have
more than 10 glasses.
Bradley told NBC that
police accused her of kill-
ing Lisa and she believes
she will be arrested. But
she also insisted again that
she had 'not harmed her
daughter.
"No, no ... I don't think
alcohol changes a person
enough to do something
like that," she said.
FBI agents used tracking
dogs Monday to search the
family's house, a home next
door and Irwin's parents'
house. They also drained
a creek near Bradley and
Irwin's home in their effort
to find the child. There
, were no immediate reports
of what, if anything, they
found.
Police .have said they
have no suspects or major
leads even after multiple
searches of the family's
neighborhood, nearby
wooded areas, a landfill and
abandoned homes.
Bradley and Irwin held
hands at a Monday after-
noon news conference
where defense attorney
Joe Tacopina announced
he was representing them.
Tacopina said it was natural


Federal judge


orders more
a 0
review on


polar bears


ASSOCIATED PRESS
Deborah Bradley (left) and Jeremy Irwin, the parents of
missing baby Lisa Irwin, embrace while in the lobby of an
Hampton Inn hotel in Kansas City, Mo. on Oct. 7,


for police to focus on the
parents.
"The police have to start
with the mother and father,
they absolutely have to,"
he said. '"They're the first
people they should look at.
But don't come to a con-
clusion because there's no
other answers."
Bradley told NBC she
is scared her arrest would
essentially end the police
search and Lisa would
never be found.
"If they arrest me, people
are going to stop looking
for her and I'll never know


what happened," Bradley
said.
She also said her two
sons, ages 6 and 8, say
they heard noises the
night Lisa disappeared,
but she doesn't know
whether they heard nois-
es before they went to
sleep or later in the night
and she doesn't want them
involved in the investiga-
tion. The boys have been
made available to police for
interviews, Tacopina said.

Associated Press


Cellphone companies to warn


as plans approach limit


By MATTHEW DALY
Associated Press

WASHINGTON A fed-
eral judge has thrown out
a key section of an Interior
Department rule concern-
'ing the threat to polar bears
posed by global warming.
U.S. District Judge Emmet
Sullivan ruled Monday that
the Bush administration
did not complete a required
environmental review when
it said the bear's designation
as threatened in 2008 could
not be used as a backdoor
way to control greenhouse
gases blamed for global
warming.


The Obama administra-
tion agreed with the Bush
administration a year later,
saying that activities out-
side of the bear's habitat
such as emissions from
a power plant could not
be controlled using the
Endangered Species Act.
The Center for
Biological Diversity, an
environmental group
that filed a lawsuit over
the 2008 rule,. said the
decision puts the fate of
the polar bear back in
the hands of the Obama
administration and.
Interior Secretary Ken'
Salazar.


By PETER SVENSSON
AP Technology Writer
NEW YORK (AP) Cellphone
companies pledged Monday to warn
subscribers before they go over their
monthly limits for calling minutes,.
text messages and data use.
* The'pledge comes in response to
a threat of regulation by the Federal
Communications Commission, which
wants to curb nasty surprises in the,
monthly bills of wireless subscribers.
CTIA The Wireless Association,
a trade group representing the major
cellphone companies, said they're
ilso promising to warn subscribers
that they're paying roaming fees if
they travel abroad.
The warnings will arrive as text
messages, and subscribers won't
need to sign up for them they'll
arrive automatically. CTIA said its
member will have warnings in place
on at least half their plans in a year
and all of them in two years.
AT&T Inc. and Verizon Wireless,
the two largest carriers, already
provide text-message warnings on
their data plans, but not on text mes-
saging or calls. Instead, subscribers


OBITUARI

Martha Skinner Petty years. 1
William
Martha Skinner Petty, 84, a resi- He was
dent of Lake City, Florida passed loved to
away October 16, 2011 at her father ar
home after an extended illness. Survivor
Mrs. Petty was a lifelong resi- wife Ar
dent of Lake City, Florida and Fl. Two
is the daughter of the late Barry Bridgett
and Arkansas Register Skinner. City, Fl
She is preceded in death by her Bodi, Pe
husband Shelton Petty and one Porter,
son Richard Petty. She was a Watson,
member of the Huntsville Bap- 'In-Law,
tist Church, Lake City, Florida. Lake Bu
Survivors include her daughter: Patricia
Deborah Anne (Bruce) Glover, Fl. Grad
Lake City, Fl. one son Larry Pet- Ayers, L
ty, Gainesville, Ga. One sister: Andrea
Mary Whitfield, Lake City, Fl. Funeral:
Eight Grandchildren and eighteen ed Thur
great grandchildren also survive, at 11:00
Funeral services for Mrs. Petty City Chu
will be conducted Thursday, Oc- Sammy
tober 20, 2011 at 3:30 P.M. in the ney Hur
North Lake City Church of God will foil
with the Rev. Barney Hurst and etery, La
the Rev. Elijah Hammons offici- will rece
ating. Interment will follow in 'October
the Oak Grove Cemetery, Lake P.M. at t
City, Fl. The family will receive of flowe
friends Wednesday, October 19, made to
2011 'from 6:00-8:00 P.M. at School C
the funeral home. GUERRY Arlingto
FUNERAL HOME 2659 SW. ida 320:
Main Blvd. Lake City is in charge that you
of arrangements. 386-752-2211. to the
FUNER
SW Ma
Gerald Dale Thomas Fl. is
rangeme
Gerald "Jerry" Dale Thomas, 43,
a resident of Lake City, Florida
passed away October 15, 2011. Obituaries
Mr. Thomas was a native of Tole- ments. F
do, Ohio and had resided in Lake ment atR
City for the past twenty-three


have to look up their usage data.
The announcement was made
jointly by the CTIA and the FCC,
which credited Consumer's Union,
the publisher of Consumer Report,
for raising awareness of the issue.
The magazine had found that many
of its subscribers had been startled
by high monthly bills.
Curbing occasional high bills is
unlikely to have much of a financial
effect at phone companies. Analyst
Michael McCormack at Nomura
Securities noted that the companies
say that only a few percent of their
subscribers exceed their allotments
in a month. The trend over the past
few years of making calls to other
cellphones "free," or not counting
toward the plan limits, has reduced
the number of people who go over
on calling minutes, he said.
Phone companies are also moving
away from charging for each text
message or selling "buckets" of 500
messages per month. Rather, they
have moved toward offering unlim-
ited text messaging.
The biggest remaining "bill
shock" problem for consumers may
be in international data roaming,


ES

He is the son of the late
and Carol Bodi Thomas.
a huge Gator fan and
fish. He was a excellent
id husband to his family.
rs include his loving
mi Thomas, Lake City,
o daughters: Erika and'
Thomas' both of Lake
.Three Brothers: Rick
errysburg, Ohio, Jeffrey
Lake City, Fl. Joseph
Lake City, Fl. Father-
Bruce (Christine) Smith,
utler, Fl. Mother-In-Law,
(Ron) Potter, Lake City,
admother in Law, Ruby
,ake City, Fl. one niece:
Porter, Lake City, Fl.
services will be conduct-
sday, October 20, 2011
A.M. in the North Lake
irch of God with the Rev.
Bass and the Rev. Bar-
st, officiating. Interment
ow in the Salem Cem-
ake City, Fl. The family
eive friends Wednesday,
19, 2011 from 6:00-8:00
he funeral home. In lieu
;rs donations should be
the Lake City Middle
Chorus Program, 843 SW
n Blvd., Lake City, Flor-
25. The family request
where your Gator Shirts
visitation. GUERRY
AL HOME 2659
ain Blvd. Lake City,
in charge of all ar-
nts. 386-752-2414.

's are paid advertise-
or details, call the Lake
orter's classified depart-
752-1293.


McCormack said. Someone who
travels abroad with a smartphone
might use it sparingly for calls, but
be unaware that apps are using
data in the background, racking up
big fees that only become apparent
when the bill arrives. *
The alerts are voluntary for
the phone companies, but FCC
Chairman Julius Genachowski made
it clear that the agency would step
in if companies fail to police them-
selves.
Kathleen Grillo, senior vice presi-
dent for federal regulatory affairs at
Verizon Communication Inc., said
the voluntary approach was prefer-
able because things change quickly
in the wireless world and regulations
don't always keep up.
"The result is an industry code
. that will serve consumers better
than rules that would soon be out-
dated," she said.
Asked at the press conference
why it would take two years to fully
,implement the warnings, CTIA
President Steve Largent said phone
companies have to reconfigure their
systems.


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MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
148 North Marion Ave.
Lake City, FL 32055-3915
Bus. 386-752-1215
TF Fax 800-217-2105
TE. 888-752-1215
robert.woodard@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011


Magnolia Fest set for weekend at Spirit of Suwannee


From staff reports

Magnolia Fest returns this weekend with
both annual favorites and new names atThe
Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park in Live
Oak. Lucinda Williams and Bela Fleck and
the Flecktones are the headlining the four-
day Americana music festival. Locals musi-
cians performing include Whethermen,
Sentropolis, and Amy Hendrickson and
The Prime Directive. Saturday at 11 a.m.
there will be a New Orleans style parade
with decorated golf carts. *
Today is the last day to buy tickets at the


discounted price of $165 for all four days
with camping. Tickets with be $180 at the
gate. Tickets for Saturday and Sunday cost
$125 and include camping. They are avail-
able at the gate only.
Single day tickets are $50 on Thursday
and Sunday. Friday and Saturday tickets
are $70. There are also special rates for
students and military.
Seating is first come, first serve so lawn
chairs and blankets are recommended.
For more information call (386) 364-1683,
email spirit@musicliveshere.com or go to
www.musicliveshere.com.


Left: The
band moe will
perform Friday
and Saturday
at Magnolia
Fest at The
Spirit of the
Suwannee
Music Park.


w^-r
COURTS
The band 7 Walkers will perform Thursday at 11 p.m. at Magnolia Fest at The Spirit of the
Suwannee Music Park. Their music is a blend of rock and New Orleans funk.


Doctors: Pap best test for cervical cancer


By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Chief Medical Writer

There's more news on
cancer screening tests -
this time for women.
Scientists advising the
government say a Pap- test
is a good way to screen
young and middle-aged
women for cervical cancer,
and it's only needed once
every three years. But they
say there is not enough
evidence yet to back test-
ing for HPV, the virus that
causes the disease.
That's at odds with the
American Cancer Society
and other groups, which
have long said that using
both tests can be an option
for women over 30.
Those groups and the
U.S. Preventive Services
Task Force separately
plan to release proposed
new guidelines for cervi-
cal cancer screening on
Wednesday and. invite
public comment. The task
force is the same group
that recommended against
routine PSA tests to screen
for prostate cancer, say-
ing they were doing -more
harm than good for men at
average risk.
Cervical cancer screen-
ing is a success story. In
the United States, cases
and death rates have been
cut more than in half since
the 1970s because of Pap
smears lab exams of
cells scraped -from the
cervix, the gateway to the
uterus. The test can find
early signs of this slow-
growing cancer and treat
them before a tumor has a
chance to develop.
So "the bar is set pretty
high" for a test to replace or


supplement Paps, said Dr.
Evelyn Whitlock of Kaiser
Permanente Northwest's
Center for Health Research
in Portland, Ore.
Not enough is known
about the benefits and
especially the harms of
HPV testing, concludes a
scientific review she led
for the task force that was
published on Monday. The
panel voted unanimously
in March that there was
insufficient evidence to
recommend for or against
HPV testing, but has con-
tinued to discuss the issue
and will give its advice on
Wednesday.
Here's the dilemma:
Infections with HPV, the
human papillomavirus, are
very common especially in
young women. They usu-
ally go away on their own
and only pose a cancer risk
when they last a year or
more.
Tests--that find these
infections might lead many
women to more invasive fol-
low-up tests that can weak-
en the cervix and cause
problems having children
later.
"A lot of people use the
word 'superior' to mean it
catches more cancer. But
the other side of it is, does
it catch more things that
are not cancer? You have
to weigh benefits versus
harms for any screening
test," said Debbie Saslow,
the cancer society's direc-
tor of breast and gyneco-
logic cancer.
The evidence review
finds'little risk of cervical
cancer in women under 21
and says screening below
that age may be harmful.
It also says screening can


stop at-age 65 if a woman
has had adequate screen-
ing in the past and is not
otherwise at high risk.
The reviewwas published
Monday in the Annals of
Internal Medicine.
The same journal also
published a study on anoth-
er women's cancer issue
- breast cancer screening.
That research supports
having mammograms
every other year instead of
annually. Over time, there
are more false alarms with
annual screening, and
going every two years does
not significantly raise the
risk of a late-stage cancer
being found, researchers
report
Breast cancer screen-
ing has been an emotional
issue since 2009 when the
government task force
said women at average risk
of the disease don't need
mammograms until age 50
and then just every 'other
year to age 74. The can-
cer society and others still
advise annual tests starting
at age 40.
The federally funded
study gives a real-world
view of the downside of
screening the worry,
expense and medical risks
of biopsies and other tests
that ultimately prove unnec-
essary. It looked at false
alarms at various intervals
of screening for nearly
170,000 women ages 40 to
59 in ordinary community
settings, plus nearly 4,500
other women with invasive
breast cancer.
About 61 percent of
women who get a mam-
mogram every year for a
decade will be called back
at least once for extra tests


that turn out not to show
breast cancer, the study
found.
Screening every other
year drops this false alarm
rate to 42 percent without
a big risk of cancer being
discovered at a late stage.
And a tip for women: If you
changed where you go for
mammograms, bringing or
having doctors send your
last one to be compared to
the new one cuts in half the
chance of a false alarm.
Women who started hav-
ing mammograms in their
40s versus their 50s were
more likely to have a false
alarm just because they
were having more tests
- not because mammog-
raphy is less accurate in
that age group.
, False alarms "are part of
the price to pay for early
detection," said study
leader Rebecca Hubbard
of Group Health Research
Institute, part of a Seattle-
based managed care sys-
tem. Women need to know
how common they are, and
"if it happens to them they
will feel less anxiety," she
said.
Dr. Robert Smith, the
cancer society's director of
cancer screening, said the
study should have more pre-
cisely defined intervals it
called annual screening an
interval of 9 to 18 months,
and biennial screening, 19
to 30 months.
"A false positive is com-
monly discussed as if it
were a catastrophic event
For the large majority of
women, it isn't," and sur-
veys say women will accept
the risk in return for find-
ing cancer early, he said.


Snake farm owner found

guilty of animal cruelty


OBERLIN, La. A for-
mer Oakdale snake farm
owner has been sentenced
to jail for cruelty to animals
and a Florida snake farm
is getting his snakes, the
Louisiana Department of
Wildlife and Fisheries said
Monday.
David Beauchemin got a
two-year sentence, with one
year suspended and cred-
it for five months served
since his arrest in May,
department spokesman
Adam Einck said.
He said Judge Joel Davis
ordered Beauchemin on
Oct. 6 to pay a $1,000 fine
within 60 days of release
or go back to jail for the
second year.
Allen Parish sheriff's dep-
uties got a warrant in March
2010 to search the home of
Beauchemin and his wife,
Tawni Beauchemin, after
getting a complaint that a
dog turned over to their
Happy Hounds Rescue had
been advertised for sale on
the Internet.
Deputies booked them
with cruelty to 17 dogs and
five cats taken from their
property. Wildlife agents


cited the Beauchemins
with 22 counts of illegally
possessing pythons over 12
feet in length without the
required free permit
The Beauchemins failed
to appear for arraignment
in the local state court
last September. Tawni
Beauchemin remains at
large, but her husband
was arrested in April in
Quitman, Texas
Authorities said at the
time that'he faced 21 counts
of cruelty, one of possess-
ing a snake longer than
12 feet, violating interstate
commerce laws by selling
snakes not legal to possess,
theft of less than $300 by
fraud, telephone harass-
ment and cyberstalking.
All charges except one
each of aggravated and sim-
ple cruelty to animals were
dropped as part of a plea
agreement, Einck said.
He said more than
200 snakes confiscated
from High End Herps
in Oakdale now belong
to Glades Herp Farm of
Bushnell, Fla., which has
been taking care of them.
* Associated Press


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MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
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--. Lake City, FL 32055-3915
-* Bus. 386-752-1215
-- 'TF Fax 800-217-2105
TF. 888-752-1215
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234 SW Main Boulevard
Lake City, FL 32056
Bus 386-752 5866
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A reading is not guaranteed.


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427


11 f -1, 11 6rq' % I- 4O A P@ I t --' Ik 14Jil 0, B' 1







LAKE CITY REPORTER SCHOOLS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011


Bulletin Board

NE SABOTORS CHOOS


CAMPUS NEWS


Columbia City Elementary
New faculty
Columbia City would like to welcome new members
to the faculty. Dawn Dicks joined us at CCE and is teach-
ing second grade. Mary Ann Tompkins is returning
to CCE as a first grade teacher and Amber Mansmann
was recently welcomed to the first grade team. Lauran
Steinman.is our new.addition in the ESE Department
and Beth BIllard is returning to CCE after a two-year
grant assignment at the district office.,
Fundraiser prizes
CCE just completed the Cookie Dough Fundraiser.
Congratulations to the top three selling students who
will receive a cash prize: Carol Dougherty, Colby Odom,
and Walt Henck. The top selling class in the school was
Mrs. Peale's 5th grade class. They will receive a pizza
party.
The classes with the highest percentage of students
selling in each grade level will receive an ice cream
sandwich party. These classes are: K Hunter, 1st
Clyatt, 2nd -Blanton, 3rd -Malphurs, 4th Bass, 5th
-Godsmark, ESE M. Boone.
Niblack Elementary
Student council
Niblack Elementary is proud to announce the
Student Council Officers for the 2011 2012 school
year. President Sheronya Cooley, Vice-President
Bryanna Bowles, Secretary: Mya Watson, and Publicity
Chairperson: Dakayda Allen. The candidate's speeches
were broadcast on September 22nd and the voting took
place on September 23rd. Many thanks to the Supervisor
of Elections Office for providing the voting booths!
PTO meeting
Our next PTO meeting will be held Thursday, October
20, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. If you would like to come and read
with your child, the media center will be open after
school for Family Reading Night and light refreshments
will be available.
Safety patrols
School Safety Patrols have been selected for the 2011
2012 school year. We believe we have a wonderful
group of safety patrols this year. They will be role mod-
els for all the students at Niblack. The members are:
Ty'anna Baker, Alexus Barkley, Precious Bell, Kouvaris
Daniels, Mitchell George, Ty'niya Griffin, Taylor Ivery,
barion Johnson, Hakeem Kelly, Johnsha McClellan, Nya
Sheppard, Kreesia Stokes, Sidney Tomlin, and A'mirrah
White.

Melrose Park Elementary
PreK students
PreK students will celebrate Fall during the month of
october. On Friday, October 14, we took a walking trip
to the First United Methodist Church for story time and
to see fall decorations. .
On October 27, we will have our Fall.Festival with lots
of fun for everyone with games and refreshments. "
: Lastly, on October 28 PreK students will visit other -
Melrose Park classrooms to practice their trick or treat
skills. Children will be able to dress up in their charac-
ter costumes.


Mistaken nominee

for Nat'l Book Award,

'Shine' withdraws
NEW YORK This finalists announced last
year's National Book Wednesday for the young
Awards have become a people's literature cat-
story of embarrassment a,- egory. But the National ,
month before the winners Book Foundation, which
are to be announced. sponsors the prizes, cited a
SWithin.just a few days, "miscommunication" with
children's author Lauren the judges and quickly
gyracle has been a, said that her book had
nommee; anon-noridinee, a, been confused with Franny
nominee again and, finally,' Billingsley's "Chime." (To
4 noni-nominee, asked to. avoid advanced word leak-
withdraw bver mistakes ing 'n the Internet, judges
riot her own. inform the foundation by
Myracle's "Shine" was telephone of their choices.)
on the original list of five


Kindergarten students
Kindergarten students are busy preparing for our fall
festival. We are making fall arts and crafts and learning
about the seasons. We are excited about our upcoming
field trips to the pumpkin patch and the farm. We are
learning our letters and sounds, rhyming words, and
beginning to write our first sentences.
First grade students
First grade students went on a fieldtrip to the Lake
City Fire Department and the Public Library on Friday,
October 14. We learned about goods and services pro-'
vided in our community.
Our Fall festival will be held on October 28th. We will
have a costume parade and fun and games with prizes
and goodies.
In reading we have started giving fluency grades.
The students enjoy practicing with the timers! In math
we have learned about double facts, counting on and
doubles plus one and doubles minus one. We practice
math facts on the computer too! In process writing, we
are learning about focus statements and using transition
words in our stories.
In science we learned about using our senses to
observe and using our inquiry skills to plan investiga-
tions.
We have been having a great time so far and we have
learned so much already! We are almost finished with
our first reading book!

Second grade students
In the wonderful world of second grade we are explor-
ing place value through 4-digit numbers and addition.
We are also planting seeds and exploring the scientific
method. Along with that we are preparing for our field
trip to Stephen Foster by studying various cultures.
Studying masks
All students at Melrose Park Elementary have all
been studying masks. First, the boys and girls watched a
Power Point presentation which introduced the different
ways masks are used all over the world. As they viewed
a variety of masks from different cultures, students
compared and contrasted the diverse images. They also
discussed facial expressions and their importance in
communication.
To prepare the kindergarten and first grade students
to sketch plans for their mask making. The boys and
girls have been practicing lines, shapes, and forms. They
are using these geometrical lines to create artwork that
resemble those masks found in Africa. The students are
also learning about classifying the.warm colors- red,
orange and yellow.
Second and third graders have been focusing
on masks made by the Pacific Northwest Native
Americans. Likewise, our second and third graders are
using these same motifs as they construct their masks.
To complement their mask studies, they have also read
the book titled; Raven A Trickster Tale from the Pacific
Northwest,
Fourth and fifth grade students are making masks.
Their masks are much more complex and are'similar to
the masks found in the country of Bali and Indonesia.
These masks are very imaginative and are derived from
make believe images and characters. Fourth and fifth
graders first sketch a plan for their masks, then choose
and color the facial features, and lastly, add details to
enhance their artwork.


Lake City Reporter

UF collaborating

with Spain on

satellite research


GAINESVILLE -- The
University of Florida and
Spanish scientists are col-
laborating on research
that includes small space
satellites.
Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carol
was traveled to Madrid
to sign an official agree-
ment Friday. Cristina
Garmendia, minister of
science and innovation,
will sign for Spain.
Other research areas
are agriculture biotech-
nology and the science
of aging. The satellite
research could help boost
Florida's aerospace indus-
try.


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initiated the arrangement.
Scientists will work on
developing satellites rang-
ing in size from four cubic
inches to three cubic feet.
Smaller satellites would
cut launch costs. One
potential use would be
to monitor crops for dis-
eases.
Spain has built and
flown small satellites for
years. Unlike Florida, <
Spain doesn't have its
own launch facilities.'It
has been launching from
Russia and France.
* Associated Press


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LAKE CITY REPORTER NEWS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011


'Kudzu bug' threatens to eat US farmers' lunch


By ALLEN G. BREED
AP National Writer
BIACKVILLE, S.C.
- Kudzu the "plant
that ate the South" has
finally met a pest that's just
as voracious. Trouble is,
the so-called "kudzu bug"
is also fond of another East
Asian transplant that we
happen to like, and that is
big money for American
farmers.
Soybeans.
"When this insect is
feeding on kudzu, it's
beneficial," Clemson
University entomologist
Jeremy Greene says as he
stands in a field swarming
with the brown, pea-sized
critters. "When it's feeding
on soybeans, it's a pest."
Like kudzu, which was
introduced to the South
from Japan in the late 19th
century as a fodder and a
way to stem erosion on the
region's worn-out farm-
lands, this insect is native
to the Far East And like
the invasive vine, which
"Deliverance" author
James Dickey famously
deemed "a vegetable form
of cancer," the kudzu bug
is running rampant
Megacopta cribrari, as
this member of the stink-
bug family is known in
scientific circles, was first
identified near Atlanta in
late October 2009. Since
V-


then, it has spread to most
of Georgia and North
Carolina, all of South
Carolina, and several coun-
ties in Alabama.
And it shows no signs of
stopping.
Kudzu and soybeans are
both legumes. The bug
- also known as the bean
plataspid breeds and
feeds in the kudzu patches
until soybean planting
time, then crosses over
to continue the moveable
feast, says Tracie Jenkins,
a plant geneticist at the
University of Georgia.
On a recent sunny
day, Greene and doc-
toral student Nick Seiter
visited the 10-acre test
field at Clemson's Edisto
Research & Education
Center in Blackville, about
42 miles east of Augusta,
Ga.
Starting in the middle
of the field, Seiter walks
down a row, sweeping a
canvas net back and forth
through the bean plants as
he goes. Bugs cling to his
pants and shirt,;dotting his
face like moles.
"I feel like I'm wearing
a bee beard over here," he
says. "It tickles."
At row's end, Seiter
pushes his hand up
through the net. Bugs
cascade over the edge and
pool on the sandy soil at
his feet.


The writhing pile makes
a fizzing sound like a
freshly opened soda.
"Wow. It's a couple of
inches thick," Greene
says. "That's just shy of a
standard sample that we
use to evaluate soybean
insects ... and we're look- .
ing at a couple of thousand
bugs, easy."
The bugs secrete a caus-
tic substance that smells
like a cross between a
commercial cleanser and
an industrial lubricant
Greene says it's unclear
whether this is a defensive
device, a way of locating
each other in a field, or
serves some other pur-
pose.
Whatever it's for, the
secretions are potent
enough to etch the bot-
toms of the plastic tubs
he uses to ship samples
to colleagues and to
stain the skin on Seiter's
blistered right palm a
pale orange that can't be
washed off.
"Self tanner," he quips.
These insects are what
entomologists call "true
bugs," meaning they have
needle-like mouth parts
that they use to suck on
the plant So rather than
feeding on the pods or
leaves, as corn ear worms
and common stinkbugs
do, kudzu bugs attack the
stems and leaf petioles, lit-


3 charged after 4 disabled

adults locked up in Pa.


By RON TODT
Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA
- Three people have been
charged following the
,discovery of four malnour-
ished mentally disabled
adults chained to a boiler
in a locked northeast
Philadelphia basement
room that was too small.
for an adult to stand up
straight and also reeked
of waste from the buckets
they used to relieve them-
selves, police said Sunday.
Officers were investigat-'
ing a report of squatters in
a building Saturday when
they found three men and
a woman in a 15-by-15-foot
roon-r behind a steel door
that was chained shut The
subbasement room they
were in called to mind a
Cold War-era bomb shelter
and contained a makeshift
bed, mattress and sheets,
said Officer Tanya Little, a
police spokeswoman.
"It was horrible," she
said Sunday. "The space


was very tiny and con-
fined.""
Police are investigating
the possibility that the sus-
pects were trying to make
money through access to
the victims' Social Security
or disability checks, Little
said.
Charges of criminal
conspiracy, aggravated
assault, kidnapping, i
criminal trespass, unlawful
restraint, false imprison-
ment and related offenses
were filed Sunday against
Linda Ann Weston, 51, and
Thomas Gregory, 47, both
of Philadelphia, as well
as Eddie Wright, 49, offi-
cially listed as homeless
but originally from Texas.
Listed numbers for the
defendants could not be
found Sunday and it was
unclear whether they had
attorneys.
It wasn't clear how they
know the victims.
Federal charges
could also be added, Lt.
Raymond Evers told The
Philadelphia Inquirer.


"We're going to find
every crime possible in the
crime code to put on these
individuals," Evers said.
The 29-year-old woman
and the men, who are
31, 35, and 41, have the
mental capacity of 10-year-
olds, police said. They
were taken to a hospital
for treatment and listed
in stable condition. Little
said the victims, whose
names were not released,
appeared to have no physi-
cal problems other than
malnourishment
Little said that getting
information from the vic-
tims had been difficult
due to their disability, but
they apparently had been
brought to Philadelphia
about-10 days before they
were found. They had
apparently been in West
Palm Beach, Fla., and
before that in Texas, she
said.
"It's heartbreaking that
people can do such horrify-
ing things to other people,"
she said.


The Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Announces a
Public Meeting
To discuss a Basin Management Action Plan for improving and protecting
water quality in the Santa Fe River.

October 25, 2011
7.;OOPM
Ft. White Public Library
17700 SW State Road 47, Ft. White FL

BMAP developed by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection
with Input from local citizens, agencies, and organizations.
For more information contact:
Terry Hansen PG, FDEP, 2600 Blair Stone Rd., MS 3565, Tallahassee, FL 32399-
2400; terry.hansen@dep.state.fl.us; or (850)245-8561.



The Columbia County School District
is teaching the
scientific theory of evolution
in its new science standards. This teaching is
a fallacy contrary to the Word of God, The Holy
Bible. Therefore, using the Holy Bible I challenge
the Columbia County School District and all of its
teachers to a public debate in Lake City, Florida.
Genesis chapter 1 to Revelation 22.
Kenny Merriken 386-344-7339
kbmerriken@hotmail.com
In The Year of our Lord 2011
Paid for by Kenny Merriken


ASSOCIATED PRESJ
Clemson University doctoral student Nick Seiter shows a sweep net filled with "kudzu bugs"
caught in a test plot in Blackville, S.C. Seiter is studying the invasive Asian bug, which is


wreaking havoc on soybean cro
erally draining the life out
of the soybeans.
"Its reducing the abil-
ity of the plant to produce
or to send photosynthate
... the food that the plant
makes from the sun, to
the fruit, to the seed," says
Greene. "So we're going to
have ... a reduced number
of pods per plant, reduced
number of seed per pqd,
and reduced seed size as
well all the above," he
says. "It's not showy in
terms of the damage that it
does to the plant ... but it's


going to cause yield loss."
University of Georgia
researchers have recorded
losses as high as 23 per-
cent in untreated fields.
"If you add up all
our insect damage put
together of different pests
on soybeans, it probably
would total maybe in an
average year maybe a 5
percent yield loss," says
North Carolina State
University pest specialist
Jack Bacheler, who has
been warily watching the
bug's spread through his


state. "And sometimes,
with agricultural crops like
soybeans, 20 bushels an
acre at $10 to $13 could
be the difference between
profit and loss."
One thing that concerns
Bacheler and others is the
bug's hardiness.
Jenkins says they may ,
be able to respond to :I,
temperature and other
environmental changes by
turning a gene or genes oh
or off, making them par-
ticularly adaptable.


Federal officials break up

Jacksonville pill mill


JACKSONVILLE Federal authorities
are arresting a group of Jacksonville doc-
tors and other people charged in a federal
indictment with running a multimillion-
dollar pill mill operation that led to at least
one death.
A three-count, grand jury indictment
accused 13 people of scheming to profit
off patients. The indictment alleges the
13 sold painkiller prescriptions from
December 2009 until late July 2010. The


buyers of highly addictive oxycodonie
and Xanax came primarily from Ohio,
Kentucky and Tennessee. Many returned
home to sell the drugs at a profit for
themselves.
Doctors sometimes earned as much as
$12,000 a week, records show.
The federal indictment followed a near-
ly two-year investigation by the DEA, FBI
and Jacksonville police that has already v
led to charges against others.


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.4


S II 90 West (next to 84 Lamber J Lake City 386 -


i


Page Editor: Laura Hampson, 754-0427











Lake City Reporter


Story ideas?


Contact
Tim Kirby
Sports Editor
754-0421 '
tkirby@lakeatyreporter.com


SPORTS


Tuesday, October 18, 201 I


www.lakecityreporter.com


Section B


BRIEFS

WORLD SERIES
Cardinals get
to open at home
ST. LOUIS That
chant of "Happy Flight!
Happy Flight!" has been
exceptionally joyful
lately -forthe Set Louis

They celebrated in
Philadelphia after JASON M
knocking off the favored JASON MA
Phillies in the National Alabama linebackers Dont'a Hightow
League division series, Nico Johnson (right) converge on FIc
then hushed a packed Jordan Reed (11) during a game at E
crowd in Milwaukee and in Gainesville on Oct. 1.
sprayed champagne in
the visitor's clubhouse
after winning the .4
franchise's 18th pennant.
The clinching
victory over the Brewers
on Sunday was the LSU, Alabama a li]
15th consecutive time ranked 1-2 in first mat
the Cardinals had won o i the
before heading for the poll Of SeaSOn. T'
airport. They open the and
World Series Wednesday By RALPH D. RUSSO State
against the AL champion Associated Press to p
Texas Rangers. 12 s
The Cardinals have the LSU, Alabama, Oklahoma rival
home-field advantage, and Oklahoma State hold Still'
thanks to Prince Fielder's the top four spots in the Tl
three-run homer in the first BCS standings, setting top
National League's up two potentially huge con- BCS
All-Star victory. ference games that could cam
determine which teams was
AUTO RACING play for the national title. (Nel
Southeastern Conference ,and
IndyCar driver rivals first-place LSU and Tec
Wheldon killed second-place Alabama meet Ti
Nov. 5 in Tuscaloosa, Ala. corn
LAS VEGAS Dan The Tigers play defend- Harr
Wheldon, who moved to ing national champion tion
the United States from Auburn at home on ings
his native England with Saturday and the Crimson -Bo
hopes of winning the Tide is at Tennessee. If they the
Indianapolis 500 and. .. can- get through that, both
wenton to.twice prevail, will be off for a week before
at his sport's most famed
race, died Sunday after a
massive, fiery wreck at
the Las Vegas Indy 300.
Wheldon was 33.
Wheldon started last
in the 34-car field and U
was up to 24th quickly,
but still well behind the
first wave of cars that got
into trouble on the
fateful lap. He had no
way to avoid the wrecks
in front of him. There
was no time to brake or
steer out of trouble. His
car sailed into the fence
extending high over the
track barrier, and about
two hours later, his death
was announced.
"The biggest thing for
me is the Indianapolis
500," Wheldon said in
2005, after becoming the
first Englishman since
Graham Hill in 1966 to Columbia High's girls golf team place
win the race. "It would on Monday. The Lady Tigers advance
be really difficult to leave
this series 'because of
that race, .

* Assacl.eld Press




,. day .
* tort,'White Hi ., '
volley atf v, Columbila : "
High, 6 p.m.(JV-5) Lady igers move their

SColumbia High ,
bowling vs. Fort White COme in mith. the
High, Suwannee High at D
Lake City Bowl, 4 p.m. By TIM KIRBY rebc
Fort White High tkirby@lakecityreporter.com nine
volleyball at Union County A
High, 4 p.m. Columbia High's golf with
Thursday teams teed it up in their Bro
Fort White High District 2-2A tournaments Gilli
volleyball at Oak Hall on Monday, with mixed "T'
School, 6 p.m. (JV-5) results. tough
Columbia High JV The LadyTigers placed in said
football at North Marion the top three in the tourna- fast.
High, 7 p.m. ment at Haile Plantation in front
Friday Gainesville and will advance mad
Columbia High to region competition, have
football vs. Middleburg Columbia's boys placed men
High, 7:30 p.m. fifth and did not qualify as our
Fort White High a team, nor did any indi- off."
football at Fernandina vidual, in the tournament CI
Beach High, 7:30 p.m. at Killearn Estates in boys
Saturday Tallahassee. Buc


Host Columbia High, Buchholz High ran away out t
Fort White High cross in the girls match with 318. fied
country in Alligator Lake Chiles High placed second M
XC Invitational, 9 a.m. with 387, and Columbia was Colt


BOWL CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES


IATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Ner (left) and
)rida tight end
3en Hill Griffin Stadium




sBCS


kely No. 1 vs. No. 2
chup that could decide
SEC West.
hird-place Oklahoma
fourth-place Oklahoma
e have to wait longer
play their potential Big
howdown. The Bedlam
dry is set for Dec. 3 at
water, Okla.
'he only other time the
four teams in the first
standings of the season
e from two conferences
2000, when the Big 12
braska and Oklahoma)
the Big East (Virginia
h and Miami) did it.
he BCS standings
abine the coaches' poll,
ris poll and a compila-
of six computer rank-

oise State was fifth in
first BCS standings, in
BSo .t," d 2B9


Rk
I. LSU I
2.Alabama 2
3. Okla. 3
4. Ok. St. 6
5. Boise St. 5
6.Wisc. 4
7. Clemson 8
8. Stanford 7
9.Arkansas 10
10. Oregon 9
1 1. Kan. St. 12
12.Va.Tech 16
13. Nebr. I 1
14. S. Car. 13
15.WestVa. 14
16. Mich.St. 15
17.TexA&M 19
18. Michigan 17
19. Houston 22
20.Auburn 21
21.Penn St 24
22. Ga.Tech 18
23. Illinois 20
24.Texas 28
25.Wash. 25

1. LSU
2.Alabama
3. Oklahoma
4. Oklahoma St.
5. Boise St.
6.Wisconsin
7. Clemson
8. Stanford
9.Arkansas
I0. Oregon
I 1. Kansas St.
12.Virginia Tech
13. Nebraska
14. South Carolina
15.West Virginia
16. Michigan St.
17.Texas A&M
18. Michigan
19. Houston
20.Auburn
21.Penn St.
22. Georgia Tech
23. Illinois
24.Texas
25.Washington


Harris
Pts
2819
2744
2684
2315
2339
2463
2063
2291
1805
1955
1457
1259
1484
1396
1359
1290
779
914
562
565
293
839
571
77
240


Pct
0.9805
0.9544
0.9336
0.8052
0.8136
0.8567
0.7176
0.7969
0.6278
0.6800
0.5068
0.4379
0.5162
0.4856
0.4727
0.4487
0.2710
0.3179
0.1955
0.1965
0.1019
0.2918
0.1986
0.0268
0.0835


AH
3
2
4
I
"6
10
5
8
is
16
S7
12
17
9
23
25
18
14
I I
19
20
24
22
13
0


USA Today
Pts
1410
1403
1426
1173
1172
1262
1028
1222
931
1028
678
688
775
765
688
690
415
458
359
202
253
396
260
26
174

CM
4
3
2
I
5
14
6

17
16
7
9
15
13
20
23
22
10
12
25
I I
24
18
19
0


Pct
0.9559
0.9512
0.9668
0.7953
0.7946
0.8556
0.6969
0.8285
0.6312
0.6969
0.4597
0.4664
0.5254
0.5186
0.4664
0.4678
0.2814
0.3105
0.2434
0.1369
0.1715
0.2685
0.1763
0.0176
0.1180


Computer


Rk
3
2
4
I
6
II
5
t8
t8
12
7
10
15
13
21
24
18
20
t16
14
t16
27
t22
19
25

JS
2

5
4
8
6
3
15
7
II
9
14
12
20
19
0
16
0
18
10
13
0
' 0
17
21


Pct
.920
.950
.890 ,
.970
.800
.600
.860
.620
.620
.480
.740
.610
.450
.470
.180
.070
.370
.270
.420
.460
.420
.030
.080
.360
.060


Avg
0.9522
0.9519
0.9301
0.8568
0.8027
0.7708
0.7582
0.7484
0.6263
0.6190
0.5688
0.5048
0.4972
0.4914
0.3730
0.3288
0.3074
0.2995
0.2863
0.2645
0.2311
0.1968
0.1516
0.1348
0.0871


Explanation Key
The BCS Average is calculated by averaging the percent totals of the Harris Interactive, USA Today Coaches and Computer polls.
Team percentages are derived by dividing a team's actual voting points by a maximum 2875 possible points in the Harris Interactive
Poll and 1475 possible points in the USA Today Coaches Poll.
Six computer rankings are used to determine the overall computer component.The highest and lowest ranking for each team is
dropped, and the remaining four are added and divided to produce a Computer Rankings Percentage.The six computer ranking pro-
viders are Anderson & Hester, Richard Billingsley, Colley Matrix, Kenneth Massey, Jeff Sagarin and Peter Wolfe. Each coriputer ranking


eu nt onrin u on U L accounts for schedule strength in its formula.



Fort White to face


stumbling Pirates


Reporter file photo
?d third,in the District 2-2A tournament at Haile Plantation
ed to region play at Eglin Air Force Base Golf Course.




results for




bia golf


d at 397.
eon, Lincoln and Mosley
schools also were in
field.
arian Ste-Marie
)unded from a front
43 to shoot 78.
shley Mixon shot 101,
Shelby Camp at 108,
oke Russell at 110 and
an Norris at 113.
The course was set up
gh," coach Todd Carter
. "The green speed was
and the girls had to play
n the silver tees, which
e the course longer. We
seen a lot of improve-
at during the year. All
hard work is paying

hiles shot 299 to win the
s match. Leon (304) and
hholz (310) rounded
he top three, and quali-
for region.
4osley shot 316 and
umbia shot 317.


Gainesville High (323) was
sixth and Lincoln (329) was
seventh.
Dean Soucinek led CHS
with a 78, but missed the
,individual playoff by one
shot.
Nick Jones and Dalton
Mauldin shot 79, while
Dillan VanVleck shot 81
and Tim Bagley shot 94.
"The 317 is not a bad
score, but it is a very com-
petitive district," coach
Steve Smithy said. "We
beat our best 18-hole score
this year and I'm proud we
played our best at district. I
feel like, and I think all the
players would say the same
thing, this team could have
shot better. I was a little dis-
appointed nobody qualified
for region.
"We have everybody
coming back, but to be
competitive in this district
we have got to get better."


Indians' next two
opponents have
three wins total.

By TIM KIRBY
tkirby@lakecityreporter.com

FORT WHITE Fort
White High football steps.
up in class the next two
weeks, but the opposition
is on the decline.
The Indians improved to
4-2 with a 35-20 home win
over Williston High.
Fort White travels to
Fernandina Beach High for
a 7:30 p.m. game Friday.
Fernandina Beach (3-4,
0-1 in District 2-4A) lost
27-14 at Matanzas High
last week. It was the sec-
ond straight loss for the
Pirates.
Rickards High, Fort
White's homecoming foe
on Oct. 28, lost to FAMU
High 21-7 on Saturday. The
winless Raiders (0-6, 0-1 in
District 2-5A) play host to
Godby High this week in a
district game.
Trinity Catholic High,
which will host Fort White
for the District 3-3A game
on Nov. 4, was shut out by
home team Vanguard High
21-0 last week. The Celtics
play Glades Day School in


Belle Glade on Friday.
Santa Fe High (6-0, 2-0
in District 5-5A) had an
open date to prepare for
a district showdown at
North. Marion High on
Friday. Santa Fe will visit
Fort White on Nov. 11.
Williston (3-3). plays at
Chiefland High this week.
Union County High (6-0,
2-0 in District 7-1A) scored
more than 50 points for the
second week in a row. The
Tigers blasted P.K Yonge
56-7 in Gainesville.
Wakulla High (4-2, 1-0 in
District 2-5A) was off last
week and hosts Suwannee
-High on Friday in a district
game.
Taylor County High (4-2,
1-0 in District 1-4A) won at
Jefferson County High last
week, 37-27. The Bulldogs
host East Gadsden High in
a district game on Friday.
Newberry (2-5, 1-0 in
District 7-1A) lost last week
to visiting Hawthorne
High, 33-27. The Panthers
play a district game at Dixie
County High on Friday.
Hamilton County High
(1-5, 0-1 in District 5-1A)
posted its first win last
week, beating Crescent
High 50-26 at home. The
Trojans host Branford
High in district on Friday.


JASON MATTHEW WALKER/Lake City Reporter
Fort White High's Soron Williams (21) smashes through the
Williston High defense to score a touchdown Friday.


".-. I - ---------- I-











LAKE CITY REPORTER SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011


TELEVISION

TV sports

Today
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
8 p.m.
ESPN2 FIU at Arkansas St.
GOLF
4 p.m.
TNT PGA of America, Grand Slam
of Golf. first round, at Southampton,
Bermuda
NHL
7:30 p.m.
VERSUS Pittsburgh at Minnesota
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Inter Milan at Ulle *
8 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League,
Otelul Galati vs. Manchester United, at
Bucharest, Romania (same-day tape)


BASEBALL

MLB playoffs

LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
American League
Texas 3, Detroit 2
Texas 7, Detroit 3, I1 innings '
Detroit S,Texas 2
Texas 7, Detroit 3,11 innings
Detroit 7,Texas 5
Saturday
Texas IS, Detroit 5,Texas wins series
4-2
National League
Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 6
St. Louis 12, Milwaukee 3
St. Louis 4, Milwaukee 3
Milwaukee 4, St. Louis 2
St. Louis 7, Milwaukee I
Sunday
St. Louis 12, Milwaukee 6, St. Louis
wins series 4-2
WORLD SERIES
Wednesday
Texas (Wilson 16-7) at St. Louis
(Carpenter II-9),TBA
Thursday
Texas (Lewis 14-10) at St. Louis,TBA
Saturday, Oct. 22
St. Louis at Texas (Holland 16-5),TBA
Sunday, Oct. 23
St. Louis at Texas (Harrison 14-9),TBA


FOOTBALL

NFL standings

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA


New England
Buffalo
N.Y.Jets
Miami


Tennessee
Houston
Jacksonville
Indianapolis


Baltimore
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Cleveland


San Diego
Oakland
Kansas City
Denver


5 I 0.833185 135
4 2, 0.667188 147
S2 3 0.400121 125
0 4 0.000 69 104
South
W L T Pct PF PA
3 2 0.600105 94
3 3 0.500141 124
I 5 0.167 72 132
0 6' 0.000104 163
North
W L T Pct PF PA
4 I 0.800148 71
4 2 0.667137111
4 2 0.667119102
2 3 0.40091 117
West
W L T Pct PF PA
4 I 0.800120 109
4 2 0.667160 150
2 3 0.40077 150
I 4 0.200105 140


NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Giants 4 2 0.667154 147
Washington 3 2 0.600 96 83
Dallas 2 3 0.400115 121
Philadelphia 2 4 0.333145 145
South'
W L T Pct PF PA
TampaBay 4 2 0.667113 145
New Orleans 4 2 0.667177 151
Atlanta 3 3 0.500135 147
Carolina I 5 0.167133 163
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 6 0 01.000197114
Detroit 5 I 0.833178114
Chicago 3 3 0.500146 132
Minnesota I 5 0.167121 145
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Francisco 5 I- 0.833167 97
Seattle 2 3 0.400 94 122
Arizona I 4 0.200 96 121
St.Louis 0 5 0.00049 137
Sunday's Games
Green Bay 24, St. Louis 3
Pittsburgh 17,Jacksonville 13
Philadelphia 20,Washington 13
San Francisco 25, Detroit 19
Atlanta 31, Carolina 17
Cincinnati 27, Indianapolis 17
N.Y. Giants 27, Buffalo 24
Oakland 24, Cleveland 17
Baltimore 29, Houston 14
New England 20, Dallas 16
Tampa Bay 26. New Orleans 20
Chicago 39, Minnesota 10
Monday's Game
Miami at N.Y.Jets (n)
Open: Arizona, Denver, Kansas City,
San Diego, Seattle,Tennessee
Sunday, Oct. 23
Houston at Tennessee, I p.m.
Washington at Carolina, I p.m.
San Diego at N.Y.Jets, I p.m.
Seattle at Cleveland, I p.m.
Denver at Miami, I p.m.
Atlanta at Detroit, I p.m.
Chicago vs. Tampa Bay at London,
I p.m.
Kansas City at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Arizona, 4:05 p.m.
St. Louis at Dallas, 4:15 p.m.
Green Bay at Minnesbta, 4:15 p.m.
Indianapolis at New Orleans, 8:20 p.m.
Monday, Oct.24
Baltimore at Jacksonville, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, N.Y. Giants,
New England, Philadelphia, San Francisco

College schedule

Today
FIU (4-2) at Arkansas St. (4-2),
8 p.m.
Thursday
Bethune-Cookman at Norfolk
St., 7:30 p.m.


UCF at UAB, 8 p.m.
UCLA atArizona, 9 p.m.
Friday
West Virginia at Syracuse, 8 p.m.
Rutgers at Louisville, 8 p.m.


AUTO RACING

Bank of America 500

At Charlotte Motor Speedway
Concord, N.C.
Saturday
(Start position in parentheses)
I. (2) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 334 laps, 136
rating, 47 points, $284,436.
2. (25) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 334, 108.4,
44, $234,766.
3. (3) Carl Edwards, Ford, 334, 118.4,
42, $188,091.
4. (8) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 334, 98.7.
40,$149,633.
5. (12) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 334,
106.7,39, $151,466.
6. (14) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 334,
90.3,38, $156,186.
7. (4) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 334,
100.3, 37, $132,686.
8. (I) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 334,
121.2,37, $160,608.
9. (17) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 334,
91.1,35,$129,100.
10. (6) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 334,
96.5,35, $123,300.
I I. (I I) David Ragan, Ford, 334, 105.8,
34, $90,225.
12. (16) Joey Logano, Toyota, 334, 78,
32, $87,300.
13. (20) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 334, 83.3,
31,$119,625.
14. (32) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet,
334,68.9,31,$112,633.
15. (5) Greg Biffle, Ford, 334, 112.7,
30, $96,125.
16. (26) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 333,
64.6,28, $97,908.
17. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 333,
77.5,27, $81,350.
18. (28) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 333,
62.7,26, $81,100.
19. (15) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
333, 75.3, 25, $79,600.
20. (31) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 333,
58.7,24, $98,414. *
21. (23) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 333,
68.2,23,$108,211.
22. (38) J.J. Yeley, Ford, 333, 52, 23,
$87,683.
23. (18) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 332,
74.8,21, $78,900.
24. (19) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 332,
53.4,20,$1 10,558.
25. (21) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 332,
61,19, $95,720.
26. (29) David Reutimann,Toyota, 332,
65.6, 18, $96,983.
27. (27) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet,
332,59.9, 17, $104,889.
28. (30) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 332,
52.3,0, $81,208.
29. (22) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 331,
48.1, I15, $94,670.
30. (42) Mike Bliss, Ford, 331, 37.7, 0,
$78,647.
3 I. (10) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 329, 83.2,
0, $65,200.
32. (24) Casey Mears, Toyota, engine,
323,46.5, 12, $64,675.
33.(41) Hermie Sadler, Ford,322,34.4,
0, $73,500.
34. (9) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet,
accident, 316,86.8, I I,$ 118,761.
35.(35) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, engine,
292,37.4.9, $64,275.
36. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 289,37.5,
8, $64,100.
37. (13) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 287,
57.6,7, $71,975.
38. (43) Robby Gordon, Dodge,
vibration, 33,31.8,6, $63,850.
39. (37) Michael McDowell, Toyota,
suspension, 30, 33.4, 5, $63,725.
40. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford,
overheating, 27, 33,0, $63,600.
41. (36) David Stremme, Chevrolet,
overheating, 22,30.5,3, $63,450.
42. (40) Andy Lally, Ford, brakes, 20,


28.6,0, $64,825.
43. (39) Joe Nemechek, Toyota,
vibration, 11 28.1,0, $63,713.
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner:
146.194 mph.
Time of Race: 3 hours, 25 minutes,
37 seconds.
Margin ofVictory: 0.968 seconds.
Caution Flags: 8 for 34 laps.
Lead Changes: 16 among 10 drivers.
Top 12 in Points: I. C.Edwards. 2,203;
2. K.Harvick. 2,198; 3. M.Kenseth. 2,196; 4.
Ky.Busch, 2,185; 5.T.Stewart, 2,179; 6. Bra.
Keselowski, 2,178; 7. Ku.Busch, 2,176; 8.
J.Johnson, 2,168; 9. D.Earnhardt Jr., 2,143;
10. R.Newman, 2,142; II J.Gordon, 2,137;
12. D.Hamlin, 2,117.

IndyCar 2011 winners


March 27 Honda Grand Prix of St.
Petersburg (Dario Franchitti)
April 10 Honda Indy Grand Prix of
Alabama (Will Power)
April 17 -Toyota Grand Prix of Long
Beach (Mike Conway)
May I Itaipava Sao Paulo Indy 300
(Will Power)
May 29 Indianapolis 500 (Dan
Wheldon)
June II Firestone Twin 275 Race 2
(Will Power)
June II Firestone Twin 275 Race I
(Dario Franchitti)
June 19 -The Milwaukee 225 (Dario
Franchitti)
June 25 Iowa Corn Indy 250
(Marco Andretti)
July 10- Honda Indy Toronto (Dario
Franchitti)
July 24 Edmonton Indy (Will
Power)
Aug. 7 Honda Indy 200 (Scott
Dixon)
Aug. 14 MoveThatBlock.com Indy
225 (Ryan Hunter-Reay)
Aug.28 Indy Grand Prix of Sonoma
(Will Power)
Sep. 4 Baltimore Grand Prix (Will
Power) 1*
Sep. 18 Indy Japan 300 (Scott
Dixon)
Oct. 2 Kentucky Indy 300 (Ed
Carpenter)
Oct. 16 ItOD IndyCar World
Championships, Las Vegas, ccd.
Points leaders final
1. Dario Franchitti, 573.
2.Will Power, 555.
3. Scott Dixon, 518.
4. Oriol Servia, 425.
5.TonyKanaan, 366.
6. Ryan Briscoe, 364.
7. Ryan Hunter-Reay, 347.
8. Marco Andretti, 337.
9. Graham Rahal, 320.
10. Danica Patrick, 314.
I I. Hello Castroneves, 312.
12.James Hinchcliffe, 302.
13.Takuma Sato. 297.
14.J.R. Hildebrand, 296.
15.Alex Tagliani, 296.


HOCKEY

NHL schedule

Sunday's Game
St. Louis atAnaheim, 8 p.m.
Monday's Games
Colorado at Toronto (n)
Florida at Tampa Bay (n)
Pittsburgh at Winnipeg (n)
Nashville at Edmonton (n)
Anaheim at San Jose (n) ,
Today's Games
Carolina at Boston, 7 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m.
Edmonton at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Chicago at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
St. Louis at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.


4-WHEEL AULM


Air Force at Boi


ROUNTREE MOORE (g~ J;X431 WUU
CHEROET I AILCINSA (367.


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek


Unscramble these four Jumbles,,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

I ERICI


I I I THE PROGRAM ABOUT


BEKAMR BAALL. WAS A --
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
-- -- suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: = I , f

(Answers tomorrow)
Yesterday's Jumbles: IMPEL DAZED SHRILL FACTOR
Answer: Winners at the Arctic Olympics won -
COLD MEDALS


COLLEGE POLLS


AP Top 25

The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through
Oct. 15, total points based on 25 points
for a first-place vote through one point
for a 25th-place vote, and previous


ranking:
R
I.LSU (41)
2. Alabama (I I)
3. Oklahoma (6)
4.Wisconsin
5. Boise St (I)
6. Oklahoma St.
7. Stanford
8. Clemson
9. Oregon
I 0.Arkansas
Ii.WestVirginia ,
12. Kansas St.
13. Nebraska
14. South Carolina
15. Michigan St.
16.Virginia Tech
17.TexasA&M
18. Michigan
19.Auburn
20. Georgia Tech
21. Houston
22.Washington
23. Illinois
24.Arizona St.
24. Georgia


record
7-0.
7-0
6-0
6-0
6-0
6-0
6-0
7-0
5-1
5-1
5-1
6-0
5-1
6-1
5-1
6-1
4-2
6-1
5-2
6-1
6-0
5-1
6-1
5-2
5-2


PCs Pv
1,452 I
1,411 2
1,372 3
1,252 4
1,218 5
1,186 6
1,164 7
1,064 8
1.020 9
946 10
778 13
762 17
748 14
690 15
610 23
597 19
467 21
442 II
374 24
284 12
238 25
'221 NR
207 16
144 18
144 NR


Others receiving votes: Penn St. 130,
Notre Dame 107, Southern Cal 87, Baylor
19,SMU 19,Texas 12.Cincinnati4,Southern
Miss 4,Wake Forest 3, Rutgers 2.

Top 25 results

No. I LSU (7-0) beat Tennessee 38-7.
Next vs. No. 24 Auburn, Saturday.
No. 2 Alabama (7-0) beat Mississippi
52-7. Next vs.Tennessee, Saturday.
No. 3 Oklahoma (6-0) beat Kansas
47-17. Next: vs.Texas Tech, Saturday.
No. 4 Wisconsin (6-0) beat Indiana
59-7. Next at No. 23 Michigan State,
Saturday.
No. 5 Boise State (6-0) beat Colorado
State 63-13. Next: vs.Air Force, Saturday.
No. 6 Oklahoma State (6-0) beat
No. 22 Texas 38-26. Next: at Missouri,
Saturday..
No. 7 Stanford (6-0) beat Washington
State 44-14. Next: vs. Washington,
Saturday.
No. 8 Clemson (7-0) beat Maryland
56-45. Next vs. North Carolina, Saturday.
No. 9 Oregon (5-1) beat No. 18
Arizona State 41-27. Next at Colorado,
Saturday.
No. 10 Arkansas (5-1) did not play.
Next at Mississippi, Saturday.
No. II Michigan (&-I1) lost to No. 23
Michigan State 28-14. Next: vs. Purdue,
Saturday, Oct. 29.
No. 12 Georgia Tech (6-1) lost to
Virginia 24-21. Next at Miami, Saturday.
No. 13 WestVirginia (5-1) did not play.
Next at Syracuse, Friday.
No. 14 Nebraska (5-1) did not play.


I


Record
1. Oklahoma (31) 6-0
2. LSU (15) 7-0
3.Alabama (12) 7-0
4.Wisconsin (I) 6-0
5. Stanford 6-0
6. Oklahoma State 6-0
7. Boise State 6-0
8. Clemson 7-0
8. Oregon 5-1
10.Arkansas 5-1
11. Nebraska 5-1
12. South Carolina 6-1
13. Michigan State 5-I
14.WestVirginia 5-1
14.Virginia Tech 6-1
16. Kansas State 6-0
17. Michigan 6-I
18.Texas A&M 4-2
19. Georgia Tech 6-1
20. Houston 6-0
21. Illinois 6-1
22. Penn State 6-1
23.Auburn 5-2
24.Washington 5-1I
25.Arizona State 5-2


Pts Pvs
1,426 I
1,410 2
1,403 3
1,262 4
1,222 5
1,173 7
1,172 6
1,028 8
1,028 9
931 II
775 14
765 13
690 19
688 16
688 17
678 18
458 10
415 23
396 12
359 22
260 15
253 25
202 NR
174 NR
86 20


Others 'receiving votes: Georgia 60;
Notre Dame 36; Rutgers 3i; Southern
Methodist 27; Texas 26; Cincinnati 14;
Southern Mississippi 14; Baylor 9; North
Carolina 9;Temple 3;Virginia 3;TCU I.

Harris Top 25

The Top 25 teams in the Harris
Interactive College Football Poll, with


Next: at Minnesota, Saturday.
No. 15 South Carolina (6-1) beat
Mississippi State 14-12.Next:atTennessee.
Saturday, Oct. 29.
No. 16 Illinois (6-1) lost to Ohio State
17-7. Next: at Purdue, Saturday.
No. 17 Kansas State (6-0) beat Texas
Tech 41-34. Next at Kansas, Saturday.
No. 18 Arizona State (5-2) lost to
No. 9 pregon 41-27. Next: vs. Colorado,
Saturday, Oct. 29.
No. 19 Virginia Tech (6-1) beat Wake
Forest 38-17. Next: vs. Boston College,
Saturday.
No. 20 Baylor (4-2) lost to
No. 21 Texas A&M 55-28. Next: at No. 6
Oklahoma State, Sat4rday. Oct. 29.
No. 21 Texas A&M (4-2) beat
No. 20 Baylor 55-28. Next: at Iowa State,
Saturday.
No. 22 Texas (4-2) lost to No. 6
Oklahoma State 38-26. Next vs. Kansas,
Saturday, Oct. 29.
No. 23 Michigan State (5-1) beat
No. II Michigan 2q--14. Next: vs. No 4
Wisconsin, Saturday.
No. 24Auburn (5-2) beat Florida 17-6.
Next: at No. I LSU Saturday.
No. 25 Houston (6-0) did not play.
Next vs. Marshall, Saturday.

USA Today Top 25

The USA TodayTop 25 football coaches
poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Oct. 15, total points
based on 25 points for first place through
one point for 25th, and previous ranking:


Georgia
Florida
Vanderbilt
Tennessee
Kentuck);

Alabama
LSU
Auburn
Arkansas
Mississippi
Mississippi St.


4
2
0
0
0
West
4
4
3

0


146 108
108 129
61 95
42' 91
20 137


0 4 62 98


BCS: Two matchups among top 4


Continued From Page 13

good position to at least
earn a spot in the five most
lucrative bowl games, if
not the BCS champion-
ship game on Jan. 9 in New
Orleans.
Wisconsin was sixth,
followed by fellow unde-
feated teams Clemson and


ACROSS
1 Joke
4 Afternoon
social
7 NOt sunnv


side up
11 Actress -
MENT Hartman
12 Brat in
"Blondie"
14 Han Solo's
love
15 Peak
17 "Jurassic
Park" co-star
NtAT 18 Wild West bar
19 Sloshed
21 Gary's st.
nMdt 22 Foul up
ca& 23 Portals
h 26 West Coast
port
se Sate 29 Whodunit
name
E 30 Hebrew
letters
31 Choose
33 Tiny


Stanford. The dther two
undefeated major college
team are Kansas State in
11th place and Houston in
19th.
With half the season to
play, there is still plenty of
opportunities to shake up
the standings, but for now


34 Cross the
creek
35 Loose
garment
36 Prized
statuettes
38 Have a hunch
39 Joule fraction
40 degree
41 Fill with fizz
44 An outer
Planet
48 Lesage hero
Gil -
49 Return
(2 wds.)
51 Biology topic
52 Gush forth
53 Percent
ending
54 Diner sign
.55 Hwys.
56 Mandate

DOWN
1 Cat burglar's
quest
2 Dwarf buffalo


the focus will be on the
SEC and the Big 12.
Seven times in the
13-year history of the Bowl
Championship Series, the
teams that played in the
national championship
game were in the top four
of the first standings.


Answer to Previous Puzzle


BA Y AME _SSE
EX EC ROTE AlL
ALATI ICEBE
NERVES PINA
IVE VEE
TRUCE FEWEST
OURS WORE HEM
ENG PIXY DINE
EERILY HONDA
HEE RAM
KUDU OLIVES
ALUMINUM NEAP
RNS RIME NOISE
OAK ALPO LED


3 France, long
ago
4 Wyoming
range
5 Spiral-horned
antelope
6 Yvette's date


Want more puzzles?
Check out the "Just Right Crossword Puzzles" books
at QuillDriverBooks.com


10-18


7 Seasoned vet
(2 wds.)
8 Pre's No. 2
9 Blarney Stone
site
10 Writer Ayn -
13 Off base,
maybe
(2 wds.)
16 Bete -
20 Circle parts
23 Flower droplet
24 Chocolate
cookie
25 Bullring yells
26 Youngsters
27 Gaze dreamily
28 Police alerts
30 Rifle range
needs
32 Pipe joint
34 Skin growth
35 Fixed-up
building
37 Halts
38 Scatters
40 Microwaved
41 Fully qualified
42 Charles Lamb
43 Ride the
rapids
45 Picture holder
46 NCAA Bruins
47 Distort data
50 Spring mo.


2011 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SCOREBOARD


Page Editor: Tim Kirby, 754-0421


first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Oct. 15. total points based on 25
points for a first-place vote through one
point for a 25th-place vote and previous
ranking:
Record Pts Pv
I. LSU (74) 7-0 2,819 I
2.Alabama (25) 7-0 2,744 2
3. Oklahoma (13) 6-0 2,684 3
4.Wisconsin (I) 6-0 2,463 4
5. Boise State (1) 6-0 2.339 5
6. Oklahoma State 6-0 2,315 6
7. Stanford (I) 6-0 2.291 7
8. Clemson 7-0 2.063 8
9. Oregon 5-1 1,955 9
10.Arkansas 5-1 1.805 II
II. Nebraska 5-1 1,484 13
12. Kansas State 6-0 1,457 17
13. South Carolina 6-1 1,396 15
14.WestVirginia 5-1 1,359 16
15. Michigan State 5-1 1,290 22
16.Virginia Tech 6-1 1,259 18
17. Michigan 6-1 914 10
18. GeorgiaTech 6-1 839 12
19.TexasA&M 4-2 779 23
20. Illinois 6-1 571 14
21.Auburn- 5-2 565 NR
22. Houston 6-0 562 24
23.Arizona State 5-2 346 19
24. Penn State 6-1 293 NR
25.Washington 5-1 240 NR
Other teams receiving votes: Notre
Dame 124; Georgia 105;Texas 77;SMU 59;
Baylor 56; Rutgers 35; Cincinnati 25; Ohio
State 14; TCU I I;Virginia 11; Louisiana-
Lafayette 6; Texas Tech 6; Southern Miss
5; Florida State 3; South Florida 3;
Missouri 2; North Carolina I.

ACC standings

Atlantic Division
W L PF PA
Clemson .4 0 150 92
Wake Forest 3 I 113 114
Florida St. I 2 101 86
Maryland I 2 93 101
NC State 0 2 62 79
Boston College 0 3 52 83
Coastal Division
GeorgiaTech 3 I 122 103.
Virginia Tech 2 I 79 75
Virginia I I 41 49
Duke I I 36 60
North Carolina I 2 80 82
Miami I 2 89 94

SEC standings

SEast
W L PF PA
South Carolina 4 I 147 76











LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVERTISEMENT TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011 3B


SHIRLEY MIKELL
MIKELL'S POWER EQUIPMENT
LSU
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON
OREGON
ARKANSAS
GEORGIA TECH
FLORIDA STATE
VIRGINIA
BOISE STATE
63-15


CHRIS POTTLE JOHN BURNS JOHN KASAK
FURNITURE SHOWPLACE STATE FARM STATE FARM
LSU LSU
ALABAMA ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON CLEMSON
OREGON OREGON
ARKANSAS ARKANSAS
GEORGIA TECH GEORGIA TECH
FLORIDA STATE FLORIDA STATE
VIRGINIA VIRGINIA
BOISE STATE BOISE STATE
60-18 65-13


JASON FLOYD
FIRST COAST HOMES
LSU
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON
OREGON
ARKANSAS
GEORGIA TECH
FLORIDA STATE
'IVIRGINIA
BOISE STATE
64-14


BAKER'S COMMUNICATION

LSU
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON
OREGON
ARKANSAS'
GEORGIA TECH
FLORIDA STATE
NORTH CAROLINA STATE
BOISE STATE
62-16


AW ANU JAMES KREN IIAW
PHISH HEADS


LSU
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON
OREGON
ARKANSAS
GEORGIA TECH
FLORIDA STATE
VIRGINIA
BOISE STATE
66-12


DKUE 1UKAWUT
DRAWDY INSURANCE
LSU
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON
OREGON
ARKANSAS
GEORGIA TECH
FLORIDA STATE
NORTH CAROLINA STATE
BOISE STATE
64-14


lHRISb SAMSU UN
CMS PRO-STAFFING
LSU
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON'
OREGON
ARKANSAS
GEORGIA TECH
FLORIDA STATE
NORTH CAROLINA STATE
BOISE STATE
,' 61-17


1/1,IE11: KU5DUKI
ROUNTREE MOORE CHEVY
LSU
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
MISSOURI
CLEMSON
OREGON
OLE MISS
MIAMI (FL)
FLORIDA STATE
VIRGINIA
BOISE STATE
62-16


BKTYAN BLAIR
ROUNTREE MOORE CHEVY
LSU
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON
OREGON
ARKANSAS
GEORGIA TECH
MARYLAND
VIRGINIA
BOISE STATE
58-20


GARY WILSON AND ERIC WILSON
WILSON OUTFITTERS
LSU ,
ALABAMA
OKLAHOMA
OKLAHOMA STATE
CLEMSON
OREGON
ARKANSAS
GEORGIA TECH
MARYLAND
NORTH CAROLINA STATE
BOISE STATE
61-17


ICI


U
~I


DEADLINE


Every Thursday, 5:00 pm
TIE BREAKER: (SCORES)
CHS vs Middleburg __


CONTEST RULES
On Tuesday selected games will be sponsored in each of the ads of the participating ADDRESS
merchants. Indicate which team you think will win by writing the team name beside the
sponsoring merchant's name in the entry blank. Entries may be mailed or dropped off at ,
the Lake City Reporter at 180 E. Duval St., Lake City, FL 32055 or fax to 386-752-9400. PHONE
Entries must be received by 5:00pm on Thursday following the contest. Prize will be
awarded weekly on the basis of most games selected correctly. In case of a tie, the
winner will be determined by the most accurate guess on the Tie-Breaker (score AGE
required). You must be 18 years of age to enter; one entry per person. Participating
sponsors and their families, employees of the Lake City Reporter and their families are
not eligible to enter.


Phish Heads


Baker's Communication


Mikell's


State Farm Insurance


Drawdy Insurance


Rountree Moore


Rountree Moore


First Coast Homes


WHson's Outfitters


Furniture Showplace


CMS Pro Staffing


This week's reader winner: Jerry Starling


I


' LUm


r^\










Page Editor: Emogene Graham, 754-0415 LAKE CITY REPORTER ADVICE & COMICS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011 4B


DILBERT
OUR COMPETITOR IS | THEY'RE TRYING
SUING US IN AN TO BLOCK US FROM
ELBONIAN COURT FOR 4 MANUFACTURING
SOtME SORT OF DESIGN ANYTHING SHAPED
TRADEMARK VIOLATION. 8 LIKE A RECTANGLE.


BABY BLUES


BLONDIE


BEETLE BAILEY


HAGARTHE HORRIBLE


SNUFFY SMITH


ZITS


GARFIELD


B.C.


FRANK & ERNEST


TOPAY: r
A4IWG '/
YOUR MOWEY .
60 FURTHER O



FOR BETTER ORWORSE


TUTORIAL..
ON E

PAP6Rg
AIgPLAN,5. -

, ^ __


DEAR ABBY


Friend who threatens suicide

has tragic example in her past


WHAT
DESIGN ONL
SHAPES AS
ARE "IPR
AVAIL- M
ABLE? A



T


4LY ONE,
SUMING
,REGULAR
OLE" IS
SHAPE.


DEAR ABBY: I have
a dear friend, "Angie,"
who lost her father to
suicide several years ago.
Whenever life throws
her a curveball, she talks
about "ending it all." This
bothers me tremendously
because I went through
the heartache and distress
with her when her father
took his life.
Angie has a loving
family mother, sister,
beautiful children and a
boyfriend. I, on the other
hand, am completely alone,
yet I muddle along with-
out threatening suicide at
every bump in life.
How can I get my friend
to stop and realize how
lucky she? NOT GIVING
UP IN LAS VEGAS
DEAR NOT GIVING
UP: You can't, although
I'm sure you have tried.
You have inner resources
that it appears Angie does
not. However, if a friend of
mine whose relative had
committed suicide told
me repeatedly that she
was considering doing the
same, I would report it to
her family and urge them
to see that she got profes-
sional help. That's what
you should do, in case
depression and suicidal
impulses run in her,family,
as is sometimes the case.

DEAR ABBY: I appreci-
ate frugality, especially now


ARIES (March 21-April
19): Trouble is brewing -
at home and with family.
Listen to what's being said.
A valid point can make a
difference to the outcome
of an important decision
you have to make. Don't
let someone from your,
-past confuse yoti about
your future. **
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Associate with people
who share your interests
and you will form a work-
able partnership that can
lead to greater financial
opportunity and incentives.
A personal service you-
offer someone will lead
to a better relationship.

GEMINI (May 21-June
20): Listen carefully and
learn. Let your findings
help you develop an idea
that is marketable or can
improve your chances
of getting a better job.
Something or someone
from your past will help
you make the right choice
now. ***
CANCER June 21-July
22): You'll have trouble
containing your emotions.
Let your feelings be known
and don't hesitate to make
a move romantically that
can change your life. Don't
wait to see what others do.
Taking action will dem-
onstrate that you mean
business. Favors will be
granted. ***
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):


THE LAST WORD
Eugenia Last

Let others make mistakes.
Its not up to you to cover
for everyone else. Focus on_
having some fun and alter-
ing your life to suit your
needs. Personal changes
will pay off and bring you
greater opportunity to con-
centrate on what's impor-
tant to you. ***
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22): You will have the
opportunity to break new
ground if you discuss
your intentions'and share
future plans with someone.
Financial assistance is
attainable for something,
you want to do, if you
are willing to share the
returns. ****
LIBRA (Sept 23-Oct
22): Don't let depression
set in when its vital to keep
moving. Stop worrying and
start doing. You cannot
change the past, but you
can alter the future. Avoid
people who bully in order to
advance. Use intelligence,
know-how and discipline to
prosper. **
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Make your move. Stop
fixing and fussing and start
showing off what you've
accomplished. Don't fear
failure or success. What
counts is that you try and
keep trying. There is a
shift taking place in the
way you think. Make it
work for you. *****


SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec. 21): What you do
for others' benefit will pay
off. Social networking will
open a door to new con-
tractual opportunities. A
group you join will adopt
one of your creative ideas.
Do what works for you
and others will follow your
lead. ***
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19):- A partnership will
influence the outcome of a
professional deal you are
working towards. Don't let
someone's negativity rain
on your parade. Love is in
the stars, and a romantic
evening to celebrate your
gains should be on your
agenda. ***
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 18): Put money into
something that shows
growth potential. Spending
on friends, travel or items.
that promise the impossi-
ble will lead to disappoint-
ment. Take direction from
someone experienced who
also has a vested interest
in your success. ***
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): You've got what it
takes to achieve profes-
sionally and financially.
Contracts and legal mat-
ters will turn out in your
favor. Romance is looking
good, and sharing your
success will enhance your
relationship. Someone
from your past will play
an important role in your
future. *****


CELEBRITY CIPHER

by Luis Campos
Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present.
Each letter in the cipher stands for another.
TODAY Y'S CLUE: Z equals A
"XU B IJ DH SJXHE, B IJ'DH VIE
RXWXVM. BIJ'WH MIE El G H VIXAB ZVC
Y I R I D U J R ZVC RXW H R B."
- L HR GD I IT A

Previous Solution: "Laughter is the corrective force which prevents us from
becoming cranks." Henri Bergson
2011 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 10-18'


CLASSIC PEANUTS
/IMAAPfiOeT ,
FOR PPR LO4NJ L
PAPER, UNO. t


Abigail Van Buren
www.dearobbycom
that we all have to watch
our spending. However,
my neighbor is incredibly
frugal. She often asks if she
can "borrow" something
instead of buying whatever,
it is she needs.
Her latest request was
for socks yes, socks! -
- for her daughter's dance
recital. I put socks in the
same category as-under-
wear, something a little
too personal to be lending
out Before that, it was leg-
gings, a CD the list goes
on and on. She always
returns the items, but
enough is enough!
Please share your
thoughts. WHAT NEXT?
DEAR WHAT NEXT?: If'
your neighbor isn't working
because she chooses not
to, then say no. If she's not
working because she hasn't
been able to find a job a
circumstance in which mil-
lions of people in this coun-
fry find themselves then
treat her as you would want
to be treated if you were in
her shoes.
** ** **M
DEAR ABBY: My father,


HOROSCOPES


I


who is happily married
to his third wife, recently
came across some pho-
tos of his first wedding
to my mother in 1961.
Apparently, the walk down
memory lane didn't stop
there for him. He asked
his wife, who evidently
agreed, if he could have a
party to celebrate the 50th
anniversary of this event
I am appalled and
kind of nauseated by the
thought. Should I just suck
it up, or tell my father I
think the idea is narcis-
sistic, insensitive and
foolish? SICK TO MY
STOMACH
DEAR SICK TO MY
STOMACH: Why your
father would consider
throwing a golden anni-
versary party to celebrate
a marriage that turned to
lead and "sank" is mystify-
ing. Equally so is his cur-
rent wife's willingness to
go along with it.
While you and I might
consider his idea to be
ill-conceived, resist the
urge to indulge in name-
calling. Let him hear from
others that the idea is
narcissistic, insensitive and
foolish. And, by the way,
you are not obligated to
accept every invitation you
, receive.
Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los
Angeles, CA 90069.










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011

Lake City Reporter




CLASSIFIED


Take ADvantage of the
Reporter Classifieds!

755-5440


- ADvantage -


[sonal Me


Limited to service type advertis-
ing only.
4 lines, one month....$92.00
$10.80 each additional line
Includes an additional $2.00 per
ad for each Wednesday insertion.



You can call us at 755-5440,
Monday through Friday from 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Some people prefer to place their
classified ads in person, and some "
ad categories will require prepay-
ment. Our office is located at 180
kast Duval Street.'
You can also fax or email your ad
copy to the Reporter.
FAX: 386-752-9400 Please
direct your copy to the Classified
Department.
EMAIL: classifieds@lakecityre-
porter.com





Ad IsAt al lx FEmaWl by:
Tuesday Mon.,i10 a.m. Mu.,9:00 a.
Wednesday Mon 10t0 am. Mou., a0 am.
Thursday Wed.,1000 am. Wed., 0 a.m.
Friday ThuI s 00am. Thuu,, 0 aam.
Saturday Fi., 100. ant Fi.t, 90 am.
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These deadlines are subject to change without notice.




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on the first day of publication.
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only the charge for the ad space
In error. Please call 755-5440
Immediately for prompt correc-
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Cancellations- Normal advertising
deadlines apply for cancellation.
BillIng Inquiries- Call 755-5440.
Should further information be
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ferred to the accounting depart-
ment.


Advertising copy is subject to
approval by the Publisher who
reserves the right to edit, reject,
or classify all advertisements under
appropriate headings. Copy should
be checked for errors by the
advertiser on the first day of pub-
IIcation. Credit for published errors
will be allowed for the first insertion
for that portion of the advertisement
which was incorrect. Further, the
Publisher shall not be liable for any
omission of advertisements ordered
to be published, nor for any general,
special or consequential damages.
-Advertising language must comply
with Federal, State or local laws
regarding the prohibition of discrimi-
nation in employment, housing and
public accommodations. Standard
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not be abbreviated.

In Print and Online
www.lakeeityreporter.com


Legal

AMENDED NOTICE OF INTENT
TO ADOPT ORDINANCE TO
WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
The Board of County Commissioners
of Columbia County, Florida will at
its regular meeting on Thursday, No-
vember 3, 2011, in the Columbia
County School Board
Administration Building, 372 West
Duval Street, Lake City, Florida at
3:00 p.m. consider the adoption of an
ordinance entitled:
AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO
BOATING RESTRICTED AREAS;
PROVIDING FOR A PURPOSE;
PROVIDING DEFINITIONS; ES-
TABLISHING BOATING RE-
STRICTED AREAS, PENALTIES
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.
The substance of the above-named
ordinance is as provided in its name.
Copies of the proposed'ordinance are
available for inspection at the office
of the County Manager located in the
County Administration Complex,
135 NE Hemando Avenue, Lake
City, Florida, between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Any interested party
may appear and be heard at this pub-
lic hearing.
In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the Board of
County Commissioners with respect
to any matter relating to the consid-
eration of the ordinance at the above-
referenced public hearing, a record
of the proceeding may be needed and
in such event, such person may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which re-
cord includes the testimony and evi-
dence on which the appeal is to be
based.
In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act, a person heed-
ing special accommodations or an in-
terpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact Lisa Roberts
.386/752-1006 or T.D.' Services
386/758-2139, at least seven (7) days
prior to the date of the hearing.
DATED this 7th day of October,
2011.
Is/P. DeWitt Cason by P.A. Perry
P. DEWITT CASON
Clerk qf Court
05528440
October 11, 18, 2011


IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT
OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
COLUMBIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 12-2Q10-CA-000046
Division
FIRST FEbERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
KATRYNA J. LUMBERT AND
UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given to Final Judg-,
merit of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on October 11,
2011, in the Circuit Court of Colum-
bia County, Florida, I will sell the
property situated in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida described as:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHEAST
1/4;, SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 4
SOUTH, RANGE 17 EAST AND
AND RUN THENCE NORTH 0
DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST,
613.38 FEET; RUN THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MI-
NUTES WEST, 280.00 FEET; RUN
THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 40
MINUTES WEST, 150.00 FEET TO
THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
SAID LOT; CONTINUE NORTH 0
DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST,
125.00 FEET; RUN THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MI-
NUTES WEST 105.00 FEET; RUN
THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 40
MINUTES EAST, 125.00 FEET;
RUN THENCE SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 22 MINUTES EAST,
105.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, COLUMBIA COUN-
TY, FLORIDA, A/K/A LOT 2,
BLOCK C, AZALEA PARK SUB-
DIVISION.
and commonly known as: 266 SW
DAHLIA LN, LAKE CITY, FL
32025; including he building, appur-
tenances, and fixtures located there-
in, at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on No-
vember 16, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this llth day of October,
2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05528536
October 18, 25, 2011


Lawn & Landscape Service

J&M LAWN Service & more for
all your outdoor needs. Don't
waste your time or weekend,
Free Estimate. 386-984-2187


Services

DIVORCE, BANKRUPTCY,
RESUMES.
Other court approved forms-
386-961-5896.


HAULING. Rental clean out,
garage clean out. Cut up and
remove brush. FREE Estimates!!
386-497-3099


Legal

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR COLUM-
BIA COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No.: 12-2010-CA-000743
Division
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS
BANK OF FLORIDA
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHRISTIAN GONZALEZ-ORTIZ,
DORIS A. GONZALEZ AND UN-
KNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given to Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on October 5,
2011, in the Circuit Court of Colum-
bia County, Florida, I will sell the
property situated in Columbia Coun-
ty, Florida described as:
LOT 22, OF MAY-FAIR UNIT
TWO, A SUBDIVISION ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF ,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6,
PAGE 95-95A, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF COLUMBIA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
and commonly known as: 277 SW
COURTESY WAY, 'LAKE CITY,
FL 32024; including he building, ap-
purtenances, and fixtures located
therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, AT THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COLUM-
BIA COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
145 N. HERNANDO STREET,
LAKE CITY, FLORIDA, on No-'
vember 16, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated this 5th day of October, 2011.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:/s/ B. Scippio
Deputy Clerk
05528500
October 18, 25, 2011


100. Job
100 Opportunities

05528560
Full time Housekeeper/Laundry/
Maintenance person needed.
Experience preferred.
Apply in person at North Florida
Surgery Center
256 SW Professional Glen
Lake City, Fl. 32025
386-758-8937
or Fax 386-755-2169

AVON?! Only $10 to start!
Earn bonus $ up to $150+
1-800-275-9945 pin #4206
www.youravon.com/tdavies
Cloth Cutter: Person to cut cloth '
from patterns in small
sewing company.
Call Hafners 386-755-6481


Due to increased sales volume at
Burkins Chevrolet of Macclenny,
we are currently seeking 2
professional sales consultants.
Experience is a plus, as well as
GM training. We have an
excellent working environment
with opportunity to grow in our
organization. Please contact Bob
Burkins at Burkins Chevrblet in
person Monday through Friday.
Experienced Real estate closer/
Title agent needed for local office:
Send reply to Box 05078, C/O The
Lake City Reporter, P.O. Box
1709, Lake City, FL, 32056
NEED CNC Machinist
Must have Metal Working
Machine Shop exp. Send resume,
Quality Mill, 3631 US Hwy. 90
East, Lake City, FL 32055.
Resolutions Health Alliance has
an immediate opening for a PT
Office Clerk in Lake City.
Must be: timely, proficient in
Microsoft Word, Excel and
Outlook, organized, detail
oriented, data entry, filing,
excellent phone skills, and
customer oriented. Salary is $8.00
an hour. Email resume to:
employment@rhapa.net or
fax (386)754-9017 or website:
www.rhapa.com
Sales Help at Florida Visitors
Center. Benefits, hourly wage
plus commission. Excellent
opportunity with National
company. Call Ed. 904-540-2314

120 Medical
1 Employment

05528030
LEARN TO DRAW BLOOD
Local Phlebotomy Course
offered in Lake City, FLA
Certificate program.
(904)566-1328

RN's needed, Med Surg/Psych
Exp. to work in local hospitals.
Immediate work, instant pay,
$300 sign-on bonus.
Call 352-336-0964.
www.suwanneemedical.com

240 Schools &
2 Education

05528364
Interested in a Medical Career?
Express Training offers
courses for beginners & exp
Nursing Assistant, $479
next class- 10/24/10
Phlebotomy national certifica-
tion, $800 next class- 11/28/11
Continuing education
Fees incl. books, supplies, exam.
fees. Call 386-755-4401 or
expresstrainingservices.com


REPORTER Classifieds

In Print and On Line
www.lakecityreporter.com


310 Pets & Supplies
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
Florida Law 828.29 requires dogs
and cats being sold to be at least 8
weeks old and have a health
certificate from a licensed
veterinarian documenting they
have mandatory shots and are
free from intestinal and external
parasites. Many species of wild-
life must be licensed by Florida
Fish and Wildlife. If you are
unsure, contact the local
office for information.

402 Appliances
FROST FREE refrigerator.
Whirlpool Very clean. Works
good. White, $160.
386-292-3927
HEAVY DUTY Whirlpool
dryer, great working condition.
Less than 2 yrs. old. $175.
386-755-9239
Lg capacity White Whirlpool
Washer. Works great.
$165.
386-292-3927

407 Computers
DELL Computer,
$100.00
386-755-9984 or
386-292-2170

408 Furniture
Oak table w/leaf &
2 upholstered chairs.
$50..
386-755-9239
WOODEN
ROCKER/GLIDER
chair $25.
386-755-9239


415 Photo
4 Equipment
KODAK/SLIDE PROJECTOR.
Kodak 650h carousel slide
projector plus 41 carousel trays.
$200. obo 386-755-5988

419 TV-Radio &
1 Recording
.15" LCD TV
# $75.00 .
386-984-7510

20" SONY
Triniton TV.
$80.00
386-984-7510

420 Wanted to Buy


FL/GA License plates before
1958. $1000- Columbia Co. tags
1911-1917 gobucsl3(aaol.com
Top dollar pd. Jeff (727)424-1576
SK&H TIMBER
We Buy Pine Hardwood &
Cypress. Large or small tracts.
Call 386-961-1961.
Wanted Junk Cars, Trucks, Vans.
$275 & up CASH! Free Pick Up!
NO tide needed !386-878-9260
After 5pmr 386- 752-3648.


430 Garage Sales
PUBLISHER'S NOTE
All Yard Sale Ads
Must be Pre-Paid.


440 Miscellaneous
22,000 BTU Window AC
WORKS GREAT
$150.
386-292-3927


BRINKS FIREPROOF
small safe $40.
386-755-9239

LARGE CAT
carrier $20.
386-755-9239

Set of Michelin used tires.
225X50X17
$100.
386-292-3927
WALKER
w/basket seat and hand breaks
$40. 386-755-9239


450 Good Things
The Nut Cracker, Robert Taylor
Buy, sell, crack & shell pecans
2738 CR 252 W, Lake City 32024
Pinemount Rd/CR 252 Taylorville
386-963-4138 or 961-1420

460 Firewood
Firewood for Sale. $65. per Truck
Load. Rick 386-867-1039 or Joey
965-0288 if no answer pls leave
message we will call you back.

520 Boats for Sale -
07 SeaFox 17 ft. Center console.
Aprox. 40 hrs. Mecury 90HP. New
551b trolling motor. Alum trailer.
Pay off $13,000. 386-758-7766

630 Mobile Homes
P63 for Rent
14 Wide, 3/2-$525, 2/2-$475.
Clean, Quiet Country Park
Water, septic, garbage incl. NO.
PETS! 386-758-2280 References.


Mobile Homes
630 for Rent
lbedrm/lbth $350 mo.,Also, Resi-
dential RV lots. Between Lake
City & G'ville. Access to I-75 &
441 (352)317-1326 Call for terms.
2&3 BR MH. $395 $650. mo.
plus deposit. Water & sewer fur-
nished. Cannon Creek MHP
386-752-6422
2/2 Units.
October Special
$525. mo. Includes water.
386-984-8448
2BR/1BA CH/A includes
water, sewer, garbage.
$495. mo + $495 dep.
386-961-8466
3br/2.5ba S of Lake City,
(Branford area) $550 mo plus sec
386-590-0642 or 386-867-1833
www.suwanneevalleyproperties.com
3br/2ba moble home, in town,
private lot, front & rear porch,
storage shed $650/mo + security.
386-466-2266 or 752-5911'
Mobile Homes for rent in
White Springs, Lake City & Ft.
White. Contact 386-623-3404
or 386-397-2779
Nice clean 2 & 3br. in 5 Points
area, 3/br Westside & 3/br
Ft. White 1st mo. rent +dep.
No Pets. 386-961-1482

640 Mobile Homes
640 for Sale'
Just Reduced! Clean inside & out.
Updated kit cabinets & counters.
Owner Finance offered $99,000,
MLS75853. Robin Williams.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
It's Here. Jacobson Homes
"Sub Zero" Top Quality Home
with lots of tape and texture and
a dream kitchen and more.
North Point Homes, Gainesville
(352)872-5566
Jacobson Homes Factory Outlet
Try us in Gainesville. Best Prices
and Financing in Florida. North
Pointe Homes (352)872-5566
Remax Professionals. Well main-
tained home, great open floor plan.
Spacious bedrooms. MLS 78757
$49,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
3br/2ba on 1.77 ac. midway
between Lake City & Live Oak.
Don or Sherry Ratliff
365-8414 MLS# 78737,$59,900
3br/2ba, well maintained DWMH
on 4.85 ac. Fence, pasture, fruit
trees. MLS#72427, $64,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Very nice 3/2 DW "Model Home"
cond. Split floor plan, Ig master,
1 ac nicely landscaped $84,900
MLS#77988, Nancy Rogers
867-1271 R.E.O. Realty Group


NEW 2012 Town Homes
28X44 3/2 Only $37,900, 32X80
4/2 Just $69,900. Both include
Deliyery and set, AC, Skirting and
steps. No Games!
North Pointe Homes, Gainesville,
Fl. (352)872-5566
Palm Harbor Homes
Has 3 Modular Homes
Available at HUGE Savings.
Over 40K Off
800-622-2832


MOVE-IN READY! Country liv-
ing at it's best. Sbr/2ba in pristine
condition on'1.39 acres $89,900
MLS#78345 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110

650A Mobile Home
650 & Land
Outside of'Fanning Springs. River-
walk is a gated community adja-
cent to Nature Coast Greenway.
$23,900 MLS 73574 Brittany Re-'
sults Realty 386-397-3473


Affordable 4/3, Ig 2,280 sqft in
nice S/D on 2 ac. New homeowner
will have fishing rights to Timber-
lake $59,900 MLS 74862 Brittany'
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunting Tract. 40 ac. w/power
pole, water & septic. W/nice
camper. Owner finance offered
$84,000, MLS75532. Jay Sears.
867-1613 Hallmark Real Estate
4/2 on 10 ac. in Bell. 2,268 heated
sqft. in a country setting. 10x20
frame shed. Bring offers!
$89,000 MLS 76582 Brittany
Results Realty,386-397-3473
3/2 1,008 SQFT. Cute affordable,
clean MH in Three Rivers Estates.
River access with $100 Fee annu-
ally $27,000 MLS 78725 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Excellent homesite in a homes
only S/D. Just 10 min. from Live
Oak & 20 min. from I ake City
$23.999 MLS 78764 Brittany
Results Realty 386-397-3473-


650 Mobile Home
650 &Land
3/2 DWMH on .91 ac. Three Riv- *
ers Estates. Well maintained home
that shows pride in ownership '
$130,000 MLS 78905 Brittiny
Results Realty 386-397-3473
Hunter's Dream. near the National
Forest. 3/2 DW w/5 ac. Near
Olustee. Sold "as is". $48,800,
MLS79011. Ginger Parker.
365,-2135 Hallmark Real Estate

710 Unfurnished Apt.
710 For Rent

05527705
SPRING HILL VILLAGE
,Excellent High Springs location.
1, 2 & 3 bedroom floor-plans;
some with garages. i
Call 386-454-1469
or visit our website:
www.springhillvillage.net







2BR/IBA. Close to town.
$565.mo plus deposit.
Includes water & sewer.
386-965-2922
2BR/2BA w/garage
5 minutes from VA hospital.
Call for details.
386-365-5150
,Amberwood Hills Apts.
Private Patio area. Beautiful yard.
Washer/dryer hkup. Free water &
sewer. 1/1, 2/4. Move in special.
386-754-1800. wwwmyflapts.com
Columbia Arms Apt. located 1/
mi from V.A. & Winn Dixie. Pet
Friendly. Move in Special $199.
Pool, laundry & balcony.
386-754-1800. www.myflapts.com
Duplex w/garage spacious, 2/1,
1300 sq ft, W/D hook up, CH/A, -
$650 month & bckgmd chk,
386-697-3248 or 352-377-7652
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/ lba duplex. No pets
Non-smoking environment
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Fall Special! 1/2 Price First
Month. Updated Apt, w/tile
floors/fresh paint. Great area.
From $395.+sec. 386-752-9626
GreentreeTownhouse
Summer special. 2/1, 2/1..5. Free
water & sewer. Balcony>& patio.
Laundry. Behind Kens 6n1~.y 90.
386-754-1800 wwwmvflab'.com
Large 2 br Apt In town-
$500. mo $500 dep .
386-344-2972

Redwine Apartments. Move in
special $199. Limited time. Pets
welcome, with 5 complexes,
we have a home for you.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
The Lakes Apts. Studios & lBr's
from $135/wk. Util. & cable incl.,
Sec 8 vouchers accepted, monthly
rates avail Call 386-752-2741
Wayne Manor Apts.
Move in $199. Summer special.
2/1, washer/dryer. Behind Kens off
Hw'y 90. 386-754-1800
www.myflapts.com
Windsor Arms Apartments.
Summer special $199. Move in!
2/1, 2/1.5, 2/2. Pet Friendy. Free
200 ch. Dish. Washer/dryer hkup.
386-754-1800. www.mvflapts.com
X-CLEAN 1700 sf SECOND
story 2/2, deck, quiet private
acre 8 mi nw of VA. No dogs.
$600 mo + dep 386-961-9181

720 Furnished Apts.
I For Rent
Rooms for Rent. Hillcrest, Sands,
Columbia. All furnished. Electric,
cable, fridge, rhicrowave. Weekly ,
or monthly rates. 1 person $135,
2 persons $150. weekly
386-752-5808

730 Unfurnished
7 Home For Rent
2br/lba Huge living area. W/D in-
cluded. New carpet, nice area.
Convenient: VA, DOT, schools.&
shopping. $750.mo. 386-344-0565.
3BR/1.5 BA Large lot. Very.clean
with storage shed. Quiet area.
$850 mo. + $850. dep.
386-752-7578
3br/lba brick home in Lake City
Available 10/22..
$650 mo. + $450 dep.
Call 561-723-4306 or 4302
3BR/2BA HOME. Private
wooded lot. Rent $695. mo + sec.
dep. $450. Application required.
Call 386-935-1482


Experienced Salesperson

TOP BREED

Great Benefits Package

401k

Paid Vacation
Please call
Jay or MikeIt-

755-6500 U 0 N DA










Classified Department: 755-5440


LAKE CITY REPORTER CLASSIFIED TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2011


730, Unfurnished
SHome For Rent
3BR/2BA NEW construction
Lease option. I st. last plus $200
sec.S900. mo. South of town.
Credit ref's req'd. 386-755-9476
4hr/2ba CHA Brick. 1200 sqft
lac.. Close to FGCC. CR 245A.
Ceramic tile/carpet. $700 mo $800
dep (904)708-8478 App. req'd
4BR/3.5BA Executive Home on
41 ac farm. Horses ok.
Old brick & heart pine floors,
jet tub, DSL. Beautiful!
For right person $1650/mo.
negotiable 386-209-4610
Brick 3br/2ba Large yard, garage,
CH/A. 179 SW Stanley Ct. Lake
City. $900. mo + $850 dep.
Call 386-365-8543
Nice in town 2br/lba C+I/A
$700. mo. $700 deposit.
386-758-3922 or
386-344-5065
Prime location 2br/l ba.
Resid'l or comm'l. Comer of Baya
& McFarlane. $600. mo. $500 sec.
386-752-9144 or 755-2235
Rent with option to purchase.
3/2 Brick Home. Private on 1.5 ac.
386-752-5035x3112
7 Days 7-7 A Bar Sales, Inc.

750 Business &
Office Rentals
05528S66
OFFICE SPACE for Lease
576 sq' $450/mth
900 sq' $600/mth
3568 sq' $2973/mth
8300 sq' $5533/mth
also Bank Building
Excellent Locations
Tom Eagle, GRI
(386) 961-1086 DCA Realtor

FOR LEASE: Downtown office
space. Convenient to
Court house.
Call 386-755-3456
For Lease: E Baya Ave. Two -
1000 sqft office space units or
combined for 2000 sqft. 386-984-
0622 or weekends 386-497-4762
1525 S. Ohio Ave, Live Oak, FL
Flexible space for lease. Great
location. 1,500 17,000sf. Scott
Stewart 867-3498 MLS# 77247
Westfield Realty Group

780 Condos for Sale
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Country Club. All remodeled.
2br/2ba Condo. Tennis court &
pool privileges. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77219 $129,900

805 Lots for Sale
BEAUTIFUL 5 acres in
Lake City, 100% owner financing,
no qualifying, $395 per month.
Please call 512-663-0065
Bring the Horses. 4br/2ba. Plenty
of room on 5 ac lot. Master suite
w/garden tub.$109,500 MLS
78982 Roger Lovelady
386-365-7039 Westfield Realty
PUBLISHER'S NOTE'
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the fair
housing act which makes it illegal
to advertise "any preference,
limitation, or discrimination based
on race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or nation-
al origin; or any intention to make
such preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial status
includes children under the age of
18 living with parents or legal
, custodians, pregnant women and
people securing custody of chil-
dren under the age of 18. This
newspaper will not knowingly
accept any advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby in-
formed that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper are availa-
ble on an equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimination call
HUD toll free at 1-800-669-9777,
the toll free
telephone number to the hearing
impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

810 Home for Sale
2BR/IBA mfg home on 4 acres in
Oakwood Acres; owner financing
available $44,900 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78838
3/2 built in 2010, split floor plan,
Master bath w/large tub
on 2 acres MLS#78520
'$109,900, 386-243-8227
R.E.O. Realty Group
LAKE CITY 2006 Brick home
with shop, 3 BR/2 BA, 1,700 sq.
ft., double lot fenced, $199,900
or best offer. Call 417-396-2134.


810 Home for Sale
3800 sf two story. 5 br 3b, metal
roof, two kitchens, quiet nice
country acre 8 mi. NW of VA.
$159,000 firm cash only
386.961.9181
3br/2ba on Alligator Lake.
Fireplace, cathedral ceilings. 2 car
garage. Tennis court in back.
$156,900 Lisa Waltrip 365-5900
Westfield Realty Group
CUTE 3BR/I.5BA recently reno-
vated; 1,455 SqFt with city utilities
ONLY $75,000 DANIEL
CRAPPS AGENCY, INC.
386-755-5110 #78971
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba I car garage Priced
@ $72,900
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
Eastside Village 55+ Retirement
2br/2ba 1 car garage priced @
$75,000
Eastside Village Realty, Inc.
Call Denise Bose @ 752-5290
IN-GROUND POOL! Remodeled
3 or 4 BR w/hardwd floors, new
carpet & vinyl in 2011 $79,500
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #79233
LOCATION! CONDITION!
PRICE! 3BR/2BA w/open floor
plan; freshly painted $96,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 755-5110 #78278
Own a piece of history. Folk Vic-
torian in Wellborn. Includes triple-
wide MH. Total of 9 br's & 3ba.
Patti Taylor @ Access Realty
MLS # 71594 $155,900 623-6896
Great 3/2 home w/2346 sq ft
under roof on .67 ac., Creekside
S/D. Big back yard w/plenty of
shade trees. On a cul-de-sac,
MLS # 77385 $164,900 623-6896
Remax Professionals. Beautiful
Log cabin on 5 manicured acres.
Wrap around porch. MLS 75550
$199,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Attention Pilots! 3br/lba. high
ceilings, brick fireplace. Old Flori-
da living. MLS 77756
$349,900 Josh Grecian. 386-466-
2517 Westfield Realty Group
Motivated Seller. County area,
paved rd. 3br/2ba home. New AC
& upgraded wdows. MLS 78027
$79,500. Brodie Allred. 623-0906
Westfield Realty Group
Home for entertaining 3/2 plus
pool house w/half bath, 2.25
fenced ac. Freshly painted. Split
plan, Large rear deck MLS 78103
$179,900 386-623-6896
Remax Professionals. New home
with large pond. Well maintained
w/open floor plan. MLS 78957
$139,000 Missy Zecher 386-623-
0237 www.missyzecher.com
Lake front 3/2 custom Western Ce-
dar. Lots of storage space. Private
dock $220,000. MLS# 74681
Jo Lytte-Remax 386-365-2821,
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Custom built brick home on 5+ ac.
5br/4ba. 3 car garage In ground
pool. Lori Giebeig Simpson
365-5678 MLS# 75854 $569,900
3br/2ba. 2706sf. Island kL. Corian
countertops. Det garage, Koi pond,
green house & more MLS# 76255 .
$247,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Wonderful Neighborhood. 2 story
in town. 3br/2.5ba. Beautiful wood
burning fireplace. MLS# 77050
$114,900 Carrie Cason 386-623-
2806 Westfield Realty Group
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D Over-
sized garage. 3/2 split floor plan.
Storage shed. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77708 $169,900
Coldwell Banker/Bishopl Realty
Brick home in town on lake front.
3br/2ba. New royf & hardwoods.
Glass room w/view Elaine Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 78092 $249,900
3br/2ba. Split plan, recessed
lighting, wood/lam/carpet/tile.
Appliances included. MLS# 78143
$160,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
4br/2.5ba Awesome deal in Russ-
wood on 1.46 ac. SS appliances,
granite countertops & more. MLS#
79188 $269,000 Pam Beauchamp
Remax Professionals 758-8900
Short Sale. Attention Golfers!
3br/2.5ba. Fairway Villas in Quail
Heights. MLS#69928, $79,900
Jo Lytte, Remax 386-365-2821
jolytte@remaxnfl.com
Well maintained home in adult
community. Spacious floor plan,
all season porch, carport. $67,900
MLS#76136 Charlie Sparks 755-
0808 Westfield Realty Group


Larsd Lake
4-. ~ 227 Bellflower Drive
Model Hours:
COrial HOpen Dad-12-.5pm
Coral \ I Sat-. 10-4 Sun: t-4pm
by Arthur Rutenberg Call Bryan eer
rnui Zchr H Iome, Inc....in Independent iranchis e (38 752 653
o f ^rinr RtLcnbcrg Homes, n ic. cnsc #CBCI257343 1


810 Home for Sale
Southern Oaks CC. Custom built
block & stucco. 3br/2ba open floor
plan. MLS#76395 $109.900
Mike Lienemann 386-867-9053
Westfield Realty Group
Lofty home on Itchetucknee River,
Wrap around covered decks on
two levels.MustSEE! $375,000
MLS#77006 Jo Lytte
Remax 386-365-2821
Just reduced 4/2 on 10.5 acres.
Up to date kitchen, Ig detached
garage/workshop. MLS#77410.
$178,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Great home, Great neighborhood,
3/2 located in town A Must See!.
MLS#77411, $79,900.
Nancy Rogers 386-867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
4/2, immaculate, new carpet/fix-
tures. Lg kitchen, FI room, shed,
fence. 2 car garage, MLS#77602,
$159,200, Nancy Rogers 867-1271
R.E.O. Realty Group
3/2 w/i car garage, detach carport
Lifetime metal roof. MLS#77780
$96,000, Call Jo Lytte -
Remax386-365-2821
www.jolytte.florida-property-search.com
Amazing 4/3 Ranch style over
2000 sqft. & 56.28 rolling acres.
Too many extras. MLS#78420.
$500,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Lake City Country Club. 4/3
beautiful interior renovation, huge
kitchen. MLS#78637 $179,900
Nancy Rogers
R.E.O. Realty Group 867-1271
JUST LISTED, Beautiful 5 acres
w/3/2 DWMH & 2/1 SWMH.
Close to town. MLS#79010
$69,000 REO Realty Group
Heather Craig. 386-466-9223
Like New. 4/3 in Calloway w/new
carpet& laminate, fresh paint &
mother-in-law suite. $159,000,
MLS78238. Teresa Spradley.
365-8343 Hallmark Real Estate
Brick Ranch 3/2 FI room. Side en-
try garage & workshop. 2 sheds.
New AC appl & roof. MLS78442
$109,900. Millard Gillen 365-7001
Westfield Realty Group
Investment Property! 3/2 home w/
updated kitchen, sun room. Wel
kept'3/2 DW on 2 ac. $69,900,
MLS79144. Ginger Parker.
365-2135 Hallmark Real Estate
3/2.5 DW w/extra Ig kitchen .
Wired 24x36 workshop, steel roof,
pole barn. Owner Finance offered
$139,900, MLS79187. Janet Creel.
719-0382 Hallmark Real Estate
PRICE SLASHED TO $95,000!
Well-maintained 3BR/2BA home
in Gwen Lake area on comer lot
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #77307-
PRICED TO SELL! 3BR/2BA
w/2,012 SqFt w/liAing rm &
family rm $39,000
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110 #78680
READY TO MOVE IN!
Living rm, dining rm, family rm,
lots of space ONLY $45,000
MLS 75210 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Remodeled home or office in city
limits. Separate bldg, possible
mother-in-law suite. $79,500
MLS#77724 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
3 or 4 br/2ba. Remodeled w/fresh
carpet paint, countertops & AC.
Fenced back yard. $79,900
MLS#78340 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110
Drastically Reduced, nice 3br/2ba
home on comer lot. Fenced back
yard in Gwen Lake area!
MLS#77307 DANIEL CRAPPS
AGENCY, INC. 386-755-5110


"1D -0-y








Bring the picture in or
we will take it for you!
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days
with a description and photo In the
newspaper and online E-edition.
* Ad runs 10 consecutive days as a
classified line ad online.
* You must include vehicle price.
* All ads are prepaid.
* Private party only.


...... -- ..
2006EF250
Ford Van
3/4 ton, metal work
shelves/ladder rack,
60K miles, exc, cond,
$10,500
Call
386-555-5555
If you don't sell your vehicle
during the first 10 days, you
can run the same vehicle ad
for 10 additional days for
only $15.00 '
Terms and conditions remain the
same for the additional run







U6 5S


810 Home for Sale
WELL-CARED FOR 4br/2.5ba
mfg home w/formal LR plus
family rm $84,000 MLS#78585
DANIEL CRAPPS AGENCY,
INC. 386-755-5110

820 Farms&
2 v Acreage
$10.000 reduction on our 10-acre
lots. Owner financed land.
Deas Bullard Properties
386-752-4339 www.landnfl.com
4 1/2 acre lot. Lake Jeffery Road.
Gorgeous Oaks!Paved Rd
Owner Financing! NO DOWN!
$59,900. $525mo 352-215-1018.
www.LandOwnerFinancine.com
4 acres. Wellborn. New Well
installed. Beautifully wooded
w/cleared Home Site. owner fin.
no down. $39.900. $410 mon
Call 352-215-1018
www.LandOwnerFinancing.com
For Lease FARM- 7 stall barn.
17+ acres, pasture, cross fenced.
Close in $500. mo.
386-961-1086
Coldwell Banker/Bishop Realty
Brick in WoodCrest S/D. Split
plan. Screened porch. Lg back
yard. Elaine K. Tolar
755-6488 MLS# 77015 $137,900
10 Acres with Free Travel Trailer.
Convenient location. $38,000
MLS#76264 Millard Gillen
386-365-7001
Westfield Realty Group

83 Commercial
30 Property
166 SW Main Blvd.
Next to Wendy's
For Sale Or Lease.
386-752-7938
3 lots zoned RMF1 near Baya/
McFarlane: one vacant, brick
duplex, frame cottage and building
site $129,000 386-961-9181
Wellborn Commercial lot. 1.84
acres w/34' of Hwy frontage near
the new Dollar General. MLS
72381 Scott Stewart 386-867-3498
for info. Westfield Realty Group
788 S. Marion Comm'l bldg on
highway trontage. Across from the
VA & near downtown. $49,900.
MLS 78129 Scott Stewart 867-
3498 Westfield Realty Group

850 Waterfront
5 Property
Upscale River Cabin on
Suwannee River, Shop, Dock
MLS#76336 $349,900
Call Jo Lytte @ Remax
386-365-2821
870 Real Estate
70 Wanted
I Buy Houses
CASH!
Quick Sale Fair Price
386-269-0606


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To place yourI 3909 US Hwy 90 West
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755-5440 .. ,. (386) 752-1452
JASONFLOYD,_GENERALMANAGER RIM An


Adoption

A childless, young, successful woman seeks
to adopt. Will provide loving home/doting
grandma. Large extended family. Excellent
support. Financial security. Expenses paid.
Jessica or Adam. 1-800-790-5260. Bar#0150789

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Business Opportunities

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Education

ALLIED HEALTH career training-Attend
college 100% online. Job placement assistance.
Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
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Financial Services


$$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$
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Need $500-$500,000++within 48/hrs? Low rates
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A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401K 2
Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782
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Driver- Weekly Hometime! Part & Full-time.
Daily or Weekly Pay. Steady Miles Means MORE
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Driver $2000 Sign On Bonus! Start a New
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Required. CRST EXPEDITED (800)326-2778
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Land For Sale


GA LAND SALE 32 AC $1,650/AC Perfect
small hunting tract. Creek, hardwoods, planted
pine. Visit our website. stregispaper.cong
(478)987-9700 St.Regis Paper Co.

UPSTATE NYFARM LIQUIDATION! October
29th & 30th! 3 to 41 acre lots, $12,900 $49,900!
Less than 3 hrs NYC! Call to register! (877)352-
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Miscellaneous

SAWMILLS from only $3997- MAKE MONEY
& SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut
lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship.
FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.
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ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting,
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Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified.
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AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high
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approved program. Financial aid if qualified
Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of
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Real Estate

Auction Over 110 Properties: AL & FL.
October 24th-28th. Commercial, Homes,
Condos, Acreage & Lots. Sperry Van Ness
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( Week of October 17, 2011